Sample records for determination characterizing stimulation

  1. Method and apparatus for determining nutrient stimulation of biological processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colwell, F.S.; Geesey, G.G.; Gillis, R.J.; Lehman, R.M.

    1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus is described for determining the nutrients to stimulate microorganisms in a particular environment. A representative sample of microorganisms from a particular environment are contacted with multiple support means wherein each support means has intimately associated with the surface of the support means a different nutrient composition for said microorganisms in said sample. The multiple support means is allowed to remain in contact with the microorganisms in the sample for a time period sufficient to measure differences in microorganism effects for the multiple support means. Microorganism effects for the multiple support means are then measured and compared. The invention is particularly adaptable to being conducted in situ. The additional steps of regulating nutrients added to the particular environment of microorganisms can enhance the desired results. Biological systems particularly suitable for this invention are bioremediation, biologically enhanced oil recovery, biological leaching of metals, and agricultural bioprocesses. 5 figs.

  2. Method and apparatus for determining nutrient stimulation of biological processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colwell, F.S.; Geesey, G.G.; Gillis, R.J.; Lehman, R.M.

    1999-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for determining the nutrients to stimulate microorganisms in a particular environment. A representative sample of microorganisms from a particular environment are contacted with multiple support means wherein each support means has intimately associated with the surface of the support means a different nutrient composition for microorganisms in the sample. The multiple support means is allowed to remain in contact with the microorganisms in the sample for a time period sufficient to measure difference in microorganism effects for the multiple support means. Microorganism effects for the multiple support means are then measured and compared. The invention is particularly adaptable to being conducted in situ. The additional steps of regulating nutrients added to the particular environment of microorganisms can enhance the desired results. Biological systems particularly suitable for this invention are bioremediation, biologically enhanced oil recovery, biological leaching of metals, and agricultural bioprocesses. 5 figs.

  3. Method and apparatus for determining nutrient stimulation of biological processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colwell, Frederick S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Geesey, Gill G. (Bozeman, MT); Gillis, Richard J. (Bozeman, MT); Lehman, R. Michael (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for determining the nutrients to stimulate microorganisms in a particular environment. A representative sample of microorganisms from a particular environment are contacted with multiple support means wherein each support means has intimately associated with the surface of the support means a different nutrient composition for said microorganisms in said sample. The multiple support means is allowed to remain in contact with the microorganisms in the sample for a time period sufficient to measure differences in microorganism effects for the multiple support means. Microorganism effects for the multiple support means are then measured and compared. The invention is particularly adaptable to being conducted in situ. The additional steps of regulating nutrients added to the particular environment of microorganisms can enhance the desired results. Biological systems particularly suitable for this invention are bioremediation, biologically enhanced oil recovery, biological leaching of metals, and agricultural bioprocesses.

  4. Method and apparatus for determining nutrient stimulation of biological processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colwell, Frederick S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Geesey, Gill G. (Bozeman, MT); Gillis, Richard J. (Bozeman, MT); Lehman, R. Michael (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for determining the nutrients to stimulate microorganisms in a particular environment. A representative sample of microorganisms from a particular environment are contacted with multiple support means wherein each support means has intimately associated with the surface of the support means a different nutrient composition for said microorganisms in said sample. The multiple support means is allowed to remain in contact with the microorganisms in the sample for a time period sufficient to measure difference in microorganism effects for the multiple support means. Microorganism effects for the multiple support means are then measured and compared. The invention is particularly adaptable to being conducted in situ. The additional steps of regulating nutrients added to the particular environment of microorganisms can enhance the desired results. Biological systems particularly suitable for this invention are bioremediation, biologically enhanced oil recovery, biological leaching of metals, and agricultural bioprocesses.

  5. Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Stimulation in Enhanced...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Geothermal Systems; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Fracture Characterization in Enhanced Geothermal Systems by Wellbore and Reservoir Analysis; 2010...

  6. Characterization of B-doped polycrystalline diamond films using thermally stimulated luminescence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Characterization of B-doped polycrystalline diamond films using thermally stimulated luminescence, boron level in polycrystalline diamond films was identified by TL by an intense glow peak at 226 K polycrystalline diamond films grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) have a wide array of potential applications

  7. Listed waste determination report. Environmental characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On September 23, 1988, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a notice clarifying interim status requirements for the management of radioactive mixed waste thereby subjecting the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and other applicable Department of Energy (DOE) sites to regulation under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Therefore, the DOE was required to submit a Part A Permit application for each treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) unit within the INEL, defining the waste codes and processes to be regulated under RCRA. The September 1990 revised Part A Permit application, that was approved by the State of Idaho identified 101 potential acute and toxic hazardous waste codes (F-, P-, and U- listed wastes according to 40 CFR 261.31 and 40 CFR 261.33) for some TSD units at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. Most of these waste were assumed to have been introduced into the High-level Liquid Waste TSD units via laboratory drains connected to the Process Equipment Waste (PEW) evaporator (PEW system). At that time, a detailed and systematic evaluation of hazardous chemical use and disposal practices had not been conducted to determine if F-, P-, or Unlisted waste had been disposed to the PEW system. The purpose of this investigation was to perform a systematic and detailed evaluation of the use and disposal of the 101 F-, P-, and Unlisted chemicals found in the approved September 1990 Part A Permit application. This investigation was aimed at determining which listed wastes, as defined in 40 CFR 261.31 (F-listed) and 261.33 (P & Unlisted) were discharged to the PEW system. Results of this investigation will be used to support revisions to the RCRA Part A Permit application.

  8. Characterization of optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters, OSLDs, for clinical dosimetric measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jursinic, Paul A. [West Michigan Cancer Center, 200 North Park Street, Kalamazoo, Michigan 49007 (United States)

    2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters, OSLDs, are plastic disks infused with aluminum oxide doped with carbon (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C). These disks are encased in a light-tight plastic holder. Crystals of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C when exposed to ionizing radiation store energy that is released as luminescence (420 nm) when the OSLD is illuminated with stimulation light (540 nm). The intensity of the luminescence depends on the dose absorbed by the OSLD and the intensity of the stimulation light. OSLDs used in this work were InLight/OSL Dot dosimeters, which were read with a MicroStar reader (Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL). The following are dosimetric properties of the OSLD that were determined: After a single irradiation, repeated readings cause the signal to decrease by 0.05% per reading; the signal could be discharged by greater than 98% by illuminating them for more than 45 s with a 150 W tungsten-halogen light; after irradiation there was a transient signal that decayed with a 0.8 min halftime; after the transient signal decay the signal was stable for days; repeated irradiations and readings of an individual OSLD gave a signal with a coefficient of variation of 0.6%; the dose sensitivity of OSLDs from a batch of detectors has a coefficient of variation of 0.9%, response was linear with absorbed dose over a test range of 1-300 cGy; above 300 cGy a small supra-linear behavior occurs; there was no dose-per-pulse dependence over a 388-fold range; there was no dependence on radiation energy or mode for 6 and 15 MV x rays and 6-20 MeV electrons; for Ir-192 gamma rays OSLD had 6% higher sensitivity; the dose sensitivity was unchanged up to an accumulated dose of 20 Gy and thereafter decreased by 4% per 10 Gy of additional accumulated dose; dose sensitivity was not dependent on the angle of incidence of radiation; the OSLD in its light-tight case has an intrinsic buildup of 0.04 g/cm{sup 2}; dose sensitivity of the OSLD was not dependent on temperature at the time of irradiation in the range of 10-40 deg. C. The clinical use of OSLDs for in vivo dosimetric measurements is shown to be feasible.

  9. Characterizing strain in the proximal rat tibia during electrical muscle stimulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vyvial, Brent Aron

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    simulated resistive exercise countermeasure to attenuate this bone loss. I sought to determine the relationship between strain measured at the antero-medial aspect of the proximal diaphysis of tibia and plantar-flexor torque measured at the ankle during...

  10. Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Stimulation in Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: identify tracers with sorption properties favorable for EGS applications; apply reversibly sorbing tracers to determine the fracture-matrix interface area available for heat transfer; and; explore the feasibility of obtaining fracture-matrix interface area from non-isothermal; single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tests.

  11. Gamma/neutron time-correlation for special nuclear material characterization %3CU%2B2013%3E active stimulation of highly enriched uranium.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marleau, Peter; Nowack, Aaron B.; Clarke, Shaun D. [University of Michigan; Monterial, Mateusz [University of Michigan; Paff, Marc [University of Michigan; Pozzi, Sara A. [University of Michigan

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of simulations and experiments were undertaken to explore and evaluate the potential for a novel new technique for fissile material detection and characterization, the timecorrelated pulse-height (TCPH) method, to be used concurrent with active stimulation of potential nuclear materials. In previous work TCPH has been established as a highly sensitive method for the detection and characterization of configurations of fissile material containing Plutonium in passive measurements. By actively stimulating fission with the introduction of an external radiation source, we have shown that TCPH is also an effective method of detecting and characterizing configurations of fissile material containing Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU). The TCPH method is shown to be robust in the presence of the proper choice of external radiation source. An evaluation of potential interrogation sources is presented.

  12. Determination and Characterization of Ice Propagation Mechanisms on Surfaces Undergoing Dropwise Condensation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dooley, Jeffrey B.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The mechanisms responsible for ice propagation on surfaces undergoing dropwise condensation have been determined and characterized. Based on experimental data acquired non-invasively with high speed quantitative microscopy, the freezing process...

  13. SEISMIC DETERMINATION OF RESERVOIR HETEROGENEITY; APPLICATION TO THE CHARACTERIZATION OF HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthias G. Imhof; James W. Castle

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the project is to examine how seismic and geologic data can be used to improve characterization of small-scale heterogeneity and their parameterization in reservoir models. The study is performed at West Coalinga Field in California. We continued our investigation on the nature of seismic reactions from heterogeneous reservoirs. We began testing our algorithm to infer parameters of object-based reservoir models from seismic data. We began integration of seismic and geologic data to determine the deterministic limits of conventional seismic data interpretation. Lastly, we began integration of seismic and geologic heterogeneity using stochastic models conditioned both on wireline and seismic data.

  14. Optically stimulated differential impedance spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maxey, Lonnie C; Parks, II, James E; Lewis, Sr., Samuel A; Partridge, Jr., William P

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatuses for evaluating a material are described. Embodiments typically involve use of an impedance measurement sensor to measure the impedance of a sample of the material under at least two different states of illumination. The states of illumination may include (a) substantially no optical stimulation, (b) substantial optical stimulation, (c) optical stimulation at a first wavelength of light, (d) optical stimulation at a second wavelength of light, (e) a first level of light intensity, and (f) a second level of light intensity. Typically a difference in impedance between the impedance of the sample at the two states of illumination is measured to determine a characteristic of the material.

  15. Characterization of a fluidized-bed combustion ash to determine potential for environmental impact. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassett, D.J.; Henderson, A.K.; Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.; Mann, M.D.; Eylands, K.E.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 440-megawatt, circulating fluidized-bed combustion (CFBC), lignite-fired power plant is planned for construction in Choctaw County north of Ackerman, Mississippi. This power plant will utilize Mississippi lignite from the first lignite mine in that state. Malcolm Pirnie, Inc., is working with the power plant developer in the current planning and permitting efforts for this proposed construction project. In order to accommodate Mississippi state regulatory agencies and meet appropriate permit requirements, Malcolm Pirnie needed to provide an indication of the characteristics of the by-products anticipated to be produced at the proposed plant. Since the Mississippi lignite is from a newly tapped mine and the CFBC technology is relatively new, Malcolm Pirnie contacted with the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to develop and perform a test plan for the production and characterization of ash similar to ash that will be eventually produced at the proposed power plant. The work performed at the EERC included two primary phases: production of by-products in a bench-scale CFBC unit using lignite provided by Malcolm Pirnie with test conditions delineated by Malcolm Pirnie to represent expected operating conditions for the full-scale plant; and an extensive characterization of the by-products produced, focusing on Mississippi regulatory requirements for leachability, with the understanding that return of the by-product to the mine site was an anticipated by-product management plan. The overall focus of this project was the environmental assessment of the by-product expected to be produced at the proposed power plant. Emphasis was placed on the leachability of potentially problematic trace elements in the by-products. The leaching research documented in this report was performed to determine trends of leachability of trace elements under leaching conditions appropriate for evaluating land disposal in monofills, such as returning the by-products to the mine site.

  16. New York Canyon Stimulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raemy, B. Principal Investigator, TGP Development Company, LLC

    2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The New York Canyon Stimulation Project was to demonstrate the commercial application of Enhanced Geothermal System techniques in Buena Vista Valley area of Pershing County, Nevada. From October 2009 to early 2012, TGP Development Company aggressively implemented Phase I of Pre-Stimulation and Site/Wellbore readiness. This included: geological studies; water studies and analyses and procurement of initial permits for drilling. Oversubscription of water rights and lack of water needed for implementation of EGS were identified and remained primary obstacles. Despite extended efforts to find alternative solutions, the water supply circumstances could not be overcome and led TGP to determine a "Ă?Â?Ă?Â?No Go"Ă?Â?Ă?Âť decision and initiate project termination in April 2012.

  17. Seismic Determination of Reservoir Heterogeneity: Application to the Characterization of Heavy Oil Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imhof, Matthias G.; Castle, James W.

    2003-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the project was to examine how seismic and geologic data could be used to improve characterization of small-scale heterogeneity and their parameterization in reservoir models. The study was performed at West Coalinga Field in California.

  18. Purification and Characterization of a Recombinant Glycoprotein, Canine Thyroid Stimulating Hormone, as a Prelude to the Development of the Reproductive Glycoproteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delovio, Malcolm Leihulu

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Stimulation of TSH production and subsequent release is affected by TRH, which consists of three amino acids, binding to the thyrotropin releasing hormone receptors (TRH-R) on the thyrotropes of the adenohypophysis. There exist two different forms of TRH-R..., TRH-R1 and TRH-R2. Both forms are found outside the anterior pituitary while only the TRH-R1 form inhabits thyrotropes (Neumann et al., 2010). As a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), TRH-R initiates outside of the cell (N- terminus) then forms...

  19. Geothermal well stimulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinclair, A.R.; Pittard, F.J.; Hanold, R.J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All available data on proppants and fluids were examined to determine areas in technology that need development for 300 to 500/sup 0/F (150/sup 0/ to 265/sup 0/C) hydrothermal wells. While fluid properties have been examined well into the 450/sup 0/F range, proppants have not been previously tested at elevated temperatures except in a few instances. The latest test data at geothermal temperatures is presented and some possible proppants and fluid systems that can be used are shown. Also discussed are alternative stimulation techniques for geothermal wells.

  20. Seismic Determination of Reservoir Heterogeneity: Application to the Characterization of Heavy Oil Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imhof, Matthias G.; Castle, James W.

    2003-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the project was to examine how seismic and geologic data could be used to improve characterization of small-scale heterogeneity and their parameterization in reservoir models. Performed a theoretical and numerical study to examine which subsurface features the surface seismic method actually resolves.

  1. Determination

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign: Potential Application to ARM MeasurementsDetermination of

  2. Method for determining formation quality factor from well log data and its application to seismic reservoir characterization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walls, Joel; Taner, M. Turhan; Dvorkin, Jack

    2006-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for seismic characterization of subsurface Earth formations includes determining at least one of compressional velocity and shear velocity, and determining reservoir parameters of subsurface Earth formations, at least including density, from data obtained from a wellbore penetrating the formations. A quality factor for the subsurface formations is calculated from the velocity, the density and the water saturation. A synthetic seismogram is calculated from the calculated quality factor and from the velocity and density. The synthetic seismogram is compared to a seismic survey made in the vicinity of the wellbore. At least one parameter is adjusted. The synthetic seismogram is recalculated using the adjusted parameter, and the adjusting, recalculating and comparing are repeated until a difference between the synthetic seismogram and the seismic survey falls below a selected threshold.

  3. SEISMIC DETERMINATION OF RESERVOIR HETEROGENEITY: APPLICATION TO THE CHARACTERIZATION OF HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthias G. Imhof; James W. Castle

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the project was to examine how seismic and geologic data can be used to improve characterization of small-scale heterogeneity and their parameterization in reservoir models. The study focused on West Coalinga Field in California. The project initially attempted to build reservoir models based on different geologic and geophysical data independently using different tools, then to compare the results, and ultimately to integrate them all. We learned, however, that this strategy was impractical. The different data and tools need to be integrated from the beginning because they are all interrelated. This report describes a new approach to geostatistical modeling and presents an integration of geology and geophysics to explain the formation of the complex Coalinga reservoir.

  4. Quantitative determination and characterization of iron coatings on rice root surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cy-Chain

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Joe B. Dixon Iron oxyhydroxide (FeOOH) formed on rice root surfaces by the ox- idation of ferrous ions in the soil solution by oxygen released from the roots. The FeOOH coatings were extracted by dithionite...-citrate- bi. carbonate treatment. Three factors (rice variety, growth stage of rice and soil type) were determined to be statistically significant in relation to the amount of iron oxyhydroxide per unit weight of dry root. The accumulation of Fe...

  5. Characterizing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamosCharacterization of Selective Binding of AlkaliImpact of

  6. Imbibition well stimulation via neural network design

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, William (Socorro, NM)

    2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for stimulation of hydrocarbon production via imbibition by utilization of surfactants. The method includes use of fuzzy logic and neural network architecture constructs to determine surfactant use.

  7. Optimal irreversible stimulated emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D Valente; Y Li; J P Poizat; J M Gerard; L C Kwek; M F Santos; A Auffeves

    2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We studied the dynamics of an initially inverted atom in a semi-infinite waveguide, in the presence of a single propagating photon. We show that atomic relaxation is enhanced by a factor of 2, leading to maximal bunching in the output field. This optimal irreversible stimulated emission is a novel phenomenon that can be observed with state-of-the-art solid-state atoms and waveguides. When the atom interacts with two one-dimensional electromagnetic environments, the preferential emission in the stimulated field can be exploited to efficiently amplify a classical or a quantum state.

  8. CX-009846: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Petrophysics/Tight Rock Characterization for Improved Stimulation and Production Technology in Shales CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 01/30/2013 Location(s): Alabama Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  9. CX-009845: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Petrophysics/Tight Rock Characterization for Improved Stimulation and Production Technology in Shales CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 01/30/2013 Location(s): Oklahoma Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  10. CX-009844: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Petrophysics/Tight Rock Characterization for Improved Stimulation and Production Technology in Shales CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 01/30/2013 Location(s): Alabama Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  11. CX-004280: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterizing Stimulation Domains for Improved Well Completions in Gas ShalesCX(s) Applied: A9Date: 10/18/2010Location(s): Albuquerque, New MexicoOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  12. CX-004282: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterizing Stimulation Domains for Improved Well Completions in Gas ShalesCX(s) Applied: A9Date: 10/18/2010Location(s): Houston, TexasOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  13. CX-004279: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterizing Stimulation Domains for Improved Well Completions in Gas ShalesCX(s) Applied: A9Date: 10/18/2010Location(s): Houston, TexasOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  14. CX-004281: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterizing Stimulation Domains for Improved Well Completions in Gas ShalesCX(s) Applied: A9Date: 10/18/2010Location(s): Tulsa, OklahomaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  15. CX-005814: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterizing Stimulation Domains for Improved Well Completions in Gas ShalesCX(s) Applied: A9Date: 05/13/2011Location(s): Salt Lake City, UtahOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  16. Ultraviolet stimulation of hydrogen peroxide production using...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultraviolet stimulation of hydrogen peroxide production using aminoindazole, diaminopyridine, and phenylenediamine solid polymer Ultraviolet stimulation of hydrogen peroxide...

  17. Biogeochemical Processes In Ethanol Stimulated Uranium Contaminated...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Processes In Ethanol Stimulated Uranium Contaminated Subsurface Sediments. Biogeochemical Processes In Ethanol Stimulated Uranium Contaminated Subsurface Sediments. Abstract: A...

  18. Collective stimulated Brillouin scatter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander O. Korotkevich; Pavel M. Lushnikov; Harvey A. Rose

    2011-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a statistical theory of stimulated Brillouin backscatter (BSBS) of a spatially and temporally partially incoherent laser beam for laser fusion relevant plasma. We find a new collective regime of BSBS which has a much larger threshold than the classical threshold of a coherent beam in long-scale-length laser fusion plasma. We identify two contributions to BSBS convective instability increment. The first is collective with intensity threshold independent of the laser correlation time and controlled by diffraction. The second is independent of diffraction, it grows with increase of the correlation time and does not have an intensity threshold. The instability threshold is inside the typical parameter region of National Ignition Facility (NIF). We also find that the bandwidth of KrF-laser-based fusion systems would be large enough to allow additional suppression of BSBS.

  19. Developments in deep brain stimulation using time dependent magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowther, L.J.; Nlebedim, I.C.; Jiles, D.C.

    2012-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of head model complexity upon the strength of field in different brain regions for transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been investigated. Experimental measurements were used to verify the validity of magnetic field calculations and induced electric field calculations for three 3D human head models of varying complexity. Results show the inability for simplified head models to accurately determine the site of high fields that lead to neuronal stimulation and highlight the necessity for realistic head modeling for TMS applications.

  20. Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program: technology transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following are included: review of available data from previous fracturing stimulation operations, stimulation process variables, fracturing fluid design, hydraulic fracture design, stimulation case histories, and selected bibliography. (MHR)

  1. Digital electronic bone growth stimulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1995-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A device is described for stimulating bone tissue by applying a low level alternating current signal directly to the patient`s skin. A crystal oscillator, a binary divider chain and digital logic gates are used to generate the desired waveforms that reproduce the natural electrical characteristics found in bone tissue needed for stimulating bone growth and treating osteoporosis. The device, powered by a battery, contains a switch allowing selection of the correct waveform for bone growth stimulation or osteoporosis treatment so that, when attached to the skin of the patient using standard skin contact electrodes, the correct signal is communicated to the underlying bone structures. 5 figs.

  2. Digital electronic bone growth stimulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for stimulating bone tissue by applying a low level alternating current signal directly to the patient's skin. A crystal oscillator, a binary divider chain and digital logic gates are used to generate the desired waveforms that reproduce the natural electrical characteristics found in bone tissue needed for stimulating bone growth and treating osteoporosis. The device, powered by a battery, contains a switch allowing selection of the correct waveform for bone growth stimulation or osteoporosis treatment so that, when attached to the skin of the patient using standard skin contact electrodes, the correct signal is communicated to the underlying bone structures.

  3. CHAPTER: In-Situ Characterization of Stimulating Microelectrode Arrays: Study of an Idealized Structure Based on Argus II Retinal implantsBOOK TITLE: Implantable Neural Prostheses 2: Techniques and Engineering Approaches, D.M. Zhou and E. Greenbaum, Eds., Springer, NY 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenbaum, Elias [ORNL; Sanders, Charlene A [ORNL; Kandagor, Vincent [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of a retinal prosthesis for artificial sight includes a study of the factors affecting the structural and functional stability of chronically implanted microelectrode arrays. Although neuron depolarization and propagation of electrical signals have been studied for nearly a century, the use of multielectrode stimulation as a proposed therapy to treat blindness is a frontier area of modern ophthalmology research. Mapping and characterizing the topographic information contained in the electric field potentials and understanding how this information is transmitted and interpreted in the visual cortex is still very much a work in progress. In order to characterize the electrical field patterns generated by the device, an in vitro prototype that mimics several of the physical and chemical parameters of the in vivo visual implant device was fabricated. We carried out multiple electrical measurements in a model 'eye,' beginning with a single electrode, followed by a 9-electrode array structure, both idealized components based on the Argus II retinal implants. Correlating the information contained in the topographic features of the electric fields with psychophysical testing in patients may help reduce the time required for patients to convert the electrical patterns into graphic signals.

  4. Imaging, Characterizing, and Modeling of Fracture Networks and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project title: Stimulation at Desert Peak and Bradys reservoirs: modeling with the coupled THM code FEHM Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems...

  5. Demultiplexer circuit for neural stimulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wessendorf, Kurt O; Okandan, Murat; Pearson, Sean

    2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A demultiplexer circuit is disclosed which can be used with a conventional neural stimulator to extend the number of electrodes which can be activated. The demultiplexer circuit, which is formed on a semiconductor substrate containing a power supply that provides all the dc electrical power for operation of the circuit, includes digital latches that receive and store addressing information from the neural stimulator one bit at a time. This addressing information is used to program one or more 1:2.sup.N demultiplexers in the demultiplexer circuit which then route neural stimulation signals from the neural stimulator to an electrode array which is connected to the outputs of the 1:2.sup.N demultiplexer. The demultiplexer circuit allows the number of individual electrodes in the electrode array to be increased by a factor of 2.sup.N with N generally being in a range of 2-4.

  6. Magnetically stimulated fluid flow patterns

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Martin, Jim; Solis, Kyle

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories' Jim Martin and Kyle Solis explain research on the effects of magnetic fields on fluid flows and how they stimulate vigorous flows. Fluid flow is a necessary phenomenon in everything from reactors to cooling engines in cars.

  7. Magnetically stimulated fluid flow patterns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Jim; Solis, Kyle

    2014-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories' Jim Martin and Kyle Solis explain research on the effects of magnetic fields on fluid flows and how they stimulate vigorous flows. Fluid flow is a necessary phenomenon in everything from reactors to cooling engines in cars.

  8. FRACTURE STIMULATION IN ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    FRACTURE STIMULATION IN ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS A REPORT SUBMITTED TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (Principal Advisor) #12;#12;v Abstract Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) are geothermal reservoirs formed

  9. CX-011845: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    45: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-011845: Categorical Exclusion Determination Materials Characterization Laboratory & RadiologicalEnvironment, Safety and Health Training...

  10. Unreviewed Safety Question Determination - Processing Waste in...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Unreviewed Safety Question Determination - Processing Waste in the Waste Characterization Glovebox Unreviewed Safety Question Determination - Processing Waste in the Waste...

  11. CX-005708: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-005708: Categorical Exclusion Determination Phase 3 - Seismic Fracture Characterization Methodologies for Enhanced Geothermal Systems CX(s)...

  12. CX-004293: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004293: Categorical Exclusion Determination New York Canyon Stimulation CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B5.1 Date: 10202010 Location(s):...

  13. Characterization Activities to Determine the Extent of DNAPL in the Vadose Zone at the A-014 Outfall of A/M Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, D.G.

    2000-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this investigation was to perform characterization activities necessary to confirm the presence and extent of DNAPL in the shallow vadose zone near the headwaters of the A-014 Outfall. Following the characterization, additional soil vapor extraction wells and vadose monitoring probes were installed to promote and monitor remediation activities in regions of identified DNAPL.

  14. Stimulation Techniques Used In Enhanced Geothermal Systems: Perspectives From Geomechanics and Rock Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen L. Karner; Joel Renner

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the processes that enhance fluid flow in crustal rocks is a key step towards extracting sustainable thermal energy from the Earth. To achieve this, geoscientists need to identify the fundamental parameters that govern how rocks respond to stimulation techniques, as well as the factors that control the evolution of permeability networks. These parameters must be assessed over variety of spatial scales: from microscopic rock properties (such as petrologic, mechanical, and diagenetic characteristics) to macroscopic crustal behavior (such as tectonic and hydro-dynamic properties). Furthermore, these factors must be suitably monitored and/or characterized over a range of temporal scales before the evolutionary behavior of geothermal fields can be properly assessed. I am reviewing the procedures currently employed for reservoir stimulation of geothermal fields. The techniques are analyzed in the context of the petrophysical characteristics of reservoir lithologies, studies of wellbore data, and research on regional crustal properties. I determine common features of geothermal fields that can be correlated to spatiotemporal evolution of reservoirs, with particular attention to geomechanics and petrophysical properties. The study of these correlations can then help guide procedures employed when targeting new prospective geothermal resources.

  15. Electrical stimulation of beef carcasses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKeith, Floyd Kenneth

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT Electrical Stimulation of Beef' Carcasses (August 1979) Floyd Kenneth McKeith B. S. , Washington State University Co-Chairmen of Advisory Committee: Dr. Z. L. Carpenter Dr. G. C. Smith A three-part stuoy was conducted on electrica' stim...

  16. Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program: technology transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Each of the following types of well stimulation techniques are summarized and explained: hydraulic fracturing; thermal; mechanical, jetting, and drainhole drilling; explosive and implosive; and injection methods. Current stimulation techniques, stimulation techniques for geothermal wells, areas of needed investigation, and engineering calculations for various techniques. (MHR)

  17. Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Stimulation in Enhanced...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    good progress. Strongly recommend looking at heterogeneous earth, not just homogeneous medium. 4.6.7.3 Accomplishments, Expected Outcomes and Progress Ratings of Five-member...

  18. Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Stimulation in Enhanced

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic|Industrial Sector,DepartmentFebruary 19,TopProcess |Town o5

  19. Technical Basis for the Determination that Current Characterization Data and Processes are Sufficient to Ensure Safe Storage and to Design Waste Disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SIMPSON, B.C.

    1999-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the technical basis for closure of Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 93-5 Implementation Plan milestone 5.6.3.13, ''Core sample all tanks by 2002'' (DOE-RL 1996). The milestone was based on the need for characterization data to ensure safe storage of the waste, to operate the tanks safely, and to plan and implement retrieval and processing of the waste. Sufficient tank characterization data have been obtained to ensure that existing controls are adequate for safe storage of the waste in the 177 waste tanks at the Hanford Site. In addition, a process has been developed, executed, and institutionalized to systemically identify information needs, to integrate and prioritize the needs, and to reliably obtain and analyze the associated samples. This document provides a technical case that the remaining 45 incompletely sampled tanks no longer require sampling to support the intent of the Implementation Plan milestone. Sufficient data have been obtained to close the Unreviewed Safety Questions (USQs), and to ensure that existing hazard controls are adequate and appropriately applied. However, in the future, additional characterization of tanks at the site will be required to support identified information needs. Closure of this milestone allows sampling and analytical data to be obtained in a manner that is consistent with the integrated priority process.

  20. The conscience and the dream: an analysis of the influence of Mark Twain's determinism on characterization and thematic unity in Huckleberry Finn.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capps, Mikie Leslene

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Finn in Review 89 2. The Determinist in 1885 101 BIB LI 0G RAP H Y . 102 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION The Scholars on the Development of Twain's Determinism Most Mark Twain scholars agree that sometime during the last fifteen years of his life Mark... to his master- piece. Covici, in Mark Twain's Humor: The Ima e of a World, deals more directly with Twain's determinism than Blair; however, his scope of discussion is narrow ? even more so than Bellamy's, though it 10 Walter Blair, Mark Twain...

  1. Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation using Geomechanics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    using Geomechanics-Based Stochastic Analysis of Injection-Induced Seismicity Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation using Geomechanics-Based Stochastic Analysis of...

  2. Reservoir-Stimulation Optimization with Operational Monitoring...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Testing and Development at the Raft River Geothermal Field, Idaho Creation of an Engineered Geothermal System through Hydraulic and Thermal Stimulation Desert Peak EGS Project...

  3. Predicting Stimulation Response Relationships For Engineered...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    For Engineered Geothermal Reservoirs Project objectives: Using existing LLNL computer programs, develop realistic models of EGS stimulation-response scenarios involving...

  4. Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation using Geomechanics...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of discontinuities * Rock stimulation is often accompanied by multiple micro- seismic events. * Micro-seismic events are used for detection of permeable zones - planning...

  5. Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation using Geomechanics...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of discontinuities - Rock stimulation is often accompanied by multiple micro-seismic events. Micro-seismic events are used for detection of permeable zones, planning...

  6. Electrode array for neural stimulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wessendorf, Kurt O. (Albuquerque, NM); Okandan, Murat (Edgewood, NM); Stein, David J. (Albuquerque, NM); Yang, Pin (Albuquerque, NM); Cesarano, III, Joseph (Albuquerque, NM); Dellinger, Jennifer (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrode array for neural stimulation is disclosed which has particular applications for use in a retinal prosthesis. The electrode array can be formed as a hermetically-sealed two-part ceramic package which includes an electronic circuit such as a demultiplexer circuit encapsulated therein. A relatively large number (up to 1000 or more) of individually-addressable electrodes are provided on a curved surface of a ceramic base portion the electrode array, while a much smaller number of electrical connections are provided on a ceramic lid of the electrode array. The base and lid can be attached using a metal-to-metal seal formed by laser brazing. Electrical connections to the electrode array can be provided by a flexible ribbon cable which can also be used to secure the electrode array in place.

  7. Characterization and significance of a stylolitic fracture system determined from horizontal core and borehole imaging data, Hanifa Reservoir, Abqaiq Field (SA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luthy, S.T.; Grover, G. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Wiltse, E. [Schlumberger, Al-Khobar (Saudi Arabia)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanifa reservoir at Abqaiq Field, eastern Saudi Arabia, consists of microporous (up to 30% porosity) lime mudstones with low matrix permeability (< 10 md). SEM imagery reveals a crystal framework texture of micro-rhombic calcite crystals with 2-5 {mu}m-sized intercrystalline pore spaces. Fluid transmissibility was preliminarily identified as via fractures as indicated by no stratigraphic predictability to fluid flow, high flow over thin stratigraphic intervals, little relationship between high flow and high porosity intervals, large disparity between core Kh and well-test Kh, and observation offractures in cores and borehole imaging logs front horizontal Hanifa wells. Integration of descriptions from over 4000 fractures observed in borehole images together with descriptions of over 500 fractures identified from vertica1 and horizontal cores has resulted in further characterization of the fracture system. The fractures are open to partially-open, with an east-to northeast orientation, and they cluster in low porosity zones which are characterized by intense stylolitization. These sub-parallel, nearly vertical, discontinuous fractures terminate at stylolites, or pinchout locally into tight carbonate matrix, and contain appreciable amounts of dead oil and calcite cement. In zones of particularly intense stylolitization, fracturing may be locally pervasive, giving the rock a brecciated appearance. Together, the stylolites and stylolite-related fractures form the primary permeability system ofthe Hanifa reservoir. This fracture system architecture is critical to understanding the production characteristics of the reservoir, which include anomalously high fluid flow in low porosity zones or transition zones between high and low porosity, radial flow behavior from well tests, smaller than expected differences in well productivity between vertical and horizontal wells, and limited injection water breakthrough.

  8. Metabolic heat production in electrically stimulated and non-stimulated muscle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzwater, Roy James

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    METABOLIC HEAT PRODUCTION IN ELECTRICALLY STIMULATED AND NON-STIMULATED MUSCLE A Thesis by ROY JAMES FITZWATER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAM University in partial fufillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER CF... SCIENCE August 1980 Major Subject: Food Science and Technology METABOLIC HEAT PRODUCTION IN ELECTRICALLY STIMULATED . AND NON-STIMULATED MUSCLE A Thesis . by ROY JAMES FITZWATER Approved as to style and content by: (Co-chai n of Committee) (Co...

  9. CX-009330: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-009330: Categorical Exclusion Determination Gas Hydrate Dynamics on the Alaskan Beaufort Continental Slope: Modeling and Field Characterization CX(s)...

  10. CX-009328: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination CX-009328: Categorical Exclusion Determination Gas Hydrate Dynamics on the Alaskan Beaufort Continental Slope: Modeling and Field Characterization CX(s)...

  11. CX-003495: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    5: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003495: Categorical Exclusion Determination Seismic Fracture Characterization Methodologies for Enhanced Geothermal Systems CX(s) Applied:...

