Sample records for determination computational fluid

  1. Computational fluid dynamic applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, S.-L.; Lottes, S. A.; Zhou, C. Q.

    2000-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapid advancement of computational capability including speed and memory size has prompted the wide use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes to simulate complex flow systems. CFD simulations are used to study the operating problems encountered in system, to evaluate the impacts of operation/design parameters on the performance of a system, and to investigate novel design concepts. CFD codes are generally developed based on the conservation laws of mass, momentum, and energy that govern the characteristics of a flow. The governing equations are simplified and discretized for a selected computational grid system. Numerical methods are selected to simplify and calculate approximate flow properties. For turbulent, reacting, and multiphase flow systems the complex processes relating to these aspects of the flow, i.e., turbulent diffusion, combustion kinetics, interfacial drag and heat and mass transfer, etc., are described in mathematical models, based on a combination of fundamental physics and empirical data, that are incorporated into the code. CFD simulation has been applied to a large variety of practical and industrial scale flow systems.

  2. Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics 424512 E #1 -rz Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics 424512 E #1 - rz Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics (iCFD) 424512.0 E, 5 sp / 3 sw 1. Introduction; Fluid dynamics (lecture 1 of 5) Ron Zevenhoven Ă?bo to Computational Fluid Dynamics 424512 E #1 - rz april 2013 Ă?bo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering

  3. Determining effects of turbine blades on fluid motion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Linn, Rodman Ray (Los Alamos, NM); Koo, Eunmo (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a technique for simulating wind interaction with wind turbines. A turbine blade is divided into radial sections. The effect that each of these radial sections has on the velocities in Eulerian computational cells they overlap is determined. The effect is determined using Lagrangian techniques such that the calculations need not include wind components in the radial direction. A force on each radial section of turbine blade is determined. This force depends on the axial and azimuthal components of the fluid flow in the computational cell and the geometric properties of the turbine blade. The force on the turbine blade is fed back to effect the fluid flow in the computational cell for the next time step.

  4. Determining effects of turbine blades on fluid motion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Linn, Rodman Ray (Los Alamos, NM); Koo, Eunmo (Los Alamos, NM)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a technique for simulating wind interaction with wind turbines. A turbine blade is divided into radial sections. The effect that each of these radial sections has on the velocities in Eulerian computational cells they overlap is determined. The effect is determined using Lagrangian techniques such that the calculations need not include wind components in the radial direction. A force on each radial section of turbine blade is determined. This force depends on the axial and azimuthal components of the fluid flow in the computational cell and the geometric properties of the turbine blade. The force on the turbine blade is fed back to effect the fluid flow in the computational cell for the next time step.

  5. COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS INCOMPRESSIBLE FLOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonough, James M.

    to numerically solve the Euler equations in order to predict effects of bomb blast waves following WW II­71, and was published the following year [1]. Computing power at that time was still grossly inadequate for what we.S., in Europe (especially France, Great Britain and Sweden) and in the (former) Soviet Union. Today

  6. Three-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haworth, D.C.; O'Rourke, P.J.; Ranganathan, R.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is one discipline falling under the broad heading of computer-aided engineering (CAE). CAE, together with computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM), comprise a mathematical-based approach to engineering product and process design, analysis and fabrication. In this overview of CFD for the design engineer, our purposes are three-fold: (1) to define the scope of CFD and motivate its utility for engineering, (2) to provide a basic technical foundation for CFD, and (3) to convey how CFD is incorporated into engineering product and process design.

  7. The incorporation of bubbles into a computer graphics fluid simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenwood, Shannon Thomas

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We present methods for incorporating bubbles into a photorealistc fluid simulation. Previous methods of fluid simulation in computer graphics do not include bubbles. Our system automatically creates bubbles, which are simulated on top of the fluid...

  8. Experimentally Determined Interfacial Area Between Immiscible Fluids in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crandall, Dustin; Niessner, J; Hassanizadeh, S.M; Smith, Duane

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When multiple fluids flow through a porous medium, the interaction between the fluid interfaces can be of great importance. While this is widely recognized in practical applications, numerical models often disregard interactios between discrete fluid phases due to the computational complexity. And rightly so, for this level of detail is well beyond most extended Darcy Law relationships. A new model of two-phase flow including the interfacial area has been proposed by Hassarizadeh and Gray based upon thermodynamic principles. A version of this general equation set has been implemented by Nessner and Hassarizadeh. Many of the interfacial parameters required by this equation set have never been determined from experiments. The work presented here is a description of how the interfacial area, capillary pressure, interfacial velocity and interfacial permeability from two-phase flow experiments in porous media experiments can be used to determine the required parameters. This work, while on-going, has shown the possibility of digitizing images within translucent porous media and identifying the location and behavior of interfaces under dynamic conditions. Using the described methods experimentally derived interfacial functions to be used in larger scale simulations are currently being developed. In summary, the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) by mapping a pore-throat geometry onto an image of immiscible fluid flow, the saturation of fluids and the individual interfaces between the fluids can be identified; (2) the resulting saturation profiles of the low velocity drainage flows used in this study are well described by an invasion percolation fractal scaling; (3) the interfacial area between fluids has been observed to increase in a linear fashion during the initial invasion of the non-wetting fluid; and (4) the average capillary pressure within the entire cell and representative elemental volumes were observed to plateau after a small portion of the volume was invaded.

  9. Computational Fluid Dynamics of rising droplets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Matthew [Lake Superior State University; Francois, Marianne M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The main goal of this study is to perform simulations of droplet dynamics using Truchas, a LANL-developed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software, and compare them to a computational study of Hysing et al.[IJNMF, 2009, 60:1259]. Understanding droplet dynamics is of fundamental importance in liquid-liquid extraction, a process used in the nuclear fuel cycle to separate various components. Simulations of a single droplet rising by buoyancy are conducted in two-dimensions. Multiple parametric studies are carried out to ensure the problem set-up is optimized. An Interface Smoothing Length (ISL) study and mesh resolution study are performed to verify convergence of the calculations. ISL is a parameter for the interface curvature calculation. Further, wall effects are investigated and checked against existing correlations. The ISL study found that the optimal ISL value is 2.5{Delta}x, with {Delta}x being the mesh cell spacing. The mesh resolution study found that the optimal mesh resolution is d/h=40, for d=drop diameter and h={Delta}x. In order for wall effects on terminal velocity to be insignificant, a conservative wall width of 9d or a nonconservative wall width of 7d can be used. The percentage difference between Hysing et al.[IJNMF, 2009, 60:1259] and Truchas for the velocity profiles vary from 7.9% to 9.9%. The computed droplet velocity and interface profiles are found in agreement with the study. The CFD calculations are performed on multiple cores, using LANL's Institutional High Performance Computing.

  10. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of coal gasification in a pressurized spout-fluid bed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhongyi Deng; Rui Xiao; Baosheng Jin; He Huang; Laihong Shen; Qilei Song; Qianjun Li [Southeast University, Nanjing (China). Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling, which has recently proven to be an effective means of analysis and optimization of energy-conversion processes, has been extended to coal gasification in this paper. A 3D mathematical model has been developed to simulate the coal gasification process in a pressurized spout-fluid bed. This CFD model is composed of gas-solid hydrodynamics, coal pyrolysis, char gasification, and gas phase reaction submodels. The rates of heterogeneous reactions are determined by combining Arrhenius rate and diffusion rate. The homogeneous reactions of gas phase can be treated as secondary reactions. A comparison of the calculated and experimental data shows that most gasification performance parameters can be predicted accurately. This good agreement indicates that CFD modeling can be used for complex fluidized beds coal gasification processes. 37 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Chapter 17 in Encyclopedia of Computational Mechanics, Volume 3: Fluids Finite Element Methods for Fluid Dynamics with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tezduyar, Tayfun E.

    Chapter 17 in Encyclopedia of Computational Mechanics, Volume 3: Fluids Finite Element Methods surfaces, two-fluid interfaces, fluid­object and fluid­structure in- teractions, and moving mechanical in Encyclopedia of Computational Mechanics, Volume 3: Fluids (eds. E. Stein, R. De Borst and T.J.R. Hughes), John

  12. Application of computational fluid dynamics to aerosol sampling and concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Shishan

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An understanding of gas-liquid two-phase interactions, aerosol particle deposition, and heat transfer is needed. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is becoming a powerful tool to predict aerosol behavior for related design work. In this study...

  13. Computational Fluid Dynamics Study of Aerosol Transport and Deposition Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Yingjie

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, various aerosol particle transport and deposition mechanisms were studied through the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling, including inertial impaction, gravitational effect, lift force, interception, and turbophoresis, within...

  14. Method and apparatus for determining fluid mass flowrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamel, W.R.

    1982-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a new method and new apparatus for determining fluid mass flowrate and density. In one aspect of the invention, the fluid is passed through a straight cantilevered tube in which transient oscillation has been induced, thus generating Coriolis damping forces on the tube. The decay rate and frequency of the resulting damped oscillation are measured, and the fluid mass flowrate and density are determined therefrom. In another aspect of the invention, the fluid is passed through the cantilevered tube while an electrically powered device imparts steady-state harmonic excitation to the tube. This generates Coriolis tube-damping forces which are dependent on the mass flowrate of the fluid. Means are provided to respond to incipient flow-induced changes in the amplitude of vibration by changing the power input to the excitation device as required to sustain the original amplitude of vibration. The fluid mass flowrate and density are determined from the required bending of the fluid flow.

  15. PREDICTION OF CUTTINGS BED HEIGHT WITH COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS IN DRILLING HORIZONTAL AND HIGHLY DEVIATED WELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ullmer, Brygg

    PREDICTION OF CUTTINGS BED HEIGHT WITH COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS IN DRILLING HORIZONTAL parameters such as wellbore geometry, pump rate, drilling fluid rheology and density, and maximum drilling Computational Fluid Dynamics methods. Movement, concentration and accumulation of drilled cuttings in non

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - aiaa computational fluid Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: , European Conference on Computational Fluid Dynamics, TU Delft, Delft The Netherland, 2006. D. Lazzara (MIT... Dynamics Research, No. AIAA 99-3798, AIAA Fluid Dynamics...

  17. Determination of petroleum pipe scale solubility in simulated lung fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cezeaux, Jason Roderick

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    ??????. 18 13 Teflon? filter holder (unassembled and assembled)????????.... 21 14 Dissolution experiment setup?????????????????.... 22 15 Curve showing the dissolution profile of barium released from scale... done to determine the solubility of pipe scale in human gastrointestinal fluid (Raabe 1996). Through this work and others, it has been shown that barium sulfate scale is extremely insoluble, even in harsh acidic environments. Based on these results...

  18. Seventh International Conference on Computational Fluid Dynamics (ICCFD7),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    industrial purpose CFD codes, such as TONUS [7], to investigate turbulent combustion flows. The main drawback-diffusive scheme, upwind downwind-controlled splitting 1 Introduction The use of Computational Fluids Dynamics (CFD: the reaction zone in a laminar deflagration at atmospheric condition can vary from about 1 mm to 10 mm

  19. Air Ingress Benchmarking with Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Air Ingress Benchmarking with Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis Tieliang Zhai Professor by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission #12;2 Air Ingress Accident Objectives and Overall Strategy: Depresurization Pure Diffusion Natural Convection Challenging: Natural convection Multi-component Diffusion (air

  20. Air Ingress Benchmarking with Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Air Ingress Benchmarking with Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis Andrew C. Kadak Department District Beijing, China September 22-24, 2004 Abstract Air ingress accident is a complicated accident scenario is compounded by multiple physical phenomena that are involved in the air ingress event

  1. TILLMPAD NUMERISK STRMNINGSMEKANIK MVK 150 Applied Computational Fluid Mechanics (CFD), basic course

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TILL�MPAD NUMERISK STR�MNINGSMEKANIK MVK 150 Applied Computational Fluid Mechanics (CFD), basic vanligaste lösningsförfarandena presenteras och jämförs. Litteratur Andersson, J.D.; Computational Fluid

  2. TILLMPAD NUMERISK STRMNINGSMEKANIK MVK150 Applied Computational Fluid Mechanics (CFD), basic course

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TILLĂ?MPAD NUMERISK STRĂ?MNINGSMEKANIK MVK150 Applied Computational Fluid Mechanics (CFD), basic.D.; Computational Fluid Dynamics, The basics with applications, McGraw-Hill, 1995. #12;

  3. Computer determination of bacterial volume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffis, David William

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    ~, ~ Computer A1". . v', tI'i. : 22 vz: LIST OP TABLES Table I. liean Cellular Volur" ~ nf:-63 i it". , easur ed usinr; Tji!0 (0+ i. u-'tj -o3a, Y e J An- lyzer Ta31e II, &'!ean Cellular Volu", . e of E-6ig Yieasured Uslnq TN 1705 ". 'i. ulti...CCNPU. "ZE D"1 '6 ~'1. '~A""1 iu'i iY EACTEl'. JAi V 'LUV, E 'l'he s i e HAUTE' *8, LIAY. QRJEEES SabFi i te(i 0 'l'ne Gx ala%'6?' c11 ege cf exas A%5: Universi+; pal' t la 1 f a 1 f 1 1 Pen 'h Qf 4' t1 e, '. e ll 'J 3 n e~ en' f ox' 't l i 6...

  4. The simulation of free surface flows with Computational Fluid Dynamics B. Godderidge1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 The simulation of free surface flows with Computational Fluid Dynamics B. Godderidge1 A of these applications make their simulation with computational fluid dynamics particularly challenging. The successful Computational fluid dynamics is a powerful and versatile tool for the analysis of flow problems encountered

  5. Issues in computational fluid dynamics code verification and validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Blottner, F.G.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A broad range of mathematical modeling errors of fluid flow physics and numerical approximation errors are addressed in computational fluid dynamics (CFD). It is strongly believed that if CFD is to have a major impact on the design of engineering hardware and flight systems, the level of confidence in complex simulations must substantially improve. To better understand the present limitations of CFD simulations, a wide variety of physical modeling, discretization, and solution errors are identified and discussed. Here, discretization and solution errors refer to all errors caused by conversion of the original partial differential, or integral, conservation equations representing the physical process, to algebraic equations and their solution on a computer. The impact of boundary conditions on the solution of the partial differential equations and their discrete representation will also be discussed. Throughout the article, clear distinctions are made between the analytical mathematical models of fluid dynamics and the numerical models. Lax`s Equivalence Theorem and its frailties in practical CFD solutions are pointed out. Distinctions are also made between the existence and uniqueness of solutions to the partial differential equations as opposed to the discrete equations. Two techniques are briefly discussed for the detection and quantification of certain types of discretization and grid resolution errors.

  6. Flow modeling of flat oval ductwork elbows using computational fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahank, T.A.; Mumma, S.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Incompressible turbulent flow fields in heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) elbows were computed using an incompressible, three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver implementing a {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model. Two different geometries were investigated, including 90-degree five-gore hard-bend and easy-bend flat oval elbows. The geometries represent a subset of many configurations analyzed in ASHRAE RP-854, Determination of Duct Fitting Resistance by Numerical Analysis. For each configuration, the zero-length pressure loss coefficient was calculated. The flow was described through contours of velocity and plots of static pressure. The Reynolds number for these flows was held constant at 100,000 based on duct diameter and mean fluid velocity.

  7. Computational thermal, chemical, fluid, and solid mechanics for geosystems management.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davison, Scott; Alger, Nicholas; Turner, Daniel Zack; Subia, Samuel Ramirez; Carnes, Brian; Martinez, Mario J.; Notz, Patrick K.; Klise, Katherine A.; Stone, Charles Michael; Field, Richard V., Jr.; Newell, Pania; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; Red-Horse, John Robert; Bishop, Joseph E.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Hopkins, Polly L.; Mesh, Mikhail; Bean, James E.; Moffat, Harry K.; Yoon, Hongkyu

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes research performed under the SNL LDRD entitled - Computational Mechanics for Geosystems Management to Support the Energy and Natural Resources Mission. The main accomplishment was development of a foundational SNL capability for computational thermal, chemical, fluid, and solid mechanics analysis of geosystems. The code was developed within the SNL Sierra software system. This report summarizes the capabilities of the simulation code and the supporting research and development conducted under this LDRD. The main goal of this project was the development of a foundational capability for coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical, chemical (THMC) simulation of heterogeneous geosystems utilizing massively parallel processing. To solve these complex issues, this project integrated research in numerical mathematics and algorithms for chemically reactive multiphase systems with computer science research in adaptive coupled solution control and framework architecture. This report summarizes and demonstrates the capabilities that were developed together with the supporting research underlying the models. Key accomplishments are: (1) General capability for modeling nonisothermal, multiphase, multicomponent flow in heterogeneous porous geologic materials; (2) General capability to model multiphase reactive transport of species in heterogeneous porous media; (3) Constitutive models for describing real, general geomaterials under multiphase conditions utilizing laboratory data; (4) General capability to couple nonisothermal reactive flow with geomechanics (THMC); (5) Phase behavior thermodynamics for the CO2-H2O-NaCl system. General implementation enables modeling of other fluid mixtures. Adaptive look-up tables enable thermodynamic capability to other simulators; (6) Capability for statistical modeling of heterogeneity in geologic materials; and (7) Simulator utilizes unstructured grids on parallel processing computers.

  8. Development of a Computational Fluid Dynamics Model for Combustion of Fast Pyrolysis Liquid (Bio-oil).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGrath, Arran Thomas

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??A study was carried out into the computational fluid dynamic simulation of bio-oil combustion. Measurements were taken in an empirical burner to obtain information regarding… (more)

  9. Computational fluid dynamic modeling of fluidized-bed polymerization reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rokkam, Ram [Ames Laboratory

    2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Polyethylene is one of the most widely used plastics, and over 60 million tons are produced worldwide every year. Polyethylene is obtained by the catalytic polymerization of ethylene in gas and liquid phase reactors. The gas phase processes are more advantageous, and use fluidized-bed reactors for production of polyethylene. Since they operate so close to the melting point of the polymer, agglomeration is an operational concern in all slurry and gas polymerization processes. Electrostatics and hot spot formation are the main factors that contribute to agglomeration in gas-phase processes. Electrostatic charges in gas phase polymerization fluidized bed reactors are known to influence the bed hydrodynamics, particle elutriation, bubble size, bubble shape etc. Accumulation of electrostatic charges in the fluidized-bed can lead to operational issues. In this work a first-principles electrostatic model is developed and coupled with a multi-fluid computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model to understand the effect of electrostatics on the dynamics of a fluidized-bed. The multi-fluid CFD model for gas-particle flow is based on the kinetic theory of granular flows closures. The electrostatic model is developed based on a fixed, size-dependent charge for each type of particle (catalyst, polymer, polymer fines) phase. The combined CFD model is first verified using simple test cases, validated with experiments and applied to a pilot-scale polymerization fluidized-bed reactor. The CFD model reproduced qualitative trends in particle segregation and entrainment due to electrostatic charges observed in experiments. For the scale up of fluidized bed reactor, filtered models are developed and implemented on pilot scale reactor.

  10. Computational Fluid Dynamics Framework for Turbine Biological Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Ebner, Laurie L.; Sick, Mirjam; Cada, G. F.

    2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a method for turbine biological performance assessment is introduced to bridge the gap between field and laboratory studies on fish injury and turbine design. Using this method, a suite of biological performance indicators is computed based on simulated data from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a proposed turbine design. Each performance indicator is a measure of the probability of exposure to a certain dose of an injury mechanism. If the relationship between the dose of an injury mechanism and frequency of injury (dose-response) is known from laboratory or field studies, the likelihood of fish injury for a turbine design can be computed from the performance indicator. By comparing the values of the indicators from various turbine designs, the engineer can identify the more-promising designs. Discussion here is focused on Kaplan-type turbines, although the method could be extended to other designs. Following the description of the general methodology, we will present sample risk assessment calculations based on CFD data from a model of the John Day Dam on the Columbia River in the USA.

  11. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Fluidized Bed Polymerization Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rong Fan

    2006-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluidized beds (FB) reactors are widely used in the polymerization industry due to their superior heat- and mass-transfer characteristics. Nevertheless, problems associated with local overheating of polymer particles and excessive agglomeration leading to FB reactors defluidization still persist and limit the range of operating temperatures that can be safely achieved in plant-scale reactors. Many people have been worked on the modeling of FB polymerization reactors, and quite a few models are available in the open literature, such as the well-mixed model developed by McAuley, Talbot, and Harris (1994), the constant bubble size model (Choi and Ray, 1985) and the heterogeneous three phase model (Fernandes and Lona, 2002). Most these research works focus on the kinetic aspects, but from industrial viewpoint, the behavior of FB reactors should be modeled by considering the particle and fluid dynamics in the reactor. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a powerful tool for understanding the effect of fluid dynamics on chemical reactor performance. For single-phase flows, CFD models for turbulent reacting flows are now well understood and routinely applied to investigate complex flows with detailed chemistry. For multiphase flows, the state-of-the-art in CFD models is changing rapidly and it is now possible to predict reasonably well the flow characteristics of gas-solid FB reactors with mono-dispersed, non-cohesive solids. This thesis is organized into seven chapters. In Chapter 2, an overview of fluidized bed polymerization reactors is given, and a simplified two-site kinetic mechanism are discussed. Some basic theories used in our work are given in detail in Chapter 3. First, the governing equations and other constitutive equations for the multi-fluid model are summarized, and the kinetic theory for describing the solid stress tensor is discussed. The detailed derivation of DQMOM for the population balance equation is given as the second section. In this section, monovariate population balance, bivariate population balance, aggregation and breakage equation and DQMOM-Multi-Fluid model are described. In the last section of Chapter 3, numerical methods involved in the multi-fluid model and time-splitting method are presented. Chapter 4 is based on a paper about application of DQMOM to polydisperse gas-solid fluidized beds. Results for a constant aggregation and breakage kernel and a kernel developed from kinetic theory are shown. The effect of the aggregation success factor and the fragment distribution function are investigated. Chapter 5 shows the work on validation of mixing and segregation phenomena in gas-solid fluidized beds with a binary mixture or a continuous size distribution. The simulation results are compared with available experiment data and discrete-particle simulation. Chapter 6 presents the project with Univation Technologies on CFD simulation of a Polyethylene pilot-scale FB reactor, The fluid dynamics, mass/heat transfer and particle size distribution are investigated through CFD simulation and validated with available experimental data. The conclusions of this study and future work are discussed in Chapter 7.

  12. Computational fluid dynamics for the CFBR : challenges that lie ahead /

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashiwa, B. A.; Yang, Wen-ching,

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential of Computational Fluid Dynamics as a tool for design and analysis of the Circulating Fluidized Bed Reactor is considered. The ruminations are largely philosophical in nature, and are based mainly on experience. An assessment of where CFD may, or may not, be a helpful tool for developing the needed understanding, is furnished. To motivate this assessment, a clarification of what composes a CFD analysis is provided. Status of CFD usage in CFBR problems is summarized briefly. Some successes and failures of CFD in CFBR analysis are also discussed; this suggests a practical way to proceed toward the goal of adding CFD as a useful tool, to be used in combination with well-defined experiments, for CFBR needs. The conclusion is that there remains substantial hope that CFD could be very useful in this application. In order to make the hope a reality, nontrivial, and achievable, advances in multiphase flow theory must be made.

  13. HYDRA, A finite element computational fluid dynamics code: User manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christon, M.A.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HYDRA is a finite element code which has been developed specifically to attack the class of transient, incompressible, viscous, computational fluid dynamics problems which are predominant in the world which surrounds us. The goal for HYDRA has been to achieve high performance across a spectrum of supercomputer architectures without sacrificing any of the aspects of the finite element method which make it so flexible and permit application to a broad class of problems. As supercomputer algorithms evolve, the continuing development of HYDRA will strive to achieve optimal mappings of the most advanced flow solution algorithms onto supercomputer architectures. HYDRA has drawn upon the many years of finite element expertise constituted by DYNA3D and NIKE3D Certain key architectural ideas from both DYNA3D and NIKE3D have been adopted and further improved to fit the advanced dynamic memory management and data structures implemented in HYDRA. The philosophy for HYDRA is to focus on mapping flow algorithms to computer architectures to try and achieve a high level of performance, rather than just performing a port.

  14. Experimental methodology for computational fluid dynamics code validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aeschliman, D.P.; Oberkampf, W.L.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes is an essential element of the code development process. Typically, CFD code validation is accomplished through comparison of computed results to previously published experimental data that were obtained for some other purpose, unrelated to code validation. As a result, it is a near certainty that not all of the information required by the code, particularly the boundary conditions, will be available. The common approach is therefore unsatisfactory, and a different method is required. This paper describes a methodology developed specifically for experimental validation of CFD codes. The methodology requires teamwork and cooperation between code developers and experimentalists throughout the validation process, and takes advantage of certain synergisms between CFD and experiment. The methodology employs a novel uncertainty analysis technique which helps to define the experimental plan for code validation wind tunnel experiments, and to distinguish between and quantify various types of experimental error. The methodology is demonstrated with an example of surface pressure measurements over a model of varying geometrical complexity in laminar, hypersonic, near perfect gas, 3-dimensional flow.

  15. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of a Lithium/Thionyl Chloride Battery with Electrolyte Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chao-Yang

    Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of a Lithium/Thionyl Chloride Battery with Electrolyte Flow W.B. Gu and C.Y. Wang GATE Center of Excellence for Advanced Energy Storage Department of Mechanical are performed using a finite volume method of computational fluid dynamics. The predicted discharge curves

  16. Code Verification of the HIGRAD Computational Fluid Dynamics Solver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Buren, Kendra L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Canfield, Jesse M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hemez, Francois M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sauer, Jeremy A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to outline code and solution verification activities applied to HIGRAD, a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solver of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and used to simulate various phenomena such as the propagation of wildfires and atmospheric hydrodynamics. Code verification efforts, as described in this report, are an important first step to establish the credibility of numerical simulations. They provide evidence that the mathematical formulation is properly implemented without significant mistakes that would adversely impact the application of interest. Highly accurate analytical solutions are derived for four code verification test problems that exercise different aspects of the code. These test problems are referred to as: (i) the quiet start, (ii) the passive advection, (iii) the passive diffusion, and (iv) the piston-like problem. These problems are simulated using HIGRAD with different levels of mesh discretization and the numerical solutions are compared to their analytical counterparts. In addition, the rates of convergence are estimated to verify the numerical performance of the solver. The first three test problems produce numerical approximations as expected. The fourth test problem (piston-like) indicates the extent to which the code is able to simulate a 'mild' discontinuity, which is a condition that would typically be better handled by a Lagrangian formulation. The current investigation concludes that the numerical implementation of the solver performs as expected. The quality of solutions is sufficient to provide credible simulations of fluid flows around wind turbines. The main caveat associated to these findings is the low coverage provided by these four problems, and somewhat limited verification activities. A more comprehensive evaluation of HIGRAD may be beneficial for future studies.

  17. Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics 424512 E #2Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics 424512 E #2 --rzrz IntroductionIntroduction toto ComputationalComputational Fluid DynamicsFluid DynamicsIntroductionIntroduction toto ComputationalComputa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    transferExample: stationary heat transfer Stationary heat transfer, 2-D (Laplace eq'n): with a grid fluid flow (and heat,(and heat, massmass transfer)transfer) ((lecturelecture 4 of 5)4 of 5) Ron #2 -- rzrz Example: stationary heat transferExample: stationary heat transferExample: stationary heat

  18. Methodology for computational fluid dynamics code verification/validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Blottner, F.G.; Aeschliman, D.P.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The issues of verification, calibration, and validation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes has been receiving increasing levels of attention in the research literature and in engineering technology. Both CFD researchers and users of CFD codes are asking more critical and detailed questions concerning the accuracy, range of applicability, reliability and robustness of CFD codes and their predictions. This is a welcomed trend because it demonstrates that CFD is maturing from a research tool to the world of impacting engineering hardware and system design. In this environment, the broad issue of code quality assurance becomes paramount. However, the philosophy and methodology of building confidence in CFD code predictions has proven to be more difficult than many expected. A wide variety of physical modeling errors and discretization errors are discussed. Here, discretization errors refer to all errors caused by conversion of the original partial differential equations to algebraic equations, and their solution. Boundary conditions for both the partial differential equations and the discretized equations will be discussed. Contrasts are drawn between the assumptions and actual use of numerical method consistency and stability. Comments are also made concerning the existence and uniqueness of solutions for both the partial differential equations and the discrete equations. Various techniques are suggested for the detection and estimation of errors caused by physical modeling and discretization of the partial differential equations.

  19. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Flexible Duct Junction Box Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beach, R.; Prahl, D.; Lange, R.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IBACOS explored the relationships between pressure and physical configurations of flexible duct junction boxes by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to predict individual box parameters and total system pressure, thereby ensuring improved HVAC performance. Current Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) guidance (Group 11, Appendix 3, ACCA Manual D, Rutkowski 2009) allows for unconstrained variation in the number of takeoffs, box sizes, and takeoff locations. The only variables currently used in selecting an equivalent length (EL) are velocity of air in the duct and friction rate, given the first takeoff is located at least twice its diameter away from the inlet. This condition does not account for other factors impacting pressure loss across these types of fittings. For each simulation, the IBACOS team converted pressure loss within a box to an EL to compare variation in ACCA Manual D guidance to the simulated variation. IBACOS chose cases to represent flows reasonably correlating to flows typically encountered in the field and analyzed differences in total pressure due to increases in number and location of takeoffs, box dimensions, and velocity of air, and whether an entrance fitting is included. The team also calculated additional balancing losses for all cases due to discrepancies between intended outlet flows and natural flow splits created by the fitting. In certain asymmetrical cases, the balancing losses were significantly higher than symmetrical cases where the natural splits were close to the targets. Thus, IBACOS has shown additional design constraints that can ensure better system performance.

  20. Area per Lipid and Acyl Length Distributions in Fluid Phosphatidylcholines Determined by 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Michael F.

    Area per Lipid and Acyl Length Distributions in Fluid Phosphatidylcholines Determined by 2 H NMR diamond lattice approach. Statistical mechanical principles were used to relate the measured order the force balance in fluid bilayers. At the same absolute temperature, the phosphatidylcholine (PC) series

  1. Investigation into the discrepancies between computational fluid dynamics lift predictions and experimental results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fairman, Randall S. (Randall Scott), 1967-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of current computational fluid dynamics capabilities in predicting mean lift forces for two dimensional foils is conducted. It is shown that both integral boundary layer theory and Reynolds Averaged Navier ...

  2. Using the FLUENT computational fluid dynamics code to model the NACOK corrosion test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parks, Benjamin T

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a part of advancing nuclear technology, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis offers safer and lower-cost results relative to experimental work. Its use as a safety analysis tool is gaining much broader acceptance ...

  3. Developing an integrated building design tool by coupling building energy simulation and computational fluid dynamics programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhai, Zhiqiang, 1971-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building energy simulation (ES) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can play important roles in building design by providing essential information to help design energy-efficient, thermally comfortable and healthy ...

  4. Coupling of a multizone airflow simulation program with computational fluid dynamics for indoor environmental analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Yang, 1974-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current design of building indoor environment comprises macroscopIC approaches, such as CONT AM multizone airflow analysis tool, and microscopic approaches that apply Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Each has certain ...

  5. Infiltration Heat Recovery in Building Walls: Computational Fluid Dynamics Investigations Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-51324 Infiltration Heat Recovery in Building Walls: Computational Fluid Dynamics leading to partial recovery of heat conducted through the wall. The Infiltration Heat Recovery (IHR) factor was introduced to quantify the heat recovery and correct the conventional calculations

  6. Determination of fluid viscosities from biconical annular geometries: Experimental and modeling studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rondon, Nolys Javier

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge of viscosity of flow streams is essential for the design and operation of production facilities, drilling operations and reservoir engineering calculations. The determination of the viscosity of a reservoir fluid at downhole conditions...

  7. Computational Methods for Analyzing Fluid Flow Dynamics from Digital Imagery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luttman, A.

    2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The main goal (long term) of this work is to perform computational dynamics analysis and quantify uncertainty from vector fields computed directly from measured data. Global analysis based on observed spatiotemporal evolution is performed by objective function based on expected physics and informed scientific priors, variational optimization to compute vector fields from measured data, and transport analysis proceeding with observations and priors. A mathematical formulation for computing flow fields is set up for computing the minimizer for the problem. An application to oceanic flow based on sea surface temperature is presented.

  8. Method and apparatus for simultaneous determination of fluid mass flow rate, mean velocity and density

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamel, William R. (Farragut, TN)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a new method and new apparatus for determining fluid mass flowrate and density. In one aspect of the invention, the fluid is passed through a straight cantilevered tube in which transient oscillation has been induced, thus generating Coriolis damping forces on the tube. The decay rate and frequency of the resulting damped oscillation are measured, and the fluid mass flowrate and density are determined therefrom. In another aspect of the invention, the fluid is passed through the cantilevered tube while an electrically powered device imparts steady-state harmonic excitation to the tube. This generates Coriolis tube-damping forces which are dependent on the mass flowrate of the fluid. Means are provided to respond to incipient flow-induced changes in the amplitude of vibration by changing the power input to the excitation device as required to sustain the original amplitude of vibration. The fluid mass flowrate and density are determined from the required change in power input. The invention provides stable, rapid, and accurate measurements. It does not require bending of the fluid flow.

  9. 2014-02-21 Issuance: Proposed Determination of Computer Servers...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    withdrawing the previously proposed determination that computer servers qualify as a covered product, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on February...

  10. Experimental and Computational Study of Fluid Dynamics in Solar Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chien, Min-Hsiu

    2014-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimental simulation and a computational validation of a methane-cracking solar reactor powered by solar energy is the focus of this article. A solar cyclone reactor operates at over 1000 °C where the methane decomposition reaction takes...

  11. validation and Enhancement of Computational Fluid Dynamics and Heat Transfer Predictive Capabilities for Generation IV Reactor Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert E. Spall; Barton Smith; Thomas Hauser

    2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Nationwide, the demand for electricity due to population and industrial growth is on the rise. However, climate change and air quality issues raise serious questions about the wisdom of addressing these shortages through the construction of additional fossil fueled power plants. In 1997, the President's Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology Energy Research and Development Panel determined that restoring a viable nuclear energy option was essential and that the DOE should implement a R&D effort to address principal obstacles to achieving this option. This work has addressed the need for improved thermal/fluid analysis capabilities, through the use of computational fluid dynamics, which are necessary to support the design of generation IV gas-cooled and supercritical water reactors.

  12. Experimental Validation of a Computational Fluid Dynamics Model for IAQ applications in Ice Rink Arenas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    1 Experimental Validation of a Computational Fluid Dynamics Model for IAQ applications in Ice Rink, USA, Fax: 617-432-4122, Abstract Many ice rink arenas have ice resurfacing equipment that uses fossil temperature distributions in ice rinks. The numerical results agree reasonably with the corresponding

  13. Two-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics and Conduction Simulations of Heat Transfer in Window Frames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Two-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics and Conduction Simulations of Heat Transfer Arasteh and Dragan Curcija ABSTRACT Accurately analyzing heat transfer in window frame cavities radiation heat-transfer effects.) We examine three representative complex cavity cross-section profiles

  14. Optimization of a high-efficiency jet ejector by computational fluid dynamic software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watanawanavet, Somsak

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software. A conventional finite-volume scheme was utilized to solve two-dimensional transport equations with the standard k-?? turbulence model (Kim et. al., 1999). In this study of a constant-area jet ejector, all parameters...

  15. Fluid computation of the performanceenergy trade-off in large scale Markov models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imperial College, London

    total energy consumption should be chosen. H priority job SLA: 6.5s 90% L priority job SLA: 8s 80Fluid computation of the performance­energy trade-off in large scale Markov models Anton Stefanek to deal with is that of running costs such as energy consumption versus the availability and re- sponse

  16. Computational Fluid Dynamics Evaluation of Good Combustion Performance in Waste Incinerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Yong Jung

    -furnace destruction of pollutants are stated as: good combustion is achieved when 2-second gas residence time at 850 C1 Computational Fluid Dynamics Evaluation of Good Combustion Performance in Waste Incinerators waste incinerators, good combustion practices(GCP or GOP) have been established. These operating (and

  17. A Simple Interface to Computational Fluid Dynamics Programs for Building Environment Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    . SCI can be easily integrated into new CFD programs. Introduction Advanced building design requests and pressure distributions that are crucial for thermal comfort and building structure designs. TraditionallyA Simple Interface to Computational Fluid Dynamics Programs for Building Environment Simulations

  18. Application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to nuclear applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brewster, R. A.; Jonnavithula, S.; Rizwan-Uddin; Rock, D. T.; Weber, D. P.; Wei, T. Y. C.

    1999-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed analysis of a quarter channel was performed using VIPRE and CFX. Results show that VIPRE and CFX agree closely in both cross-sectionally averaged axial temperature and cross-sectionally averaged axial velocity profiles. Detailed temperature distributions in the radial direction over 1mm from the clad surface towards the center of the channel were calculated using CFX, showing significant local variation. This information can be used for example, to determine if this temperature will lead to bubble nucleation. Quarter subassembly calculations were made with both VIPRE and STAR-CD. Comparison between the solutions show that the two codes yield very similar solutions under comparable conditions. However, the STAR-CD CFD calculation provides the analyst with much more detailed flow and temperature distributions than can be predicted by a one-dimensional code such as VIPRE. In addition, a 60 million cell one-eighth reactor core calculation was made using STAR-CD. This analysis showed the importance of accurately predicting the flow and temperature fields in all assemblies simultaneously with modern parallel processing technology, practical turnaround for these types of calculation can be obtained.

  19. Investigation of Swirling Flow in Rod Bundle Subchannels Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holloway, Mary V. [United States Naval Academy, 117 Decatur Road, Annapolis, MD 21402-5018 (United States); Beasley, Donald E. [Clemson University, Clemson, S.C. 29634 (United States); Conner, Michael E. [Westinghouse Nuclear Fuel (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fluid dynamics for turbulent flow through rod bundles representative of those used in pressurized water reactors is examined using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The rod bundles of the pressurized water reactor examined in this study consist of a square array of parallel rods that are held on a constant pitch by support grids spaced axially along the rod bundle. Split-vane pair support grids are often used to create swirling flow in the rod bundle in an effort to improve the heat transfer characteristics for the rod bundle during both normal operating conditions and in accident condition scenarios. Computational fluid dynamics simulations for a two subchannel portion of the rod bundle were used to model the flow downstream of a split-vane pair support grid. A high quality computational mesh was used to investigate the choice of turbulence model appropriate for the complex swirling flow in the rod bundle subchannels. Results document a central swirling flow structure in each of the subchannels downstream of the split-vane pairs. Strong lateral flows along the surface of the rods, as well as impingement regions of lateral flow on the rods are documented. In addition, regions of lateral flow separation and low axial velocity are documented next to the rods. Results of the CFD are compared to experimental particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements documenting the lateral flow structures downstream of the split-vane pairs. Good agreement is found between the computational simulation and experimental measurements for locations close to the support grid. (authors)

  20. Determining position inside building via laser rangefinder and handheld computer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, Jr. James L. (Albuquerque, NM); Finley, Patrick (Albuquerque, NM); Melton, Brad (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus, computer software, and a method of determining position inside a building comprising selecting on a PDA at least two walls of a room in a digitized map of a building or a portion of a building, pointing and firing a laser rangefinder at corresponding physical walls, transmitting collected range information to the PDA, and computing on the PDA a position of the laser rangefinder within the room.

