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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination baseload nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

SunShot Initiative: Baseload Concentrating Solar Power Generation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Concentrating Solar Power Generation Concentrating Solar Power Generation In 2010, DOE issued the Baseload Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Generation funding opportunity announcement (FOA). The following projects were selected under this competitive solicitation: Abengoa: Advanced Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant eSolar: Modular and Scalable Baseload Molten Salt Plant Conceptual Design and Feasibility General Atomics: Baseload CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Heat Storage HiTek: Low-Cost Heliostat Development Infinia: Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload Power PPG: Next-Generation Low-Cost Reflector Rocketdyne: Solar Power Tower Improvements with the Potential to Reduce Costs SENER: High-Efficiency Thermal Storage System for Solar Plants

2

Project Profile: Brayton Cycle Baseload Power Tower  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Wilson Solarpower, under the Baseload CSP FOA, is validating a proposed utility-scale, Brayton cycle baseload power tower system with a capacity factor of at least 75% and LCOE of $0.09/kWh.

3

Project Profile: Innovative Thermal Energy Storage for Baseload...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Thermal Energy Storage for Baseload Solar Power Generation Project Profile: Innovative Thermal Energy Storage for Baseload Solar Power Generation University of South Florida logo...

4

SunShot Initiative: Brayton Cycle Baseload Power Tower  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Brayton Cycle Baseload Power Brayton Cycle Baseload Power Tower to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Brayton Cycle Baseload Power Tower on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Brayton Cycle Baseload Power Tower on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Brayton Cycle Baseload Power Tower on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Brayton Cycle Baseload Power Tower on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Brayton Cycle Baseload Power Tower on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Brayton Cycle Baseload Power Tower on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Systems Components Competitive Awards CSP Research & Development Thermal Storage CSP Recovery Act Baseload CSP SunShot Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative CSP Heat Integration for Baseload Renewable Energy Deployment

5

SunShot Initiative: Baseload Concentrating Solar Power Generation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Concentrating Solar Concentrating Solar Power Generation to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Baseload Concentrating Solar Power Generation on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Baseload Concentrating Solar Power Generation on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Baseload Concentrating Solar Power Generation on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Baseload Concentrating Solar Power Generation on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Baseload Concentrating Solar Power Generation on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Baseload Concentrating Solar Power Generation on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Systems Components Competitive Awards CSP Research & Development Thermal Storage CSP Recovery Act Baseload CSP SunShot Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative

6

Project Profile: Baseload CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Related Links FAQs Contact Us Offices You are here Home Concentrating Solar Power Project Profile: Baseload CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based...

7

Project Profile: Advanced Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Abengoa, under the Baseload CSP FOA, will demonstrate a 100-megawatt electrical (MWe) central receiver plant using nitrate salt as the receiver coolant, thermal storage medium, and heat transport fluid in the steam generator.

8

Investment Decisions for Baseload Power Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Investment Decisions for Investment Decisions for Baseload Power Plants January 29, 2010 402/012910 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United

9

Project Profile: Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Storage for Baseload CSP Plants  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Terrafore, under the Baseload CSP FOA, is developing novel encapsulated phase change materials (PCM) for use in thermal storage applications to significantly reduce the LCOE for baseload CSP plants.

10

Project Profile: Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload Power  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Infinia, under the Baseload CSP FOA, is developing and demonstrating a subscale system for baseload CSP power generation using thermal energy storage (TES) in a unique integration of innovative enhancements that improves performance and reduces cost.

11

Project Profile: Baseload CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Heat Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

General Atomics, under the Baseload CSP FOA, is demonstrating the engineering feasibility of using a sulfur-based thermochemical cycle to store heat from a CSP plant and support baseload power...

12

SunShot Initiative: Modular and Scalable Baseload Molten Salt Plant  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Modular and Scalable Baseload Modular and Scalable Baseload Molten Salt Plant Conceptual Design and Feasibility to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Modular and Scalable Baseload Molten Salt Plant Conceptual Design and Feasibility on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Modular and Scalable Baseload Molten Salt Plant Conceptual Design and Feasibility on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Modular and Scalable Baseload Molten Salt Plant Conceptual Design and Feasibility on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Modular and Scalable Baseload Molten Salt Plant Conceptual Design and Feasibility on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Modular and Scalable Baseload Molten Salt Plant Conceptual Design and Feasibility on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Modular and Scalable

13

CX-010503: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Baseload Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant Design CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6, B5.17 Date: 06/03/2013 Location(s): Colorado, Colorado Offices(s): Golden Field Office

14

SunShot Initiative: Baseload CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CSP Generation CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Heat Storage to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Baseload CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Heat Storage on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Baseload CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Heat Storage on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Baseload CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Heat Storage on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Baseload CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Heat Storage on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Baseload CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Heat Storage on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Baseload CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Heat Storage on

15

Project Profile: Innovative Thermal Energy Storage for Baseload Solar Power Generation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The University of South Florida, under the Baseload CSP FOA, is researching and developing a thermal energy storage system based on encapsulated phase change materials (PCM) that can meet the utility-scale baseload CSP plant requirements at significantly lower system costs.

16

CX-011252: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Determination CX-011252: Categorical Exclusion Determination Concentrating Solar Power Heat Integration for Baseload Renewable Energy Deployment CX(s) Applied: A9 Date:...

17

Flexible Coal: An Example Evolution from Baseload to Peaking Plant (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Twenty-first century power systems, with higher penetration levels of low-carbon energy, smart grids, and other emerging technologies, will favor resources that have low marginal costs and provide system flexibility (e.g., the ability to cycle on and off to follow changes in variable renewable energy plant output). Questions remain about both the fate of coal plants in this scenario and whether they can cost-effectively continue to operate if they cycle routinely. The experience from the CGS plant demonstrates that coal plants can become flexible resources. This flexibility - namely the ability to cycle on and off and run at lower output (below 40% of capacity) - requires limited hardware modifications but extensive modifications to operational practice. Cycling does damage the plant and impact its life expectancy compared to baseload operations. Nevertheless, strategic modifications, proactive inspections and training programs, among other operational changes to accommodate cycling, can minimize the extent of damage and optimize the cost of maintenance. CGS's cycling, but not necessarily the associated price tag, is replicable. Context - namely, power market opportunities and composition of the generation fleet - will help determine for other coal plants the optimal balance between the level of cycling-related forced outages and the level of capital investment required to minimize those outages. Replicating CGS's experience elsewhere will likely require a higher acceptance of forced outages than regulators and plant operators are accustomed to; however, an increase in strategic maintenance can minimize the impact on outage rates.

Cochran, J.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Flexible Coal: An Example Evolution from Baseload to Peaking Plant (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Twenty-first century power systems, with higher penetration levels of low-carbon energy, smart grids, and other emerging technologies, will favor resources that have low marginal costs and provide system flexibility (e.g., the ability to cycle on and off to follow changes in variable renewable energy plant output). Questions remain about both the fate of coal plants in this scenario and whether they can cost-effectively continue to operate if they cycle routinely. The experience from the CGS plant demonstrates that coal plants can become flexible resources. This flexibility - namely the ability to cycle on and off and run at lower output (below 40% of capacity) - requires limited hardware modifications but extensive modifications to operational practice. Cycling does damage the plant and impact its life expectancy compared to baseload operations. Nevertheless, strategic modifications, proactive inspections and training programs, among other operational changes to accommodate cycling, can minimize the extent of damage and optimize the cost of maintenance. CGS's cycling, but not necessarily the associated price tag, is replicable. Context - namely, power market opportunities and composition of the generation fleet - will help determine for other coal plants the optimal balance between the level of cycling-related forced outages and the level of capital investment required to minimize those outages. Replicating CGS's experience elsewhere will likely require a higher acceptance of forced outages than regulators and plant operators are accustomed to; however, an increase in strategic maintenance can minimize the impact on outage rates.