  12. CX-005052: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-005052: Categorical Exclusion Determination Shoot 2-Dimensional Seismic at Characterization Site CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 01192011 Location(s): Craig,...

  13. CX-002474: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination Full Scale Testing Characterization, System Optimization, Demonstration of Grid Connected Wind Turbines and Wind Powered Water Desalination...

  14. Intraseasonal characterization of tropospheric O3 in the North of the Buenos Aires Province: determining four months cycle and teleconnection evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cionco, Rodolfo G; Quaranta, Nancy; Agosta, Eduardo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tropospheric ozone (O3T) is a secondary pollutant whose formation involved primarily solar radiation, NOx and volatile organic compounds. The North of the Buenos Aires Province has great agricultural-industrial activity; therefore, O3T study is an important issue in the area. In this paper, we present the first results tend to estimate and characterize O3T in San Nicol\\'as de los Arroyos, North of Buenos Aires. Due to a lack of in situ data, we analyse the observations of the instrument OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) of land remote sensing satellite AURA (GSFC/NASA). The data cover the years 2004-2013. Applying the multitaper technique (MTM), very suitable for short and noisy data series, spectral analysis is performed on a grid corresponding 1{\\deg} in latitude by 1.5{\\deg} in longitude, centred South of the Province of Santa Fe. The most remarkable result is the emergence of a significant peak (95%) of four months cycle. To test the validity of this signal in San Nicol\\'as, daily solar radiation data (Q)...

  15. GLOVEBOX GLOVE CHARACTERIZATION SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinko, P.

    2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A task was undertaken to determine primarily the permeation behavior of various glove compounds from four manufacturers. As part of the basic characterization task, the opportunity to obtain additional mechanical and thermal properties presented itself. Consequently, a total of fifteen gloves were characterized for permeation, Thermogravimetric Analysis, Puncture Resistance, Tensile Properties and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis. Detailed reports were written for each characterization technique used. This report contains the summary of the results.

  16. Supercontinuum Stimulated Emission Depletion Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesoine, Michael; Bose, Sayantan; Petrich, Jacob; Smith, Emily

    2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Supercontinuum (SC) stimulated emission depletion (STED) fluorescence lifetime imaging is demonstrated by using time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) detection. The spatial resolution of the developed STED instrument was measured by imaging monodispersed 40-nm fluorescent beads and then determining their fwhm, and was 36 ± 9 and 40 ± 10 nm in the X and Y coordinates, respectively. The same beads measured by confocal microscopy were 450 ± 50 and 430 ± 30 nm, which is larger than the diffraction limit of light due to underfilling the microscope objective. Underfilling the objective and time gating the signal were necessary to achieve the stated STED spatial resolution. The same fluorescence lifetime (2.0 ± 0.1 ns) was measured for the fluorescent beads by using confocal or STED lifetime imaging. The instrument has been applied to study Alexa Fluor 594-phalloidin labeled F-actin-rich projections with dimensions smaller than the diffraction limit of light in cultured cells. Fluorescence lifetimes of the actin-rich projections range from 2.2 to 2.9 ns as measured by STED lifetime imaging.

  17. Digital electronic bone growth stimulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to the electrical treatment of biological tissue. In particular, the present invention discloses a device that produces discrete electrical pulse trains for treating osteoporosis and accelerating bone growth. According to its major aspects and broadly stated, the present invention consists of an electrical circuit configuration capable of generating Bassett-type waveforms shown with alternative signals provide for the treatment of either fractured bones or osteoporosis. The signal generator comprises a quartz clock, an oscillator circuit, a binary divider chain, and a plurality of simple, digital logic gates. Signals are delivered efficiently, with little or no distortion, and uniformly distributed throughout the area of injury. Perferably, power is furnished by widely available and inexpensive radio batteries, needing replacement only once in several days. The present invention can be affixed to a medical cast without a great increase in either weight or bulk. Also, the disclosed stimulator can be used to treat osteoporosis or to strengthen a healing bone after the cast has been removed by attaching the device to the patient`s skin or clothing.

  18. Monitoring EGS Stimulation and Reservoir Dynamics with InSAR...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Monitoring EGS Stimulation and Reservoir Dynamics with InSAR and MEQ Monitoring EGS Stimulation and Reservoir Dynamics with InSAR and MEQ Monitoring EGS Stimulation and Reservoir...

  19. Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Wolhart

    2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies conducted a study to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project was to review U.S. deep well drilling and stimulation activity, review rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep, high-pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. This report documents results from this project.

  20. aggregate stimulates macrophages: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dobson, Christopher M. 2015-01-01 8 Laser-stimulated Synthesis of Large Nanostructured Fractal Silver Aggregates CERN Preprints Summary: A Laser-stimulated synthesis of large...

  1. Electron-Stimulated Production of Molecular Oxygen in Amorphous...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water. Electron-Stimulated Production of Molecular Oxygen in Amorphous Solid Water. Abstract: The low-energy, electron-stimulated production of molecular oxygen from pure amorphous...

  2. Low power circuits and systems for wireless neural stimulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arfin, Scott K. (Scott Kenneth)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical stimulation of tissues is an increasingly valuable tool for treating a variety of disorders, with applications including cardiac pacemakers, cochlear implants, visual prostheses, deep brain stimulators, spinal ...

  3. Energetic Materials for EGS Well Stimulation (solids, liquids...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energetic Materials for EGS Well Stimulation (solids, liquids, gases) Energetic Materials for EGS Well Stimulation (solids, liquids, gases) Energetic Materials for EGS Well...

  4. AltaRock Energy Announces Successful Multiple-Zone Stimulation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Announces Successful Multiple-Zone Stimulation of Well at the Newberry Enhanced Geothermal Systems Demonstration AltaRock Energy Announces Successful Multiple-Zone Stimulation...

  5. Fracture Evolution Following a Hydraulic Stimulation within an...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evolution Following a Hydraulic Stimulation within an EGS Reservoir Fracture Evolution Following a Hydraulic Stimulation within an EGS Reservoir Fracture Evolution Following a...

  6. A miniature, implantable wireless neural stimulation system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arfin, Scott K. (Scott Kenneth)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I present the design of a wireless neural stimulation system. The system consists of an external transmitter, controllable through a computer interface, and a miniature, implantable wireless receiver and ...

  7. Seismic stimulation for enhanced oil recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pride, S.R.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Elastic-wave stimulation of oil produc- tion: A review ofCapillary-induced resonance of oil blobs in capillary tubesCapillary-induced resonance of oil blobs in porous media:

  8. Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies is conducting a study to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project is to assess U.S. deep well drilling & stimulation activity, review rock mechanics & fracture growth in deep, high pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. An assessment of historical deep gas well drilling activity and forecast of future trends was completed during the first six months of the project; this segment of the project was covered in Technical Project Report No. 1. The second progress report covers the next six months of the project during which efforts were primarily split between summarizing rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep reservoirs and contacting operators about case studies of deep gas well stimulation.

  9. FRACTURING FLUID CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subhash Shah

    2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic fracturing technology has been successfully applied for well stimulation of low and high permeability reservoirs for numerous years. Treatment optimization and improved economics have always been the key to the success and it is more so when the reservoirs under consideration are marginal. Fluids are widely used for the stimulation of wells. The Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility (FFCF) has been established to provide the accurate prediction of the behavior of complex fracturing fluids under downhole conditions. The primary focus of the facility is to provide valuable insight into the various mechanisms that govern the flow of fracturing fluids and slurries through hydraulically created fractures. During the time between September 30, 1992, and March 31, 2000, the research efforts were devoted to the areas of fluid rheology, proppant transport, proppant flowback, dynamic fluid loss, perforation pressure losses, and frictional pressure losses. In this regard, a unique above-the-ground fracture simulator was designed and constructed at the FFCF, labeled ''The High Pressure Simulator'' (HPS). The FFCF is now available to industry for characterizing and understanding the behavior of complex fluid systems. To better reflect and encompass the broad spectrum of the petroleum industry, the FFCF now operates under a new name of ''The Well Construction Technology Center'' (WCTC). This report documents the summary of the activities performed during 1992-2000 at the FFCF.

  10. Dynamics of stimulated L ? H transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miki, K. [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of) [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Computational Science and e-Systems, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Chiba 277-8587 (Japan); Diamond, P. H.; Xiao, W. W. [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of) [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Hahn, S.-H. [KSTAR Team, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)] [KSTAR Team, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Gürcan, Ö. D. [LPP, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, 92118 Palaiseau Cedex (France)] [LPP, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, 92118 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Tynan, G. R. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)] [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on model studies of stimulated L ? H transitions [K. Miki et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 195002 (2013)]. These studies use a reduced mesoscale model. Model studies reveal that L ? H transition can be triggered by particle injection into a subcritical state (i.e., Pstimulated transition. For low ambient heating, strong injection is predicted to trigger a transient turbulence collapse. Repetitive injection at a period less than the lifetime of the collapsed state can thus maintain the turbulence collapse and so sustain a driven H-mode-like state. The total number of particles required to induce a transition by either injection or gas puffing is estimated. Results indicate that the total number of injected particles required is much smaller than that required for a transition by gas puffing. We thus show that internal injection is more efficient than gas puffing of comparable strength. We also observe that zonal flows do not play a critical role in stimulated transitions. For spontaneous transitions, the spike of the Reynolds work of turbulence on the zonal flow precedes the spike in the mean electric field shear. In contrast, we show that the two are coincident for stimulated transitions, suggesting that there is no causal link between zonal and mean flows for stimulated transitions.

  11. Reservoir Stimulation Optimization with Operational Monitoring for Creation of EGS

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Fernandez, Carlos A.

    EGS field projects have not sustained production at rates greater than ˝ of what is needed for economic viability. The primary limitation that makes commercial EGS infeasible is our current inability to cost-effectively create high-permeability reservoirs from impermeable, igneous rock within the 3,000-10,000 ft depth range. Our goal is to develop a novel fracturing fluid technology that maximizes reservoir permeability while reducing stimulation cost and environmental impact. Laboratory equipment development to advance laboratory characterization/monitoring is also a priority of this project to study and optimize the physicochemical properties of these fracturing fluids in a range of reservoir conditions. Barrier G is the primarily intended GTO barrier to be addressed as well as support addressing barriers D, E and I.

  12. Non invasive brain stimulation : modeling and experimental analysis of transcranial magnetic stimulations and transcranial DC stimulation as a modality for neuropathology treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Timothy A. (Timothy Andrew), 1974-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis will explore the use of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) and Transcranial DC Stimulation (tDCS) as modalities for neuropathology treatment by means of both experimental and modeling paradigms. The first ...

  13. Physiologic Responses to Acupuncture Point Stimulation: A Pilot Study to Evaluate Methods and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and electrodermal response (EDR) were measured along with the times of needle insertion, interim needle stimulation and electrodermal responses (EDR) [1]­[12]. The results of these individual studies, in which commonly used APs] determined that activation of an auricular AP decreased a stimulus-induced EDR while Wang and Cain [13

  14. Isolation, Characterization of an Intermediate in an Oxygen Atom...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Characterization of an Intermediate in an Oxygen Atom-Transfer Reaction, and the Determination of the Bond Isolation, Characterization of an Intermediate in an Oxygen Atom-Transfer...

  15. Creation of an Enhanced Geothermal System through Hydraulic and Thermal Stimulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, Peter Eugene [Energy and Geoscience Institute at the Univerity of Utah

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a 10-year DOE-funded project to design, characterize and create an Engineered Geothermal System (EGS) through a combination of hydraulic, thermal and chemical stimulation techniques. Volume 1 describes a four-year Phase 1 campaign, which focused on the east compartment of the Coso geothermal field. It includes a description of the geomechanical, geophysical, hydraulic, and geochemical studies that were conducted to characterize the reservoir in anticipation of the hydraulic stimulation experiment. Phase 1 ended prematurely when the drill bit intersected a very permeable fault zone during the redrilling of target stimulation well 34-9RD2. A hydraulic stimulation was inadvertently achieved, however, since the flow of drill mud from the well into the formation created an earthquake swarm near the wellbore that was recorded, located, analyzed and interpreted by project seismologists. Upon completion of Phase 1, the project shifted focus to a new target well, which was located within the southwest compartment of the Coso geothermal field. Volume 2 describes the Phase 2 studies on the geomechanical, geophysical, hydraulic, and geochemical aspects of the reservoir in and around target-stimulation well 46A-19RD, which is the deepest and hottest well ever drilled at Coso. Its total measured depth exceeding 12,000 ft. It spite of its great depth, this well is largely impermeable below a depth of about 9,000 ft, thus providing an excellent target for stimulation. In order to prepare 46A-19RD for stimulation, however, it was necessary to pull the slotted liner. This proved to be unachievable under the budget allocated by the Coso Operating Company partners, and this aspect of the project was abandoned, ending the program at Coso. The program then shifted to the EGS project at Desert Peak, which had a goal similar to the one at Coso of creating an EGS on the periphery of an existing geothermal reservoir. Volume 3 describes the activities that the Coso team contributed to the Desert Peak project, focusing largely on a geomechanical investigation of the Desert Peak reservoir, tracer testing between injectors 21-2 and 22-22 and the field�s main producers, and the chemical stimulation of target well 27-15.

  16. Creation of an Enhanced Geothermal System through Hydraulic and Thermal Stimulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, Peter Eugene [Energy and Geoscience Institute at the University of Utah

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a 10-year DOE-funded project to design, characterize and create an Engineered Geothermal System (EGS) through a combination of hydraulic, thermal and chemical stimulation techniques. Volume 1 describes a four-year Phase 1 campaign, which focused on the east compartment of the Coso geothermal field. It includes a description of the geomechanical, geophysical, hydraulic, and geochemical studies that were conducted to characterize the reservoir in anticipation of the hydraulic stimulation experiment. Phase 1 ended prematurely when the drill bit intersected a very permeable fault zone during the redrilling of target stimulation well 34-9RD2. A hydraulic stimulation was inadvertently achieved, however, since the flow of drill mud from the well into the formation created an earthquake swarm near the wellbore that was recorded, located, analyzed and interpreted by project seismologists. Upon completion of Phase 1, the project shifted focus to a new target well, which was located within the southwest compartment of the Coso geothermal field. Volume 2 describes the Phase 2 studies on the geomechanical, geophysical, hydraulic, and geochemical aspects of the reservoir in and around target-stimulation well 46A-19RD, which is the deepest and hottest well ever drilled at Coso. Its total measured depth exceeding 12,000 ft. It spite of its great depth, this well is largely impermeable below a depth of about 9,000 ft, thus providing an excellent target for stimulation. In order to prepare 46A-19RD for stimulation, however, it was necessary to pull the slotted liner. This proved to be unachievable under the budget allocated by the Coso Operating Company partners, and this aspect of the project was abandoned, ending the program at Coso. The program then shifted to the EGS project at Desert Peak, which had a goal similar to the one at Coso of creating an EGS on the periphery of an existing geothermal reservoir. Volume 3 describes the activities that the Coso team contributed to the Desert Peak project, focusing largely on a geomechanical investigation of the Desert Peak reservoir, tracer testing between injectors 21-2 and 22-22 and the field�������¢����������������s main producers, and the chemical stimulation of target well 27-15.

  17. IMPROVING SANDSTONE MATRIX STIMULATION OF OIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abu-Khamsin, Sidqi

    products and the oil that otherwise would be contacted. This paper pre- sents the resultsIMPROVING SANDSTONE MATRIX STIMULATION OF OIL WELLS BY GAS PRECONDITIONING M. A. Aggour, M. Al, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia ABSTRACT Experience has shown that for sandstone formations, oil wells respond

  18. STIMULATION AND RESERVOIR ENGINEERING OF GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    STIMULATION AND RESERVOIR ENGINEERING OF GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES Paul Kruger and Henry J . Ramey, Jr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Mass Transfer i n Porous and Fractured Media . . . . . . . . . 61 Heat Transfer i n Fractun3d Rock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Geothermal Reservoir Phy.Sica1 PIodels . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 RAD3N I N GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

  19. STIMULATION AND RESERVOIR ENGINEERING OF GEOTHERMAL RESOURCXS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    STIMULATION AND RESERVOIR ENGINEERING OF GEOTHERMAL RESOURCXS Henry J. Ramey, Jr., and A. Louis C a p i l l a r i t y . . . . . . . . . . 28 RADON I N GEOTHEENAL RESERVOIRS . . . . . . . 33 HEAT AND MASS TRANSPORT I N FRACTURED ROCKS . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 Mathematical Models

  20. STIMULATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR DEEP WELL COMPLETIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Wolhart

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring a Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies is conducting a project to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project is to assess U.S. deep well drilling & stimulation activity, review rock mechanics & fracture growth in deep, high pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. Phase 1 was recently completed and consisted of assessing deep gas well drilling activity (1995-2007) and an industry survey on deep gas well stimulation practices by region. Of the 29,000 oil, gas and dry holes drilled in 2002, about 300 were drilled in the deep well; 25% were dry, 50% were high temperature/high pressure completions and 25% were simply deep completions. South Texas has about 30% of these wells, Oklahoma 20%, Gulf of Mexico Shelf 15% and the Gulf Coast about 15%. The Rockies represent only 2% of deep drilling. Of the 60 operators who drill deep and HTHP wells, the top 20 drill almost 80% of the wells. Six operators drill half the U.S. deep wells. Deep drilling peaked at 425 wells in 1998 and fell to 250 in 1999. Drilling is expected to rise through 2004 after which drilling should cycle down as overall drilling declines.

  1. Using Nanotechnology in Viscoelastic Surfactant Stimulation Fluids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurluk, Merve Rabia 1986-

    2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    USING NANOTECHNOLOGY IN VISCOELASTIC SURFACTANT STIMULATION FLUIDS A Thesis by MERVE RABIA GURLUK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... .......................................... 9 1.7 Kinetics of Micellization ......................................................................... 10 1.8 Nanotechnology ....................................................................................... 16...

  2. Collector/Receiver Characterization (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet describing NREL CSP Program capabilities for collector/receiver characterization: determining optical efficiency, measuring heat loss, developing and testing concentrators, concentrating the sun's power, and optically characterizing CSP plants.

  3. Laboratory imaging of stimulation fluid displacement from hydraulic fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tidwell, V. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Parker, M. [SPE, Richardson, TX (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to physically investigate the processes governing stimulation fluid displacement from hydraulic fractures. Experiments were performed on two scales: meter-scale in a 1500 cm{sup 2} sand pack and core-scale in a 65 cm{sup 2} API linear conductivity cell. High-resolution light transmission imaging was employed at the meter-scale to visualize and quantify processes governing fluid displacement. For comparison, complimentary tests were performed using an API conductivity cell under ambient test conditions and at elevated closure stress. In these experiments viscous fingering and gravity drainage were identified as the dominant processes governing fluid displacement. Fluid viscosity was found to dictate the relative importance of the competing displacement processes and ultimately determine the residual liquid saturation of the sand pack. The process by which fluid displacement occurs was seen to effect the shape of both the gas and liquid phase relative permeability functions. Knowledge of such viscosity/relative permeability relationships may prove useful in bounding predictions of post-stimulation recovery of gels from the fracture pack.

  4. CX-009465: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination Temporal Characterization of Hydrates System Dynamics Beneath Seafloor Mounds: Integrating Time-Lapse CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 10182012...

  5. CX-009462: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination Temporal Characterization of Hydrates System Dynamics Beneath Seafloor Mounds: Integrating Time-Lapse CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 1018...

  6. CX-009463: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination Temporal Characterization of Hydrates System Dynamics Beneath Seafloor Mounds: Integrating Time-Lapse CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 10182012...

  7. CX-009464: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determination Temporal Characterization of Hydrates System Dynamics beneath Seafloor Mounds: Integrating Time-Lapse CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 1018...

  8. CX-002605: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CX-002605: Categorical Exclusion Determination Characterization of Most Promising Carbon Capture and Sequestration Formations in the Central Rocky Mountain Region CX(s)...

  9. CX-000413: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CX-000413: Categorical Exclusion Determination Characterization of Most Promising Carbon Capture and Sequestration Formations in the Central Rocky Mountain Region CX(s)...

  10. CX-000416: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CX-000416: Categorical Exclusion Determination Characterization of Most Promising Carbon Capture and Sequestration Formations in the Central Rocky Mountain Region CX(s)...

  11. CX-000415: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CX-000415: Categorical Exclusion Determination Characterization of Most Promising Carbon Capture and Sequestration Formations in the Central Rocky Mountain Region CX(s)...

  12. CX-002604: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CX-002604: Categorical Exclusion Determination Characterization of Most Promising Carbon Capture and Sequestration Formations in the Central Rocky Mountain Region CX(s)...

  13. CX-005689: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CX-005689: Categorical Exclusion Determination Joint Inversion of Electrical and Seismic Data for Fracture Characterization and Imaging of Fluid Flow in Geothermal Systems...

  14. Rose Run stimulation: A case history of problem identification, research, planning, implementation, and evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cramer, J.W.; Thomas, J.B.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Rose Run Sandstone consists of individual quartz and feldspar grains cemented by dolomite, clay minerals, and overgrowths of quartz and feldspars. Historically, the Rose Run has been stimulated with hydrochloric (HCl) acid with appropriate additives to remove the dolomitic cement matrix to improve permeability. Post stimulation results vary widely. The production from some wells suffered from steep declines. When shut-in, most wells exhibited good pressure recovery. Reservoir analysis calculated skin factors as high as +10 indicating formation damage. An in-depth study of wells in Randolph Township of Portage County, Ohio was initiated to try to identify the mechanisms that effect well productivity. Drill cutting samples, well logs, rotary sidewall cores, petrologic data, core analysis, and SEM photos were analyzed. The primary goal of this study was to determine possible improvements to current stimulation treatments. An additional benefit of this study was to evaluate the viability of remedial acid treatments in removing damage from producing wells.

  15. Stimulating Energy Efficiency in Kentucky: An Implementation Model for States

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, given through the DOE's Technical Assitance Program (TAP), provides information on Stimulating Energy Efficiency in Kentucky.

  16. Laser-Stimulated Fluorescence in Paleontology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaye, Thomas G.; Falk, Amanda Renee; Pittman, Michael; Sereno, Paul C.; Martin, Larry D.; Burnham, David A.; Gong, Enpu; Xu, Xing; Wang, Yinan

    2015-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    . doi: 10.1371/journal.pone. 0009223 PMID: 20169153 8. Warren TS, Gleason S, Bostwick RC, Verbeek ER. Ultraviolet light and fluorescent minerals: under- standing, collecting and displaying fluorescent minerals. GemGuides Book. 1999. 9. Hibbs AR. Confocal... fake and genuine vertebrate fossils. Journal of Paleontological Techniques. 2008; 2:1–5. Laser-Stimulated Fluorescence in Paleontology PLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0125923 May 27, 2015 22 / 22 ...

  17. HYDRAULIC STIMULATION OF NATURAL FRACTURES AS REVEALED BY INDUCED MICROEARTHQUAKES,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -1- HYDRAULIC STIMULATION OF NATURAL FRACTURES AS REVEALED BY INDUCED MICROEARTHQUAKES, CARTHAGE, December, 2001 Manuscript # 01066 LAUR# 01-1204 #12;Hydraulic Stimulation of Natural Fractures -2- ABSTRACT We have produced a high-resolution microseismic image of a hydraulic fracture stimulation

  18. Reservoir characterization using wavelet transforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivera Vega, Nestor

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Automated detection of geological boundaries and determination of cyclic events controlling deposition can facilitate stratigraphic analysis and reservoir characterization. This study applies the wavelet transformation, a recent advance in signal...

  19. Improved Microseismicity Detection During Newberry EGS Stimulations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Templeton, Dennise

    Effective enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) require optimal fracture networks for efficient heat transfer between hot rock and fluid. Microseismic mapping is a key tool used to infer the subsurface fracture geometry. Traditional earthquake detection and location techniques are often employed to identify microearthquakes in geothermal regions. However, most commonly used algorithms may miss events if the seismic signal of an earthquake is small relative to the background noise level or if a microearthquake occurs within the coda of a larger event. Consequently, we have developed a set of algorithms that provide improved microearthquake detection. Our objective is to investigate the microseismicity at the DOE Newberry EGS site to better image the active regions of the underground fracture network during and immediately after the EGS stimulation. Detection of more microearthquakes during EGS stimulations will allow for better seismic delineation of the active regions of the underground fracture system. This improved knowledge of the reservoir network will improve our understanding of subsurface conditions, and allow improvement of the stimulation strategy that will optimize heat extraction and maximize economic return.

  20. Improved Microseismicity Detection During Newberry EGS Stimulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Templeton, Dennise

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) require optimal fracture networks for efficient heat transfer between hot rock and fluid. Microseismic mapping is a key tool used to infer the subsurface fracture geometry. Traditional earthquake detection and location techniques are often employed to identify microearthquakes in geothermal regions. However, most commonly used algorithms may miss events if the seismic signal of an earthquake is small relative to the background noise level or if a microearthquake occurs within the coda of a larger event. Consequently, we have developed a set of algorithms that provide improved microearthquake detection. Our objective is to investigate the microseismicity at the DOE Newberry EGS site to better image the active regions of the underground fracture network during and immediately after the EGS stimulation. Detection of more microearthquakes during EGS stimulations will allow for better seismic delineation of the active regions of the underground fracture system. This improved knowledge of the reservoir network will improve our understanding of subsurface conditions, and allow improvement of the stimulation strategy that will optimize heat extraction and maximize economic return.

  1. Improved Microseismicity Detection During Newberry EGS Stimulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Templeton, Dennise

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) require optimal fracture networks for efficient heat transfer between hot rock and fluid. Microseismic mapping is a key tool used to infer the subsurface fracture geometry. Traditional earthquake detection and location techniques are often employed to identify microearthquakes in geothermal regions. However, most commonly used algorithms may miss events if the seismic signal of an earthquake is small relative to the background noise level or if a microearthquake occurs within the coda of a larger event. Consequently, we have developed a set of algorithms that provide improved microearthquake detection. Our objective is to investigate the microseismicity at the DOE Newberry EGS site to better image the active regions of the underground fracture network during and immediately after the EGS stimulation. Detection of more microearthquakes during EGS stimulations will allow for better seismic delineation of the active regions of the underground fracture system. This improved knowledge of the reservoir network will improve our understanding of subsurface conditions, and allow improvement of the stimulation strategy that will optimize heat extraction and maximize economic return.

  2. Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation using Geomechanics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Seismicity This project will develop a model for seismicity-based reservoir characterization (SBRC) by combining rock mechanics; finite element modeling;...

  3. Performance Characterization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Performance characterization efforts within the SunShot Systems Integration activities focus on collaborations with U.S. solar companies to:

  4. Central Characterization Program (CCP) Transuranic Waste Certification...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Certification Plan Central Characterization Program (CCP) Transuranic Waste Certification Plan This document was used to determine facts and conditions during the Department of...

  5. Central Characterization Program (CCP) Acceptable Knowledge Documentat...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Acceptable Knowledge Documentation Central Characterization Program (CCP) Acceptable Knowledge Documentation This document was used to determine facts and conditions during the...

  6. Central Characterization Program (CCP) Transuranic Authorized...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Authorized Methods for Payload Control Central Characterization Program (CCP) Transuranic Authorized Methods for Payload Control This document was used to determine facts and...

  7. Central Characterization Program (CCP) TRU Nonconforming Item...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    TRU Nonconforming Item Reporting and Control Central Characterization Program (CCP) TRU Nonconforming Item Reporting and Control This document was used to determine facts and...

  8. Characterization of Amorphous Zinc Tin Oxide Semiconductors....

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Amorphous Zinc Tin Oxide Semiconductors. Characterization of Amorphous Zinc Tin Oxide Semiconductors. Abstract: Amorphous zinc tin oxide (ZTO) was investigated to determine the...

  9. area geological characterization: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Utilization Websites Summary: Geological Characterization of California's Offshore Carbon Dioxide Storage Capacity ENVIRONMENTAL sequestration pilot studies to determine...

  10. Stimulation Prediction Models | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk,SoutheastSt.SteepStimulation Prediction Models Jump to:

  11. The Gottingen Minipig Is a Model of the Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome: G-Colony Stimulating Factor Stimulates Hematopoiesis and Enhances Survival From Lethal Total-Body ?-Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moroni, Maria, E-mail: maria.moroni@usuhs.edu [Radiation Countermeasures Program, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Ngudiankama, Barbara F. [Laboratory of Viral Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Christensen, Christine [Division of Comparative Pathology, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Olsen, Cara H. [Biostatistics Consulting Center, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Owens, Rossitsa [Radiation Countermeasures Program, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Lombardini, Eric D. [Veterinary Medicine Department, Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences, Bangkok (Thailand); Holt, Rebecca K. [Veterinary Science Department, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Whitnall, Mark H. [Radiation Countermeasures Program, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: We are characterizing the Gottingen minipig as an additional large animal model for advanced drug testing for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) to enhance the discovery and development of novel radiation countermeasures. Among the advantages provided by this model, the similarities to human hematologic parameters and dynamics of cell loss/recovery after irradiation provide a convenient means to compare the efficacy of drugs known to affect bone marrow cellularity and hematopoiesis. Methods and Materials: Male Gottingen minipigs, 4 to 5 months old and weighing 9 to 11 kg, were used for this study. We tested the standard off-label treatment for ARS, rhG-CSF (Neupogen, 10 ?g/kg/day for 17 days), at the estimated LD70/30 total-body ?-irradiation (TBI) radiation dose for the hematopoietic syndrome, starting 24 hours after irradiation. Results: The results indicated that granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhanced survival, stimulated recovery from neutropenia, and induced mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. In addition, the administration of G-CSF resulted in maturation of monocytes/macrophages. Conclusions: These results support continuing efforts toward validation of the minipig as a large animal model for advanced testing of radiation countermeasures and characterization of the pathophysiology of ARS, and they suggest that the efficacy of G-CSF in improving survival after total body irradiation may involve mechanisms other than increasing the numbers of circulating granulocytes.

  12. Development and Validation of an Advanced Stimulation Prediction...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of created fractures." State Colorado Objectives Develop and validate an advanced computer model that can be used in the planning and design of stimulation techniques to create...

  13. adipocytes insulin stimulates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pathway. Physics Websites Summary: -stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Continuous infusion of LPS through mini-osmotic pumps was also associated1 Lipopolysaccharides-mediated...

  14. acrolein generation stimulates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a powerful means of control over supercontinuum generation by stimulating the process with a very weak optical seed signal 2. This minute addition significantly...

  15. Electron-Stimulated Production of Molecular Oxygen in Amorphous...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water on Pt(111): Precursor Transport Through the Hydrogen Electron-Stimulated Production of Molecular Oxygen in Amorphous Solid Water on Pt(111): Precursor Transport Through the...

  16. Controlled Rapid Pressurization Using Liquid Propellants for EGS Well Stimulation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objective: Investigate the use of Ťnon-toxic? or negligible environmental impact liquid propellants for the stimulation of geothermal fields.

  17. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- New York Canyon Stimulation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    New York Canyon Stimulation Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced Search New Hot Docs News...

  18. Stimulated Raman scattering in large plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillion, D.W.; Banner, D.L.

    1980-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Stimulated Raman scattering is of concern to laser fusion since it can create a hot electron environment which can increase the difficulty of achieving high final fuel densities. In earlier experiments with one micron laser light, the energy measured in Raman-scattered light has been insignificant. But these experiments were done with, at most, about 100 joules of laser energy. The Raman instability has a high threshold which also requires a large plasma to be irradiated with a large diameter spot. Only with a long interaction length can the Raman-scattered light wave convectively grow to a large amplitude, and only in recent long pulse, high energy experiments (4000 joules in 2 ns) at the Shiva laser facility have we observed as much as several percent of the laser light to be Raman-scattered. We find that the Raman instability has a much lower intensity threshold for longer laser pulselength and larger laser spot size on a solid target.

  19. GAS INJECTION/WELL STIMULATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John K. Godwin

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Driver Production proposes to conduct a gas repressurization/well stimulation project on a six well, 80-acre portion of the Dutcher Sand of the East Edna Field, Okmulgee County, Oklahoma. The site has been location of previous successful flue gas injection demonstration but due to changing economic and sales conditions, finds new opportunities to use associated natural gas that is currently being vented to the atmosphere to repressurize the reservoir to produce additional oil. The established infrastructure and known geological conditions should allow quick startup and much lower operating costs than flue gas. Lessons learned from the previous project, the lessons learned form cyclical oil prices and from other operators in the area will be applied. Technology transfer of the lessons learned from both projects could be applied by other small independent operators.

  20. Phase-locked rhythms in periodically stimulated heart cell aggregates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glass, Leon

    Phase-locked rhythms in periodically stimulated heart cell aggregates MICHAEL R. GUEVARA, ALVIN GUEVARA,MICHAEL R., ALVIN SHRIER,ANDLEONGLASS. Phase-locked rhythms in periodically stimulated heart cell, THE SINOATRIAL NODE acts as the pace- maker of the heart. As a result of the orderly spread of excitation

  1. INFLUENCE OF SOUND WAVE STIMULATION ON THE GROWTH OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    INFLUENCE OF SOUND WAVE STIMULATION ON THE GROWTH OF STRAWBERRY IN SUNLIGHT GREENHOUSE Lirong Qi differences between the circumstances of the two sunlight greenhouses, the strawberry after the sound wave disease and insect pest were enhanced. The experiment results show that sound wave stimulation can

  2. Interferon-Stimulated Genes in the Pregnant Mouse Uterus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilford, Sarah

    2008-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    INTERFERON-STIMULATED GENES IN THE PREGNANT MOUSE UTERUS A Senior Honors Thesis by SARAH TILFORD Submitted to the Office of Honors Programs Texas A&M University In partial... fulfillment of the requirements of the UNIVERSITY UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH FELLOWS May 2008 Major: Biomedical Science and Chemistry ii ABSTRACT Interferon-Stimulated Genes in the Pregnant Mouse Uterus (May 2008) Sarah Tilford Department...

  3. SB 4 Well Stimulation Treatment Regulations Text of Proposed Regulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    surveys; routine activities that do not affect the integrity of the well or the formation; the removal SB 4 Well Stimulation Treatment Regulations Text of Proposed Regulations Page 1 of 13 SB 4 WELL STIMULATION TREATMENT REGULATIONS TEXT OF PROPOSED REGULATIONS Added text is shown in underline

  4. Stimulating Cooperative Diversity in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks through Pricing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adve, Raviraj

    Stimulating Cooperative Diversity in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks through Pricing Naveen Shastry in commercial wireless ad hoc networks. For the relay, cooperation represents both a real cost of energy a pricing game that stimulates cooperation via reimbursements to the relay. Specifically, given the price

  5. Spatial mode structure of stimulated Stokes emission from a Raman generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlsten, J.L.; Rifkin, J.; MacPherson, D.C.

    1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spatial structure of the stimulated Stokes emission from a H/sub 2/ Raman generator has been accurately determined by using a linear photodiode array and imaging techniques. The diffraction-limited pump beam was obtained by spatially clipping the output of an injection-locked XeCl laser. The spatial profiles of the stimulated Stokes beam are compared with the predictions of Yariv's theory of propagation in a quadratic gain medium applied to Raman scattering. (A. Yariv, Quantum Electronics (Wiley, New York, 1975)). While the theory compares well with the experimental data at low intensities, the spatial profile develops features at higher intensities that are not predicted by the simple theory.