  1. National Ignition Facility computational fluid dynamics modeling and light fixture case studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, R.; Bernardin, J.; Parietti, L.; Dennison, B.

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report serves as a guide to the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) as a design tool for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) program Title I and Title II design phases at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In particular, this report provides general guidelines on the technical approach to performing and interpreting any and all CFD calculations. In addition, a complete CFD analysis is presented to illustrate these guidelines on a NIF-related thermal problem.

  2. MR-driven Computational Fluid Dynamics J-F. Nielsen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    MR-driven Computational Fluid Dynamics J-F. Nielsen1 , and K. S. Nayak2 1 Biomedical Engineering-encoding gradient pulse (VENC=1.6 m/s) was placed on the x, y, or z-gradient axis, or was turned off. MR-driven CFD component (vertical in Fig. 1) was incorporated into the MR-driven CFD solver. Hence, vx and vy were

  3. Numerical model to determine the composition of H2ONaClCaCl2 fluid inclusions based on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodnar, Robert J.

    Numerical model to determine the composition of H2O­NaCl­CaCl2 fluid inclusions based 2010 Abstract Natural fluids approximated by the H2O­NaCl­CaCl2 system are common in a wide range the compositions of fluid inclusions in the H2O­NaCl­CaCl2 sys- tem based on microthermometric and microanalytical

  4. Approved Module Information for ME4501, 2014/5 Module Title/Name: Computational Fluid Dynamics and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neirotti, Juan Pablo

    -requisites: Thermodynamics and Fluids (ME3011). Engineering Mathematics 2 (AM21EM). Co-requisites: None Specified ModuleApproved Module Information for ME4501, 2014/5 Module Title/Name: Computational Fluid Dynamics and Applications Module Code: ME4501 School: Engineering and Applied Science Module Type: Standard Module New

  5. With faster processors and better numerical techniques, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools have revolutionized engineering design and optimization--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Clark R.

    With faster processors and better numerical techniques, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools have revolutionized engineering design and optimization-- limiting expensive experimentation and Engineering Division (GED) at Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI®) has extensive experience and capabilities

  6. Optical position sensor for determining the interface between a clear and an opaque fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An inexpensive, optical position sensor for measuring a position or length, x, along a one-dimensional curvilinear, coordinate system. The sensor can be used, for example, to determine the position of an interface between a clear and an opaque fluid (such as crude oil and water). In one embodiment, the sensor utilizes the principle of dual-fluorescence, where a primary fiber emits primary fluorescent light and a parallel secondary fiber collects a portion of the primary fluorescent light that is not blocked by the opaque fluid. This, in turn, excites secondary fluorescence in the secondary fiber at a longer wavelength. A light detector measures the intensity of secondary fluorescence emitted from an end of the secondary fiber, which is used to calculate the unknown position or length, x. Side-emitting fibers can be used in place of, or in addition to, fluorescent fibers. The all-optical sensor is attractive for applications involving flammable liquids.

  7. COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODELING OF SCALED HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK MIXING - CFD MODELING SENSITIVITY STUDY RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JACKSON VL

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary purpose of the tank mixing and sampling demonstration program is to mitigate the technical risks associated with the ability of the Hanford tank farm delivery and celtification systems to measure and deliver a uniformly mixed high-level waste (HLW) feed to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Uniform feed to the WTP is a requirement of 24590-WTP-ICD-MG-01-019, ICD-19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed, although the exact definition of uniform is evolving in this context. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling has been used to assist in evaluating scaleup issues, study operational parameters, and predict mixing performance at full-scale.

  8. Computational Fluid Dynamics in Support of the SNS Liquid Mercury Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siman-Tov, M.; Wendel, M.W.; Yoder, G.L.

    1999-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental and computational thermal-hydraulic research is underway to support the liquid mercury target design for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) facility. The SNS target will be subjected to internal nuclear heat generation that results from pulsed proton beam collisions with the mercury nuclei. Recirculation and stagnation zones within the target are of particular concern because of the likelihood that they will result in local hot spots and diminished heat removal from the target structure. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models are being used as a part of this research. Recent improvements to the 3D target model include the addition of the flow adapter which joins the inlet/outlet coolant pipes to the target body and an updated heat load distribution at the new baseline proton beam power level of 2 MW. Two thermal-hydraulic experiments are planned to validate the CFD model.

  9. Unit physics performance of a mix model in Eulerian fluid computations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vold, Erik [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Douglass, Rod [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we evaluate the performance of a K-L drag-buoyancy mix model, described in a reference study by Dimonte-Tipton [1] hereafter denoted as [D-T]. The model was implemented in an Eulerian multi-material AMR code, and the results are discussed here for a series of unit physics tests. The tests were chosen to calibrate the model coefficients against empirical data, principally from RT (Rayleigh-Taylor) and RM (Richtmyer-Meshkov) experiments, and the present results are compared to experiments and to results reported in [D-T]. Results show the Eulerian implementation of the mix model agrees well with expectations for test problems in which there is no convective flow of the mass averaged fluid, i.e., in RT mix or in the decay of homogeneous isotropic turbulence (HIT). In RM shock-driven mix, the mix layer moves through the Eulerian computational grid, and there are differences with the previous results computed in a Lagrange frame [D-T]. The differences are attributed to the mass averaged fluid motion and examined in detail. Shock and re-shock mix are not well matched simultaneously. Results are also presented and discussed regarding model sensitivity to coefficient values and to initial conditions (IC), grid convergence, and the generation of atomically mixed volume fractions.

  10. Three-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling of dry spent nuclear fuel storage canisters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.Y.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the interim storage configurations being considered for aluminum-clad foreign research reactor fuel, such as the Material and Testing Reactor (MTR) design, is in a dry storage facility. To support design studies of storage options, a computational and experimental program was conducted at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The objective was to develop computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models which would be benchmarked using data obtained from a full scale heat transfer experiment conducted in the SRS Experimental Thermal Fluids Laboratory. The current work documents the CFD approach and presents comparison of results with experimental data. CFDS-FLOW3D (version 3.3) CFD code has been used to model the 3-dimensional convective velocity and temperature distributions within a single dry storage canister of MTR fuel elements. For the present analysis, the Boussinesq approximation was used for the consideration of buoyancy-driven natural convection. Comparison of the CFD code can be used to predict reasonably accurate flow and thermal behavior of a typical foreign research reactor fuel stored in a dry storage facility.

  11. Wanapum Dam Advanced Hydro Turbine Upgrade Project: Part 2 - Evaluation of Fish Passage Test Results Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dresser, Thomas J.; Dotson, Curtis L.; Fisher, Richard K.; Graf, Michael J.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Mathur, Dilip; Heisey, Paul G.

    2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper, the second part of a 2 part paper, discusses the use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to gain further insight into the results of fish release testing conducted to evaluate the modifications made to upgrade Unit 8 at Wanapum Dam. Part 1 discusses the testing procedures and fish passage survival. Grant PUD is working with Voith Siemens Hydro (VSH) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) of DOE and Normandeau Associates in this evaluation. VSH has prepared the geometry for the CFD analysis corresponding to the four operating conditions tested with Unit 9, and the 5 operating conditions tested with Unit 8. Both VSH and PNNL have conducting CFD simulations of the turbine intakes, stay vanes, wicket gates, turbine blades and draft tube of the units. Primary objectives of the analyses were: • determine estimates of where the inserted fish passed the turbine components • determine the characteristics of the flow field along the paths calculated for pressure, velocity gradients and acceleration associated with fish sized bodies • determine the velocity gradients at the structures where fish to structure interaction is predicted. • correlate the estimated fish location of passage with observed injuries • correlate the calculated pressure and acceleration with the information recorded with the sensor fish • utilize the results of the analysis to further interpret the results of the testing. This paper discusses the results of the CFD analyses made to assist the interpretation of the fish test results.

  12. Determination of several variables affecting laboratory measurements of cross-linked fracture fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Matilda Jane

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SHEAR RATE o) PSEUDOPLASTIC NEWTONIAN SHEAR RATE b) Figure 3 ? Fluid Flow Behavior shear rate. These fluids are also called shear-thinning fluids. The power law (Ostwald-dewaele) model is the most popular model used to describe the flow behavior...

  13. Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis of the VHTR Lower Plenum Standard Problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard W. Johnson; Richard R. Schultz

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy is promoting the resurgence of nuclear power in the U. S. for both electrical power generation and production of process heat required for industrial processes such as the manufacture of hydrogen for use as a fuel in automobiles. The DOE project is called the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) and is based on a Generation IV reactor concept called the very high temperature reactor (VHTR), which will use helium as the coolant at temperatures ranging from 450 şC to perhaps 1000 şC. While computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has not been used for past safety analysis for nuclear reactors in the U. S., it is being considered for safety analysis for existing and future reactors. It is fully recognized that CFD simulation codes will have to be validated for flow physics reasonably close to actual fluid dynamic conditions expected in normal and accident operational situations. To this end, experimental data have been obtained in a scaled model of a narrow slice of the lower plenum of a prismatic VHTR. The present report presents results of CFD examinations of these data to explore potential issues with the geometry, the initial conditions, the flow dynamics and the data needed to fully specify the inlet and boundary conditions; results for several turbulence models are examined. Issues are addressed and recommendations about the data are made.

  14. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Modeling for High Rate Pulverized Coal Injection (PCI) into the Blast Furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Chenn Zhou

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulverized coal injection (PCI) into the blast furnace (BF) has been recognized as an effective way to decrease the coke and total energy consumption along with minimization of environmental impacts. However, increasing the amount of coal injected into the BF is currently limited by the lack of knowledge of some issues related to the process. It is therefore important to understand the complex physical and chemical phenomena in the PCI process. Due to the difficulty in attaining trus BF measurements, Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling has been identified as a useful technology to provide such knowledge. CFD simulation is powerful for providing detailed information on flow properties and performing parametric studies for process design and optimization. In this project, comprehensive 3-D CFD models have been developed to simulate the PCI process under actual furnace conditions. These models provide raceway size and flow property distributions. The results have provided guidance for optimizing the PCI process.

  15. Technical Review of the CENWP Computational Fluid Dynamics Model of the John Day Dam Forebay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army Corps of Engineers Portland District (CENWP) has developed a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the John Day forebay on the Columbia River to aid in the development and design of alternatives to improve juvenile salmon passage at the John Day Project. At the request of CENWP, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Hydrology Group has conducted a technical review of CENWP's CFD model run in CFD solver software, STAR-CD. PNNL has extensive experience developing and applying 3D CFD models run in STAR-CD for Columbia River hydroelectric projects. The John Day forebay model developed by CENWP is adequately configured and validated. The model is ready for use simulating forebay hydraulics for structural and operational alternatives. The approach and method are sound, however CENWP has identified some improvements that need to be made for future models and for modifications to this existing model.

  16. Computing hitting times via fluid approximation: application to the coupon collector problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gast, Nicolas

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we show how to use stochastic approximation to compute hitting time of a stochastic process, based on the study of the time for a fluid approximation of this process to be at distance 1/N of its fixed point. This approach is developed to study a generalized version of the coupon collector problem. The system is composed by N independent identical Markov chains. At each time step, one Markov chain is picked at random and performs one transition. We show that the time at which all chains have hit the same state is bounded by a N log N + b N log log N + O(N) where a and b are two constants depending on eigenvalues of the Markov chain.

  17. A SUB-GRID VOLUME-OF-FLUIDS (VOF) MODEL FOR MIXING IN RESOLVED SCALE AND IN UNRESOLVED SCALE COMPUTATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VOLD, ERIK L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; SCANNAPIECO, TONY J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A sub-grid mix model based on a volume-of-fluids (VOF) representation is described for computational simulations of the transient mixing between reactive fluids, in which the atomically mixed components enter into the reactivity. The multi-fluid model allows each fluid species to have independent values for density, energy, pressure and temperature, as well as independent velocities and volume fractions. Fluid volume fractions are further divided into mix components to represent their 'mixedness' for more accurate prediction of reactivity. Time dependent conversion from unmixed volume fractions (denoted cf) to atomically mixed (af) fluids by diffusive processes is represented in resolved scale simulations with the volume fractions (cf, af mix). In unresolved scale simulations, the transition to atomically mixed materials begins with a conversion from unmixed material to a sub-grid volume fraction (pf). This fraction represents the unresolved small scales in the fluids, heterogeneously mixed by turbulent or multi-phase mixing processes, and this fraction then proceeds in a second step to the atomically mixed fraction by diffusion (cf, pf, af mix). Species velocities are evaluated with a species drift flux, {rho}{sub i}u{sub di} = {rho}{sub i}(u{sub i}-u), used to describe the fluid mixing sources in several closure options. A simple example of mixing fluids during 'interfacial deceleration mixing with a small amount of diffusion illustrates the generation of atomically mixed fluids in two cases, for resolved scale simulations and for unresolved scale simulations. Application to reactive mixing, including Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), is planned for future work.

  18. Performance of a municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerator predicted with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anglesio, P.; Negreanu, G.P.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate by the means of numerical simulation the performance of the MSW incinerator with of Vercelli (Italy). FLUENT, a finite-volumes commercial code for Fluid Dynamics has been used to predict the 3-D reacting flows (gaseous phase) within the incinerator geometry, in order to estimate if the three conditions settled by the Italian law (P.D. 915 / 82) are respected: (a) Flue gas temperature at the input of the secondary combustion chamber must exceed 950 C. (b) Oxygen concentration in the same section must exceed 6 %. (c) Residence time for the flue gas in the secondary combustion chamber must exceed 2 seconds. The model of the incinerator has been created using the software pre-processing facilities (wall, input, outlet and live cells), together with the set-up of boundary conditions. There are also imposed the combustion constants (stoichiometry, heat of combustion, air excess). The solving procedure transforms at the level of each live cell the partial derivative equations in algebraic equations, computing the velocities field, the temperatures, gases concentration, etc. These predicted values were compared with the design properties, and the conclusion was that the conditions (a), (b), (c), are respected in normal operation. The powerful graphic interface helps the user to visualize the magnitude of the computed parameters. These results may be successfully used for the design and operation improvements for MSW incinerators. This fact will substantially increase the efficiency, reduce pollutant emissions and optimize the plant overall performance.

  19. Three-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells and Stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Hawkes; James O'Brien; Carl Stoots; Stephen Herring

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) electrochemical model has been created for detailed analysis of a high-temperature electrolysis stack (solid oxide fuel cells operated as electrolyzers). Inlet and outlet plenum flow distributions are discussed. Maldistribution of plena flow show deviations in per-cell operating conditions due to non-uniformity of species concentrations. Models have also been created to simulate experimental conditions and for code validation. Comparisons between model predictions and experimental results are discussed. Mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation and transport are provided via the core features of the commercial CFD code FLUENT. A solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) model adds the electrochemical reactions and loss mechanisms and computation of the electric field throughout the cell. The FLUENT SOFC user-defined subroutine was modified for this work to allow for operation in the electrolysis mode. Model results provide detailed profiles of temperature, Nernst potential, operating potential, activation over-potential, anode-side gas composition, cathode-side gas composition, current density and hydrogen production over a range of stack operating conditions. Variations in flow distribution, and species concentration are discussed. End effects of flow and per-cell voltage are also considered. Predicted mean outlet hydrogen and steam concentrations vary linearly with current density, as expected. Contour plots of local electrolyte temperature, current density, and Nernst potential indicate the effects of heat transfer, reaction cooling/heating, and change in local gas composition.

  20. Method of and apparatus for determining the similarity of a biological analyte from a model constructed from known biological fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM); Ward, Kenneth J. (Albuquerque, NM); Eaton, Robert P. (Albuquerque, NM); Haaland, David M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The characteristics of a biological fluid sample having an analyte are determined from a model constructed from plural known biological fluid samples. The model is a function of the concentration of materials in the known fluid samples as a function of absorption of wideband infrared energy. The wideband infrared energy is coupled to the analyte containing sample so there is differential absorption of the infrared energy as a function of the wavelength of the wideband infrared energy incident on the analyte containing sample. The differential absorption causes intensity variations of the infrared energy incident on the analyte containing sample as a function of sample wavelength of the energy, and concentration of the unknown analyte is determined from the thus-derived intensity variations of the infrared energy as a function of wavelength from the model absorption versus wavelength function.

  1. Determining circulating fluid temperature in drilling, workover, and well-control operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kabir, C.S. [Chevron Overseas Petroleum Technology Co. (Kuwait); Hasan, A.R.; Ameen, M.M. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Kouba, G.E.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimation of fluid temperature in both flow conduits (drillpipe or tubing and the annulus) is required to ascertain the fluid density and viscosity and, in turn, to calculate the pressure drop or the maximum allowable pumping rate for a number of operations. These operations include drilling, workover, and well control. The fluid temperature estimation becomes critical for high-temperature or geothermal reservoirs where significant heat exchange occurs or when fluid properties are temperature sensitive, such as for a non-Newtonian fluid. In this work, the authors present an analytical model for the flowing fluid temperature in the drillpipe/tubing and in the annulus as a function of well depth and circulation time. The model is based on an energy balance between the formation and the fluid in the drillpipe.tubing and annulus. Steady-state heat transfer is assumed in the wellbore while transient heat transfer takes place in the formation. solutions are obtained for two possible scenarios: (1) the fluid flows down the annulus and up the drillpipe/tubing, and (2) the fluid flows down the tubing and up the annulus. The analytic model developed is cast in a set of simple algebraic equations for rapid implementation. The authors also show that the maximum temperature occurs not at the well bottom, but at some distance higher from the bottom for flow up the annulus.

  2. From: Numerical Grid Generation in Computational Fluid Dynamics and Related Fields, ed. B. K. Soni, J. F. Thompson, H. Hausser and P. R.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gable, Carl W.

    From: Numerical Grid Generation in Computational Fluid Dynamics and Related Fields, ed. B. K. Soni. Press, 1996. 1 From: Numerical Grid Generation in Computational Fluid Dynamics and Related Fields, ed. B State Univ. Press, 1996. Geological Applications of Automatic Grid Generation Tools for Finite Elements

  3. A proposed methodology for computational fluid dynamics code verification, calibration, and validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aeschliman, D.P.; Oberkampf, W.L.; Blottner, F.G.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Verification, calibration, and validation (VCV) of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes is an essential element of the code development process. The exact manner in which code VCV activities are planned and conducted, however, is critically important. It is suggested that the way in which code validation, in particular, is often conducted--by comparison to published experimental data obtained for other purposes--is in general difficult and unsatisfactory, and that a different approach is required. This paper describes a proposed methodology for CFD code VCV that meets the technical requirements and is philosophically consistent with code development needs. The proposed methodology stresses teamwork and cooperation between code developers and experimentalists throughout the VCV process, and takes advantage of certain synergisms between CFD and experiment. A novel approach to uncertainty analysis is described which can both distinguish between and quantify various types of experimental error, and whose attributes are used to help define an appropriate experimental design for code VCV experiments. The methodology is demonstrated with an example of laminar, hypersonic, near perfect gas, 3-dimensional flow over a sliced sphere/cone of varying geometrical complexity.

  4. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analyses on Very High Temperature Reactor Air Ingress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang H Oh; Eung S. Kim; Richard Schultz; David Petti; Hyung S. Kang

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A preliminary computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed to understand density-gradient-induced stratified flow in a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) air-ingress accident. Various parameters were taken into consideration, including turbulence model, core temperature, initial air mole-fraction, and flow resistance in the core. The gas turbine modular helium reactor (GT-MHR) 600 MWt was selected as the reference reactor and it was simplified to be 2-D geometry in modeling. The core and the lower plenum were assumed to be porous bodies. Following the preliminary CFD results, the analysis of the air-ingress accident has been performed by two different codes: GAMMA code (system analysis code, Oh et al. 2006) and FLUENT CFD code (Fluent 2007). Eventually, the analysis results showed that the actual onset time of natural convection (~160 sec) would be significantly earlier than the previous predictions (~150 hours) calculated based on the molecular diffusion air-ingress mechanism. This leads to the conclusion that the consequences of this accident will be much more serious than previously expected.

  5. A proposed framework for computational fluid dynamics code calibration/validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberkampf, W.L.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper reviews the terminology and methodology that have been introduced during the last several years for building confidence n the predictions from Computational Fluid Dynamics (CID) codes. Code validation terminology developed for nuclear reactor analyses and aerospace applications is reviewed and evaluated. Currently used terminology such as ``calibrated code,`` ``validated code,`` and a ``validation experiment`` is discussed along with the shortcomings and criticisms of these terms. A new framework is proposed for building confidence in CFD code predictions that overcomes some of the difficulties of past procedures and delineates the causes of uncertainty in CFD predictions. Building on previous work, new definitions of code verification and calibration are proposed. These definitions provide more specific requirements for the knowledge level of the flow physics involved and the solution accuracy of the given partial differential equations. As part of the proposed framework, categories are also proposed for flow physics research, flow modeling research, and the application of numerical predictions. The contributions of physical experiments, analytical solutions, and other numerical solutions are discussed, showing that each should be designed to achieve a distinctively separate purpose in building confidence in accuracy of CFD predictions. A number of examples are given for each approach to suggest methods for obtaining the highest value for CFD code quality assurance.

  6. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics for the Spallation Neutron Source liquid mercury target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendel, M.W.; Siman-Tov, M.

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a high-power accelerator-based pulsed spallation source being designed by a multilaboratory team led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to achieve high fluxes of neutrons for scientific experiments. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is being used to analyze the SNS design. The liquid-mercury target is subjected to the neutronic (internal) heat generation that results from the proton collisions with the mercury nuclei. The liquid mercury simultaneously serves as the neutronic target medium, transports away the heat generated within itself, and cools the metallic target structure. Recirculation and stagnation zones within the target are of particular concern because of the likelihood that they will result in local hot spots. These zones exist because the most feasible target designs include a complete U-turn flow redirection. Although the primary concern is that the target is adequately cooled, the pressure drop from inlet to outlet must also be considered because pressure drop directly affects structural loading and required pumping power. Based on the current design, a three-dimensional CFD model has been developed that includes the stainless steel target structure, the liquid-mercury target flow, and the liquid-mercury cooling jacket that wraps around the nose of the target.

  7. Wind Turbine Modeling for Computational Fluid Dynamics: December 2010 - December 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tossas, L. A. M.; Leonardi, S.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the shortage of fossil fuel and the increasing environmental awareness, wind energy is becoming more and more important. As the market for wind energy grows, wind turbines and wind farms are becoming larger. Current utility-scale turbines extend a significant distance into the atmospheric boundary layer. Therefore, the interaction between the atmospheric boundary layer and the turbines and their wakes needs to be better understood. The turbulent wakes of upstream turbines affect the flow field of the turbines behind them, decreasing power production and increasing mechanical loading. With a better understanding of this type of flow, wind farm developers could plan better-performing, less maintenance-intensive wind farms. Simulating this flow using computational fluid dynamics is one important way to gain a better understanding of wind farm flows. In this study, we compare the performance of actuator disc and actuator line models in producing wind turbine wakes and the wake-turbine interaction between multiple turbines. We also examine parameters that affect the performance of these models, such as grid resolution, the use of a tip-loss correction, and the way in which the turbine force is projected onto the flow field.

  8. Forebay Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling for The Dalles Dam to Support Vortex Suppress Device Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was used in an investigation into the suppression of a surface vortex that forms and the south-most spilling bay at The Dalles Project. The CFD work complemented work at the prototype and the reduced-scale physical models. The CFD model was based on a model developed for other work in the forebay but had additional resolution added near the spillway. Vortex suppression devices (VSDs) were to placed between pier noses and/or in the bulkhead slot of the spillway bays. The simulations in this study showed that placing VSD structures or a combination of structures to suppress the vortex would still result in near-surface flows to be entrained in a vortex near the downstream spillwall. These results were supported by physical model and prototype studies. However, there was a consensus of the fish biologists at the physical model that the fish would most likely move north and if the fish went under the VSD it would immediately exit the forebay through the tainter gate and not get trapped between VSDs or the VSDs and the tainter gate if the VSDs were deep enough.

  9. The determination of glucose in sonophoretically extracted interstitial fluid and the characterization of ultrasound parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantrell, Jeffrey Travis

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    chamber and used to correlate ultrasound spectral properties to the amount of fluid extracted. Results indicate that the highest amount of water extracted occurs when the acoustic coupling media on the surface of the skin is cavitating, resulting in mild...

  10. Investigation of wellbore cooling by circulation and fluid penetration into the formation using a wellbore thermal simulator computer code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duda, L.E.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high temperatures of geothermal wells present severe problems for drilling, logging, and developing these reservoirs. Cooling the wellbore is perhaps the most common method to solve these problems. However, it is usually not clear what may be the most effective wellbore cooling mechanism for a given well. In this paper, wellbore cooling by the use of circulation or by fluid injection into the surrounding rock is investigated using a wellbore thermal simulator computer code. Short circulation times offer no prolonged cooling of fluid in the wellbore, but long circulation times (greater than ten or twenty days) greatly reduce the warming rate after shut-in. The dependence of the warming rate on the penetration distance of cooler temperatures into the rock formation (as by fluid injection) is investigated. Penetration distances of greater than 0.6 m appear to offer a substantial reduction in the warming rate. Several plots are shown which demonstrate these effects. 16 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Unit physics testing of a mix model in an eulerian fluid computation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vold, Erik [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Douglass, Rod [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A K-L turbulence mix model driven with a drag-buoyancy source term is tested in an Eulerian code in a series of basic unit-physics tests, as part of a mix validation milestone. The model and the closure coefficient values are derived in the work of Dimonte-Tipton [D-T] in Phys.Flu.18, 085101 (2006), and many of the test problems were reported there, where the mix model operated in Lagrange computations. The drag-buoyancy K-L mix model was implemented within the Eulerian code framework by A.J. Scannapieco. Mix model performance is evaluated in terms of mix width growth rates compared to experiments in select regimes. Results in our Eulerian code are presented for several unit-physics I-D test problems including the decay of homogeneous isotropic turbulence (HIT), Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) unstable mixing, shock amplification of initial turbulence, Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) mixing in several single shock test cases and in comparison to two RM experiments including re-shock (Vetter-Sturtevant and Poggi, et.al.). Sensitivity to model parameters, to Atwood number, and to initial conditions are examined. Results here are in good agreement in some tests (HIT, RT) with the previous results reported for the mix model in the Lagrange calculations. The HIT turbulent decay agrees closely with analytic expectations, and the RT growth rate matches experimental values for the default values of the model coefficients proposed in [D-T]. Results for RM characterized with a power law growth rate differ from the previous mix model work but are still within the range for reasonable agreement with experiments. Sensitivity to IC values in the RM studies are examined; results are sensitive to initial values of L[t=O], which largely determines the RM mix layer growth rate, and generally differs from the IC values used in the RT studies. Result sensitivity to initial turbulence, K[t=O], is seen to be small but significant above a threshold value. Initial conditions can be adjusted so that single shock RM mix width results match experiments but we have not been able to obtain a good match for first shock and re-shock growth rates in the same experiment with a single set of parameters and Ie. Problematic issues with KH test problems are described. Resolution studies for an RM test problem show the K-L mix growth rate decreases as it converges at a supra-linear rate, and, convergence requires a fine grid (on the order of 10 microns). For comparison, a resolution study of a second mix model [Scannapieco and Cheng, Phys.Lett.A, 299(1),49, (2002)] acting on a two fluid interface problem was examined. The mix in this case was found to increase with grid resolution at low to moderate resolutions, but converged at comparably fine resolutions. In conclusion, these tests indicate that the Eulerian code K-L model, using the Dimonte Tipton default model closure coefficients, achieve reasonable results across many of the unit-physics experimental conditions. However, we were unable to obtain good matches simultaneously for shock and re-shock mix in a single experiment. Results are sensitive to initial conditions in the regimes under study, with different IC best suited to RT or RM mix. It is reasonable to expect IC sensitivity in extrapolating to high energy density regimes, or to experiments with deceleration due to arbitrary combinations of RT and RM. As a final comparison, the atomically generated mix fraction and the mix width were each compared for the K-L mix model and the Scannapieco model on an identical RM test problem. The Scannapieco mix fraction and width grow linearly. The K-L mix fraction and width grow with the same power law exponent, in contrast to expectations from analysis. In future work it is proposed to do more head-to-head comparisons between these two models and other mix model options on a full suite of physics test problems, such as interfacial deceleration due to pressure build-up during an idealized ICF implosion.

  12. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Cavity Cooling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Angelo Frisani; Yassin A. Hassan; Victor M. Ugaz

    2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of passive heat removal systems is one of the main concerns for the modular very high temperature gas-cooled reactors (VHTR) vessel cavity. The reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) is a key heat removal system during normal and off-normal conditions. The design and validation of the RCCS is necessary to demonstrate that VHTRs can survive to the postulated accidents. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) STAR-CCM+/V3.06.006 code was used for three-dimensional system modeling and analysis of the RCCS. A CFD model was developed to analyze heat exchange in the RCCS. The model incorporates a 180-deg section resembling the VHTR RCCS experimentally reproduced in a laboratory-scale test facility at Texas A&M University. All the key features of the experimental facility were taken into account during the numerical simulations. The objective of the present work was to benchmark CFD tools against experimental data addressing the behavior of the RCCS following accident conditions. Two cooling fluids (i.e., water and air) were considered to test the capability of maintaining the RCCS concrete walls' temperature below design limits. Different temperature profiles at the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) wall obtained from the experimental facility were used as boundary conditions in the numerical analyses to simulate VHTR transient evolution during accident scenarios. Mesh convergence was achieved with an intensive parametric study of the two different cooling configurations and selected boundary conditions. To test the effect of turbulence modeling on the RCCS heat exchange, predictions using several different turbulence models and near-wall treatments were evaluated and compared. The comparison among the different turbulence models analyzed showed satisfactory agreement for the temperature distribution inside the RCCS cavity medium and at the standpipes walls. For such a complicated geometry and flow conditions, the tested turbulence models demonstrated that the realizable k-epsilon model with two-layer all y+ wall treatment performs better than the other k-epsilon and k-omega turbulence models when compared to the experimental results and the Reynolds stress transport turbulence model results. A scaling analysis was developed to address the distortions introduced by the CFD model in simulating the physical phenomena inside the RCCS system with respect to the full plant configuration. The scaling analysis demonstrated that both the experimental facility and the CFD model achieve a satisfactory resemblance of the main flow characteristics inside the RCCS cavity region, and convection and radiation heat exchange phenomena are properly scaled from the actual plant.

  13. A computational procedure for calculating the thermodynamic properties of binary mixtures of Yukawa fluids under the mean spherical approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arrieta, Eduardo

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A COMPUTATIONAL PROCEDURE FOR CALCULATING THE THERMODYNAMIC PROPERTIES OF BINARY MIXTURES OF YUKAWA FLUIDS UNDER THE MEAN SPHERICAL APPROXIMATION A Thesis by EDUARDO ARRIFTA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AkM University... Region (below the curves) of non-real mathematical solution for M2 mixtures at different compositions zi. 22 3. Comparison between the initial estimates and solution values for the (D, I). Mixture Ml at zi ? 0. 65 and temperature T' = 0. 717. 27...

  14. Computing Approximate Solutions of the Protein Structure Determination Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dal PalĂą, Alessandro

    dovier@dimi.uniud.it 3 Dept. of Computer Science, New Mexico State University epontell of Computer Science at New Mexico State University, where he also serves as the Di- rector of the Knowledge in the context of energy landscape studies (24; 17; 2; 22; 1). Commonly, Monte Carlo simulations, based

  15. GASFLOW: A Computational Fluid Dynamics Code for Gases, Aerosols, and Combustion, Volume 2: User's Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. D. Nichols; C. Müller; G. A. Necker; J. R. Travis; J. W. Spore; K. L. Lam; P. Royl; T. L. Wilson

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FzK) are developing GASFLOW, a three-dimensional (3D) fluid dynamics field code as a best-estimate tool to characterize local phenomena within a flow field. Examples of 3D phenomena include circulation patterns; flow stratification; hydrogen distribution mixing and stratification; combustion and flame propagation; effects of noncondensable gas distribution on local condensation and evaporation; and aerosol entrainment, transport, and deposition. An analysis with GASFLOW will result in a prediction of the gas composition and discrete particle distribution in space and time throughout the facility and the resulting pressure and temperature loadings on the walls and internal structures with or without combustion. A major application of GASFLOW is for predicting the transport, mixing, and combustion of hydrogen and other gases in nuclear reactor containment and other facilities. It has been applied to situations involving transporting and distributing combustible gas mixtures. It has been used to study gas dynamic behavior in low-speed, buoyancy-driven flows, as well as sonic flows or diffusion dominated flows; and during chemically reacting flows, including deflagrations. The effects of controlling such mixtures by safety systems can be analyzed. The code version described in this manual is designated GASFLOW 2.1, which combines previous versions of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission code HMS (for Hydrogen Mixing Studies) and the Department of Energy and FzK versions of GASFLOW. The code was written in standard Fortran 90. This manual comprises three volumes. Volume I describes the governing physical equations and computational model. Volume II describes how to use the code to set up a model geometry, specify gas species and material properties, define initial and boundary conditions, and specify different outputs, especially graphical displays. Sample problems are included. Volume III contains some of the assessments performed by LANL and FzK.

  16. GASFLOW: A Computational Fluid Dynamics Code for Gases, Aerosols, and Combustion, Volume 3: Assessment Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Müller; E. D. Hughes; G. F. Niederauer; H. Wilkening; J. R. Travis; J. W. Spore; P. Royl; W. Baumann

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FzK) are developing GASFLOW, a three-dimensional (3D) fluid dynamics field code as a best- estimate tool to characterize local phenomena within a flow field. Examples of 3D phenomena include circulation patterns; flow stratification; hydrogen distribution mixing and stratification; combustion and flame propagation; effects of noncondensable gas distribution on local condensation and evaporation; and aerosol entrainment, transport, and deposition. An analysis with GASFLOW will result in a prediction of the gas composition and discrete particle distribution in space and time throughout the facility and the resulting pressure and temperature loadings on the walls and internal structures with or without combustion. A major application of GASFLOW is for predicting the transport, mixing, and combustion of hydrogen and other gases in nuclear reactor containment and other facilities. It has been applied to situations involving transporting and distributing combustible gas mixtures. It has been used to study gas dynamic behavior in low-speed, buoyancy-driven flows, as well as sonic flows or diffusion dominated flows; and during chemically reacting flows, including deflagrations. The effects of controlling such mixtures by safety systems can be analyzed. The code version described in this manual is designated GASFLOW 2.1, which combines previous versions of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission code HMS (for Hydrogen Mixing Studies) and the Department of Energy and FzK versions of GASFLOW. The code was written in standard Fortran 90. This manual comprises three volumes. Volume I describes the governing physical equations and computational model. Volume II describes how to use the code to set up a model geometry, specify gas species and material properties, define initial and boundary conditions, and specify different outputs, especially graphical displays. Sample problems are included. Volume III contains some of the assessments performed by LANL and FzK

  17. Forebay Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling for The Dalles Dam to Support Behavior Guidance System Siting Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Johnson, Gary E.

    2005-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models were developed to support the siting and design of a behavioral guidance system (BGS) structure in The Dalles Dam (TDA) forebay on the Columbia River. The work was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (CENWP). The CFD results were an invaluable tool for the analysis, both from a Regional and Agency perspective (for the fish passage evaluation) and a CENWP perspective (supporting the BGS design and location). The new CFD model (TDA forebay model) included the latest bathymetry (surveyed in 1999) and a detailed representation of the engineered structures (spillway, powerhouse main, fish, and service units). The TDA forebay model was designed and developed in a way that future studies could easily modify or, to a large extent, reuse large portions of the existing mesh. This study resulted in these key findings: (1) The TDA forebay model matched well with field-measured velocity data. (2) The TDA forebay model matched observations made at the 1:80 general physical model of the TDA forebay. (3) During the course of this study, the methodology typically used by CENWP to contour topographic data was shown to be inaccurate when applied to widely-spaced transect data. Contouring methodologies need to be revisited--especially before such things as modifying the bathymetry in the 1:80 general physical model are undertaken. Future alignments can be evaluated with the model staying largely intact. The next round of analysis will need to address fish passage demands and navigation concerns. CFD models can be used to identify the most promising locations and to provide quantified metrics for biological, hydraulic, and navigation criteria. The most promising locations should then be further evaluated in the 1:80 general physical model.

  18. 2014-03-26 Issuance: Proposed Determination of Computer and Battery...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    extending the public comment period for the proposed determination of computer and battery backup systems, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on...

  19. 2014-02-21 Issuance: Proposed Determination of Computer and Battery...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    determination regarding computer systems, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on February 21, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any...

  20. Users manual for CAFE-3D : a computational fluid dynamics fire code.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalil, Imane; Lopez, Carlos; Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma (Alion Science and Technology, Albuquerque, NM)

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Container Analysis Fire Environment (CAFE) computer code has been developed to model all relevant fire physics for predicting the thermal response of massive objects engulfed in large fires. It provides realistic fire thermal boundary conditions for use in design of radioactive material packages and in risk-based transportation studies. The CAFE code can be coupled to commercial finite-element codes such as MSC PATRAN/THERMAL and ANSYS. This coupled system of codes can be used to determine the internal thermal response of finite element models of packages to a range of fire environments. This document is a user manual describing how to use the three-dimensional version of CAFE, as well as a description of CAFE input and output parameters. Since this is a user manual, only a brief theoretical description of the equations and physical models is included.

  1. From: Numerical Grid Generation in Computational Fluid Dynamics and Related Fields, ed. B. K. Soni, J. F. Thompson, H. Hausser and P. R.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gable, Carl W.