Cochran, J.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Baseload Solar Power for California? Ammonia-based Solar Energy Storage Using Trough Concentrators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Baseload Solar Power for California? Ammonia-based Solar Energy Storage Using Trough Concentrators to eventually optimise the reactor geometry for ammonia-based solar energy storage with troughs, which.1. Storing Solar Energy with Ammonia H2 / N2 gas liquid NH3 Heat Exchangers Power Generation (Steam Cycle

20

Project Profile: Modular and Scalable Baseload Molten Salt Plant Conceptual Design and Feasibility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

eSolar, under the Baseload CSP FOA, is designing a 100-MW, 75% capacity factor, molten salt power tower plant, based around a molten salt receiver and heliostat field module with a nominal thermal rating of 50 MWth. They are taking a modular approach, which can be scaled through replication of the receiver/field module to meet output and capacity factor requirements.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination baseload nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Colorado | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

August 4, 2010 August 4, 2010 CX-003201: Categorical Exclusion Determination Baseload Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant Design CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 08/04/2010 Location(s): Colorado Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office July 30, 2010 CX-003332: Categorical Exclusion Determination Reclamation Projects on Wedding Bell Mountain Lease Tract C-WM-17, Uranium Leasing Program CX(s) Applied: B1.28 Date: 07/30/2010 Location(s): Montrose County, Colorado Office(s): Legacy Management July 30, 2010 CX-003331: Categorical Exclusion Determination Reclamation Projects on Slick Rock Lease Tract C-SR-II, Uranium Leasing Program CX(s) Applied: B1.28 Date: 07/30/2010 Location(s): San Miguel County, Colorado Office(s): Legacy Management July 30, 2010 CX-003333: Categorical Exclusion Determination

22

SunShot Initiative: Baseload CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Heat Storage CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Heat Storage General Atomics logo Graphic of a diagram of squares and circles connected by arrows. Sulfur-based TES can compensate for diurnal and seasonal insolation fluctuations. General Atomics, under the Baseload CSP FOA, is demonstrating the engineering feasibility of using a sulfur-based thermochemical cycle to store heat from a CSP plant and support baseload power generation. Approach There are three main project objectives under this award: Study the sulfur generating disproportionation reaction and develop it into a practical engineering process step. Carry out preliminary process components design and experimental validation. The engineering data will be used for process integration between the CSP plant, the sulfur processing and storage plant, and the electricity generation unit.

23

Nitrate reduction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Nitrates are reduced to nitrogen gas by contacting the nitrates with a metal to reduce the nitrates to nitrites which are then contacted with an amide to produce nitrogen and carbon dioxide or acid anions which can be released to the atmosphere. Minor amounts of metal catalysts can be useful in the reduction of the nitrates to nitrites. Metal salts which are formed can be treated electrochemically to recover the metals.

Dziewinski, Jacek J. (Los Alamos, NM); Marczak, Stanislaw (Los Alamos, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Brayton-Cycle Baseload Power Tower CSP System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objectives of Phase 2 of this Project were: 1. Engineer, fabricate, and conduct preliminary testing on a low-pressure, air-heating solar receiver capable of powering a microturbine system to produce 300kWe while the sun is shining while simultaneously storing enough energy thermally to power the system for up to 13 hours thereafter. 2. Cycle-test a high-temperature super alloy, Haynes HR214, to determine its efficacy for the system’s high-temperature heat exchanger. 3. Engineer the thermal energy storage system This Phase 2 followed Wilson’s Phase 1, which primarily was an engineering feasibility study to determine a practical and innovative approach to a full Brayton-cycle system configuration that could meet DOE’s targets. Below is a summary table of the DOE targets with Wilson’s Phase 1 Project results. The results showed that a Brayton system with an innovative (low pressure) solar receiver with ~13 hours of dry (i.e., not phase change materials or molten salts but rather firebrick, stone, or ceramics) has the potential to meet or exceed DOE targets. Such systems would consist of pre-engineered, standardized, factory-produced modules to minimize on-site costs while driving down costs through mass production. System sizes most carefully analyzed were in the range of 300 kWe to 2 MWe. Such systems would also use off-the-shelf towers, blowers, piping, microturbine packages, and heliostats. Per DOE’s instructions, LCOEs are based on the elevation and DNI levels of Daggett, CA, for a 100 MWe power plant following 2 GWe of factory production of the various system components. Success criteria DOE targets Wilson system LCOE DOE’s gas price $6.75/MBtu 9 cents/kWh 7.7 cents/kWh LCOE Current gas price $4.71/MBtu NA 6.9 cents/kWh Capacity factor 75% (6500hr) 75-100% Solar fraction 85% (5585hr) >5585hr Receiver cost $170/kWe $50/kWe Thermal storage cost $20/kWhth $13/kWhth Heliostat cost $120/m2 $89.8/m2

Anderson, Bruce

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

25

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Golden Field Office | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

June 3, 2013 June 3, 2013 CX-010507: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development and Demonstration of Smart Grid Inverters for High-Penetration Photovoltaic Applications CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6, B5.16 Date: 06/03/2013 Location(s): Hawaii Offices(s): Golden Field Office June 3, 2013 CX-010504: Categorical Exclusion Determination Installation of Additional Wind Turbine and Tower at NWTC Site 3.2 CX(s) Applied: B5.18 Date: 06/03/2013 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Golden Field Office June 3, 2013 CX-010503: Categorical Exclusion Determination Baseload Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant Design CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6, B5.17 Date: 06/03/2013 Location(s): Colorado, Colorado Offices(s): Golden Field Office June 3, 2013 CX-010502: Categorical Exclusion Determination Sacramento Municipal Utility District: Community Renewable Energy

26

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3, 2013 3, 2013 CX-010507: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development and Demonstration of Smart Grid Inverters for High-Penetration Photovoltaic Applications CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6, B5.16 Date: 06/03/2013 Location(s): Hawaii Offices(s): Golden Field Office June 3, 2013 CX-010504: Categorical Exclusion Determination Installation of Additional Wind Turbine and Tower at NWTC Site 3.2 CX(s) Applied: B5.18 Date: 06/03/2013 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Golden Field Office June 3, 2013 CX-010503: Categorical Exclusion Determination Baseload Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant Design CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6, B5.17 Date: 06/03/2013 Location(s): Colorado, Colorado Offices(s): Golden Field Office June 3, 2013 CX-010502: Categorical Exclusion Determination Sacramento Municipal Utility District: Community Renewable Energy

27

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3, 2013 3, 2013 CX-010503: Categorical Exclusion Determination Baseload Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant Design CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6, B5.17 Date: 06/03/2013 Location(s): Colorado, Colorado Offices(s): Golden Field Office June 3, 2013 CX-010502: Categorical Exclusion Determination Sacramento Municipal Utility District: Community Renewable Energy Deployment- Coenergy Solar Facility at Sutter's Landing Park CX(s) Applied: B5.16 Date: 06/03/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): Golden Field Office June 3, 2013 CX-010697: Categorical Exclusion Determination Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for New Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Furnace Fans CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 06/03/2013 Location(s): CX: none Offices(s): Golden Field Office June 3, 2013 CX-010673: Categorical Exclusion Determination

28

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B5.17 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7 7 Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B5.17 Existing Regulations B5.17: Solar thermal systems The installation, modification, operation, and removal of commercially available small-scale solar thermal systems (including, but not limited to, solar hot water systems) located on or contiguous to a building, and if located on land, generally comprising less than 10 acres within a previously disturbed or developed area. Covered actions would be in accordance with applicable requirements (such as local land use and zoning requirements) in the proposed project area and would incorporate appropriate control technologies and best management practices. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD June 3, 2013 CX-010503: Categorical Exclusion Determination Baseload Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant Design

29

CX-003712: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination Brayton-Cycle Baseload Power Tower Concentrated Solar Power System CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 09092010 Location(s): Woburn,...

30

SunShot Initiative: Advanced Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant Advanced Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant Abengoa logo Photo of two lit towers surrounded by much smaller blue flat plates that are mounted on the ground. Commercial central receiver plant designs Abengoa, under the Baseload CSP FOA, will demonstrate a 100-megawatt electrical (MWe) central receiver plant using nitrate salt as the receiver coolant, thermal storage medium, and heat transport fluid in the steam generator. Approach The plan is to operate the plant at full load for 6,400 hours each year using only solar energy. Abengoa is working to create a team of suppliers capable of deploying a commercially ready nitrate salt central receiver technology that can be competitive in the current power marketplace. Innovation Abengoa is developing a new molten-salt power tower technology with a surround heliostat field. Key components include:

31

Base-Load and Peak Electricity from a Combined Nuclear Heat and Fossil Combined-Cycle Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A combined-cycle power plant is proposed that uses heat from a high-temperature reactor and fossil fuel to meet base-load and peak electrical demands. The high-temperature gas turbine produces shaft power to turn an electric generator. The hot exhaust is then fed to a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) that provides steam to a steam turbine for added electrical power production. A simplified computational model of the thermal power conversion system was developed in order to parametrically investigate two different steady-state operation conditions: base load nuclear heat only from an Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), and combined nuclear heat with fossil heat to increase the turbine inlet temperature. These two cases bracket the expected range of power levels, where any intermediate power level can result during electrical load following. The computed results indicate that combined nuclear-fossil systems have the potential to offer both low-cost base-load electricity and lower-cost peak power relative to the existing combination of base-load nuclear plants and separate fossil-fired peak-electricity production units. In addition, electric grid stability, reduced greenhouse gases, and operational flexibility can also result with using the conventional technology presented here for the thermal power conversion system coupled with the AHTR.