  6. Stimulated photon emission from the vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felix Karbstein; Rashid Shaisultanov

    2015-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effect of stimulated photon emission from the vacuum in strong space-time-dependent electromagnetic fields. We emphasize the viewpoint that the vacuum subjected to macroscopic electromagnetic fields with at least one nonzero electromagnetic field invariant, as, e.g., attainable by superimposing two laser beams, can represent a source term for outgoing photons. We believe that this view is particularly intuitive and allows for a straightforward and intuitive study of optical signatures of quantum vacuum nonlinearity in realistic experiments involving the collision of high-intensity laser pulses, and exemplify this view for the vacuum subjected to a strong standing electromagnetic wave as generated in the focal spot of two counterpropagating, linearly polarized, high-intensity laser pulses. Focusing on a comparably simple electromagnetic field profile, which should nevertheless capture the essential features of the electromagnetic fields generated in the focal spots of real high-intensity laser beams, we provide estimates for emission characteristics and the numbers of emitted photons attainable with present and near future high-intensity laser facilities.

  7. Increasing Production from Low-Permeability Gas Reservoirs by Optimizing Zone Isolation for Successful Stimulation Treatments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred Sabins

    2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Maximizing production from wells drilled in low-permeability reservoirs, such as the Barnett Shale, is determined by cementing, stimulation, and production techniques employed. Studies show that cementing can be effective in terms of improving fracture effectiveness by 'focusing' the frac in the desired zone and improving penetration. Additionally, a method is presented for determining the required properties of the set cement at various places in the well, with the surprising result that uphole cement properties in wells destined for multiple-zone fracturing is more critical than those applied to downhole zones. Stimulation studies show that measuring pressure profiles and response during Pre-Frac Injection Test procedures prior to the frac job are critical in determining if a frac is indicated at all, as well as the type and size of the frac job. This result is contrary to current industry practice, in which frac jobs are designed well before the execution, and carried out as designed on location. Finally, studies show that most wells in the Barnett Shale are production limited by liquid invasion into the wellbore, and determinants are presented for when rod or downhole pumps are indicated.

  8. High-Density PhyloChip profiling of stimulated aquifer microbial communities reveals a complex response to acetate amendment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Handley, Kim M.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Piceno, Y. M.; Andersen, Gary L.; DeSantis, Todd; Williams, Kenneth H.; Wilkins, Michael J.; N'Guessan, A. Lucie; Peacock, Aaron D.; Bargar, John; Long, Philip E.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2012-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    There is increasing interest in harnessing the functional capacities of indigenous microbial communities to transform and remediate a wide range of environmental contaminants. Information about which community members respond to stimulation can guide the interpretation and development of remediation approaches. To comprehensively determine community membership and abundance patterns among a suite of samples associated with uranium bioremediation experiments we employed a high?density microarray (PhyloChip). Samples were unstimulated, naturally reducing, or collected during Fe(III) (early) and sulfate reduction (late biostimulation) from an acetate re?amended/amended aquifer in Rifle, Colorado, and from laboratory experiments using field?collected materials. Deep community sampling with PhyloChip identified hundreds?to?thousands of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) present during amendment, and revealed close similarity among highly enriched taxa from drill?core and groundwater well?deployed column sediment. Overall, phylogenetic data suggested stimulated community membership was most affected by a carryover effect between annual stimulation events. Nevertheless, OTUs within the Fe(III)? and sulfate?reducing lineages, Desulfuromonadales and Desulfobacterales, were repeatedly stimulated. Less consistent, co?enriched taxa represented additional lineages associated with Fe(III) and sulfate reduction (for example, Desulfovibrionales; Syntrophobacterales; Peptococcaceae) and autotrophic sulfur oxidation (Sulfurovum; Campylobacterales). These data imply complex membership among highly stimulated taxa, and by inference biogeochemical responses to acetate, a non?fermentable substrate.

  9. Fast response system for large-volume acid stimulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilson, B.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Historically, the conventional approach to large-volume offshore acid stimulation has been to use a vessel dedicated to offshore stimulation services or to use a semi-permanent installation on the rig or platform. This approach often results in long-term commitment to an offshore vessel restricted to stimulation work or a great reduction of the valuable space on the rig or platform for an extended time. Both of these options usually require continuous, large capital outlays with periods of little or no use. The fast response stimulation package (FRSP) described in this paper provides a 25-bbl/min, centrally controlled, modular, acid-stimulation system with 50,000-gal acid storage capacity, 25-bbl/min, computer-operated blending equipment, acid-resistant manifold modules, and high-pressure pumping units. All processes are monitored and operated from a central control cabin. The FRSP can be quickly installed on an offshore work vessel or drilling rig of sufficient size to perform matrix acidizing and acid frac, and then be removed between jobs. The equipment has recently completed acid-stimulation services in a five-well program in 30 days, delivering up to 41,000 gal of blended acid at rates of 0.5 to 17 bbl/min from two different drilling rigs. This equipment has provided for greater versatility and better use of operator assets while providing specified requirements for stimulation services.

  10. Timing in the Absence of Supraspinal Input: Effects of Temporally Regular Stimulation on Spinal Plasticity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Kuan Hsien

    2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    task, in which response-contingent leg shock produces an increase in flexion duration. Exposure to temporally regular stimulation (fixed spaced stimulation; FT) promotes learning, and temporally irregular stimulation produces a learning deficit...

  11. Effect of electrical stimulation on bacteria of meats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mrigadat, Boosya

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from vacuum packaged top round. However, none of these differences in count were statistically significant (P&0. 05) . Electrical stimulation did not cause any consistent substantial changes in micro- bial types in ground beef, blade steaks, T...-boned ground beef from stimulated and unstimulated carcasses (n=10) stored for 6 days at. 0-3'C 70 19 Aerobic plate counts of ground beef prepared from vacuum packaged top round of stimulated and unstimulated carcasses (n=9) stored for 6 days at 0-3'C 71...

  12. ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY WITH DOWNHOLE VIBRATION STIMULATION IN OSAGE COUNTY OKLAHOMA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Westermark; J. Ford Brett

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Final Report covers the entire project from July 13, 2000 to June 30, 2003. The report summarizes the details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma'' under DOE Contract Number DE-FG26-00BC15191. The project was divided into nine separate tasks. This report is written in an effort to document the lessons learned during the completion of each task. Therefore each task will be discussed as the work evolved for that task throughout the duration of the project. Most of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, but certain tasks were dependent on earlier tasks being completed. During the three years of project activities, twelve quarterly technical reports were submitted for the project. Many individual topic and task specific reports were included as appendices in the quarterly reports. Ten of these reports have been included as appendices to this final report. Two technical papers, which were written and accepted by the Society of Petroleum Engineers, have also been included as appendices. The three primary goals of the project were to build a downhole vibration tool (DHVT) to be installed in seven inch casing, conduct a field test of vibration stimulation in a mature waterflooded field and evaluate the effects of the vibration on both the produced fluid characteristics and injection well performance. The field test results are as follows: In Phase I of the field test the DHVT performed exceeding well, generating strong clean signals on command and as designed. During this phase Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory had installed downhole geophones and hydrophones to monitor the signal generated by the downhole vibrator. The signals recorded were strong and clear. Phase II was planned to be ninety-day reservoir stimulation field test. This portion of the field tests was abruptly ended after one week of operations, when the DHVT became stuck in the well during a routine removal activity. The tool cannot operate in this condition and remains in the well. There was no response measured during or afterwards to either the produced fluids from the five production wells or in the injection characteristics of the two injection wells in the pilot test area. Monitoring the pilot area injection and production wells ceased when the field test was terminated March 14, 2003. Thus, a key goal of this project, which was to determine the effects of vibration stimulation on improving oil recovery from a mature waterflood, was not obtained. While there was no improved oil recovery effect measured, there was insufficient vibration stimulation time to expect a change to occur. No conclusion can be drawn about the effectiveness of vibration stimulation in this test.

  13. Electron-Stimulated Reactions and O-2 Production in Methanol...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and O-2 Production in Methanol-Covered Amorphous Solid Water Films. Electron-Stimulated Reactions and O-2 Production in Methanol-Covered Amorphous Solid Water Films. Abstract: The...

  14. Klamath Falls: High-Power Acoustic Well Stimulation Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, Brian

    2006-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Acoustic well stimulation (AWS) technology uses high-power sonic waves from specific frequency spectra in an attempt to stimulate production in a damaged or low-production wellbore. AWS technology is one of the most promising technologies in the oil and gas industry, but it has proven difficult for the industry to develop an effective downhole prototype. This collaboration between Klamath Falls Inc. and the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) included a series of tests using high-power ultrasonic tools to stimulate oil and gas production. Phase I testing was designed and implemented to verify tool functionality, power requirements, and capacity of high-power AWS tools. The purpose of Phase II testing was to validate the production response of wells with marginal production rates to AWS stimulation and to capture and identify any changes in the downhole environment after tool deployment. This final report presents methodology and results.

  15. Monitoring EGS Stimulation and Reservoir Dynamics with InSAR...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Monitoring EGS Stimulation and Reservoir Dynamics with InSAR and MEQ, DE-EE0005510 PI: Nicholas C. Davatzes Temple University Topic 4: Observation Tools and Data Collection System...

  16. Evaluation of Perforated Carbonate Cores Under Acid Stimulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diaz, Nerwing Jose

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Although it has been shown that clean perforation tunnels facilitate the evolution of a single, deeper-penetrating wormhole, there are no reported applications of reactive shaped charges in carbonates prior to acid stimulation. The present study...

  17. Fracture Evolution Following a Hydraulic Stimulation within an EGS Reservoir

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. This project will provide the first ever formal evaluation of fracture and fracture flow evolution in an EGS reservoir following a hydraulic stimulation.

  18. A system for efficient neural stimulation with energy recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Shawn Kevin, 1973-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analog VLSI-based low-power neural tissue stimulator is presented as a part of the MIT and Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary Retinal Implant Project to develop a prosthesis for restoring some useful vision to patients ...

  19. Selection of fracture fluid for stimulating tight gas reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malpani, Rajgopal Vijaykumar

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    , surveys from fracturing experts, and statistical analysis of production data, this research provides guidelines for selection of the appropriate stimulation treatment fluid in most gas shale and tight gas reservoirs. This study takes into account various...

  20. appetite stimulants: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    centres of the lateral hypothalamus in feeding 4 Responses to food reward and to brain-stimulation reward in the lateral Rolls, Edmund T. 2 Introduction In 1918, Wallace...

  1. TweetBubble: A Twitter Extension Stimulates Exploratory Browsing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ajit Jain, -

    2014-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We extend the Twitter interface to stimulate exploratory browsing of social media and develop a method to establish its efficacy. In exploratory browsing, users seek and traverse diverse and novel information as they investigate a conceptual space...

  2. Possible stimulation of nuclear alpha-decay by superfluid helium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. L. Barabanov

    2009-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    It is suggested that superfluid helium (condensate of 4-He atoms) may stimulate nuclear alpha-decay in a situation when an alpha-emitter moves through superfluid helium with fine-tuned velocity, so that the backward-emitted alpha-particle is at rest in the laboratory frame. It is shown that the probability of stimulated alpha-decay in this case may be sizable enough to be detected.

  3. Picosecond buildup and relaxation of intense stimulated emission in GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ageeva, N. N.; Bronevoi, I. L., E-mail: bil@cplire.ru; Zabegaev, D. N.; Krivonosov, A. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kotelnikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics (Russian Federation)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of the idea developed previously based on circumstantial evidence, we have found that stimulated emission emerges in GaAs and its intensity increases with a picosecond delay relative to the front of powerful picosecond optical pumping that produced a dense electron-hole plasma. The emission intensity relaxes with decreasing pumping with a characteristic time of {approx}10 ps. We have derived the dependences of the delay time, the relaxation time, and the duration of the picosecond emission pulse on its photon energy. The estimates based on the fact that the relaxation of emission is determined by electron-hole plasma cooling correspond to the measured relaxation time.

  4. An Optically Stimulated Luminescence Uranium Enrichment Monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Steven D.; Tanner, Jennifer E.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Conrady, Matthew M.; Benz, Jacob M.; Greenfield, Bryce A.

    2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has pioneered the use of Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) technology for use in personnel dosimetry and high dose radiation processing dosimetry. PNNL has developed and patented an alumina-based OSL dosimeter that is being used by the majority of medical X-ray and imaging technicians worldwide. PNNL has conceived of using OSL technology to passively measure the level of UF6 enrichment by attaching the prototype OSL monitor to pipes containing UF6 gas within an enrichment facility. The prototype OSL UF6 monitor utilizes a two-element approach with the first element open and unfiltered to measure both the low energy and high energy gammas from the UF6, while the second element utilizes a 3-mm thick tungsten filter to eliminate the low energy gammas and pass only the high energy gammas from the UF6. By placing a control monitor in the room away from the UF6 pipes and other ionizing radiation sources, the control readings can be subtracted from the UF6 pipe monitor measurements. The ratio of the shielded to the unshielded net measurements provides a means to estimate the level of uranium enrichment. PNNL has replaced the commercially available MicroStar alumina-based dosimeter elements with a composite of polyethylene plastic, high-Z glass powder, and BaFBr:Eu OSL phosphor powder at various concentrations. The high-Z glass was added in an attempt to raise the average “Z” of the composite dosimeter and increase the response. Additionally, since BaFBr:Eu OSL phosphor is optimally excited and emits light at different wavelengths compared to alumina, the commercially available MicroStar reader was modified for reading BaFBr:Eu in a parallel effort to increase reader sensitivity. PNNL will present the design and performance of our novel OSL uranium enrichment monitor based on a combination of laboratory and UF6 test loop measurements. PNNL will also report on the optimization effort to achieve the highest possible performance from both the OSL enrichment monitor and the new custom OSL reader modified for this application. This project has been supported by the US Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration’s Office of Dismantlement and Transparency (DOE/NNSA/NA-241).

  5. Threat Characterization: Trajectory Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell Schweickart; Clark Chapman; Dan Durda; Bill Bottke; David Nesvorny; Piet Hut

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Given a primary interest in "mitigation of the potential hazard" of near-Earth objects impacting the Earth, the subject of characterization takes on an aspect not normally present when considering asteroids as abstract bodies. Many deflection concepts are interested in the classic geophysical characteristics of asteroids when considering the physical challenge of modifying their orbits in order to cause them to subsequently miss an impact with Earth. Yet for all deflection concepts there are characteristics of the threat which overwhelm these traditional factors. For example, a close gravitational encounter with Earth some years or decades prior to impact can reduce the velocity change necessary for deflection by several orders of magnitude if the deflection precedes the close encounter (or encounters). Conversely this "benefit" comes at a "price"; a corresponding increase in the accuracy of tracking required to determine the probability of impact. Societal issues, both national and international, also characterize the NEO deflection process and these may strongly contend with the purely technical issues normally considered. Therefore critical factors not normally considered must be brought into play as one characterizes the threat of NEO impacts.

  6. Characterization of the mutS-proximal region of the Salmonella typhimurium SPI-1 identies a group of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galan, Jorge E

    Characterization of the mutS-proximal region of the Salmonella typhimurium SPI-1 identi˘es a groupA genes, encodes a type III protein secretion system and an iron uptake system. We have characterized exerts its function by delivering a battery of eˇector proteins that stimulate and/or interfere

  7. Optic probe for semiconductor characterization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, Bhushan L. (Denver, CO); Hambarian, Artak (Yerevan, AM)

    2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Described herein is an optical probe (120) for use in characterizing surface defects in wafers, such as semiconductor wafers. The optical probe (120) detects laser light reflected from the surface (124) of the wafer (106) within various ranges of angles. Characteristics of defects in the surface (124) of the wafer (106) are determined based on the amount of reflected laser light detected in each of the ranges of angles. Additionally, a wafer characterization system (100) is described that includes the described optical probe (120).

  8. Laser stimulation can activate autophagy in HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yisen; Hu, Minglie; Wang, Chingyue [Ultrafast Laser Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Information Technology (Ministry of Education), College of Precision Instrument and Optoelectronics Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Lan, Bei; Cao, Youjia [Key Laboratory of Microbial Functional Genomics of Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin (China); He, Hao, E-mail: haohe@tju.edu.cn [Ultrafast Laser Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Information Technology (Ministry of Education), College of Precision Instrument and Optoelectronics Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Med-X Research Institute, School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China)

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    For decades, lasers have been a daily tool in most biological research for fluorescent excitation by confocal or multiphoton microscopy. More than 20 years ago, cell photodamage caused by intense laser stimulation was noticed by generating reactive oxygen species, which was then thought as the main damage effect by photons. In this study, we show that laser stimulation can induce autophagy, an important cell lysosomal pathway responding to immune stimulation and starvation, without any biochemical treatment. Two different types of laser stimulations are found to be capable of activating autophagy: continuous scanning by continuous-wave visible lasers and a short-time flash of femtosecond laser irradiation. The autophagy generation is independent from wavelength, power, and scanning duration of the visible lasers. In contrast, the power of femtosecond laser is very critical to autophagy because the multiphoton excited Ca{sup 2+} dominates autophagy signaling. In general, we show here the different mechanisms of autophagy generation by such laser stimulation, which correspond to confocal microscopy and cell surgery, respectively. Those results can help further understanding of photodamage and autophagy signaling.

  9. New Technique for Speciation of Uranium in Sediments Following Acetate-Stimulated Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Acetate-stimulated bioremediation is a promising new technique for sequestering toxic uranium contamination from groundwater. The speciation of uranium in sediments after such bioremediation attempts remains unknown as a result of low uranium concentration, and is important to analyzing the stability of sequestered uranium. A new technique was developed for investigating the oxidation state and local molecular structure of uranium from field site sediments using X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS), and was implemented at the site of a former uranium mill in Rifle, CO. Glass columns filled with bioactive Rifle sediments were deployed in wells in the contaminated Rifle aquifer and amended with a hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) stock solution to increase uranium concentration while maintaining field conditions. This sediment was harvested and XAS was utilized to analyze the oxidation state and local molecular structure of the uranium in sediment samples. Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) data was collected and compared to known uranium spectra to determine the local molecular structure of the uranium in the sediment. Fitting was used to determine that the field site sediments did not contain uraninite (UO{sub 2}), indicating that models based on bioreduction using pure bacterial cultures are not accurate for bioremediation in the field. Stability tests on the monomeric tetravalent uranium (U(IV)) produced by bioremediation are needed in order to assess the efficacy of acetate-stimulation bioremediation.

  10. Surface plasmon amplification by stimulated emission of radiation (SPASER)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stockman, Mark I. (Atlanta, GA); Bergman, David J. (Ramat Hasharon, IL)

    2009-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A nanostructure is used to generate a highly localized nanoscale optical field. The field is excited using surface plasmon amplification by stimulated emission of radiation (SPASER). The SPASER radiation consists of surface plasmons that undergo stimulated emission, but in contrast to photons can be localized within a nanoscale region. A SPASER can incorporate an active medium formed by two-level emitters, excited by an energy source, such as an optical, electrical, or chemical energy source. The active medium may be quantum dots, which transfer excitation energy by radiationless transitions to a resonant nanosystem that can play the same role as a laser cavity in a conventional laser. The transitions are stimulated by the surface plasmons in the nanostructure, causing the buildup of a macroscopic number of surface plasmons in a single mode.

  11. Stimulated Brillouin Scatter in a Magnetized Ionospheric Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Selcher, C. A.; Lehmberg, R. H. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States); Rodriguez, S. P.; Thomason, J. F. [Radar Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States); Groves, K. M. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Hansom AFB, Massachusetts (United States); McCarrick, M. J. [BAE Systems, Washington, D.C. (United States); Frazer, G. J. [ISR Division, DSTO, Edinburgh, South Australia (Australia)

    2010-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    High power electromagnetic waves transmitted from the HAARP facility in Alaska can excite low-frequency electrostatic waves by magnetized stimulated Brillouin scatter. Either an ion-acoustic wave with a frequency less than the ion cyclotron frequency (f{sub CI}) or an electrostatic ion cyclotron (EIC) wave just above f{sub CI} can be produced. The coupled equations describing the magnetized stimulated Brillouin scatter instability show that the production of both ion-acoustic and EIC waves is strongly influenced by the wave propagation relative to the background magnetic field. Experimental observations of stimulated electromagnetic emissions using the HAARP transmitter have confirmed that only ion-acoustic waves are excited for propagation along the magnetic zenith and that EIC waves can only be detected with oblique propagation angles. The ion composition can be obtained from the measured EIC frequency.

  12. Compact biomedical pulsed signal generator for bone tissue stimulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W. (108 Independent Blvd., Aiken, SC 29801)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for stimulating bone tissue for stimulating bone growth or treating osteoporosis by applying directly to the skin of the patient an alternating current electrical signal comprising wave forms known to simulate the piezoelectric constituents in bone. The apparatus may, by moving a switch, stimulate bone growth or treat osteoporosis, as desired. Based on low-power CMOS technology and enclosed in a moisture-resistant case shaped to fit comfortably, two astable multivibrators produce the desired waveforms. The amplitude, pulse width and pulse frequency, and the subpulse width and subpulse frequency of the waveforms are adjustable. The apparatus, preferably powered by a standard 9-volt battery, includes signal amplitude sensors and warning signals indicate an output is being produced and the battery needs to be replaced.

  13. Compact biomedical pulsed signal generator for bone tissue stimulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1993-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for stimulating bone tissue for stimulating bone growth or treating osteoporosis by applying directly to the skin of the patient an alternating current electrical signal comprising wave forms known to simulate the piezoelectric constituents in bone. The apparatus may, by moving a switch, stimulate bone growth or treat osteoporosis, as desired. Based on low-power CMOS technology and enclosed in a moisture-resistant case shaped to fit comfortably, two astable multivibrators produce the desired waveforms. The amplitude, pulse width and pulse frequency, and the subpulse width and subpulse frequency of the waveforms are adjustable. The apparatus, preferably powered by a standard 9-volt battery, includes signal amplitude sensors and warning signals indicate an output is being produced and the battery needs to be replaced.

  14. Possible Stimulated Emission of Entangled Rhodium Mossbauer Gammas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao Cheng; Zhongming Wang

    2006-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Observation of possible stimulated emission of Mossbauer gamma is reported by liquid-nitrogen quenching of rhodium sample from room temperature to 77K in the time-resolved Mossbauer spectroscopy. Recently, we have demonstrated the anomalous emission of three entangled gammas of the E3 Mossbauer transition generated by bremsstrahlung irradiation. In this work, we further report the high-speed decay of excited state. We conjecture that cooling shrinkage, gravitational redshift and crystal lattice collimate entangled gammas in a linear cavity. This opens up a new approach towards gamma lasing, if the stimulated emission occurs at this obtained low excitation density.

  15. Possible Stimulated Emission of Entangled Rhodium Mossbauer Gammas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Y; Cheng, Yao; Wang, Zhongming

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observation of possible stimulated emission of Mossbauer gamma is reported by liquid-nitrogen quenching of rhodium sample from room temperature to 77K in the time-resolved Mossbauer spectroscopy. Recently, we have demonstrated the anomalous emission of three entangled gammas of the E3 Mossbauer transition generated by bremsstrahlung irradiation. In this work, we further report the high-speed decay of excited state. We conjecture that cooling shrinkage, gravitational redshift and crystal lattice collimate entangled gammas in a linear cavity. This opens up a new approach towards gamma lasing, if the stimulated emission occurs at this obtained low excitation density.

  16. Remote auditing of radiotherapy facilities using optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lye, Jessica, E-mail: jessica.lye@arpansa.gov.au; Dunn, Leon; Kenny, John; Alves, Andrew [Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, Yallambie, Victoria 3085 (Australia)] [Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, Yallambie, Victoria 3085 (Australia); Lehmann, Joerg; Williams, Ivan [Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, Yallambie, Victoria 3085, Australia and School of Applied Science, RMIT University, Melbourne 3000 (Australia)] [Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, Yallambie, Victoria 3085, Australia and School of Applied Science, RMIT University, Melbourne 3000 (Australia); Kron, Tomas [School of Applied Science, RMIT University, Melbourne 3000, Australia and Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne 3008 (Australia)] [School of Applied Science, RMIT University, Melbourne 3000, Australia and Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne 3008 (Australia); Oliver, Chris; Butler, Duncan; Johnston, Peter [Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, Yallambie, Victoria 3085 (Australia)] [Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, Yallambie, Victoria 3085 (Australia); Franich, Rick [School of Applied Science, RMIT University, Melbourne 3000 (Australia)] [School of Applied Science, RMIT University, Melbourne 3000 (Australia)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: On 1 July 2012, the Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service (ACDS) released its Optically Stimulated Luminescent Dosimeter (OSLD) Level I audit, replacing the previous TLD based audit. The aim of this work is to present the results from this new service and the complete uncertainty analysis on which the audit tolerances are based. Methods: The audit release was preceded by a rigorous evaluation of the InLight® nanoDot OSLD system from Landauer (Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL). Energy dependence, signal fading from multiple irradiations, batch variation, reader variation, and dose response factors were identified and quantified for each individual OSLD. The detectors are mailed to the facility in small PMMA blocks, based on the design of the existing Radiological Physics Centre audit. Modeling and measurement were used to determine a factor that could convert the dose measured in the PMMA block, to dose in water for the facility's reference conditions. This factor is dependent on the beam spectrum. The TPR{sub 20,10} was used as the beam quality index to determine the specific block factor for a beam being audited. The audit tolerance was defined using a rigorous uncertainty calculation. The audit outcome is then determined using a scientifically based two tiered action level approach. Audit outcomes within two standard deviations were defined as Pass (Optimal Level), within three standard deviations as Pass (Action Level), and outside of three standard deviations the outcome is Fail (Out of Tolerance). Results: To-date the ACDS has audited 108 photon beams with TLD and 162 photon beams with OSLD. The TLD audit results had an average deviation from ACDS of 0.0% and a standard deviation of 1.8%. The OSLD audit results had an average deviation of ?0.2% and a standard deviation of 1.4%. The relative combined standard uncertainty was calculated to be 1.3% (1?). Pass (Optimal Level) was reduced to ?2.6% (2?), and Fail (Out of Tolerance) was reduced to >3.9% (3?) for the new OSLD audit. Previously with the TLD audit the Pass (Optimal Level) and Fail (Out of Tolerance) were set at ?4.0% (2?) and >6.0% (3?). Conclusions: The calculated standard uncertainty of 1.3% at one standard deviation is consistent with the measured standard deviation of 1.4% from the audits and confirming the suitability of the uncertainty budget derived audit tolerances. The OSLD audit shows greater accuracy than the previous TLD audit, justifying the reduction in audit tolerances. In the TLD audit, all outcomes were Pass (Optimal Level) suggesting that the tolerances were too conservative. In the OSLD audit 94% of the audits have resulted in Pass (Optimal level) and 6% of the audits have resulted in Pass (Action Level). All Pass (Action level) results have been resolved with a repeat OSLD audit, or an on-site ion chamber measurement.

  17. DESY -August 7th 2007, Hamburg, Germany 1 Optically Stimulated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DESY - August 7th 2007, Hamburg, Germany 1 Optically Stimulated Luminescence Dosimetry Based on Sr, Germany 2 Why OSL ? A bit of History... 1950/1960: first suggestion of OSL as a dosimetry tool 80's years dosimetry system for RADECS Conference INTRODUCTION #12;DESY - August 7th 2007, Hamburg, Germany 3

  18. Optical gain, spontaneous and stimulated emission of surface plasmon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grandidier, Jonathan

    Optical gain, spontaneous and stimulated emission of surface plasmon polaritons in confined plasmonic waveguide G. Colas des Francs,1, P. Bramant,1 J. Grandidier,1,2 A. Bouhelier,1 J.-C. Weeber,1.colas-des-francs@u-bourgogne.fr Abstract: We develop a theoretical model to compute the local density of states in a confined plasmonic

  19. Stimulated Emission of Radiation in a Nuclear Fusion Reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Duren

    1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This letter claims that process of stimulated emission of radiation can be used to induce a fusion reaction in a HD molecule to produce Helium-3. An experimental set-up for this reaction is presented. It is proposed to study the technical potential of this reaction as an energy amplifier.

  20. Neutron Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography of Stable Isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the development of a new molecular imaging technique using inelastic scattering of fast neutrons. Earlier studies characteristic gamma photons through inelastic scattering of an external neutron beam. These stable isotopes canNeutron Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography of Stable Isotopes Carey E. Floyd Jr.*ab , Calvin

  1. Stimulated emission with a non-equilibrium state of radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Accardi; K. Imafuku; S. V. Kozyrev

    2001-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The stimulated emission from an atom interacting with radiation in non-equilibrium state is considered. The stochastic limit, applied to the non-relativistic Hamiltonian describing the interaction, shows that the state of atoms, driven by some non-equilibrium state of the field approaches a stationary state which can continuously emit photon, unlike the case with an equilibrium state.

  2. acth stimulation test: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    acth stimulation test First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Calcium Ion as a Second Messenger...

  3. acetazolamide stimulation test: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    acetazolamide stimulation test First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Acetazolamide-based...

  4. accumbens stimulate ethanol: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    accumbens stimulate ethanol First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Suppression of...

  5. Intra-operative Registration for Deep Brain Stimulation Procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Intra-operative Registration for Deep Brain Stimulation Procedures based on a Full Physics Head´e Rennes I Abstract. Brain deformation is a factor of inaccuracy during stereo- tactic neurosurgeries to update the pre-operative planning based on a physical simulation of the brain shift. A minimization

  6. A Competition between Stimulators and Antagonists of Upf Complex Recruitment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bedwell, David M.

    A Competition between Stimulators and Antagonists of Upf Complex Recruitment Governs (NMD) pathway subjects mRNAs with premature termination codons (PTCs) to rapid decay. The conserved Upf or antagonize recruitment of the Upf complex to the terminating ribosome. We identify cytoplasmic PABP

  7. CONCEPTS & SYNTHESIS EMPHASIZING NEW IDEAS TO STIMULATE RESEARCH IN ECOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammerton, James

    CONCEPTS & SYNTHESIS EMPHASIZING NEW IDEAS TO STIMULATE RESEARCH IN ECOLOGY Ecology, 93(7), 2012, pp. 1527­1539 Ó 2012 by the Ecological Society of America Uses and misuses of bioclimatic envelope, they can be applied to a variety of questions in ecology, evolution, and conservation. However, some have

  8. CONCEPTS & SYNTHESIS EMPHASIZING NEW IDEAS TO STIMULATE RESEARCH IN ECOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    CONCEPTS & SYNTHESIS EMPHASIZING NEW IDEAS TO STIMULATE RESEARCH IN ECOLOGY Ecology, 87(6), 2006, pp. 1345­1358 Ó 2006 by the Ecological Society of America ANALYTIC WEBS SUPPORT THE SYNTHESIS OF ECOLOGICAL DATA SETS AARON M. ELLISON,1,3 LEON J. OSTERWEIL,2 LORI CLARKE,2 JULIAN L. HADLEY,1 ALEXANDER WISE

  9. Nonlinear stimulated Brillouin scattering based photonic signal processors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minasian, Robert A. [School of Electrical and Information Engineering, Institute of Photonics and Optical Science, University of Sydney, NSW, Sydney, 2006 (Australia)

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent new methods in photonic signal processing based on stimulated Brillouin scattering, that enable the realization of photonic mixers with high conversion efficiency, ultra-wide continuously tunable high-resolution microwave photonic filters and programmable switchable microwave photonic tunable filters, are presented. These processors provide new capabilities for the realisation of high-performance and high-resolution signal processing.

  10. Shale Oil Production Performance from a Stimulated Reservoir Volume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhary, Anish Singh

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    .1 Unconventional resources ................................................................................. 1 1.2 Oil shale and shale oil ....................................................................................... 6 1.3 Production from unconventional..., heavy oil, shale gas and shale oil. On the other hand, conventional reservoirs can be produced at economic flow rates and produce economic volumes of oil and gas without large stimulation treatments or any special recovery process. Conventional...

  11. Light stimulation of iris tyrosinase in vivo. [Rabbits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dryja, T.P.; Kimball, G.P.; Albert, D.M.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents evidence that light stimulates tyrosinase activity in iris melanocytes in rabbits. Levels of iris tyrosinase were found to be greater in eyes of rabbits exposed to light for 6 weeks than in eyes of rabbits maintained in darkness. Despite increasing tyrosinase levels, exposure to light produced no clinically observable change in iris color.

  12. acupuncture stimulations lead: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    acupuncture stimulations lead First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Original Research Neural...

  13. Effects of kinesthetic and cutaneous stimulation during the learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siena, Universitŕ di

    with movement disabilities [1]. A variety of assistive control strategies have been designed, including robots consists of applying a viscous curl field during the execution of point-to-point reaching movements, Member, IEEE Abstract--Haptic stimulation can help humans learn perceptual motor skills, but the precise

  14. Rock Physics Based Determination of Reservoir Microstructure for Reservoir Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adesokan, Hamid 1976-

    2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most important, but often ignored, factors affecting the transport and the seismic properties of hydrocarbon reservoir is pore shape. Transport properties depend on the dimensions, geometry, and distribution of pores and cracks. Knowledge...

  15. SU-E-T-264: Preliminary Results On New Optically Stimulated Luminescent Materials for Proton Therapy Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doull, B [Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK (United States); Zheng, Y [Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK (United States); Procure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Yukihara, E

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to test the premise that luminescence materials with less under-response to proton beams can be identified by testing their dose response to low-LET radiation. The goal is to develop new Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) materials with improved response for proton therapy dosimetry. Methods: We first measured the dose response of new OSL materials, synthesized in our laboratory, to low-LET radiation (beta rays from a {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y source) and selected two materials having different OSL saturation characteristics and good dosimetric properties, namely MgB4O7:Ce,Li and MgO:Li. Commercial Al2O3:C was also used for comparison. These materials were then irradiated at several depths along a pristine proton beam. The luminescence responses of the materials, relative to the entrance response, were compared with the depth dose profile measured by a multiple-layer ion chamber. Results: The OSL signals of MgB4O7:Ce,Li and MgO:Li were characterized for signal stability, dose response, and response to a clinical proton beam. The materials were also compared with the commercial Al2O3:C. The signals from both MgB4O7:Ce,Li and MgO:Li were relatively stable after a one day delay following irradiation. The low-LET dose response of the materials showed that, over the dose range investigated (up to ?800 Gy), MgB4O7:Ce,Li did not saturate, whereas MgO:Li and Al2O3:C saturated at doses of ?100 Gy. MgB4O7:Ce,Li showed less underresponse to proton beams than MgO:Li and Al2O3:C. Conclusion: In general the material with the highest saturation doses for low-LET radiation (MgB4O7:Ce,Li) showed the least under-response to proton beams, which suggests that it may be possible to develop better OSL materials for proton dosimetry if the dose response can be controlled during synthesis. Nevertheless, the degree in which the response to proton beams can be controlled remains to be determined. The research is funded by the Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology (OCAST), project number HR12-055.

  16. Temporal dynamics of stimulated emission with applications in nuclear quantum optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Reichegger; Jörg Evers

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The temporal dynamics of stimulated emission is studied, with the particular emphasis on stimulated emission induced by x-ray pulses interacting with nuclei. In typical nuclear forward scattering experiments, the short incident x-ray pulse is accompanied by a huge number of off-resonant background photons. This prompts the question, if stimulated emission can be observed in the delayed nuclear scattering signal which is emitted after the incident pulse has passed. We find that the stimulated photons essentially overlap with the stimulating pulse. To overcome this problem, we identify the reduction of the delayed scattered light intensity as alternative signature for the stimulated emission. We further study a phase-sensitive variant of stimulated emission in the low-excitation regime, which provides convenient control parameters to facilitate the detection. Finally, we analyze the possibility to observe stimulated emission in nuclei driven by free electron lasers or synchrotron radiation sources.