    From: Numerical Grid Generation in Computational Fluid Dynamics and Related Fields, ed. B. K. Soni. Press, 1996. 3-Dimensional Wells and Tunnels for Finite Element Grids 1 3-Dimensional Wells and Tunnels for Finite Element Grids Terry A. Cherry1 Carl W. Gable1 Harold Trease2 ABSTRACT Modeling fluid, vapor

  2. A comparison of grid-based techniques for Navier-Stokes fluid simulation in computer graphics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chrisman, Cameron

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Computer Graphics 2. Previous Work . . . . . . .B. Applications in Computer Graphics II The Navier Stokesand Tricks for Real-Time Graphics. Pearson Higher Education,

  3. Graduate Studies Environmental Fluid Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Storici, Francesca

    Graduate Studies Environmental Fluid Mechanics and Water Resources Engineering GRADUATE COURSESResourcesManagement · IntermediateFluidMechanics · AdvancedFluidMechanics · EnvironmentalFluidMechanics · AdvancedEnvironmental FluidMechanics · FluidMechanicsofOrganisms · OpenChannelHydraulics · SedimentTransport · ComputationalFluidMechanics

  4. Computational Fluid Dynamics Best Practice Guidelines in the Analysis of Storage Dry Cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zigh, A.; Solis, J. [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Rockville, MD MS (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods are used to evaluate the thermal performance of a dry cask under long term storage conditions in accordance with NUREG-1536 [NUREG-1536, 1997]. A three-dimensional CFD model was developed and validated using data for a ventilated storage cask (VSC-17) collected by Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The developed Fluent CFD model was validated to minimize the modeling and application uncertainties. To address modeling uncertainties, the paper focused on turbulence modeling of buoyancy driven air flow. Similarly, in the application uncertainties, the pressure boundary conditions used to model the air inlet and outlet vents were investigated and validated. Different turbulence models were used to reduce the modeling uncertainty in the CFD simulation of the air flow through the annular gap between the overpack and the multi-assembly sealed basket (MSB). Among the chosen turbulence models, the validation showed that the low Reynolds k-{epsilon} and the transitional k-{omega} turbulence models predicted the measured temperatures closely. To assess the impact of pressure boundary conditions used at the air inlet and outlet channels on the application uncertainties, a sensitivity analysis of operating density was undertaken. For convergence purposes, all available commercial CFD codes include the operating density in the pressure gradient term of the momentum equation. The validation showed that the correct operating density corresponds to the density evaluated at the air inlet condition of pressure and temperature. Next, the validated CFD method was used to predict the thermal performance of an existing dry cask storage system. The evaluation uses two distinct models: a three-dimensional and an axisymmetrical representation of the cask. In the 3-D model, porous media was used to model only the volume occupied by the rodded region that is surrounded by the BWR channel box. In the axisymmetric model, porous media was used to model the entire region that encompasses the fuel assemblies as well as the gaps in between. Consequently, a larger volume is represented by porous media in the second model; hence, a higher frictional flow resistance is introduced in the momentum equations. The conservatism and the safety margins of these models were compared to assess the applicability and the realism of these two models. The three-dimensional model included fewer geometry simplifications and is recommended as it predicted less conservative fuel cladding temperature values, while still assuring the existence of adequate safety margins. (authors)

  5. Development and Verification of a Computational Fluid Dynamics Model of a Horizontal-Axis Tidal Current Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawson, M. J.; Li, Y.; Sale, D. C.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the development of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methodology to simulate the hydrodynamics of horizontal-axis tidal current turbines. Qualitative measures of the CFD solutions were independent of the grid resolution. Conversely, quantitative comparisons of the results indicated that the use of coarse computational grids results in an under prediction of the hydrodynamic forces on the turbine blade in comparison to the forces predicted using more resolved grids. For the turbine operating conditions considered in this study, the effect of the computational timestep on the CFD solution was found to be minimal, and the results from steady and transient simulations were in good agreement. Additionally, the CFD results were compared to corresponding blade element momentum method calculations and reasonable agreement was shown. Nevertheless, we expect that for other turbine operating conditions, where the flow over the blade is separated, transient simulations will be required.

  6. Computing Approximate Solutions of the Protein Structure Determination Problem using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dal PalĂą, Alessandro

    dovier@dimi.uniud.it 3 Dept. of Computer Science, New Mexico State University epontell conformation of protein structures, in particular in the context of energy landscape studies [25, 16, 2, 22, 1 be effectively em- ployed to solve energy minimization problems, and thus, can be used to com- pute putative

  7. A mechanistic model for computing fluid temperature profiles in gas-lift wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasan, A.R. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Kabir, C.S. [Chevron Overseas Petroleum Technology Co. (Kuwait)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a continuous-flow gas-lift operation, gas is injected down the annulus into the tubing near the top of perforations. The intrinsic idea is to aerate the liquid column, thus providing the necessary stimulus for fluid flow. Because the volumetric gas rate is dependent upon both the pressure and temperature at the depth of injection, accurate knowledge of these entities cannot be overemphasized for an efficient lift. In particular, the behavior of the nitrogen gas charged in the dome is critically dependent upon the temperature prediction for the optimal performance of the bellows-charged gas-lift valves. Current practice entails use of a linear temperature profile for the annular fluid while applying empirical correlations for the tubing fluids. Improved temperature predictions are now possible for fluids in both conduits by modeling the heat and fluid flow problem at hand from first principles. In this work, they present a mechanistic model for the flowing temperature of the annular gas and the gas/liquid two-phase mixture in the tubing as a function of both well depth and production time, regardless of the well deviation angle. The model is based on energy balance between the formation and fluids flowing through each conduit. While flowing down the annulus, the cold gas injected at the wellhead continues to gain heat. The heat-transfer rate for the annular gas depends on the relative temperatures of the formation and the tubing fluid. They assume unsteady-state heat transfer in the formation and steady-state heat transfer in the tubular for a continuous-flow gas-lift operation.

  8. Investigation of wellbore cooling by circulation and fluid penetration into the formation using a wellbore thermal simulator computer code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duda, L.E.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high temperatures of geothermal wells present severe problems for drilling, logging, and developing these reservoirs. Cooling the wellbore is perhaps the most common method to solve these problems. However, it is usually not clear what may be the most effective wellbore cooling mechanism for a given well. In this paper, wellbore cooling by the use of circulation or by fluid injection into the surrounding rock is investigated using a wellbore thermal simulator computer code. Short circulation times offer no prolonged cooling of the wellbore, but long circulation times (greater than ten or twenty days) greatly reduce the warming rate after shut-in. The dependence of the warming rate on the penetration distance of cooler temperatures into the rock formation (as by fluid injection) is investigated. Penetration distances of greater than 0.6 m appear to offer a substantial reduction in the warming rate. Several plots are shown which demonstrate these effects.

  9. Development and testing of a standard procedure for determining the viscous properties of crosslinked fracture fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worlow, David Wayne

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the shear rate at the bob by use of the Kr ieger correction. During the develop- ment of the testing pr ocedur e, it was discover ed that the gel experienced shear degradation when subjected to an incr easing shear rate. Therefore, the shear rate should... always be decreased when measuring these fluids. The applicability of the testing procedure was verified by test- ing gel systems supplied by four service companies with gel concentrations of 0. 48$ and 0. 72$ HPG (40 and 60 Ib/1000 gal, respectively...

  10. Description of interfaces of fluid-tethered chains: advances in density functional theories and off-lattice computer simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Soko?owski; J. Ilnytskyi; O. Pizio

    2014-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Many objects of nanoscopic dimensions involve fluid-tethered chain interfaces. These systems are of interest for basic science and for several applications, in particular for design of nanodevices for specific purposes. We review recent developments of theoretical methods in this area of research and in particular of density functional (DF) approaches, which provide important insights into microscopic properties of such interfaces. The theories permit to describe the dependence of adsorption, wettability, solvation forces and electric interfacial phenomena on thermodynamic states and on characteristics of tethered chains. Computer simulations for the problems in question are overviewed as well. Theoretical results are discussed in relation to simulation results and to some experimental observations.

  11. Computational Procedures for Determining Parameters in Ramberg-Osgood

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart ofMeasuring DopamineEnergy,6. RadiativeLaboratory (LANL)Computational

  12. Coupled computational fluid dynamics and heat transfer analysis of the VHTR lower plenum.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Rodriguez, Salvador B.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The very high temperature reactor (VHTR) concept is being developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and other groups around the world for the future generation of electricity at high thermal efficiency (> 48%) and co-generation of hydrogen and process heat. This Generation-IV reactor would operate at elevated exit temperatures of 1,000-1,273 K, and the fueled core would be cooled by forced convection helium gas. For the prismatic-core VHTR, which is the focus of this analysis, the velocity of the hot helium flow exiting the core into the lower plenum (LP) could be 35-70 m/s. The impingement of the resulting gas jets onto the adiabatic plate at the bottom of the LP could develop hot spots and thermal stratification and inadequate mixing of the gas exiting the vessel to the turbo-machinery for energy conversion. The complex flow field in the LP is further complicated by the presence of large cylindrical graphite posts that support the massive core and inner and outer graphite reflectors. Because there are approximately 276 channels in the VHTR core from which helium exits into the LP and a total of 155 support posts, the flow field in the LP includes cross flow, multiple jet flow interaction, flow stagnation zones, vortex interaction, vortex shedding, entrainment, large variation in Reynolds number (Re), recirculation, and mixing enhancement and suppression regions. For such a complex flow field, experimental results at operating conditions are not currently available. Instead, the objective of this paper is to numerically simulate the flow field in the LP of a prismatic core VHTR using the Sandia National Laboratories Fuego, which is a 3D, massively parallel generalized computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code with numerous turbulence and buoyancy models and simulation capabilities for complex gas flow fields, with and without thermal effects. The code predictions for simpler flow fields of single and swirling gas jets, with and without a cross flow, are validated using reported experimental data and theory. The key processes in the LP are identified using phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT). It may be argued that a CFD code that accurately simulates simplified, single-effect flow fields with increasing complexity is likely to adequately model the complex flow field in the VHTR LP, subject to a future experimental validation. The PIRT process and spatial and temporal discretizations implemented in the present analysis using Fuego established confidence in the validation and verification (V and V) calculations and in the conclusions reached based on the simulation results. The performed calculations included the helicoid vortex swirl model, the dynamic Smagorinsky large eddy simulation (LES) turbulence model, participating media radiation (PMR), and 1D conjugate heat transfer (CHT). The full-scale, half-symmetry LP mesh used in the LP simulation included unstructured hexahedral elements and accounted for the graphite posts, the helium jets, the exterior walls, and the bottom plate with an adiabatic outer surface. Results indicated significant enhancements in heat transfer, flow mixing, and entrainment in the VHTR LP when using swirling inserts at the exit of the helium flow channels into the LP. The impact of using various swirl angles on the flow mixing and heat transfer in the LP is qualified, including the formation of the central recirculation zone (CRZ), and the effect of LP height. Results also showed that in addition to the enhanced mixing, the swirling inserts result in negligible additional pressure losses and are likely to eliminate the formation of hot spots.

  13. Computer simulation of effective viscosity of fluid-proppant mixture used in hydraulic fracturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuzkin, Vitaly A; Linkov, Aleksandr M

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents results of numerical experiments performed to evaluate the effective viscosity of a fluid-proppant mixture, used in hydraulic fracturing. The results, obtained by two complimenting methods (the particle dynamics and the smoothed particle hydrodynamics), coincide to the accuracy of standard deviation. They provide an analytical equation for the dependence of effective viscosity on the proppant concentration, needed for numerical simulation of the hydraulic fracture propagation.

  14. Computing leakage current distributions and determination of minimum leakage vectors for combinational designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gulati, Kanupriya

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    approach to determine and implicitly represent the leakage value for all input vectors of a combinational circuit is presented. In its exact form, this technique can compute the leakage value of each input vector, by storing these leakage values implicitly...

  15. Massively parallel computational fluid dynamics calculations for aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Payne, J.L.; Hassan, B.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Massively parallel computers have enabled the analyst to solve complicated flow fields (turbulent, chemically reacting) that were previously intractable. Calculations are presented using a massively parallel CFD code called SACCARA (Sandia Advanced Code for Compressible Aerothermodynamics Research and Analysis) currently under development at Sandia National Laboratories as part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI). Computations were made on a generic reentry vehicle in a hypersonic flowfield utilizing three different distributed parallel computers to assess the parallel efficiency of the code with increasing numbers of processors. The parallel efficiencies for the SACCARA code will be presented for cases using 1, 150, 100 and 500 processors. Computations were also made on a subsonic/transonic vehicle using both 236 and 521 processors on a grid containing approximately 14.7 million grid points. Ongoing and future plans to implement a parallel overset grid capability and couple SACCARA with other mechanics codes in a massively parallel environment are discussed.

  16. Simulations for Complex Fluid Flow Problems from Berkeley Lab's Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering (CCSE)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering (CCSE) develops and applies advanced computational methodologies to solve large-scale scientific and engineering problems arising in the Department of Energy (DOE) mission areas involving energy, environmental, and industrial technology. The primary focus is in the application of structured-grid finite difference methods on adaptive grid hierarchies for compressible, incompressible, and low Mach number flows. The diverse range of scientific applications that drive the research typically involve a large range of spatial and temporal scales (e.g. turbulent reacting flows) and require the use of extremely large computing hardware, such as the 153,000-core computer, Hopper, at NERSC. The CCSE approach to these problems centers on the development and application of advanced algorithms that exploit known separations in scale; for many of the application areas this results in algorithms are several orders of magnitude more efficient than traditional simulation approaches.

  17. Globally Distributed Engineering Teams in Computational Fluid Dynamics and in Product Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Susanne R.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    , experimental research on idea generation methods used in globally distributed teams during the conceptual design phase of the product development process is presented. An experimental study simulating the global distribution of a three person Computational...

  18. Development of one-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code 'GFLOW' for groundwater flow and contaminant transport analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahatgaonkar, P. S.; Datta, D.; Malhotra, P. K.; Ghadge, S. G. [Nuclear Power Corporation of India Ltd., R-2, Ent. Block, Nabhikiya Urja Bhavan, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai - 400 094 (India)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prediction of groundwater movement and contaminant transport in soil is an important problem in many branches of science and engineering. This includes groundwater hydrology, environmental engineering, soil science, agricultural engineering and also nuclear engineering. Specifically, in nuclear engineering it is applicable in the design of spent fuel storage pools and waste management sites in the nuclear power plants. Ground water modeling involves the simulation of flow and contaminant transport by groundwater flow. In the context of contaminated soil and groundwater system, numerical simulations are typically used to demonstrate compliance with regulatory standard. A one-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics code GFLOW had been developed based on the Finite Difference Method for simulating groundwater flow and contaminant transport through saturated and unsaturated soil. The code is validated with the analytical model and the benchmarking cases available in the literature. (authors)

  19. Method, system and computer program product for monitoring and optimizing fluid extraction from geologic strata

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Medizade, Masoud (San Luis Obispo, CA); Ridgely, John Robert (Los Osos, CA)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An arrangement which utilizes an inexpensive flap valve/flow transducer combination and a simple local supervisory control system to monitor and/or control the operation of a positive displacement pump used to extract petroleum from geologic strata. The local supervisory control system controls the operation of an electric motor which drives a reciprocating positive displacement pump so as to maximize the volume of petroleum extracted from the well per pump stroke while minimizing electricity usage and pump-off situations. By reducing the electrical demand and pump-off (i.e., "pounding" or "fluid pound") occurrences, operating and maintenance costs should be reduced sufficiently to allow petroleum recovery from marginally productive petroleum fields. The local supervisory control system includes one or more applications to at least collect flow signal data generated during operation of the positive displacement pump. No flow, low flow and flow duration are easily evaluated using the flap valve/flow transducer arrangement.

  20. The environment of a geomaterial (soil, rock, concrete) determines its susceptibility to failure: grain size distribution and mineralogy, fluid-saturation, pore fluid chemistry, current state of stress, history, the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borja, Ronaldo I.

    to failure: grain size distribution and mineralogy, fluid-saturation, pore fluid chemistry, current state

  1. Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Vapor Dispersion Modeling with Computational Fluid Dynamics Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi, Ruifeng

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Federal regulation 49 CFR 193 and standard NFPA 59A require the use of validated consequence models to determine the vapor cloud dispersion exclusion zones for accidental liquefied natural gas (LNG) releases. For modeling purposes, the physical...

  2. June 6, 2007 Large-Scale Scientific Computations'07, Sozopol, Bulgaria -p. 1/29 Multiscale Modeling and Simulation of Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popov, Peter

    in porous media (soil, porous rocks, etc.) x Elasticity problems in composite materials (adobe, concrete/29 Presentation outline s Brief overview of upscaling methods in deformable porous media s The Fluid upscaling of flow in deformable porous media #12;June 6, 2007 Large-Scale Scientific Computations'07

  3. Advanced Computational Thermal Fluid Physics (CTFP) and Its Assessment for Light Water Reactors and Supercritical Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.M. McEligot; K. G. Condie; G. E. McCreery; H. M. McIlroy; R. J. Pink; L.E. Hochreiter; J.D. Jackson; R.H. Pletcher; B.L. Smith; P. Vukoslavcevic; J.M. Wallace; J.Y. Yoo; J.S. Lee; S.T. Ro; S.O. Park

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: The ultimate goal of the study is the improvement of predictive methods for safety analyses and design of Generation IV reactor systems such as supercritical water reactors (SCWR) for higher efficiency, improved performance and operation, design simplification, enhanced safety and reduced waste and cost. The objective of this Korean / US / laboratory / university collaboration of coupled fundamental computational and experimental studies is to develop the supporting knowledge needed for improved predictive techniques for use in the technology development of Generation IV reactor concepts and their passive safety systems. The present study emphasizes SCWR concepts in the Generation IV program.

  4. Two-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics and Conduction Simulations of Heat Transfer in Horizontal Window Frames with Internal Cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavsen, Arlid; Kohler, Christian; Dalehaug, Arvid; Arasteh, Dariush

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper assesses the accuracy of the simplified frame cavity conduction/convection and radiation models presented in ISO 15099 and used in software for rating and labeling window products. Temperatures and U-factors for typical horizontal window frames with internal cavities are compared; results from Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations with detailed radiation modeling are used as a reference. Four different frames were studied. Two were made of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and two of aluminum. For each frame, six different simulations were performed, two with a CFD code and four with a building-component thermal-simulation tool using the Finite Element Method (FEM). This FEM tool addresses convection using correlations from ISO 15099; it addressed radiation with either correlations from ISO 15099 or with a detailed, view-factor-based radiation model. Calculations were performed using the CFD code with and without fluid flow in the window frame cavities; the calculations without fluid flow were performed to verify that the CFD code and the building-component thermal-simulation tool produced consistent results. With the FEM-code, the practice of subdividing small frame cavities was examined, in some cases not subdividing, in some cases subdividing cavities with interconnections smaller than five millimeters (mm) (ISO 15099) and in some cases subdividing cavities with interconnections smaller than seven mm (a breakpoint that has been suggested in other studies). For the various frames, the calculated U-factors were found to be quite comparable (the maximum difference between the reference CFD simulation and the other simulations was found to be 13.2 percent). A maximum difference of 8.5 percent was found between the CFD simulation and the FEM simulation using ISO 15099 procedures. The ISO 15099 correlation works best for frames with high U-factors. For more efficient frames, the relative differences among various simulations are larger. Temperature was also compared, at selected locations on the frames. Small differences was found in the results from model to model. Finally, the effectiveness of the ISO cavity radiation algorithms was examined by comparing results from these algorithms to detailed radiation calculations (from both programs). Our results suggest that improvements in cavity heat transfer calculations can be obtained by using detailed radiation modeling (i.e. view-factor or ray-tracing models), and that incorporation of these strategies may be more important for improving the accuracy of results than the use of CFD modeling for horizontal cavities.

  5. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of the Operation of a Flame Ionization Sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huckaby, E.D.; Chorpening, B.T.; Thornton, J.D.

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sensors and controls research group at the United States Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is continuing to develop the Combustion Control and Diagnostics Sensor (CCADS) for gas turbine applications. CCADS uses the electrical conduction of the charged species generated during the combustion process to detect combustion instabilities and monitor equivalence ratio. As part of this effort, combustion models are being developed which include the interaction between the electric field and the transport of charged species. The primary combustion process is computed using a flame wrinkling model (Weller et. al. 1998) which is a component of the OpenFOAM toolkit (Jasak et. al. 2004). A sub-model for the transport of charged species is attached to this model. The formulation of the charged-species model similar that applied by Penderson and Brown (1993) for the simulation of laminar flames. The sub-model consists of an additional flux due to the electric field (drift flux) added to the equations for the charged species concentrations and the solution the electric potential from the resolved charge density. The subgrid interactions between the electric field and charged species transport have been neglected. Using the above procedure, numerical simulations are performed and the results compared with several recent CCADS experiments.

  6. C. R. Acad. Sci. Paris, t. ???, S erie II b, p. ?????, 2005 -PXPP????.TEX -Mecanique des fluides num erique/Computational fluid mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -Paul Caltagirone c Transferts, Ecoulements, Fluides, Energ´etique (TREFLE), UMR CNRS 8508 Site Ecole Nationale Sup´erique original `a traiter efficacement ce probl`eme d'onde hautement non-lin´eaire. Dans cette Note, les r

  7. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of two-phase flow in a BWR fuel assembly. Final CRADA Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tentner, A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A direct numerical simulation capability for two-phase flows with heat transfer in complex geometries can considerably reduce the hardware development cycle, facilitate the optimization and reduce the costs of testing of various industrial facilities, such as nuclear power plants, steam generators, steam condensers, liquid cooling systems, heat exchangers, distillers, and boilers. Specifically, the phenomena occurring in a two-phase coolant flow in a BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) fuel assembly include coolant phase changes and multiple flow regimes which directly influence the coolant interaction with fuel assembly and, ultimately, the reactor performance. Traditionally, the best analysis tools for this purpose of two-phase flow phenomena inside the BWR fuel assembly have been the sub-channel codes. However, the resolution of these codes is too coarse for analyzing the detailed intra-assembly flow patterns, such as flow around a spacer element. Advanced CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) codes provide a potential for detailed 3D simulations of coolant flow inside a fuel assembly, including flow around a spacer element using more fundamental physical models of flow regimes and phase interactions than sub-channel codes. Such models can extend the code applicability to a wider range of situations, which is highly important for increasing the efficiency and to prevent accidents.

  8. A computational model for viscous fluid flow, heat transfer, and melting in in situ vitrification melt pools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McHugh, P.R.; Ramshaw, J.D.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MAGMA is a FORTRAN computer code designed to viscous flow in in situ vitrification melt pools. It models three-dimensional, incompressible, viscous flow and heat transfer. The momentum equation is coupled to the temperature field through the buoyancy force terms arising from the Boussinesq approximation. All fluid properties, except density, are assumed variable. Density is assumed constant except in the buoyancy force terms in the momentum equation. A simple melting model based on the enthalpy method allows the study of the melt front progression and latent heat effects. An indirect addressing scheme used in the numerical solution of the momentum equation voids unnecessary calculations in cells devoid of liquid. Two-dimensional calculations can be performed using either rectangular or cylindrical coordinates, while three-dimensional calculations use rectangular coordinates. All derivatives are approximated by finite differences. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a new fully implicit iterative technique, while the energy equation is differenced explicitly in time. Spatial derivatives are written in conservative form using a uniform, rectangular, staggered mesh based on the marker and cell placement of variables. Convective terms are differenced using a weighted average of centered and donor cell differencing to ensure numerical stability. Complete descriptions of MAGMA governing equations, numerics, code structure, and code verification are provided. 14 refs.

  9. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of chemical looping combustion process with calcium sulphate oxygen carrier - article no. A19

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baosheng Jin; Rui Xiao; Zhongyi Deng; Qilei Song [Southeast University (China). Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To concentrate CO{sub 2} in combustion processes by efficient and energy-saving ways is a first and very important step for its sequestration. Chemical looping combustion (CLC) could easily achieve this goal. A chemical-looping combustion system consists of a fuel reactor and an air reactor. Two reactors in the form of interconnected fluidized beds are used in the process: (1) a fuel reactor where the oxygen carrier is reduced by reaction with the fuel, and (2) an air reactor where the reduced oxygen carrier from the fuel reactor is oxidized with air. The outlet gas from the fuel reactor consists of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, while the outlet gas stream from the air reactor contains only N{sub 2} and some unused O{sub 2}. The water in combustion products can be easily removed by condensation and pure carbon dioxide is obtained without any loss of energy for separation. Until now, there is little literature about mathematical modeling of chemical-looping combustion using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach. In this work, the reaction kinetic model of the fuel reactor (CaSO{sub 4}+ H{sub 2}) is developed by means of the commercial code FLUENT and the effects of partial pressure of H{sub 2} (concentration of H{sub 2}) on chemical looping combustion performance are also studied. The results show that the concentration of H{sub 2} could enhance the CLC performance.

  10. Computational fluid dynamics simulation of the air/suppressant flow in an uncluttered F18 engine nacelle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, A.R.; Gritzo, L.A.; Hassan, B.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the purposes of designing improved Halon-alternative fire suppression strategies for aircraft applications, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of the air flow, suppressant transport, and air-suppressant mixing within an uncluttered F18 engine nacelle were performed. The release of inert gases from a Solid Propellant Gas Generator (SPGG) was analyzed at two different injection locations in order to understand the effect of injection position on the flow patterns and the mixing of air and suppression agent. An uncluttered engine nacelle was simulated to provide insight into the global flow features as well as to promote comparisons with previous nacelle fire tests and recent water tunnel tests which included little or no clutter. Oxygen concentration levels, fuel/air residence times that would exist if a small fuel leak were present, velocity contours, and streamline patterns are presented inside the engine nacelle. The numerical results show the influence of the gent release location on regions of potential flame extinction due to oxygen inerting and high flame strain. The occurrence of inflow through the exhaust ducts on the aft end of the nacelle is also predicted. As expected, the predicted oxygen concentration levels were consistently higher than the measured levels since a fire was not modeled in this analysis. Despite differences in the conditions of these simulations and the experiments, good agreement was obtained between the CFD predictions and the experimental measurements.

  11. Integration of microvascular, interstitial, and lymphatic function to determine the effect of their interaction on interstitial fluid volume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dongaonkar, Ranjeet Manohar

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    , three specific aims were achieved. 1) Develop a simple, transparent, and general algebraic approach that predicts interstitial fluid pressure, volume and protein concentration resulting from the interaction of microvascular, interstitial and lymphatic...

  12. Determining when a set of compute nodes participating in a barrier operation on a parallel computer are ready to exit the barrier operation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blocksome, Michael A. (Rochester, MN)

    2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for determining when a set of compute nodes participating in a barrier operation on a parallel computer are ready to exit the barrier operation that includes, for each compute node in the set: initializing a barrier counter with no counter underflow interrupt; configuring, upon entering the barrier operation, the barrier counter with a value in dependence upon a number of compute nodes in the set; broadcasting, by a DMA engine on the compute node to each of the other compute nodes upon entering the barrier operation, a barrier control packet; receiving, by the DMA engine from each of the other compute nodes, a barrier control packet; modifying, by the DMA engine, the value for the barrier counter in dependence upon each of the received barrier control packets; exiting the barrier operation if the value for the barrier counter matches the exit value.

  13. 18th AIAA Computational Fluid Dynamics Conference, June 2528, 2007, Miami, FL Petaflops Opportunities for the NASA Fundamental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peraire, Jaime

    in high performance computing at the national level. Advocacy for high performance computing has role as a leading advocate for high performance computational engi- neering at the national level. We in formulating the case for increased investment in high performance computing activities, and that a similar

  14. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of the Bonneville Project: Tailrace Spill Patterns for Low Flows and Corner Collector Smolt Egress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Perkins, William A.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2003, an extension of the existing ice and trash sluiceway was added at Bonneville Powerhouse 2 (B2). This extension started at the existing corner collector for the ice and trash sluiceway adjacent to Bonneville Powerhouse 2 and the new sluiceway was extended to the downstream end of Cascade Island. The sluiceway was designed to improve juvenile salmon survival by bypassing turbine passage at B2, and placing these smolt in downstream flowing water minimizing their exposure to fish and avian predators. In this study, a previously developed computational fluid dynamics model was modified and used to characterized tailrace hydraulics and sluiceway egress conditions for low total river flows and low levels of spillway flow. STAR-CD v4.10 was used for seven scenarios of low total river flow and low spill discharges. The simulation results were specifically examined to look at tailrace hydraulics at 5 ft below the tailwater elevation, and streamlines used to compare streamline pathways for streamlines originating in the corner collector outfall and adjacent to the outfall. These streamlines indicated that for all higher spill percentage cases (25% and greater) that streamlines from the corner collector did not approach the shoreline at the downstream end of Bradford Island. For the cases with much larger spill percentages, the streamlines from the corner collector were mid-channel or closer to the Washington shore as they moved downstream. Although at 25% spill at 75 kcfs total river, the total spill volume was sufficient to "cushion" the flow from the corner collector from the Bradford Island shore, areas of recirculation were modeled in the spillway tailrace. However, at the lowest flows and spill percentages, the streamlines from the B2 corner collector pass very close to the Bradford Island shore. In addition, the very flow velocity flows and large areas of recirculation greatly increase potential predator exposure of the spillway passed smolt. If there is concern for egress issues for smolt passing through the spillway, the spill pattern and volume need to be revisited.

  15. Comparison of Hydrodynamic Load Predictions Between Engineering Models and Computational Fluid Dynamics for the OC4-DeepCwind Semi-Submersible: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benitz, M. A.; Schmidt, D. P.; Lackner, M. A.; Stewart, G. M.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrodynamic loads on the platforms of floating offshore wind turbines are often predicted with computer-aided engineering tools that employ Morison's equation and/or potential-flow theory. This work compares results from one such tool, FAST, NREL's wind turbine computer-aided engineering tool, and the computational fluid dynamics package, OpenFOAM, for the OC4-DeepCwind semi-submersible analyzed in the International Energy Agency Wind Task 30 project. Load predictions from HydroDyn, the offshore hydrodynamics module of FAST, are compared with high-fidelity results from OpenFOAM. HydroDyn uses a combination of Morison's equations and potential flow to predict the hydrodynamic forces on the structure. The implications of the assumptions in HydroDyn are evaluated based on this code-to-code comparison.

  16. Reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo computation and Bayesian model determination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter J. Green

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Markov chain Monte Carlo methods for Bayesian computation have until recently been restricted to problems where the joint distribution of all variables has a density with respect to some xed standard underlying measure. They have therefore not been available for application to Bayesian model determination, where the dimensionality of the parameter vector is typically not xed. This article proposes a new framework for the construction of reversible Markov chain samplers that jump between parameter subspaces of di ering dimensionality, which is exible and entirely constructive. It should therefore have wide applicability in model determination problems. The methodology is illustrated with applications to multiple change-point analysis in one and two dimensions, and toaBayesian comparison of binomial experiments.

  17. Fluid Flow Modeling in Fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Sudipta

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we study fluid flow in fractures using numerical simulation and address the challenging issue of hydraulic property characterization in fractures. The methodology is based on Computational Fluid Dynamics, ...

  18. 6. Fluid mechanics: fluid statics; fluid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    1/96 6. Fluid mechanics: fluid statics; fluid dynamics (internal flows, external flows) Ron and Flow Engineering | 20500 Turku | Finland 2/96 6.1 Fluid statics Ă?bo Akademi University | Thermal and Flow Engineering | 20500 Turku | Finland #12;3/96 Fluid statics, static pressure /1 Two types

  19. The use of computed radiography plates to determine light and radiation field coincidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerns, James R. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Anand, Aman [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona 85259 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona 85259 (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Photo-stimulable phosphor computed radiography (CR) has characteristics that allow the output to be manipulated by both radiation and optical light. The authors have developed a method that uses these characteristics to carry out radiation field and light field coincidence quality assurance on linear accelerators.Methods: CR detectors from Kodak were used outside their cassettes to measure both radiation and light field edges from a Varian linear accelerator. The CR detector was first exposed to a radiation field and then to a slightly smaller light field. The light impinged on the detector's latent image, removing to an extent the portion exposed to the light field. The detector was then digitally scanned. A MATLAB-based algorithm was developed to automatically analyze the images and determine the edges of the light and radiation fields, the vector between the field centers, and the crosshair center. Radiographic film was also used as a control to confirm the radiation field size.Results: Analysis showed a high degree of repeatability with the proposed method. Results between the proposed method and radiographic film showed excellent agreement of the radiation field. The effect of varying monitor units and light exposure time was tested and found to be very small. Radiation and light field sizes were determined with an uncertainty of less than 1 mm, and light and crosshair centers were determined within 0.1 mm.Conclusions: A new method was developed to digitally determine the radiation and light field size using CR photo-stimulable phosphor plates. The method is quick and reproducible, allowing for the streamlined and robust assessment of light and radiation field coincidence, with no observer interpretation needed.

  20. Eye-gaze determination of user intent at the computer interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, J.H. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Industrial Engineering; Schryver, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Determination of user intent at the computer interface through eye-gaze monitoring can significantly aid applications for the disabled, as well as telerobotics and process control interfaces. Whereas current eye-gaze control applications are limited to object selection and x/y gazepoint tracking, a methodology was developed here to discriminate a more abstract interface operation: zooming-in or out. This methodology first collects samples of eve-gaze location looking at controlled stimuli, at 30 Hz, just prior to a user`s decision to zoom. The sample is broken into data frames, or temporal snapshots. Within a data frame, all spatial samples are connected into a minimum spanning tree, then clustered, according to user defined parameters. Each cluster is mapped to one in the prior data frame, and statistics are computed from each cluster. These characteristics include cluster size, position, and pupil size. A multiple discriminant analysis uses these statistics both within and between data frames to formulate optimal rules for assigning the observations into zooming, zoom-out, or no zoom conditions. The statistical procedure effectively generates heuristics for future assignments, based upon these variables. Future work will enhance the accuracy and precision of the modeling technique, and will empirically test users in controlled experiments.

  1. Computational tools for experimental determination and theoretical prediction of protein structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Donoghue, S.; Rost, B.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This tutorial was one of eight tutorials selected to be presented at the Third International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology which was held in the United Kingdom from July 16 to 19, 1995. The authors intend to review the state of the art in the experimental determination of protein 3D structure (focus on nuclear magnetic resonance), and in the theoretical prediction of protein function and of protein structure in 1D, 2D and 3D from sequence. All the atomic resolution structures determined so far have been derived from either X-ray crystallography (the majority so far) or Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy (becoming increasingly more important). The authors briefly describe the physical methods behind both of these techniques; the major computational methods involved will be covered in some detail. They highlight parallels and differences between the methods, and also the current limitations. Special emphasis will be given to techniques which have application to ab initio structure prediction. Large scale sequencing techniques increase the gap between the number of known proteins sequences and that of known protein structures. They describe the scope and principles of methods that contribute successfully to closing that gap. Emphasis will be given on the specification of adequate testing procedures to validate such methods.

  2. Apparent horizon in fluid-gravity duality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booth, Ivan; Heller, Michal P.; Plewa, Grzegorz; Spalinski, Michal [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, A1C 5S7 (Canada); Instituut voor Theoretische Fysica, Universiteit van Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1090 GL Amsterdam (Netherlands); Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland) and Physics Department, University of Bialystok, 15-424 Bialystok (Poland)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This article develops a computational framework for determining the location of boundary-covariant apparent horizons in the geometry of conformal fluid-gravity duality in arbitrary dimensions. In particular, it is shown up to second order and conjectured to hold to all orders in the gradient expansion that there is a unique apparent horizon which is covariantly expressible in terms of fluid velocity, temperature, and boundary metric. This leads to the first explicit example of an entropy current defined by an apparent horizon and opens the possibility that in the near-equilibrium regime there is preferred foliation of apparent horizons for black holes in asymptotically anti-de Sitter spacetimes.

  3. Analysis, scientific computing and fundamental studies in fluid mechanics. Final report Number 21, May 1, 1997--September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of work in progress and completed. Subject areas covered are: effective numerical methods for interfacial flows; multiscale finite element methods: analysis and applications; an efficient boundary integral method for the Mullins-Sekera problem; numerical simulation of three-dimensional water waves using a fast summation method; numerical solutions of steady-state rising bubbles; solidification coupled to fluid convection; turbulence models; exact solution of very viscous and Hele-Shaw flow; fundamental vortex dynamics; functional methods for turbulence; structure functions for isotropic turbulence; and water waves.

  4. Determination of Transport Properties From Flowing Fluid Temperature LoggingIn Unsaturated Fractured Rocks: Theory And Semi-Analytical Solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Tsang, Yvonne W.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flowing fluid temperature logging (FFTL) has been recently proposed as a method to locate flowing fractures. We argue that FFTL, backed up by data from high-precision distributed temperature sensors, can be a useful tool in locating flowing fractures and in estimating the transport properties of unsaturated fractured rocks. We have developed the theoretical background needed to analyze data from FFTL. In this paper, we present a simplified conceptualization of FFTL in unsaturated fractured rock, and develop a semianalytical solution for spatial and temporal variations of pressure and temperature inside a borehole in response to an applied perturbation (pumping of air from the borehole). We compare the semi-analytical solution with predictions from the TOUGH2 numerical simulator. Based on the semi-analytical solution, we propose a method to estimate the permeability of the fracture continuum surrounding the borehole. Using this proposed method, we estimated the effective fracture continuum permeability of the unsaturated rock hosting the Drift Scale Test (DST) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Our estimate compares well with previous independent estimates for fracture permeability of the DST host rock. The conceptual model of FFTL presented in this paper is based on the assumptions of single-phase flow, convection-only heat transfer, and negligible change in system state of the rock formation. In a sequel paper [Mukhopadhyay et al., 2008], we extend the conceptual model to evaluate some of these assumptions. We also perform inverse modeling of FFTL data to estimate, in addition to permeability, other transport parameters (such as porosity and thermal conductivity) of unsaturated fractured rocks.

  5. Fluid varieties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ewa Graczynska; Dietmar Schweigert

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We invent the notion of a derived and fluid variety. Fluid variety has no proper derived variety as its subvariety. We examine some properties of fluid and derived varieties. Examples of such varieties of bands are presented.

  6. Thermal Fluids

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thermal Fluids The Thermal Fluids and Heat Transfer program works on thermal hydraulic reactor safety code development and experimental heat transferthermal hydraulics. The...

  7. Ultrasonic fluid quality sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gomm, Tyler J. (Meridian, ID); Kraft, Nancy C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Phelps, Larry D. (Pocatello, ID); Taylor, Steven C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for determining the composition of a multiple-component fluid and for determining linear flow comprising at least one sing-around circuit that determines the velocity of a signal in the multiple-component fluid and that is correlatable to a database for the multiple-component fluid. A system for determining flow uses two of the inventive circuits, one of which is set at an angle that is not perpendicular to the direction of flow.

  8. Ultrasonic Fluid Quality Sensor System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gomm, Tyler J. (Meridian, ID); Kraft, Nancy C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Phelps, Larry D. (Pocatello, ID); Taylor, Steven C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2003-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for determining the composition of a multiple-component fluid and for determining linear flow comprising at least one sing-around circuit that determines the velocity of a signal in the multiple-component fluid and that is correlatable to a database for the multiple-component fluid. A system for determining flow uses two of the inventive circuits, one of which is set at an angle that is not perpendicular to the direction of flow.