Conklin, Jim [ORNL; Forsberg, Charles W [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Base-Load and Peak Electricity from a Combined Nuclear Heat and Fossil Combined-Cycle Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A combined-cycle power plant is proposed that uses heat from a high-temperature reactor and fossil fuel to meet base-load and peak electrical demands. The high temperature gas turbine produces shaft power to turn an electric generator. The hot exhaust is then fed to a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) that provides steam to a steam turbine for added electrical power production. A simplified computational model of the thermal power conversion system was developed in order to parametrically investigate two different steady-state operation conditions: base load nuclear heat only from an Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), and combined nuclear heat with fossil heat to increase the turbine inlet temperature. These two cases bracket the expected range of power levels, where any intermediate power level can result during electrical load following. The computed results indicate that combined nuclear-fossil systems have the potential to offer both low-cost base-load electricity and lower-cost peak power relative to the existing combination of base-load nuclear plants and separate fossil-fired peak-electricity production units. In addition, electric grid stability, reduced greenhouse gases, and operational flexibility can also result with using the conventional technology presented here for the thermal power conversion system coupled with the AHTR. (authors)

Conklin, James C.; Forsberg, Charles W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Standard test method for determination of bromine and chlorine in UF6 and uranyl nitrate by X-Ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This method covers the determination of bromine (Br) and chlorine (Cl) in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and uranyl nitrate solution. The method as written covers the determination of bromine in UF6 over the concentration range of 0.2 to 8 ?g/g, uranium basis. The chlorine in UF6 can be determined over the range of 4 to 160 ?g/g, uranium basis. Higher concentrations may be covered by appropriate dilutions. The detection limit for Br is 0.2 ?g/g uranium basis and for Cl is 4 ?g/g uranium basis. 1.2 This standard may involve hazardous materials, operations and equipment. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

A DOE-Funded Design Study for Pioneer Baseload Application Of...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

testing effort to determine the feasibility of applying anadvanced high-efficiency binary heat recovery cycle - the KalinaCycleTM - to recover energy from 171' C silica-rich...

35

Thermochemical nitrate destruction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed for denitrification of nitrates and nitrates present in aqueous waste streams. The method comprises the steps of (1) identifying the concentration nitrates and nitrites present in a waste stream, (2) causing formate to be present in the waste stream, (3) heating the mixture to a predetermined reaction temperature from about 200.degree. C. to about 600.degree. C., and (4) holding the mixture and accumulating products at heated and pressurized conditions for a residence time, thereby resulting in nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas, and hydroxides, and reducing the level of nitrates and nitrites to below drinking water standards.

Cox, John L. (Richland, WA); Hallen, Richard T. (Richland, WA); Lilga, Michael A. (Richland, WA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Thermochemical nitrate destruction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed for denitrification of nitrates and nitrites present in aqueous waste streams. The method comprises the steps of (1) identifying the concentration nitrates and nitrites present in a waste stream, (2) causing formate to be present in the waste stream, (3) heating the mixture to a predetermined reaction temperature from about 200 C to about 600 C, and (4) holding the mixture and accumulating products at heated and pressurized conditions for a residence time, thereby resulting in nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas, and hydroxides, and reducing the level of nitrates and nitrites to below drinking water standards.

Cox, J.L.; Hallen, R.T.; Lilga, M.A.

1992-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

37

A nitrate sink in estuaries?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

and d15N and d18O of nitrate along the salinity gradient in the estuary of the river Elbe, one of the largest German rivers discharging into the North Sea. Nitrate ...

2008-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

38

Purification of alkali metal nitrates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is disclosed for removing heavy metal contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises mixing the impure nitrates with sufficient water to form a concentrated aqueous solution of the impure nitrates, adjusting the pH of the resulting solution to within the range of between about 2 and about 7, adding sufficient reducing agent to react with heavy metal contaminants within said solution, adjusting the pH of the solution containing reducing agent to effect precipitation of heavy metal impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified aqueous solution of alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified solution of alkali metal nitrates may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrate suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of alkali metal nitrates.

Fiorucci, Louis C. (Hamden, CT); Gregory, Kevin M. (Woodridge, IL)

1985-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

39

CX-000603: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3: Categorical Exclusion Determination 3: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000603: Categorical Exclusion Determination Baseload Energy Inc. Brasada-Harney 115-kilovolt Transmission Line Project CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 02/04/2010 Location(s): Deschutes County, Oregon Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration The proposed project is a result of an interconnection request that was made by Baseload Energy, Inc., to interconnect onto the Federal Columbia River Transmission System. This interconnection request would accommodate a High Altitude Wind Generation Turbine that would generate up to 8 megawatts of harvested wind power. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-000603.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-010589: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005844: Categorical Exclusion Determination

40

Detonation of Ammonium Nitrate Fertilizer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Detonation of Ammonium Nitrate Fertilizer ... charge of the fertilizer enclosed in ¼-inch Shelby seamless tubing, 3 inches in diameter and 20 inches in length, detonated with extreme violence. ...

1947-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination baseload nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

CX-003199: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

99: Categorical Exclusion Determination 99: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003199: Categorical Exclusion Determination Using Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Storage for Baseload Concentrating Solar Power Plants CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/04/2010 Location(s): Riverside, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Terrafore Incorporated proposes to use federal funds to research and develop novel encapsulated phase change materials for the use in thermal storage applications. The project will conclude with a demonstration of new encapsulated phase change materials systems for base-load concentrating solar power plants. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-003199.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-003198: Categorical Exclusion Determination

42

Molten nitrate salt technology development status report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recognizing thermal energy storage as potentially critical to the successful commercialization of solar thermal power systems, the Department of Energy (DOE) has established a comprehensive and aggressive thermal energy storage technology development program. Of the fluids proposed for heat transfer and energy storage molten nitrate salts offer significant economic advantages. The nitrate salt of most interest is a binary mixture of NaNO/sub 3/ and KNO/sub 3/. Although nitrate/nitrite mixtures have been used for decades as heat transfer and heat treatment fluids the use has been at temperatures of about 450/sup 0/C and lower. In solar thermal power systems the salts will experience a temperature range of 350 to 600/sup 0/C. Because central receiver applications place more rigorous demands and higher temperatures on nitrate salts a comprehensive experimental program has been developed to examine what effects, if any, the new demands and temperatures have on the salts. The experiments include corrosion testing, environmental cracking of containment materials, and determinations of physical properties and decomposition mechanisms. This report details the work done at Sandia National Laboratories in each area listed. In addition, summaries of the experimental programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the University of New York, EIC Laboratories, Inc., and the Norwegian Institute of Technology on molten nitrate salts are given. Also discussed is how the experimental programs will influence the near-term central receiver programs such as utility repowering/industrial retrofit and cogeneration. The report is designed to provide easy access to the latest information and data on molten NaNO/sub 3//KNO/sub 3/ for the designers and engineers of future central receiver projects.

Carling, R.W.; Kramer, C.M.; Bradshaw, R.W.; Nissen, D.A.; Goods, S.H.; Mar, R.W.; Munford, J.W.; Karnowsky, M.M.; Biefeld, R.N.; Norem, N.J.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

CX-003706: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

06: Categorical Exclusion Determination 06: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003706: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development and Demonstration of an Innovative Thermal Energy Storage System for Baseload Solar Power Generation CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 09/09/2010 Location(s): Tampa, Florida Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office The University of South Florida would demonstrate the feasibility of a thermal energy storage system made from phase change materials to meet utility-scale base-load solar plant requirement economically. The location of the laboratory work would take place at the Clean Energy Research Center and Nanomaterials, and Nanomanufacturing Research Center laboratories at the USF in the Research Park (IDRB 121), and Engineering Building (ENG

44

CX-003976: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

76: Categorical Exclusion Determination 76: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003976: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of a High-Concentration Low-Cost Parabolic Trough System for Baseload Concentrated Solar Power Generation CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 Date: 09/20/2010 Location(s): Arvada, Colorado Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office The Department of Energy is proposing to provide federal funding to SkyFuel to develop and demonstrate an advanced low-cost Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) solar collector, using higher-concentration, higher-temperature parabolic trough technology, with the ultimate goal of reducing the cost of baseload utility-scale solar power generation. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-003976.pdf More Documents & Publications

45

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9, 2010 9, 2010 CX-003713: Categorical Exclusion Determination Validation of Coupled Models and Optimization of Materials for Offshore Wind Structures CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.3, B3.6 Date: 09/09/2010 Location(s): Maine Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office September 9, 2010 CX-003712: Categorical Exclusion Determination Brayton-Cycle Baseload Power Tower Concentrated Solar Power System CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 09/09/2010 Location(s): Woburn, Massachusetts Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office September 9, 2010 CX-003706: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development and Demonstration of an Innovative Thermal Energy Storage System for Baseload Solar Power Generation CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 09/09/2010