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - autologous granulocyte-colony-stimulating...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mediators and the administrated recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating... -cell infusion mobilized with granulocyte ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de mathmatiques...

  18. Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

    2001-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate the impact of downhole vibration stimulation on oil production rates in a mature waterflood field. Oil & Gas Consultants International, Inc. (OGCI) will manage the project in close cooperation with the Osage Tribe as the tests will be conducted in Osage County, Oklahoma, the mineral estate of the Osage Tribe. The field is owned and operated by Calumet Oil Company. Phillips Petroleum Company will contribute their proprietary vibration core analysis of cores recovered from the pilot test area. To achieve the project objectives, the work has been divided into nine tasks, some are concurrent, while other tasks rely on completion of previous steps. The operator, Calumet Oil Company operates several field in Osage County Oklahoma. The North Burbank Unit will be the site of the test. The team will then determine where within the field to optimally locate the vibration test well. With the location determined, the test well will be drilled, cored, logged and 7-inch production casing run and cemented. In a parallel effort, OGCI will be designing, building, and testing a new version of the downhole vibration tool based on their patented and field proven whirling orbital vibrator. With the field test tool built to run in 7-inch casing. Reliability testing of the downhole tool and surface power source will be conducted in nearby field operated by Calumet Oil Company. After the core is recovered, Phillips Petroleum Company will be conducting laboratory tests utilizing their proprietary sonic core apparatus to determine fluid flow response to a range of vibration frequencies. These results, in turn, will allow final adjustments to the frequency generation mechanisms of the downhole vibration tool. One or more offset wells, near to the vibration test well, will be equipped with downhole geophones and or hydro-phones to determine the strength of signal and if the producing formation has a characteristic resonant frequency response. Surface geophones will also be set out and arranged to pick up the signal generated by the downhole vibration tool. The downhole vibrator will be installed in the test well. Monitoring the production and injection for the pilot test area will continue. As the frequency of the downhole tool is changed, the recording of seismic signals, both on the surface and downhole, will also be conducted. The results of the data collection will be a matrix of varying vibration stimulation conditions corresponding to changes in production fluid rates and seismic responses. The report on the results of the downhole vibration stimulation will be prepared and delivered using several venues. Technical papers will be submitted to the Society of Petroleum Engineers. Workshops are planned to be held for operators in Osage County and surrounding areas. A dedicated technical session on vibration stimulation may be offered at the 2002 SPE/DOE/IOR Conference, bringing together the world's experts in this emerging technology. The final task will be to close out the project.

  19. A gamma/neutron-discriminating, Cooled, Optically Stimulated Luminescence (COSL) dosemeter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eschbach, P.A.; Miller, S.D.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cooled Optically Stimulated Luminescence (COSL) of CaF{sub 2}:Mn (grain sizes from 0.1 to 100 microns) powder embedded in a hydrogenous matrix is reported as a function of fast-neutron dose. When all the CaF{sub 2}:Mn grains are interrogated at once, the COSL plastic dosemeters have a minimum detectable limit of 1 cSv fast neutrons; the gamma component from the bare {sup 252}cf exposure was determined with a separate dosemeter. We report here on a proton-recoil-based dosemeter that generates pulse height spectra, much like the scintillator of Hornyak, (2) to provide information on both the neutron and gamma dose.

  20. Bone Marrow Stimulation of the Medial Femoral Condyle Produces Inferior Cartilage and Bone Repair Compared to the Trochlea in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buschmann, Michael

    Bone Marrow Stimulation of the Medial Femoral Condyle Produces Inferior Cartilage and Bone Repair femoral condylar (MFC) versus femoral trochlear (TR) defects 3 months after bone marrow stimulation: cartilage repair; medial femoral condyle; trochlea; bone marrow stimulation; meniscus degeneration Articular

  1. Characterization Well R-22 Geochemistry Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Longmire

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides analytical results for groundwater collected during four characterization-sampling rounds conducted at well R-22 from March 2001 through March 2002. Characterization well R-22 was sampled from March 6 through 13, 2001; June 19 through 26, 2001; November 30 through December 10, 2001; and February 27 through March 7, 2002. The goal of the characterization efforts was to assess the hydrochemistry and to determine whether or not contaminants are present in the regional aquifer in the vicinity of the well. A geochemical evaluation of the analytical results for the well is also presented in this report.

  2. Predicting Stimulation Response Relationships For Engineered Geothermal Reservoirs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Using existing LLNL computer programs, develop realistic models of EGS stimulation-response scenarios involving hydraulic and explosive propagation of tensile/shear fracture systems in hard rock formations where a pre-existing fracture network may be present along with regional stress and temperature distributions. Evaluate resulting heat transfer improvement of enhanced target formations using LLNL NUFT subsurface flow and transport program.

  3. Entrainment and termination of reentrant wave propagation in a periodically stimulated ring of excitable media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glass, Leon

    Entrainment and termination of reentrant wave propagation in a periodically stimulated ring periodic stimulation of a class of cardiac arrhythmias caused by reentrant wave propagation in the human wave of circulation. In analogy with earlier results found from the periodic stimulation

  4. Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory for Carbonate Studies Executive Summary for 2014 Outcrop and Subsurface Characterization of Carbonate Reservoirs for Improved Recovery of Remaining/Al 0.00 0.02 0.04 Eagle Ford Fm #12;#12; Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory Research Plans

  5. Reservoir CharacterizationReservoir Characterization Research LaboratoryResearch Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Reservoir CharacterizationReservoir Characterization Research LaboratoryResearch Laboratory at Austin Austin, Texas 78713Austin, Texas 78713--89248924 #12;Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory for Carbonate Studies Research Plans for 2012 Outcrop and Subsurface Characterization of Carbonate

  6. Petroleum characterization by perfluorocarbon tracers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senum, G.I.; Fajer, R.W. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Harris, B.R. Jr. (USDOE Naval Petroleum Reserves in California, Tupman, CA (United States)); DeRose, W.E. (Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)); Ottaviani, W.L. (Chevron U.S.A., Inc., Bakersfield, CA (United States))

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Perfluorocarbon tracers (PFTs), a class of six compounds, were used to help characterize the Shallow Oil Zone (SOZ) reservoir at the Naval Petroleum Reserve in California (NPRC) at Elk Hills. The SOZ reservoir is undergoing a pilot gas injection program to assess the technical feasibility and economic viability of injecting gas into the SOZ for improved oil recovery. PFTs were utilized in the pilot gas injection to qualitatively assess the extent of the pilot gas injection so as to determine the degree of gas containment within the SOZ reservoir.

  7. The Stimulation of Hydrocarbon Reservoirs with Subsurface Nuclear Explosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LORENZ,JOHN C.

    2000-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Between 1965 and 1979 there were five documented and one or more inferred attempts to stimulate the production from hydrocarbon reservoirs by detonating nuclear devices in reservoir strata. Of the five documented tests, three were carried out by the US in low-permeability, natural-gas bearing, sandstone-shale formations, and two were done in the USSR within oil-bearing carbonates. The objectives of the US stimulation efforts were to increase porosity and permeability in a reservoir around a specific well by creating a chimney of rock rubble with fractures extending beyond it, and to connect superimposed reservoir layers. In the USSR, the intent was to extensively fracture an existing reservoir in the more general vicinity of producing wells, again increasing overall permeability and porosity. In both countries, the ultimate goals were to increase production rates and ultimate recovery from the reservoirs. Subsurface explosive devices ranging from 2.3 to about 100 kilotons were used at depths ranging from 1208 m (3963 ft) to 2568 m (8427 ft). Post-shot problems were encountered, including smaller-than-calculated fracture zones, formation damage, radioactivity of the product, and dilution of the BTU value of tie natural gas with inflammable gases created by the explosion. Reports also suggest that production-enhancement factors from these tests fell short of expectations. Ultimately, the enhanced-production benefits of the tests were insufficient to support continuation of the pro-grams within increasingly adversarial political, economic, and social climates, and attempts to stimulate hydrocarbon reservoirs with nuclear devices have been terminated in both countries.

  8. Fall Rubber Colloquium CHARACTERIZATION OF DISPERSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    9th Fall Rubber Colloquium CHARACTERIZATION OF DISPERSION MECHANISMS OF AGGLOMERATED FILLERS (styrene-butadiene rubber). The objective was to determine the role of the intrinsic parameters Carbon black and silica are widely used as reinforcing fillers for rubber compounds in the tire industry

  9. Characterization of geothermal solid wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, W.F.; Stephens, F.B.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The compositions of 5 major types of geothermal wastes have been determined, and samples have been subjected to EPA recommended extraction tests to determine if they contain toxic metals that would classify the wastes as hazardous. Of the samples tested, the extracts of geothermal brines clearly contain levels of As, Ba and Pb exceeding the maximum allowed concentrations that characterize wastes as toxic. Only one other waste type, geothermal scale, exhibited EP toxicity. Pb was found in the extract of geothermal scale at a level of 7 mg/l, only 2 mg/l over the maximum limit. All of the other types of geothermal waste samples showed levels of toxic metals in the extracts well below the regulated limits.

  10. High-density PhyloChip profiling of stimulated aquifer microbial communities reveals a complex response to acetate amendment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Handley, Kim M.; Wrighton, Kelly E.; Piceno, Y. M.; Anderson, Gary L.; DeSantis, Todd; Williams, Kenneth H.; Wilkins, Michael J.; N'Guessan, A. L.; Peacock, Aaron; Bargar, John R.; Long, Philip E.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    There is increasing interest in harnessing the functional diversity of indigenous microbial communities to transform and remediate a wide range of environmental contaminants. Understanding the response of communities to stimulation, including flanking taxa, presents important opportunities for optimizing remediation approaches. We used high-density PhyloChip microarray analysis to comprehensively determine community membership and abundance patterns amongst a suite of samples from U(VI) bioremediation experiments. Samples were unstimulated or collected during Fe(III) and sulfate reduction from an acetate-augmented aquifer in Rifle, Colorado, and from laboratory experiments using field-collected materials. Results showed the greatest diversity in abundant SRB lineages was present in naturally-reduced sediment. Desulfuromonadales and Desulfobacterales were consistently identified as the dominant Fe(III)- and sulfate-reducing bacteria (IRB and SRB) throughout acetate amendment experiments. Stimulated communities also exhibited a high degree of functional redundancy amongst enriched flanking members. Not surprisingly, competition for both sulfate and iron was evident amongst abundant taxa, but the distribution and abundance of these ancillary SRB (Peptococcaceae, Desulfovibrionales and Syntrophobacterales), and lineages containing IRB (excluding Desulfobacteraceae) was heterogeneous amongst sample types. Interesting, amongst the most abundant taxa, particularly during sulfate reduction, were Epsilonproteobacteria that perform microaerobic or nitrate-dependant sulfur oxidation, and a number of bacteria other than Geobacteraceae that may enzymatically reduce U(VI). Finally, in depth community probing with PhyloChip determined the efficacy of experimental approaches, notably revealing striking similarity amongst stimulated sediment (from drill cores and in-situ columns) and groundwater communities, and demonstrating that sediment-packed in-situ (down-well) columns served as an ideal method for subsurface biostimulation.

  11. Double tracks test site characterization report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of site characterization activities performed at the Double Tracks Test Site, located on Range 71 North, of the Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR) in southern Nevada. Site characterization activities included reviewing historical data from the Double Tracks experiment, previous site investigation efforts, and recent site characterization data. The most recent site characterization activities were conducted in support of an interim corrective action to remediate the Double Tracks Test Site to an acceptable risk to human health and the environment. Site characterization was performed using a phased approach. First, previously collected data and historical records sere compiled and reviewed. Generalized scopes of work were then prepared to fill known data gaps. Field activities were conducted and the collected data were then reviewed to determine whether data gaps were filled and whether other areas needed to be investigated. Additional field efforts were then conducted, as required, to adequately characterize the site. Characterization of the Double Tracks Test Site was conducted in accordance with the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER).

  12. ORISE: Characterization surveys

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    extent of radiological contamination at sites scheduled for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). A fundamental aspect of all D&D projects, characterization surveys provide...

  13. Seismic characterization of fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JM Carcione

    2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic characterization of fractures. José M. Carcione, OGS, Italy. Fractured geological formations are generally represented with a stress-strain relation.

  14. CX-005657: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Use of Scrap Tires for Oil Well StimulationCX(s) Applied: B6.1Date: 04/28/2011Location(s): Ellery, New YorkOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  15. CX-005662: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Use of Scrap Tires for Oil Well StimulationCX(s) Applied: B3.7Date: 04/29/2011Location(s): Upper Falls, West VirginiaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  16. CX-004401: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Use of Scrap Tires for Oil Well StimulationCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 11/08/2010Location(s): Waynesburg, PennsylvaniaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  17. CX-004402: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Use of Scrap Tires for Oil Well StimulationCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 11/08/2010Location(s): Monroeville, PennsylvaniaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  18. CX-010523: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fracture Evolution Following Hydraulic Stimulations within EGS Reservoirs CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.6 Date: 05/20/2013 Location(s): Utah Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  19. A study of the effects of stimulation on Devonian Shale gas well performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuber, Michael Dean

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of actual production data from producing Devonian Shale gas wells throughout the Appalachian Basin. These comparisons are of limited use, however, because they fail to take into account recently developed stimulation technologies and because compari... by analysis of these data. Unfortunately, too little data are available for wells stimulated using current technologies. This study included no production data from wells stimulated by radial (tailored-pulse) fracturing methods. These data are vital...

  20. acute glucose-stimulated insulin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pathway. Physics Websites Summary: -stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Continuous infusion of LPS through mini-osmotic pumps was also associated1 Lipopolysaccharides-mediated...

  1. affects acute glucose-stimulated: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pathway. Physics Websites Summary: -stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Continuous infusion of LPS through mini-osmotic pumps was also associated1 Lipopolysaccharides-mediated...

  2. attenuates glucose-stimulated insulin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pathway. Physics Websites Summary: -stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Continuous infusion of LPS through mini-osmotic pumps was also associated1 Lipopolysaccharides-mediated...

  3. Experimental detection of stimulation of superconductivity by a current in ''long'' tunnel Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudenko, =.M.; Nevirkovets, I.P.; Shaternik, V.E.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    External agencies can stimulate superconductivity in suitable materials with nonequilibrium population of the levels. An investigation of this effect is reported. (AIP)

  4. alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Association of habituation with endogenous alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone in the brain of the toad, Bufo cognatus. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Several...

  5. Ultrafast stimulated Raman parallel adiabatic passage by shaped pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Dridi; S. Guerin; V. Hakobyan; H. R. Jauslin; H. Eleuch

    2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a general and versatile technique of population transfer based on {\\it parallel adiabatic passage} by femtosecond shaped pulses. Their amplitude and phase are specifically designed to optimize the adiabatic passage corresponding to parallel eigenvalues at all times. We show that this technique allows the robust adiabatic population transfer in a Raman system with the total pulse area as low as 3 $\\pi$, corresponding to a fluence of one order of magnitude below the conventional stimulated Raman adiabatic passage process. This process of short duration, typically pico- and subpicosecond, is easily implementable with the modern pulse shaper technology and opens the possibility of ultrafast robust population transfer with interesting applications in quantum information processing.

  6. Geothermal fracture stimulation technology. Volume III. Geothermal fracture fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed study of all available and experimental frac fluid systems is presented. They have been examined and tested for physical properties that are important in the stimulation of hot water geothermal wells. These fluids consist of water-based systems containing high molecular weight polymers in the uncrosslinked and crosslinked state. The results of fluid testing for many systems are summarized specifically at geothermal conditions or until breakdown occurs. Some of the standard tests are ambient viscosity, static aging, high temperature viscosity, fluid-loss testing, and falling ball viscosity at elevated temperatures and pressures. Results of these tests show that unalterable breakdown of the polymer solutions begins above 300/sup 0/F. This continues at higher temperatures with time even if stabilizers or other high temperature additives are included.

  7. Non-Hermitian shortcut to stimulated Raman adiabatic passage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyan T. Torosov; Giuseppe Della Valle; Stefano Longhi

    2014-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a non-Hermitian generalization of stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP), which allows one to increase speed and fidelity of the adiabatic passage. This is done by adding balanced imaginary (gain/loss) terms in the diagonal (bare energy) terms of the Hamiltonian and choosing them such that they cancel exactly the nonadiabatic couplings, providing in this way an effective shortcut to adiabaticity. Remarkably, for a STIRAP using delayed Gaussian-shaped pulses in the counter-intuitive scheme the imaginary terms of the Hamiltonian turn out to be time independent. A possible physical realization of non-Hermitian STIRAP, based on light transfer in three evanescently-coupled optical waveguides, is proposed.

  8. Hyperspectral stimulated emission depletion microscopy and methods of use thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Timlin, Jerilyn A; Aaron, Jesse S

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hyperspectral stimulated emission depletion ("STED") microscope system for high-resolution imaging of samples labeled with multiple fluorophores (e.g., two to ten fluorophores). The hyperspectral STED microscope includes a light source, optical systems configured for generating an excitation light beam and a depletion light beam, optical systems configured for focusing the excitation and depletion light beams on a sample, and systems for collecting and processing data generated by interaction of the excitation and depletion light beams with the sample. Hyperspectral STED data may be analyzed using multivariate curve resolution analysis techniques to deconvolute emission from the multiple fluorophores. The hyperspectral STED microscope described herein can be used for multi-color, subdiffraction imaging of samples (e.g., materials and biological materials) and for analyzing a tissue by Forster Resonance Energy Transfer ("FRET").

  9. GEOFRAC: an explosives stimulation technique for a geothermal well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mumma, D.M.; McCullough, F. Jr.; Schmidt, E.W.; Pye, D.S.; Allen, W.C.; Pyle, D.; Hanold, R.J.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first known use of explosives for stimulating a geothermal well was successfully conducted in December 1981 with a process called GEOFRAC. The 260/sup 0/C well was located at the Union Oil Company's Geysers Field in northern California. For the initial test, 364 kg of a new explosive called HITEX II was placed at a depth of 2256 meters and detonated to verify techniques. The explosive was contained in an aluminum canister to separate it from the well fluids. In the second test, 5000 kg of explosive was used representing a column length of approximately 191 meters. The explosive was detonated at a depth of 1697 meters in the same well. The results of these tests show that HITEX II can be safely emplaced and successfully detonated in a hot geothermal well without causing damage to the well bore or casing.

  10. Stochastic Liouville Equations for Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar; Dorfman, Konstantin E; Mukamel, Shaul

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron and vibrational dynamics of molecules are commonly studied by subjecting them to two interactions with a fast actinic pulse that prepares them in a nonstationary state and after a variable delay period $T$, probing them with a Raman process induced by a combination of a broadband and a narrowband pulse. This technique known as femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) can effectively probe time resolved vibrational resonances. We show how FSRS signals can be modeled and interpreted using the stochastic Liouville equations (SLE) originally developed for NMR lineshapes. The SLE provides a convenient simulation protocol that can describe complex dynamics due to coupling to collective coordinates at much lower cost that a full dynamical simulation. The origin of the dispersive features which appear when there is no separation of timescales between vibrational variations and dephasing is clarified.

  11. "OPERA superluminal neutrinos explained by spontaneous emission and stimulated absorption"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rafael Torrealba

    2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work it is shown, that for short 3ns neutrino pulses reported by OPERA, a relativistic shape deforming effect of the neutrino distribution function due to spontaneous emission, produces an earlier arrival of 65.8ns in agreement with the reported 62.1ns\\pm 3.7ns, with a RMS of 16.4ns explaining the apparent superluminal effect. It is also shown, that early arrival of long 10500ns neutrinos pulse to Gran Sasso, by 57.8ns with respect to the speed of light, could be explained by a shape deforming effect due to a combination of stimulated absorption and spontaneous emission, while traveling by the decay tunnel that acts as a LASER tube.

  12. Analysis of federal incentives used to stimulate energy consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, R.J.; Cone, B.W.; Emery, J.C.; Huelshoff, M.; Lenerz, D.E.; Marcus, A.; Morris, F.A.; Sheppard, W.J.; Sommers, P.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the analysis is to identify and quantify Federal incentives that have increased the consumption of coal, oil, natural gas, and electricity. The introductory chapter is intended as a device for presenting the policy questions about the incentives that can be used to stimulate desired levels of energy development. In the theoretical chapter federal incentives were identified for the consumption of energy as Federal government actions whose major intent or result is to stimulate energy consumption. The stimulus comes through changing values of variables included in energy demand functions, thereby inducing energy consumers to move along the function in the direction of greater quantity of energy demanded, or through inducing a shift of the function to a position where more energy will be demanded at a given price. The demand variables fall into one of six categories: price of the energy form, price of complements, price of substitutes, preferences, income, and technology. The government can provide such incentives using six different policy instruments: taxation, disbursements, requirements, nontraditional services, traditional services, and market activity. The four major energy forms were examined. Six energy-consuming sectors were examined: residential, commercial, industrial, agricultural, transportation, and public. Two types of analyses of incentive actions are presented in this volume. The generic chapter focused on actions taken in 1978 across all energy forms. The subsequent chapters traced the patterns of incentive actions, energy form by energy form, from the beginning of the 20th century, to the present. The summary chapter includes the results of the previous chapters presented by energy form, incentive type, and user group. Finally, the implications of these results for solar policy are presented in the last chapter. (MCW)

  13. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and thyrotropin-releasing hormone stimulate newly synthesized, not stored, prolactin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maas, D.L.; Arnaout, M.A.; Martinson, D.R.; Erdmann, M.D.; Hagen, T.C. (Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee (USA))

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments were designed to determine whether vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), reported to stimulate basal PRL secretion, affects PRL processing by lactotrophs. Initially, rat anterior pituitary quarters were incubated for 2 h with (3H)leucine, with and without 10(-5) M VIP, and immunoreactive and immunoprecipitable rPRL were measured during 56 mM KCl perifusion to determine total and 3H-labeled PRL, respectively. Inclusion of VIP increased immunoreactive PRL, decreased immunoprecipitable PRL, and, therefore, decreased the specific activity of labeled PRL. These results suggested an enhanced release of newly synthesized PRL before KCl depolarization, thus decreasing the release of labeled PRL. To discriminate between the two PRL pools, newly synthesized and storage, pituitary quarters were incubated with and without 10(-5) M VIP for 4 h with (14C)leucine, 2 h in cold medium and 2 h with (3H)leucine. Immunoprecipitable PRL was measured during perifusion with 56 mM KCl. Data were depicted as the 3H/14C disintegrations per min ratio of PRL released/3H/14C disintegrations per min of total tissue to account for any differences in tissue labeling. This ratio was greater for tissue labeled in the presence of VIP. To determine whether VIP, as a secretagogue, differentiates between the newly synthesized and storage pools, VIP was added after pulse chase, as previously described. No preferential release was observed between the two groups. Finally, using the same (3H)- and (14C)leucine-labeling protocol with and without 10(-5) M VIP, tissue was perifused with medium 199 for 1 h, with 10(-5) M TRH for 30 min, with medium 199 for 30 min, and with 56 mM KCl for 1 h. Inclusion of VIP increased the 3H/14C released/3H/14C total tissue ratio during basal perifusion and TRH exposure.

  14. Machine characterization and benchmark performance prediction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saavedra-Barrera, R.H.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From runs of standard benchmarks or benchmark suites, it is not possible to characterize the machine nor to predict the run time of other benchmarks which have not been run. A new approach to benchmarking and machine characterization is reported. The creation and use of a machine analyzer is described, which measures the performance of a given machine on FORTRAN source language constructs. The machine analyzer yields a set of parameters which characterize the machine and spotlight its strong and weak points. Also described is a program analyzer, which analyzes FORTRAN programs and determines the frequency of execution of each of the same set of source language operations. It is then shown that by combining a machine characterization and a program characterization, we are able to predict with good accuracy the run time of a given benchmark on a given machine. Characterizations are provided for the Cray-X-MP/48, Cyber 205, IBM 3090/200, Amdahl 5840, Convex C-1, VAX 8600, VAX 11/785, VAX 11/780, SUN 3/50, and IBM RT-PC/125, and for the following benchmark programs or suites: Los Alamos (BMK8A1), Baskett, Linpack, Livermore Loops, Madelbrot Set, NAS Kernels, Shell Sort, Smith, Whetstone and Sieve of Erathostenes.

  15. Stimulation of Na{sup +}/K{sup +} ATPase activity and Na{sup +} coupled glucose transport by {beta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sopjani, Mentor [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany) [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Prishtina, Kosovo (Country Unknown); Alesutan, Ioana; Wilmes, Jan [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany)] [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Dermaku-Sopjani, Miribane [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany) [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Faculty of Medicine, University of Prishtina, Kosovo (Country Unknown); Lam, Rebecca S. [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany) [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Department of Molecular Neurogenetics, Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Koutsouki, Evgenia [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany)] [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Jakupi, Muharrem [Faculty of Medicine, University of Prishtina, Kosovo (Country Unknown)] [Faculty of Medicine, University of Prishtina, Kosovo (Country Unknown); Foeller, Michael [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany)] [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Lang, Florian, E-mail: florian.lang@uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany)] [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany)

    2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Research highlights: {yields} The oncogenic transcription factor {beta}-catenin stimulates the Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase. {yields} {beta}-Catenin stimulates SGLT1 dependent Na{sup +}, glucose cotransport. {yields} The effects are independent of transcription. {yields} {beta}-Catenin sensitive transport may contribute to properties of proliferating cells. -- Abstract: {beta}-Catenin is a multifunctional protein stimulating as oncogenic transcription factor several genes important for cell proliferation. {beta}-Catenin-regulated genes include the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase SGK1, which is known to stimulate a variety of transport systems. The present study explored the possibility that {beta}-catenin influences membrane transport. To this end, {beta}-catenin was expressed in Xenopus oocytes with or without SGLT1 and electrogenic transport determined by dual electrode voltage clamp. As a result, expression of {beta}-catenin significantly enhanced the ouabain-sensitive current of the endogeneous Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase. Inhibition of vesicle trafficking by brefeldin A revealed that the stimulatory effect of {beta}-catenin on the endogenous Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase was not due to enhanced stability of the pump protein in the cell membrane. Expression of {beta}-catenin further enhanced glucose-induced current (Ig) in SGLT1-expressing oocytes. In the absence of SGLT1 Ig was negligible irrespective of {beta}-catenin expression. The stimulating effect of {beta}-catenin on both Na{sup +}/K{sup +} ATPase and SGLT1 activity was observed even in the presence of actinomycin D, an inhibitor of transcription. The experiments disclose a completely novel function of {beta}-catenin, i.e. the regulation of transport.

  16. Panel 3 - characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erck, R.A.; Erdemir, A.; Janghsing Hsieh; Lee, R.H.; Xian Zheng Pan; Deming Shu [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Feldman, A. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Glass, J.T. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh (United States); Kleimer, R. [Coors Ceramics Co., Golden, CO (United States); Lawton, E.A. [JPL/Caltech, Pasadena, CA (United States); McHargue, C.J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville (United States)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The task of this panel was to identify and prioritize needs in the area of characterization of diamond and diamond-like-carbon (DLC) films for use in the transportation industry. Until recent advances in production of inexpensive films of diamonds and DLC, it was not feasible that these materials could be mass produced. The Characterization Panel is restricting itself to identifying needs in areas that would be most useful to manufacturers and users in producing and utilizing diamond and DLC coatings in industry. These characterization needs include in-situ monitoring during growth, relation of structure to performance, and standards and definitions.

  17. Brain-shift aware risk map for Deep Brain Stimulation Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Brain-shift aware risk map for Deep Brain Stimulation Planning Bilger Alexandre 1 , Essert Caroline / Université de Strasbourg, FRANCE Abstract. In Deep Brain Stimulation surgery, the eciency of the pro- cedure of the placement is dicult due to brain shifts occurring during and after the procedure. We propose an approach

  18. Phosphate stimulates Matrix Gla Protein expression in chondrocytes through the ERK signaling pathway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Phosphate stimulates Matrix Gla Protein expression in chondrocytes through the ERK signaling. Email: Jerome.guicheux@nantes.inserm.fr Short title Phosphate stimulates MGP expression via ERK-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) was performed in rib organ cultures from newborn mice. Results indicated that Pi

  19. Muscle metabolism and meat quality of Pectoralis from turkeys treated with postmortem electrical stimulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owens, Casey Michelle

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of electrical stimulation (ES) on muscle metabolism and breast meat quality in turkeys. Thirty-six turkey hens were either electrically stimulated at the neck in a saline bath (570 V, 450 mA, AC...

  20. THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 134, 234310 (2011) False estimates of stimulated Raman pumping efficiency caused

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 134, 234310 (2011) False estimates of stimulated Raman pumping June 2011; published online 20 June 2011) One technique for measuring the fraction of molecules pumped to the excited state in stimulated Raman pumping (SRP) is to record the depletion of molecules in the lower state

  1. Plasticity in the Rat Posterior Auditory Field Following Nucleus Basalis Stimulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kilgard, Michael P.

    Plasticity in the Rat Posterior Auditory Field Following Nucleus Basalis Stimulation Amanda C. Plasticity in the rat posterior auditory field following nucleus basalis stimulation. J Neurophysiol 98: 253 have been shown to cause frequency-specific plasticity in both primary and secondary cortical areas

  2. Discrimination and characterization of Parkinsonian rest tremors by analyzing long-term correlations and multifractal signatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Livi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we analyze 48 signals of rest tremor velocity related to 12 distinct subjects affected by Parkinson's disease. The subjects belong to two different groups, formed by four and eight subjects with, respectively, high- and low-amplitude rest tremors. Each subject is tested in four settings, given by combining the use of deep brain stimulation and L-DOPA medication. We develop two main feature-based representations of such signals, which are obtained by considering (i) the long-term correlations and multifractal properties, and (ii) the power spectra. The feature-based representations are initially utilized for the purpose of characterizing the subjects under different settings. In agreement with previous studies, we show that deep brain stimulation does not significantly characterize neither of the two groups, regardless of the adopted representation. On the other hand, the medication effect yields statistically significant differences in both high- and low-amplitude tremor groups. We successively...

  3. Rock failure during massive hydraulic stimulation of the Baca location geothermal reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearson, C.; Keppler, H.; Albright, J.; Potter, R.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The analyses of microearthquake signals occurring during hydraulic stimulation provide an estimate of the size and location of the fractures thus produced. Studies of microearthquakes occurring during two large (> 10/sup 3/m/sup 3/) hydraulic stimulations of the hydrothermal reservoir at the Baca Location in the Jemez Mountains of northeastern New Mexico are reported. Both stimulations consisted of water, viscosity enhancer, and proppant. The microearthquake event rate was low but variable throughout most of the treatment. Rock failure as indicated by the distribution of the microearthquakes' foci appeared restricted to a nearly vertical NE striking zone. This orientation is in good agreement with the local earth stresses inferred from geological considerations. The second stimulation which occurred in a neighboring well was similar to the first except for a larger injected volume. The lateral extent of the detected fracture system was 600 m in both stimulations.

  4. Central Characterization Program (CCP) Reconciliation of Data...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Central Characterization Program (CCP) Reconciliation of Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) and Reporting Characterization Data Central Characterization Program (CCP) Reconciliation of...

  5. Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF) Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF)...

  6. Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarke, D.; Koerner, R.; Moos D.; Nguyen, J.; Phillips, C.; Tagbor, K.; Walker, S.

    1999-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This project used advanced reservoir characterization tools, including the pulsed acoustic cased-hole logging tool, geologic three-dimensional (3-D) modeling software, and commercially available reservoir management software to identify sands with remaining high oil saturation following waterflood. Production from the identified high oil saturated sands was stimulated by recompleting existing production and injection wells in these sands using conventional means as well as a short radius redrill candidate.

  7. Development of Characterization Tools for Reliability Testing of MicroElectroMechanical System Actuators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, James J.; Eaton, William P.; Smith, Norman F.; Tanner, Danelle M.

    1999-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterization tools have been developed to study the performance characteristics and reliability of surface micromachined actuators. These tools include (1) the ability to electrically stimulate or stress the actuator, (2) the capability to visually inspect the devices in operation, (3) a method for capturing operational information, and (4) a method to extract performance characteristics from the operational information. Additionally, a novel test structure has been developed to measure electrostatic forces developed by a comb drive actuator.

  8. Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Frank (Bud) Bridges, University of California-Santa Cruz

    2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The two-and-a-half day symposium on the "Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials" will be the first comprehensive meeting on this topic held under the auspices of a major U.S. professional society. Spring MRS Meetings provide a natural venue for this symposium as they attract a broad audience of researchers that represents a cross-section of the state-of-the-art regarding synthesis, structure-property relations, and applications of nanostructured materials. Close interactions among the experts in local structure measurements and materials researchers will help both to identify measurement needs pertinent to â??real-worldâ?ť materials problems and to familiarize the materials research community with the state-of-the-art local structure measurement techniques. We have chosen invited speakers that reflect the multidisciplinary and international nature of this topic and the need to continually nurture productive interfaces among university, government and industrial laboratories. The intent of the symposium is to provide an interdisciplinary forum for discussion and exchange of ideas on the recent progress in quantitative characterization of structural order in nanomaterials using different experimental techniques and theory. The symposium is expected to facilitate discussions on optimal approaches for determining atomic structure at the nanoscale using combined inputs from multiple measurement techniques.

  9. BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumacher, R.F.

    2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling. A number of engineering considerations and recommendations were prepared based on the experimental findings, experience, and other process considerations. Recommendations for future testing are included. In conjunction with future work, it is recommended that a professional consultant be engaged to guide and assist with testing and design input.

  10. BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumacher, R.F.

    2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. The problems might include arching or ratholing in the silo/hopper. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling.

  11. EMPOWERING DIGITAL SELF DETERMINATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Rhiju

    : Communication and Digital Media 2. Data Context and Digital Personas 3. Personal Data: Use, ReuseEMPOWERING DIGITAL SELF DETERMINATION Symposium Summary Stanford University, Summer 2012 #12;#12;EMPOWERING DIGITAL SELF DETERMINATION Symposium, Stanford University, CA Summer, 2012 210 Panama Street

  12. Apparatus for characterizing conductivity of superconducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doss, James D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method for noncontact, radio-frequency shielding current characterization of materials. Self- or mutual inductance changes in one or more inductive elements, respectively, occur when materials capable of supporting shielding currents are placed in proximity thereto, or undergo change in resistivity while in place. Such changes can be observed by incorporating the inductor(s) in a resonant circuit and determining the frequency of oscillation or by measuring the voltage induced on a coupled inductive element. The present invention is useful for determining the critical temperature and superconducting transition width for superconducting samples.

  13. Apparatus for characterizing conductivity of superconducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doss, J.D.

    1993-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method for noncontact, radio-frequency shielding current characterization of materials. Self- or mutual inductance changes in one or more inductive elements, respectively, occur when materials capable of supporting shielding currents are placed in proximity thereto, or undergo change in resistivity while in place. Such changes can be observed by incorporating the inductor(s) in a resonant circuit and determining the frequency of oscillation or by measuring the voltage induced on a coupled inductive element. The present invention is useful for determining the critical temperature and superconducting transition width for superconducting samples. 10 figures.