  9. Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    assetsimagesicon-science.jpg Computing Providing world-class high performance computing capability that enables unsurpassed solutions to complex problems of...

  10. Development of a method to determine the down-hole properties of drilling fluids and predict bottom hole pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkpatrick, D.B.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project developed a method to predict the pressure at the bottom of the well based on a gelled plug model and physical properties measured at the elevated temperatures. A wellbore temperature profile simulation was developed to estimate the temperature in the well. This program includes heat generation in the well; simulation of flow or shut-in conditions; variable vertical and radial elements; and a band storage matrix to evaluate systems too large for the computer memory. The room temperature capillary rheometer and rotary rheometer give different gel strength results on similar muds. The rotary shows a continual making and rebreaking of the gel. The capillary gel strength peaks and then slowly decreases. After breaking the gel, both rheometer gel strengths come to an equilibrium stress, which is higher than the ungelled mud shear stress. The gelled mud shear stress/shear rate relationship gives higher shear stress at the low shear rates than does the ungelled mud. These results were used in the development of the gelled plug model. Other results showed that the shear stress/shear rate results increase with increasing tub diameter and gap size. The high temperature capillary rheometer was not completely successful due to design problems. The results are believed to show the physical property trends at high temperatures, but the design of the capillary unit did not permit the collection of accurate data. Gel strengths near room temperature asymptotically increase to a constant stress with increasing setting periods. High temperature gel strengths decrease from a maximum stress to a minimum and then increase to a constant stress with increased setting periods. The shear stress/shear rate relationship increases with increasing temperature. This suggests that the mud structure changes with temperature.

  11. Computational fluid dynamics assessment: Volume 1, Computer simulations of the METC (Morgantown Energy Technology Center) entrained-flow gasifier: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Celik, I.; Chattree, M.

    1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An assessment of the theoretical and numerical aspects of the computer code, PCGC-2, is made; and the results of the application of this code to the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) advanced gasification facility entrained-flow reactor, ''the gasifier,'' are presented. PCGC-2 is a code suitable for simulating pulverized coal combustion or gasification under axisymmetric (two-dimensional) flow conditions. The governing equations for the gas and particulate phase have been reviewed. The numerical procedure and the related programming difficulties have been elucidated. A single-particle model similar to the one used in PCGC-2 has been developed, programmed, and applied to some simple situations in order to gain insight to the physics of coal particle heat-up, devolatilization, and char oxidation processes. PCGC-2 was applied to the METC entrained-flow gasifier to study numerically the flash pyrolysis of coal, and gasification of coal with steam or carbon dioxide. The results from the simulations are compared with measurements. The gas and particle residence times, particle temperature, and mass component history were also calculated and the results were analyzed. The results provide useful information for understanding the fundamentals of coal gasification and for assessment of experimental results performed using the reactor considered. 69 refs., 35 figs., 23 tabs.

  12. Robust processing of optical flow of fluids Ashish Doshi and Adrian G. Bors, Senior Member, IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bors, Adrian

    the computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Navier-Stokes equations have been extensively studied in fluid mechanics Terms--Optical flow of fluids, computational fluid dy- namics, diffusion, vortex detection I displaying fluid movement. Velocity fields, characterizing the motion of fluids can be modelled using

  13. Pitch-catch only ultrasonic fluid densitometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenwood, Margaret S. (Richland, WA); Harris, Robert V. (Pasco, WA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is an ultrasonic fluid densitometer that uses a material wedge and pitch-catch only ultrasonic transducers for transmitting and receiving ultrasonic signals internally reflected within the material wedge. Density of a fluid is determined by immersing the wedge into the fluid and measuring reflection of ultrasound at the wedge-fluid interface.

  14. Pitch-catch only ultrasonic fluid densitometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenwood, M.S.; Harris, R.V.

    1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is an ultrasonic fluid densitometer that uses a material wedge and pitch-catch only ultrasonic transducers for transmitting and receiving ultrasonic signals internally reflected within the material wedge. Density of a fluid is determined by immersing the wedge into the fluid and measuring reflection of ultrasound at the wedge-fluid interface. 6 figs.

  15. Computer vision determination of the stem/root joint on processing carrots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batchelor, Matthew McMahon

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (Emerson Electric Company, 1982). Camera, Lens, and Field of View The vision sensor used in this research was a non-interlaced, solid state. black and white television camera. This Hitachi CCTV - MOB Camera Model KP-1 20U had a resolution of 320 (H... in the camera's field of view (FOV) (Hitachi, 1985). A 12. 5-75 mm f1:1. 8 Computer TV zoom lens was selected for use with the television camera. The zoom feature of this lens and its short minimum focal length were appropriate for this application...

  16. Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity2 Computational PhysicsComputing and Storage Requirements

  17. Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity2 Computational PhysicsComputing and Storage

  18. KINETIC MODELING OF A FISCHER-TROPSCH REACTION OVER A COBALT CATALYST IN A SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTOR FOR INCORPORATION INTO A COMPUTATIONAL MULTIPHASE FLUID DYNAMICS MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anastasia Gribik; Doona Guillen, PhD; Daniel Ginosar, PhD

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently multi-tubular fixed bed reactors, fluidized bed reactors, and slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) are used in commercial Fischer Tropsch (FT) synthesis. There are a number of advantages of the SBCR compared to fixed and fluidized bed reactors. The main advantage of the SBCR is that temperature control and heat recovery are more easily achieved. The SBCR is a multiphase chemical reactor where a synthesis gas, comprised mainly of H2 and CO, is bubbled through a liquid hydrocarbon wax containing solid catalyst particles to produce specialty chemicals, lubricants, or fuels. The FT synthesis reaction is the polymerization of methylene groups [-(CH2)-] forming mainly linear alkanes and alkenes, ranging from methane to high molecular weight waxes. The Idaho National Laboratory is developing a computational multiphase fluid dynamics (CMFD) model of the FT process in a SBCR. This paper discusses the incorporation of absorption and reaction kinetics into the current hydrodynamic model. A phased approach for incorporation of the reaction kinetics into a CMFD model is presented here. Initially, a simple kinetic model is coupled to the hydrodynamic model, with increasing levels of complexity added in stages. The first phase of the model includes incorporation of the absorption of gas species from both large and small bubbles into the bulk liquid phase. The driving force for the gas across the gas liquid interface into the bulk liquid is dependent upon the interfacial gas concentration in both small and large bubbles. However, because it is difficult to measure the concentration at the gas-liquid interface, coefficients for convective mass transfer have been developed for the overall driving force between the bulk concentrations in the gas and liquid phases. It is assumed that there are no temperature effects from mass transfer of the gas phases to the bulk liquid phase, since there are only small amounts of dissolved gas in the liquid phase. The product from the incorporation of absorption is the steady state concentration profile of the absorbed gas species in the bulk liquid phase. The second phase of the model incorporates a simplified macrokinetic model to the mass balance equation in the CMFD code. Initially, the model assumes that the catalyst particles are sufficiently small such that external and internal mass and heat transfer are not rate limiting. The model is developed utilizing the macrokinetic rate expression developed by Yates and Satterfield (1991). Initially, the model assumes that the only species formed other than water in the FT reaction is C27H56. Change in moles of the reacting species and the resulting temperature of the catalyst and fluid phases is solved simultaneously. The macrokinetic model is solved in conjunction with the species transport equations in a separate module which is incorporated into the CMFD code.

  19. The determination of phase relations in the CH?-H?O-NaCl system at 2 and 5 kbars, 300 to 600° C using synthetic fluid inclusions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McShane, Christopher Joseph

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the fluid. The fractured prisms were dried overnight at approximately 130'C and placed into an annealed Au capsule (4. 75 mm x 4. 50 mm x 76 mm). Known amounts of HtO + NaCl solutions of various molalities were placed in the capsule along with the prism...

  20. Fluid dynamics of dilatant fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiizu Nakanishi; Shin-ichiro Nagahiro; Namiko Mitarai

    2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Dense mixture of granules and liquid often shows a sever shear thickening and is called a dilatant fluid. We construct a fluid dynamics model for the dilatant fluid by introducing a phenomenological state variable for a local state of dispersed particles. With simple assumptions for an equation of the state variable, we demonstrate that the model can describe basic features of the dilatant fluid such as the stress-shear rate curve that represents discontinuous severe shear thickening, hysteresis upon changing shear rate, instantaneous hardening upon external impact. Analysis of the model reveals that the shear thickening fluid shows an instability in a shear flow for some regime and exhibits {\\it the shear thickening oscillation}, i.e. the oscillatory shear flow alternating between the thickened and the relaxed states. Results of numerical simulations are presented for one and two-dimensional systems.

  1. Fluid inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, X. [Centre for Theoretical Cosmology, DAMTP, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Firouzjahi, H. [School of Astronomy, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Namjoo, M.H. [School of Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sasaki, M., E-mail: x.chen@damtp.cam.ac.uk, E-mail: firouz@ipm.ir, E-mail: mh.namjoo@ipm.ir, E-mail: misao@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Yukawa Institute for theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we present an inflationary mechanism based on fluid dynamics. Starting with the action for a single barotropic perfect fluid, we outline the procedure to calculate the power spectrum and the bispectrum of the curvature perturbation. It is shown that a perfect barotropic fluid naturally gives rise to a non-attractor inflationary universe in which the curvature perturbation is not frozen on super-horizon scales. We show that a scale-invariant power spectrum can be obtained with the local non-Gaussianity parameter f{sub NL} = 5/2.

  2. Technology for Increasing Geothermal Energy Productivity. Computer Models to Characterize the Chemical Interactions of Goethermal Fluids and Injectates with Reservoir Rocks, Wells, Surface Equiptment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nancy Moller Weare

    2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report describes the results of a research program we carried out over a five-year (3/1999-9/2004) period with funding from a Department of Energy geothermal FDP grant (DE-FG07-99ID13745) and from other agencies. The goal of research projects in this program were to develop modeling technologies that can increase the understanding of geothermal reservoir chemistry and chemistry-related energy production processes. The ability of computer models to handle many chemical variables and complex interactions makes them an essential tool for building a fundamental understanding of a wide variety of complex geothermal resource and production chemistry. With careful choice of methodology and parameterization, research objectives were to show that chemical models can correctly simulate behavior for the ranges of fluid compositions, formation minerals, temperature and pressure associated with present and near future geothermal systems as well as for the very high PT chemistry of deep resources that is intractable with traditional experimental methods. Our research results successfully met these objectives. We demonstrated that advances in physical chemistry theory can be used to accurately describe the thermodynamics of solid-liquid-gas systems via their free energies for wide ranges of composition (X), temperature and pressure. Eight articles on this work were published in peer-reviewed journals and in conference proceedings. Four are in preparation. Our work has been presented at many workshops and conferences. We also considerably improved our interactive web site (geotherm.ucsd.edu), which was in preliminary form prior to the grant. This site, which includes several model codes treating different XPT conditions, is an effective means to transfer our technologies and is used by the geothermal community and other researchers worldwide. Our models have wide application to many energy related and other important problems (e.g., scaling prediction in petroleum production systems, stripping towers for mineral production processes, nuclear waste storage, CO2 sequestration strategies, global warming). Although funding decreases cut short completion of several research activities, we made significant progress on these abbreviated projects.

  3. Noncommutative Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexios P. Polychronakos

    2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the connection between noncommutative gauge theory, matrix models and fluid mechanical systems. The noncommutative Chern-Simons description of the quantum Hall effect and bosonization of collective fermion states are used as specific examples.

  4. Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User Group andCompositional Variation TheSimulations YieldComputing

  5. Computer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity2 Computational Physics and MethodsIfEnergy

  6. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR NUMERICAL METHODS IN FLUIDS Int. J. Numer. Meth. Fluids 31: 345358 (1999)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Subrata

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR NUMERICAL METHODS IN FLUIDS Int. J. Numer. Meth. Fluids 31: 345­358 (1999 AND S. ROYc,3 a Engineering Science Program, MAES Department, 316A Perkins Hall, Uni6ersity of Tennessee Corporation, Burr Ridge, IL, USA SUMMARY The quest continues for accurate and efficient computational fluid

  7. CX-001110: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001110: Categorical Exclusion Determination Fracture Network and Fluid Flow Imaging for Engineered Geothermal Systems Applications from...

  8. Universal fluid droplet ejector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, E.R.; Perl, M.L.

    1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A droplet generator comprises a fluid reservoir having a side wall made of glass or quartz, and an end cap made from a silicon plate. The end cap contains a micromachined aperture through which the fluid is ejected. The side wall is thermally fused to the end cap, and no adhesive is necessary. This means that the fluid only comes into contact with the side wall and the end cap, both of which are chemically inert. Amplitudes of drive pulses received by reservoir determine the horizontal displacements of droplets relative to the ejection aperture. The drive pulses are varied such that the dropper generates a two-dimensional array of vertically-falling droplets. Vertical and horizontal inter-droplet spacings may be varied in real time. Applications include droplet analysis experiments such as Millikan fractional charge searches and aerosol characterization, as well as material deposition applications. 8 figs.

  9. Universal fluid droplet ejector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Eric R. (Redwood City, CA); Perl, Martin L. (Palo Alto, CA)

    1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A droplet generator comprises a fluid reservoir having a side wall made of glass or quartz, and an end cap made from a silicon plate. The end cap contains a micromachined aperture through which the fluid is ejected. The side wall is thermally fused to the end cap, and no adhesive is necessary. This means that the fluid only comes into contact with the side wall and the end cap, both of which are chemically inert. Amplitudes of drive pulses received by reservoir determine the horizontal displacements of droplets relative to the ejection aperture. The drive pulses are varied such that the dropper generates a two-dimensional array of vertically-falling droplets. Vertical and horizontal interdroplet spacings may be varied in real time. Applications include droplet analysis experiments such as Millikan fractional charge searches and aerosol characterization, as well as material deposition applications.

  10. Quantum fluids in the Kaehler parametrization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Holender; M. A. Santos; I. V. Vancea

    2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we address the problem of the quantization of the perfect relativistic fluids formulated in terms of the K\\"{a}hler parametrization. This fluid model describes a large set of interesting systems such as the power law energy density fluids, Chaplygin gas, etc. In order to maintain the generality of the model, we apply the BRST method in the reduced phase space in which the fluid degrees of freedom are just the fluid potentials and the fluid current is classically resolved in terms of them. We determine the physical states in this setting, the time evolution and the path integral formulation.

  11. Ultrasonic fluid densitometer for process control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenwood, Margaret S. (Richland, WA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is an ultrasonic fluid densitometer that uses at least one pair of transducers for transmitting and receiving ultrasonic signals internally reflected within a material wedge. A temperature sensor is provided to monitor the temperature of the wedge material. Density of a fluid is determined by immersing the wedge into the fluid and measuring reflection of ultrasound at the wedge-fluid interface and comparing a transducer voltage and wedge material temperature to a tabulation as a function of density.

  12. R fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Caimmi

    2007-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A theory of collisionless fluids is developed in a unified picture, where nonrotating figures with anisotropic random velocity component distributions and rotating figures with isotropic random velocity component distributions, make adjoints configurations to the same system. R fluids are defined and mean and rms angular velocities and mean and rms tangential velocity components are expressed, by weighting on the moment of inertia and the mass, respectively. The definition of figure rotation is extended to R fluids. The generalized tensor virial equations are formulated for R fluids and further attention is devoted to axisymmetric configurations where, for selected coordinate axes, a variation in figure rotation has to be counterbalanced by a variation in anisotropy excess and vice versa. A microscopical analysis of systematic and random motions is performed under a few general hypotheses, by reversing the sign of tangential or axial velocity components of an assigned fraction of particles, leaving the distribution function and other parameters unchanged (Meza 2002). The application of the reversion process to tangential velocity components, implies the conversion of random motion rotation kinetic energy into systematic motion rotation kinetic energy. The application of the reversion process to axial velocity components, implies the conversion of random motion translation kinetic energy into systematic motion translation kinetic energy, and the loss related to a change of reference frame is expressed in terms of systematic (imaginary) motion rotation kinetic energy. A procedure is sketched for deriving the spin parameter distribution (including imaginary rotation) from a sample of observed or simulated large-scale collisionless fluids i.e. galaxies and galaxy clusters.

  13. Fluid extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Laintz, Kenneth E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated .beta.-diketone. In especially preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide, and the chelating agent comprises a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate, or a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkylphosphine oxide. Although a trialkyl phosphate can extract lanthanides and actinides from acidic solutions, a binary mixture comprising a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate or a trialkylphosphine oxide tends to enhance the extraction efficiencies for actinides and lanthanides. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides and lanthanides from acidic solutions. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  14. Downhole Fluid Analyzer Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill Turner

    2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel fiber optic downhole fluid analyzer has been developed for operation in production wells. This device will allow real-time determination of the oil, gas and water fractions of fluids from different zones in a multizone or multilateral completion environment. The device uses near infrared spectroscopy and induced fluorescence measurement to unambiguously determine the oil, water and gas concentrations at all but the highest water cuts. The only downhole components of the system are the fiber optic cable and windows. All of the active components--light sources, sensors, detection electronics and software--will be located at the surface, and will be able to operate multiple downhole probes. Laboratory testing has demonstrated that the sensor can accurately determine oil, water and gas fractions with a less than 5 percent standard error. Once installed in an intelligent completion, this sensor will give the operating company timely information about the fluids arising from various zones or multilaterals in a complex completion pattern, allowing informed decisions to be made on controlling production. The research and development tasks are discussed along with a market analysis.

  15. Fluid jet electric discharge source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bender, Howard A. (Ripon, CA)

    2006-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluid jet or filament source and a pair of coaxial high voltage electrodes, in combination, comprise an electrical discharge system to produce radiation and, in particular, EUV radiation. The fluid jet source is composed of at least two serially connected reservoirs, a first reservoir into which a fluid, that can be either a liquid or a gas, can be fed at some pressure higher than atmospheric and a second reservoir maintained at a lower pressure than the first. The fluid is allowed to expand through an aperture into a high vacuum region between a pair of coaxial electrodes. This second expansion produces a narrow well-directed fluid jet whose size is dependent on the size and configuration of the apertures and the pressure used in the reservoir. At some time during the flow of the fluid filament, a high voltage pulse is applied to the electrodes to excite the fluid to form a plasma which provides the desired radiation; the wavelength of the radiation being determined by the composition of the fluid.

  16. The Quantum Theory of Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben Gripaios; Dave Sutherland

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantum theory of fields is largely based on studying perturbations around non-interacting, or free, field theories, which correspond to a collection of quantum-mechanical harmonic oscillators. The quantum theory of an ordinary fluid is `freer', in the sense that the non-interacting theory also contains an infinite collection of quantum-mechanical free particles, corresponding to vortex modes. By computing a variety of correlation functions at tree- and loop-level, we give evidence that a quantum perfect fluid can be consistently formulated as a low-energy, effective field theory. We speculate that the quantum behaviour is radically different to both classical fluids and quantum fields, with interesting physical consequences for fluids in the low temperature regime.

  17. Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 The fluid dynamics of an underfloor air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linden, Paul F.

    Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 The fluid dynamics of an underfloor air-0411, U.S.A., (Received 30 May 2005) This paper discusses the fluid dynamics of an under floor air. The experiments show that the properties of the system are determined by the entrainment into the plumes

  18. Enhancing the Computation of Approximate Solutions of the Protein Structure Determination Problem Through Global Constraints for Discrete Crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dal PalĂą, Alessandro

    @dimi.uniud.it Enrico Pontelli Dept. Computer Science, New Mexico State University, epontell@cs.nmsu.edu Abstract--using a simplified pairwise energy model in [2] and a more precise energy model in [9]. In these approaches

  19. Nonlinear Fluid Dynamics from Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sayantani Bhattacharyya; Veronika E Hubeny; Shiraz Minwalla; Mukund Rangamani

    2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Black branes in AdS5 appear in a four parameter family labeled by their velocity and temperature. Promoting these parameters to Goldstone modes or collective coordinate fields -- arbitrary functions of the coordinates on the boundary of AdS5 -- we use Einstein's equations together with regularity requirements and boundary conditions to determine their dynamics. The resultant equations turn out to be those of boundary fluid dynamics, with specific values for fluid parameters. Our analysis is perturbative in the boundary derivative expansion but is valid for arbitrary amplitudes. Our work may be regarded as a derivation of the nonlinear equations of boundary fluid dynamics from gravity. As a concrete application we find an explicit expression for the expansion of this fluid stress tensor including terms up to second order in the derivative expansion.

  20. Nonlinear alternating current responses of dipolar fluids J. P. Huang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Ji-Ping

    Nonlinear alternating current responses of dipolar fluids J. P. Huang Max Planck Institute Mechanics Group, Laboratory of Computational Engineering, Helsinki University of Technology, P. O. Box 9203-dependent nonlinear dielectric increment of dipolar fluids in nonpolar fluids is often mea- sured by using

  1. Holographic plasma and anyonic fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel K. Brattan; Gilad Lifschytz

    2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We use alternative quantisation of the $D3/D5$ system to explore properties of a strongly coupled charged plasma and strongly coupled anyonic fluids. The $S$-transform of the $D3/D5$ system is used as a model for charged matter interacting with a U(1) gauge field in the large coupling regime, and we compute the dispersion relationship of the propagating electromagnetic modes as the density and temperature are changed. A more general $SL(2,\\mathbb{Z})$ transformation gives a strongly interacting anyonic fluid, and we study its transport properties as we change the statistics of the anyons and the background magnetic field.

  2. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dilley, Lorie

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  3. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dilley, Lorie

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  4. Chemically Reactive Working Fluids

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    commercial application. Goal: Demonstrate feasibility of employing chemically reacting fluids (CRFW) as heat transfer fluids (HTF) for CSP systems operating at 650C-1200C....

  5. Simulating Fluids Exhibiting Microstructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ... fluids containing elastic particles, and polymer fluids, all exhibit non-trivial macroscopic behavior due to interactions occurring on micro/mesoscopic scales.

  6. A Computational Method for Determining Distributed Aerodynamic Loads on Planforms of Arbitrary Shape in Compressible Subsonic Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Matthew Alan

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The methods presented in this work are intended to provided an easy to understand and easy to apply method for determining the distributed aerodynamic loads and aerodynamic characteristics of planforms of nearly arbitrary shape. Through application...

  7. Fluid casting of particle-based articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Menchhofer, Paul (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for the production of articles made of a particle-based material; e.g., ceramics and sintered metals. In accordance with one aspect of the invention, a thermally settable slurry containing a relatively high concentration of the particles is introduced into an immiscible, heated fluid. The slurry sets or hardens into a shape determined by the physical characteristics of the fluid and the manner of introduction of the slurry into the fluid. For example, the slurry is pulse injected into the fluid to provide spherical articles. The hardened spheres may then be sintered to consolidate the particles and provide a high density product.

  8. Non-Newtonian fluid flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osinski, Charles Anthony

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    zero and unity. The Ostwald- de Waele Equation (4), commonly known as the power law, is sometimes used to describe fluid behavior of this type. The rheological equation is (4) where the parameters "k" and "n" are constant for a particular fluid... be extended to include Reynolds numbers and the type of flow determined to be laminar and/or turbulent. It is assumed that the transition from laminar to turbulent flow occurs at a Reynolds number of 2100, the numeric distribution of Reynolds numbers...

  9. Fluid transport container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeRoos, B.G.; Downing, J.P. Jr.; Neal, M.P.

    1995-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved fluid container for the transport, collection, and dispensing of a sample fluid that maintains the fluid integrity relative to the conditions of the location at which it is taken. More specifically, the invention is a fluid sample transport container that utilizes a fitting for both penetrating and sealing a storage container under controlled conditions. Additionally, the invention allows for the periodic withdrawal of portions of the sample fluid without contamination or intermixing from the environment surrounding the sample container. 13 figs.

  10. Computational Aerodynamics and Aeroacoustics for Wind Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Computational Aerodynamics and Aeroacoustics for Wind Turbines #12;#12;Computational Aerodynamics and Aeroacoustics for Wind Turbines Wen Zhong Shen Fluid Mechanics Department of Mechanical Engineering TECHNICAL Shen, Wen Zhong Computational Aerodynamics and Aeroacoustics for Wind Turbines Doctor Thesis Technical

  11. Effects of using a two-phase two-component working fluid in a Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renfroe, D.A.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the major problems associated with Stirling engines has been their low power density. Traditional solutions to this problem have been to use high pressure hydrogen or helium as working fluids to increase the pressure excursion for a given temperature difference. This paper discusses a computer program which models a Stirling engine using a two-phase two-component (TPTC) working fluid used to improve power density. With the model the pressure, temperature, mass flux, heat transfer, work output, and amount of condensed water vs. vapor can be determined for any position in the engine and at any time. With the engine configuration described in the paper, the model indicated that the total power increased as water was added but the power factor decreased due to increased losses without substantial gains from the condensing/boiling mechanism of the two-phase fluid.

  12. CX-007385: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-007385: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of Molten-Salt Heat Transfer Fluid Technology for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants CX(s) Applied: A9...

  13. CX-003888: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-003888: Categorical Exclusion Determination Improved Drilling and Fracturing Fluids for Shale Gas Reservoirs CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09102010...

  14. CX-005198: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-005198: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of Molten-Salt Heat Transfer Fluid Technology for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants CX(s) Applied: A9,...

  15. CX-005199: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-005199: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of Molten-Salt Heat Transfer Fluid Technology for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants CX(s) Applied: A9,...

  16. Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2013 Fluid Level Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    PENNSTATE Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2013 Fluid Level Sensing Overview The current course of action to determine the level of fluid in a tank on a tractor requires the operator to get out a system capable of measuring the volume of fluid in a non-uniform reservoir and displaying the value

  17. Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area. Notes Stable isotope analysis of thermal fluids determined meteoric origin primarily from the Mineral Mountains with a small...

  18. Standardization of Thermo-Fluid Modeling in Modelica.Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franke, Rudiger

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermo-Fluid Systems, Modelica 2003 Conference, Linköping,H. Tummescheit: The Modelica Fluid and Media Library forThermo-Fluid Pipe Networks, Modelica 2006 Conference, Vi-

  19. Environmentally safe fluid extractor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sungaila, Zenon F. (Orland Park, IL)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An environmentally safe fluid extraction device for use in mobile laboratory and industrial settings comprising a pump, compressor, valving system, waste recovery tank, fluid tank, and a exhaust filtering system.

  20. Fluid sampling tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnston, Roger G. (Los Alamos, NM); Garcia, Anthony R. E. (Espanola, NM); Martinez, Ronald K. (Santa Cruz, NM)

    2001-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention includes a rotatable tool for collecting fluid through the wall of a container. The tool includes a fluid collection section with a cylindrical shank having an end portion for drilling a hole in the container wall when the tool is rotated, and a threaded portion for tapping the hole in the container wall. A passageway in the shank in communication with at least one radial inlet hole in the drilling end and an opening at the end of the shank is adapted to receive fluid from the container. The tool also includes a cylindrical chamber affixed to the end of the shank opposite to the drilling portion thereof for receiving and storing fluid passing through the passageway. The tool also includes a flexible, deformable gasket that provides a fluid-tight chamber to confine kerf generated during the drilling and tapping of the hole. The invention also includes a fluid extractor section for extracting fluid samples from the fluid collecting section.

  1. Viscous fluid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2007-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly discuss the phenomenological theory of dissipative fluid. We also present some numerical results for hydrodynamic evolution of QGP fluid with dissipation due to shear viscosity only. Its effect on particle production is also studied.

  2. HEAT TRANSFER FLUIDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lenert, Andrej

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The choice of heat transfer fluids has significant effects on the performance, cost, and reliability of solar thermal systems. In this chapter, we evaluate existing heat transfer fluids such as oils and molten salts based ...

  3. Methods for fluid separations, and devices capable of separating fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    TeGrotenhuis, Ward E [Kennewick, WA; Stenkamp, Victoria S [Richland, WA

    2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Wick-Containing apparatus capable of separating fluids and methods of separating fluids using wicks are disclosed.

  4. Methods for fluid separations, and devices capable of separating fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    TeGrotenhuis, Ward E. (Kennewick, WA); Stenkamp, Victoria S. (Richland, WA)

    2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Wick-Containing apparatus capable of separating fluids and methods of separating fluids using wicks are disclosed.

  5. Fluid Catalytic Cracking Power Recovery Computer Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samurin, N. A.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    re covery available in new plants results in the air string being almost self sustaining, 8S far as direct input power. With some processes, it is possible to produce excess power on the order of 1,000 to 9,000 HP. Waste heat recovery in the form...

  6. Distributed computational fluid dynamics Karl Jenkins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Gispert, AdriĂ 

    of large and complex datasets. Thus, remote access to this information is an integral part of the CFD turbulent combustion pro- cesses is a strong coupling between turbulence, chemical kinetics and heat release provides a route around the departmental firewalls. The clusters run Globus and Condor for remote job

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive SolarEducation Programs:CRFProvide Insight for Rotor Design

  8. Conformal higher-order viscoelastic fluid mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masafumi Fukuma; Yuho Sakatani

    2012-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a generally covariant formulation of conformal higher-order viscoelastic fluid mechanics with strain allowed to take arbitrarily large values. We give a general prescription to determine the dynamics of a relativistic viscoelastic fluid in a way consistent with the hypothesis of local thermodynamic equilibrium and the second law of thermodynamics. We then elaborately study the transient time scales at which the strain almost relaxes and becomes proportional to the gradients of velocity. We particularly show that a conformal second-order fluid with all possible parameters in the constitutive equations can be obtained without breaking the hypothesis of local thermodynamic equilibrium, if the conformal fluid is defined as the long time limit of a conformal second-order viscoelastic system. We also discuss how local thermodynamic equilibrium could be understood in the context of the fluid/gravity correspondence.

  9. Graduate Studies Environmental Fluid Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, Laurence J.

    Graduate Studies Environmental Fluid Mechanics and Water Resources Engineering ENVIRONMENTAL FLUID MECHANICS AND WATER RESOURCES ENGINEERING (EFMWR) The environmental fluid mechanics and water resources Environmental Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Engineering research focuses on turbulent entrainment, transport

  10. Statistical mechanics of homogeneous partly pinned fluid systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent Krakoviack

    2010-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The homogeneous partly pinned fluid systems are simple models of a fluid confined in a disordered porous matrix obtained by arresting randomly chosen particles in a one-component bulk fluid or one of the two components of a binary mixture. In this paper, their configurational properties are investigated. It is shown that a peculiar complementarity exists between the mobile and immobile phases, which originates from the fact that the solid is prepared in presence of and in equilibrium with the adsorbed fluid. Simple identities follow, which connect different types of configurational averages, either relative to the fluid-matrix system or to the bulk fluid from which it is prepared. Crucial simplifications result for the computation of important structural quantities, both in computer simulations and in theoretical approaches. Finally, possible applications of the model in the field of dynamics in confinement or in strongly asymmetric mixtures are suggested.

  11. CX-004510: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Displacement and Mixing in Subsea Jumpers Experimental Data and Computational Fluid Dynamica (CFD)CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 11/22/2010Location(s): Tulsa, OklahomaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  12. CX-004511: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Displacement and Mixing in Subsea Jumpers Experimental Data and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)CX(s) Applied: A9, A11Date: 11/22/2010Location(s): Tulsa, OklahomaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  13. System and method measuring fluid flow in a conduit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ortiz, Marcos German (Idaho Falls, ID); Kidd, Terrel G. (Blackfoot, ID)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for measuring fluid mass flow in a conduit in which there exists a pressure differential in the fluid between at least two spaced-apart locations in the conduit. The system includes a first pressure transducer disposed in the side of the conduit at a first location for measuring pressure of fluid at that location, a second or more pressure transducers disposed in the side of the conduit at a second location, for making multiple measurements of pressure of fluid in the conduit at that location, and a computer for computing the average pressure of the multiple measurements at the second location and for computing flow rate of fluid in the conduit from the pressure measurement by the first pressure transducer and from the average pressure calculation of the multiple measurements.

  14. Spinning fluids reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Jan D; Hupka, Jan; Aranowski, Robert

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A spinning fluids reactor, includes a reactor body (24) having a circular cross-section and a fluid contactor screen (26) within the reactor body (24). The fluid contactor screen (26) having a plurality of apertures and a circular cross-section concentric with the reactor body (24) for a length thus forming an inner volume (28) bound by the fluid contactor screen (26) and an outer volume (30) bound by the reactor body (24) and the fluid contactor screen (26). A primary inlet (20) can be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce flow-through first spinning flow of a first fluid within the inner volume (28). A secondary inlet (22) can similarly be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce a second flow of a second fluid within the outer volume (30) which is optionally spinning.

  15. Mech 521 Fluid Mechanics Project December 6, 2012 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muradoglu, Metin

    the open source computational fluid dynamics (CFD) package OpenFOAM to computationally examine supersonic and a bow-shock wave is formed in front of the airfoil. Software and Computer Lab: OpenFOAM is an open source CFD package that is freely available and can be downloaded from its web page www.openfoam

  16. Membrane fluids and Dirac membrane fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. G. Ivanov

    2005-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    There are two different methods to describe membrane (string) fluids, which use different field content. The relation between the methods is clarified by construction of combined method. Dirac membrane field appears naturally in new approach. It provides a possibility to consider new aspects of electrodynamics-type theories with electric and magnetic sources. The membrane fluid models automatically prohibit simulatenos existence of electric and magnetic currents. Possible applications to the dark energy problem are mentioned.

  17. Control system for fluid heated steam generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boland, J.F.; Koenig, J.F.

    1984-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A control system for controlling the location of the nucleate-boiling region in a fluid heated steam generator comprises means for measuring the temperature gradient (change in temperature per unit length) of the heating fluid along the steam generator; means for determining a control variable in accordance with a predetermined function of temperature gradients and for generating a control signal in response thereto; and means for adjusting the feedwater flow rate in accordance with the control signal.

  18. MATHEMATICAL MODELING AND SIMULATION FOR FLUID FLOW IN POROUS MEDIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ewing, Richard E.

    1 MATHEMATICAL MODELING AND SIMULATION FOR FLUID FLOW IN POROUS MEDIA Ewing, Richard Texas A is to understand the complex chemical, physical, and fluid flow processes occurring in an underground porous medium with one pass through these four steps. Once a computer code has been developed which gives concrete

  19. Structural anisotropy and orientation-induced Casimir repulsion in fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCauley, Alexander Patrick

    In this work we theoretically consider the Casimir force between two periodic arrays of nanowires (both in vacuum, and on a substrate separated by a fluid) at separations comparable to the period. Specifically, we compute ...

  20. 2005 Pearson Education South Asia Pte Ltd Applied Fluid Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

    (NPSH) for a pump and discuss its significancein pump performance. 13. Pump Selection and Applications pressure of the fluid in relation to the NPSH. · Compute the NPSH available for a given suction line design

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - aiaa fluid dynamics Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    , European Conference on Computational Fluid Dynamics, TU Delft, Delft The Netherland, 2006. D. Lazzara (MIT... Process, No. ... Source: de Weck, Olivier L. - Department...

  2. Fiber optic fluid detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angel, S.M.

    1987-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element having a cladding or coating of a material which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses. 10 figs.

  3. Disposal of drilling fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryson, W.R.

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior to 1974 the disposal of drilling fluids was not considered to be much of an environmental problem. In the past, disposal of drilling fluids was accomplished in various ways such as spreading on oil field lease roads to stabilize the road surface and control dust, spreading in the base of depressions of sandy land areas to increase water retention, and leaving the fluid in the reserve pit to be covered on closure of the pit. In recent years, some states have become concerned over the indescriminate dumping of drilling fluids into pits or unauthorized locations and have developed specific regulations to alleviate the perceived deterioration of environmental and groundwater quality from uncontrolled disposal practices. The disposal of drilling fluids in Kansas is discussed along with a newer method or treatment in drilling fluid disposal.

  4. Metalworking and machining fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erdemir, Ali (Naperville, IL); Sykora, Frank (Caledon, ON, CA); Dorbeck, Mark (Brighton, MI)

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved boron-based metal working and machining fluids. Boric acid and boron-based additives that, when mixed with certain carrier fluids, such as water, cellulose and/or cellulose derivatives, polyhydric alcohol, polyalkylene glycol, polyvinyl alcohol, starch, dextrin, in solid and/or solvated forms result in improved metalworking and machining of metallic work pieces. Fluids manufactured with boric acid or boron-based additives effectively reduce friction, prevent galling and severe wear problems on cutting and forming tools.

  5. Purely radiative perfect fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Bastiaensen; H. R. Karimian; N. Van den Bergh; L. Wylleman

    2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We study `purely radiative' (div E = div H = 0) and geodesic perfect fluids with non-constant pressure and show that the Bianchi class A perfect fluids can be uniquely characterized --modulo the class of purely electric and (pseudo-)spherically symmetric universes-- as those models for which the magnetic and electric part of the Weyl tensor and the shear are simultaneously diagonalizable. For the case of constant pressure the same conclusion holds provided one also assumes that the fluid is irrotational.

  6. MECH 386 INDUSTRIAL FLUID MECHANICS INDUSTRIAL FLUID MECHANICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MECH 386 ­ INDUSTRIAL FLUID MECHANICS 1 INDUSTRIAL FLUID MECHANICS MECH 386 Contact information Dr This course is an introduction to industrial fluid mechanics. According to J. C. R. Hunt (a famous fluid mechanics specialist): "industrial fluid mechanics broadly covers those aspects of the design, manufacture

  7. Computational Ship Hydrodynamics MOERI Propeller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    Computational Ship Hydrodynamics MOERI Propeller This area of research is coordinated by the ship 5415 #12;Fluid-Structure Interaction MOERI Propeller 22 Associate force fluid to structure Associate hydrodynamics problems, like slamming and whipping. The code has recently been applied to wind turbine flows

  8. Topological Quantum Computation and Error Correction by Biological Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J T Lofthouse

    2005-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A Topological examination of phospholipid dynamics in the Far from Equilibrium state has demonstrated that metabolically active cells use waste heat to generate spatially patterned membrane flows by forced convection and shear. This paper explains the resemblance between this nonlinear membrane model and Witten Kitaev type Topological Quantum Computation systems, and demonstrates how this self-organising membrane enables biological cells to circumvent the decoherence problem, perform error correction procedures, and produce classical level output as shielded current flow through cytoskeletal protein conduit. Cellular outputs are shown to be Turing compatible as they are determined by computable in principle hydromagnetic fluid flows, and importantly, are Adaptive from an Evolutionary perspective.