46

System study of an MHD/gas turbine combined-cycle baseload power plant. HTGL report No. 134  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MHD/gas turbine combined-cycle system has been designed specifically for applications where the availability of cooling water is very limited. The base case systems which were studied consisted of an MHD plant with a gas turbine bottoming plant, and required no cooling water. The gas turbine plant uses only air as its working fluid and receives its energy input from the MHD exhaust gases by means of metal tube heat exchangers. In addition to the base case systems, vapor cycle variation systems were considered which included the addition of a vapor cycle bottoming plant to improve the thermal efficiency. These systems required a small amount of cooling water. The MHD/gas turbine systems were modeled with sufficient detail, using realistic component specifications and costs, so that the thermal and economic performance of the system could be accurately determined. Three cases of MHD/gas turbine systems were studied, with Case I being similar to an MHD/steam system so that a direct comparison of the performances could be made, with Case II being representative of a second generation MHD system, and with Case III considering oxygen enrichment for early commercial applications. The systems are nominally 800 MW/sub e/ to 1000 MW/sub e/ in size. The results show that the MHD/gas turbine system has very good thermal and economic performances while requiring either little or no cooling water. Compared to the MHD/steam system which has a cooling tower heat load of 720 MW, the Base Case I MHD/gas turbine system has a heat rate which is 13% higher and a cost of electricity which is only 7% higher while requiring no cooling water. Case II results show that an improved performance can be expected from second generation MHD/gas turbine systems. Case III results show that an oxygen enriched MHD/gas turbine system may be attractive for early commercial applications in dry regions of the country.

Annen, K.D.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Dietary inorganic nitrate reverses features of metabolic syndrome in endothelial nitric oxide synthase-deficient mice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...mitochondria to affect oxygen consumption, substrate oxidation, and generation...that dietary nitrate fuels a nitrate-nitrite-NO...libitum. Water and food consumption were determined...microreaction purge vessel coupled with a condenser...integrated with the purge vessel and the outlet of the...

Mattias Carlström; Filip J. Larsen; Thomas Nyström; Michael Hezel; Sara Borniquel; Eddie Weitzberg; Jon O. Lundberg

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Nitrate Salt Bearing Waste Container  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEPA filtration. On April 11, 2014, in anticipation of investigation of the source of a radiological on the possibility that a container of inadequately remediated nitrate salt bearing waste had caused the release and is the most Page 1 of 17 #12;likely source of the release. Further investigation is underway to determine

Napp, Nils

49

A Novel Chemical Nitrate Destruction Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nitrates represent one of the most significant pollutant discharged to the Baltic Sea by the Sliiamae hydrometallurgical plant. This article contains a brief overview of the existing nitrate destruction technologies followed by the description of a new process developed by the authors. The new chemical process for nitrate destruction is cost effective and simple to operate. It converts the nitrate to nitrogen gas which goes to the atmosphere.

Dziewinski, J.; Marczak, S.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Aniline-induced nitrosative stress in rat spleen: Proteomic identification of nitrated proteins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aniline exposure is associated with toxicity to the spleen which is characterized by splenomegaly, hyperplasia, fibrosis, and a variety of sarcomas on chronic exposure in rats. However, mechanisms by which aniline elicits splenotoxic responses are not well understood. Earlier we have shown that aniline exposure leads to increased nitration of proteins in the spleen. However, nitrated proteins remain to be characterized. Therefore, in the current study using proteomic approaches, we focused on characterizing the nitrated proteins in the spleen of aniline-exposed rats. Aniline exposure led to increased tyrosine nitration of proteins, as determined by 2D Western blotting with anti-3-nitrotyrosine specific antibody, compared to the controls. The analyzed nitrated proteins were found in the molecular weight range of 27.7 to 123.6 kDa. A total of 37 nitrated proteins were identified in aniline-treated and control spleens. Among them, 25 were found only in aniline-treated rats, 11 were present in both aniline-treated and control rats, while one was found in controls only. The nitrated proteins identified mainly represent skeletal proteins, chaperones, ferric iron transporter, enzymes, nucleic acids binding protein, and signaling and protein synthesis pathways. Furthermore, aniline exposure led to significantly increased iNOS mRNA and protein expression in the spleen, suggesting its role in increased reactive nitrogen species formation and contribution to increased nitrated proteins. The identified nitrated proteins provide a global map to further investigate alterations in their structural and functional properties, which will lead to a better understanding of the role of protein nitration in aniline-mediated splenic toxicity. - Highlights: > Proteomic approaches are used to identify nitrated proteins in the spleen. > Twenty five nitrated proteins were found only in the spleen of aniline-treated rats. > Aniline exposure led to increased iNOS mRNA and protein expression in the spleen. > Results support the role of nitrosative stress in splenic toxicity of aniline.

Fan Xiuzhen; Wang Jianling [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Soman, Kizhake V. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Ansari, G.A.S. [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Khan, M. Firoze, E-mail: mfkhan@utmb.edu [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

51

CX-000262: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

62: Categorical Exclusion Determination 62: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000262: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ohio City Columbus CX(s) Applied: A1, B5.1 Date: 12/21/2009 Location(s): Columbus, Ohio Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant for: Downtown Bike Infrastructure Improvements, Cultural Arts Center Lighting Efficiency Improvements, Central Safety Building Energy Retrofit, Fire Stations High Efficiency Lighting Retrofit, Business Energy Efficiency Revolving Loan Program, Pedestrian Signal Upgrade to LED (light-emitting diode) Technology, Center for Science and Industry Energy Efficiency Improvements, Home Energy Efficiency Baseload Reduction Program, Project Oversight. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

52

Nitrates and Prussic Acid in Forages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When nitrates and prussic acid accumulate in forage, the feed may not be safe for livestock consumption. Learn the symptoms of nitrate and prussic acid poisoning and which plants are most likely to pose a risk to livestock. Also learn sampling...

Provin, Tony; Pitt, John L.

2003-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

53

Nitrate removal from drinking water -- Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nitrate concentrations in surface water and especially in ground water have increased in Canada, the US, Europe, and other areas of the world. This trend has raised concern because nitrates cause methemoglobiinemia in infants. Several treatment processes including ion exchange, biological denitrification, chemical denitrification, reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, and catalytic denitrification can remove nitrates from water with varying degrees of efficiency, cost, and ease of operation. Available technical data, experience, and economics indicate that ion exchange and biological denitrification are more acceptable for nitrate removal than reverse osmosis. Ion exchange is more viable for ground water while biological denitrification is the preferred alternative for surface water. This paper reviews the developments in the field of nitrate removal processes.

Kapoor, A.; Viraraghavan, T. [Univ. of Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

In-situ remediation of nitrate-contaminated ground water by electrokinetics/iron wall processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The feasibility of using electrokinetics coupled with a zero valent iron (Fe0) treatment wall to abiotically remediate nitrate-contaminated soils was investigated. Upon completion of each test run, the contaminated soil specimen was sliced into five parts and analyzed for nitrate-nitrogen, ammonia-nitrogen and nitrite-nitrogen. Nitrogen mass balance was used to determine the major transformation products. In control experiments where only electrokinetics was used at various constant voltages, 25 to 37% of the nitrate-nitrogen was transformed. The amount of nitrate-nitrogen transformed improved when a Fe0 wall (20 g or about 8–10% by weight) was placed near the anode. For test runs at various constant voltages, the amount of nitrate-nitrogen transformed ranged from 54 to 87%. By switching to constant currents, the amount of nitrate-nitrogen — transformed was about 84 to 88%. The major transformation products were ammonia-nitrogen and nitrogen gases. Nitrite-nitrogen was less than 1% in all experimental runs. Two localized pH conditions exist in the system, a low pH region near the anode and a high pH region near the cathode. Placing of an iron wall near the anode increases the pH in that area as time increases. Movement of the acid front did not flush across the cathode. This research has demonstrated that the electrokinetics/iron wall process can be used to remediate nitrate-contaminated groundwater.

Chin F. Chew; Tian C. Zhang

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Reactions Between Water Soluble Organic Acids and Nitrates in...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Between Water Soluble Organic Acids and Nitrates in Atmospheric Aerosols: Recycling of Nitric Acid and Formation of Reactions Between Water Soluble Organic Acids and Nitrates in...