  14. adar1 stimulates viral: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    whole-genome sequence data. The module of predicted B-cell antigenic determinants in VirGen is an attempt to link the genome to its vaccinome. Comparative genome analysis data...

  15. Driving Functional Behavioral Recovery Using Activity-Dependent Stimulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guggenmos, David

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project was to determine if artificially linking spared motor and sensory areas following a cortical lesion would lead to increased behavioral recovery on a skilled reaching task. Sensory-motor integration is critical for skilled...

  16. Electro-chemical stimulation of neuromuscular systems using ion-selective membranes : flexible device fabrication and motor unit recruitment order

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El Khaja, Ragheb Mohamad Fawaz

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spinal Cord injury (SCI) leads to paralysis, decrease in quality of life and high lifetime medical costs. Direct nerve Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) induces muscles to contract by electrically stimulating nerves, ...

  17. THERMOGRAVIMETRIC CHARACTERIZATION OF GLOVEBOX GLOVES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinko, P.

    2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental project was initiated to characterize mass loss when heating different polymer glovebox glove material samples to three elevated temperatures, 90, 120, and 150 C. Samples from ten different polymeric gloves that are being considered for use in the tritium gloveboxes were tested. The intent of the study was to determine the amount of material lost. These data will be used in a subsequent study to characterize the composition of the material lost. One goal of the study was to determine which glove composition would least affect the glovebox atmosphere stripper system. Samples lost most of the mass in the initial 60 minutes of thermal exposure and as expected increasing the temperature increased the mass loss and shortened the time to achieve a steady state loss. The most mass loss was experienced by Jung butyl-Hypalon{reg_sign} at 146 C with 12.9% mass loss followed by Piercan Hypalon{reg_sign} at 144 C with 11.4 % mass loss and Jung butyl-Viton{reg_sign} at 140 C with 5.2% mass loss. The least mass loss was experienced by the Jung Viton{reg_sign} and the Piercan polyurethane. Unlike the permeation testing (1) the vendor and fabrication route influences the amount of gaseous species that is evolved. Additional testing to characterize these products is recommended. Savannah River Site (SRS) has many gloveboxes deployed in the Tritium Facility. These gloveboxes are used to protect the workers and to ensure a suitable environment in which to handle tritium gas products. The gas atmosphere in the gloveboxes is purified using a stripper system. The process gas strippers collect molecules that may have hydrogen or its isotopes attached, e.g., waters of hydration, acids, etc. Recently, sulfur containing compounds were detected in the stripper system and the presence of these compounds accelerates the stripper system's aging process. This accelerated aging requires the strippers to be replaced more often which can impact the facility's schedule and operational cost. It was posited that sulfur bearing and other volatile compounds were derived from glove off-gassing. Due to the large number of gloves in the facility, small mass loss from each glove could result in a significant total mass of undesirable material entering the glovebox atmosphere and subsequently the stripper system. A thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) study was conducted to determine the amount of low temperature volatiles that may be expected to offgas from the gloves. The data were taken on relatively small samples but are normalized with respect to the sample's surface area. Additional testing is needed to determine the composition of the off-gassing species. The TGA study was conducted to ascertain the magnitude of the issue and to determine if further experimentation is warranted or necessary.

  18. Mutagenic potency of Helicobacter pylori in the gastric mucosa of mice determined by sex and duration of infection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheh, Alexander

    Helicobacter pylori is a human carcinogen, but the mechanisms evoked in carcinogenesis during this chronic inflammatory disease remain incompletely characterized. We determined whether chronic H. pylori infection induced ...

  19. Temperature determination using pyrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Breiland, William G. (Albuquerque, NM); Gurary, Alexander I. (Bridgewater, NJ); Boguslavskiy, Vadim (Princeton, NJ)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for determining the temperature of a surface upon which a coating is grown using optical pyrometry by correcting Kirchhoff's law for errors in the emissivity or reflectance measurements associated with the growth of the coating and subsequent changes in the surface thermal emission and heat transfer characteristics. By a calibration process that can be carried out in situ in the chamber where the coating process occurs, an error calibration parameter can be determined that allows more precise determination of the temperature of the surface using optical pyrometry systems. The calibration process needs only to be carried out when the physical characteristics of the coating chamber change.

  20. Site Characterization Work Plan for Gasbuggy, New Mexico (Rev.1, Jan. 2002)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV)

    2002-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Project Gasbuggy was the first of three joint government-industry experiments conducted to test the effectiveness of nuclear explosives to fracture deeply buried, low-permeability natural gas reservoirs to stimulate production. The scope of this work plan is to document the environmental objectives and the proposed technical site investigation strategies that will be utilized for the site characterization of the Project Gasbuggy Site. Its goal is the collection of data in sufficient quantity and quality to determine current site conditions, support a risk assessment for the site surfaces, and evaluate if further remedial action is required to achieve permanent closure of the site that is both protective of human health and the environment. The Gasbuggy Site is located approximately 55 air miles east of Farmington, New Mexico, in Rio Arriba County within the Carson National Forest in the northeast portion of the San Juan Basin. Historically, Project Gasbuggy consisted of the joint government-industry detonation of a nuclear device on December 10, 1967, followed by reentry drilling and gas production testing and project evaluation activities in post-detonation operations from 1967 to 1976. Based on historical documentation, no chemical release sites other than the mud pits were identified; additionally, there was no material buried at the Gasbuggy Site other than drilling fluids and construction debris. Although previous characterization and restoration activities including sensitive species surveys, cultural resources surveys, surface geophysical surveys, and limited soil sampling and analysis were performed in 1978 and again in 2000, no formal closure of the site was achieved. Also, these efforts did not adequately address the site's potential for chemical contamination at the surface/shallow subsurface ground levels or the subsurface hazards for potential migration outside of the current site subsurface intrusion restrictions. Additional investigation activities will focus on the surface/shallow subsurface sampling and deep subsurface modeling. Suspected potential contaminants of concern for investigative analysis at the Gasbuggy Site include total petroleum hydrocarbons (diesel- and gasoline-range), volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, and radionuclides. The results of this characterization and risk assessment will be used to evaluate corrective action alternatives to include no further action, the implementation of institutional controls, capping on site, or off-site disposal of contaminated waste which will be presented in a subsequent corrective action decision document.

  1. Robust Growth Determinants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doppelhofer, Gernot; Weeks, Melvyn

    2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates the robustness of determinants of economic growth in the presence of model uncertainty, parameter heterogeneity and outliers. The robust model averaging approach introduced in the paper uses a flexible and parsimonious...

  2. Stimulated Emission from a Single Excited Atom in a Waveguide Eden Rephaeli1,* and Shanhui Fan2,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Shanhui

    Stimulated Emission from a Single Excited Atom in a Waveguide Eden Rephaeli1,* and Shanhui Fan2, 1; published 3 April 2012) We study stimulated emission from an excited two-level atom coupled to a waveguide by the atom, plays a very important role in stimulated emission. Additionally, the temporal duration

  3. Observation of pressure stimulated voltages in rocks using an electric potential sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aydin, A.; Prance, R. J.; Prance, H.; Harland, C. J. [Centre for Physical Electronics and Quantum Technology, School of Engineering and Design, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QT (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent interest in the electrical activity in rock and the use of electric field transients as candidates for earthquake precursors has led to studies of pressure stimulated currents in laboratory samples. In this paper, an electric field sensor is used to measure directly the voltages associated with these currents. Stress was applied as uniaxial compression to marble and granite at an approximately constant rate. In contrast with the small pressure stimulated currents previously measured, large voltage signals are reported. Polarity reversal of the signal was observed immediately before fracture for the marble, in agreement with previous pressure stimulated current studies.

  4. Biogeochemical Processes In Ethanol Stimulated Uranium Contaminated Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohanty, Santosh R.; Kollah, Bharati; Hedrick, David B.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Roden, Eric E.

    2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A laboratory incubation experiment was conducted with uranium contaminated subsurface sediment to assess the geochemical and microbial community response to ethanol amendment. A classical sequence of TEAPs was observed in ethanol-amended slurries, with NO3- reduction, Fe(III) reduction, SO4 2- reduction, and CH4 production proceeding in sequence until all of the added 13C-ethanol (9 mM) was consumed. Approximately 60% of the U(VI) content of the sediment was reduced during the period of Fe(III) reduction. No additional U(VI) reduction took place during the sulfate-reducing and methanogenic phases of the experiment. Only gradual reduction of NO3 -, and no reduction of U(VI), took place in ethanol-free slurries. Stimulation of additional Fe(III) or SO4 2- reduction in the ethanol-amended slurries failed to promote further U(VI) reduction. Reverse transcribed 16S rRNA clone libraries revealed major increases in the abundance of organisms related to Dechloromonas, Geobacter, and Oxalobacter in the ethanolamended slurries. PLFAs indicative of Geobacter showed a distinct increase in the amended slurries, and analysis of PLFA 13C/12C ratios confirmed the incorporation of ethanol into these PLFAs. A increase in the abundance of 13C-labeled PLFAs indicative of Desulfobacter, Desulfotomaculum, and Desulfovibrio took place during the brief period of sulfate reduction which followed the Fe(III) reduction phase. Our results show that major redox processes in ethanol-amended sediments can be reliably interpreted in terms of standard conceptual models of TEAPs in sediments. However, the redox speciation of uranium is complex and cannot be explained based on simplified thermodynamic considerations.

  5. CX-000645: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Development and Validation of an Advanced Stimulation Prediction Model for Enhanced Geothermal SystemsCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6Date: 01/26/2010Location(s): Golden, ColoradoOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  6. CX-003751: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    State Energy Program: Strengthening Building Retrofit Markets and Stimulating Energy Efficiency ActionCX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1Date: 09/17/2010Location(s): MississippiOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  7. CX-003750: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    State Energy Program: Strengthening Building Retrofit Markets and Stimulating Energy Efficiency ActionCX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1Date: 09/17/2010Location(s): KentuckyOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  8. CX-001424: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Modeling of Enhanced Geothermal System Reservoirs - Continuum through Discontinuum Representations: Capturing Reservoir Stimulation, Evolution and Induced SeismicityCX(s) Applied: A9Date: 03/29/2010Location(s): PennsylvaniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  9. Hydrogeologic characterization of Illinois wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miner, J.J.; Miller, M.V.; Rorick, N.L.; Fucciolo, C.S. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS), under contract from the Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT), is evaluating a series of selected wetlands and sites proposed for wetland construction and/or restoration. The program is associated with wetland mitigation for unavoidable effects of state highway construction. The goal of this ongoing program is: (1) to collect commonly lacking geologic, geomorphic, hydrologic, and geochemical data from various wetland sites; and (2) to create a database of this information for use by government agencies and the private sector. Some of the potential uses of this database include: (1) determination of history, role, and possible life cycle of various wetland types allowing more effective design criteria; (2) functional comparison of constructed or restored wetlands versus natural wetlands; (3) testing of wetland hypotheses and delineation techniques under a variety of known hydrogeologic conditions in Illinois; (4) hydrogeologic assessment of potential mitigation sites against a suite of known sites; and (5) determination of data and collection methods appropriate for hydrogeologic wetland studies. A series of tasks is required to complete each study. Historical information is collected from ISGS records, including data regarding topography, soils, sediments, bedrock, and local well records. A field-testing plan is prepared, which includes goals of the study, methods, research potential, and potential results. An initial report is prepared after geologic and geochemical characterization and the installation of needed ground water monitoring wells and surface water gauges. After one year of water-level monitoring, a final report is prepared regarding the present conditions of a site. Further monitoring may be required to determine the performance at constructed and/or restored sites.

  10. Potential for Microbial Stimulation in Deep Vadose Zone Sediments by Gas-Phase Nutrients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, S.W.; Plymale, A. E.; Brockman, F.J.

    2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Viable microbial populations are low, typically 10{sup 4} cells per gram, in deep vadose zones in arid climates. There is evidence that microbial distribution in these environments is patchy. In addition, infiltration or injection of nutrient-laden water has the potential to spread and drive contaminants downward to the saturated zone. For these reasons, there are uncertainties regarding the feasibility of bioremediation of recalcitrant contaminants in deep vadose zones. The objectives of this study were to investigate the occurrence of denitrifying activity and gaseous carbon-utilizing activity in arid-climate deep vadose zone sediments contaminated with, and/or affected by past exposure to, carbon tetrachloride (CT). These metabolisms are known to degrade CT and/or its breakdown product chloroform under anoxic conditions. A second objective was to determine if CT would be degraded in these sediments under unsaturated, bulk-phase aerobic incubation conditions. Both denitrifier population (determined by MPN) and microbial heterotrophic activity (measured by mineralization of 14-C labeled glucose and acetate) were relatively low and the sediments with greater in situ moisture (10-21% versus 2-7%) tended to have higher activities. When sediments were amended with gaseous nutrients (nitrous oxide and triethyl/tributyl phosphate) and gaseous C sources (a mixture of methane, ethane, propylene, propane, and butane) and incubated for 6 months, approximately 50% of the samples showed removal of one or more gaseous C sources, with butane most commonly used (44% of samples), followed by propylene (42%), propane (31%), ethane (22%), and methane (4%). Gaseous N and gaseous P did not stimulate removal of gaseous C substrates compared to no addition of N and P. CT and gaseous C sources were spiked into the sediments that removed gaseous C sources to determine if hydrocarbon-degraders have the potential to degrade CT under unsaturated conditions. In summary, gaseous C sources--particularly butane and propylene--have promise for increasing the numbers and activity of indigenous microbial populations in arid-climate deep vadose zone sediments.

  11. CX-002347: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    will continue to provide objective information that stimulates the development of the hydrogen economy. Increased awareness about the hydrogen economy and its benefits....

  12. WebWorkload Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zilles, Craig

    WebWorkload Characterization at a Micro­architectural Level Ramesh Radhakrishnan, Lizy John Laboratory, IBM Austin, TX. #12; Goals of this study n We study the behavior of modernWeb server applications programs to understand how they interact with the underlyingWeb server, hardware and OS under realistic

  13. Applying reservoir characterization technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lake, L.W.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    While reservoir characterization is an old discipline, only within the last 10 years have engineers and scientists been able to make quantitative descriptions, due mostly to improvements in high-resolution computational power, sophisticated graphics, and geostatistics. This paper summarizes what has been learned during the past decade by using these technologies.

  14. amp camp-mediated stimulation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    shows the Bode magnitude plots for both VoVi and A (j). The figure shows Leach Jr.,W. Marshall 111 Optimal quantum cloning via stimulated emission CERN Preprints Summary: We...

  15. Flexible Split-Ring Electrode for Insect Flight Biasing Using Multisite Neural Stimulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Wei Mong

    We describe a flexible multisite microelectrode for insect flight biasing using neural stimulation. The electrode is made of two layers of polyimide (PI) with gold sandwiched in between in a split-ring geometry. The ...

  16. Stimulating the anaerobic degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated sediments by providing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    Stimulating the anaerobic degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated sediments to simulate the degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in anaerobic contaminated sediments was investigated as the sole electron acceptor. Providing graphite electrodes as an electron acceptor in hydrocarbon

  17. Development and evaluation of an implantable chronic DC stimulation and measurement probe for nerve regeneration studies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macha, Douglas Bryan

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    isotropic. The actual field strength or current density induced by the applied current is seldom directly measured in-vivo. This research seeks to evaluate the design of an implantable DC stimulator capable of delivering a constant, stable and measurable...

  18. Stimulation results in the low-permeability Wasatch formation - An evolution to foam fracturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, P.C.; Bailey, D.E.; Evertz, G.L.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wasatch Formation of the Uinta Basin in eastern Utah is typical of many formations in the Rocky Mountains, having low permeability and high sensitivity to water. Stimulation treatments with several types of fracturing fluids, including oilwater emulsion fluids, complex gel fluids and foam fluids, have been generally successful. Production decline curves from twenty four wells in the field were used for comparison of the different stimulation methods. Although foam fracturing has been used for the shortest period of time, comparison of the production histories show the relatively higher efficiency of the foam fracturing treatments compared to other stimulation methods in the Wasatch formation. Foam fluids gave higher production rates and higher flowing pressures than offset wells fractured with complex gel fluids. A stimulation model for oil and gas production was used to match the production history from this reservoir. The model allowed a projection of gas production based on early production from the wells and knowledge of the reservoir.

  19. Surface electric variations induced by deep hydraulic stimulation: An example from the Soultz HDR site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sailhac, Pascal

    Surface electric variations induced by deep hydraulic stimulation: An example from the Soultz HDR exchanger to heat up the water that activates turbines that generate electricity. It is therefore essential

  20. Tenderness, drip loss, and postmortem metabilism of broiler pectoralis from electrically stimulated and air chilled carcasses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skarovsky, Clinton John

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of postmortem electrical stimulation (ES) on tenderness, absorbance ratio (r-value), pH, and drip loss of breast fillets following air chilling. In each of four replications, eight birds were...

  1. Developing a tight gas sand advisor for completion and stimulation in tight gas reservoirs worldwide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogatchev, Kirill Y.

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    while completing and stimulating TGS reservoirs. The modules include Perforation Selection and Proppant Selection. Based on input well/reservoir parameters these subroutines provide unambiguous recommendations concerning which perforation strategy...

  2. STIMULATION OF GEOTHERMAL AQUIFERS Paul Kruger and Henry J. Ramey, J r .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    . STIMULATION OF GEOTHERMAL AQUIFERS Paul Kruger and Henry J. Ramey, J r . Co o f Geothermal Formations . . . . . . . . 6 Table 2: Water Quali t y Constituents-Water Distribution Coefficients . . . . . . . . 62 Table 7: Gaseous Constituents i n Geothermal Fluids . . . . . . 64

  3. Modeling wellbore pressure with application to multi-stage, acid-stimulation treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ejofodomi, Efejera A.

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    -industrial applications: as a displacing agent in porous media, underbalanced drilling and wellbore circulating fluid; and as a stimulating fluid during acidizing and hydraulic fracturing treatments. Foam has low mobility in rock which enables the effective diversion...

  4. Nonthermal Water Splitting on Rutile TiO2: Electron-Stimulated...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nonthermal Water Splitting on Rutile TiO2: Electron-Stimulated Production of H-2 and O-2 in Amorphous Solid Water Films on TiO2 Nonthermal Water Splitting on Rutile TiO2:...

  5. Progression of chondrocyte signaling responses to mechanical stimulation in 3-D gel culture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chai, Diana H

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mechanical stimulation of 3-D chondrocyte cultures increases extracellular matrix (ECM) production and mechanical stiffness in regenerating cartilage. The goal of this study was to examine the progression of chondrocyte ...

  6. A Bayesian statistical analysis of behavioral facilitation associated with deep brain stimulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Anne C.

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for Parkinson's Disease and is being investigated as a treatment for chronic depression, obsessive compulsive disorder and for facilitating functional recovery of ...

  7. A New Organic Acid to Stimulate Deep Wells in Carbonate Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Douri, Ahmad F

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbonate acidizing has been carried out using HCl-based stimulation fluids for decades. However, at high temperatures, HCl does not produce acceptable results because of its fast reaction, acid penetration, and hence surface dissolution, and its...

  8. Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Cao

    2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding of the correlation of uncertainties is required for $\\theta_{13}$ experiments. Precise determination of reactor neutrino flux will also improve the sensitivity of the non-proliferation monitoring and future reactor experiments. We will discuss the flux calculation and recent progresses.

  9. Effects of stimulation/completion practices on Eastern Devonian Shale well productivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nearing, Timothy Ray

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the Devonian shale, ' then the degree of fracture density and fracture preferential direction caused by these stresses should dictate the choice of stimulation method. Young states that fracture orientation will be dictated by the in-situ stress field...EFFECTS OF STIMULATION/COMPLETION PRACTICES ON EASTERN DEVONIAN SHALE WELL PRODUCTIVITY A Thesis by TIMOTHY RAY NEARING Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  10. Stimulated emission of two photons in parametric amplification and its interpretation as multi-photon interference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. W. Sun; B. H. Liu; Y. X. Gong; Y. F. Huang; Z. Y. Ou; G. C. Guo

    2007-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Stimulated emission of two photons is observed experimentally in the parametric amplification process and is compared to a three-photon interference scheme. We find that the underlying physics of stimulated emission is simply the constructive interference due to photon indistinguishability. So the observed signal enhancement upon the input of photons is a result of multi-photon interference of the input photons and the otherwise spontaneously emitted photon from the amplifier.

  11. Numerical-model developments for stimulation technologies in the Eastern Gas Shales Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbour, T.G.; Maxwell, D.E.; Young, C.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These efforts were directed towards the development of a numerical tensile failure model that could be used to make a parameter sensitivity study of the EGSP wellbore stimulation methods for gas recovery in Devonain shales, calculations were performed using the NTS Multi-Frac Mineback Experiments as the geometry, boundary conditions and material properties of the models. Several major accomplishments were achieved during this task. These include: development of a Crack and Void Strain (CAVS) tensile failure model for one-dimensional fracture analysis using the one-dimensional geometries available in SAI's STEALTH 1-D finite-difference code; modification of the original CAVS tensile failure criteria to improve its representation of multiple fracture development by introducing a logic that adjusts the material's tensile strength (both for crack initiation and crack propagation) according to the degree of cracking that has occurred; adding a submodel to CAVS to allow for cracking propping when a crack is reclosed and to require energy to be expanded during this process; adding a submodel to CAVS to allow for crack pressurization when a crack void strain is in communication with the fluid pressure of the borehole; and performing a parameter sensitivity analysis to determine the effect that the material properties of the rock has on crack development, to include the effects of yielding and compaction. Using the CAVS model and its submodels, a series of STEALTH calculations were then performed to estimate the response of the NTS unaugmented Dynafrac experiment. Pressure, acceleration and stress time histories and snapshot data were obtained and should aid in the evaluation of these experiments. Crack patterns around the borehole were also calculated and should be valuable in a comparison with the fracture patterns observed during mineback.

  12. Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) on Human Memory.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matzen, Laura E.; Trumbo, Michael Christopher Stefan

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Training a person in a new knowledge base or skill set is extremely time consuming and costly, particularly in highly specialized domains such as the military and the intelligence community. Recent research in cognitive neuroscience has suggested that a technique called transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has the potential to revolutionize training by enabling learners to acquire new skills faster, more efficiently, and more robustly (Bullard et al., 2011). In this project, we tested the effects of tDCS on two types of memory performance that are critical for learning new skills: associative memory and working memory. Associative memory is memory for the relationship between two items or events. It forms the foundation of all episodic memories, so enhancing associative memory could provide substantial benefits to the speed and robustness of learning new information. We tested the effects of tDCS on associative memory, using a real-world associative memory task: remembering the links between faces and names. Working memory refers to the amount of information that can be held in mind and processed at one time, and it forms the basis for all higher-level cognitive processing. We investigated the degree of transfer between various working memory tasks (the N-back task as a measure of verbal working memory, the rotation-span task as a measure of visuospatial working memory, and Raven's progressive matrices as a measure of fluid intelligence) in order to determine if tDCS-induced facilitation of performance is task-specific or general.

  13. Evaluation of electromagnetic stimulation of Texas heavy oil reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doublet, Louis Edward

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . By determining the ~ir and fluid properties that were most important, empirical estimation equations for both ~ and wellbore power were developed. A large number of producing scenarios were evaluated for the sensitivity study. All the cases were simulated... oil deposits of Texas was made in order to find candidates for the EMH process. 3. An empirical heated oil production rate estimation equation was used to evaluate economically viable reservoirs. A single well, single phase, two...

  14. WFPC2 CTE Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew E. Dolphin

    2002-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The limiting factor of the accuracy of WFPC2 photometry is the CTE loss, which has increased to the level of 50% or more for faint stars at the top of the chips. I describe recent work on characterizing this effect, and provide improved equations for CTE correction. I also examine issues affecting background measurement, which if not done correctly can introduce artificial nonlinearities into photometry.

  15. Hypervelocity microparticle characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Idzorek, G.C.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To protect spacecraft from orbital debris requires a basic understanding of the processes involved in hypervelocity impacts and characterization of detectors to measure the space environment. Both require a source of well characterized hypervelocity particles. Electrostatic acceleration of charged microspheres provides such a source. Techniques refined at the Los Alamos National Laboratory provided information on hypervelocity impacts of particles of known mass and velocity ranging from 20-1000 nm diameter and 1-100 km/s. A Van De Graaff generator operating at 6 million volts was used to accelerate individual carbonyl iron microspheres produced by a specially designed particle source. Standard electrostatic lenses and steering were used to control the particles flight path. Charge sensitive pickoff tubes measured the particle charge and velocity in- flight without disturbing the particle. This information coupled with the measured Van De Graaff terminal voltage allowed calculation of the particle energy, mass, momenta and (using an assumed density) the size. Particles with the desired parameters were then electrostatically directed to a target chamber. Targets used in our experiments included cratering and foil puncture targets, microphone momentum enhancement detectors, triboluminescent detectors, and ``splash`` charge detectors. In addition the system has been used to rapidly characterize size distributions of conductive plastic particles and potentially provide a method of easily sorting microscopic particles by size.

  16. Biofuels supply chain characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Anindya, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ethanol can be made from agricultural residues like wheat straw and from crops dedicated to energy use, like switchgrass. We study the logistics aspects of this transformation and determine the main characteristics of the ...

  17. Characterization of Mineralogical & Genetic Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr.Timothy Magnuson

    2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK 270 - characterization of mineralogical and molecular genetic events assoc. w/colonization of mineral surfaces by geobacter

  18. Ignition quality determination of marine diesel fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gulder, O.L.; Glavincevski, B.; Kassinger, R.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ignition quality of heavy marine diesel fuels is considered to be an important parameter. The standard procedures used to quantify this parameter for distillate fuels are not applicable to residual fuels. Proton NMR Spectroscopy was demonstrated to be an effective tool to characterize the ''global'' fuel composition of commercially available fuels covering a wide range of ignition quality. Proton NMR data from these fuels were used to determine a cetane number (CNp) for the heavy fuels using procedures previously reported for distillate fuels. The validity of this instrumental technique for determining CNp was corroborated by actual ASTM D 613 engine tests on a number of commercially available fuels, run as blends with secondary reference fuels. Viscosity and density values of the analyzed heavy fuels were regressed against predicted cetane numbers to obtain a correlation expression.

  19. An Alternate Approach to Determine the Explosibility of Dusts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganesan, Balaji

    2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    protocol that more accurately characterizes the explosibility of dusts. The CAAQES protocol for determining MEC is to test a wide range of concentrations of a dust in a 28.3-L (1 ft^(3)) Plexiglas chamber with a diaphragm and a stationary ignition source...

  20. Determining Air Quality and Greenhouse Gas Impacts of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabdub, Donald

    Determining Air Quality and Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Hydrogen Infrastructure and Fuel Cell of hydrogen infrastructure and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (HFCVs) to replace gasoline internal combustion) to characterize the pollutant and GHG emissions associated with a comprehensive hydrogen supply infrastructure

  1. Gunfire characterization and simulation using temporal moments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smallwood, D.O.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of band-limited temporal moments is briefly reviewed. An input-output relationship for the band-limited product model is derived. The band-limited product model is then used to characterize and simulate a gunfire record in the following manner. An ensemble of 50 gunfire rounds are averaged to determine the mean response. The mean is subtracted from the original record and the remaining signal is characterized using a smoothed mean square response of the signal filtered into contiguous bandwidths. This operation preserves the lower bandlimited temporal moments of the original data. This smoothed mean square response was used as the deterministic window for the product model. The power spectrum of the response with the mean removed is used to estimate the spectrum for the random part a product model. An additional step varied the repetition rate in a random manner of the simulated gunfire rounds to match the original record in a statistical sense.

  2. Methodologies for Reservoir Characterization Using Fluid Inclusion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Surveys Chemical Signatures of and Precursors to Fractures Using Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy Creation of an Engineered Geothermal System through Hydraulic and Thermal Stimulation...

  3. Central Characterization Program (CCP) Transuranic Waste Characterizat...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Characterization Quality Assurance Project Plan Central Characterization Program (CCP) Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Project Plan This document was used to...

  4. Laboratory characterization of rock joints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsiung, S.M.; Kana, D.D.; Ahola, M.P.; Chowdhury, A.H.; Ghosh, A. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laboratory characterization of the Apache Leap tuff joints under cyclic pseudostatic and dynamic loads has been undertaken to obtain a better understanding of dynamic joint shear behavior and to generate a complete data set that can be used for validation of existing rock-joint models. Study has indicated that available methods for determining joint roughness coefficient (JRC) significantly underestimate the roughness coefficient of the Apache Leap tuff joints, that will lead to an underestimation of the joint shear strength. The results of the direct shear tests have indicated that both under cyclic pseudostatic and dynamic loadings the joint resistance upon reverse shearing is smaller than that of forward shearing and the joint dilation resulting from forward shearing recovers during reverse shearing. Within the range of variation of shearing velocity used in these tests, the shearing velocity effect on rock-joint behavior seems to be minor, and no noticeable effect on the peak joint shear strength and the joint shear strength for the reverse shearing is observed.

  5. Optical Characterization Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Optical Characterization Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The Optical Characterization Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) conducts optical characterization of large solar concentration devices. Concentration solar power (CSP) mirror panels and concentrating solar systems are tested with an emphasis is on measurement of parabolic trough mirror panels. The Optical Characterization Laboratory provides state-of-the-art characterization and testing capabilities for assessing the optical surface quality and optical performance for various CSP technologies including parabolic troughs, linear Fresnel, dishes, and heliostats.

  6. TRU waste characterization chamber gloveboxes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, D. S.

    1998-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) is participating in the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Transuranic Waste Program in support of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The Laboratory's support currently consists of intrusive characterization of a selected population of drums containing transuranic waste. This characterization is performed in a complex of alpha containment gloveboxes termed the Waste Characterization Gloveboxes. Made up of the Waste Characterization Chamber, Sample Preparation Glovebox, and the Equipment Repair Glovebox, they were designed as a small production characterization facility for support of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This paper presents salient features of these gloveboxes.

  7. Determining Pregnancy in Cattle.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorensen, A. M. Jr.; Beverly, J. R.

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . This should not upset the pal- pator. An indication of rectum damage is a sand- paper or gritty feeling. In this case, the mucosa lining the rectum has been rubbed off in the palpation pro- cess. It is best to stop further palpation when this occurs. A... good land- mark, figure 2. After locating the cervix, the pal- pator can move forward to the uterus to determine pregnancy. The paunch, located directly forward and to the left, may feel like the end of a football and be rather soft and mushy...

  8. Nondestructive material characterization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, Vance A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, John A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Telschow, Kenneth L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for nondestructive material characterization, such as identification of material flaws or defects, material thickness or uniformity and material properties such as acoustic velocity. The apparatus comprises a pulsed laser used to excite a piezoelectric (PZ) transducer, which sends acoustic waves through an acoustic coupling medium to the test material. The acoustic wave is absorbed and thereafter reflected by the test material, whereupon it impinges on the PZ transducer. The PZ transducer converts the acoustic wave to electrical impulses, which are conveyed to a monitor.

  9. PUNCTURE TEST CHARACTERIZATION OF GLOVEBOX GLOVES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinko, P.; Chapman, G.

    2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An experiment was conducted to determine the puncture resistance of 15 gloves that are used or proposed for use in the Tritium Facility at Savannah River Site (SRS). These data will serve as a baseline for characterization and may be incorporated into the glove procurement specification. The testing was conducted in agreement with ASTM D120 and all of the gloves met or exceeded the minimum requirements. Butyl gloves exhibited puncture resistance nearly 2.5 times the minimum requirements at SRS while Polyurethane was nearly 7.5x the minimum.

  10. Ultrasonic characterization of solid liquid suspensions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panetta, Paul D.

    2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Using an ultrasonic field, properties of a solid liquid suspension such as through-transmission attenuation, backscattering, and diffuse field are measured. These properties are converted to quantities indicating the strength of different loss mechanisms (such as absorption, single scattering and multiple scattering) among particles in the suspension. Such separation of the loss mechanisms can allow for direct comparison of the attenuating effects of the mechanisms. These comparisons can also indicate a model most likely to accurately characterize the suspension and can aid in determination of properties such as particle size, concentration, and density of the suspension.

  11. The Research Path to Determining the Natural Gas Supply Potential of Marine Gas Hydrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boswell, R.M.; Rose, K.K.; Baker, R.C.

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A primary goal of the U.S. National Interagency Gas Hydrates R&D program is to determine the natural gas production potential of marine gas hydrates. In pursuing this goal, four primary areas of effort are being conducted in parallel. First, are wide-ranging basic scientific investigations in both the laboratory and in the field designed to advance the understanding of the nature and behavior of gas hydrate bearing sediments (GHBS). This multi-disciplinary work has wide-ranging direct applications to resource recovery, including assisting the development of exploration and production technologies through better rock physics models for GHBS and also in providing key data for numerical simulations of productivity, reservoir geomechanical response, and other phenomena. In addition, fundamental science efforts are essential to developing a fuller understanding of the role gas hydrates play in the natural environment and the potential environmental implications of gas hydrate production, a critical precursor to commercial extraction. A second area of effort is the confirmation of resource presence and viability via a series of multi-well marine drilling expeditions. The collection of data in the field is essential to further clarifying what proportion of the likely immense in-place marine gas hydrate resource exists in accumulations of sufficient quality to represent potential commercial production prospects. A third research focus area is the integration of geologic, geophysical, and geochemical field data into an effective suite of exploration tools that can support the delineation and characterization commercial gas hydrate prospects prior to drilling. The fourth primary research focus is the development and testing of well-based extraction technologies (including drilling, completion, stimulation and production) that can safely deliver commercial gas production rates from gas hydrate reservoirs in a variety of settings. Initial efforts will take advantage of the relatively favorable economics of conducting production tests in Arctic gas-hydrate bearing sandstones with the intent of translating the knowledge gained to later testing in marine sandstone reservoirs. The full and concurrent pusuit of each of these research topics is essential to the determining the future production potential of naturally-occuring gas hydrates.

  12. Mound facility physical characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonne, W.R.; Alexander, B.M.; Cage, M.R.; Hase, E.H.; Schmidt, M.J.; Schneider, J.E.; Slusher, W.; Todd, J.E.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a baseline physical characterization of Mound`s facilities as of September 1993. The baseline characterizations are to be used in the development of long-term future use strategy development for the Mound site. This document describes the current missions and alternative future use scenarios for each building. Current mission descriptions cover facility capabilities, physical resources required to support operations, current safety envelope and current status of facilities. Future use scenarios identify potential alternative future uses, facility modifications required for likely use, facility modifications of other uses, changes to safety envelope for the likely use, cleanup criteria for each future use scenario, and disposition of surplus equipment. This Introductory Chapter includes an Executive Summary that contains narrative on the Functional Unit Material Condition, Current Facility Status, Listing of Buildings, Space Plans, Summary of Maintenance Program and Repair Backlog, Environmental Restoration, and Decontamination and Decommissioning Programs. Under Section B, Site Description, is a brief listing of the Site PS Development, as well as Current Utility Sources. Section C contains Site Assumptions. A Maintenance Program Overview, as well as Current Deficiencies, is contained within the Maintenance Program Chapter.