  9. Computational mechanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goudreau, G.L.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Computational Mechanics thrust area sponsors research into the underlying solid, structural and fluid mechanics and heat transfer necessary for the development of state-of-the-art general purpose computational software. The scale of computational capability spans office workstations, departmental computer servers, and Cray-class supercomputers. The DYNA, NIKE, and TOPAZ codes have achieved world fame through our broad collaborators program, in addition to their strong support of on-going Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) programs. Several technology transfer initiatives have been based on these established codes, teaming LLNL analysts and researchers with counterparts in industry, extending code capability to specific industrial interests of casting, metalforming, and automobile crash dynamics. The next-generation solid/structural mechanics code, ParaDyn, is targeted toward massively parallel computers, which will extend performance from gigaflop to teraflop power. Our work for FY-92 is described in the following eight articles: (1) Solution Strategies: New Approaches for Strongly Nonlinear Quasistatic Problems Using DYNA3D; (2) Enhanced Enforcement of Mechanical Contact: The Method of Augmented Lagrangians; (3) ParaDyn: New Generation Solid/Structural Mechanics Codes for Massively Parallel Processors; (4) Composite Damage Modeling; (5) HYDRA: A Parallel/Vector Flow Solver for Three-Dimensional, Transient, Incompressible Viscous How; (6) Development and Testing of the TRIM3D Radiation Heat Transfer Code; (7) A Methodology for Calculating the Seismic Response of Critical Structures; and (8) Reinforced Concrete Damage Modeling.

  10. Fluid blade disablement tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jakaboski, Juan-Carlos (Albuquerque, NM); Hughs, Chance G. (Albuquerque, NM); Todd, Steven N. (Rio Rancho, NM)

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluid blade disablement (FBD) tool that forms both a focused fluid projectile that resembles a blade, which can provide precision penetration of a barrier wall, and a broad fluid projectile that functions substantially like a hammer, which can produce general disruption of structures behind the barrier wall. Embodiments of the FBD tool comprise a container capable of holding fluid, an explosive assembly which is positioned within the container and which comprises an explosive holder and explosive, and a means for detonating. The container has a concavity on the side adjacent to the exposed surface of the explosive. The position of the concavity relative to the explosive and its construction of materials with thicknesses that facilitate inversion and/or rupture of the concavity wall enable the formation of a sharp and coherent blade of fluid advancing ahead of the detonation gases.

  11. CX-005689: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination Joint Inversion of Electrical and Seismic Data for Fracture Characterization and Imaging of Fluid Flow in Geothermal Systems CX(s) Applied: A9,...

  12. Thermodynamic Model for Fluid-Fluid Interfacial Areas in Porous...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (free) and isolated (entrapped) nonwetting fluids. The model is restricted to two-fluid systems in which (1) no significant conversion of mechanical work into heat occurs,...

  13. Circular hydraulic jump in generalized-Newtonian fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rai, Ashutosh; Poria, Swarup

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We carry out an analytical study of laminar circular hydraulic jumps, in generalized-Newtonian fluids obeying the two-parametric power-law model of Ostwald-de Waele. Under the boundary-layer approximation we obtained exact expressions determining the flow, an implicit relation for the jump radius is derived. Corresponding results for Newtonian fluids can be retrieved as a limiting case for the flow behavior index n=1, predictions are made for fluids deviating from Newtonian behavior.

  14. FRACTURING FLUID CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subhash Shah

    2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic fracturing technology has been successfully applied for well stimulation of low and high permeability reservoirs for numerous years. Treatment optimization and improved economics have always been the key to the success and it is more so when the reservoirs under consideration are marginal. Fluids are widely used for the stimulation of wells. The Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility (FFCF) has been established to provide the accurate prediction of the behavior of complex fracturing fluids under downhole conditions. The primary focus of the facility is to provide valuable insight into the various mechanisms that govern the flow of fracturing fluids and slurries through hydraulically created fractures. During the time between September 30, 1992, and March 31, 2000, the research efforts were devoted to the areas of fluid rheology, proppant transport, proppant flowback, dynamic fluid loss, perforation pressure losses, and frictional pressure losses. In this regard, a unique above-the-ground fracture simulator was designed and constructed at the FFCF, labeled ''The High Pressure Simulator'' (HPS). The FFCF is now available to industry for characterizing and understanding the behavior of complex fluid systems. To better reflect and encompass the broad spectrum of the petroleum industry, the FFCF now operates under a new name of ''The Well Construction Technology Center'' (WCTC). This report documents the summary of the activities performed during 1992-2000 at the FFCF.

  15. Fluid sampling tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garcia, A.R.; Johnston, R.G.; Martinez, R.K.

    1999-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluid sampling tool is described for sampling fluid from a container. The tool has a fluid collecting portion which is drilled into the container wall, thereby affixing it to the wall. The tool may have a fluid extracting section which withdraws fluid collected by the fluid collecting section. The fluid collecting section has a fluted shank with an end configured to drill a hole into a container wall. The shank has a threaded portion for tapping the borehole. The shank is threadably engaged to a cylindrical housing having an inner axial passageway sealed at one end by a septum. A flexible member having a cylindrical portion and a bulbous portion is provided. The housing can be slid into an inner axial passageway in the cylindrical portion and sealed to the flexible member. The bulbous portion has an outer lip defining an opening. The housing is clamped into the chuck of a drill, the lip of the bulbous section is pressed against a container wall until the shank touches the wall, and the user operates the drill. Wall shavings (kerf) are confined in a chamber formed in the bulbous section as it folds when the shank advances inside the container. After sufficient advancement of the shank, an o-ring makes a seal with the container wall. 6 figs.

  16. Supercritical fluid extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Laintz, Kenneth (Pullman, WA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated or lipophilic crown ether or fluorinated dithiocarbamate. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  17. Multiphase fluid characterization system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement system and method for permitting multiple independent measurements of several physical parameters of multiphase fluids flowing through pipes are described. Multiple acoustic transducers are placed in acoustic communication with or attached to the outside surface of a section of existing spool (metal pipe), typically less than 3 feet in length, for noninvasive measurements. Sound speed, sound attenuation, fluid density, fluid flow, container wall resonance characteristics, and Doppler measurements for gas volume fraction may be measured simultaneously by the system. Temperature measurements are made using a temperature sensor for oil-cut correction.

  18. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR NUMERICAL METHODS IN FLUIDS Int. J. Numer. Meth. Fluids (2010)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Pascal

    based on anisotropic mesh adaptation for solving two-fluid flows Thi Thu Cuc Bui1,,, P. Frey1,2 and B of the computational domain in the vicinity of the interface for better accuracy. Copyright 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd@ann.jussieu.fr Contract/grant sponsor: French Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique Copyright 2010 John Wiley

  19. Thermal Fluid Multiphysics Optimization of Spherical Tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lumsdaine, Arnold [ORNL; Tipton, Joseph B [ORNL; Peng, Yueng Kay Martin [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) is required that will create the environment that simultaneously achieves high energy neutrons and high ion fluence necessary in order to bridge the gaps from ITER to the realization of a fusion nuclear power plant. One concept for achieving this is a high duty cycle spherical torus. This study will focus on thermal modeling of the spherical torus centerpost using computational fluid dynamics to effectively model the thermal transfer of the cooling fluid to the centerpost. The design of the fluid channels is optimized in order to minimize the temperature in the centerpost. Results indicate the feasibility of water cooling for a long-pulse spherical torus FNSF.

  20. Computer resources Computer resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Computer resources 1 Computer resources available to the LEAD group Cédric David 30 September 2009 #12;Ouline · UT computer resources and services · JSG computer resources and services · LEAD computers· LEAD computers 2 #12;UT Austin services UT EID and Password 3 https://utdirect.utexas.edu #12;UT Austin

  1. Statistical mechanics of simple fluids: beyond van der Waals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebowitz, Joel

    to Sir John Lennard-Jones. In this comparison computers play a central part. By computer simulation we of his, is a senior scientist with Systems, Science and Software, in San Diego, Cal. theory,1 particularly for very dense fluids, for which we now have approximations to the free energy and structure

  2. Circulating Fluid Bed Combustor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraley, L. D.; Do, L. N.; Hsiao, K. H.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The circulating bed combustor represents an alternative concept of burning coal in fluid bed technology, which offers distinct advantages over both the current conventional fluidized bed combustion system and the pulverized coal boilers equipped...

  3. Fluid pumping apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    West, Phillip B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus suitable for coupling seismic or other downhole sensors to a borehole wall in high temperature and pressure environments. In one embodiment, one or more metal bellows mounted to a sensor module are inflated to clamp the sensor module within the borehole and couple an associated seismic sensor to a borehole wall. Once the sensing operation is complete, the bellows are deflated and the sensor module is unclamped by deflation of the metal bellows. In a further embodiment, a magnetic drive pump in a pump module is used to supply fluid pressure for inflating the metal bellows using borehole fluid or fluid from a reservoir. The pump includes a magnetic drive motor configured with a rotor assembly to be exposed to borehole fluid pressure including a rotatable armature for driving an impeller and an associated coil under control of electronics isolated from borehole pressure.

  4. Basic fluid system trainer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Semans, Joseph P. (Uniontown, PA); Johnson, Peter G. (Pittsburgh, PA); LeBoeuf, Jr., Robert F. (Clairton, PA); Kromka, Joseph A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Goron, Ronald H. (Connellsville, PA); Hay, George D. (Venetia, PA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A trainer, mounted and housed within a mobile console, is used to teach and reinforce fluid principles to students. The system trainer has two centrifugal pumps, each driven by a corresponding two-speed electric motor. The motors are controlled by motor controllers for operating the pumps to circulate the fluid stored within a supply tank through a closed system. The pumps may be connected in series or in parallel. A number of valves are also included within the system to effect different flow paths for the fluid. In addition, temperature and pressure sensing instruments are installed throughout the closed system for measuring the characteristics of the fluid, as it passes through the different valves and pumps. These measurements are indicated on a front panel mounted to the console, as a teaching aid, to allow the students to observe the characteristics of the system.

  5. Phoresis in fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, Howard

    This paper presents a unified theory of phoretic phenomena in single-component fluids. Simple formulas are given for the phoretic velocities of small inert force-free non-Brownian particles migrating through otherwise ...

  6. Valve for fluid control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oborny, Michael C. (Albuquerque, NM); Paul, Phillip H. (Livermore, CA); Hencken, Kenneth R. (Pleasanton, CA); Frye-Mason, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM); Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A valve for controlling fluid flows. This valve, which includes both an actuation device and a valve body provides: the ability to incorporate both the actuation device and valve into a unitary structure that can be placed onto a microchip, the ability to generate higher actuation pressures and thus control higher fluid pressures than conventional microvalves, and a device that draws only microwatts of power. An electrokinetic pump that converts electric potential to hydraulic force is used to operate, or actuate, the valve.

  7. R3 fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Caimmi

    2006-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    With regard to large-scale astrophysical systems, the current paper deals with (i) formulation of tensor virial equations from the standpoint of analytical mechanics; (ii) investigation on the role of systematic and random motions for virial equilibrium configurations; (iii) extent to which systematic and random motions are equivalent in changing a fluid shape. The tensor virial equations are formulated using analytical mechanics, and the self potential-energy tensor is shown to be symmetric. The role of systematic and random motions in collisionless, ideal, self-gravitating fluids, is analysed in detail including radial and tangential velocity dispersion on the equatorial plane. R3 fluids are defined as ideal, self-gravitating fluids in virial equilibrium, with systematic rotation around a principal axis of inertia, and ihe related virial equations are formulated. A unified theory of systematic and random motions is developed for R3 fluids, taking into consideration imaginary rotation. The effect of random motion excess is shown to be equivalent to an additional real or imaginary rotation, respectively, inducing flattening or elongation. R3 fluids are found to admit adjoint configurations with isotropic random velocity distribution. Further constraints are established on the amount of random velocity anisotropy along the principal axes, for triaxial configurations. A necessary condition is formulated for the occurrence of bifurcation points from axisymmetric to triaxial configurations in virial equilibrium, which is independent of the anisotropy parameters. In the special case of homeoidally striated Jacobi ellipsoid, some previously known results are reproduced.

  8. Gender determination of avian embryo

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daum, Keith A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Atkinson, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a method for gender determination of avian embryos. During the embryo incubation process, the outer hard shells of eggs are drilled and samples of allantoic fluid are removed. The allantoic fluids are directly introduced into an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) for analysis. The resulting spectra contain the relevant marker peaks in the positive or negative mode which correlate with unique mobilities which are sex-specific. This way, the gender of the embryo can be determined.

  9. Lecture notes Introductory fluid mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malham, Simon J.A.

    Lecture notes Introductory fluid mechanics Simon J.A. Malham Simon J.A. Malham (22nd February 2013 of fluid mechanics and along the way see lots of interesting applications. 2 Fluid flow 2.1 Flow A material essential to all modern car braking mechanisms. Fluids can be further subcatergorized. There are ideal

  10. Lecture notes Introductory fluid mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malham, Simon J.A.

    Lecture notes Introductory fluid mechanics Simon J.A. Malham Simon J.A. Malham (17th March 2014 of fluid mechanics and along the way see lots of interesting applications. 2 Fluid flow, the Continuum are generally incompressible--a feature essential to all modern car braking mechanisms. Fluids can be further

  11. Fluid Mechanics and Homeland Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Settles, Gary S.

    Fluid Mechanics and Homeland Security Gary S. Settles Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Department. 2006. 38:87­110 The Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics is online at fluid.annualreviews.org doi: 10 security involves many applications of fluid mechanics and offers many opportunities for research

  12. Please bring this to a Financial Aid Counselor to review and determine aid eligibility Program Name Computer Science in Croatia Program Dates March 4, 2013 -May 17, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zanibbi, Richard

    Name Computer Science in Croatia Program Dates March 4, 2013 - May 17, 2013 Student Name Student UID,300.00$ Temporary Stay Visa in Croatia $96 $206 Personal 1,000.00$ Misc. Expenses (books) 100.00$ Total estimated

  13. Computer Abstractions and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Chun-Hsi

    & wheel Supersedes roller-ball mechanical mouse #12;Chapter 1 -- Computer Abstractions and Technology to building sized Embedded computers Hidden as components of systems Stringent power of machine instructions executed per operation Processor and memory system Determine how fast instructions

  14. The effect of lymphatic fluid protein concentration on lymphatic resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Ellen Marie

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    were manipulated by altering the height of the outflow port. Two fluids - lactated Ringers solution and 6% albumin in lactated Ringers solution - were introduced alternately into the vessels. Flow through the vessel was determined for several pressure...

  15. Nonlinear dielectric effect of dipolar fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Szalai; S. Nagy; S. Dietrich

    2009-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The nonlinear dielectric effect for dipolar fluids is studied within the framework of the mean spherical approximation (MSA) of hard core dipolar Yukawa fluids. Based on earlier results for the electric field dependence of the polarization our analytical results show so-called normal saturation effects which are in good agreement with corresponding NVT ensemble Monte Carlo simulation data. The linear and the nonlinear dielectric permittivities obtained from MC simulations are determined from the fluctuations of the total dipole moment of the system in the absence of an applied electric field. We compare the MSA based theoretical results with the corresponding Langevin and Debye-Weiss behaviors.

  16. The Geometric Structure of Complex Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    François Gay-Balmaz; Tudor S. Ratiu

    2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper develops the theory of affine Euler-Poincar\\'e and affine Lie-Poisson reductions and applies these processes to various examples of complex fluids, including Yang-Mills and Hall magnetohydrodynamics for fluids and superfluids, spin glasses, microfluids, and liquid crystals. As a consequence of the Lagrangian approach, the variational formulation of the equations is determined. On the Hamiltonian side, the associated Poisson brackets are obtained by reduction of a canonical cotangent bundle. A Kelvin-Noether circulation theorem is presented and is applied to these examples.

  17. Development of an analytical model for organic-fluid fouling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panchal, C.B.; Watkinson, A.P.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research goal of this project is to determine ways to effectively mitigate fouling in organic fluids: hydrocarbons and derived fluids. The fouling research focuses on the development of methodology for determining threshold conditions for fouling. Initially, fluid containing chemicals known to produce foulant is analyzed; subsequently, fouling of industrial fluids is investigated. The fouling model developed for determining the effects of physical parameters is the subject of this report. The fouling model is developed on the premise that the chemical reaction for generation of precursor can take place in the bulk fluid, in the thermal-boundary layer, or at the fluid/wall interface, depending upon the interactive effects of fluid dynamics, heat and mass transfer, and the controlling chemical reaction. In the analysis, the experimental data are examined for fouling deposition of polyperoxide produced by autoxidation of indene in kerosene. The effects of fluid and wall temperatures for two flow geometries are analyzed. The results show that the relative effects of physical parameters on the fouling rate differ for the three fouling mechanisms. Therefore, to apply the closed-flow-loop data to industrial conditions, the controlling mechanism must be identified.

  18. Fluid driven recipricating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whitehead, John C. (Davis, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus comprising a pair of fluid driven pump assemblies in a back-to-back configuration to yield a bi-directional pump. Each of the pump assemblies includes a piston or diaphragm which divides a chamber therein to define a power section and a pumping section. An intake-exhaust valve is connected to each of the power sections of the pump chambers, and function to direct fluid, such as compressed air, into the power section and exhaust fluid therefrom. At least one of the pistons or diaphragms is connected by a rod assembly which is constructed to define a signal valve, whereby the intake-exhaust valve of one pump assembly is controlled by the position or location of the piston or diaphragm in the other pump assembly through the operation of the rod assembly signal valve. Each of the pumping sections of the pump assemblies are provided with intake and exhaust valves to enable filling of the pumping section with fluid and discharging fluid therefrom when a desired pressure has been reached.

  19. Fluid driven reciprocating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whitehead, J.C.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus is described comprising a pair of fluid driven pump assemblies in a back-to-back configuration to yield a bi-directional pump. Each of the pump assemblies includes a piston or diaphragm which divides a chamber therein to define a power section and a pumping section. An intake-exhaust valve is connected to each of the power sections of the pump chambers, and function to direct fluid, such as compressed air, into the power section and exhaust fluid therefrom. At least one of the pistons or diaphragms is connected by a rod assembly which is constructed to define a signal valve, whereby the intake-exhaust valve of one pump assembly is controlled by the position or location of the piston or diaphragm in the other pump assembly through the operation of the rod assembly signal valve. Each of the pumping sections of the pump assemblies are provided with intake and exhaust valves to enable filling of the pumping section with fluid and discharging fluid therefrom when a desired pressure has been reached. 13 figs.

  20. CX-006160: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-006160: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pumpernickel Valley: Sub-soil Gas and Fluid Inclusion Exploration and Slim Well Drilling CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1,...

  1. CX-001196: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-001196: Categorical Exclusion Determination High-Potential Working Fluids for Next Generation Binary Cycle Geothermal Power Plants CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date:...

  2. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date - 2003 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Several fluid-flow models presented regarding the Long Valley Caldera....

  3. Computational poroelasticity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 29, 2009 ... water saturated sandstone, diffusion of pore fluid between different out ... finite-

  4. View dependent fluid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barran, Brian Arthur

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    VIEW DEPENDENT FLUID DYNAMICS A Thesis by BRIAN ARTHUR BARRAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2006 Major Subject: Visualization... Sciences VIEW DEPENDENT FLUID DYNAMICS A Thesis by BRIAN ARTHUR BARRAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Donald...

  5. A lattice mesoscopic model of dynamically heterogeneous fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Lamura; S. Succi

    2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a mesoscopic three-dimensional Lattice Boltzmann Model which attempts to mimick the physical features associated with cage effects in dynamically heterogeneous fluids. To this purpose, we extend the standard Lattice Boltzmann dynamics with self-consistent constraints based on the non-local density of the surrounding fluid. The resulting dynamics exhibits typical features of dynamic heterogeneous fluids, such as non-Gaussian density distributions and long-time relaxation. Due to its intrinsically parallel dynamics, and absence of statistical noise, the method is expected to compute significantly faster than molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo and lattice glass models.

  6. Circulating fluidized bed hydrodynamics experiments for the multiphase fluid dynamics research consortium (MFDRC).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oelfke, John Barry; Torczynski, John Robert; O'Hern, Timothy John; Tortora, Paul Richard; Bhusarapu, Satish (; ); Trujillo, Steven Mathew

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental program was conducted to study the multiphase gas-solid flow in a pilot-scale circulating fluidized bed (CFB). This report describes the CFB experimental facility assembled for this program, the diagnostics developed and/or applied to make measurements in the riser section of the CFB, and the data acquired for several different flow conditions. Primary data acquired included pressures around the flow loop and solids loadings at selected locations in the riser. Tomographic techniques using gamma radiation and electrical capacitance were used to determine radial profiles of solids volume fraction in the riser, and axial profiles of the integrated solids volume fraction were produced. Computer Aided Radioactive Particle Tracking was used to measure solids velocities, fluxes, and residence time distributions. In addition, a series of computational fluid dynamics simulations was performed using the commercial code Arenaflow{trademark}.

  7. TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID-INCLUSION GAS CHEMISTRY Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings:...

  8. Relativistic viscoelastic fluid mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masafumi Fukuma; Yuho Sakatani

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed study is carried out for the relativistic theory of viscoelasticity which was recently constructed on the basis of Onsager's linear nonequilibrium thermodynamics. After rederiving the theory using a local argument with the entropy current, we show that this theory universally reduces to the standard relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics in the long time limit. Since effects of elasticity are taken into account, the dynamics at short time scales is modified from that given by the Navier-Stokes equations, so that acausal problems intrinsic to relativistic Navier-Stokes fluids are significantly remedied. We in particular show that the wave equations for the propagation of disturbance around a hydrostatic equilibrium in Minkowski spacetime become symmetric hyperbolic for some range of parameters, so that the model is free of acausality problems. This observation suggests that the relativistic viscoelastic model with such parameters can be regarded as a causal completion of relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics. By adjusting parameters to various values, this theory can treat a wide variety of materials including elastic materials, Maxwell materials, Kelvin-Voigt materials, and (a nonlinearly generalized version of) simplified Israel-Stewart fluids, and thus we expect the theory to be the most universal description of single-component relativistic continuum materials. We also show that the presence of strains and the corresponding change in temperature are naturally unified through the Tolman law in a generally covariant description of continuum mechanics.

  9. Supersymmetric Fluid Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Jackiw; A. P. Polychronakos

    2000-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    When anticommuting Grassmann variables are introduced into a fluid dynamical model with irrotational velocity and no vorticity, the velocity acquires a nonvanishing curl and the resultant vorticity is described by Gaussian potentials formed from the Grassmann variables. Upon adding a further specific interaction with the Grassmann degrees of freedom, the model becomes supersymmetric.

  10. Computer Science Computer Science?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    Michigan Autonomous Aerial Vehicles, UM::Autonomy, U-M Programming, U-M Solar Car, Hybrid RacingComputer Science @ Michigan Life as a CS Student What is Computer Science? Computer science is shaping the future. A degree in computer science can help shape yours. Michigan CS students have

  11. Device and method for measuring multi-phase fluid flow in a conduit using an elbow flow meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ortiz, Marcos G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Boucher, Timothy J. (Helena, MT)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for measuring fluid flow in a conduit. The system utilizes pressure transducers disposed generally in line upstream and downstream of the flow of fluid in a bend in the conduit. Data from the pressure transducers is transmitted to a microprocessor or computer. The pressure differential measured by the pressure transducers is then used to calculate the fluid flow rate in the conduit. Control signals may then be generated by the microprocessor or computer to control flow, total fluid dispersed, (in, for example, an irrigation system), area of dispersal or other desired effect based on the fluid flow in the conduit.

  12. Device and method for measuring multi-phase fluid flow in a conduit using an elbow flow meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ortiz, M.G.; Boucher, T.J.

    1997-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described for measuring fluid flow in a conduit. The system utilizes pressure transducers disposed generally in line upstream and downstream of the flow of fluid in a bend in the conduit. Data from the pressure transducers is transmitted to a microprocessor or computer. The pressure differential measured by the pressure transducers is then used to calculate the fluid flow rate in the conduit. Control signals may then be generated by the microprocessor or computer to control flow, total fluid dispersed, (in, for example, an irrigation system), area of dispersal or other desired effect based on the fluid flow in the conduit. 2 figs.

  13. Magnetically stimulated fluid flow patterns

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Martin, Jim; Solis, Kyle

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories' Jim Martin and Kyle Solis explain research on the effects of magnetic fields on fluid flows and how they stimulate vigorous flows. Fluid flow is a necessary phenomenon in everything from reactors to cooling engines in cars.

  14. Apparatus for characterizing the temporo-spatial properties of a dynamic fluid front and method thereof

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battiste, Richard L

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus are described for characterizing the temporal-spatial properties of a dynamic fluid front within a mold space while the mold space is being filled with fluid. A method includes providing a mold defining a mold space and having one or more openings into the mold space; heating a plurality of temperature sensors that extend into the mold space; injecting a fluid into th emold space through the openings, the fluid experiencing a dynamic fluid front while filling the mold space with a fluid; and characterizing temporal-spatial properties of the dynamic fluid front by monitoring a termperature of each of the plurality of heated temperature sensors while the mold space is being filled with the fluid. An apparatus includes a mold defining a mold space; one or more openings for introducing a fluid into th emold space and filling the mold space with the fluid, the fluid experiencing a dynamic fluid front while filling the mold space; a plurality of heated temperature sensors extending into the mold space; and a computer coupled to the plurality of heated temperature sensors for characterizing the temporal-spatial properties of the dynamic fluid front.

  15. Apparatus for characterizing the temporo-spatial properties of a dynamic fluid front and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Battiste, Richard L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2007-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus are described for characterizing the temporal-spatial properties of a dynamic fluid front within a mold space while the mold space is being filled with fluid. A method includes providing a mold defining a mold space and having one or more openings into the mold space; heating a plurality of temperature sensors that extend into the mold space; injecting a fluid into the mold space through the openings, the fluid experiencing a dynamic fluid front while filling the mold space with the fluid; and characterizing temporal-spatial properties of the dynamic fluid front by monitoring a temperature of each of the plurality of heated temperature sensors while the mold space is being filled with the fluid. An apparatus includes a mold defining a mold space; one or more openings for introducing a fluid into the mold space and filling the mold space with the fluid, the fluid experiencing a dynamic fluid front while filling the mold space; a plurality of heated temperature sensors extending into the mold space; and a computer coupled to the plurality of heated temperature sensors for characterizing the temporal-spatial properties of the dynamic fluid front.

  16. Lecture notes Ideal fluid mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malham, Simon J.A.

    Lecture notes Ideal fluid mechanics Simon J.A. Malham Simon J.A. Malham (6th Feb 2010) Maxwell and in the process learn about the subtleties of fluid mechanics and along the way see lots of interesting are generally incompressible--a feature essential to all modern car braking mechanisms. Fluids can be further

  17. Fluid Mechanics 25 March 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabiri, John O.

    Journal of Fluid Mechanics 25 March 2009 VOLUME 623 Journal of Fluid Mechanics 25 Mar. 2009 VOLUME 623 #12;J. Fluid Mech. (2009), vol. 623, pp. 75­84. c 2009 Cambridge University Press doi:10.1017/SLCS and the capture region enable analysis of the effect of several physiological and mechanical parameters

  18. Computer Engineering Curriculum Notes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    1 Computer Engineering Curriculum Notes 2013-2014 Technical Electives Students fulfill 15 credits be assigned to either group A or group B as determined by Computer Engineering program committee. Every year the computer engineering program committee will review the list and may make change(s). Group A (at least 6

  19. Transport in non-conformal holographic fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shailesh Kulkarni; Bum-Hoon Lee; Jae-Hyuk Oh; Chanyong Park; Raju Roychowdhury

    2013-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We have considered non-conformal fluid dynamics whose gravity dual is a certain Einstein dilaton system with Liouville type dilaton potential, characterized by an intrinsic parameter $\\eta$. We have discussed the Hawking-Page transition in this framework using hard-wall model and it turns out that the critical temperature of the Hawking-Page transition encapsulates a non-trivial dependence on $\\eta$. We also obtained transport coefficients such as AC conductivity, shear viscosity and diffusion constant in the hydrodynamic limit, which show non-trivial $\\eta$ dependent deviations from those in conformal fluids, although the ratio of the shear viscosity to entropy density is found to saturate the universal bound. Some of the retarded correlators are also computed in the high frequency limit for case study.

  20. Electromagnetic Radiations as a Fluid Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniele Funaro

    2009-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We combine Maxwell's equations with Eulers's equation, related to a velocity field of an immaterial fluid, where the density of mass is replaced by a charge density. We come out with a differential system able to describe a relevant quantity of electromagnetic phenomena, ranging from classical dipole waves to solitary wave-packets with compact support. The clue is the construction of an energy tensor summing up both the electromagnetic stress and a suitable mass tensor. With this right-hand side, explicit solutions of the full Einstein's equation are computed for a wide class of wave phenomena. Since our electromagnetic waves may behave and interact exactly as a material fluid, they can create vortex structures. We then explicitly analyze some vortex ring configurations and examine the possibility to build a model for the electron.

  1. Weakly nonlocal fluid mechanics - the Schrodinger equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Van; T. Fulop

    2004-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A weakly nonlocal extension of ideal fluid dynamics is derived from the Second Law of thermodynamics. It is proved that in the reversible limit the additional pressure term can be derived from a potential. The requirement of the additivity of the specific entropy function determines the quantum potential uniquely. The relation to other known derivations of Schr\\"odinger equation (stochastic, Fisher information, exact uncertainty) is clarified.

  2. Oscillating fluid power generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, David C

    2014-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for harvesting the kinetic energy of a fluid flow for power generation with a vertically oriented, aerodynamic wing structure comprising one or more airfoil elements pivotably attached to a mast. When activated by the moving fluid stream, the wing structure oscillates back and forth, generating lift first in one direction then in the opposite direction. This oscillating movement is converted to unidirectional rotational movement in order to provide motive power to an electricity generator. Unlike other oscillating devices, this device is designed to harvest the maximum aerodynamic lift forces available for a given oscillation cycle. Because the system is not subjected to the same intense forces and stresses as turbine systems, it can be constructed less expensively, reducing the cost of electricity generation. The system can be grouped in more compact clusters, be less evident in the landscape, and present reduced risk to avian species.

  3. Fluid-fluid versus fluid-solid demixing in mixtures of parallel hard hypercubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luis Lafuente; Yuri Martinez-Raton

    2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well known that the increase of the spatial dimensionality enhances the fluid-fluid demixing of a binary mixture of hard hyperspheres, i.e. the demixing occurs for lower mixture size asymmetry as compared to the three-dimensional case. However, according to simulations, in the latter dimension the fluid-fluid demixing is metastable with respect to the fluid-solid transition. According to the results obtained from approximations to the equation of state of hard hyperspheres in higher dimensions, the fluid-fluid demixing might becomes stable for high enough dimension. However, this conclusion is rather speculative since none of the above works have taken into account the stability of the crystalline phase (nor by a minimization of a given density functional, neither spinodal calculations or MC simulations). Of course, the lack of results is justified by the difficulty for performing density functional calculations or simulations in high dimensions and, in particular, for highly asymmetric binary mixtures. In the present work, we will take advantage of a well tested theoretical tool, namely the fundamental measure density functional theory for parallel hard hypercubes (in the continuum and in the hypercubic lattice). With this, we have calculated the fluid-fluid and fluid-solid spinodals for different spatial dimensions. We have obtained, no matter of the dimensionality, the mixture size asymmetry nor the polydispersity (included as a bimodal distribution function centered around the asymmetric edge-lengths), that the fluid-fluid critical point is always located above the fluid-solid spinodal. In conclusion, these results point to the existence of demixing between at least one solid phase rich in large particles and one fluid phase rich in small ones, preempting a fluid-fluid demixing, independently of the spatial dimension or the polydispersity.

  4. CX-011580: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Model Validation Using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)-Grade Experimental Database for Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Reactor Cavity Cooling Systems with Water and Air CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/13/2013 Location(s): Michigan Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  5. CX-002296: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Analysis Density Separator of an Air-Based Density SeparatorCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 05/18/2010Location(s): Lexington, KentuckyOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  6. Calibration method and apparatus for measuring the concentration of components in a fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Durham, M.D.; Sagan, F.J.; Burkhardt, M.R.

    1993-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A calibration method and apparatus for use in measuring the concentrations of components of a fluid is provided. The measurements are determined from the intensity of radiation over a selected range of radiation wavelengths using peak-to-trough calculations. The peak-to-trough calculations are simplified by compensating for radiation absorption by the apparatus. The invention also allows absorption characteristics of an interfering fluid component to be accurately determined and negated thereby facilitating analysis of the fluid. 7 figures.

  7. Calibration method and apparatus for measuring the concentration of components in a fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Durham, Michael D. (Castle Rock, CO); Sagan, Francis J. (Lakewood, CO); Burkhardt, Mark R. (Denver, CO)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A calibration method and apparatus for use in measuring the concentrations of components of a fluid is provided. The measurements are determined from the intensity of radiation over a selected range of radiation wavelengths using peak-to-trough calculations. The peak-to-trough calculations are simplified by compensating for radiation absorption by the apparatus. The invention also allows absorption characteristics of an interfering fluid component to be accurately determined and negated thereby facilitating analysis of the fluid.

  8. Motivating Learners in Secondary Science Classrooms: Analysis of a Computer-Supported, Inquiry-Based Learning Environment Using Self-Determination Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scogin, Stephen C.

    2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Nature of Science NRC National Research Council NSF National Science Foundation PS PlantingScience SDT Self-Determination Theory SPORE Science Prize for Online Resources in Education SSP Student-Scientist Partnership SWOT Strengths... ...................................... 57 3.3 Open and Axial Coding Categories With Corresponding Properties and Dimensions .......................................................................................... 92 3.4 Results of SWOT Analysis...

  9. Applying one-dimensional fluid thermal elements into a 3D CLIC accelerating strucutre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raatikainen, Riku; Österberg, Kenneth; Riddone, Germana; Samoshkin, Alexander; Gudkov, Dmitry

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A finite element modeling method to simplify the analysis of coupled thermal-structural model for the CLIC accelerating structure is presented. In addition, the results of thermal and structural analyses for the accelerating structure are presented. Instead of using a standard 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method for solving problems involving fluid dynamics and heat transfer in 3D environment, one-dimensional fluid thermal elements are used. In one-dimensional flow, the governing equations of fluid dynamics are considerably simplified. Thus, it is expected that the computational time for more complex simulations becomes shorter. The method was first applied to several test models, which demonstrated the suitability of the one-dimensional flow modeling. The results show that one-dimensional fluid flow reduces the computation time considerably allowing the modeling for the future larger assemblies with sufficient accuracy.

  10. Indirect determination of the electric field in plasma discharges using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaudolon, J., E-mail: julien.vaudolon@cnrs-orleans.fr; Mazouffre, S., E-mail: stephane.mazouffre@cnrs-orleans.fr [CNRS - ICARE (Institut de Combustion Aérothermique Réactivité et Environnement), 1 C Av. de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orléans Cedex 2 (France)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The evaluation of electric fields is of prime interest for the description of plasma characteristics. In this work, different methods for determining the electric field profile in low-pressure discharges using one- and two-dimensional Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) measurements are presented and discussed. The energy conservation, fluid, and kinetic approaches appear to be well-suited for the electric field evaluation in this region of the plasma flow. However, the numerical complexity of a two-dimensional kinetic model is penalizing due to the limited signal-to-noise ratio that can be achieved, making the computation of the electric field subject to large error bars. The ionization contribution which appears in the fluid model makes it unattractive on an experimental viewpoint. The energy conservation and 1D1V kinetic approaches should therefore be preferred for the determination of the electric field when LIF data are used.

  11. Dynamics of non-minimally coupled perfect fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bettoni, Dario

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a general formulation of the theory for a non-minimally coupled perfect fluid in which both conformal and disformal couplings are present. We discuss how such non-minimal coupling is compatible with the assumptions of a perfect fluid and derive both the Einstein and the fluid equations for such model. We found that, while the Euler equation is significantly modified with the introduction of an extra force related to the local gradients of the curvature, the continuity equation is unaltered, thus allowing for the definition of conserved quantities along the fluid flow. As an application to cosmology and astrophysics we compute the effects of the non-minimal coupling on a Friedmann--Lema\\^itre--Robertson--Walker background metric and on the Newtonian limit of our theory.

  12. Self-similar Breakup of Near-inviscid Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castrejon-Pita, J.R.; Castrejon-Pita, A.A.; Hinch, E.J.; Lister, J.R.; Hutchings, I.M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Castrejon-Pita, J.R., Castrejon-Pita, A.A., Hinch, E.J., Lister, J.R., Hutchings, I.M., Physical Review (in press 2012) 'Self-similar Breakup of Near-inviscid Fluids' Self-similar Breakup of Near-inviscid Fluids J.R. Castrejo´n-Pita, A.A. Castrejo... 3 9EW, U.K. The final stages of pinchoff and breakup of dripping droplets of near-inviscid Newtonian fluids are studied experimentally for pure water and ethanol. High speed imaging and image analysis are used to determine the angle and the minimum...

  13. Fluid Mechanical and Electrical Fluctuation Forces in Colloids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Drosdoff; A. Widom

    2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluctuations in fluid velocity and fluctuations in electric fields may both give rise to forces acting on small particles in colloidal suspensions. Such forces in part determine the thermodynamic stability of the colloid. At the classical statistical thermodynamic level, the fluid velocity and electric field contributions to the forces are comparable in magnitude. When quantum fluctuation effects are taken into account, the electric fluctuation induced van der Waals forces dominate those induced by purely fluid mechanical motions. The physical principles are applied in detail for the case of colloidal particle attraction to the walls of the suspension container and more briefly for the case of forces between colloidal particles.

  14. Virial coefficients and vapor-liquid equilibria of the EXP6 and 2-Yukawa fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Krejcí; I. Nezbeda; R. Melnyk; A. Trokhymchuk

    2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Virial coefficients $B_2$ through $B_4$ and the vapor-liquid equilibria for the EXP6 and 2-Yukawa (2Y) fluids have been determined using numerical integrations and Gibbs ensemble simulations, respectively. The chosen 2Y models have been recently determined as an appropriate reference fluid for the considered EXP6 models.

  15. Office of Fusion Energy computational review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, B.I.; Cohen, R.H.; Byers, J.A. [and others

    1996-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The LLNL MFE Theory and Computations Program supports computational efforts in the following areas: (1) Magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium and stability; (2) Fluid and kinetic edge plasma simulation and modeling; (3) Kinetic and fluid core turbulent transport simulation; (4) Comprehensive tokamak modeling (CORSICA Project) - transport, MHD equilibrium and stability, edge physics, heating, turbulent transport, etc. and (5) Other: ECRH ray tracing, reflectometry, plasma processing. This report discusses algorithm and codes pertaining to these areas.

  16. Non-contact fluid characterization in containers using ultrasonic waves

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method for non-contact (stand-off) ultrasonic determination of certain characteristics of fluids in containers or pipes are described. A combination of swept frequency acoustic interferometry (SFAI), wide-bandwidth, air-coupled acoustic transducers, narrowband frequency data acquisition, and data conversion from the frequency domain to the time domain, if required, permits meaningful information to be extracted from such fluids.