56

Report seeks solutions for nitrate in drinking water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nitrate in California’s Drinking Water report http://Clark Report seeks solutions for nitrate in drinking waternitrate contamination of drinking water in high-risk areas

Editors, By

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Nitrate Enhanced Microbial Cr(VI) Reduction-Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major challenge for the bioremediation of radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium) and metals (i.e., Cr(VI), Hg) is the co-occurrence of nitrate as it can inhibit metal transformation. Denitrification (nitrate reduction to dinitrogen gas) is considered the most important ecological process. For many metal and metalloid reducing bacteria, however, ammonia is the end product through respiratory nitrate reduction (RNRA). The focus of this work was to determine how RNRA impacts Cr(VI) transformation. The goal was to elucidate the specific mechanism(s) that limits Cr(VI) reduction in the presence of nitrate and to use this information to develop strategies that enhance Cr(VI) reduction (and thus detoxification). Our central hypothesis is that nitrate impacts the biotransformation of metals and metalloids in three ways 1) as a competitive alternative electron acceptor (inhibiting transformation), 2) as a co-metabolite (i.e., concomitant reduction, stimulating transformation), and 3) as an inducer of specific proteins and pathways involved in oxidation/reduction reactions (stimulating transformation). We have identified three model organisms, Geobacter metallireducens (mechanism 1), Sulfurospirillum barnesii, (mechasism 2), and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (mechanisms 3). Our specific aims were to 1) investigate the role of Cr(VI) concentration on the kinetics of both growth and reduction of nitrate, nitrite, and Cr(VI) in these three organisms; 2) develop a profile of bacterial enzymes involved in nitrate transformation (e.g., oxidoreductases) using a proteomic approach; 3) investigate the function of periplasmic nitrite reductase (Nrf) as a chromate reductase; and 4) develop a strategy to maximize microbial chromium reduction in the presence of nitrate. We found that growth on nitrate by G. metallireducens was inhibited by Cr(VI). Over 240 proteins were identified by LC/MS-MS. Redox active proteins, outer membrane heavy metal efflux proteins, and chemotaxis sensory proteins (Gmet_2478 and Gmet_1641) were up-regulated with exposure to Cr(VI). A nine-heme cytochrome C was purified that could reduce nitrite and could be oxidized by Cr(VI). For D. desulfuricans, we found that confirmed that Cr(VI) induced a prolonged lag period when Cr(VI) was reduced. Over three hundred proteins were unequivocally identified by LC/MS-MS and a significant number of down-regulated proteins for which the levels were changed >2 fold compared to control. Sulfite reductase levels were similar, however, nitrate and nitrite reductase were down-regulated. The supernatant of spent cultures was found to contain a filterable, heat stable compound that rapidly reduced Cr(VI). In addition, desulfoviridin was purified from nitrate grown cells and shown to have nitrite reductase activity that was inhibited by Cr(VI). For S. barnesii, periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap), nitrite reductase (Nrf), and the metalloid reductase (Rar) were purified and characterized. The supernatant of spent cultures was also found to contain a filterable, heat stable compound that rapidly reduced Cr(VI) but that Rar also reduced Cr(VI). Our results from specific aims 1 through 3 indicate that for G. metallireducens, Cr(VI) inhibits nitrate respiration as it oxidizes cytochromes involved in nitrate respiration. Iron reduction is apparently not affected and the inhibitory affects of Cr(VI) may be attenuated by the addition of sufficient Fe(III) to generate Fe(II) that abiotically reduces the chromium. For S. barnesii, although the enzyme assays indicate that the components of the respiratory pathway for nitrate (e.g. Nap and Nrf) are inhibited by chromate, the organism has a mechanism to prevent this from actually occurring. Our current hypothesis is that the non-specific metalloid reductase (Rar) is providing resistance by reducing the Cr(VI). The strategy here would be to enhance its growth and metabolism in the natural setting. Lactate is a suitable electron donor for S. barnesii but other donors are possible. Although the version of the Phylochip used for monitoring the microb

John F. Stolz

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

58

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Washington | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

July 26, 2010 July 26, 2010 CX-003272: Categorical Exclusion Determination Washington-City-Everett CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.32, B5.1 Date: 07/26/2010 Location(s): Everett, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy July 26, 2010 CX-003170: Categorical Exclusion Determination Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload Power CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07/26/2010 Location(s): Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office July 22, 2010 CX-003234: Categorical Exclusion Determination Demolition of Vacant House at Bonneville Power Administration's Ross Complex CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 07/22/2010 Location(s): Clark County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration July 21, 2010 CX-003236: Categorical Exclusion Determination

59

Synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nitrate esters have been known as useful energetic materials since the discovery of nitroglycerin by Ascanio Sobrero in 1846. The development of methods to increase the safety and utility of nitroglycerin by Alfred Nobel led to the revolutionary improvement in the utility of nitroglycerin in explosive applications in the form of dynamite. Since then, many nitrate esters have been prepared and incorporated into military applications such as double-based propellants, detonators and as energetic plasticizers. Nitrate esters have also been shown to have vasodilatory effects in humans and thus have been studied and used for treatments of ailments such as angina. The mechanism of the biological response towards nitrate esters has been elucidated recently. Interestingly, many of the nitrate esters used for military purposes are liquids (ethylene glycol dinitrate, propylene glycol dinitrate, etc). Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) is one of the only solid nitrate esters, besides nitrocellulose, that is used in any application. Unfortunately, PETN melting point is above 100 {sup o}C, and thus must be pressed as a solid for detonator applications. A more practical material would be a melt-castable explosive, for potential simplification of manufacturing processes. Herein we describe the synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester (1) that is a solid at ambient temperatures, has a melting point of 85-86 {sup o}C and has the highest density of any known nitrate ester composed only of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen. We also describe the chemical, thermal and sensitivity properties of 1 as well as some preliminary explosive performance data.

Chavez, David E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Nitrate movement in soils and nitrogen uptake efficiency as affected by nitrogen source, time of application, and a nitrification inhibitor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NITRATE MOVEMENT IN SOILS AND NITROGEN UPTAKE EFFICIENCY AS AFFECTED BY NITROGEN SOURCEs TINE OF APPLICATIONs AIJD A NITRIFICATION INHIBITOR A Thesis by KENNETH PHAIJON BANKS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&N University..., Norwood silt loam (Typic Udifluvent) and Houston Black clay (Udic Pellustert) to determine the amount of N03-N leaching from various N fertilizer sources. Nitrate N movement, as affected by time of application, was determined for (NHq)2 Sop, urea...

Banks, Kenneth Phanon

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination baseload nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Massachusetts | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

September 9, 2010 September 9, 2010 CX-003712: Categorical Exclusion Determination Brayton-Cycle Baseload Power Tower Concentrated Solar Power System CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 09/09/2010 Location(s): Woburn, Massachusetts Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office September 1, 2010 CX-003678: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Storage/Conservation and Carbon Emissions Reduction Demonstration Project CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 Date: 09/01/2010 Location(s): Hudson, Massachusetts Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory August 31, 2010 CX-003665: Categorical Exclusion Determination High Performance Buildings Program - Hawthorne Hotel CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 08/31/2010 Location(s): Salem, Massachusetts

62

Benchmark Evaluation of Plutonium Nitrate Solution Arrays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In October and November of 1981 thirteen approach-to-critical experiments were performed on a remote split table machine (RSTM) in the Critical Mass Laboratory of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in Richland, Washington, using planar arrays of polyethylene bottles filled with plutonium (Pu) nitrate solution. Arrays of up to sixteen bottles were used to measure the critical number of bottles and critical array spacing with a tight fitting Plexiglas{reg_sign} reflector on all sides of the arrays except the top. Some experiments used Plexiglas shells fitted around each bottles to determine the effect of moderation on criticality. Each bottle contained approximately 2.4 L of Pu(NO3)4 solution with a Pu content of 105 g Pu/L and a free acid molarity H+ of 5.1. The plutonium was of low 240Pu (2.9 wt.%) content. These experiments were performed to fill a gap in experimental data regarding criticality limits for storing and handling arrays of Pu solution in reprocessing facilities. Of the thirteen approach-to-critical experiments eleven resulted in extrapolations to critical configurations. Four of the approaches were extrapolated to the critical number of bottles; these were not evaluated further due to the large uncertainty associated with the modeling of a fraction of a bottle. The remaining seven approaches were extrapolated to critical array spacing of 3-4 and 4-4 arrays; these seven critical configurations were evaluation for inclusion as acceptable benchmark experiments in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) Handbook. Detailed and simple models of these configurations were created and the associated bias of these simplifications was determined to range from 0.00116 and 0.00162 {+-} 0.00006 ?keff. Monte Carlo analysis of all models was completed using MCNP5 with ENDF/BVII.0 neutron cross section libraries. A thorough uncertainty analysis of all critical, geometric, and material parameters was performed using parameter perturbation methods. It was found that uncertainty in the impurities in the polyethylene bottles, reflector position, bottle outer diameter, and critical array spacing had the largest effect. The total uncertainty ranged from 0.00651 to 0.00920 ?keff. Evaluation methods and results will be presented and discussed in greater detail in the full paper.

M. A. Marshall; J. D. Bess

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Perchlorate and nitrate in situ bioremediation of ground water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nitrate and perchlorate are growing worldwide problems as mobile anionic groundwater contaminants. Biological rduction of nitrate and perchlorate in groundwater is under development as a technology to address these problems.