  13. Carbon Characterization Laboratory Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Swank; William Windes; D.C. Haggard; David Rohrbaugh; Karen Moore

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The newly completed Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Carbon Characterization Laboratory (CCL) is located in Lab-C20 of the Idaho National Laboratory Research Center. This laboratory was established under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project to support graphite research and development activities. The CCL is designed to characterize and test carbon-based materials such as graphite, carbon-carbon composites, and silicon-carbide composite materials. The laboratory is fully prepared to measure material properties for nonirradiated carbon-based materials. Plans to establish the laboratory as a radiological facility within the next year are definitive. This laboratory will be modified to accommodate irradiated materials, after which it can be used to perform material property measurements on both irradiated and nonirradiated carbon-based material. Instruments, fixtures, and methods are in place for preirradiation measurements of bulk density, thermal diffusivity, coefficient of thermal expansion, elastic modulus, Young’s modulus, Shear modulus, Poisson ratio, and electrical resistivity. The measurement protocol consists of functional validation, calibration, and automated data acquisition.

  14. Method for surface plasmon amplification by stimulated emission of radiation (SPASER)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stockman, Mark I. (Atlanta, GA); Bergman, David J. (Ramat Hasharon, IL)

    2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A nanostructure is used to generate a highly localized nanoscale optical field. The field is excited using surface plasmon amplification by stimulated emission of radiation (SPASER). The SPASER radiation consists of surface plasmons that undergo stimulated emission, but in contrast to photons can be localized within a nanoscale region. A SPASER can incorporate an active medium formed by two-level emitters, excited by an energy source, such as an optical, electrical, or chemical energy source. The active medium may be quantum dots, which transfer excitation energy by radiationless transitions to a resonant nanosystem that can play the same role as a laser cavity in a conventional laser. The transitions are stimulated by the surface plasmons in the nanostructure, causing the buildup of a macroscopic number of surface plasmons in a single mode.

  15. C Produced by Nuclear Power Reactors Generation and Characterization of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    14 C Produced by Nuclear Power Reactors ­ Generation and Characterization of Gaseous, Liquid and process water from nuclear reactors ­ A method for quantitative determination of organic and inorganic and Solid Waste �sa Magnusson Division of Nuclear Physics Department of Physics 2007 Akademisk avhandling

  16. Bacterial Diversity in Livestock Manure Composts as Characterized by Terminal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiquia-Arashiro, Sonia M.

    Bacterial Diversity in Livestock Manure Composts as Characterized by Terminal Restriction Fragment in the decomposition of organic matter during the composting process. However, microbial communities active in composts of bacterial communities in livestock manure compost was determined based on terminal restriction fragment

  17. Page 1 of 8 AN INNOVATIVE EXPERIMENTAL DEVICE TO CHARACTERIZE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    to determine the residual capacity of aged specimens. This paper aims at describing the proposed creep test test configuration and the creep load was applied to the specimens by means of a sustained dead weightPage 1 of 8 AN INNOVATIVE EXPERIMENTAL DEVICE TO CHARACTERIZE THE CREEP BEHAVIOR OF CONCRETE

  18. Distributed Energy Technology Characterization (Desiccant Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Characterization (Desiccant Technologies), January 2004 Distributed Energy Technology Characterization (Desiccant Technologies), January 2004 The purpose of this report is to...

  19. Materials Synthesis and Characterization | Center for Functional...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Synthesis and Characterization Facility materials synthesis The Materials Synthesis and Characterization Facility includes laboratories for producing nanostructured...

  20. Evaluation and Characterization of Lightweight Materials: Success...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Characterization of Lightweight Materials: Success Stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Evaluation and Characterization of Lightweight...

  1. Advanced Battery Materials Characterization: Success stories...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Advanced Battery Materials Characterization: Success stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Advanced Battery Materials Characterization: Success...

  2. CLEERS Activities: Diesel Soot Filter Characterization & NOx...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Activities: Diesel Soot Filter Characterization & NOx Control Fundamentals CLEERS Activities: Diesel Soot Filter Characterization & NOx Control Fundamentals 2009 DOE Hydrogen...

  3. Mechanical Characterization of Fuel Injector Piezoactuators and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Characterization of Fuel Injector Piezoactuators and their Piezoceramics Mechanical Characterization of Fuel Injector Piezoactuators and their Piezoceramics 2007 Diesel...

  4. Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Project objective: Make Seismic...

  5. Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for...

  6. Mixed waste characterization reference document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste characterization and monitoring are major activities in the management of waste from generation through storage and treatment to disposal. Adequate waste characterization is necessary to ensure safe storage, selection of appropriate and effective treatment, and adherence to disposal standards. For some wastes characterization objectives can be difficult and costly to achieve. The purpose of this document is to evaluate costs of characterizing one such waste type, mixed (hazardous and radioactive) waste. For the purpose of this document, waste characterization includes treatment system monitoring, where monitoring is a supplement or substitute for waste characterization. This document establishes a cost baseline for mixed waste characterization and treatment system monitoring requirements from which to evaluate alternatives. The cost baseline established as part of this work includes costs for a thermal treatment technology (i.e., a rotary kiln incinerator), a nonthermal treatment process (i.e., waste sorting, macronencapsulation, and catalytic wet oxidation), and no treatment (i.e., disposal of waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)). The analysis of improvement over the baseline includes assessment of promising areas for technology development in front-end waste characterization, process equipment, off gas controls, and monitoring. Based on this assessment, an ideal characterization and monitoring configuration is described that minimizes costs and optimizes resources required for waste characterization.

  7. Laboratory Experiments to Stimulate CO(2) Ocean Disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masutani, S.M.

    1997-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This Technical Progress Report summarizes activities conducted over the period 8/16/96-2/15/97 as part of this project. This investigation responds to the possibility that restrictions on greenhouse gas emissions may be imposed in the future to comply with the Framework Convention on Climate Change. The primary objective of the investigation is to obtain experimental data that can be applied to assess the technical feasibility and environmental impacts of oceanic containment strategies to limit release of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal and other fossil fuel combustion systems into the atmosphere. Critical technical uncertainties of ocean disposal of CO{sub 2} will be addressed by performing experiments that: (1) characterize size spectra and velocities of a dispersed CO{sub 2} phase in the near-field of a discharge jet; and (2) estimate rates of mass transfer from dissolving droplets of liquid CO{sub 2} encased in a thin hydrate shell. Experiments will be conducted in a laboratory facility that can reproduce conditions in the ocean to depths of 600 m (1,969 ft). Between 8/16/96 and 2/15/97, activities focused on modifications to the experimental apparatus and the testing of diagnostics. Following completion of these tasks, experiments will be initiated and will continue through the end of the 36 month period of performance. Major accomplishments of this reporting period were: (1) delivery, set-up, and testing of the PDPA (Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer), which will be the principal diagnostic of the continuous CO{sub 2} jet injection tests; (2) presentation of research papers and posters at the 212th American Chemical Society National Meeting and the Third International Conference on Carbon Dioxide Removal; (3) participation in the 4th Expert Workshop on Ocean Storage of Carbon Dioxide; (4) execution of an Agreement with ABB Management, Ltd. to support and extend the activities of this grant; and (5) initiation of research collaborations with Dr. P.M. Haugen of the University of Bergen, Norway, and Dr. A. Yamasaki of the National Institute of Materials and Chemical Research, Japan.

  8. Effect of laser beam filamentation on coexisting stimulated Raman and Brillouin scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, R. P.; Vyas, Ashish; Kishor Singh, Ram [Centre for Energy Studies, IIT, Delhi 110016 (India)] [Centre for Energy Studies, IIT, Delhi 110016 (India)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the study of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) when both of these processes are coexisting and pump laser beam initial power is more than filamentation threshold. On account of the ponderomotive nonlinearity, the pump laser beam gets filamented, and both the scattering processes (SRS and SBS) get affected. Simultaneous presence of SRS and SBS (five wave interaction case) also affect the pump filamentation process due to pump depletion. Both the scattering processes (SRS and SBS) are enhanced due to filamentation of laser beam. Results are also compared with the three wave interaction case (either SRS or SBS) with and without filamentation.

  9. Self-tracking Energy Transfer for Neural Stimulation in Untethered Mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, John S; Iyer, Shrivats Mohan; Christensen, Amelia J; Grosenick, Logan; Deisseroth, Karl; Delp, Scott L; Poon, Ada S Y

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical or electrical stimulation of neural circuits in mice during natural behavior is an important paradigm for studying brain function. Conventional systems for optogenetics and electrical microstimulation require tethers or large head-mounted devices that disrupt animal behavior. We report a method for wireless powering of small-scale implanted devices based on the strong localization of energy that occurs during resonant interaction between a radio-frequency cavity and intrinsic modes in mice. The system features self-tracking over a wide (16 cm diameter) operational area, and is used to demonstrate wireless activation of cortical neurons with miniaturized stimulators (10 mm$^{3}$, 20 mg) fully implanted under the skin.

  10. Unprecedentedly Strong and Narrow Electromagnetic Emissions Stimulated by High-Frequency Radio Waves in the Ionosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norin, L.; Leyser, T. B.; Nordblad, E.; Thide, B.; McCarrick, M. [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala (Sweden); BAE Systems Advanced Technologies, Washington, D.C. (United States)

    2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental results of secondary electromagnetic radiation, stimulated by high-frequency radio waves irradiating the ionosphere, are reported. We have observed emission peaks, shifted in frequency up to a few tens of Hertz from radio waves transmitted at several megahertz. These emission peaks are by far the strongest spectral features of secondary radiation that have been reported. The emissions are attributed to stimulated Brillouin scattering, long predicted but hitherto never unambiguously identified in high-frequency ionospheric interaction experiments. The experiments were performed at the High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP), Alaska, USA.

  11. Significant Radionuclides Determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jo A. Ziegler

    2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this calculation is to identify radionuclides that are significant to offsite doses from potential preclosure events for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste expected to be received at the potential Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). In this calculation, high-level radioactive waste is included in references to DOE SNF. A previous document, ''DOE SNF DBE Offsite Dose Calculations'' (CRWMS M&O 1999b), calculated the source terms and offsite doses for Department of Energy (DOE) and Naval SNF for use in design basis event analyses. This calculation reproduces only DOE SNF work (i.e., no naval SNF work is included in this calculation) created in ''DOE SNF DBE Offsite Dose Calculations'' and expands the calculation to include DOE SNF expected to produce a high dose consequence (even though the quantity of the SNF is expected to be small) and SNF owned by commercial nuclear power producers. The calculation does not address any specific off-normal/DBE event scenarios for receiving, handling, or packaging of SNF. The results of this calculation are developed for comparative analysis to establish the important radionuclides and do not represent the final source terms to be used for license application. This calculation will be used as input to preclosure safety analyses and is performed in accordance with procedure AP-3.12Q, ''Calculations'', and is subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (DOE 2000) as determined by the activity evaluation contained in ''Technical Work Plan for: Preclosure Safety Analysis, TWP-MGR-SE-000010'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b) in accordance with procedure AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''.

  12. Stimulation model for lenticular sands: Volume 2, Users manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rybicki, E.F.; Luiskutty, C.T.; Sutrick, J.S.; Palmer, I.D.; Shah, G.H.; Tomutsa, L.

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This User's Manual contains information for four fracture/proppant models. TUPROP1 contains a Geertsma and de Klerk type fracture model. The section of the program utilizing the proppant fracture geometry data from the pseudo three-dimensional highly elongated fracture model is called TUPROPC. The analogous proppant section of the program that was modified to accept fracture shape data from SA3DFRAC is called TUPROPS. TUPROPS also includes fracture closure. Finally there is the penny fracture and its proppant model, PENNPROP. In the first three chapters, the proppant sections are based on the same theory for determining the proppant distribution but have modifications to support variable height fractures and modifications to accept fracture geometry from three different fracture models. Thus, information about each proppant model in the User's Manual builds on information supplied in the previous chapter. The exception to the development of combined treatment models is the penny fracture and its proppant model. In this case, a completely new proppant model was developed. A description of how to use the combined treatment model for the penny fracture is contained in Chapter 4. 2 refs.

  13. Chemical characterization of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in seawater : structure, cycling, and the role of biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quan, Tracy M. (Tracy Michelle), 1977-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this thesis is to investigate three different areas relating to the characterization of dissolved organic matter (DOM): further determination of the chemical compounds present in high molecular weight DOM ...

  14. Photoelectronic characterization of heterointerfaces.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brumbach, Michael Todd

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In many devices such as solar cells, light emitting diodes, transistors, etc., the performance relies on the electronic structure at interfaces between materials within the device. The objective of this work was to perform robust characterization of hybrid (organic/inorganic) interfaces by tailoring the interfacial region for photoelectron spectroscopy. Self-assembled monolayers (SAM) were utilized to induce dipoles of various magnitudes at the interface. Additionally, SAMs of molecules with varying dipolar characteristics were mixed into spatially organized structures to systematically vary the apparent work function. Polymer thin films were characterized by depositing films of varying thicknesses on numerous substrates with and without interfacial modifications. Hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) was performed to evaluate a buried interface between indium tin oxide (ITO), treated under various conditions, and poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). Conducting polymer films were found to be sufficiently conducting such that no significant charge redistribution in the polymer films was observed. Consequently, a further departure from uniform substrates was taken whereby electrically disconnected regions of the substrate presented ideally insulating interfacial contacts. In order to accomplish this novel strategy, interdigitated electrodes were used as the substrate. Conducting fingers of one half of the electrodes were electrically grounded while the other set of electrodes were electronically floating. This allowed for the evaluation of substrate charging on photoelectron spectra (SCOPES) in the presence of overlying semiconducting thin films. Such an experiment has never before been reported. This concept was developed out of the previous experiments on interfacial modification and thin film depositions and presents new opportunities for understanding chemical and electronic changes in a multitude of materials and interfaces.

  15. Stimulation of erythrocyte phosphatidylserine exposure by mercury ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisele, Kerstin [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Lang, Philipp A. [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Kempe, Daniela S. [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Klarl, Barbara A. [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Niemoeller, Olivier [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Wieder, Thomas [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Huber, Stephan M. [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Duranton, Christophe [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Lang, Florian [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany)]. E-mail: florian.lang@uni-tuebingen.de

    2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The sequelae of mercury intoxication include induction of apoptosis. In nucleated cells, Hg{sup 2+}-induced apoptosis involves mitochondrial damage. The present study has been performed to elucidate effects of Hg{sup 2+} in erythrocytes which lack mitochondria but are able to undergo apoptosis-like alterations of the cell membrane. Previous studies have documented that activation of a Ca{sup 2+}-sensitive erythrocyte scramblase leads to exposure of phosphatidylserine at the erythrocyte surface, a typical feature of apoptotic cells. The erythrocyte scramblase is activated by osmotic shock, oxidative stress and/or energy depletion which increase cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} activity and/or activate a sphingomyelinase leading to formation of ceramide. Ceramide sensitizes the scramblase to Ca{sup 2+}. The present experiments explored the effect of Hg{sup 2+} ions on erythrocytes. Phosphatidylserine exposure after mercury treatment was estimated from annexin binding as determined in FACS analysis. Exposure to Hg{sup 2+} (1 {mu}M) indeed significantly increased annexin binding from 2.3 {+-} 0.5% (control condition) to 23 {+-} 6% (n = 6). This effect was paralleled by activation of a clotrimazole-sensitive K{sup +}-selective conductance as measured by patch-clamp recordings and by transient cell shrinkage. Further experiments revealed also an increase of ceramide formation by {approx}66% (n = 7) after challenge with mercury (1 {mu}M). In conclusion, mercury ions activate a clotrimazole-sensitive K{sup +}-selective conductance leading to transient cell shrinkage. Moreover, Hg{sup 2+} increases ceramide formation. The observed mechanisms could similarly participate in the triggering of apoptosis in nucleated cells by Hg{sup 2+}.

  16. TGF-{beta}-stimulated aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin via the ERK signaling pathway in cultured retinal pigment epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Eun Jee [Department of Ophthalmology, National Health Insurance Corporation Ilsan Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Ophthalmology, National Health Insurance Corporation Ilsan Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Chun, Ji Na; Jung, Sun-Ah [Konyang University Myunggok Medical Research Institute, Kim's Eye Hospital, Konyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Konyang University Myunggok Medical Research Institute, Kim's Eye Hospital, Konyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jin Won [Department of Biology, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Biology, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joon H., E-mail: joonhlee@konyang.ac.kr [Konyang University Myunggok Medical Research Institute, Kim's Eye Hospital, Konyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta} induces aberrant expression of {beta}III in RPE cells via the ERK pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta} increases O-GlcNAc modification of {beta}III in RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mature RPE cells have the capacity to express a neuron-associated gene by TGF-{beta}. -- Abstract: The class III {beta}-tubulin isotype ({beta}{sub III}) is expressed exclusively by neurons within the normal human retina and is not present in normal retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in situ or in the early phase of primary cultures. However, aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin has been observed in passaged RPE cells and RPE cells with dedifferentiated morphology in pathologic epiretinal membranes from idiopathic macular pucker, proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). Transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) has been implicated in dedifferentiation of RPE cells and has a critical role in the development of proliferative vitreoretinal diseases. Here, we investigated the potential effects of TGF-{beta} on the aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin and the intracellular signaling pathway mediating these changes. TGF-{beta}-induced aberrant expression and O-linked-{beta}-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNac) modification of class III {beta}-tubulin in cultured RPE cells as determined using Western blotting, RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. TGF-{beta} also stimulated phosphorylation of ERK. TGF-{beta}-induced aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin was significantly reduced by pretreatment with U0126, an inhibitor of ERK phosphorylation. Our findings indicate that TGF-{beta} stimulated aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin via activation of the ERK signaling pathway. These data demonstrate that mature RPE cells have the capacity to express a neuron-associated gene in response to TGF-{beta} stimulation and provide useful information towards understanding the pathogenesis of proliferative vitreoretinal diseases.

  17. Historical hydronuclear testing: Characterization and remediation technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaulis, L.; Wilson, G.; Jacobson, R.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the most current literature and information available on characterization and remediation technologies that could be used on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) historical hydronuclear test areas. Historical hydronuclear tests use high explosives and a small amount of plutonium. The explosion scatters plutonium within a contained subsurface environment. There is currently a need to characterize these test areas to determine the spatial extent of plutonium in the subsurface and whether geohydrologic processes are transporting the plutonium away from the event site. Three technologies were identified to assist in the characterization of the sites. These technologies are the Pipe Explorer{trademark}, cone penetrometer, and drilling. If the characterization results indicate that remediation is needed, three remediation technologies were identified that should be appropriate, namely: capping or sealing the surface, in situ grouting, and in situ vitrification. Capping the surface would prevent vertical infiltration of water into the soil column, but would not restrict lateral movement of vadose zone water. Both the in situ grouting and vitrification techniques would attempt to immobilize the radioactive contaminants to restrict or prevent leaching of the radioactive contaminants into the groundwater. In situ grouting uses penetrometers or boreholes to inject the soil below the contaminant zone with low permeability grout. In situ vitrification melts the soil containing contaminants into a solid block. This technique would provide a significantly longer contaminant immobilization, but some research and development would be required to re-engineer existing systems for use at deep soil depths. Currently, equipment can only handle shallow depth vitrification. After existing documentation on the historical hydronuclear tests have been reviewed and the sites have been visited, more specific recommendations will be made.

  18. CX-012271: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Quantitative Characterization of Impacts of Couple Geomechanics and Flow - Lab Experiments/Modeling CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/25/2014 Location(s): California Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  19. CX-012270: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Quantitative Characterization of Impacts of Couple Geomechanics and Flow - Lab Experiments/Modeling CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/25/2014 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  20. CX-011565: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In-pile Thermal Conductivity Characterization with Time Resolved Raman CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/18/2013 Location(s): Iowa Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  1. CX-008005: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Site Characterization and Environmental Monitoring CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 11/28/2011 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Science, Pacific Northwest Site Office

  2. CX-010847: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization of Methanotrophs at the Old Integrated Demonstration Site, M Area CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 07/23/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  3. CX-011437: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Analytical Methods for Air and Stray Gas Emissions and Produced Brine Characterization CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 11/21/2013 Location(s): New York Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  4. CX-010930: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Analytical Methods for Air and Stray Gas Emissions and Produced Brine Characterization CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 09/20/2013 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  5. CX-009327: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Gas Hydrate Dynamics on the Alaskan Beaufort Continental Slope: Modeling and Field Characterization CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 09/27/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  6. CX-009329: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Gas Hydrate Dynamics on the Alaskan Beaufort Continental Slope: Modeling and Field Characterization CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.16 Date: 09/27/2012 Location(s): Alaska Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  7. CX-010356: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Site Characterization Investigation and Environmental Monitoring Activities CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 11/19/2012 Location(s): Tennessee, California, Virginia Offices(s): Berkeley Site Office

  8. CX-001229: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization of Fluidized Beds by Pressure Fluctuation AnalysisCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 03/11/2010Location(s): IdahoOffice(s): Idaho Operations Office, Nuclear Energy

  9. CX-011586: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A Positron Generator System in Support of High Brightness Materials Characterization at the Pulstar Reactor CX(s) Applied: B1.31 Date: 11/05/2013 Location(s): North Carolina Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  10. CX-011585: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A Positron Microprobe Spectrometer for Defects and Nano-Vacancy Characterization in Materials CX(s) Applied: B1.31 Date: 11/05/2013 Location(s): North Carolina Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  11. CX-010141: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization of Process Solutions and Solids CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/06/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  12. CX-011573: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Predictive Characterization of Aging and Degradation of Reactor Materials in Extreme Environments CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/14/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  13. CX-011682: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization of SCO Sludge, Supernate, and Glass for Tank Farm Return CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/02/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  14. CX-008856: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Site Characterization and Environmental Monitoring on the Hanford Site CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 08/01/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office

  15. CX-010534: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Site Characterization and Environmental Monitoring on the Hanford Site - 2013 CX(s) Applied: B3.14 Date: 06/13/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office

  16. CX-012427: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alaska Hydrate Production Testing: Test Site Selection and Characterization CX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 41879 Location(s): ColoradoOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  17. Hydrocarbons emitted by waggle-dancing honey bees stimulate colony foraging activity by causing experienced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrocarbons emitted by waggle-dancing honey bees stimulate colony foraging activity by causing of the hydrocarbons emitted by waggle-dancing bees are investigated in this study. First, we test the hypothesis itself. waggle dance / cuticular hydrocarbon / nectar foraging / semiochemical / pheromone 1

  18. Modelling the thermal quenching mechanism in quartz based on time-resolved optically stimulated luminescence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Reuven

    , Denmark c Nordic Laboratory for Luminescence Dating, Department of Earth Science, Aarhus University, Risø luminescence Pulsed OSL Thermoluminescence Quartz Luminescence lifetimes Kinetic rate equations Kinetic model temperature is raised, and has been observed in both thermo- luminescence (TL) and optically stimulated

  19. Electron transport and precipitation at Mercury during the MESSENGER flybys: Implications for electron-stimulated desorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80303, USA h Solar System Exploration Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center-stimulated desorption MESSENGER a b s t r a c t To examine electron transport, energization, and precipitation analysis for two solar-wind parameter conditions corresponding to the first two MESSENGER Mercury flybys

  20. Hydrogen bond breaking probed with multidimensional stimulated vibrational echo correlation spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Hydrogen bond breaking probed with multidimensional stimulated vibrational echo correlation September 2003 Hydrogen bond population dynamics are extricated with exceptional detail using ultrafast ( 50 of methanol­OD oligomers in CCl4 . Hydrogen bond breaking makes it possible to acquire data for times much

  1. Molecular Resonance Raman and Rayleigh Scattering Stimulated by a Short Laser Pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagedorn, George A.

    Molecular Resonance Raman and Rayleigh Scattering Stimulated by a Short Laser Pulse George A.S.A. May 9, 2013 Abstract We study a simple model for a molecule subjected to a short laser pulse. We resonance Rayleigh and Raman scattering amplitudes for a molecular system subjected to a short laser pulse

  2. Spermiation of paddlefish (Polyodon spathula, Acipenseriformes) stimulated with injection of LHRH analogue and carp pituitary powder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villefranche sur mer

    Note Spermiation of paddlefish (Polyodon spathula, Acipenseriformes) stimulated with injection Center, Kentucky State University, Frankfort, KY 40601, USA c Zoology Department, University of Oklahoma spathula) was tested. Single injections of the LH-RH analogue at 0.2, 0.1, or 0.05 mg·kg­1 increased

  3. Elevated CO2 stimulates grassland soil respiration by increasing carbon inputs rather than by enhancing soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Elevated CO2 stimulates grassland soil respiration by increasing carbon inputs rather than It is not clear whether the consistent positive effect of elevated CO2 on soil respiration (soil carbon flux, SCF) results from increased plant and microbial activity due to (i) greater C availability through CO2-induced

  4. Imaging Oxygen Consumption in Forepaw Somatosensory Stimulation in Rats Under Isoflurane Anesthesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duong, Timothy Q.

    Imaging Oxygen Consumption in Forepaw Somatosensory Stimulation in Rats Under Isoflurane Anesthesia consumption, indicative of partial coupling of CBF and CMRO2. This study describes a useful forepaw. Following Fox et al.'s (2) initial study with positron emission tomography (PET), stimulus- evoked CMRO2

  5. The Boston Retinal Prosthesis A 15-Channel Hermetic Wireless Neural Stimulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Shawn K.

    The Boston Retinal Prosthesis A 15-Channel Hermetic Wireless Neural Stimulator Shawn K. Kelly-- A miniaturized, hermetically-encased, wirelessly- operated retinal prosthesis has been developed for pre-clinical studies in Yucatan minipig animal models. The prosthesis attaches conformally to the outside of the eye

  6. A Functional Electric StimulationAssisted Exercise Therapy System for Hemiplegic Hand Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prochazka, Arthur

    stimulator was used to assist hand opening. Main Outcome Measures: Kinematic data, provided by the workstation sensors, and 3 clinical tests. Results: Kinematic data indicated statistically significant scores 5.46; mean pretreatment/follow-up ES [pre/FU ES] 3.44). Two of 3 clinical tests showed improvement

  7. Journal of Neuroscience Methods 138 (2004) 2737 Effective parameters for stimulation of dissociated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of stimulation scenarios, possibly extending to in-vivo experiments. © 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved after they have decided on elec- trode material: whether to use bipolar stimuli (between two electrodes to cells. (This harm can be much reduced by employing charge-balanced stimuli, making such stimuli

  8. Field Investigations of Lactate-Stimulated Bioreduction of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. C. Hazen; B. Faybishenko; D. Joyner; S. Borglin; E. Brodie; S.; K. Williams; J. Peterson; J. Wan; T. Tokunaga; M.; P. E. Long; Resch, C.T.; Newcomer, D.; Koenigsberg, S.; Willet, A.

    2005-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this paper is to carry out field investigations to assess the potential for immobilizing and detoxifying chromium-contaminated groundwater using lactate-stimulated bioreduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) at the Hanford 100H site.

  9. SB 4 Interim Well Stimulation Treatment Regulations Notice of Proposed Emergency Rulemaking Action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . DIVISION OF OIL, GAS, AND GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES Notice Published December 11, 2013 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN of Oil, Gas and Geothermal Resources to conduct well stimulation treatment. The permit application must RULEMAKING ACTION REGARDING TITLE 14. NATURAL RESOURCES DIVISION 2. DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION CHAPTER 4

  10. Stimulation at Desert Peak -modeling with the coupled THM code FEHM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    kelkar, sharad

    2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical modeling of the 2011 shear stimulation at the Desert Peak well 27-15. This submission contains the FEHM executable code for a 64-bit PC Windows-7 machine, and the input and output files for the results presented in the included paper from ARMA-213 meeting.

  11. Michigan Technological University November 2001 Page 1 of 2 Calibration and Testing of Sonic Stimulation Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan Technological University November 2001 Page 1 of 2 Calibration and Testing of Sonic Stimulation Technologies A DOE-sponsored project by Michigan Technological University 2002-2004 Michigan, between field and laboratory, and between field demonstrations and the scientific method. Michigan

  12. Stimulation at Desert Peak -modeling with the coupled THM code FEHM

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    kelkar, sharad

    Numerical modeling of the 2011 shear stimulation at the Desert Peak well 27-15. This submission contains the FEHM executable code for a 64-bit PC Windows-7 machine, and the input and output files for the results presented in the included paper from ARMA-213 meeting.

  13. Stimulation of Lake Michigan Plankton Metabolism by Sediment Resuspension and River Runoff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stimulation of Lake Michigan Plankton Metabolism by Sediment Resuspension and River Runoff Thomas H. Paul, Minnesota 55108 ABSTRACT. Previous work during a major sediment resuspension event (March 1988. INDEX WORDS: Sediment resuspension, river runoff, plankton metabolism, Lake Michigan. J. Great Lakes Res

  14. MRI-free neuronavigation for transcranial magnetic stimulation in severe depression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    MRI-free neuronavigation for transcranial magnetic stimulation in severe depression Beno^it Comb-35043 Rennes, France d Pontchaillou Univ. Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, F-35033 Rennes, France e Syneika, F-35000 Rennes, France Abstract. This paper presents a MRI-free neuronavigation technique

  15. Do Intellectual Property Rights Stimulate R&D and Productivity Growth?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lansky, Joshua

    for enforcement and administration), static deadweight losses (in terms of the deviation of markets from- tial output directly by affecting the technical efficiency of production, or indirectly by stimulating (technical efficiency of production and R&D accumulation) have been stressed in aca- demic and policy debates

  16. Hair-bundle movements elicited by transepithelial electrical stimulation of hair cells in the sacculus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudspeth, A. James

    Hair-bundle movements elicited by transepithelial electrical stimulation of hair cells transduction by the inner ear. We present evidence for a single-cell correlate of this phenomenon, hair motion that incorporates the negative stiffness of the hair bundle as well as its two mechanisms

  17. An animal model of functional electrical stimulation: evidence that the central nervous system modulates the consequences of training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grau, James

    Review An animal model of functional electrical stimulation: evidence that the central nervous of functional electrical stimulation (FES) in an animal model. Methods: Spinal effects of FES are examined system modulates the consequences of training MA Hook*,1 and JW Grau1 1 Department of Psychology, Texas A

  18. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE, VOL. 55, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 2008 501 Neutron Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the human body. NSECT uses a beam of fast neutrons that scatter inelastically from atomic nuclei in tissueIEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE, VOL. 55, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 2008 501 Neutron Stimulated Emission. Pedroni, and Carey E. Floyd, Jr. Abstract--Neutron stimulated emission computed tomography (NSECT

  19. THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 135, 184202 (2011) Can stimulated Raman pumping cause large population transfers in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 135, 184202 (2011) Can stimulated Raman pumping cause large 2011; published online 9 November 2011) When stimulated Raman pumping (SRP) is applied to a stream with the energy difference between the pump and Stokes laser pulses. Using the optical Bloch-Feynman equations, we

  20. Gas Explosion Characterization, Wave Propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    s & Dt^boooo^j Risø-R-525 Gas Explosion Characterization, Wave Propagation (Small-Scale Experiments EXPLOSION CHARACTERIZATION, WAVE PROPAGATION (Small-Scale Experiments) G.C. Larsen Abstract. A number characteristics 14 3.5. Characteristics of the primary pressure wave 21 3.6. Pressure propagation over a hard

  1. CHARACTERIZATION SUMMARY AUGUST 21, 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the Site in accordance with the approved Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP), the Characterization Survey Work Plan (CSWP), and using the guidance provided in Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation and to evaluate a variety of management options. The Site characterization methods included the following

  2. Characterization Well R-7 Geochemistry Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.Longmire; F.Goff

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides analytical results for four groundwater-sampling rounds conducted at characterization well R-7. The goal of the characterization efforts was to assess the hydrochemistry and to determine if contaminants from Technical Area (TA)-2 and TA-21 of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) are present in the regional aquifer in the vicinity of the well. Figure 1.0-1 shows the well's location in the narrow upper part of Los Alamos Canyon, between the inactive Omega West reactor and the mouth of DP Canyon. Well R-7 is in an excellent location to characterize the hydrology and groundwater chemistry in both perched groundwater and the regional aquifer near sites of known Laboratory effluent release, including radionuclides and inorganic chemicals (Stone et al. 2002, 72717). The Risk Reduction and Environmental Stewardship-Remediation (RRES-R) Program (formerly the Environmental Restoration [ER] Project) installed well R-7 as part of groundwater investigations to satisfy requirements of the ''Hydrogeologic Workplan'' (LANL 1998, 59599) and to support the Laboratory's ''Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan'' (LANL 1996, 70215). Well R-7 was designed primarily to provide geochemical or water quality and hydrogeologic data for the regional aquifer within the Puye Formation. This report also presents a geochemical evaluation of the analytical results for well R-7 and provides hydrogeochemical interpretations using analytical results for groundwater samples collected at the well. Discussion of other hydrogeochemical data collected within the east-central portion of the Laboratory, however, is deferred until they can be evaluated in the context of sitewide information collected from other RRES and Hydrogeologic Workplan characterization wells (R-8A, R-9, and R-9i). Once all deep groundwater investigations in the east-central portion of the Laboratory are completed, geochemical and hydrogeologic conceptual models for the Los Alamos Canyon watershed may be included in a groundwater risk analysis. These models will include an evaluation of potential contaminant transport pathways. Well R-7 was completed on March 9, 2001, with three screens (363.2 to 379.2 ft, 730.4 to 746.4 ft, and 895.5 to 937.4 ft). Screen No.2 was dry during characterization sampling. Four rounds of groundwater characterization samples, collected from a perched zone and the regional aquifer from depths of 378.0 ft (screen No.1) and 915.0 ft (screen No.3), were chemically characterized for radionuclides, metals and trace elements, major ions, high-explosive (HE) compounds, total organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, organic compounds, and stable isotopes (H, N, and O). Although well R-7 is primarily a characterization well, its design and construction also meet the requirements of a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)-compliant monitoring well as described in the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) document ''RCRA Groundwater Monitoring: Draft Technical Guidance,'' November 1992, EPA 530-R-93- 001. Incorporation of this well into a Laboratory-wide groundwater-monitoring program will be considered, and more specifically evaluated (e.g., sampling frequency, analytes, etc.), when the results of the well R-7 characterization activities are comprehensively evaluated in conjunction with other groundwater investigations in the ''Hydrogeologic Workplan'' (LANL 1998, 59599).

  3. Determining the neutrino mass hierarchy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parke, Stephen J.; /Fermilab

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this proceedings I review the physics that future experiments will use to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy.

  4. Realisation of four-wave mixing phase matching for frequency components at intracavity stimulated Raman scattering in a calcite crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smetanin, Sergei N; Fedin, Aleksandr V; Shurygin, Anton S

    2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The possibilities of implementing four-wave mixing (FWM) phase matching at stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in a birefringent SRS-active crystal placed in a cavity with highly reflecting mirrors have been theoretically and experimentally investigated. Phase-matching angles providing conditions for five types of phase matching are determined for a calcite crystal. These types are characterised by different combinations of polarisation directions for the interacting waves and ensure FWM generation of either an anti-Stokes wave or the second Stokes SRS component. In agreement with the calculation results, low-threshold generation of the second Stokes SRS component with a wavelength 0.602 {mu}m was observed at angles of incidence on a calcite crystal of 4.8 Degree-Sign and 18.2 Degree-Sign , under SRS pumping at a wavelength of 0.532 {mu}m. This generation is due to the FWM coupling of the first and second Stokes SRS components with the SRS-pump wave. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  5. The use of pre- and post-stimulation well test analysis in the evaluation of stimulation effectiveness in the Devonian Shales of the Appalachian Basin 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lancaster, David Earl

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas wells throughout the Appalachian Basin. The analysis of pre-stimulation well tests from four wells in Pike County, KY illustrates the practical difficulties in obtaining analyzable data from Devonian Shale wells. Fig. 1 shows the location... and requires that the flow periods prior to shut-in be even longer. The Martin 1 well located in Martin County, KY illustrates the problem of an insufficient flow period in a more typical Devonian Shale well test. The Martin 1 well was studied as part...