  17. Proceedings of FEDSM'03: ASME/JSME Joint Fluids Engineering Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Subrata

    Proceedings of FEDSM'03: 4th ASME/JSME Joint Fluids Engineering Conference Honolulu, Hawaii, USA Reni Raju and Subrata Roy Computational Plasma Dynamics Laboratory Department of Mechanical Engineering is no longer valid as the mean free path of the fluid becomes comparable to the dimension of the system

  18. Proceedings of FEDSM2006 2006 ASME Joint U.S. -European Fluids Engineering Summer Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Subrata

    Proceedings of FEDSM2006 2006 ASME Joint U.S. - European Fluids Engineering Summer Meeting July 17: Datta.Gaitonde@wpafb.af.mil Subrata Roy Computational Plasma Dynamics Laboratory Mechanical Engineering of the latter approach, a proce- dure to couple unsteady force fields obtained from multi-fluid models to very

  19. Fluid Streaming in Micro Bifurcating Networks Z. Zhang, A. Fadl, C. Liu, D. Meyer, M. Krafczyk*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Zongqin

    Fluid Streaming in Micro Bifurcating Networks Z. Zhang, A. Fadl, C. Liu, D. Meyer, M. Krafczyk. In this paper, we propose a novel and simple micro streaming-based fluid propulsion technology that has the phenomena of flow streaming in a network of symmetrical bifurcations using computer simulations. Dimensional

  20. Dissipative hydrodynamics for viscous relativistic fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulrich W. Heinz; Huichao Song; Asis K. Chaudhuri

    2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Explicit equations are given for describing the space-time evolution of non-ideal (viscous) relativistic fluids undergoing boost-invariant longitudinal and arbitrary transverse expansion. The equations are derived from the second-order Israel-Stewart approach which ensures causal evolution. Both azimuthally symmetric (1+1)-dimensional and non-symmetric (2+1)-dimensional transverse expansion are discussed. The latter provides the formal basis for the hydrodynamic computation of elliptic flow in relativistic heavy-ion collisions including dissipative effects.

  1. The Tutorial for the Project of Mech 301 Fluid Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muradoglu, Metin

    The Tutorial for the Project of Mech 301 Fluid Mechanics (Preprocessing, Solving, and Postprocessing) In this, project we will use OpenFOAM software to computationally examine the transonic flow past a 2D NACA airfoil. Since OpenFOAM is working only on Linux operation system, we have installed Ubuntu

  2. Numerical simulation of fluid flow in porous/fractured media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Travis B.J.; Cook, T.L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical models of fluid flow in porous/fractured media can help in the design of in situ fossil energy and mineral extraction technologies. Because of the complexity of these processes, numerical solutions are usually required. Sample calculations illustrate the capabilities of present day computer models.

  3. Multiscale Modeling and Simulation of Fluid Flows in Inelastic Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popov, Peter

    in porous media (e.g. soil), Elasticity equations in heterogeneous media (concrete, asphalt), etc porous media s The Fluid-Structure interaction (FSI) problem at the microscale and numerical methods with computational solutions s Numerical upscaling of flow in deformable porous media #12;- p. 3/42 Why homogenize

  4. Comparison of Hybrid Systems and Fluid Stochastic Petri Nets \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tuffin, Bruno

    Comparison of Hybrid Systems and Fluid Stochastic Petri Nets \\Lambda Bruno Tuffin , Dong S. Chen Engineering Duke University, Durham, NC 27708­0291, U.S.A. Abstract. Hybrid Systems are models of interacting digital and continuous devices with applications in the control of aircraft, computers, or modern cars

  5. LUBRICANTS AND HYDRAULIC FLUIDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engineer Manual Department

    Contents) Major General, USA Chief of Staff i Table of Contents Purpose ........................................................ 1-1 1-1 Applicability .................................................... 1-2 1-1 References ...................................................... 1-3 1-1 Distribution Statement ............................................. 1-4 1-1 Scope ......................................................... 1-5 1-2 Friction ........................................................ 2-1 2-1 Wear .......................................................... 2-2 2-4 Lubrication and Lubricants ......................................... 2-3 2-6 Hydrodynamic or Fluid Film Lubrication ............................... 2-4 2-6 Boundary Lubrication ............................................. 2-5 2-8 Extreme Pressure (EP) Lubrication ................................... 2-6 2-9 Elastohydrodynamic (EHD) Lubrication ................................ 2-7 2-9 Oil R

  6. Mixture of anisotropic fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wojciech Florkowski; Radoslaw Maj

    2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The recently introduced approach describing coupled quark and gluon anisotropic fluids is generalized to include explicitly the transitions between quarks and gluons. We study the effects of such processes on the thermalization rate of anisotropic systems. We find that the quark-gluon transitions may enhance the overall thermalization rate in the cases where the initial momentum anisotropies correspond to mixed oblate-prolate or prolate configurations. On the other hand, no effect on the thermalization rate is found in the case of oblate configurations. The observed regularities are connected with the late-time behavior of the analyzed systems which is described either by the exponential decay or the power law.

  7. Breaking the Tension: Development and Investigation of a Centrifugal Tensioned Metastable Fluid Detector System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solom, Matthew 1985-

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    of laser-induced cavitation in a seeded fluid, and demonstrated some of the associated limitations as well. In addition, the CFD framework developed here can be used to cross-compare experimental results with computer simulations as well...

  8. Investigation of two-fluid methods for Large Eddy Simulation of spray combustion in Gas Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Investigation of two-fluid methods for Large Eddy Simulation of spray combustion in Gas Turbines the EL method well suited for gas turbine computations, but RANS with the EE approach may also be found

  9. A stochastic Monte Carlo computer simulation of the drop-weight test for the determination of nil-ductility transition temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lambert, Michael Andrew

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the surface of the specimen blank can produce heat affected zones that are tougher than the base metal, which could lead to artificially low predictions of NDIT [17[. In such m O zS O e O 0 LU 4 CR ki ?E O Z -I of 0 tiE I- O z 1 V gm 0) c e H N... aside, the manner in which test temperatures are chosen may contribute most to the variance and bias inherent in the drO-wweigh test method (ASTM E 208) for determining the nil-ductility transition temperature, NDTI; for ferritic steels...

  10. CX-008011: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-008011: Categorical Exclusion Determination Install EMSL Super-Computer Power Infrastructure CX(s) Applied: B1.7 Date: 06302011 Location(s): Washington...

  11. Device and method for measuring multi-phase fluid flow in a conduit having an abrupt gradual bend

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ortiz, M.G.

    1998-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described for measuring fluid flow in a conduit having an abrupt bend. The system includes pressure transducers, one disposed in the conduit at the inside of the bend and one or more disposed in the conduit at the outside of the bend but spaced a distance therefrom. The pressure transducers measure the pressure of fluid in the conduit at the locations of the pressure transducers and this information is used by a computational device to calculate fluid flow rate in the conduit. For multi-phase fluid, the density of the fluid is measured by another pair of pressure transducers, one of which is located in the conduit elevationally above the other. The computation device then uses the density measurement along with the fluid pressure measurements, to calculate fluid flow. 1 fig.

  12. CX-000411: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination Fiber Containing Sweep Fluids for Ultra Deepwater Drilling Applications CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6 Date: 12172009 Location(s): Norman,...

  13. Drilling fluids and reserve pit toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leuterman, A.J.J.; Jones, F.V.; Chandler, J.E. (M-I Drilling Fluids Co. (US))

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drilling fluids are now classified as exempt under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste laws. Since 1986, however, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has been studying reserve pit contents to determine whether oilfield wastes should continue under this exemption. Concerns regarding reserve pit contents and disposal practices have resulted in state and local governmental regulations that limit traditional methods of construction, closure, and disposal of reserve pit sludge and water. A great deal of attention and study has been focused on drilling fluids that eventually reside in reserve pits. In-house studies show that waste from water-based drilling fluids plays a limited role (if any) in possible hazards associated with reserve pits. Reserve pit water samples and pit sludge was analyzed and collated. Analyses show that water-soluble heavy metals (Cr, Pb, Zn and Mn) in reserve pits are generally undetectable or, if found in the total analysis, are usually bound to clays or organics too tightly to exceed the limitations as determined by the EPA toxicity leachate test. The authors' experience is that most contamination associated with reserve pits involves high salt content from produced waters and/or salt formations, lead contamination from pipe dope, or poorly designed pits, which could allow washouts into surface waters or seepage into groundwater sources. The authors' analyses show that reserve its associated with water-based drilling fluid operations should not be classified as hazardous; however, careful attention attention should be paid to reserve pit construction and closure to help avoid any adverse environmental impact.

  14. Local order variations in confined hard-sphere fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim Nygĺrd; Sten Sarman; Roland Kjellander

    2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Pair distributions of fluids confined between two surfaces at close distance are of fundamental importance for a variety of physical, chemical, and biological phenomena, such as interactions between macromolecules in solution, surface forces, and diffusion in narrow pores. However, in contrast to bulk fluids, properties of inhomogeneous fluids are seldom studied at the pair-distribution level. Motivated by recent experimental advances in determining anisotropic structure factors of confined fluids, we analyze theoretically the underlying anisotropic pair distributions of the archetypical hard-sphere fluid confined between two parallel hard surfaces using first-principles statistical mechanics of inhomogeneous fluids. For this purpose, we introduce an experimentally accessible ensemble-averaged local density correlation function and study its behavior as a function of confining slit width. Upon increasing the distance between the confining surfaces, we observe an alternating sequence of strongly anisotropic versus more isotropic local order. The latter is due to packing frustration of the spherical particles. This observation highlights the importance of studying inhomogeneous fluids at the pair-distribution level.

  15. Spin and Madelung fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Salesi

    2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Starting from the Pauli current we obtain the decomposition of the non-relativistic local velocity in two parts: one parallel and the other orthogonal to the momentum. The former is recognized to be the ``classical'' part, that is the velocity of the center-of-mass, and the latter the ``quantum'' one, that is the velocity of the motion in the center-of-mass frame (namely, the internal ``spin motion'' or {\\em Zitterbewegung}). Inserting the complete expression of the velocity into the kinetic energy term of the classical non-relativistic (i.e., Newtonian) Lagrangian, we straightforwardly derive the so-called ``quantum potential'' associated to the Madelung fluid. In such a way, the quantum mechanical behaviour of particles appears to be strictly correlated to the existence of spin and Zitterbewegung.

  16. Computing Images

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computing Images The interior of an automated tape library in Brookhaven's RHIC and ATLAS Computing Facility. Brookhaven engineers in the RHIC and ATLAS Computing Facility....

  17. Interfacial deformation and jetting of a magnetic fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afkhami, Shahriar; Griffiths, Ian M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An attractive technique for forming and collecting aggregates of magnetic material at a liquid--air interface by an applied magnetic field gradient was recently addressed theoretically and experimentally [Soft Matter, (9) 2013, 8600-8608]: when the magnetic field is weak, the deflection of the liquid--air interface has a steady shape, while for sufficiently strong fields, the interface destabilizes and forms a jet that extracts magnetic material. Motivated by this work, we develop a numerical model for the closely related problem of solving two-phase Navier--Stokes equations coupled with the static Maxwell equations. We computationally model the forces generated by a magnetic field gradient produced by a permanent magnet and so determine the interfacial deflection of a magnetic fluid (a pure ferrofluid system) and the transition into a jet. We analyze the shape of the liquid--air interface during the deformation stage and the critical magnet distance for which the static interface transitions into a jet. We d...

  18. BE436 FUNDAMENTALS OF FLUID MECHANICS (Spring 2014) Fluid mechanics is the study of how and why fluids move. The behavior of fluids plays a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vajda, Sandor

    BE436 FUNDAMENTALS OF FLUID MECHANICS (Spring 2014) Fluid mechanics is the study of how and why fluids move. The behavior of fluids plays a fundamental role in the function of living biological, and microfluidic devices. Course info: We will examine all of the usual topics in fluid mechanics. This course

  19. Fully Coupled Well Models for Fluid Injection and Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Mark D.; Bacon, Diana H.; White, Signe K.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Wells are the primary engineered component of geologic sequestration systems with deep subsurface reservoirs. Wells provide a conduit for injecting greenhouse gases and producing reservoirs fluids, such as brines, natural gas, and crude oil, depending on the target reservoir. Well trajectories, well pressures, and fluid flow rates are parameters over which well engineers and operators have control during the geologic sequestration process. Current drilling practices provided well engineers flexibility in designing well trajectories and controlling screened intervals. Injection pressures and fluids can be used to purposely fracture the reservoir formation or to purposely prevent fracturing. Numerical simulation of geologic sequestration processes involves the solution of multifluid transport equations within heterogeneous geologic media. These equations that mathematically describe the flow of fluid through the reservoir formation are nonlinear in form, requiring linearization techniques to resolve. In actual geologic settings fluid exchange between a well and reservoir is a function of local pressure gradients, fluid saturations, and formation characteristics. In numerical simulators fluid exchange between a well and reservoir can be specified using a spectrum of approaches that vary from totally ignoring the reservoir conditions to fully considering reservoir conditions and well processes. Well models are a numerical simulation approach that account for local conditions and gradients in the exchange of fluids between the well and reservoir. As with the mathematical equations that describe fluid flow in the reservoir, variation in fluid properties with temperature and pressure yield nonlinearities in the mathematical equations that describe fluid flow within the well. To numerically simulate the fluid exchange between a well and reservoir the two systems of nonlinear multifluid flow equations must be resolved. The spectrum of numerical approaches for resolving these equations varies from zero coupling to full coupling. In this paper we describe a fully coupled solution approach for well model that allows for a flexible well trajectory and screened interval within a structured hexahedral computational grid. In this scheme the nonlinear well equations have been fully integrated into the Jacobian matrix for the reservoir conservation equations, minimizing the matrix bandwidth.

  20. Fluid inflation with brane correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratbay Myrzakulov; Lorenzo Sebastiani

    2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we have investigated the possibility to have inflation from inhomogeneous viscous fluids by taking into account the brane correction coming from string-inspired five dimensional Einsten's gravity. We have realized several kinds of viable solutions for early-time acceleration. At the end of inflation, the classical Einstein's gravity is recovered and fluids produce decelerated expansion.

  1. LECTURES IN ELEMENTARY FLUID DYNAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonough, James M.

    LECTURES IN ELEMENTARY FLUID DYNAMICS: Physics, Mathematics and Applications J. M. McDonough Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506-0503 c 1987, 1990, 2002, 2004, 2009 #12;Contents 1 Introduction 1 1.1 Importance of Fluids

  2. The nature of the phase transition in dipolar fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. M. Tavares; J. J. Weis; M. M. Telo da Gama

    2005-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Monte Carlo computer simulations of a quasi two dimensional (2D) dipolar fluid at low and intermediate densities indicate that the structure of the fluid is well described by an ideal mixture of self-assembling clusters. A detailed analysis of the topology of the clusters, of their internal energy and of their size (or mass) distributions further suggests that the system undergoes a phase transition from a dilute phase characterized by a number of disconnected clusters to a condensed phase characterized by a network or spanning (macroscopic) cluster that includes most of the particles in the system.

  3. Computer, Computational, and Statistical Sciences Division

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computing CCS Division Computer, Computational, and Statistical Sciences Division Computational physics, computer science, applied mathematics, statistics and the integration of...

  4. Quartz resonator fluid density and viscosity monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Stephen J. (Albuquerque, NM); Wiczer, James J. (Albuquerque, NM); Cernosek, Richard W. (Albuquerque, NM); Frye, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM); Gebert, Charles T. (Albuquerque, NM); Casaus, Leonard (Bernalillo, NM); Mitchell, Mary A. (Tijeras, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pair of thickness-shear mode resonators, one smooth and one with a textured surface, allows fluid density and viscosity to be independently resolved. A textured surface, either randomly rough or regularly patterned, leads to trapping of liquid at the device surface. The synchronous motion of this trapped liquid with the oscillating device surface allows the device to weigh the liquid; this leads to an additional response that depends on liquid density. This additional response enables a pair of devices, one smooth and one textured, to independently resolve liquid density and viscosity; the difference in responses determines the density while the smooth device determines the density-viscosity product, and thus, the pair determines both density and viscosity.

  5. Apparatus and method for rapid separation and detection of hydrocarbon fractions in a fluid stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sluder, Charles S.; Storey, John M.; Lewis, Sr., Samuel A.

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for rapid fractionation of hydrocarbon phases in a sample fluid stream are disclosed. Examples of the disclosed apparatus and method include an assembly of elements in fluid communication with one another including one or more valves and at least one sorbent chamber for removing certain classifications of hydrocarbons and detecting the remaining fractions using a detector. The respective ratios of hydrocarbons are determined by comparison with a non separated fluid stream.

  6. Inserting Group Variables into Fluid Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Jackiw

    2004-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluid, like a quark-gluon plasma, may possess degrees of freedom indexed by a group variable, which retains its identity even in the fluid/continuum description. Conventional Eulerian fluid mechanics is extended to encompass this possibility.

  7. Finite element simulation of electrorheological fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhyou, Chanryeol, 1973-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrorheological (ER) fluids change their flow properties dramatically when an electric field is applied. These fluids are usually composed of dispersions of polarizable particles in an insulating base fluid or composed ...

  8. ENERGY LANDSCAPE OF 2D FLUID FORMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y. JIANG; ET AL

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The equilibrium states of 2D non-coarsening fluid foams, which consist of bubbles with fixed areas, correspond to local minima of the total perimeter. (1) The authors find an approximate value of the global minimum, and determine directly from an image how far a foam is from its ground state. (2) For (small) area disorder, small bubbles tend to sort inwards and large bubbles outwards. (3) Topological charges of the same sign repel while charges of opposite sign attract. (4) They discuss boundary conditions and the uniqueness of the pattern for fixed topology.

  9. : Computer Aided Learning in Computer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milenkovi, Aleksandar

    CAL2 : Computer Aided Learning in Computer Architecture Laboratory JOVAN DJORDJEVIC,1 BOSKO NIKOLIC,1 TANJA BOROZAN,1 ALEKSANDAR MILENKOVIC´ 2 1 Computer Engineering Department, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia 2 Electrical and Computer Engineering Department

  10. Fluid flow monitoring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKay, M.D.; Sweeney, C.E.; Spangler, B.S. Jr.

    1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A flow meter and temperature measuring device are described comprising a tube with a body centered therein for restricting flow and a sleeve at the upper end of the tube to carry several channels formed longitudinally in the sleeve to the appropriate axial location where they penetrate the tube to allow pressure measurements and temperature measurements with thermocouples. The high pressure measurement is made using a channel penetrating the tube away from the body and the low pressure measurement is made at a location at the widest part of the body. An end plug seals the end of the device and holes at its upper end allow fluid to pass from the interior of the tube into a plenum. The channels are made by cutting grooves in the sleeve, the grooves widened at the surface of the sleeve and then a strip of sleeve material is welded to the grooves closing the channels. Preferably the sleeve is packed with powdered graphite before cutting the grooves and welding the strips. 7 figures.

  11. Fluid flow monitoring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKay, Mark D. (1426 Socastee Dr., North Augusta, SC 29841); Sweeney, Chad E. (3600 Westhampton Dr., Martinez, GA 30907-3036); Spangler, Jr., B. Samuel (2715 Margate Dr., Augusta, GA 30909)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A flow meter and temperature measuring device comprising a tube with a body centered therein for restricting flow and a sleeve at the upper end of the tube to carry several channels formed longitudinally in the sleeve to the appropriate axial location where they penetrate the tube to allow pressure measurements and temperature measurements with thermocouples. The high pressure measurement is made using a channel penetrating the tube away from the body and the low pressure measurement is made at a location at the widest part of the body. An end plug seals the end of the device and holes at its upper end allow fluid to pass from the interior of the tube into a plenum. The channels are made by cutting grooves in the sleeve, the grooves widened at the surface of the sleeve and then a strip of sleeve material is welded to the grooves closing the channels. Preferably the sleeve is packed with powdered graphite before cutting the grooves and welding the strips.

  12. Fluid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Houck, E.D.

    1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An fluid sampling system allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped upwardly into a sampling jet of a venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to be decreased, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodically leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank. 4 figs.

  13. Fluid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Houck, Edward D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An fluid sampling system allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped upwardly into a sampling jet of a venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to decreased, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodically leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank.

  14. The influence of fluid properties on the success of hydraulic fracturing operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Power, D.J.; Boger, D.V. [Univ. of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Paterson, L.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydroxypropylguar based fluids are the most commonly used fluids for hydraulic fracturing. Through the addition of borate ions the polymer present in the fluid can crosslink to form a high viscosity gel. Prior to placement in the fracture the fluid is required to have a low viscosity to minimize friction losses in the tubular goods. A high viscosity fluid is required in the fracture for several reasons, primarily to suspend the proppant and to minimize fluid loss into the formation. This paper describes a new method which can be used to model the gelation reaction of crosslinking fluids. By modeling the dynamic properties of the fluid it is possible to predict the physical state of the fluid at any time during a fracturing treatment. Small amplitude oscillatory measurements are applied to fluid samples in a cone-and-plate geometry. The change in the dynamic properties with time can be fitted to a simple model which can then be used to determine the gel time for the fluid. Methods used to distinguish between the liquid and gel state are also discussed.

  15. Violation of Bell's inequality in fluid mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Brady; Ross Anderson

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that a classical fluid mechanical system can violate Bell's inequality because the fluid motion is correlated over large distances.

  16. Fluid Gravity Engineering Rocket motor flow analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anand, Mahesh

    Fluid Gravity Engineering Capability · Rocket motor flow analysis -Internal (performance) -External young scientists/engineers Fluid Gravity Engineering Ltd #12;

  17. Variable flexure-based fluid filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Steve B.; Colston Jr., Billy W.; Marshall, Graham; Wolcott, Duane

    2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for filtering particles from a fluid comprises a fluid inlet, a fluid outlet, a variable size passage between the fluid inlet and the fluid outlet, and means for adjusting the size of the variable size passage for filtering the particles from the fluid. An inlet fluid flow stream is introduced to a fixture with a variable size passage. The size of the variable size passage is set so that the fluid passes through the variable size passage but the particles do not pass through the variable size passage.

  18. Insertable fluid flow passage bridgepiece and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, Daniel O. (Glenville, NV)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluid flow passage bridgepiece for insertion into an open-face fluid flow channel of a fluid flow plate is provided. The bridgepiece provides a sealed passage from a columnar fluid flow manifold to the flow channel, thereby preventing undesirable leakage into and out of the columnar fluid flow manifold. When deployed in the various fluid flow plates that are used in a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell, bridgepieces of this invention prevent mixing of reactant gases, leakage of coolant or humidification water, and occlusion of the fluid flow channel by gasket material. The invention also provides a fluid flow plate assembly including an insertable bridgepiece, a fluid flow plate adapted for use with an insertable bridgepiece, and a method of manufacturing a fluid flow plate with an insertable fluid flow passage bridgepiece.

  19. Computer analyses for the design, operation and safety of new isotope production reactors: A technology status review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wulff, W.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review is presented on the currently available technologies for nuclear reactor analyses by computer. The important distinction is made between traditional computer calculation and advanced computer simulation. Simulation needs are defined to support the design, operation, maintenance and safety of isotope production reactors. Existing methods of computer analyses are categorized in accordance with the type of computer involved in their execution: micro, mini, mainframe and supercomputers. Both general and special-purpose computers are discussed. Major computer codes are described, with regard for their use in analyzing isotope production reactors. It has been determined in this review that conventional systems codes (TRAC, RELAP5, RETRAN, etc.) cannot meet four essential conditions for viable reactor simulation: simulation fidelity, on-line interactive operation with convenient graphics, high simulation speed, and at low cost. These conditions can be met by special-purpose computers (such as the AD100 of ADI), which are specifically designed for high-speed simulation of complex systems. The greatest shortcoming of existing systems codes (TRAC, RELAP5) is their mismatch between very high computational efforts and low simulation fidelity. The drift flux formulation (HIPA) is the viable alternative to the complicated two-fluid model. No existing computer code has the capability of accommodating all important processes in the core geometry of isotope production reactors. Experiments are needed (heat transfer measurements) to provide necessary correlations. It is important for the nuclear community, both in government, industry and universities, to begin to take advantage of modern simulation technologies and equipment. 41 refs.

  20. The mechanical behavior of normally consolidated soils as a function of pore fluid salinity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horan, Aiden James

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pore fluid salinities in the Gulf of Mexico area can reach levels of 250 grams of salt per liter of pore fluid (g/1). It is now necessary to determine the effect that this salinity level can play on the mechanical behaviors ...

  1. Fluid Mixing from Viscous Fingering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jha, Birendra

    Mixing efficiency at low Reynolds numbers can be enhanced by exploiting hydrodynamic instabilities that induce heterogeneity and disorder in the flow. The unstable displacement of fluids with different viscosities, or ...

  2. Bio-inspired fluid locomotion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Brian, 1980-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed several novel methods of locomotion at low Reynolds number, for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids: Robosnails 1 and 2, which operate on a lubrication layer, and the three-link swimmer which moves ...

  3. Computing Frontier: Distributed Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity2 Computational PhysicsComputing and

  4. Computational Procedures for Determining Parameters in Ramberg...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ueng Jian-Chu Chen July, 1992 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States...

  5. Determining Memory Use | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape, Density,TiO2(110). |Gas-phase Allinea DDT Core

  6. Determining Allocation Requirements | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: CrudeOffice ofINLNuclear262AboutDesignerFileDetecting

  7. Numerical implication of Riemann problem theory for fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menikoff, R.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Riemann problem plays an important role in understanding the wave structure of fluid flow. It is also crucial step in some numerical algorithms for accurately and efficiently computing fluid flow; Godunov method, random choice method, and from tracking method. The standard wave structure consists of shock and rarefaction waves. Due to physical effects such as phase transitions, which often are indistinguishable from numerical errors in an equation of state, anomalkous waves may occur, ''rarefaction shocks'', split waves, and composites. The anomalous waves may appear in numerical calculations as waves smeared out by either too much artificial viscosity or insufficient resolution. In addition, the equation of state may lead to instabilities of fluid flow. Since these anomalous effects due to the equation of state occur for the continuum equations, they can be expected to occur for all computational algorithms. The equation of state may be characterized by three dimensionless variables: the adiabatic exponent ..gamma.., the Grueneisen coefficient GAMMA, and the fundamental derivative G. The fluid flow anomalies occur when inequalities relating these variables are violated. 18 refs.

  8. Rheological fluid motion in tube by metachronal wave of cilia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maiti, S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is a theoretical study of a non-linear problem of rheological fluid transport in an axisymmetric tube by cilium. However, an attempt has been made to explain the role of cilia motion on the transport of fluid through the ductus efferentes of the male reproductive tract. Ostwald-de Waele power law viscous fluid has been considered to represent the rheological fluid to analyze pumping by means of a sequence of beat of cilia from row to row of cilia in a given row of cells and from one row of cells to the next (metachronal wave movement) under conditions for which the corresponding Reynolds number is small enough for inertial effects to be negligible and the wavelength to diameter ratio is large enough for the pressure to be considered uniform over the cross-section. Analyses and computations of the detailed fluid motions reveal that the time-averaged flow rates are directly dependent on epsilon, a non-dimensional measure involving the mean radius R of the tube and the cilia length. Thu...

  9. Acoustic sand detector for fluid flowstreams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beattie, Alan G. (Corrales, NM); Bohon, W. Mark (Frisco, TX)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The particle volume and particle mass production rate of particulate solids entrained in fluid flowstreams such as formation sand or fracture proppant entrained in oil and gas production flowstreams is determined by a system having a metal probe interposed in a flow conduit for transmitting acoustic emissions created by particles impacting the probe to a sensor and signal processing circuit which produces discrete signals related to the impact of each of the particles striking the probe. The volume or mass flow rate of particulates is determined from making an initial particle size distribution and particle energy distribution and comparing the initial energy distribution and/or the initial size distribution with values related to the impact energies of a predetermined number of recorded impacts. The comparison is also used to recalibrate the system to compensate for changes in flow velocity.

  10. Experimental characterisation of nonlocal photon fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vocke, David; Marino, Francesco; Wright, Ewan M; Carusotto, Iacopo; Faccio, Daniele

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum gases of atoms and exciton-polaritons are nowadays a well established theoretical and experimental tool for fundamental studies of quantum many-body physics and suggest promising applications to quantum computing. Given their technological complexity, it is of paramount interest to devise other systems where such quantum many-body physics can be investigated at a lesser technological expense. Here we examine a relatively well-known system of laser light propagating through thermo-optical defocusing media: based on a hydrodynamical description of light as a quantum fluid of interacting photons, we propose such systems as a valid, room temperature alternative to atomic or exciton-polariton condensates for studies of many-body physics. First, we show that by using a technique traditionally used in oceanography, it is possible to perform a direct measurement of the single-particle part of the dispersion relation of the elementary excitations on top of the photon fluid and to detect its global flow. Then, ...

  11. IEEE Computer Society: http://computer.org Computer: http://computer.org/computer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    IEEE Computer Society: http://computer.org Computer: http://computer.org/computer computer@computer.org IEEE Computer Society Publications Office: +1 714 821 8380 COVER FEATURES GUEST EDITOR'S INTRODUCTION 28 Computational Photography--The Next Big Step Oliver Bimber Computational photography extends

  12. FLUID MECHANICS AND MATHEMATICAL STRUCTURES PHILIP BOYLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyland, Philip

    FLUID MECHANICS AND MATHEMATICAL STRUCTURES PHILIP BOYLAND Department of Mathematics University in the most basic models of fluid motion. 1. Introduction Fluid mechanics is the source of many of the ideas, Lagrange, . . .. Mathematicians have abstracted and vastly generalized ba- sic fluid mechanical concepts

  13. Mechanical Engineering ME 3720 FLUID MECHANICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panchagnula, Mahesh

    Mechanical Engineering ME 3720 FLUID MECHANICS Pre-requisite: ME 2330 Co-requisite: ME 3210) to develop an understanding of the physical mechanisms and the mathematical models of fluid mechanics of fluid mechanics problems in engineering practice. The basic principles of fluid mechanics

  14. Fluid Mechanics IB Lecturer: Dr Natalia Berloff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -efficient aircraft design, hydroelectric power, chemical processing, jet-driven cutting tools · our fluid environment

  15. Transparent fluids for 157-nm immersion lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    - gineers. [DOI: 10.1117/1.1637366] Subject terms: 157-nm lithography; immersion fluid; perfluoropolyether

  16. Numerical and experimental study of expiratory flow in the case of major upper airway obstructions with fluid-structure interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and the larynx (fig. 1), is the most external part of the respiratory system. Modelling the fluid flow is described. The theory of linear elasticity in small deformations has been chosen to compute the mechanical of the respiratory fluid flow (Shome et al., 1998; Allen et al., 2004; Xu et al., 2006; Sung et al., 2006; Liu et al

  17. European Conference on Computational Fluid Dynamics ECCOMAS CFD 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frangi, Alejandro

    in industrialized countries. The major CVD include coronary (or ischaemic) heart disease (heart attack), cerebrovascular disease (stroke), hypertension (high blood pressure), rheumatic heart disease and heart failure. Damage to the heart tissues from CVD or from heart surgery can disrupt the natural electrical impulses

  18. European Conference on Computational Fluid Dynamics ECCOMAS CFD 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barr, Al

    aluminum tubes due to the passage of ethylene-oxygen detonation waves is presented. 1 INTRODUCTION The Center for Simulation of Dynamic Response of Materials at the California In- stitute of Technology has reliably with such a "weakly coupled" method, when the evolving interface geometry and velocities

  19. Seventh International Conference on Computational Fluid Dynamics (ICCFD7),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groth, Clinton P. T.

    , and combusting flows encountered in propulsion systems (e.g., gas turbine engines and solid propellant rocket

  20. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of the John Day Dam Tailrace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.

    2010-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    US Army Corps of Engineers - Portland District required that a two-dimensional (2D) depth-averaged and a three-dimensional (3D) free-surface numerical models to be developed and validated for the John Day tailrace. These models were used to assess potential impact of a select group of structural and operational alternatives to tailrace flows aimed at improving fish survival at John Day Dam. The 2D model was used for the initial assessment of the alternatives in conjunction with a reduced-scale physical model of the John Day Project. A finer resolution 3D model was used to more accurately model the details of flow in the stilling basin and near-project tailrace hydraulics. Three-dimensional model results were used as input to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory particle tracking software, and particle paths and times to pass a downstream cross section were used to assess the relative differences in travel times resulting from project operations and structural scenarios for multiple total river flows. Streamlines and neutrally-buoyant particles were seeded in all turbine and spill bays with flows. For a Total River of 250 kcfs running with the Fish Passage Plan spill pattern and a spillwall, the mean residence times for all particles were little changed; however the tails of the distribution were truncated for both spillway and powerhouse release points, and, for the powerhouse releases, reduced the residence time for 75% of the particles to pass a downstream cross section from 45.5 minutes to 41.3 minutes. For a total river of 125 kcfs configured with the operations from the Fish Passage Plan for the temporary spillway weirs and for a proposed spillwall, the neutrally-buoyant particle tracking data showed that the river with a spillwall in place had the overall mean residence time increase; however, the residence time for 75% of the powerhouse-released particles to pass a downstream cross section was reduced from 102.4 min to 89 minutes.

  1. ESS liquid-metal target design using computational fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dury, T.V. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal-hydraulic performance of a spallation neutron source target limits the highest neutron fluxes that can be generated. The current design for the European spallation source consists of a liquid metal encased within a containing shell, wedge-shaped in the direction of the incoming proton beam, with rounded sides in a cross section through a plane normal to the beam.

  2. Designing high power targets with computational fluid dynamics (CFD)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covrig, S. D. [Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    High power liquid hydrogen (LH2) targets, up to 850 W, have been widely used at Jefferson Lab for the 6 GeV physics program. The typical luminosity loss of a 20 cm long LH2 target was 20% for a beam current of 100 ?A rastered on a square of side 2 mm on the target. The 35 cm long, 2500 W LH2 target for the Qweak experiment had a luminosity loss of 0.8% at 180 ?A beam rastered on a square of side 4 mm at the target. The Qweak target was the highest power liquid hydrogen target in the world and with the lowest noise figure. The Qweak target was the first one designed with CFD at Jefferson Lab. A CFD facility is being established at Jefferson Lab to design, build and test a new generation of low noise high power targets.

  3. Modeling an EDC Cracker using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaggerud, Torbjřrn Herder

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? The process used by the Norwegian company Hydro for making Vinyl Chloride Monomer (VCM) from natural gas and sodium chloride has been studied. A… (more)

  4. Geophysical Disaster Computational Fluid Dynamics Center Our scientific advances.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Improve how Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models work. (numerics, dynamics, physics) · Use mountain-weather random errors by making many different NWP runs. (ensemble numerical prediction) · Reduce systematic outcomes. (probabilistic forecasting) · Predict weather and turbulence in the lower atmosphere where people

  5. V European Conference on Computational Fluid Dynamics ECCOMAS CFD 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MĂĽller,Bernhard

    an important role include ink-jet printing, spray cooling, pesticide spraying, erosion processes due to rain and ther- mal spray coating. Drop impacts also play an important role in gas-liquid separation.g. density and viscosity are smeared out over several grid points. The result of those diffuse interface

  6. Welcome to the Computational Fluid Dynamics Matt de Stadler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Deli

    applications Wake behind Guadalupe island http://www.nasaimages.org/luna/servlet/detail/nasaNAS~10~10~8 4390 flow over a ridge [movie] #12;Stratified turbulent wakes Wakes are generated by every moving body is the energy distributed? What characteristic

  7. Welcome to the Computational Fluid Dynamics Matt de Stadler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Deli

    applications Wake behind Guadalupe island http://www.nasaimages.org/luna/servlet/detail/nasaNAS~1 0 Wakes are generated by every moving body and flow past any fixed body Application sizes range from spray will the wake last? How is the energy distributed? What characteristic features emerge? Low-level winds rushing

  8. European Conference on Computational Fluid Dynamics ECCOMAS CFD 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    217, 7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlands e-mail: {L.Pesch, J.J.W.vanderVegt}@math.utwente.nl web page. P´eriaux (Eds) c TU Delft, The Netherlands, 2006 A SPACE-TIME DISCONTINUOUS GALERKIN FINITE

  9. European Conference on Computational Fluid Dynamics ECCOMAS CFD 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    of Twente P.O. Box 217, Enschede, The Netherlands e-mail: o.bokhove@math.utwente.nl web page: google "Onno. P´eriaux (Eds) c TU Delft, The Netherlands, 2006 A (DIS)CONTINUOUS FINITE ELEMENT MODEL of Physics, University of Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands Department of Applied Mathematics, University

  10. Computational Analysis of Fluid Flow in Pebble Bed Modular Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gandhir, Akshay

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) is a Generation IV reactor under consideration by Department of Energy and in the nuclear industry. There are two categories of HTGRs, namely, Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) and Prismatic reactor. Pebble...

  11. Stress distributions around hydrofoils using computational fluid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aharon, Ofer, S. M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research describes the reciprocal influence between two foils, vertically and horizontally oriented, on each other for different gaps between them. Those cases are the focus part of a bigger process of lowering ...

  12. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Diesel Engine Combustion and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth Codestheatfor Optimized9 * August 2004

  13. On the simulation of fluids for computer graphics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a meus pais por sempre se esfor¸carem para me oferecer uma boa educa¸c~ao. Agrade¸co o apoio e o conforto

  14. ITP Chemicals: Technology Roadmap for Computational Fluid Dynamics, January

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe U.S. Department ofIOWA1999) | Department2009 | Department

  15. Computational Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computational Science and Engineering Petascale Initiative at LBNL Progress Report PI: Alice Koniges June 28, 2010 Computational Science and Engineering Petascale Initiative PI,...

  16. Computational Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    ), in-vehicle computers, and computers in the transportation infrastructure are integrated ride- sharing, real-time multi-modal routing and navigation, to autonomous/assisted driving

  17. Experimental Assessment of Water Based Drilling Fluids in High Pressure and High Temperature Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravi, Ashwin

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Proper selection of drilling fluids plays a major role in determining the efficient completion of any drilling operation. With the increasing number of ultra-deep offshore wells being drilled and ever stringent environmental and safety regulations...

  18. Two-fluid magnetic island dynamics in slab geometry: I -Isolated islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    that there be zero net electromagnetic force acting on the island. Finally, the ion polarization current correction determination of the island phase-velocity, and the calculation of the ion and electron fluid flow profiles

  19. Two-fluid magnetic island dynamics in slab geometry Richard Fitzpatrick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    . Moreover, the island propaga- tion velocity is uniquely specified by the condition that there be zero net determination of the island propagation velocity, and the calculation of the ion and electron fluid flow

  20. Design of semi-active variable impedance materials using field-responsive fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eastman, Douglas Elmer

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I explored the design of a thin variable impedance material using electrorheological (ER) fluid that is intended to be worn by humans. To determine the critical design parameters of this material, the shear ...