Strietelmeier, E. A. (Elizabeth A.); Nuttall, H. Eric; Hatzinger, Paul; Goltz, Mark

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Denitration of High Nitrate Salts Using Reductants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes work conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in conjunction with Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), to remove nitrates in simulated low-activity waste (LAW). The major objective of this work was to provide data for identifying and demonstrating a technically viable and cost-effective approach to condition LAW for immobilization (grout).

HD Smith; EO Jones; AJ Schmidt; AH Zacher; MD Brown; MR Elmore; SR Gano

1999-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

65

3, 59195976, 2003 The nitrate aerosol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 3, 5919­5976, 2003 The nitrate aerosol field over Europe M. Schaap et al. Title Page Abstract of Utrecht, Institute of Marine and Atmospheric Science, PO Box 80005, 3508 TA, Utrecht, The Netherlands 2, The Netherlands 3 Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), PO Box 1, 1755 LE Petten, The Netherlands 4 Joint

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

66

CX-003844: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3844: Categorical Exclusion Determination 3844: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003844: Categorical Exclusion Determination Modular and Scalable Baseload Molten Salt Plant Conceptual Design and Feasibility Project CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 09/07/2010 Location(s): California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office The Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to provide funding to the recipient to design, build, and test a full-scale molten salt power plant module that would include an advanced molten salt receiver, a distributed molten salt transport system, a thermal storage system, and a molten salt steam generator. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-003844.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-005199: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007401: Categorical Exclusion Determination

67

CX-003695: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5: Categorical Exclusion Determination 5: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003695: Categorical Exclusion Determination Baseload Electricity Solar Tower CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 09/10/2010 Location(s): California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Pratt and Whitney Rocketdyne propose to use federal funding to research and develop a lower cost, operating, and maintenance concentrating solar power tower facility. This project will take place at the National Solar Thermal Testing Facility at the Sandia National Laboratory. The Balance of Power Plant will be tested at the Argonne National Laboratory. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-003695.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-010561: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-010562: Categorical Exclusion Determination

68

CX-001054: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

54: Categorical Exclusion Determination 54: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001054: Categorical Exclusion Determination Aquantis 2.5 Megawatt Ocean Current Generation Device CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 03/05/2010 Location(s): California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Dehlsen Associates, LLC is proposing to use Department of Energy funding to further develop their Aquantis 2.5 megawatt ocean current generation device technology which is an ocean current turbine designed to extract the kinetic energy from the ocean's current in hopes of achieving competitively priced base-load, continuous, and reliable power generation. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-001054.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-005670: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001097: Categorical Exclusion Determination

69

NITRATE DESTRUCTION LITERATURE SURVEY AND EVALUATION CRITERIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report satisfies the initial phase of Task WP-2.3.4 Alternative Sodium Recovery Technology, Subtask 1; Develop Near-Tank Nitrate/Nitrite Destruction Technology. Some of the more common anions in carbon steel waste tanks at SRS and Hanford Site are nitrate which is corrosive, and nitrite and hydroxide which are corrosion inhibitors. At present it is necessary to periodically add large quantities of 50 wt% caustic to waste tanks. There are three primary reasons for this addition. First, when the contents of salt tanks are dissolved, sodium hydroxide preferentially dissolves and is removed. During the dissolution process the concentration of free hydroxide in the tank liquid can decrease from 9 M to less than 0.2 M. As a result, roughly half way through the dissolution process large quantities of sodium hydroxide must be added to the tank to comply with requirements for corrosion control. Second, hydroxide is continuously consumed by reaction with carbon dioxide which occurs naturally in purge air used to prevent buildup of hydrogen gas inside the tanks. The hydrogen is generated by radiolysis of water. Third, increasing the concentration of hydroxide increases solubility of some aluminum compounds, which is desirable in processing waste. A process that converts nitrate and nitrite to hydroxide would reduce certain costs. (1) Less caustic would be purchased. (2) Some of the aluminum solid compounds in the waste tanks would become more soluble so less mass of solids would be sent to High Level Vitrification and therefore it would be not be necessary to make as much expensive high level vitrified product. (3) Less mass of sodium would be fed to Saltstone at SRS or Low Level Vitrification at Hanford Site so it would not be necessary to make as much low level product. (4) At SRS less nitrite and nitrate would be sent to Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) so less formic acid would be consumed there and less hydrogen gas would be generated. This task involves literature survey of technologies to perform the nitrate to hydroxide conversion, selection of the most promising technologies, preparation of a flowsheet and design of a system. The most promising technologies are electrochemical reduction of nitrates and chemical reduction with hydrogen or ammonia. The primary reviewed technologies are listed and they aredescribed in more detail later in the report: (1) Electrochemical destruction; (2) Chemical reduction with agents such as ammonia, hydrazine or hydrogen; (3) Hydrothermal reduction process; and (4) Calcination. Only three of the technologies on the list have been demonstrated to generate usable amounts of caustic; electrochemical reduction and chemical reduction with ammonia, hydrazine or hydrogen and hydrothermal reduction. Chemical reduction with an organic reactant such as formic acid generates carbon dioxide which reacts with caustic and is thus counterproductive. Treatment of nitrate with aluminum or other active metals generates a solid product. High temperature calcination has the potential to generate sodium oxide which may be hydrated to sodium hydroxide, but this is unproven. The following criteria were developed to evaluate the most suitable option. The numbers in brackets after the criteria are relative weighting factors to account for importance: (1) Personnel exposure to radiation for installation, routine operation and maintenance; (2) Non-radioactive safety issues; (3) Whether the technology generates caustic and how many moles of caustic are generated per mole of nitrate plus nitrite decomposed; (4) Whether the technology can handle nitrate and nitrite at the concentrations encountered in waste; (5) Maturity of technology; (6) Estimated annual cost of operation (labor, depreciation, materials, utilities); (7) Capital cost; (8) Selectivity to nitrogen as decomposition product (other products are flammable and/or toxic); (9) Impact of introduced species; (10) Selectivity for destruction of nitrate vs. nitrite; and (11) Cost of deactivation and demolition. Each technology was given a score from one

Steimke, J.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate from aqueous nitric acid solutions with CMPO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE sponsored development of the transuranium extraction (TRUEX) process for removing actinides from radioactive wastes. The solvent is a mixture of CMPO and TBP. Since the extraction characteristics of CMPO are not as well understood as those of TBP, the extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate with CMPO (dissolved in n-dodecane) were studied. Results indicate that CMPO extracts nitric acid with a 1:1 stoichiometry; equilibrium constant is 2. 660{plus_minus}0.092 at 25 C, and extraction enthalpy is -5. 46{plus_minus}0.46 kcal/mol. Slope analysis indicates that uranyl nitrate extracts with a mixed equilibria of 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries in nearly equal proportion. Equil. constant of the 2: 1 extraction was 1.213 {times} 10{sup 6}{plus_minus}3.56 {times} 10{sup 4} at 25 C; reaction enthalpy was -9.610{plus_minus}0.594 kcal/mol. Nitration complexation constant is 8.412{plus_minus}0.579, with an enthalpy of -10.72{plus_minus}1.87 kcal/mol. Bismuth nitrate also extracts with a mixed equilibria of (perhaps) 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries. A 2:1 extraction equilibrium and a nitrate complexation adequately model the data. Kinetics and enthalpies were also measured.

Spencer, B.B.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0, 2010 0, 2010 CX-003718: Categorical Exclusion Determination Research for Developing Renewable Biofuels from Algae CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/10/2010 Location(s): Nebraska Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office September 10, 2010 CX-003696: Categorical Exclusion Determination Research and Development of a Low Cost Solar Thermal Collector CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 09/10/2010 Location(s): California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office September 10, 2010 CX-003695: Categorical Exclusion Determination Baseload Electricity Solar Tower CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 09/10/2010 Location(s): California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office September 9, 2010 CX-007171: Categorical Exclusion Determination

72

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Golden Field Office | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

10, 2010 10, 2010 CX-003718: Categorical Exclusion Determination Research for Developing Renewable Biofuels from Algae CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/10/2010 Location(s): Nebraska Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office September 10, 2010 CX-003696: Categorical Exclusion Determination Research and Development of a Low Cost Solar Thermal Collector CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 09/10/2010 Location(s): California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office September 10, 2010 CX-003695: Categorical Exclusion Determination Baseload Electricity Solar Tower CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 09/10/2010 Location(s): California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office September 9, 2010 CX-003725: Categorical Exclusion Determination

73

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Golden Field Office | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