  6. The use of pre- and post-stimulation well test analysis in the evaluation of stimulation effectiveness in the Devonian Shales of the Appalachian Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lancaster, David Earl

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas wells throughout the Appalachian Basin. The analysis of pre-stimulation well tests from four wells in Pike County, KY illustrates the practical difficulties in obtaining analyzable data from Devonian Shale wells. Fig. 1 shows the location... and requires that the flow periods prior to shut-in be even longer. The Martin 1 well located in Martin County, KY illustrates the problem of an insufficient flow period in a more typical Devonian Shale well test. The Martin 1 well was studied as part...

  7. An improved viscosity equation to characterize shear-thinning fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, E.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved viscosity equation is proposed for shear-thinning polymer solutions, using a kinetic approach to model the rate of formation and loss of interactive bonding during shear flow. The bonds are caused by temporary polymer entanglements in polymer solutions, and by coordination bonding in metal ion cross-linked gels. The equation characterizes the viscosity of shear-thinning fluids over a wide range of shear rates, from the zero shear region through to infinite shear viscosity. The equation has been used to characterize fluid data from a wide range of fluids. Recent work indicates that a range of polymer solutions, polymer-based drilling fluids and frac-gels do not have a measurable yield stress, and that the equations which use extrapolated values of yield stress can be significantly in error. The new equation is compared with the Carreau and Cross equations, using the correlation procedure of Churchill and Usagi. It gives a significantly better fit to the data (by up to 50%) over a wide range of shear rates. The improved equation can be used for evaluating the fluid viscosity during the flow of polymeric fluids, in a range of oilfield applications including drilling, completion, stimulation and improved recovery (IOR) processes.

  8. Characterization of Glass-Like Fragments from the 3714 Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buck, Edgar C.

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes characterization of a sample obtained from the 3714 building in the 300 Area. Characterization of this unknown material was required for the demonolition activities in the 300 Area. The object of the study was to dertermine the nature of the material, composition, possible structure, evidence for hazards components. The green material is a sodium alumino-silicate glass. This conclusion is based on the composition provided by SEM-EDS, and the images that suggest a glass-like morphology. Further analysis with Ramin and/or infrared could be used to determine the presence of any organics.

  9. Experimental characterization of Gaussian quantum-communication channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di Guglielmo, James; Hage, Boris; Franzen, Alexander; Schnabel, Roman [Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover and Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik (Albert-Einstein-Institute), Callinstrasse 38, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Fiurasek, Jaromir [Department of Optics, Palacky University, 17 listopadu 50, 77200 Olomouc (Czech Republic)

    2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a full experimental characterization of continuous-variable quantum-communication channels established by shared entanglement together with local operations and classical communication. The resulting teleportation channel was fully characterized by measuring all elements of the covariance matrix of the shared two-mode squeezed Gaussian state. From the experimental data we determined the lower bound to the quantum channel capacity, the teleportation fidelity of coherent states, and the logarithmic negativity and purity of the shared state. Additionally, a positive secret key rate was obtained for two of the established channels.

  10. Fabrication and characterization of MCC (Materials Characterization Center) approved testing material: ATM-10 glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maupin, G.D.; Bowen, W.M.; Daniel, J.L.

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Materials Characterization Center ATM-10 glass represents a reference commercial high-level waste form similar to that which will be produced by the West Valley Nuclear Service Co. Inc., West Valley, New York. The target composition and acceptable range of composition were defined by the sponsor, West Valley Nuclear Service. The ATM-10 glass was produced in accordance with the Pacific Northwest Laboratory QA Manual for License-Related Programs, MCC technical procedures, and MCC QA Plan that were in effect during the course of the work. The method and procedure to be used in the fabrication and characterization of the ATM-10 glass were specified in two run plans for glass preparation and a characterization plan. All of the ATM-10 glass was produced in the form of bars 1.9 /times/ 1.9 /times/ 10 cm nominal size, and 93 g nominal mass. A total of 15 bars of ATM-10 glass weighing 1394 g was produced. The production bars were characterized to determine the mean composition, oxidation state, and microstructure of the ATM-10 product. Table A summarizes the characterization results. The ATM-10 glass meets all specifications. The elemental composition and oxidation state of the glass are within the specifications of the client. Visually, the ATM-10 glass bars appear uniformly glassy and generally without exterior features. Microscopic examination revealed low (less than 2 wt %) concentractions of 3-..mu..m iron-chrome (suspected spinel) crystals and /approximately/0.5-..mu..m ruthenium inclusions scattered randomly throughout the glassy matrix. Closed porosity, with pores ranging in diameter from 5 to 250 ..mu..m, was observed in all samples. 4 refs., 10 figs., 21 tabs.

  11. Analysis of stimulated Raman backscatter and stimulated Brillouin backscatter in experiments performed on SG-III prototype facility with a spectral analysis code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hao, Liang; Zhao, Yiqing; Hu, Xiaoyan; Zou, Shiyang [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Yang, Dong; Wang, Feng; Peng, Xiaoshi; Li, Zhichao; Li, Sanwei; Xu, Tao; Wei, Huiyue [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Liu, Zhanjun; Zheng, Chunyang, E-mail: zheng-chunyang@iapcm.ac.cn [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Key Laboratory of HEDP of the Ministry of Education, CAPT, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments about the observations of stimulated Raman backscatter (SRS) and stimulated Brillouin backscatter (SBS) in Hohlraum were performed on Shenguang-III (SG-III) prototype facility for the first time in 2011. In this paper, relevant experimental results are analyzed for the first time with a one-dimension spectral analysis code, which is developed to study the coexistent process of SRS and SBS in Hohlraum plasma condition. Spectral features of the backscattered light are discussed with different plasma parameters. In the case of empty Hohlraum experiments, simulation results indicate that SBS, which grows fast at the energy deposition region near the Hohlraum wall, is the dominant instability process. The time resolved spectra of SRS and SBS are numerically obtained, which agree with the experimental observations. For the gas-filled Hohlraum experiments, simulation results show that SBS grows fastest in Au plasma and amplifies convectively in C{sub 5}H{sub 12} gas, whereas SRS mainly grows in the high density region of the C{sub 5}H{sub 12} gas. Gain spectra and the spectra of backscattered light are simulated along the ray path, which clearly show the location where the intensity of scattered light with a certain wavelength increases. This work is helpful to comprehend the observed spectral features of SRS and SBS. The experiments and relevant analysis provide references for the ignition target design in future.

  12. Characterization of four CHO mutants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brancheau, Michael Raymond

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and CHO-T2S:24 to 2. 26'%%d per hour and inhibited rates of protein degradation in all four cell lines to 1. 54'%%d per hour. However, in CHO-T2S:24AB3, the positive pleiolypic activators only stimulated rates of protein synthesis to 1. 72'/. per hour... Doubling times of the four CHO cell lines. 15 Effect of cell density on rates of protein turnover. . . 17 Effect of cell density on rates of protein turnover in the four CHO cell lines. . 18 IV Effect of fetal bovine serum, insulin, and EGF on rates...

  13. Mechanical characterization of seismic base isolation elastomers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulak, R.F.; Hughes, T.H.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From the various devices proposed for seismic isolators, the laminated elastomer bearing is emerging as the preferred device for large buildings/structures, such as nuclear reactor plants. The laminated bearing is constructed from alternating thin layers of elastomer and metallic plates (shims). The elastomer is usually a carbon filled natural rubber that exhibits damping when subjected to shear. Recently, some blends of natural and synthetic rubbers have appeared. Before candidate elastomers can be used in seismic isolation bearings, their response to design-basis loads and beyond- design-basis loads must be determined. This entails the development of constitutive models and and then the determination of associated material parameters through specimen testing. This paper describes the methods used to obtain data for characterizing the mechanical response of elastomers used for seismic isolation. The data provides a data base for use in determining material parameters associated with nonlinear constitutive models. In addition, the paper presents a definition for a damping ratio that does not exhibit the usual reduction at higher strain cycles. 2 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Soil Characterization at the Linde FUSRAP Site and the Impact on Soil Volume Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyle, J.; Kenna, T.; Pilon, R.

    2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The former Linde site in Tonawanda, New York is currently undergoing active remediation of Manhattan Engineering District's radiological contamination. This remediation is authorized under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The focus of this paper will be to describe the impact of soil characterization efforts as they relate to soil volume estimates and project cost estimates. An additional objective is to stimulate discussion about other characterization and modeling technologies, and to provide a ''Lessons Learned'' scenario to assist in future volume estimating at other FUSRAP sites. Initial soil characterization efforts at the Linde FUSRAP site in areas known to be contaminated or suspected to be contaminated were presented in the Remedial Investigation Report for the Tonawanda Site, dated February 1993. Results of those initial characterization efforts were the basis for soil volume estimates that were used to estimate and negotiate the current remediation contract. During the course of remediation, previously unidentified areas of contamination were discovered, and additional characterization was initiated. Additional test pit and geoprobe samples were obtained at over 500 locations, bringing the total to over 800 sample locations at the 135-acre site. New data continues to be collected on a routine basis during ongoing remedial actions.

  15. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2Geological Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Several technological options have been proposed to stabilize atmospheric concentrations of CO{sub 2}. One proposed remedy is to separate and capture CO{sub 2} from fossil-fuel power plants and other stationary industrial sources and to inject the CO{sub 2} into deep subsurface formations for long-term storage and sequestration. Characterization of geologic formations for sequestration of large quantities of CO{sub 2} needs to be carefully considered to ensure that sites are suitable for long-term storage and that there will be no adverse impacts to human health or the environment. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage (Final Draft, October 2005) states that ''Site characterization, selection and performance prediction are crucial for successful geological storage. Before selecting a site, the geological setting must be characterized to determine if the overlying cap rock will provide an effective seal, if there is a sufficiently voluminous and permeable storage formation, and whether any abandoned or active wells will compromise the integrity of the seal. Moreover, the availability of good site characterization data is critical for the reliability of models''. This International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO{sub 2} Geological Storage (CO2SC) addresses the particular issue of site characterization and site selection related to the geologic storage of carbon dioxide. Presentations and discussions cover the various aspects associated with characterization and selection of potential CO{sub 2} storage sites, with emphasis on advances in process understanding, development of measurement methods, identification of key site features and parameters, site characterization strategies, and case studies.

  16. Expedited Site Characterization Geophysics: Geophysical Methods and Tools for Site Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, N.E.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Site Characterization Geophysics CONTENTS INTRODUCTIONSite Characterization Geophysics SELF-POTENTIAL Referencesand Environmental Geophysics, S. H. Ward, ed. (Soc. Expl.

  17. Drilling, completion, stimulation, and testing of Hardy HW[number sign]1 well, Putnam County, West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Locke, C.D.; Salamy, S.P.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the detailed field operations in drilling, logging, casing, completing, stimulating and testing the Hardy HW No. l well located in Union District, Putnam County, West Virginia. The project was designed and managed by BDM in cooperation with Cabot Oil and Gas Corporation. The well was spudded on November 29, 1989 and was completed at a total measured depth of 6406 feet on December 29, 1989. The well was drilled on an average azimuth of 335 degrees with a total horizontal displacement of 2618 feet. Approximately 1035 feet of the well had an inclination higher than 86 degrees, while 2212 feet of the well had an inclination greater than 62 degrees. The well was partitioned into five zones for stimulation purposes. Four zones were stimulated during three stimulation operations (Zones 3 and 4 were stimulated together). Zone 1 stimulation was a successful foam frac while the stimulations on Zones 2, 3-4 were Partially successful. Initial gas production rates were 4.5 times greater than the natural production rate. After 21 months, gas produced from the BDM/Cabot well has declined at a rate about one-half that of a conventional vertical well in the area. This horizontal well is projected to produce 475 million cubic feet of gas over a 30-year period.

  18. Drilling, completion, stimulation, and testing of Hardy HW{number_sign}1 well, Putnam County, West Virginia. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Locke, C.D.; Salamy, S.P.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the detailed field operations in drilling, logging, casing, completing, stimulating and testing the Hardy HW No. l well located in Union District, Putnam County, West Virginia. The project was designed and managed by BDM in cooperation with Cabot Oil and Gas Corporation. The well was spudded on November 29, 1989 and was completed at a total measured depth of 6406 feet on December 29, 1989. The well was drilled on an average azimuth of 335 degrees with a total horizontal displacement of 2618 feet. Approximately 1035 feet of the well had an inclination higher than 86 degrees, while 2212 feet of the well had an inclination greater than 62 degrees. The well was partitioned into five zones for stimulation purposes. Four zones were stimulated during three stimulation operations (Zones 3 and 4 were stimulated together). Zone 1 stimulation was a successful foam frac while the stimulations on Zones 2, 3-4 were Partially successful. Initial gas production rates were 4.5 times greater than the natural production rate. After 21 months, gas produced from the BDM/Cabot well has declined at a rate about one-half that of a conventional vertical well in the area. This horizontal well is projected to produce 475 million cubic feet of gas over a 30-year period.

  19. Y{sub 2}MoSe{sub 3}O{sub 12} and Y{sub 2}MoTe{sub 3}O{sub 12}: Solid-state synthesis, structure determination, and characterization of two new quaternary mixed metal oxides containing asymmetric coordination environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bang, Seong-eun; Pan, Zhi; Kim, Yeong Hun; Lee, Dong Woo; Ok, Kang Min, E-mail: kmok@cau.ac.kr

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two new quaternary yttrium molybdenum selenium/tellurium oxides, Y{sub 2}MoSe{sub 3}O{sub 12} and Y{sub 2}MoTe{sub 3}O{sub 12} have been prepared by standard solid-state reactions using Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MoO{sub 3}, and SeO{sub 2} (or TeO{sub 2}) as reagents. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction was used to determine the crystal structures of the reported materials. Although both of the materials contain second-order Jahn–Teller (SOJT) distortive cations and are stoichiometrically similar, they reveal different structural features: while Y{sub 2}MoSe{sub 3}O{sub 12} shows a three-dimensional framework consisting of YO{sub 8}, MoO{sub 6}, and SeO{sub 3} groups, Y{sub 2}MoTe{sub 3}O{sub 12} exhibits a layered structure composed of YO{sub 8}, MoO{sub 4}, TeO{sub 3}, and TeO{sub 4} polyhedra. With the Mo{sup 6+} cations in Y{sub 2}MoSe{sub 3}O{sub 12}, a C{sub 3}-type intraoctahedral distortion toward a face is observed, in which the direction of the out-of-center distortion for Mo{sup 6+} is away from the oxide ligand linked to a Se{sup 4+} cation. The Se{sup 4+} and Te{sup 4+} cations in both materials are in asymmetric coordination environment attributed to the lone pairs. Elemental analyses, infrared spectroscopy, thermal analyses, intraoctahedral distortions, and dipole moment calculations for the compounds are also presented. - Graphical abstract: Y{sub 2}MoSe{sub 3}O{sub 12} reveals a three-dimensional framework consisting of YO{sub 8}, MoO{sub 6}, and SeO{sub 3} polyhedra, whereas Y{sub 2}MoTe{sub 3}O{sub 12} exhibits a layered structure composed of YO{sub 8}, MoO{sub 4}, TeO{sub 3}, and TeO{sub 4} groups. - Highlights: • Two new selenite and tellurite (Y{sub 2}MoQ{sub 3}O{sub 12}; Q=Se and Te) are synthesized. • Y{sub 2}MoQ{sub 3}O{sub 12} contain second-order Jahn–Teller distortive cations in asymmetric environments. • The intra-octahedral distortion of the Mo{sup 6+} is influenced by the Se{sup 4+}.

  20. Characterizing properties of fractured porous media using x-ray computed tomography 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mudra, James

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was needed to determine the respective saturations. When three phases were present, a dual energy scan was needed to determine the three d i f f e r e n t saturations. Honarpour and Cromwell 2 1 characterized several r e s e r v o i r rock properties...

  1. Stimulated Raman Scattering and Nonlinear Focusing of High-Power Laser Beams Propagating in Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hafizi, B; Penano, J R; Gordon, D F; Jones, T G; Helle, M H; Kaganovich, D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The physical processes associated with propagation of a high-power (power > critical power for self-focusing) laser beam in water include nonlinear focusing, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), optical breakdown and plasma formation. The interplay between nonlinear focusing and SRS is analyzed for cases where a significant portion of the pump power is channeled into the Stokes wave. Propagation simulations and an analytical model demonstrate that the Stokes wave can re-focus the pump wave after the power in the latter falls below the critical power. It is shown that this novel focusing mechanism is distinct from cross-phase focusing. While discussed here in the context of propagation in water, the gain-focusing phenomenon is general to any medium supporting nonlinear focusing and stimulated forward Raman scattering.

  2. Enhanced stimulated emission in ZnO thin films using microdisk top-down structuring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nomenyo, K.; Kostcheev, S.; Lérondel, G. [Laboratoire de Nanotechnologie et d'Instrumentation Optique, Institut Charles Delaunay, CNRS UMR 6281, Université de Technologie de Troyes, 12 rue Marie Curie, CS 42060, 10004 Troyes Cedex (France); Gadallah, A.-S. [Laboratoire de Nanotechnologie et d'Instrumentation Optique, Institut Charles Delaunay, CNRS UMR 6281, Université de Technologie de Troyes, 12 rue Marie Curie, CS 42060, 10004 Troyes Cedex (France); Department of Laser Sciences and Interactions, National Institute of Laser Enhanced Sciences, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt); Rogers, D. J. [Nanovation, 8, route de Chevreuse, 78117 Châteaufort (France)

    2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Microdisks were fabricated in zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films using a top-down approach combining electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching. These microdisk structured thin films exhibit a stimulated surface emission between 3 and 7 times higher than that from a reference film depending on the excitation power density. Emission peak narrowing, reduction in lasing threshold and blue-shifting of the emission wavelength were observed along with enhancement in the emitted intensity. Results indicate that this enhancement is due to an increase in the internal quantum efficiency combined with an amplification of the stimulated emission. An analysis in terms of waveguiding is presented in order to explain these effects. These results demonstrate that very significant gains in emission can be obtained through conventional microstructuration without the need for more onerous top-down nanostructuration techniques.

  3. Eastern Gas Shales Program. Completion and stimulation of five New York State Energy Research and Development Authority Wells Allegany and Cattaraugus Counties, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rdissi, A.

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to evaluate the potential of the Devonian Shales as a source of natural gas, DOE/METC in Morgantown, West Virginia, has undertaken the Eastern Gas Shale Program (EGSP); not only to characterize and identify the resource, but also to enhance and improve the productivity of wells completed in the shale. One of the methods used to achieve improved productivity is hydraulic fracturing and, more specifically, foam fracturing. The efforts by DOE/METC included completion and stimulation of five New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) wells; located in western Allegany County and southwestern Cattaraugus County, New York. The five wells were drilled on high shcool and college properties during the months of June and July 1981. DOE/METC's contribution to the program funded the stimulation and completion of the wells. This work was done under the engineering and field supervision of Gruy Federal, Inc. as contractor to DOE. The completion work took place in the months of July and August 1981. This consisted of running a cement bond log in each well. All logs showed good bonding. This was followed by perforating the Marcellus Shale through the 4-1/2-inch casing. During the next phase, the formation was broken down with 1500 gallons of regular HF acid and, then, foam fractured using 50,000 gallons of foam consisting of water and nitrogen; the fractures were propped with 60,000 pounds of sand. After the cleanout operations, open flow potentials and rock pressures were measured in each well. None of the wells had a gas show before fracturing but, after fracturing, open flow ranged from a low of 19 Mcf/D to a high of 73 Mcf/D. 1 reference, 6 figures, 1 table.

  4. 324 Building Baseline Radiological Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.J. Reeder, J.C. Cooper

    2010-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the analysis of radiological data collected as part of the characterization study performed in 1998. The study was performed to create a baseline of the radiological conditions in the 324 Building.

  5. Cryogenic characterization of Josephson junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Keith Andrew

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cryogenic characterization is a crucial part of understanding the behavior of low-temperature quantum electronics. Reliable device testing provides the feedback to fabrication process development, facilitating the rapid ...

  6. NMR characterization of thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerald II, Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method, apparatus, and system for characterizing thin film materials. The method, apparatus, and system includes a container for receiving a starting material, applying a gravitational force, a magnetic force, and an electric force or combinations thereof to at least the starting material, forming a thin film material, sensing an NMR signal from the thin film material and analyzing the NMR signal to characterize the thin film of material.

  7. NMR characterization of thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerald, II, Rex E. (Brookfield, IL); Klingler, Robert J. (Glenview, IL); Rathke, Jerome W. (Homer Glen, IL); Diaz, Rocio (Chicago, IL); Vukovic, Lela (Westchester, IL)

    2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method, apparatus, and system for characterizing thin film materials. The method, apparatus, and system includes a container for receiving a starting material, applying a gravitational force, a magnetic force, and an electric force or combinations thereof to at least the starting material, forming a thin film material, sensing an NMR signal from the thin film material and analyzing the NMR signal to characterize the thin film of material.

  8. Effects of stimulation/completion practices on Eastern Devonian Shale well productivity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nearing, Timothy Ray

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the degree and density of natural fracturing in the shales . The counties and region designations are summarized in table 1. OH WV KY VA Figure 1 - Study Area of Devonian Gas Production. STATE TABLE 1 Description of Study Area COUNTY REGION...EFFECTS OF STIMULATION/COMPLETION PRACTICES ON EASTERN DEVONIAN SHALE WELL PRODUCTIVITY A Thesis by TIMOTHY RAY NEARING Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  9. Response of sire and family group to post-mortem electrical stimulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metteauer, Eric Allen

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ? standard erors for WBS shear4 by FAMILY*SIDE(SIRE) for half-blood carcases...................... 41 22 Least squares means ? standard erors for sire efects at 6 h temperature for half-blood carcases............................. 43 23 Least... influencing consumer aceptance for beef palatability (Savel et al., 1987, 1989; Smith et al., 1987), there lies a constant need to identify the efects of postmortem tenderization methods, such as electrical stimulation, and the efectivenes of this technology...

  10. Entangled valence electron-hole dynamics revealed by stimulated attosecond x-ray Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Healion, Daniel; Zhang, Yu; Biggs, Jason D.; Govind, Niranjan; Mukamel, Shaul

    2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that broadband x-ray pulses can create wavepackets of valence electrons and holes localized in the vicinity of a selected atom (nitrogen, oxygen or sulfur in cysteine) by resonant stimulated Raman scattering. The subsequent dynamics reveals highly correlated motions of entangled electrons and hole quasiparticles. This information goes beyond the time-dependent total charge density derived from x-ray diffraction.

  11. Data base for hydraulically stimulated gas wells producing from tight sands formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A data base was assembled in 1978 consisting of well records from more than 900 hydraulically fractured wells in the Piceance, Uinta, Washakie, Sand Wash, and Denver Basins. The purpose of the present study is to develop a western gas sand computerized data base for hydraulically stimulated gas wells by adapting and expanding the above-mentioned data file. This report describes the data file, tasks accomplished to date, and a sample well record. (DMC)

  12. Development of an Advanced Stimulation/Production Predictive Simulator for Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objective: to develop a 3-D numerical simulator to model the following aspects of stimulation and long-term operation: (1)perturbation of natural stress, pore pressure, and formation temperature distributions caused by cold water injection, (2) shear slippage and aperture increase along Ťfracture patches? and aperture change caused by changes in effective normal stress,(3) Ťfracture patch? linkup to form connected permeable volume and both reversible and irreversible permeability changes.

  13. CX-010689: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Generic CX Determination for Financial Assistance Awards CX(s) Applied: Unknown Date: 07/17/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Chicago Office

  14. CX-012200: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Determination of Excess Real Property CX(s) Applied: B1.36 Date: 05/01/2014 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Legacy Management

  15. DISSERTATION DEVICE CHARACTERIZATION OF CADMIUM TELLURIDE PHOTOVOLTAICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sites, James R.

    DISSERTATION DEVICE CHARACTERIZATION OF CADMIUM TELLURIDE PHOTOVOLTAICS Submitted by Russell M Reserved #12;ABSTRACT DEVICE CHARACTERIZATION OF CADMIUM TELLURIDE PHOTOVOLTAICS Thin-film photovoltaics

  16. Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Operations, EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF) Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations, EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 The documents...

  17. Materials Characterization Capabilities at the HTML: Surface...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    density analysis of forming samples using advanced characterization techniques Materials Characterization Capabilities at the HTML: SurfaceSub-surface dislocation density...

  18. Chemical Characterization of Crude Petroleum Using Nanospray...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    solvents that are rarely used for petroleum characterization. Citation: Eckert PA, PJ Roach, A Laskin, and J Laskin.2012."Chemical Characterization of Crude Petroleum Using...

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: Wave Energy Resource Characterization...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    eECEnergyComputational Modeling & SimulationWave Energy Resource Characterization at US Test Sites Wave Energy Resource Characterization at US Test Sites Sandia Report Presents...

  20. Synthesis, Characterization, and Catalytic Function of Novel...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Characterization, and Catalytic Function of Novel Highly Dispersed Tungsten Oxide Catalysts on Mesoporous Silica . Synthesis, Characterization, and Catalytic Function of Novel...

  1. Preparation, Characterization, and Catalytic Properties of Tungsten...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preparation, Characterization, and Catalytic Properties of Tungsten Trioxide Cyclic Trimers on FeO(111)Pt(111). Preparation, Characterization, and Catalytic Properties of Tungsten...

  2. Implantation, Activation, Characterization and Prevention/Mitigation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Activation, Characterization and PreventionMitigation of Internal Short Circuits in Lithium-Ion Cells Implantation, Activation, Characterization and PreventionMitigation of...

  3. Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen on BaOPt(111). Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen on BaOPt(111). Abstract: The formation...

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: characterizing Scaled Wind Farm...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    characterizing Scaled Wind Farm Technology facility inflow Characterizing Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility Inflow On April 1, 2014, in Energy, News, News & Events, Partnership,...

  5. Field Evidence for Co-Metabolism of Trichloroethene Stimulated by Addition of Electron Donor to Groundwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conrad, Mark E.; Brodie, Eoin L.; Radtke, Corey W.; Bill, Markus; Delwiche, Mark E.; Lee, M. Hope; Swift, Dana L.; Colwell, Frederick S.

    2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    For more than 10 years, electron donor has been injected into the Snake River aquifer beneath the Test Area North site of the Idaho National Laboratory for the purpose of stimulating microbial reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) in groundwater. This has resulted in significant TCE removal from the source area of the contaminant plume and elevated dissolved CH4 in the groundwater extending 250 m from the injection well. The delta13C of the CH4 increases from 56o/oo in the source area to -13 o/oo with distance from the injection well, whereas the delta13C of dissolved inorganic carbon decreases from 8 o/oo to -13 o/oo, indicating a shift from methanogenesis to methane oxidation. This change in microbial activity along the plume axis is confirmed by PhyloChip microarray analyses of 16S rRNA genes obtained from groundwater microbial communities, which indicate decreasing abundances of reductive dechlorinating microorganisms (e.g., Dehalococcoides ethenogenes) and increasing CH4-oxidizing microorganisms capable of aerobic co-metabolism of TCE (e.g., Methylosinus trichosporium). Incubation experiments with 13C-labeled TCE introduced into microcosms containing basalt and groundwater from the aquifer confirm that TCE co-metabolism is possible. The results of these studies indicate that electron donor amendment designed to stimulate reductive dechlorination of TCE may also stimulate co-metabolism of TCE.

  6. Geophysical Monitoring of Coupled Microbial and Geochemical Processes During Stimulated Subsurface Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Kenneth H.; Kemna, Andreas; Wilkins, Michael J.; Druhan, Jennifer L.; Arntzen, Evan V.; N'Guessan, A. Lucie; Long, Philip E.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2009-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding how microorganisms alter their physical and chemical environment during bioremediation is hindered by our inability to resolve subsurface microbial activity with high spatial resolution. Here we demonstrate the use of a minimally invasive geophysical technique to monitor stimulated microbial activity during acetate amendment in an aquifer near Rifle, Colorado. During electrical induced polarization (IP) measurements, spatiotemporal variations in the phase response between imposed electric current and the resultant electric field correlated with changes in groundwater geochemistry accompanying stimulated iron and sulfate reduction and sulfide mineral precipitation. The magnitude of the phase response varied with measurement frequency (0.125 and 1 Hz) andwasdependent upon the dominant metabolic process. The spectral effect was corroborated using a biostimulated column experiment containing Rifle sediments and groundwater. Fluids and sediments recovered from regions exhibiting an anomalous phase response were enriched in Fe(II), dissolved sulfide, and cell-associated FeS nanoparticles. The accumulation of mineral precipitates and electroactive ions altered the ability of pore fluids to conduct electrical charge, accounting for the anomalous IP response and revealing the usefulness of multifrequency IP measurements for monitoring mineralogical and geochemical changes accompanying stimulated subsurface bioremediation.

  7. Inositol lipid metabolism in vasopressin stimulated hepatocytes from rats infused with tumor necrosis factor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spitzer, J.A.; Rodriguez de Turco, E.B. (Louisiana State Univ. Medical Center, New Orleans (USA))

    1989-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We studied the effect of i.v. infusion of human recombinant tumor necrosis factor alpha (rHuTNF alpha, Cetus, 15 micrograms/100 g bw over 3 h) on vasopressin (VP)-stimulated {sup 32}P-inositol lipid turnover and the release of {sup 3}H-inositol phosphates in isolated rat hepatocytes. The early VP-induced decrease (within 30 s) in {sup 32}P-phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate and {sup 32}P-phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate labeling was significantly reduced (-40%) and at the same time the uptake of {sup 32}P into phosphatidic acid was 50% lower than in saline-infused (matched control) rats. Within 5 min of VP-stimulation, lower {sup 32}P phosphatidylinositol (-40%) and higher {sup 32}P-phosphatidic acid (+30%) labeling were observed in rHuTNF alpha-infused rats. Infusion of rHuTNF alpha also affected the VP-induced release of {sup 3}H-inositol phosphates. The accumulation of {sup 3}H-inositol-labeled water soluble products was decreased by 25% and 17% at 30 s and 10 min, respectively. These data show that rHuTNF alpha mimics early perturbations induced by Escherichia coli endotoxin infusion in VP-stimulated inositol lipid metabolism in rat hepatocytes.

  8. Uncertainty and sampling issues in tank characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liebetrau, A.M.; Pulsipher, B.A.; Kashporenko, D.M. [and others

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A defensible characterization strategy must recognize that uncertainties are inherent in any measurement or estimate of interest and must employ statistical methods for quantifying and managing those uncertainties. Estimates of risk and therefore key decisions must incorporate knowledge about uncertainty. This report focuses statistical methods that should be employed to ensure confident decision making and appropriate management of uncertainty. Sampling is a major source of uncertainty that deserves special consideration in the tank characterization strategy. The question of whether sampling will ever provide the reliable information needed to resolve safety issues is explored. The issue of sample representativeness must be resolved before sample information is reliable. Representativeness is a relative term but can be defined in terms of bias and precision. Currently, precision can be quantified and managed through an effective sampling and statistical analysis program. Quantifying bias is more difficult and is not being addressed under the current sampling strategies. Bias could be bounded by (1) employing new sampling methods that can obtain samples from other areas in the tanks, (2) putting in new risers on some worst case tanks and comparing the results from existing risers with new risers, or (3) sampling tanks through risers under which no disturbance or activity has previously occurred. With some bound on bias and estimates of precision, various sampling strategies could be determined and shown to be either cost-effective or infeasible.

  9. Beam Characterization at the Neutron Radiography Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarah Morgan; Jeffrey King

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The quality of a neutron imaging beam directly impacts the quality of radiographic images produced using that beam. Fully characterizing a neutron beam, including determination of the beam’s effective length-to-diameter ratio, neutron flux profile, energy spectrum, image quality, and beam divergence, is vital for producing quality radiographic images. This project characterized the east neutron imaging beamline at the Idaho National Laboratory Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD). The experiments which measured the beam’s effective length-to-diameter ratio and image quality are based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. An analysis of the image produced by a calibrated phantom measured the beam divergence. The energy spectrum measurements consist of a series of foil irradiations using a selection of activation foils, compared to the results produced by a Monte Carlo n-Particle (MCNP) model of the beamline. Improvement of the existing NRAD MCNP beamline model includes validation of the model’s energy spectrum and the development of enhanced image simulation methods. The image simulation methods predict the radiographic image of an object based on the foil reaction rate data obtained by placing a model of the object in front of the image plane in an MCNP beamline model.