  1. Analizing Aqueous Imbibition into Shale and the Effects of Optimizing Critical Fracturing Fluid Additives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qureshi, Maha

    2013-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    of pertinent chemical additives on fluid imbibition and intercalation into shale samples. We do this with the hope that we will eventually be able to determine how natural phenomena and additives affect long term resource production from unconventional oil...

  2. Analyzing Aqueous Solution Imbibition into Shale and the Effects of Optimizing Critical Fracturing Fluid Additives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plamin, Sammazo Jean-bertrand

    2013-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    of pertinent chemical additives on fluid imbibition and intercalation into shale samples. We do this with the hope that we will eventually be able to determine how natural phenomena and additives affect long term resource production from unconventional oil...

  3. STUDY OF WORKING FLUID MIXTURES AND HIGH TEMPERATURE WORKING FLUIDS FOR COMPRESSOR DRIVEN SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    FILE COPY DO NOT REWMOVE STUDY OF WORKING FLUID MIXTURES AND HIGH TEMPERATURE WORKING FLUIDS is the Step 2 product of the project "Study of working fluid mixtures and high temperature working fluids-ECONOMICAL EVALUATIONS ON COMPRESSION HEAT PUMPS WORKING WITH NONAZEOTROPIC MIXTURES OF FLUIDS 79 6.1 Introduction 79 6

  4. Dynamic dielectric response of electrorheological fluids in drag and pressure flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Horváth; I. Szalai

    2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We have determined the response time of dilute electrorheological fluids (ER) in drag flow, in pressure-driven flow, and in the quiescent state from the dynamic dielectric response. The dependence of the response times on the electric field strength, the shear rate, and the flow velocity were investigated. In the case of ER fluids in drag flow, the response times were also determined from the stress response of the fluid measured simultaneously with the dielectric properties. Comparing the dielectric and rheological response times measured at the same conditions, a significant discrepancy was found, which was attributed to the different instrumental response times of the employed methods. The dielectric permittivity of the quiescent ER fluid was estimated on the basis of formulas derived from the Clausius-Mossotti equation. This simple theoretical model was extended and applied to ER fluids under shear to evaluate the experimental dielectric results.

  5. Making Computer Vision Computationally Efficient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sundaram, Narayanan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Workloads 4 Parallelizing Computer Vision 4.1 Numerical9.1.1 Pattern analysis of computer vision workloads 9.1.23 Understanding Computer Vision 3.1 Patterns and

  6. CX-000954: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CX-000954: Categorical Exclusion Determination Building 94 Computational Science Computer Room 103 Renovation - Phase II CX(s) Applied: B1.29, B1.31 Date: 03012010...

  7. Maxwell's fluid model of magnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Brady; Ross Anderson

    2015-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1861, Maxwell derived two of his equations of electromagnetism by modelling a magnetic line of force as a `molecular vortex' in a fluid-like medium. Later, in 1980, Berry and colleagues conducted experiments on a `phase vortex', a wave geometry in a fluid which is analogous to a magnetic line of force and also exhibits behaviour corresponding to the quantisation of magnetic flux. Here we unify these approaches by writing down a solution to the equations of motion for a compressible fluid which behaves in the same way as a magnetic line of force. We then revisit Maxwell's historical inspiration, namely Faraday's 1846 model of light as disturbances in lines of force. Using our unified model, we show that such disturbances resemble photons: they are polarised, absorbed discretely, obey Maxwell's full equations of electromagnetism to first order, and quantitatively reproduce the correlation that is observed in the Bell tests.

  8. Finite Volume Based Computer Program for Ground Source Heat Pump System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menart, James A. [Wright State University

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a compilation of the work that has been done on the grant DE-EE0002805 entitled ?Finite Volume Based Computer Program for Ground Source Heat Pump Systems.? The goal of this project was to develop a detailed computer simulation tool for GSHP (ground source heat pump) heating and cooling systems. Two such tools were developed as part of this DOE (Department of Energy) grant; the first is a two-dimensional computer program called GEO2D and the second is a three-dimensional computer program called GEO3D. Both of these simulation tools provide an extensive array of results to the user. A unique aspect of both these simulation tools is the complete temperature profile information calculated and presented. Complete temperature profiles throughout the ground, casing, tube wall, and fluid are provided as a function of time. The fluid temperatures from and to the heat pump, as a function of time, are also provided. In addition to temperature information, detailed heat rate information at several locations as a function of time is determined. Heat rates between the heat pump and the building indoor environment, between the working fluid and the heat pump, and between the working fluid and the ground are computed. The heat rates between the ground and the working fluid are calculated as a function time and position along the ground loop. The heating and cooling loads of the building being fitted with a GSHP are determined with the computer program developed by DOE called ENERGYPLUS. Lastly COP (coefficient of performance) results as a function of time are provided. Both the two-dimensional and three-dimensional computer programs developed as part of this work are based upon a detailed finite volume solution of the energy equation for the ground and ground loop. Real heat pump characteristics are entered into the program and used to model the heat pump performance. Thus these computer tools simulate the coupled performance of the ground loop and the heat pump. The price paid for the three-dimensional detail is the large computational times required with GEO3D. The computational times required for GEO2D are reasonable, a few minutes for a 20 year simulation. For a similar simulation, GEO3D takes days of computational time. Because of the small simulation times with GEO2D, a number of attractive features have been added to it. GEO2D has a user friendly interface where inputs and outputs are all handled with GUI (graphical user interface) screens. These GUI screens make the program exceptionally easy to use. To make the program even easier to use a number of standard input options for the most common GSHP situations are provided to the user. For the expert user, the option still exists to enter their own detailed information. To further help designers and GSHP customers make decisions about a GSHP heating and cooling system, cost estimates are made by the program. These cost estimates include a payback period graph to show the user where their GSHP system pays for itself. These GSHP simulation tools should be a benefit to the advancement of GSHP systems.

  9. Recovery Act: Finite Volume Based Computer Program for Ground Source Heat Pump Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A Menart, Professor

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a compilation of the work that has been done on the grant DE-EE0002805 entitled ���¢��������Finite Volume Based Computer Program for Ground Source Heat Pump Systems.���¢������� The goal of this project was to develop a detailed computer simulation tool for GSHP (ground source heat pump) heating and cooling systems. Two such tools were developed as part of this DOE (Department of Energy) grant; the first is a two-dimensional computer program called GEO2D and the second is a three-dimensional computer program called GEO3D. Both of these simulation tools provide an extensive array of results to the user. A unique aspect of both these simulation tools is the complete temperature profile information calculated and presented. Complete temperature profiles throughout the ground, casing, tube wall, and fluid are provided as a function of time. The fluid temperatures from and to the heat pump, as a function of time, are also provided. In addition to temperature information, detailed heat rate information at several locations as a function of time is determined. Heat rates between the heat pump and the building indoor environment, between the working fluid and the heat pump, and between the working fluid and the ground are computed. The heat rates between the ground and the working fluid are calculated as a function time and position along the ground loop. The heating and cooling loads of the building being fitted with a GSHP are determined with the computer program developed by DOE called ENERGYPLUS. Lastly COP (coefficient of performance) results as a function of time are provided. Both the two-dimensional and three-dimensional computer programs developed as part of this work are based upon a detailed finite volume solution of the energy equation for the ground and ground loop. Real heat pump characteristics are entered into the program and used to model the heat pump performance. Thus these computer tools simulate the coupled performance of the ground loop and the heat pump. The price paid for the three-dimensional detail is the large computational times required with GEO3D. The computational times required for GEO2D are reasonable, a few minutes for a 20 year simulation. For a similar simulation, GEO3D takes days of computational time. Because of the small simulation times with GEO2D, a number of attractive features have been added to it. GEO2D has a user friendly interface where inputs and outputs are all handled with GUI (graphical user interface) screens. These GUI screens make the program exceptionally easy to use. To make the program even easier to use a number of standard input options for the most common GSHP situations are provided to the user. For the expert user, the option still exists to enter their own detailed information. To further help designers and GSHP customers make decisions about a GSHP heating and cooling system, cost estimates are made by the program. These cost estimates include a payback period graph to show the user where their GSHP system pays for itself. These GSHP simulation tools should be a benefit to the advancement of GSHP system

  10. Multi-fluid cosmology: An illustration of fundamental principles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. L. Comer; Patrick Peter; N. Andersson

    2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Our current understanding of the Universe depends on the interplay of several distinct "matter" components, which interact mainly through gravity, and electromagnetic radiation. The nature of the different components, and possible interactions, tends to be based on the notion of coupled perfect fluids (or scalar fields). This approach is somewhat naive, especially if one wants to be able to consider issues involving heat flow, dissipative mechanisms, or Bose-Einstein condensation of dark matter. We argue that a more natural starting point would be the multi-purpose variational relativistic multi-fluid system that has so far mainly been applied to neutron star astrophysics. As an illustration of the fundamental principles involved, we develop the formalism for determining the non-linear cosmological solutions to the Einstein equations for a general relativistic two-fluid model for a coupled system of matter (non-zero rest mass) and "radiation" (zero rest mass). The two fluids are allowed to interpenetrate and exhibit a relative flow with respect to each other, implying, in general, an anisotropic Universe. We use initial conditions such that the massless fluid flux dominates early on so that the situation is effectively that of a single fluid and one has the usual Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) spacetime. We find that there is a Bianchi I transition epoch out of which the matter flux dominates. The situation is then effectively that of a single fluid and the spacetime evolves towards the FLRW form. Such a transition opens up the possibility of imprinting observable consequences at the specific scale corresponding to the transition time.

  11. Viscosity of a nucleonic fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aram Z. Mekjian

    2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The viscosity of nucleonic matter is studied both classically and in a quantum mechanical description. The collisions between particles are modeled as hard sphere scattering as a baseline for comparison and as scattering from an attractive square well potential. Properties associated with the unitary limit are developed which are shown to be approximately realized for a system of neutrons. The issue of near perfect fluid behavior of neutron matter is remarked on. Using some results from hard sphere molecular dynamics studies near perfect fluid behavior is discussed further.

  12. Macroscopic limit of a one-dimensional model for aging fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Benoit; Claude Le Bris; Tony Leličvre

    2014-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a one-dimensional equation arising in the multiscale modeling of some non-Newtonian fluids. At a given shear rate, the equation provides the instantaneous mesoscopic response of the fluid, allowing to compute the corresponding stress. In a simple setting, we study the well-posedness of the equation and next the long-time behavior of its solution. In the limit of a response of the fluid much faster than the time variations of the ambient shear rate, we derive some equivalent macroscopic differential equations that relate the shear rate and the stress. Our analytical conclusions are confronted to some numerical experiments. The latter quantitatively confirm our derivations.

  13. Laboratory imaging of stimulation fluid displacement from hydraulic fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tidwell, V. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Parker, M. [SPE, Richardson, TX (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to physically investigate the processes governing stimulation fluid displacement from hydraulic fractures. Experiments were performed on two scales: meter-scale in a 1500 cm{sup 2} sand pack and core-scale in a 65 cm{sup 2} API linear conductivity cell. High-resolution light transmission imaging was employed at the meter-scale to visualize and quantify processes governing fluid displacement. For comparison, complimentary tests were performed using an API conductivity cell under ambient test conditions and at elevated closure stress. In these experiments viscous fingering and gravity drainage were identified as the dominant processes governing fluid displacement. Fluid viscosity was found to dictate the relative importance of the competing displacement processes and ultimately determine the residual liquid saturation of the sand pack. The process by which fluid displacement occurs was seen to effect the shape of both the gas and liquid phase relative permeability functions. Knowledge of such viscosity/relative permeability relationships may prove useful in bounding predictions of post-stimulation recovery of gels from the fracture pack.

  14. Determination hydrophobic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levitt, Michael

    of royalty provided that (1) each reproduction is done without alteration and (2) the Journal reference, of this paper may be copied or distributed royalty free without further permission by computer-based and other

  15. Compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donahoo, Eric E; Ross, Christopher W

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system for a turbine engine for directing cooling fluids from a compressor to a turbine airfoil cooling system to supply cooling fluids to one or more airfoils of a rotor assembly is disclosed. The compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system may enable cooling fluids to be exhausted from a compressor exhaust plenum through a downstream compressor bleed collection chamber and into the turbine airfoil cooling system. As such, the suction created in the compressor exhaust plenum mitigates boundary layer growth along the inner surface while providing flow of cooling fluids to the turbine airfoils.

  16. Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) Exam Fluid Mechanics Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) Exam Fluid Mechanics Review Steven Burian Civil & Environmental Engineering March 22, 2013 #12;Morning (Fluid Mechanics) A. Flow measurement B. Fluid properties C. Fluid, and compressors K. Non-Newtonian flow L. Flow through packed beds Fluids and FE #12;#12;#12;Fluids § Fluids

  17. Visually simulating realistic fluid motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naithani, Priyanka

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    's second law of motion and Conservation of Mass, which leads to the continuity equation. Newton's second law states that the total force F, acting on an element equals mass m times the element's acceleration a. In the case of fluids we do not consider...

  18. Directed flow fluid rinse trough

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kempka, Steven N. (9504 Lona La., Albuquerque, NM 87111); Walters, Robert N. (11872 LaGrange St., Boise, ID 83709)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel rinse troughs accomplish thorough uniform rinsing. The tanks are suitable for one or more essentially planar items having substantially the same shape. The troughs ensure that each surface is rinsed uniformly. The new troughs also require less rinse fluid to accomplish a thorough rinse than prior art troughs.

  19. Directed flow fluid rinse trough

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kempka, S.N.; Walters, R.N.

    1996-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel rinse troughs accomplish thorough uniform rinsing. The tanks are suitable for one or more essentially planar items having substantially the same shape. The troughs ensure that each surface is rinsed uniformly. The new troughs also require less rinse fluid to accomplish a thorough rinse than prior art troughs. 9 figs.

  20. Thermal quantum electrodynamics of nonrelativistic charged fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pascal R. Buenzli; Philippe A. Martin; Marc D. Ryser

    2007-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The theory relevant to the study of matter in equilibrium with the radiation field is thermal quantum electrodynamics (TQED). We present a formulation of the theory, suitable for non relativistic fluids, based on a joint functional integral representation of matter and field variables. In this formalism cluster expansion techniques of classical statistical mechanics become operative. They provide an alternative to the usual Feynman diagrammatics in many-body problems which is not perturbative with respect to the coupling constant. As an application we show that the effective Coulomb interaction between quantum charges is partially screened by thermalized photons at large distances. More precisely one observes an exact cancellation of the dipolar electric part of the interaction, so that the asymptotic particle density correlation is now determined by relativistic effects. It has still the $r^{-6}$ decay typical for quantum charges, but with an amplitude strongly reduced by a relativistic factor.

  1. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR NUMERICAL METHODS IN FLUIDS Int. J. Numer. Meth. Fluids 2011; 65:383404

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elman, Howard

    solvers for models of ICEO microfluidic flows Robert R. Shuttleworth1, Howard C. Elman2,,, Kevin R. Long3 demonstrate the performance of a fast computational algorithm for modeling the design of a microfluidic mixing discretization of the problem, we are able to determine optimal configurations of microfluidic devices. Copyright

  2. Reduced order modeling of fluid/structure interaction.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barone, Matthew Franklin; Kalashnikova, Irina; Segalman, Daniel Joseph; Brake, Matthew Robert

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work performed from October 2007 through September 2009 under the Sandia Laboratory Directed Research and Development project titled 'Reduced Order Modeling of Fluid/Structure Interaction.' This project addresses fundamental aspects of techniques for construction of predictive Reduced Order Models (ROMs). A ROM is defined as a model, derived from a sequence of high-fidelity simulations, that preserves the essential physics and predictive capability of the original simulations but at a much lower computational cost. Techniques are developed for construction of provably stable linear Galerkin projection ROMs for compressible fluid flow, including a method for enforcing boundary conditions that preserves numerical stability. A convergence proof and error estimates are given for this class of ROM, and the method is demonstrated on a series of model problems. A reduced order method, based on the method of quadratic components, for solving the von Karman nonlinear plate equations is developed and tested. This method is applied to the problem of nonlinear limit cycle oscillations encountered when the plate interacts with an adjacent supersonic flow. A stability-preserving method for coupling the linear fluid ROM with the structural dynamics model for the elastic plate is constructed and tested. Methods for constructing efficient ROMs for nonlinear fluid equations are developed and tested on a one-dimensional convection-diffusion-reaction equation. These methods are combined with a symmetrization approach to construct a ROM technique for application to the compressible Navier-Stokes equations.

  3. Heat Transfer in Complex Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehrdad Massoudi

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Amongst the most important constitutive relations in Mechanics, when characterizing the behavior of complex materials, one can identify the stress tensor T, the heat flux vector q (related to heat conduction) and the radiant heating (related to the radiation term in the energy equation). Of course, the expression 'complex materials' is not new. In fact, at least since the publication of the paper by Rivlin & Ericksen (1955), who discussed fluids of complexity (Truesdell & Noll, 1992), to the recently published books (Deshpande et al., 2010), the term complex fluids refers in general to fluid-like materials whose response, namely the stress tensor, is 'non-linear' in some fashion. This non-linearity can manifest itself in variety of forms such as memory effects, yield stress, creep or relaxation, normal-stress differences, etc. The emphasis in this chapter, while focusing on the constitutive modeling of complex fluids, is on granular materials (such as coal) and non-linear fluids (such as coal-slurries). One of the main areas of interest in energy related processes, such as power plants, atomization, alternative fuels, etc., is the use of slurries, specifically coal-water or coal-oil slurries, as the primary fuel. Some studies indicate that the viscosity of coal-water mixtures depends not only on the volume fraction of solids, and the mean size and the size distribution of the coal, but also on the shear rate, since the slurry behaves as shear-rate dependent fluid. There are also studies which indicate that preheating the fuel results in better performance, and as a result of such heating, the viscosity changes. Constitutive modeling of these non-linear fluids, commonly referred to as non-Newtonian fluids, has received much attention. Most of the naturally occurring and synthetic fluids are non-linear fluids, for example, polymer melts, suspensions, blood, coal-water slurries, drilling fluids, mud, etc. It should be noted that sometimes these fluids show Newtonian (linear) behavior for a given range of parameters or geometries; there are many empirical or semi-empirical constitutive equations suggested for these fluids. There have also been many non-linear constitutive relations which have been derived based on the techniques of continuum mechanics. The non-linearities oftentimes appear due to higher gradient terms or time derivatives. When thermal and or chemical effects are also important, the (coupled) momentum and energy equations can give rise to a variety of interesting problems, such as instability, for example the phenomenon of double-diffusive convection in a fluid layer. In Conclusion, we have studied the flow of a compressible (density gradient type) non-linear fluid down an inclined plane, subject to radiation boundary condition. The heat transfer is also considered where a source term, similar to the Arrhenius type reaction, is included. The non-dimensional forms of the equations are solved numerically and the competing effects of conduction, dissipation, heat generation and radiation are discussed. It is observed that the velocity increases rapidly in the region near the inclined surface and is slower in the region near the free surface. Since R{sub 7} is a measure of the heat generation due to chemical reaction, when the reaction is frozen (R{sub 7}=0.0) the temperature distributions would depend only on R{sub 1}, and R{sub 2}, representing the effects of the pressure force developed in the material due to the distribution, R{sub 3} and R{sub 4} viscous dissipation, R{sub 5} the normal stress coefficient, R{sub 6} the measure of the emissivity of the particles to the thermal conductivity, etc. When the flow is not frozen (RP{sub 7} > 0) the temperature inside the flow domain is much higher than those at the inclined and free surfaces. As a result, heat is transferred away from the flow toward both the inclined surface and the free surface with a rate that increases as R{sub 7} increases. For a given temperature, an increase in {zeta} implies that the activation energy is smaller and thus, the reaction ra

  4. An Anisotropic Fluid-Solid Model of the Mouse Heart

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carson, James P.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Jiao, Xiangmin; del Pin, Facundo; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A critical challenge in biomechanical simulations is the spatial discretization of complex fluid-solid geometries created from imaging. This is especially important when dealing with Lagrangian interfaces, as there must be at a minimum both geometric and topological compatibility between fluid and solid phases, with exact matching of the interfacial nodes being highly desirable. We have developed a solution to this problem and applied the approach to the creation of a 3D fluidsolid mesh of the mouse heart. First, a 50 micron isotropic MRI dataset of a perfusion-fixed mouse heart was segmented into blood, tissue, and background using a customized multimaterial connected fuzzy thresholding algorithm. Then, a multimaterial marching cubes algorithm was applied to produce two compatible isosurfaces, one for the blood-tissue boundary and one for the tissue-background boundary. A multimaterial smoothing algorithm that rigorously conserves volume for each phase simultaneously smoothed the isosurfaces. Next we applied novel automated meshing algorithms to generate anisotropic hybrid meshes with the number of layers and the desired element anisotropy for each material as the only input parameters. As the meshes are scale-invariant within a material and include boundary layer prisms, fluid-structure interaction computations would have a relative error equilibrated over the entire mesh. The resulting model is highly detailed mesh representation of the mouse heart, including features such as chordae and coronary vasculature, that is also maximally efficient to produce the best simulation results for the computational resources available

  5. CRITICALITY CURVES FOR PLUTONIUM HYDRAULIC FLUID MIXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WITTEKIND WD

    2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This Calculation Note performs and documents MCNP criticality calculations for plutonium (100% {sup 239}Pu) hydraulic fluid mixtures. Spherical geometry was used for these generalized criticality safety calculations and three geometries of neutron reflection are: {sm_bullet}bare, {sm_bullet}1 inch of hydraulic fluid, or {sm_bullet}12 inches of hydraulic fluid. This document shows the critical volume and critical mass for various concentrations of plutonium in hydraulic fluid. Between 1 and 2 gallons of hydraulic fluid were discovered in the bottom of HA-23S. This HA-23S hydraulic fluid was reported by engineering to be Fyrquel 220. The hydraulic fluid in GLovebox HA-23S is Fyrquel 220 which contains phosphorus. Critical spherical geometry in air is calculated with 0 in., 1 in., or 12 inches hydraulic fluid reflection.

  6. Phenomenology and simulations of active fluids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tjhung, Elsen

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Active fluids are an interesting new class of non-equilibrium systems in physics. In such fluids, the system is forced out of equilibrium by the individual active particles - in contrast to driven systems where the system ...

  7. Quantifying the stimuli of photorheological fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bates, Sarah Woodring

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a model to predict the dynamics of photorheological fluids and, more generally, photoresponsive fluids for monochromatic and polychromatic light sources. Derived from first principles, the model relates the ...

  8. Fluid sampling system for a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lau, L.K.; Alper, N.I.

    1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A system of extracting fluid samples, either liquid or gas, from the interior of a nuclear reactor containment utilizes a jet pump. To extract the sample fluid, a nonradioactive motive fluid is forced through the inlet and discharge ports of a jet pump located outside the containment, creating a suction that draws the sample fluid from the containment through a sample conduit connected to the pump suction port. The mixture of motive fluid and sample fluid is discharged through a return conduit to the interior of the containment. The jet pump and means for removing a portion of the sample fluid from the sample conduit can be located in a shielded sample grab station located next to the containment. A non-nuclear grade active pump can be located outside the grab sampling station and the containment to pump the nonradioactive motive fluid through the jet pump. 1 fig.

  9. Fluid Flow Simulation in Fractured Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Sudipta

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to analyze fluid flow in fractured reservoirs. In most petroleum reservoirs, particularly carbonate reservoirs and some tight sands, natural fractures play a critical role in controlling fluid ...

  10. Fluid sampling system for a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lau, Louis K. (Monroeville, PA); Alper, Naum I. (Monroeville, PA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system of extracting fluid samples, either liquid or gas, from the interior of a nuclear reactor containment utilizes a jet pump. To extract the sample fluid, a nonradioactive motive fluid is forced through the inlet and discharge ports of a jet pump located outside the containment, creating a suction that draws the sample fluid from the containment through a sample conduit connected to the pump suction port. The mixture of motive fluid and sample fluid is discharged through a return conduit to the interior of the containment. The jet pump and means for removing a portion of the sample fluid from the sample conduit can be located in a shielded sample grab station located next to the containment. A non-nuclear grade active pump can be located outside the grab sampling station and the containment to pump the nonradioactive motive fluid through the jet pump.

  11. Direct Measurements of Pore Fluid Density by Vibrating Tube Densimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw {Mirek} S [ORNL; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Wesolowski, David J [ORNL; Cole, David R [ORNL; Wallacher, Dirk [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The densities of pore-confined fluids were measured for the first time by means of a vibrating tube method. Isotherms of total adsorption capacity were measured directly making the method complementary to the conventional gravimetric or volumetric/piezometric adsorption techniques, which yield the excess adsorption (the Gibbsian surface excess). A custom-made high-pressure, high-temperature vibrating tube densimeter (VTD) was used to measure the densities of subcritical and supercritical propane (between 35 C and 97 C) and supercritical carbon dioxide (between 32 C and 50 C) saturating hydrophobic silica aerogel (0.2 g/cm3, 90% porosity) synthesized inside Hastelloy U-tubes. Additionally, excess adsorption isotherms for supercritical CO2 and the same porous solid were measured gravimetrically using a precise magnetically-coupled microbalance. Pore fluid densities and total adsorption isotherms increased monotonically with increasing density of the bulk fluid, in contrast to excess adsorption isotherms, which reached a maximum at a subcritical density of the bulk fluid, and then decreased towards zero or negative values at supercritical densities. Compression of the confined fluid significantly beyond the density of the bulk liquid at the same temperature was observed at subcritical temperatures. The features of the isotherms of confined fluid density are interpreted to elucidate the observed behavior of excess adsorption. The maxima of excess adsorption were found to occur below the critical density of the bulk fluid at the conditions corresponding to the beginning of the plateau of total adsorption, marking the end of the transition of pore fluid to a denser, liquid-like pore phase. The results for propane and carbon dioxide showed similarity in the sense of the principle of corresponding states. No measurable effect of pore confinement on the liquid-vapor critical point was found. Quantitative agreement was obtained between excess adsorption isotherms determined from VTD total adsorption results and those measured gravimetrically at the same temperature, confirming the validity of the vibrating tube measurements. Vibrating tube densimetry was demonstrated as a novel experimental approach capable of providing the average density of pore-confined fluids.

  12. Community computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Fulu, 1970-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis we lay the foundations for a distributed, community-based computing environment to tap the resources of a community to better perform some tasks, either computationally hard or economically prohibitive, or ...

  13. Cloud Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pete Beckman and Ian Foster

    2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Chicago Matters: Beyond Burnham (WTTW). Chicago has become a world center of "cloud computing." Argonne experts Pete Beckman and Ian Foster explain what "cloud computing" is and how you probably already use it on a daily basis.

  14. Supercritical Fluid Attachment of Palladium Nanoparticles on...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Attachment of Palladium Nanoparticles on Aligned Carbon Nanotubes. Supercritical Fluid Attachment of Palladium Nanoparticles on Aligned Carbon Nanotubes. Abstract: Nanocomposite...

  15. Experimental determination of radiated internal wave power without pressure field data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Frank M.; Morrison, P. J. [Physics Department and Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712–1192 (United States)] [Physics Department and Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712–1192 (United States); Paoletti, M. S.; Swinney, Harry L. [Physics Department, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712–1192 (United States)] [Physics Department, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712–1192 (United States)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a method to determine, using only velocity field data, the time-averaged energy flux (J) and total radiated power P for two-dimensional internal gravity waves. Both (J) and P are determined from expressions involving only a scalar function, the stream function ?. We test the method using data from a direct numerical simulation for tidal flow of a stratified fluid past a knife edge. The results for the radiated internal wave power given by the stream function method agree to within 0.5% with results obtained using pressure and velocity data from the numerical simulation. The results for the radiated power computed from the stream function agree well with power computed from the velocity and pressure if the starting point for the stream function computation is on a solid boundary, but if a boundary point is not available, care must be taken to choose an appropriate starting point. We also test the stream function method by applying it to laboratory data for tidal flow past a knife edge, and the results are found to agree with the direct numerical simulation. The supplementary material includes a Matlab code with a graphical user interface that can be used to compute the energy flux and power from two-dimensional velocity field data.

  16. Harmonic Fluids Changxi Zheng Doug L. James

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Harmonic Fluids Changxi Zheng Doug L. James Cornell University Abstract Fluid sounds- ing. Furthermore, while offline applications can rely on talented foley artists to "cook up" plausible for vortex-based fluid sounds [Dobashi et al. 2003] and solid bodies [O'Brien et al. 2001; James et al. 2006

  17. 2014 GRADUATE STUDIES ENVIRONMENTAL FLUID MECHANICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuhang

    for Civil and Environmental Engineers · Stochastic Hydrology · Water Resources Management · Fluid Mechanics2014 GRADUATE STUDIES ENVIRONMENTAL FLUID MECHANICS AND WATER RESOURCES ENGINEERING RESEARCH AREAS SELECTED COURSES FACILITIES The Environmental Fluid Mechanics and Water Resources program at the Georgia

  18. Journal of Fluid Mechanics Hesitant Nature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Journal of Fluid Mechanics Focus luids on F Hesitant Nature E. VILLERMAUX Aix-Marseille Universit0022112009991303 1 #12;Journal of Fluid Mechanics Focus luids on F 1 mm Figure 1. The `gobbling' phenomenon). J. Fluid Mech. (2009), vol. 636, pp. 1­4. c Cambridge University Press 2009 doi:10.1017/S

  19. MECH 502: Fluid Mechanics Winter semester 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MECH 502: Fluid Mechanics Winter semester 2010 Instructor: I.A. Frigaard Times: Tuesdays week of semester. Location: CHBE 103 Synopsis: This course will focus primarily on fluid mechanics will be to look at fluid mechanics fundamentals, and at the mathematical modeling & analysis of simplified flow

  20. SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW J. E. Santos1, G. B. Savioli2, J. M. Carcione3, D´e, Argentina SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW ­ p. #12;Introduction. I Storage of CO2). SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW ­ p. #12;Introduction. II CO2 is separated from natural

  1. Fluid Construction Grammar on Real Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steels, Luc

    Chapter 10 Fluid Construction Grammar on Real Robots Luc Steels1,2, Joachim De Beule3, and Pieter and P. Wellens (2012). Fluid Construction Grammar on Real Robots. In Luc Steels and Manfred Hild (Eds game experiments reported in this book. This framework is called Fluid Construction Grammar (FCG

  2. Light Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon Chalmers

    2006-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A configuration of light pulses is generated, together with emitters and receptors, that allows computing. The computing is extraordinarily high in number of flops per second, exceeding the capability of a quantum computer for a given size and coherence region. The emitters and receptors are based on the quantum diode, which can emit and detect individual photons with high accuracy.

  3. All Order Linearized Hydrodynamics from Fluid/Gravity Correspondence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanyan Bu; Michael Lublinsky

    2014-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Using fluid/gravity correspondence, we determine the (linearized) stress energy tensor of $\\mathcal{N}=4$ super-Yang-Mills theory at strong coupling with all orders in derivatives of fluid velocity included. We find that the dissipative effects are fully encoded in the shear term and a new one, which emerges starting from the third order. We derive, for the first time, closed linear holographic RG flow-type equations for (generalized) momenta-dependent viscosity functions. In the hydrodynamic regime, we obtain the stress tensor up to third order in derivative expansion analytically. We then numerically determine the viscosity functions up to large momenta. As a check of our results, we also derive the generalized Navier-Stokes equations from the Einstein equations in the dual gravity.

  4. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR NUMERICAL METHODS IN FLUIDS Int. J. Numer. Meth. Fluids 2011; 00:123

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buscaglia, Gustavo C.

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR NUMERICAL METHODS IN FLUIDS Int. J. Numer. Meth. Fluids 2011; 00 for the treatment of discontinuous pressures in multi­fluid flows Roberto F. Ausas1 , Gustavo C. Buscaglia1 WORDS: Multi­fluids, Two­phase flows, Embedded interfaces, Finite element method, Surface tension

  5. Fall 2011 ME 542 Advanced Fluid Mechanics ENG ME 542 Advanced Fluid Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fall 2011 ME 542 Advanced Fluid Mechanics ENG ME 542 Advanced Fluid Mechanics Instructor: M. S. Howe EMA 218 mshowe@bu.edu This course is intended to consolidate your knowledge of fluid mechanics specialized courses on fluid mechanics, acoustics and aeroacoustics. Outline syllabus: Equations of motion

  6. PHYSICS OF FLUIDS 24, 043102 (2012) A numerical investigation of the fluid mechanical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Audoly, Basile

    PHYSICS OF FLUIDS 24, 043102 (2012) A numerical investigation of the fluid mechanical sewing or jet of liquid falling onto a fixed surface is one of the simplest situations in fluid mechanics, yet by Chiu-Webster and Lister9 (henceforth CWL), who called it the "fluid mechanical sewing machine

  7. Application of Computational Physics: Blood Vessel Constrictions and Medical Infuses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suprijadi,; Subekti, Petrus; Viridi, Sparisoma

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of computation in many fields are growing fast in last two decades. Increasing on computation performance helps researchers to understand natural phenomena in many fields of science and technology including in life sciences. Computational fluid dynamic is one of numerical methods which is very popular used to describe those phenomena. In this paper we propose moving particle semi-implicit (MPS) and molecular dynamics (MD) to describe different phenomena in blood vessel. The effect of increasing the blood pressure on vessel wall will be calculate using MD methods, while the two fluid blending dynamics will be discussed using MPS. Result from the first phenomenon shows that around 80% of constriction on blood vessel make blood vessel increase and will start to leak on vessel wall, while from the second phenomenon the result shows the visualization of two fluids mixture (drugs and blood) influenced by ratio of drugs debit to blood debit. Keywords: molecular dynamic, blood vessel, fluid dynamic, movin...

  8. Application of Computational Physics: Blood Vessel Constrictions and Medical Infuses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suprijadi; Mohamad Rendi; Petrus Subekti; Sparisoma Viridi

    2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of computation in many fields are growing fast in last two decades. Increasing on computation performance helps researchers to understand natural phenomena in many fields of science and technology including in life sciences. Computational fluid dynamic is one of numerical methods which is very popular used to describe those phenomena. In this paper we propose moving particle semi-implicit (MPS) and molecular dynamics (MD) to describe different phenomena in blood vessel. The effect of increasing the blood pressure on vessel wall will be calculate using MD methods, while the two fluid blending dynamics will be discussed using MPS. Result from the first phenomenon shows that around 80% of constriction on blood vessel make blood vessel increase and will start to leak on vessel wall, while from the second phenomenon the result shows the visualization of two fluids mixture (drugs and blood) influenced by ratio of drugs debit to blood debit. Keywords: molecular dynamic, blood vessel, fluid dynamic, moving particle semi implicit.

  9. Extended fluid models: Pressure tensor effects and equilibria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cerri, S. S. [Physics Department “E. Fermi,” University of Pisa and CNISM, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy) [Physics Department “E. Fermi,” University of Pisa and CNISM, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM association, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Henri, P. [Physics Department “E. Fermi,” University of Pisa and CNISM, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy) [Physics Department “E. Fermi,” University of Pisa and CNISM, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, BP 4229 06304, Nice Cedex 4 (France); Califano, F.; Pegoraro, F. [Physics Department “E. Fermi,” University of Pisa and CNISM, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy)] [Physics Department “E. Fermi,” University of Pisa and CNISM, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Del Sarto, D. [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198 CNRS – Université de Lorraine, BP 239 F-54506 Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France)] [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198 CNRS – Université de Lorraine, BP 239 F-54506 Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France); Faganello, M. [International Institute for Fusion Science/PIIM, UMR 7345 CNRS Aix-Marseille University, Marseille (France)] [International Institute for Fusion Science/PIIM, UMR 7345 CNRS Aix-Marseille University, Marseille (France)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the use of “extended fluid models” as a viable alternative to computationally demanding kinetic simulations in order to manage the global large scale evolution of a collisionless plasma while accounting for the main effects that come into play when spatial micro-scales of the order of the ion inertial scale d{sub i} and of the thermal ion Larmor radius ?{sub i} are formed. We present an extended two-fluid model that retains finite Larmor radius (FLR) corrections to the ion pressure tensor while electron inertia terms and heat fluxes are neglected. Within this model we calculate analytic FLR plasma equilibria in the presence of a shear flow and elucidate the role of the magnetic field asymmetry. Using a Hybrid Vlasov code, we show that these analytic equilibria offer a significant improvement with respect to conventional magnetohydrodynamic shear-flow equilibria when initializing kinetic simulations.

  10. Non-invasive fluid density and viscosity measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The noninvasively measurement of the density and viscosity of static or flowing fluids in a section of pipe such that the pipe performs as the sensing apparatus, is described. Measurement of a suitable structural vibration resonance frequency of the pipe and the width of this resonance permits the density and viscosity to be determined, respectively. The viscosity may also be measured by monitoring the decay in time of a vibration resonance in the pipe.

  11. Fluid dynamics on sieve trays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hag, M.A.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was conducted to investigate the effects of fluid properties on the hydrodynamics of sieve tray columns. The study showed that changes in liquid viscosity influenced froth height, while changes in liquid surface tension and density influenced total pressure drop across the trays. Liquid holdup was independent of these solution properties. The liquid systems used for the study were: water/glycerol for viscosity, water/ethanol for surface tension and methanol/chloroform for density.

  12. Electrokinetic micro-fluid mixer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paul, Phillip H. (Livermore, CA); Rakestraw, David J. (Fremont, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for efficiently and rapidly mixing liquids in a system operating in the creeping flow regime such as would be encountered in capillary-based systems. By applying an electric field to each liquid, the present invention is capable of mixing together fluid streams in capillary-based systems, where mechanical or turbulent stirring cannot be used, to produce a homogeneous liquid.

  13. Fluid dynamics kill Wyoming icicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grace, R.D.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Control of a blowout in which a portion of the drill collar string was extending through the rotary table and into the derrick was compounded by ice building up on the derrick and substructure. However, the momentum kill procedure proved successful. Topics considered in this paper include oil wells, natural gas wells, sleeves, rotary drills, drilling rigs, fluid mechanics, occupational safety, blowouts, drill pipes, rotary drilling, ice removal, and freezing.