July 12, 2012 July 12, 2012 CX-008585: Categorical Exclusion Determination Solar TAC - Thermal Energy Storage Test Facility CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B1.15, B3.6 Date: 07/12/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Golden Field Office July 12, 2012 CX-008583: Categorical Exclusion Determination California State Energy Program Annual Formula CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 07/12/2012 Location(s): California Offices(s): Golden Field Office July 12, 2012 CX-008592: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hawaii State Energy Program Annual Formula CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 07/12/2012 Location(s): Hawaii Offices(s): Golden Field Office July 11, 2012 CX-008586: Categorical Exclusion Determination SkyFuel Baseload Parabolic Trough CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.15 Date: 07/11/2012 Location(s): Colorado

74

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B5.1 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0, 2010 0, 2010 CX-003976: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of a High-Concentration Low-Cost Parabolic Trough System for Baseload Concentrated Solar Power Generation CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 Date: 09/20/2010 Location(s): Arvada, Colorado Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office September 20, 2010 CX-003975: Categorical Exclusion Determination State Energy Program - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Green Jobs Training Program - College of the Desert CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 09/20/2010 Location(s): California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office September 20, 2010 CX-003974: Categorical Exclusion Determination State Energy Program - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Soliant Energy 40 Megawatt Solar Manufacturing Plant

75

CX-005670: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0: Categorical Exclusion Determination 0: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005670: Categorical Exclusion Determination Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy System Development of the Aquantis 2.5 Megawatt Ocean-Current Electricity Generation Device CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 04/13/2011 Location(s): Carpinteria, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Dehlsen Associates, in Carpinteria, California, is proposing to use federal funding to develop the Aquantis Current Plane (C-Plane), a marine current turbine designed to convert the kinetic energy from the flow, to base-load electric power generation. The C-Plane is a 2.5 megawatt hydrofoil platform with twin, 40 meter, counter-rotating blades that would operate 50 meters under the ocean's surface. This technology is derived from wind power

76

Nitrate-Cancrinite Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nitrate-Cancrinite Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford Tank Solutions B A R R Y R . B minerals at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site in Washington. Nitrate-cancrinite began's (DOE) Hanford Site in southeast Washington since the late 1950s (1). To predict the fate

Illinois at Chicago, University of

77

Phytoplankton biomass and residual nitrate in the pelagic ecosystem  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Research Article Phytoplankton biomass and residual nitrate in the pelagic ecosystem...are linked to changes in the chlorophyll biomass. The model can be treated analytically...Mathematical bounds are found for the autotrophic biomass and the residual nitrate in terms of the...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

CU(II): catalyzed hydrazine reduction of ferric nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is described for producing ferrous nitrate solutions by the cupric ion-catalyzed reduction of ferric nitrate with hydrazine. The reaction is complete in about 1.5 hours at 40/sup 0/C. Hydrazoic acid is also produced in substantial quantities as a reaction byproduct.

Karraker, D.G.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Evaluation of nitrate and nitrite destruction/separation technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes and evaluates four types of nitrate and nitrite destruction and separation technologies that could be used to treat the aqueous, alkaline, nitrate-bearing mixed waste that is generated by the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) process at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The technologies considered in this report include thermal, hydrothermal, chemical, and electrochemical technologies.

Hobbs, D.T.

1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

80

Thermal Decomposition of Nitrated Tributyl Phosphate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contact between tributyl phosphate and aqueous solutions of nitric acid and/or heavy metal nitrate salts at elevated temperatures can lead to exothermic reactions of explosive violence. Even though such operations have been routinely performed safely for decades as an intrinsic part of the Purex separation processes, several so-called ``red oil`` explosions are known to have occurred in the United States, Canada, and the former Soviet Union. The most recent red oil explosion occurred at the Tomsk-7 separations facility in Siberia, in April 1993. That explosion destroyed part of the unreinforced masonry walls of the canyon-type building in which the process was housed, and allowed the release of a significant quantity of radioactive material.

Paddleford, D.F. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States); Hou, Y.; Barefield, E.K.; Tedder, D.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I. [Georgia Institute of Technology, GA (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination baseload nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Thermal decomposition of nitrated tributyl phosphate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extended contact between heated mixtures of tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) and aqueous solutions of nitric acid and/or heavy metal nitrate salts at elevated temperatures can lead to exothermic reactions of explosive violence. Most solvent extraction operations are conducted at ambient conditions without heating TBP and have been performed safely for decades, but several explosions involving TBP have occurred in the US, Canada, and the former Soviet Union. This investigation was undertaken to characterize the products of thermal decomposition of both single- and two-phase mixtures of TBP, nitric acid, and water under a variety of conditions. The data indicate that the extent of reaction and the rate of gaseous product formation are affected by the presence of Zr{sup 4+}, distillation compared with reflux conditions, temperature, water/HNO{sub 3} and HNO{sub 3}/TBP ratios, and whether the decomposition occurs under constant pressure or constant volume conditions. Higher reaction temperatures accelerate the rate of decomposition, but the extent of decomposition, as measured by the quantity of gaseous products, was greater at lower temperatures when the decomposition was performed under distillation conditions. Higher gas production occurs under reflux conditions, lower H{sub 2}O/HNO{sub 3} ratios, and when a separate water-HNO{sub 3} phase is initially present. The major gaseous products include N{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, NO, and N{sub 2}O. Measurable amounts of NO{sub 2} were not present in the final product mixture, although an orange color suggesting the presence of NO{sub 2} was observed in the early stages of decomposition. The major liquid products were dibutyl phosphoric acid, butyl nitrate, and water. Small amounts of C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} carboxylic acids were also present. Because of the small sample sizes that were employed and the isothermal conditions of the decomposition, runaway reactions were not observed. Some possible reaction pathways are considered.

Hou, Y.; Barefield, E.K.; Tedder, D.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Standard test method for isotopic analysis of hydrolyzed uranium hexafluoride and uranyl nitrate solutions by thermal ionization mass spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This method applies to the determination of isotopic composition in hydrolyzed nuclear grade uranium hexafluoride. It covers isotopic abundance of 235U between 0.1 and 5.0 % mass fraction, abundance of 234U between 0.0055 and 0.05 % mass fraction, and abundance of 236U between 0.0003 and 0.5 % mass fraction. This test method may be applicable to other isotopic abundance providing that corresponding standards are available. 1.2 This test method can apply to uranyl nitrate solutions. This can be achieved either by transforming the uranyl nitrate solution to a uranyl fluoride solution prior to the deposition on the filaments or directly by depositing the uranyl nitrate solution on the filaments. In the latter case, a calibration with uranyl nitrate standards must be performed. 1.3 This test method can also apply to other nuclear grade matrices (for example, uranium oxides) by providing a chemical transformation to uranyl fluoride or uranyl nitrate solution. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address al...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

LITERATURE SURVEY FOR GROUNDWATER TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR NITRATE IODINE-129 AND URANIUM 200-ZP-1 OPERABLE UNIT HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This literature review presents treatment options for nitrate, iodine-129, and uranium, which are present in groundwater at the 200-ZP-I Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) within the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The objective of this review is to determine available methods to treat or sequester these contaminants in place (i.e., in situ) or to pump-and-treat the groundwater aboveground (i.e., ex situ). This review has been conducted with emphasis on commercially available or field-tested technologies, but theoretical studies have, in some cases, been considered when no published field data exist. The initial scope of this literature review included only nitrate and iodine-I 29, but it was later expanded to include uranium. The focus of the literature review was weighted toward researching methods for treatment of nitrate and iodine-129 over uranium because of the relatively greater impact of those compounds identified at the 200-ZP-I OU.

BYRNES ME

2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

84

CX-004179: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4179: Categorical Exclusion Determination 4179: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004179: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bench Scale Testing on the Cesium Nitric Acid Recovery Evaporator (CNP) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/23/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office Vapor Liquid Equilibrium (VLE) measurements will be performed on nitric acid solutions as a function of the addition of the following salts: Aluminum nitrate, Lead nitrate, Cesium nitrate, Sodium nitrate and Potassium nitrate. The VLE measurements will be performed at a temperature of 55 degrees Celsius. This work is performed in support of Hanford?s Cesium Nitric Acid Recovery Evaporator. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-004179.pdf More Documents & Publications

85

Groundwater nitrates in the Seymour Aquifer: problem or resource?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

24 tx H2O Fall 2012 Story by Alejandra Arreola-Triana In the Rolling Plains of Texas, the Seymour Aquifer is the major source of water for Haskell, Jones and Knox counties. #31;e water from the Seymour Aquifer, however, contains nitrate levels... are working on ways to manage the nitrate levels in this aquifer. Tracking the source Nitrates in groundwater can come from runo#27;, fertilizer use, leaks from septic tanks, sewage and erosion of natural deposits, according to the U.S. Environmental...