  10. CX-001057: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterizing Fractures in Geyser's Geothermal Field by Micro-Seismic Data, Using Soft Computing, Fractals, and Shear Wave AnisotropyCX(s) Applied: A9Date: 03/10/2010Location(s): CaliforniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  11. CX-000515: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization of the Coal Pile Runoff Basin 788-3A, Ash Pile 788-A, Outfalls A-013 and A-024CX(s) Applied: B3.1Date: 08/18/2009Location(s): Aiken, South CarolinaOffice(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office

  12. CX-012267: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Integrated Characterization of Carbon Dioxide Storage Reservoirs on the Rock Springs Uplift Combining Geomechanical… CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6 Date: 06/26/2014 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  13. CX-009693: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CH2MHill Plateau Remediation Company - Site Characterization and Environmental Monitoring, December 2012 to December 2013 CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 12/14/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office

  14. CX-100003: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Surface and Subsurface Geodesy Combined with Active Borehole Experimentation for the Advanced Characterization of EGS Reservoirs Award Number: DE-EE0006761 CX(s) Applied: A9 Geothermal Technologies Date: 08/27/2014 Location(s): Pennsylvania Office(s): Golden Field Office

  15. CX-007112: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geologic Characterization of the South Georgia Rift Basin - 3-Dimension Seismic SurveyCX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.1Date: 10/05/2011Location(s): Colleton County, South CarolinaOffice(s): Fossil Energy

  16. CX-011807: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Analytical Methods for Air and Stray Gas Emissions and Produced Brine Characterization CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.1, B3.6 Date: 01/27/2014 Location(s): Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  17. CX-011796: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Analytical Methods for Air and Stray Gas Emissions and Produced Brine Characterization CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.1 Date: 02/03/2014 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  18. CX-011808: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Analytical Methods for Air and Stray Gas Emissions and Produced Brine Characterization CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 01/27/2014 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  19. CX-010629: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization of Sites for Near Miscible Carbon Dioxide Applications to Improve Oil Recovery in Arbuckle Reser CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.6 Date: 07/09/2013 Location(s): Kansas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  20. CX-010628: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization of Sites for Near Miscible Carbon Dioxide Applications to Improve Oil Recovery in Arbuckle... CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6, B4.4 Date: 07/09/2013 Location(s): Kansas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  1. CX-010780: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Analytical Methods for Air and Stray Gas Emissions and Produced Brine Characterization CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 08/21/2013 Location(s): Oklahoma Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  2. CX-004271: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Site Characterization for Carbon Dioxide Storage from Coal-Fired Power Facilities in the Black Warrior Basin of AlabamaCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.6Date: 10/20/2010Location(s): Walker County, AlabamaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  3. CX-000743: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Site Characterization for Carbon Dioxide Storage from Coal-fired Power Facilities in the Black Warrior Basin of AlabamaCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1Date: 01/22/2010Location(s): Tuscaloosa, AlabamaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  4. CX-000742: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Site Characterization for Carbon Dioxide Storage from Coal-fired Power Facilities in the Black Warrior Basin of AlabamaCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1Date: 01/22/2010Location(s): Walker County, AlabamaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  5. CX-000740: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Site Characterization for Carbon Dioxide Storage from Coal-fired Power Facilities in the Black Warrior Basin of AlabamaCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1Date: 01/22/2010Location(s): Houston, TexasOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  6. CX-000775: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Site Characterization for Carbon Dioxide Storage from Coal-fired Power Facilities in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama (Drill)CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.6Date: 02/10/2010Location(s): Walker County, AlabamaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  7. CX-000741: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Site Characterization for Carbon Dioxide Storage from Coal-fired Power Facilities in the Black Warrior Basin of AlabamaCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1Date: 01/22/2010Location(s): Tuscaloosa, AlabamaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  8. CX-010144: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Additional Characterization Sampling at the Coal Pile Ash Basin 788-3A and the Ash Pile 788-A CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 03/06/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  9. CX-005949: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization of Most Promising Sequestration Formations in the Rocky Mountain Region- TerraTekCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 06/04/2011Location(s): Salt Lake City, UtahOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  10. CX-011548: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lower Length Scale Characterization and Validation of Formation and Stability of Helium Bubbles in Nano-structured Ferritic Alloys under Irradiation CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/26/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  11. CX-011639: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Site Characterization, Monitoring, and General Research Activities for Pantex Plant for FY 2014 CX(s) Applied: B3.1, B3.3, B3.6, B3.8 Date: 09/26/2013 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Pantex Site Office

  12. CX-008301: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization of the Triassic Newark Basin of New York and New Jersey for Geologic Storage CX(s) Applied: B3.1, B3.7 Date: 04/25/2012 Location(s): New York Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  13. CX-002293: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization, Analysis and Simulation of Fine Coal Filtration Second Year of Two-Year ProjectCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 05/18/2010Location(s): Salt Lake City, UtahOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  14. CX-010922: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Borehole Tool for the Comprehensive Characterization of Hydrate-Bearing Sediments CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6, Other: Bench Scale Laboratory Research Date: 09/25/2013 Location(s): Georgia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  15. DETERMINATION OF STELLAR RADII FROM ASTEROSEISMIC DATA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, Sarbani [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Chaplin, William J.; Elsworth, Yvonne, E-mail: sarbani.basu@yale.ed, E-mail: w.j.chaplin@bham.ac.u, E-mail: y.p.elsworth@bham.ac.u [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The NASA Kepler mission is designed to find planets through transits. Accurate and precise radii of the detected planets depend on knowing the radius of the host star accurately, which is difficult unless the temperature and luminosity of the star are known precisely. Kepler, however, has an asteroseismology program that will provide seismic variables that can characterize stellar radii easily, accurately, and extremely precisely. In this paper, we describe the Yale-Birmingham (YB) method to determine stellar radii using a combination of seismic and conventional variables and analyze the effect of these variables on the result. We find that for main-sequence stars, a knowledge of the parallax is not important to get accurate radii using the YB method: we can get results to an accuracy and precision of better than a few percent if we know the effective temperature and the seismic parameters for these stars. Metallicity does not make much difference either. However, good estimates of the effective temperature and metallicity, along with those of the seismic parameters, are essential to determine radii of subgiants properly. On the other hand, for red giants we find that determining radii properly is not possible without a good estimate of the parallax. We find that the so-called 'surface term' in the seismic data has minimal effect on the inferred radii. Uncertainties in the convective mixing length can matter under some circumstances and can cause a systematic shift in the inferred radii. Blind tests with data simulated to match those expected from the asteroseismic survey phase of Kepler show that it will be possible to infer stellar radii successfully using our method.

  16. System and technique for ultrasonic characterization of settling suspensions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenwood, Margaret S. (Richland, WA); Panetta, Paul D. (Richland, WA); Bamberger, Judith A. (Richland, WA); Pappas, Richard A. (Richland, WA)

    2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for determining properties of settling suspensions includes a settling container, a mixer, and devices for ultrasonic interrogation transverse to the settling direction. A computer system controls operation of the mixer and the interrogation devices and records the response to the interrogating as a function of settling time, which is then used to determine suspension properties. Attenuation versus settling time for dilute suspensions, such as dilute wood pulp suspension, exhibits a peak at different settling times for suspensions having different properties, and the location of this peak is used as one mechanism for characterizing suspensions. Alternatively or in addition, a plurality of ultrasound receivers are arranged at different angles to a common transmitter to receive scattering responses at a variety of angles during particle settling. Angular differences in scattering as a function of settling time are also used to characterize the suspension.

  17. Bioforensics: Characterization of biological weapons agents by NanoSIMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, P K; Ghosal, S; Leighton, T J; Wheeler, K E; Hutcheon, I D

    2007-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The anthrax attacks of Fall 2001 highlight the need to develop forensic methods based on multiple identifiers to determine the origin of biological weapons agents. Genetic typing methods (i.e., DNA and RNA-based) provide one attribution technology, but genetic information alone is not usually sufficient to determine the provenance of the material. Non-genetic identifiers, including elemental and isotopic signatures, provide complementary information that can be used to identify the means, geographic location and date of production. Under LDRD funding, we have successfully developed the techniques necessary to perform bioforensic characterization with the NanoSIMS at the individual spore level. We have developed methods for elemental and isotopic characterization at the single spore scale. We have developed methods for analyzing spore sections to map elemental abundance within spores. We have developed rapid focused ion beam (FIB) sectioning techniques for spores to preserve elemental and structural integrity. And we have developed a high-resolution depth profiling method to characterize the elemental distribution in individual spores without sectioning. We used these newly developed methods to study the controls on elemental abundances in spores, characterize the elemental distribution of in spores, and to study elemental uptake by spores. Our work under this LDRD project attracted FBI and DHS funding for applied purposes.

  18. Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

    2002-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Technical Quarterly Report is for the reporting period March 31, 2002 to June 30, 2002. The report provides details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma''. The project is divided into nine separate tasks. Several of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, while other tasks are dependent on earlier tasks being completed. The vibration stimulation Well 111-W-27 is located in section 8 T26N R6E of the North Burbank Unit (NBU), Osage County Oklahoma. It was drilled to 3090-feet cored, logged, cased and cemented. The rig moved off August 6, 2001. Phillips Petroleum Co. has performed several core studies on the cores recovered from the test well. Standard porosity, permeability and saturation measurements have been conducted. In addition Phillips has prepared a Core Petrology Report, detailing the lithology, stratigraphy and sedimentology for Well 111-W27, NBU. Phillips has also conducted the sonic stimulation core tests, the final sonic stimulation report has not yet been released. Calumet Oil Company, the operator of the NBU, began collecting both production and injection wells information to establish a baseline for the project in the pilot field test area since May 2001. The original 7-inch Downhole Vibration Tool (DHVT) has been thoroughly tested and it has been concluded that it needs to be redesigned. An engineering firm from Fayetteville AR has been retained to assist in developing a new design for the DHVT. The project participants requested from the DOE, a no-cost extension for the project through December 31, 2002. The no-cost extension amendment to the contract was signed during this reporting period. A technical paper SPE 75254 ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation, Osage County, Oklahoma'' was presented at the 2002 SPE/DOE Thirteenth Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery, in Tulsa OK, April 17, 2002. A one-day short course was conducted at the SPE/DOE Thirteenth Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery in Tulsa, OK, April 13-14, 2002. Dan Maloney, Phillips and Bob Westermark, OGCI, Brett Davidson and Tim Spanos, Prism Production Technologies, were the instructors. The sixteen attendees also participated in the half-day field trip to the test facility near Tulsa.

  19. Apparatus and method for characterizing conductivity of materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doss, J.D.

    1988-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method for noncontact, radio-frequency shielding current characterization of materials. Self- or mutual inductance changes in one or more inductive elements, respectively, occur when materials capable of supporting shielding currents are placed in proximity thereto, or undergo change in resistivity while in place. Such changes can be observed by incorporating the inductor(s) in a resonant circuit and determining the frequency of oscillation or by measuring the voltage induced on a coupled inductive element. The present invention is useful for determining the critical temperature and superconducting transition width for superconducting samples. 8 figs.

  20. Basic characterization of highly enriched uranium by gamma spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cong Tam Nguyen; Jozsef Zsigrai

    2005-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-spectrometric methods suitable for the characterization of highly enriched uranium samples encountered in illicit trafficking of nuclear materials are presented. In particular, procedures for determining the 234U, 235U, 238U, 232U and 236U contents and the age of highly enriched uranium are described. Consequently, the total uranium content and isotopic composition can be calculated. For determining the 238U and 232U contents a low background chamber was used. In addition, age dating of uranium was also performed using low-background spectrometry.

  1. Basic characterization of highly enriched uranium by gamma spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, C T

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-spectrometric methods suitable for the characterization of highly enriched uranium samples encountered in illicit trafficking of nuclear materials are presented. In particular, procedures for determining the 234U, 235U, 238U, 232U and 236U contents and the age of highly enriched uranium are described. Consequently, the total uranium content and isotopic composition can be calculated. For determining the 238U and 232U contents a low background chamber was used. In addition, age dating of uranium was also performed using low-background spectrometry.

  2. Characterizing quantum dynamics with initial system-environment correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Ringbauer; Christopher J. Wood; Kavan Modi; Alexei Gilchrist; Andrew G. White; Alessandro Fedrizzi

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We fully characterize the reduced dynamics of an open quantum system initially correlated with its environment. Using a photonic qubit coupled to a simulated environment we tomographically reconstruct a superchannel---a generalised channel that treats preparation procedures as inputs---from measurement of the system alone, despite its coupling to the environment. We introduce novel quantitative measures for determining the strength of initial correlations, and to allow an experiment to be optimised in regards to its environment.

  3. REAL-TIME TRACER MONITORING OF RESERVOIR STIMULATION PROCEDURES VIA ELECTRONIC WIRELINE AND TELEMETRY DATA TRANSMISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George L. Scott III

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Finalized Phase 2-3 project work has field-proven two separate real-time reservoir processes that were co-developed via funding by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Both technologies are presently patented in the United States and select foreign markets; a downhole-commingled reservoir stimulation procedure and a real-time tracer-logged fracturing diagnostic system. Phase 2 and early Phase 3 project work included the research, development and well testing of a U.S. patented gamma tracer fracturing diagnostic system. This stimulation logging process was successfully field-demonstrated; real-time tracer measurement of fracture height while fracturing was accomplished and proven technically possible. However, after the initial well tests, there were several licensing issues that developed between service providers that restricted and minimized Realtimezone's (RTZ) ability to field-test the real-time gamma diagnostic system as was originally outlined for this project. Said restrictions were encountered after when one major provider agreed to license their gamma logging tools to another. Both of these companies previously promised contributory support toward Realtimezone's DE-FC26-99FT40129 project work, however, actual support was less than desired when newly-licensed wireline gamma logging tools from one company were converted by the other from electric wireline into slickline, batter-powered ''memory'' tools for post-stimulation logging purposes. Unfortunately, the converted post-fracture measurement memory tools have no applications in experimentally monitoring real-time movement of tracers in the reservoir concurrent with the fracturing treatment. RTZ subsequently worked with other tracer gamma-logging tool companies for basic gamma logging services, but with lessened results due to lack of multiple-isotope detection capability. In addition to real-time logging system development and well testing, final Phase 2 and Phase 3 project work included the development of a real-time reservoir stimulation procedure, which was successfully field-demonstrated and is presently patented in the U.S. and select foreign countries, including Venezuela, Brazil and Canada. Said patents are co-owned by RTZ and the National Energy Technology Lab (NETL). In 2002, Realtimezone and the NETL licensed said patents to Halliburton Energy Services (HES). Additional licensing agreements (LA) are anticipated with other service industry companies in 2005. Final Phase 3 work has led to commercial applications of the real-time reservoir stimulation procedure. Four successfully downhole-mixed well tests were conducted with commercially expected production results. The most recent, fourth field test was a downhole-mixed stimulated well completed in June, 2004, which currently produces 11 BOPD with 90 barrels of water per day. Conducted Phase 2 and Phase 3 field-test work to date has resulted in the fine-tuning of a real-time enhanced stimulation system that will significantly increase future petroleum well recoveries in the United States and foreign petroleum fields, both onshore and offshore, and in vertical and horizontal wells.

  4. Seismic imaging of hydraullically-stimulated fractures: A numerical study of the effect of the source mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shabelansky, Andrey Hanan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a numerical study of seismic imaging of hydraulically stimulated fractures using a single source from an adjacent fracturing-process. The source is either a point force generated from the perforation of the ...

  5. Response comparison of an optically stimulated luminescent dosimeter, a direct-ion storage dosimeter, and a thermoluminescence dosimeter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernandez, Pete Jevon

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Light optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter (OSL) are the two candidates for replacement of the Panasonic UD-802 thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD). The dosimeters were compared in five categories: dose linearity, dose-rate linearity, fade response, humidity...

  6. Characterization of the surface properties of Illinois Basin Coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demir, I.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this research project is to provide fundamental data on the physical and chemical surface properties of Illinois coals, specifically those of the Illinois Basin Coal Sample Program (IBCSP). This will help coal researchers achieve an optimal match between Illinois Basin coals and potential coal cleaning and conversion processes (or at least reduce the number of coals suitable for a particular process) and may lead to improved desulfurization and increased utilization of Illinois Basin coals. The specific tasks scheduled to meet our objective are: (1) Physical Characterization: Determine total surface area, porosity, pore size and volume distributions of IBCSP coals crushed to two particle sizes, {minus}100 and {minus}400 mesh (exclusive of IBC-108 which is available only in {minus}400 mesh form), in both an unoxidized and oxidized state. (2) Chemical Characterization: Determine the surface charge (electrokinetic mobility) as a function of pH by electrophoresis and analyze the surface chemical structure of the above samples using Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Spectroscopy (DRIS). (3) Multivariate Statistical Analyses: Explore possible relationships among the newly determined surface properties and other available characterization data, including chemical and petrographic compositions, vitrinite reflectance, free swelling index, ash yield, sulfur forms, and other relevant properties.

  7. Determination

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    consisting of AZ road dust and soot in acetonitrile carrier solvent was sprayed onto glass coupons at very brief intervals with a high volume, low pressure pneumatic sprayer....

  8. Effects of Xylitol and Stimulated Salivary Flow on Calculus Accumulation in Gastrostomy Tube-Fed Patients: A Pilot Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCoy, Kevin Gerald

    2014-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECTS OF XYLITOL AND STIMULATED SALIVARY FLOW ON CALCULUS ACCUMULATION IN GASTROSTOMY TUBE-FED PATIENTS: A PILOT STUDY A Thesis by KEVIN GERALD MCCOY Submitted to The Office of Graduate and Professional Studies of The Texas A... Major Subject: Oral Biology Copyright 2014 Kevin Gerald McCoy   ii   ABSTRACT This pilot study was initiated to investigate whether xylitol and/or stimulated salivary flow would have an effect on the accumulation of calculus...

  9. Stimulated Raman scattering of laser in a plasma in the presence of a co-propagating electron beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parashar, J. [Department of Physics, Samrat Ashok Technological Institute, Vidisha, Madhya Pradesh 464001 (India)] [Department of Physics, Samrat Ashok Technological Institute, Vidisha, Madhya Pradesh 464001 (India)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A relativistic electron beam co-propagating with a high power laser in plasma is shown to add to the growth of the stimulated Raman back scattering of the laser. The growth rate is sensitive to phase matching of electron beam with the plasma wave. In the case of phase mismatch, the growth rate drops by an order. The energy spread of the electron beam significantly reduces the effectiveness of the beam on the stimulated Raman process.

  10. Lactate dehydrogenase activity in bovine and porcine muscle as influenced by electrical stimulation, aging, freezing, thawing and heating 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Sharen Sue

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LACTATE DEHYDROGENASE ACTIVITY IN BOVINF. AND PORCINE MUSCLE AS INFLUENCED BY ELECTRICAL STIMULATION, AGING, FREEZING, THA&v'ING AiVD HEATING A Thesis by SHAREN SUE COLLINS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1987 Major Subject: Animal Science LACTATE DEHYDROGENASE ACTIVITY IN BOVINE AND PORCINE MUSCLE AS INFLUENCED BY ELECTRICAL STIMULATION, AGING, FREEZING, THAWING AND HEATING A Thesis...

  11. Method of determining glass durability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B.; Brown, K.G.; Edwards, T.B.

    1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, {Delta}G{sub p}, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, {Delta}G{sub a}, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup WA}, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup SB} associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, {Delta}G{sub f}. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log{sub 10}(N C{sub i}(g/L))=a{sub i} + b{sub i}{Delta}G{sub f}. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained. 4 figs.

  12. Method of determining glass durability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jantzen, Carol Maryanne (Aiken, SC); Pickett, John Butler (Aiken, SC); Brown, Kevin George (Augusta, GA); Edwards, Thomas Barry (Aiken, SC)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, .DELTA.G.sub.p, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, .DELTA.G.sub.a, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.WA, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.SB associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, .DELTA.G.sub.f. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log.sub.10 (N C.sub.i (g/L))=a.sub.i +b.sub.i .DELTA.G.sub.f. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained.

  13. Biomass Surface Characterization Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet provides information about Biomass Surface Characterization Laboratory capabilities and applications at NREL.

  14. Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    (CX) Determinations By Date Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date August 25, 2015 CX-012469: Categorical Exclusion Determination Gas Analysis Services CX(s) Applied:...

  15. Determining Cropland Share Rental Arrangements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhuyvetter, Kevin C.; Kastens, Terry L.; Outlaw, Joe

    1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Determining Cropland Share Rental Arrangements Kevin C. Dhuyvetter, Terry L. Kastens and Joe L. Outlaw * Many crop producers rely heavily on rented land in their farming operations. The rental arrangements between landowners and producers can...

  16. CX-010776: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Primary Coolant Leak Rate Determination System Equipment Replacement CX(s) Applied: B2.2 Date: 07/24/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Nuclear Energy

  17. CX-008905: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Optimizing Accuracy of Determinations of Carbon Dioxide Storage Capacity and Permanence CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B3.6 Date: 08/29/2012 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  18. Cotton Gin Dust Explosibility Determinations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanderlick, Francis Jerome

    2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    COTTON GIN DUST EXPLOSIBILITY DETERMINATIONS A Thesis by FRANCIS JEROME VANDERLICK Submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... Francis Jerome Vanderlick ii ABSTRACT Following the recent Imperial sugar dust explosion in 2008, a comprehensive survey of past dust explosions was conducted by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to determine potential...

  19. Gender determination of avian embryo

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daum, Keith A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Atkinson, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a method for gender determination of avian embryos. During the embryo incubation process, the outer hard shells of eggs are drilled and samples of allantoic fluid are removed. The allantoic fluids are directly introduced into an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) for analysis. The resulting spectra contain the relevant marker peaks in the positive or negative mode which correlate with unique mobilities which are sex-specific. This way, the gender of the embryo can be determined.

  20. ROCK MASS CHARACTERIZATION FOR STORAGE OF NUCLEAR WASTE IN GRANITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witherspoon, P.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    m in diameter. 2) geological characterization - includingBasic Objectives Geological characterization Is the process

  1. Electrodic voltages accompanying stimulated bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, K.H.; N'Guessan, A.L.; Druhan, J.; Long, P.E.; Hubbard, S.S.; Lovley, D.R.; Banfield, J.F.

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The inability to track the products of subsurface microbial activity during stimulated bioremediation has limited its implementation. We used spatiotemporal changes in electrodic potentials (EP) to track the onset and persistence of stimulated sulfate-reducing bacteria in a uranium-contaminated aquifer undergoing acetate amendment. Following acetate injection, anomalous voltages approaching -900 mV were measured between copper electrodes within the aquifer sediments and a single reference electrode at the ground surface. Onset of EP anomalies correlated in time with both the accumulation of dissolved sulfide and the removal of uranium from groundwater. The anomalies persisted for 45 days after halting acetate injection. Current-voltage and current-power relationships between measurement and reference electrodes exhibited a galvanic response, with a maximum power density of 10 mW/m{sup 2} during sulfate reduction. We infer that the EP anomalies resulted from electrochemical differences between geochemically reduced regions and areas having higher oxidation potential. Following the period of sulfate reduction, EP values ranged from -500 to -600 mV and were associated with elevated concentrations of ferrous iron. Within 10 days of the voltage decrease, uranium concentrations rebounded from 0.2 to 0.8 {mu}M, a level still below the background value of 1.5 {mu}M. These findings demonstrate that EP measurements provide an inexpensive and minimally invasive means for monitoring the products of stimulated microbial activity within aquifer sediments and are capable of verifying maintenance of redox conditions favorable for the stability of bioreduced contaminants, such as uranium.

  2. Stimulation of dopamine synthesis and activation of tyrosine hydroxylase by phorbol diesters in rat striatum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onali, P.; Olianas, M.C.

    1987-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In rat striatal synaptosomes, 4..beta..-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and 4 ..beta..-phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu), two activators of Ca/sup 2 +/-phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase C) increased dopamine (DA) synthesis measured by following the release of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from L-(1-/sup 14/C) tyrosine. Maximal stimulation (21-28% increase of basal rate) was produced by 0.5 ..mu..M PMA and 1 ..mu..M PDBu. 4 ..beta..-Phorbol and 4 ..beta..-phorbol 13-acetate, which are not activators of protein kinase C, were ineffective at 1 ..mu..M. PMA did not change the release of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from L-(1-/sup 14/C)DOPA. Addition of 1 mM EGTA to a Ca/sup 2 +/-free incubation medium failed to affect PMA stimulation. KCl (60 mM) enhanced DA synthesis by 25%. Exposure of synaptosomes to either PMA or PDBu prior to KCl addition resulted in a more than additive increase (80-100%) of DA synthesis. A similar synergistic effect was observed when the phorbol diesters were combined with either veratridine or d-amphetamine but not with forskolin and dibutyryl cyclic AMP. Pretreatment of striatal synaptosomes with phorbol diesters produced an activation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) associated with a 60% increase of the Vmax and a decrease of the Km for the pterine cofactor 6-methyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydropterin. These results indicate that protein kinase C participates in the regulation of striatal TH in situ and that its activation may act synergistically with DA releasing agents in stimulating DA synthesis. 37 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  3. Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibrations Stimulation in Osage County, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

    2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Technical Quarterly Report is for the reporting period July 1, 2001 to September 30, 2001. The report provides details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma''. The project is divided into nine separate tasks. Several of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, while other tasks are dependent on earlier tasks being completed. The vibration stimulation well is permitted as Well 111-W-27, section 8 T26N R6E Osage County Oklahoma. It was spud July 28, 2001 with Goober Drilling Rig No. 3. The well was drilled to 3090-feet cored, logged, cased and cemented. The Rig No.3 moved off August 6, 2001. Phillips Petroleum Co. has begun analyzing the cores recovered from the test well. Standard porosity, permeability and saturation measurements will be conducted. They will then begin the sonic stimulation core tests Calumet Oil Company, the operator of the NBU, has begun to collect both production and injection wells information to establish a baseline for the project in the pilot field test area. Green Country Submersible Pump Company, a subsidiary of Calumet Oil Company, will provide both the surface equipment and downhole tools to allow the Downhole Vibration Tool to be operated by a surface rod rotating system. The 7-inch Downhole Vibration Tool (DHVT) has been built and is ready for initial shallow testing. The shallow testing will be done in a temporarily abandoned well operated by Calumet Oil Co. in the Wynona waterflood unit. The data acquisition doghouse and rod rotating equipment have been placed on location in anticipation of the shallow test in Well No.20-12 Wynona Waterflood Unit. A notice of invention disclosure was submitted to the DOE Chicago Operations Office. DOE Case No.S-98,124 has been assigned to follow the documentation following the invention disclosure. A paper covering the material presented to the Oklahoma Geologic Survey (OGS)/DOE Annual Workshop in Oklahoma City May 8,9 2001 has been submitted for publication to the OGS. A technical paper draft has been submitted for the ASME/ETCE conference (Feb 2002) Production Technology Symposium. A one-day SPE sponsored short course which is planned to cover seismic stimulation efforts around the world, will be offered at the SPE/DOE Thirteenth Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery in Tulsa, OK, April 13-17, 2002. Dan Maloney, Phillips and Bob Westermark, OGCI will be the instructors. In addition, a proposed technical paper has been submitted for this meeting.

  4. Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

    2001-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Technical Quarterly Report is for the reporting period September 30, 2001 to December 31, 2001. The report provides details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma''. The project is divided into nine separate tasks. Several of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, while other tasks are dependent on earlier tasks being completed. The vibration stimulation well was permitted as Well 111-W-27, section 8 T26N R6E Osage County Oklahoma. It was spud July 28, 2001 with Goober Drilling Rig No. 3. The well was drilled to 3090-feet cored, logged, cased and cemented. The Rig No.3 moved off August 6, 2001. Phillips Petroleum Co. has performed standard core analysis on the cores recovered from the test well. Standard porosity, permeability and saturation measurements have been conducted. Phillips has begun the sonic stimulation core tests. Calumet Oil Company, the operator of the NBU, has been to collecting both production and injection wells information to establish a baseline for the project in the pilot field test area since May 2001. The 7-inch Downhole Vibration Tool (DHVT) has been built and has been run in a shallow well for initial power source testing. This testing was done in a temporarily abandoned well, Wynona Waterflood Unit, Well No.20-12 operated by Calumet Oil Co both in October and December 2001. The data acquisition system, and rod rotating equipment performed as designed. However, the DHVT experienced two internal failures during vibration operations. The DHVT has been repaired with modifications to improve its functionality. A proposed technical paper abstract has been accepted by the SPE to be presented at the 2002 SPE/DOE Thirteenth Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery, in Tulsa OK, 13-17 April 2002. A one-day SPE sponsored short course which is planned to cover seismic stimulation efforts around the world, will be offered at the SPE/DOE Thirteenth Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery in Tulsa, OK, April 13-17, 2002. Dan Maloney, Phillips and Bob Westermark, OGCI will be the instructors.

  5. Osteogenic effect of optimized muscle stimulation exercise as a countermeasure during hindlimb unloading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sumner, Lindsay Rebecca

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    stimulation protocol by optimizing parameters to benefit bone and muscle. Forty-six 5.5-month-old male rats were divided into 4 groups: baseline control (BC), cage control (CC), hindlimb unloaded no exercise (HU), and hindlimb unloaded with exercise (HU+Ex...). Hindlimb unloading was achieved by tail suspension. The left leg of the HU+Ex group was exercised every other day for 28 days. The right leg of the HU+Ex group and the HU group served as disuse controls. The previous protocol consisted of 4 sets of 10...

  6. Shapiro steps and stimulated radiation of electromagnetic waves due to Josephson oscillations in layered superconductors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bulaevskii, L. N.; Kosehlev, A. E.; Tachiki, M.; Materials Science Division; LANL; Univ. of Tokyo

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Single crystals of layered high-temperature superconductors intrinsically behave as stacks of Josephson junctions. We analyze response of current-biased stack of intrinsic junctions to irradiation by the external electromagnetic (em) wave. In addition to well-known Shapiro steps in the current-voltage characteristics, irradiation promotes stimulated radiation which adds with spontaneous Josephson radiation from the crystal. Such enhancement of radiation from current-biased crystal may be used for amplification of em waves. Irradiation also facilitates synchronization of Josephson oscillations in all intrinsic Josephson junctions of a single crystal as well as oscillations in intrinsic junctions of different crystals.

  7. Microwave-stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in a Bose-Einstein condensate on an atom chip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dupont-Nivet, Matthieu; Laudat, Théo; Westbrook, Christoph I; Schwartz, Sylvain

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the achievement of stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) in the microwave frequency range between internal states of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) magnetically trapped in the vicinity of an atom chip. The STIRAP protocol used in this experiment is robust to external perturbations as it is an adiabatic transfer, and power-efficient as it involves only resonant (or quasi-resonant) processes. Taking into account the effect of losses and collisions in a non-linear Bloch equations model, we show that the maximum transfer efficiency is obtained for non-zero values of the one- and two-photon detunings, which is confirmed quantitatively by our experimental measurements.

  8. Stress- and Chemistry-Mediated Permeability Enhancement/Degradation in Stimulated Critically-Stressed Fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derek Elsworth; Abraham S. Grader; Chris Marone; Phillip Halleck; Peter Rose; Igor Faoro; Joshua Taron; André Niemeijer; Hideaki Yasuhara

    2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This work has investigated the interactions between stress and chemistry in controlling the evolution of permeability in stimulated fractured reservoirs through an integrated program of experimentation and modeling. Flow-through experiments on natural and artificial fractures in Coso diorite have examined the evolution of permeability under paths of mean and deviatoric stresses, including the role of dissolution and precipitation. Models accommodating these behaviors have examined the importance of incorporating the complex couplings between stress and chemistry in examining the evolution of permeability in EGS reservoirs. This document reports the findings of experiment [1,2] and analysis [3,4], in four sequential chapters.

  9. NEW AND NOVEL FRACTURE STIMULATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE REVITALIZATION OF EXISTING GAS STORAGE WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage wells are prone to continued deliverability loss at a reported average rate of 5% per annum (in the U.S.). This is a result of formation damage due to the introduction of foreign materials during gas injection, scale deposition and/or fines mobilization during gas withdrawal, and even the formation and growth of bacteria. As a means to bypass this damage and sustain/enhance well deliverability, several new and novel fracture stimulation technologies were tested in gas storage fields across the U.S. as part of a joint U.S. Department of Energy and Gas Research Institute R&D program. These new technologies include tip-screenout fracturing, hydraulic fracturing with liquid CO{sub 2} and proppant, extreme overbalance fracturing, and high-energy gas fracturing. Each of these technologies in some way address concerns with fracturing on the part of gas storage operators, such as fracture height growth, high permeability formations, and fluid sensitivity. Given the historical operator concerns over hydraulic fracturing in gas storage wells, plus the many other unique characteristics and resulting stimulation requirements of gas storage reservoirs (which are described later), the specific objective of this project was to identify new and novel fracture stimulation technologies that directly address these concerns and requirements, and to demonstrate/test their potential application in gas storage wells in various reservoir settings across the country. To compare these new methods to current industry deliverability enhancement norms in a consistent manner, their application was evaluated on a cost per unit of added deliverability basis, using typical non-fracturing well remediation methods as the benchmark and considering both short-term and long-term deliverability enhancement results. Based on the success (or lack thereof) of the various fracture stimulation technologies investigated, guidelines for their application, design and implementation have been developed. A final research objective was to effectively deploy the knowledge and experience gained from the project to the gas storage industry at-large.

  10. Two-dimensional stimulated resonance Raman spectroscopy of molecules with broadband x-ray pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biggs, Jason D.; Zhang Yu; Healion, Daniel; Mukamel, Shaul [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, California 92697-2025 (United States)

    2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Expressions for the two-dimensional stimulated x-ray Raman spectroscopy (2D-SXRS) signal obtained using attosecond x-ray pulses are derived. The 1D- and 2D-SXRS signals are calculated for trans-N-methyl acetamide (NMA) with broad bandwidth (181 as, 14.2 eV FWHM) pulses tuned to the oxygen and nitrogen K-edges. Crosspeaks in 2D signals reveal electronic Franck-Condon overlaps between valence orbitals and relaxed orbitals in the presence of the core-hole.

  11. Biochemical Characterization and Structure Determination of a Prolyl 4-Hydroxylase-like Protein from Bacillus anthracis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Culpepper, Megen

    2009-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    provides insight into the dimeric structure of the alpha-subunits of human-P4H-1, as well as to help understand the mode of substrate recognition that may aide in the development of selective inhibitors....

  12. Abstract--Meteorological time series are characterized by important spatial and temporal variation. Model determination and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    of the meteorological time series used, which includes the use of statistical techniques to detect whether there exist for the time series using an evolutionary algorithm that adaptively adjusts some of its parameters during its and temperatures collected in a region of Romania. The results are promising for the analysis of such time series

  13. The determination of glucose in sonophoretically extracted interstitial fluid and the characterization of ultrasound parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantrell, Jeffrey Travis

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    chamber and used to correlate ultrasound spectral properties to the amount of fluid extracted. Results indicate that the highest amount of water extracted occurs when the acoustic coupling media on the surface of the skin is cavitating, resulting in mild...

  14. Characterization of 3D Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Characterization of 3D Photovoltaics SEMICONDUCTORS Our goal is to provide industry with test structures and models of next-generation photovoltaics, with an initial focus on cadmium telluride (Cd (nanostructured) photovoltaic devices. Objective Impact and Customers · The U.S. Photovoltaic Industry Roadmap

  15. Characterizing Commercial Sites Selected for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    such as solar thermal absorption chillers, building energy management systems, and advanced lighting. The twoCharacterizing Commercial Sites Selected for Energy Efficiency Monitoring This report presents data of Commercial Sites Selected for Energy Efficiency Monitoring Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office

  16. FCLib: The Feature Characterization Library.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gentile, Ann C.; Doyle, Wendy S. K.; Kegelmeyer, W. Philip [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA; Ulmer, Craig D. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Feature Characterization Library (FCLib) is a software library that simplifies the process of interrogating, analyzing, and understanding complex data sets generated by finite element applications. This document provides an overview of the library, a description of both the design philosophy and implementation of the library, and examples of how the library can be utilized to extract understanding from raw datasets.

  17. Dissertation Imaging as Characterization Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sites, James R.

    Telluride Photovoltaics The goal of increasing the efficiency of solar cell devices is a universal oneDissertation Imaging as Characterization Techniques for Thin-Film Cadmium Telluride Photovoltaics. Increased photovoltaic (PV) performance means an increase in competition with other energy tech- nologies

  18. Electrical Characterization Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Electrical Characterization Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. Electrical Characterization Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) focuses on the detailed electrical characterization of components and systems. This laboratory allows researchers to test the ability of equipment to withstand high voltage surges and high current faults, including equipment using standard and advanced fuels such as hydrogen. Equipment that interconnected to the electric power grid is required to meet specific surge withstand capabilities. This type of application tests the ability of electrical equipment to survive a lightning strike on the main grid. These are often specified in IEEE standards such as IEEE Std. 1547. In addition, this lab provides a space for testing new, unproven, or potentially hazardous equipment for robust safety assessment prior to use in other labs at ESIF. The Electric Characterization Laboratory is in a location where new, possibly sensitive or secret equipment can be evaluated behind closed doors.

  19. Material stabilization characterization management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GIBSON, M.W.

    1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents overall direction for characterization needs during stabilization of SNM at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). Technical issues for needed data and equipment are identified. Information on material categories and links to vulnerabilities are given. Comparison data on the material categories is discussed to assist in assessing the relative risks and desired processing priority.

  20. NANOSCALE STRUCTURALAND MAGNETIC CHARACTERIZATION USING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    of novel nanoscale storage devices and sensors. However, for successful utilization, it is essential]. Such unique properties of magnetic thin films and nanostructures hold great promise for the development to the characterization of nanostructured magnetic materials. 2. ELECTRON MICROSCOPY METHODS In the transmission electron