  14. Cosmological perturbations for imperfect fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massimo Giovannini

    2005-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Interacting fluids, endowed with bulk viscous stresses, are discussed in a unified perspective with the aim of generalizing the treatment of cosmological perturbation theory to the case where both fluctuating decay rates and fluctuating bulk viscosity coefficients are simultaneously present in the relativistic plasma. A gauge-invariant treatment of the qualitatively new phenomena arising in this context is provided. In a complementary approach, faithful gauge-fixed descriptions of the gravitational and hydrodynamical fluctuations are developed and exploited. To deepen the interplay between bulk viscous stresses and fluctuating decay rates, illustrative examples are proposed and discussed both analytically and numerically. Particular attention is paid to the coupled evolution of curvature and entropy fluctuations when, in the relativistic plasma, at least one of the interacting fluids possesses a fluctuating bulk viscosity coefficient. It is argued that this class of models may be usefully employed as an effective description of the decay of the inflaton as well as of other phenomena involving imperfect relativistic fluids.

  15. Locomotion in complex fluids: Integral theorems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric Lauga

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The biological fluids encountered by self-propelled cells display complex microstructures and rheology. We consider here the general problem of low-Reynolds number locomotion in a complex fluid. {Building on classical work on the transport of particles in viscoelastic fluids,} we demonstrate how to mathematically derive three integral theorems relating the arbitrary motion of an isolated organism to its swimming kinematics {in a non-Newtonian fluid}. These theorems correspond to three situations of interest, namely (1) squirming motion in a linear viscoelastic fluid, (2) arbitrary surface deformation in a weakly non-Newtonian fluid, and (3) small-amplitude deformation in an arbitrarily non-Newtonian fluid. Our final results, valid for a wide-class of {swimmer geometry,} surface kinematics and constitutive models, at most require mathematical knowledge of a series of Newtonian flow problems, and will be useful to quantity the locomotion of biological and synthetic swimmers in complex environments.

  16. Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer Science FY 2006 Accomplishment High Performance collections of scientific data. In recent years, much of the work in computer and computational science has

  17. MHD computations for stellarators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.L.

    1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Considerable progress has been made in the development of computational techniques for studying the magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium and stability properties of three-dimensional configurations. Several different approaches have evolved to the point where comparison of results determined with different techniques shows good agreement. 55 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Hydrostatic bearings for a turbine fluid flow metering device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fincke, J.R.

    1982-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotor assembly fluid metering device has been improved by development of a hydrostatic bearing fluid system which provides bearing fluid at a common pressure to rotor assembly bearing surfaces. The bearing fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid between bearing surfaces and allows rapid replacement of bearing fluid between bearing surfaces, thereby minimizing bearing wear and corrosion. 3 figs.

  19. Hydrostatic bearings for a turbine fluid flow metering device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fincke, James R. (Rigby, ID)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotor assembly fluid metering device has been improved by development of a hydrostatic bearing fluid system which provides bearing fluid at a common pressure to rotor assembly bearing surfaces. The bearing fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid between bearing surfaces and allows rapid replacement of bearing fluid between bearing surfaces, thereby minimizing bearing wear and corrosion.

  20. System and technique for ultrasonic determination of degree of cooking

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bond, Leonard J. (Richland, WA); Diaz, Aaron A. (W. Richland, WA); Judd, Kayte M. (Richland, WA); Pappas, Richard A. (Richland, WA); Cliff, William C. (Richland, WA); Pfund, David M. (Richland, WA); Morgen, Gerald P. (Kennewick, WA)

    2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are described for determining the doneness of food during a cooking process. Ultrasonic signal are passed through the food during cooking. The change in transmission characteristics of the ultrasonic signal during the cooking process is measured to determine the point at which the food has been cooked to the proper level. In one aspect, a heated fluid cooks the food, and the transmission characteristics along a fluid-only ultrasonic path provides a reference for comparison with the transmission characteristics for a food-fluid ultrasonic path.

  1. A simplified thermohydrodynamic model for fluid film bearings. Final report, February 15, 1992--February 15, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szeri, A.Z. [Pittsburgh Univ., PA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We aim to develop a simplified yet realistic model of fluid film lubrication under thermohydrodynamic conditions, with significant thermal and elastic deformation of the bearing pads. The principal thrust is transfer of technology from the researcher to the industrial designer: the end product will include two user-friendly computer programs, one for journal bearings and the other for thrust bearings, to be used for bearing design in interactive mode on a personal computer.

  2. Some Mathematical and Numerical Issues in Geophysical Fluid Dynamics and Climate Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jianping Li; Shouhong Wang

    2007-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, we address both recent advances and open questions in some mathematical and computational issues in geophysical fluid dynamics (GFD) and climate dynamics. The main focus is on 1) the primitive equations (PEs) models and their related mathematical and computational issues, 2) climate variability, predictability and successive bifurcation, and 3) a new dynamical systems theory and its applications to GFD and climate dynamics.

  3. Noninvasive identification of fluids by swept-frequency acoustic interferometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for rapid, noninvasive identification and monitoring of chemicals in sealed containers or containers where direct access to the chemical is not possible is described. Multiple ultrasonic acoustic properties (up to four) of a fluid are simultaneously determined. The present invention can be used for chemical identification and for determining changes in known chemicals from a variety of sources. It is not possible to identify all known chemicals based on the measured parameters, but known classes of chemicals in suspected containers, such as in chemical munitions, can be characterized. In addition, a large number of industrial chemicals can be identified.

  4. Absolute measurement of the viscosity of classical and quantum fluids by rotating-cylinder viscometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donnelly, R.J.; LaMar, M.M.

    1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the use of rotating-cylinder viscometers to determine absolute shear viscosities of classical fluids and of helium II in the context of past and current knowledge of the stability and flow of these fluids between concentric cylinders. We identify a problem in measuring the absolute viscosity when the inner cylinder is rotating and the outer cylinder is at rest. We conclude by discussing the design of viscometers for absolute viscosity measurements in helium I and helium II.

  5. Spectrometer for measuring the concentration of components in a fluid stream and method for using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Durham, M.D.; Stedman, D.H.; Ebner, T.G.; Burkhardt, M.R.

    1991-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A device and method are described for measuring the concentrations of components of a fluid stream. Preferably, the fluid stream is an in-situ gas stream, such as a fossil fuel fired flue gas in a smoke stack. The measurements are determined from the intensity of radiation over a selected range of radiation wavelengths using peak-to-trough calculations. The need for a reference intensity is eliminated. 15 figures.

  6. Cloud Computing.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Muhammad Anas

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? Cloud computing has been given a great deal of attention during recent years. Almost all the technology market leaders and leading hosting service providers… (more)

  7. Multiple source/multiple target fluid transfer apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, Terry D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluid transfer apparatus includes: a) a plurality of orifices for connection with fluid sources; b) a plurality of orifices for connection with fluid targets; c) a set of fluid source conduits and fluid target conduits associated with the orifices; d) a pump fluidically interposed between the source and target conduits to transfer fluid therebetween; e) a purge gas conduit in fluid communication with the fluid source conduits, fluid target conduits and pump to receive and pass a purge gas under pressure; f) a solvent conduit in fluid communication with the fluid source conduits, fluid target conduits and pump to receive and pass solvent, the solvent conduit including a solvent valve; g) pump control means for controlling operation of the pump; h) purge gas valve control means for controlling operation of the purge gas valve to selectively impart flow of purge gas to the fluid source conduits, fluid target conduits and pump; i) solvent valve control means for controlling operation of the solvent valve to selectively impart flow of solvent to the fluid source conduits, fluid target conduits and pump; and j) source and target valve control means for controlling operation of the fluid source conduit valves and the fluid target conduit valves to selectively impart passage of fluid between a selected one of the fluid source conduits and a selected one of the fluid target conduits through the pump and to enable passage of solvent or purge gas through selected fluid source conduits and selected fluid target conduits.

  8. Multiple source/multiple target fluid transfer apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, T.D.

    1997-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluid transfer apparatus includes: (a) a plurality of orifices for connection with fluid sources; (b) a plurality of orifices for connection with fluid targets; (c) a set of fluid source conduits and fluid target conduits associated with the orifices; (d) a pump fluidically interposed between the source and target conduits to transfer fluid there between; (e) a purge gas conduit in fluid communication with the fluid source conduits, fluid target conduits and pump to receive and pass a purge gas under pressure; (f) a solvent conduit in fluid communication with the fluid source conduits, fluid target conduits and pump to receive and pass solvent, the solvent conduit including a solvent valve; (g) pump control means for controlling operation of the pump; (h) purge gas valve control means for controlling operation of the purge gas valve to selectively impart flow of purge gas to the fluid source conduits, fluid target conduits and pump; (i) solvent valve control means for controlling operation of the solvent valve to selectively impart flow of solvent to the fluid source conduits, fluid target conduits and pump; and (j) source and target valve control means for controlling operation of the fluid source conduit valves and the fluid target conduit valves to selectively impart passage of fluid between a selected one of the fluid source conduits and a selected one of the fluid target conduits through the pump and to enable passage of solvent or purge gas through selected fluid source conduits and selected fluid target conduits. 6 figs.

  9. Mathematical Modeling and Simulation for Applications of Fluid Flow in Porous Media \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ewing, Richard E.

    Mathematical Modeling and Simulation for Applications of Fluid Flow in Porous Media \\Lambda Richard descriptions at various length scales, modeling the effects of this heterogeneity of the porous medium a computer code has been developed which gives concrete quantitative results for the total model, this out

  10. On the Dynamics of Magnetic Fluids in Magnetic Resonance Padraig J. Cantillon-Murphy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Magnetic Resonance Imaging by Padraig J. Cantillon-Murphy B.E., Electrical and Electronic EngineeringOn the Dynamics of Magnetic Fluids in Magnetic Resonance Imaging by Padraig J. Cantillon-Murphy Submitted to the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in partial fulfillment

  11. Fusion Engineering and Design 82 (2007) 22172225 Integrated thermo-fluid analysis towards helium flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    Fusion Engineering and Design 82 (2007) 2217­2225 Integrated thermo-fluid analysis towards helium. Andob, I. Komadab a Fusion Engineering Sciences, Mechanical and Aerospace Eng. Department, University the ITER test blanket module (TBM) warrants the need of extensive computer aided engineering (CAE

  12. Journal of Fluids and Structures 24 (2008) 250269 Numerical and experimental study of expiratory flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Hirtum, Annemie

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , the pharynx, the mouth and the larynx (Fig. 1), is the most external part of the respiratory system. Modelling deformations has been chosen to compute the mechanical behaviour of the tongue. The main features of the flow and Depollier, 1995; Huang, 1995; Balint and Lucey, 2005), numerical simulations of the respiratory fluid flow

  13. Immersible solar heater for fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An immersible solar heater comprising a light-absorbing panel attached to a frame for absorbing heat energy from the light and transferring the absorbed heat energy directly to the fluid in which the heater is immersed. The heater can be used to heat a swimming pool, for example, and is held in position and at a preselected angle by a system of floats, weights and tethers so that the panel can operate efficiently. A skid can be used in one embodiment to prevent lateral movement of the heater along the bottom of the pool. Alternative embodiments include different arrangements of the weights, floats and tethers and methods for making the heater.

  14. Fluid cooled vehicle drive module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beihoff, Bruce C.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.; Meyer, Andreas A.; Gollhardt, Neil; Kannenberg, Daniel G.

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An electric vehicle drive includes a support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support, in conjunction with other packaging features may form a shield from both external EM/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  15. Tensiometer and method of determining soil moisture potential in below-grade earthen soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mattson, Earl D. (Albuquerque, NM); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A tensiometer to in situ determine below-grade soil moisture, potential of earthen soil includes, a) an apparatus adapted for insertion into earthen soil below grade, the apparatus having a below-grade portion, and, comprising; b) a porous material provided in the below-grade portion, the porous material at least in part defining a below-grade first fluid chamber; c) a first fluid conduit extending outwardly of the first fluid chamber; d) a first controllable isolation valve provided within the first fluid conduit, the first controllable isolation valve defining a second fluid chamber in fluid communication with the first fluid chamber through the first fluid conduit and the isolation valve, the first controllable isolation valve being received within the below-grade portion; and e) a pressure transducer in fluid communication with the first fluid chamber, the pressure transducer being received within the below-grade portion. An alternate embodiment includes an apparatus adapted for insertion into earthen soil below grade, the apparatus having a below-grade portion, and including: i) a porous material provided in the below-grade portion, the porous material at least in part defining a below-grade first fluid chamber; and ii) a pressure sensing apparatus in fluid communication with the first fluid chamber, the pressure sensing apparatus being entirely received within the below-grade portion. A method is also disclosed using the above and other apparatus.

  16. Tensiometer and method of determining soil moisture potential in below-grade earthen soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, J.M.; Mattson, E.D.; Sisson, J.B.

    1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A tensiometer to in-situ determine below-grade soil moisture, potential of earthen soil includes, (a) an apparatus adapted for insertion into earthen soil below grade, the apparatus having a below-grade portion, and, comprising; (b) a porous material provided in the below-grade portion, the porous material at least in part defining a below-grade first fluid chamber; (c) a first fluid conduit extending outwardly of the first fluid chamber; (d) a first controllable isolation valve provided within the first fluid conduit, the first controllable isolation valve defining a second fluid chamber in fluid communication with the first fluid chamber through the first fluid conduit and the isolation valve, the first controllable isolation valve being received within the below-grade portion; and (e) a pressure transducer in fluid communication with the first fluid chamber, the pressure transducer being received within the below-grade portion. An alternate embodiment includes an apparatus adapted for insertion into earthen soil below grade, the apparatus having a below-grade portion, and including: (1) a porous material provided in the below-grade portion, the porous material at least in part defining a below-grade first fluid chamber; and (2) a pressure sensing apparatus in fluid communication with the first fluid chamber, the pressure sensing apparatus being entirely received within the below-grade portion. A method is also disclosed using the above and other apparatus. 6 figs.

  17. Computation of multi-material interactions using point method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Duan Z [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ma, Xia [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Giguere, Paul T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Calculations of fluid flows are often based on Eulerian description, while calculations of solid deformations are often based on Lagrangian description of the material. When the Eulerian descriptions are used to problems of solid deformations, the state variables, such as stress and damage, need to be advected, causing significant numerical diffusion error. When Lagrangian methods are used to problems involving large solid deformat ions or fluid flows, mesh distortion and entanglement are significant sources of error, and often lead to failure of the calculation. There are significant difficulties for either method when applied to problems involving large deformation of solids. To address these difficulties, particle-in-cell (PIC) method is introduced in the 1960s. In the method Eulerian meshes stay fixed and the Lagrangian particles move through the Eulerian meshes during the material deformation. Since its introduction, many improvements to the method have been made. The work of Sulsky et al. (1995, Comput. Phys. Commun. v. 87, pp. 236) provides a mathematical foundation for an improved version, material point method (MPM) of the PIC method. The unique advantages of the MPM method have led to many attempts of applying the method to problems involving interaction of different materials, such as fluid-structure interactions. These problems are multiphase flow or multimaterial deformation problems. In these problems pressures, material densities and volume fractions are determined by satisfying the continuity constraint. However, due to the difference in the approximations between the material point method and the Eulerian method, erroneous results for pressure will be obtained if the same scheme used in Eulerian methods for multiphase flows is used to calculate the pressure. To resolve this issue, we introduce a numerical scheme that satisfies the continuity requirement to higher order of accuracy in the sense of weak solutions for the continuity equations. Numerical examples are given to demonstrate the new scheme.

  18. Split driveshaft pump for hazardous fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, II, Thomas P. (Aiken, SC); Purohit, Jwalit J. (Evans, GA); Fazio, John M. (Orchard Park, NY)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pump having a split driveshaft for use in pumping hazardous fluids wherein only one driveshaft becomes contaminated by the fluid while the second remains isolated from the fluid. The pump has a first portion and a second portion. The first portion contains a pump motor, the first driveshaft, a support pedestal, and vapor barriers and seals. The second portion contains a second, self-lubricating driveshaft and an impeller. The first and second driveshafts are connected together by a releasable coupling. A shield and a slinger deployed below the coupling prevent fluid from the second portion from reaching the first portion. In operation, only the second assembly comes into contact with the fluid being pumped, so the risk of contamination of the first portion by the hazardous fluid is reduced. The first assembly can be removed for repairs or routine maintenance by decoupling the first and second driveshafts and disconnecting the motor from the casing.

  19. On the equivalence of nonadiabatic fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Barreto

    2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we show how an anisotropic fluid in the diffusion limit can be equivalent to an isotropic fluid in the streaming out limit, in spherical symmetry. For a particular equation of state this equivalence is total, from one fluid we can obtain the other and vice versa. A numerical master model is presented, based on a generic equation of state, in which only quantitative differences are displayed between both nonadiabatic fluids. From a deeper view, other difference between fluids is shown as an asymmetry that can be overcome if we consider the appropriate initial-boundary conditions. Equivalence in this context can be considered as a first order method of approximation to study dissipative fluids.

  20. Supercritical fluid thermodynamics for coal processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Swol, F. (Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Eckert, C.A. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Chemical Engineering)

    1988-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this research is to develop an equation of state that can be used to predict solubilities and tailor supercritical fluid solvents for the extraction and processing of coal. To meet this objective we have implemented a two-sided. approach. First, we expanded the database of model coal compound solubilities in higher temperature fluids, polar fluids, and fluid mixtures systems. Second, the unique solute/solute, solute/cosolvent and solute/solvent intermolecular interactions in supercritical fluid solutions were investigated using spectroscopic techniques. These results increased our understanding of the molecular phenomena that affect solubility in supercritical fluids and were significant in the development of an equation of state that accurately reflects the true molecular makeup of the solution. (VC)

  1. Mechanical Computation: its Computational Complexity and Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, John H.

    Mechanical Computation: its Computational Complexity and Technologies Chapter, Encyclopedia Importance II. Introduction to Computational Complexity III. Computational Complexity of Mechanical Devices and their Movement Problems IV. Concrete Mechanical Computing Devices V. Future Directions VI. Bibliography Glossary

  2. Maximally Random Jamming of Two-Dimensional One-Component and Binary Hard Disc Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xinliang Xu; Stuart A. Rice

    2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We report calculations of the density of maximally random jamming (aka random close packing) of one-component and binary hard disc fluids. The theoretical structure used provides a common framework for description of the hard disc liquid to hexatic, the liquid to hexagonal crystal and the liquid-to-maximally random jammed state transitions. Our analysis is based on locating a particular bifurcation of the solutions of the integral equation for the inhomogeneous single particle density at the transition between different spatial structures. The bifurcation of solutions we study is initiated from the dense metastable fluid, and we associate it with the limit of stability of the fluid, which we identify with the transition from the metastable fluid to a maximally random jammed state. For the one-component hard disc fluid the predicted packing fraction at which the metastable fluid to maximally random jammed state transition occurs is 0.84, in excellent agreement with the experimental value 0.84 \\pm 0.02. The corresponding analysis of the limit of stability of a binary hard disc fluid with specified disc diameter ratio and disc composition requires extra approximations in the representations of the direct correlation function, the equation of state, and the number of order parameters accounted for. Keeping only the order parameter identified with the largest peak in the structure factor of the highest density regular lattice with the same disc diameter ratio and disc composition as the binary fluid, the predicted density of maximally random jamming is found to be 0.84 to 0.87, depending on the equation of state used, and very weakly dependent on the ratio of disc diameters and the fluid composition, in agreement with both experimental data and computer simulation data.

  3. Mechanics of layered anisotropic poroelastic media with applications to effective stress for fluid permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berryman, J.G.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mechanics of vertically layered porous media has some similarities to and some differences from the more typical layered analysis for purely elastic media. Assuming welded solid contact at the solid-solid interfaces implies the usual continuity conditions, which are continuity of the vertical (layering direction) stress components and the horizontal strain components. These conditions are valid for both elastic and poroelastic media. Differences arise through the conditions for the pore pressure and the increment of fluid content in the context of fluid-saturated porous media. The two distinct conditions most often considered between any pair of contiguous layers are: (1) an undrained fluid condition at the interface, meaning that the increment of fluid content is zero (i.e., {delta}{zeta} = 0), or (2) fluid pressure continuity at the interface, implying that the change in fluid pressure is zero across the interface (i.e., {delta}p{sub f} = 0). Depending on the types of measurements being made on the system and the pertinent boundary conditions for these measurements, either (or neither) of these two conditions might be directly pertinent. But these conditions are sufficient nevertheless to be used as thought experiments to determine the expected values of all the poroelastic coefficients. For quasi-static mechanical changes over long time periods, we expect drained conditions to hold, so the pressure must then be continuous. For high frequency wave propagation, the pore-fluid typically acts as if it were undrained (or very nearly so), with vanishing of the fluid increment at the boundaries being appropriate. Poroelastic analysis of both these end-member cases is discussed, and the general equations for a variety of applications to heterogeneous porous media are developed. In particular, effective stress for the fluid permeability of such poroelastic systems is considered; fluid permeabilities characteristic of granular media or tubular pore shapes are treated in some detail, as are permeabilities of some of the simpler types of fractured materials.

  4. Process for retarding fluid flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandford, B.B.; Zillmer, R.C.

    1989-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for retarding the flow of fluid in a subterranean formation, comprising: (a) introducing an effective amount of a gel-forming composition into a subterranean formation, the gel-forming composition being operable when gelled in the formation for retarding the flow of fluid therein. The gel-forming composition consists of: i. a first substance dissolved in water to form an aqueous solution, the first substance being selected from the group consisting of polyvivyl alcohols, and mixtures thereof, wherein the gel-forming composition contains an amount of the first substance of from about 0.5 to about 5 weight percent of the gel-forming composition, and ii. an effective amount of glutaraldehyde which is operable for forming a weakly acidic condition having a pH from about 5.5 to less than 7 in the gel-forming composition and also operable for promoting crosslinking of the first substance and glutaraldehyde and for forming a gel from the gel-forming composition under the weakly acidic condition within a period of time no greater than about 5 days without adding an acidic catalyst to the gel-forming composition to lower the pH of the gel-forming composition below about 5.5.

  5. Apparatus for unloading pressurized fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rehberger, K.M.

    1994-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus is described for unloading fluid, preferably pressurized gas, from containers in a controlled manner that protects the immediate area from exposure to the container contents. The device consists of an unloading housing, which is enclosed within at least one protective structure, for receiving the dispensed contents of the steel container, and a laser light source, located external to the protective structure, for opening the steel container instantaneously. The neck or stem of the fluid container is placed within the sealed interior environment of the unloading housing. The laser light passes through both the protective structure and the unloading housing to instantaneously pierce a small hole within the stem of the container. Both the protective structure and the unloading housing are specially designed to allow laser light passage without compromising the light's energy level. Also, the unloading housing allows controlled flow of the gas once it has been dispensed from the container. The external light source permits remote operation of the unloading device. 2 figures.

  6. System and method for filling a plurality of isolated vehicle fluid circuits through a common fluid fill port

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Scott C; Fansler, Douglas

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A vehicle having multiple isolated fluid circuits configured to be filled through a common fill port includes a first fluid circuit disposed within the vehicle, the first fluid circuit having a first fill port, a second fluid circuit disposed within the vehicle, and a conduit defining a fluid passageway between the first fluid circuit and second fluid circuit, the conduit including a valve. The valve is configured such that the first and second fluid circuits are fluidly coupled via the passageway when the valve is open, and are fluidly isolated when the valve is closed.

  7. Fluid control structures in microfluidic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mathies, Richard A. (Moraga, CA); Grover, William H. (Berkeley, CA); Skelley, Alison (Berkeley, CA); Lagally, Eric (Oakland, CA); Liu, Chung N. (Albany, CA)

    2008-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for implementing microfluidic analysis devices are provided. A monolithic elastomer membrane associated with an integrated pneumatic manifold allows the placement and actuation of a variety of fluid control structures, such as structures for pumping, isolating, mixing, routing, merging, splitting, preparing, and storing volumes of fluid. The fluid control structures can be used to implement a variety of sample introduction, preparation, processing, and storage techniques.

  8. Vibratory pumping of a free fluid stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merrigan, Michael A. (Santa Cruz, NM); Woloshun, Keith A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A vibratory fluid pump having a force generator for generating asymmetric periodic waves or oscillations connected to one end of one or more fluid conveyance means, such as filaments. The opposite ends of the filaments are connected to springs. Fluid introduced onto the filaments will traverse along the filaments according to the magnitude of the positive and negative excursions of the periodic waves or oscillations, and can be recovered from the filaments.

  9. Vibratory pumping of a free fluid stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merrigan, M.A.; Woloshun, K.A.

    1990-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A vibratory fluid pump is described having a force generator for generating asymmetric periodic waves or oscillations connected to one end of one or more fluid conveyance means, such as filaments. The opposite ends of the filaments are connected to springs. Fluid introduced onto the filaments will traverse along the filaments according to the magnitude of the positive and negative excursions of the periodic waves or oscillations, and can be recovered from the filaments. 3 figs.

  10. Hydrostatic bearings for a turbine fluid flow metering device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fincke, J.R.

    1980-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotor assembly fluid metering device has been improved by development of a hydrostatic bearing fluid system which provides bearing fluid at a common pressure to rotor assembly bearing surfaces. The bearing fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid between bearing surfaces and allows rapid replacement of bearing fluid between bearing surfaces, thereby minimizing bearing wear and corrosion.

  11. Methodologies for Reservoir Characterization Using Fluid Inclusion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Surveys Chemical Signatures of and Precursors to Fractures Using Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy Creation of an Engineered Geothermal System through Hydraulic and Thermal Stimulation...

  12. Quantum Mechanical Description of Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Y. Cui

    2001-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we deal with fluid motion in terms of quantum mechanics. Mechanism accounting for the appearance of quantum behavior is discussed.

  13. Coupled atomistic-continuum methods for fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I will discuss the coupling scheme, its application to polymer fluids, and the major difficulties in implementations. In the second part of the talk, I will discuss the ...

  14. DISPLAYING AND INTERPRETING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY ANALYSES...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This is the fourth paper in a series on developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy (FIS) as a logging tool for geothermal bore holes. Here we address methods of displaying...

  15. SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    santos

    SEISMIC MONITORING OF. CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW. J. E. Santos. 1. , G. B. Savioli. 2. , J. M. Carcione. 3. , D. Gei. 3. 1. CONICET, IGPUBA, Fac.

  16. Gas powered fluid gun with recoil mitigation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grubelich, Mark C; Yonas, Gerold

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas powered fluid gun for propelling a stream or slug of a fluid at high velocity toward a target. Recoil mitigation is provided that reduces or eliminates the associated recoil forces, with minimal or no backwash. By launching a quantity of water in the opposite direction, net momentum forces are reduced or eliminated. Examples of recoil mitigation devices include a cone for making a conical fluid sheet, a device forming multiple impinging streams of fluid, a cavitating venturi, one or more spinning vanes, or an annular tangential entry/exit.

  17. Solution generating theorems for perfect fluid spheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petarpa Boonserm; Matt Visser; Silke Weinfurtner

    2006-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The first static spherically symmetric perfect fluid solution with constant density was found by Schwarzschild in 1918. Generically, perfect fluid spheres are interesting because they are first approximations to any attempt at building a realistic model for a general relativistic star. Over the past 90 years a confusing tangle of specific perfect fluid spheres has been discovered, with most of these examples seemingly independent from each other. To bring some order to this collection, we develop several new transformation theorems that map perfect fluid spheres into perfect fluid spheres. These transformation theorems sometimes lead to unexpected connections between previously known perfect fluid spheres, sometimes lead to new previously unknown perfect fluid spheres, and in general can be used to develop a systematic way of classifying the set of all perfect fluid spheres. In addition, we develop new ``solution generating'' theorems for the TOV, whereby any given solution can be ``deformed'' to a new solution. Because these TOV-based theorems work directly in terms of the pressure profile and density profile it is relatively easy to impose regularity conditions at the centre of the fluid sphere.

  18. Spinning Fluids: A Group Theoretical Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dario Capasso; Debajyoti Sarkar

    2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We extend the Lagrangian formulation of relativistic non-abelian fluids in group theory language. We propose a Mathisson-Papapetrou equation for spinning fluids in terms of the reduction limit of de Sitter group. The equation we find correctly boils down to the one for non-spinning fluids. We study the application of our results for an FRW cosmological background for fluids with no vorticity and for dusts in the vicinity of a Kerr black hole. We also explore two alternative approaches based on a group theoretical formulation of particles dynamics.

  19. Fluid&ParticulateSystems 424514/2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    Being often a low temperature process, better energy economy than, for example, distillation Fluid species (no solvent present) are separated by partial freezing Zone melting (refining) from solid

  20. Identification of fluids and an interface between fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, D.O.; Wayland, J.R. Jr.

    1988-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Complex impedance measured over a predefined frequency range is used to determine the identity of different oils in a column. The location of an interface between the oils is determined from the percent frequency effects of the complex impedance measured across the interface. 4 figs.

  1. Integrated acoustic phase separator and multiphase fluid composition monitoring apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Dipen N

    2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for down hole gas separation from the multiphase fluid flowing in a wellbore or a pipe, for determining the quantities of the individual components of the liquid and the flow rate of the liquid, and for remixing the component parts of the fluid after which the gas volume may be measured, without affecting the flow stream, are described. Acoustic radiation force is employed to separate gas from the liquid, thereby permitting measurements to be separately made for these two components; the liquid (oil/water) composition is determined from ultrasonic resonances; and the gas volume is determined from capacitance measurements. Since the fluid flows around and through the component parts of the apparatus, there is little pressure difference, and no protection is required from high pressure differentials.

  2. Computing Events

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity2 Computational PhysicsComputing and StorageComputing

  3. Conditions for fluid separations in microchannels, capillary-driven fluid separations, and laminated devices capable of separating fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    TeGrotenhuis, Ward E. (Kennewick, WA); Stenkamp, Victoria S. (Richland, WA)

    2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of separating fluids using capillary forces and/or improved conditions for are disclosed. The improved methods may include control of the ratio of gas and liquid Reynolds numbers relative to the Suratman number. Also disclosed are wick-containing, laminated devices that are capable of separating fluids.

  4. Conditions for fluid separations in microchannels, capillary-driven fluid separations, and laminated devices capable of separating fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    TeGrotenhuis, Ward E [Kennewick, WA; Stenkamp, Victoria S [Richland, WA

    2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of separating fluids using capillary forces and/or improved conditions for are disclosed. The improved methods may include control of the ratio of gas and liquid Reynolds numbers relative to the Suratman number. Also disclosed are wick-containing, laminated devices that are capable of separating fluids.

  5. Laser microfluidics : fluid actuation by light Laser microfluidics: fluid actuation by light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Laser microfluidics : fluid actuation by light Laser microfluidics: fluid actuation by light Jean.delville@cpmoh.u-bordeaux1.fr Abstract: The development of microfluidic devices is still hindered by the lack of robust to extend this concept to microfluidic two-phase flows. First, we investigate the destabilization of fluid

  6. Computer gardening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faught, Robert Townes

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the initial development of a computer-controlled system for the production of three-dimensional forms. The project involved the design and construction of a carving device which was attached to an ...

  7. Immersible solar heater for fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1995-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An immersible solar heater is described comprising a light-absorbing panel attached to a frame for absorbing heat energy from the light and transferring the absorbed heat energy directly to the fluid in which the heater is immersed. The heater can be used to heat a swimming pool, for example, and is held in position and at a preselected angle by a system of floats, weights and tethers so that the panel can operate efficiently. A skid can be used in one embodiment to prevent lateral movement of the heater along the bottom of the pool. Alternative embodiments include different arrangements of the weights, floats and tethers and methods for making the heater. 11 figs.

  8. Immersible solar heater for fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An immersible solar heater is described comprising a light-absorbing panel attached to a frame for absorbing heat energy from the light and transferring the absorbed heat energy directly to the fluid in which the heater is immersed. The heater can be used to heat a swimming pool, for example, and is held in position and at a preselected angle by a system of floats, weights and tethers so that the panel can operate efficiently. A skid can be used in one embodiment to prevent lateral movement of the heater along the bottom of the pool. Alternative embodiments include different arrangements of the weights, floats and tethers and methods for making the heater.

  9. Hamilton's equations for a fluid membrane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riccardo Capovilla; Jemal Guven; Efrain Rojas

    2005-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Consider a homogenous fluid membrane described by the Helfrich-Canham energy, quadratic in the mean curvature of the membrane surface. The shape equation that determines equilibrium configurations is fourth order in derivatives and cubic in the mean curvature. We introduce a Hamiltonian formulation of this equation which dismantles it into a set of coupled first order equations. This involves interpreting the Helfrich-Canham energy as an action; equilibrium surfaces are generated by the evolution of space curves. Two features complicate the implementation of a Hamiltonian framework: (i) The action involves second derivatives. This requires treating the velocity as a phase space variable and the introduction of its conjugate momentum. The canonical Hamiltonian is constructed on this phase space. (ii) The action possesses a local symmetry -- reparametrization invariance. The two labels we use to parametrize points on the surface are themselves physically irrelevant. This symmetry implies primary constraints, one for each label, that need to be implemented within the Hamiltonian. The two lagrange multipliers associated with these constraints are identified as the components of the acceleration tangential to the surface. The conservation of the primary constraints imply two secondary constraints, fixing the tangential components of the momentum conjugate to the position. Hamilton's equations are derived and the appropriate initial conditions on the phase space variables are identified. Finally, it is shown how the shape equation can be reconstructed from these equations.

  10. FINITE VOLUME METHODS APPLIED TO THE COMPUTATIONAL MODELLING OF WELDING PHENOMENA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Gary

    1 FINITE VOLUME METHODS APPLIED TO THE COMPUTATIONAL MODELLING OF WELDING PHENOMENA Gareth A.Taylor@brunel.ac.uk ABSTRACT This paper presents the computational modelling of welding phenomena within a versatile numerical) and Computational Solid Mechanics (CSM). With regard to the CFD modelling of the weld pool fluid dynamics, heat

  11. Ice Shelves as Floating Channel Flows of Viscous Power-Law Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banik, Indranil

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We attempt to better understand the flow of marine ice sheets. Treating ice as a viscous shear-thinning power law fluid, we develop an asymptotic (late-time) theory in two cases - the presence or absence of contact with sidewalls. Most real-world situations fall somewhere between the two extreme cases considered. When sidewalls are absent, we obtain the equilibrium grounding line thickness using a simple computer model and have an analytic approximation. For shelves in contact with sidewalls, we obtain an asymptotic theory, valid for long shelves. Our theory is based on the velocity profile across the channel being a generalised version of Poiseuille flow, which works when lateral shear dominates the force balance. We determine when this is. We conducted experiments using a laboratory model for ice. This was a suspension of xanthan in water, at a concentration of 0.5% by mass. The lab model has $n \\approx 3.8$ (similar to that of ice). The experiments agreed extremely well with our theories for all relevant p...

  12. Continuum-kinetic-microscopic model of lung clearance due to core-annular fluid entrainment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitran, Sorin, E-mail: mitran@unc.edu

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The human lung is protected against aspirated infectious and toxic agents by a thin liquid layer lining the interior of the airways. This airway surface liquid is a bilayer composed of a viscoelastic mucus layer supported by a fluid film known as the periciliary liquid. The viscoelastic behavior of the mucus layer is principally due to long-chain polymers known as mucins. The airway surface liquid is cleared from the lung by ciliary transport, surface tension gradients, and airflow shear forces. This work presents a multiscale model of the effect of airflow shear forces, as exerted by tidal breathing and cough, upon clearance. The composition of the mucus layer is complex and variable in time. To avoid the restrictions imposed by adopting a viscoelastic flow model of limited validity, a multiscale computational model is introduced in which the continuum-level properties of the airway surface liquid are determined by microscopic simulation of long-chain polymers. A bridge between microscopic and continuum levels is constructed through a kinetic-level probability density function describing polymer chain configurations. The overall multiscale framework is especially suited to biological problems due to the flexibility afforded in specifying microscopic constituents, and examining the effects of various constituents upon overall mucus transport at the continuum scale.

  13. Exact Solutions for a Rotational Flow of Generalized Second Grade Fluids Through a Circular Cylinder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir Mahmood; Saifullah; Qammar Rubab

    2008-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In this note the velocity field and the associated tangential stress corresponding to the rotational flows of a generalized second grade fluid within an infinite circular cylinder are determined by means of the Laplace and Hankel transforms. At time t=0 the fluid is at rest and the motion is produced by the rotation of the cylinder, around its axis, with the angular velocity $\\Omega.t$. The velocity field and the adequate shear stress are presented under integral and series forms in terms of the generalized G-functions. Furthermore, they are presented as a sum between the Newtonian solutions and the adequate non-Newtonian contributions. The corresponding solutions for the ordinary second grade fluid and Newtonian fluid are obtained as particular cases of our solutions for $\\beta = 1$, respectively $\\alpha = 0$ and $\\beta = 1$.

  14. Teaching Image Computation: From Computer Graphics to Computer Vision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Draper, Bruce A.

    Teaching Image Computation: From Computer Graphics to Computer Vision Bruce A. Draper and J. Ross Beveridge Department of Computer Science Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO 80523 draper@cs.colostate.edu ross@cs.colostate.edu Keywords: Computer Vision, Computer Graphics, Education, Course Design

  15. Dense colloidal fluids form denser amorphous sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schofield, Andrew B.

    Dense colloidal fluids form denser amorphous sediments Shir R. Libera,b , Shai Borohovicha of their randomly packed solid sediments. We demonstrate that the most dilute fluids of colloidal hard spheres form loosely packed sediments, where the volume fraction of the particles approaches in frictional systems

  16. Foam vessel for cryogenic fluid storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spear, Jonathan D (San Francisco, CA)

    2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Cryogenic storage and separator vessels made of polyolefin foams are disclosed, as are methods of storing and separating cryogenic fluids and fluid mixtures using these vessels. In one embodiment, the polyolefin foams may be cross-linked, closed-cell polyethylene foams with a density of from about 2 pounds per cubic foot to a density of about 4 pounds per cubic foot.

  17. Conservation of Momentum: Fluids and Elastic Solids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chicone, Carmen

    Chapter 3 Conservation of Momentum: Fluids and Elastic Solids The description of the motion, t) dx = (A,t) t(x, t) + div(u)(x, t) dx (3.2) (see A.11). By conservation of mass, the rate is conserved by the fluid motion. A differential equation for the velocity field u is obtained from the equa

  18. Engineering Insights 2006 Complex Fluids Design Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Engineering Insights 2006 Complex Fluids Design Consortium (CFDC) www.mrl.ucsb.edu/cfdc Overview;Engineering Insights 2006 Objectives -- continued · Create a world-class center for complex fluid and soft and Research Highlights Glenn Fredrickson October 18, 2006 #12;Engineering Insights 2006 What is the CFDC

  19. Computational biology and high performance computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoichet, Brian

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biology and High Performance Computing Manfred Zorn, TeresaBiology and High Performance Computing Presenters: Manfred99-Portland High performance computing has become one of the

  20. A computer music instrumentarium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver La Rosa, Jaime Eduardo

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapter 6. COMPUTERS: To Solder or Not toMusic Models : A Computer Music Instrumentarium . . . . .Interactive Computer Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101