Arreola-Triana, Alejandra

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Thermal decomposition of nitrated tributyl phosphate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP), nitric acid and water mixtures are subject to thermal decomposition. The gaseous and liquid decomposition product yields are highly path dependent. Higher temperatures accelerate decomposition rates, but may result in lower extent of reaction than comparable low temperature cases. Actual extent of reaction, and gaseous by-products generation, are affected by the presence of Zr(IV), condensate reflux back into the reaction vessel, the water/HNO{sub 3} and the HNO{sub 3}/TBP molar ratios, and whether the decomposition occurs at isobaric or constant volume conditions. Higher gaseous production results from condensate reflux, lower H{sub 2}O/HNO{sub 3} ratios, and with excess HNO{sub 3} and water present as a second liquid phase. Principal gaseous products include N{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, NO and N{sub 2}O. Measurable concentrations of NO{sub 2} were not observed, although gas coloration indicative of NO{sub 2} were obsessed during the beginning of decomposition measurements. Principal liquid products are dibutyl phosphoric acid and butyl nitrate. Air sparging of TBP solutions (e.g., thru transfers using air lift pumps) may increase the hazards of TBP decomposition reactions by lowering the H{sub 2}O/HNO{sub 3} molar ratios. Runaway reactions were not observed under the conditions of this study. Possible reaction mechanisms and pathways are discussed.

Hou, Y.; Barefield, E.K.; Tedder, D.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

87

Weapon Systems Using Samine, Melanj and Isopropyl Nitrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the uses and properties of three chemicals stored in Azerbaijan: melanj, samine, and isopropyl nitrate. These three chemicals have historically been used in the manufacturing of liquid bal...

Vugar Gafarov

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

NITRATE REMOVAL BY CALCINED HYDROTALCITE-TYPE COMPOUNDS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...contaminant in drinking water (which is primarily...levels in contaminated waters. Reverse osmosis, ion exchange, and electrodialysis are considered the best...nitrate-contaminated water (Canter, 1997; Haugen...solid interface. Treatment processes, such as...

María M. Socías-Viciana; María D. Ureña-Amate; Emilio González-Pradas; María J. García-Cortés; Cristina López-Teruel

89

Model validation and uncertainty analysis -- An example using a nitrate percolation model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Model validation and uncertainty analysis are demonstrated using a model previously developed for estimating nitrate-nitrogen (nitrate) concentrations in percolation water from land application of sewage sludge. The objectives are to demonstrate alternate validation techniques and to analyze uncertainty associated with model use following validation. Field data from three published sludge application studies and two separate methods are used for the validation. The first method, point validation, is accomplished by inserting mean values into the model to make point predictions. Model accuracy is then assessed by calculating coefficient of determination (r{sup 2}), relative error and standard error. Statistical accuracy is tested using the Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test. The second method, statistical validation, uses Monte Carlo simulation to obtain distributions of model predictions. The hypothesis that field data represent reasonable samples from the distribution of model predictions is tested by checking whether observed values are within a range bounded by the 5 and 95% quantities of the distribution. Both validation methods demonstrate that the land application model generally overestimates nitrate concentrations. Monte Carlo simulation is used to identify which model input parameters are the largest contributors to the uncertainty in model predictions.

Mummert, M.C. [R.E. Wright Environmental, Inc., Middletown, PA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

90

Density of Gadolinium Nitrate Solutions for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In late 1992, the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was planning to switch the solution contained in the poison injection tank from cadmium nitrate to gadolinium nitrate. The poison injection system is an emergency system used to shut down the reactor by adding a neutron poison to the cooling water. This system must be able to supply a minimum of 69 pounds of gadolinium to the reactor coolant system in order to guarantee that the reactor would become subcritical. A graph of the density of gadolinium nitrate solutions over a concentration range of 5 to 30 wt% and a temperature range of 15 to 40{sup o}C was prepared. Routine density measurements of the solution in the poison injection tank are made by HFIR personnel, and an adaptation of the original graph is used to determine the gadolinium nitrate concentration. In late 2008, HFIR personnel decided that the heat tracing that was present on the piping for the poison injection system could be removed without any danger of freezing the solution; however, the gadolinium nitrate solution might get as cold as 5{sup o}C. This was outside the range of the current density-concentration correlation, so the range needed to be expanded. This report supplies a new density-concentration correlation that covers the extended temperature range. The correlation is given in new units, which greatly simplifies the calculation that is required to determine the pounds of gadolinium in the tank solution. The procedure for calculating the amount of gadolinium in the HFIR poison injection system is as follows: (1) Calculate the usable volume in the system; (2) Measure the density of the solution; (3) Calculate the gadolinium concentration using the following equation: Gd(lb/ft{sup 3}) = measured density (g/mL) x 34.681 - 34.785; (4) Calculate the amount of gadolinium in the system using the following equation: Amount of Gd(lb) = Gd concentration (lb/ft{sup 3}) x usable volume (ft{sup 3}). The equation in step 3 is exact for a temperature of 5{sup o}C, and overestimates the gadolinium concentration at all higher temperatures. This guarantees that the calculation is conservative, in that the actual concentration will be at least as high as that calculated. If an additional safety factor is desired, it is recommended that an administrative control limit be set that is higher than the required minimum amount of gadolinium.

Taylor, Paul Allen [ORNL; Lee, Denise L [ORNL

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

LUMINESCENCE SPECTRA OF THE URANYL ION IN TWO GEOMETRICALLY SIMILAR COORDINATION ENVIRONMENTS: URANYL NITRATE HEXAHYDRATE AND DI-u-AQUO-BIS (DIOXODINITRA-TOURANIUM(VI) DI-IMIDAZOLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coordination sphere of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UNH). U-Coordination Environments: Uranyl Nitrate Hexahydrate andin the crystal hosts of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UNH) and

Brittain, Harry G.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Thermophysical Properties of Sodium Nitrate and Sodium Chloride  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Thermophysical Properties of Sodium Nitrate and Sodium Chloride Thermophysical Properties of Sodium Nitrate and Sodium Chloride Solutions and Their Effects on Fluid Flow in Unsaturated Media Tianfu Xu and Karsten Pruess Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 ABSTRACT. Understanding movement of saline sodium nitrate (NaNO 3 ) waste solutions is important for assessing the contaminant migration near leaking waste storage tanks in the unsaturated zone at the Hanford site (Washington, USA). The purpose of this study is to contribute a basic understanding of effects of the thermophysical behavior of NaNO 3 solutions on fluid flow in unsaturated media. We first present mathematical expressions for the dependence of density, viscosity, solubility and vapor pressure of

93

Thorium Nitrate Stockpile--From Here to Eternity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Defense National Stockpile Center (DNSC), a field level activity of the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) has stewardship of a stockpile of thorium nitrate that has been in storage for decades. The stockpile is made up of approximately 3.2 million kg (7 million lb) of thorium nitrate crystals (hydrate form) stored at two depot locations in the United States. DNSC sought technical assistance from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to define and quantify the management options for the thorium nitrate stockpile. This paper describes methodologies and results comprising the work in Phase 1 and Phase 2. The results allow the DNSC to structure and schedule needed tasks to ensure continued safe long-term storage and/or phased disposal of the stockpile.

Hermes, W. H.; Hylton, T. D.; Mattus, C.H.; Storch, S. N.; Singley, P.S.; Terry. J. W.; Pecullan, M.; Reilly, F. K.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

94

STRUCTURE OF PENTAKIS (UREA) DIOXOURANIUM(VI)NITRATE LUO2 (OC (NH2)2)5 (NO3) 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate and urea which wasALL f(O,O.t» URANYL UREA NITRATE FOB AND FCA ARE THEFACTORS CO~TINUE& FOf URANYL UREA NITRATE l F[) B PAGE . ,

Zalkin, Allan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminium nitrates Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

common co.contaminant with uranium. Nitrate inhib- ited U... Mexico. Once nitrate was depleted, both U(VI) and Fe(lIl) were Ireduced concurrently. When ... Source: Lovley, Derek -...

96

THE SYSTEM THORIUM NITRATE-WATER-NITRIC ACID AT 25 AND THE HYDRATES...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SYSTEM THORIUM NITRATE-WATER-NITRIC ACID AT 25 AND THE HYDRATES OF THORIUM NITRATE Re-direct Destination: Temp Data Fields Ferraro, J.R.; Katzin, L.I. Temp Data Storage 3: Argonne...

97

Extraction of U(VI) with N,N?-dimethyl-N,N?-dioctylmalonamide from nitrate media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The extraction of uranyl nitrate with the novel extractant N,N?-dimethyl-N,N?-dioctylmalonamide (DMDOMA) from aqueous sodium nitrate (and nitric acid) was investigated. The extraction mechanism was established an...

Yu Cui; Yufen Hu; Yanju Zhang; Shaohong Yin…

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Nitrate occurrence and attenuation in the major aquifers of England and Wales  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Examination of the delta15N composition of infiltrating nitrate relative...L., Zech, W., The composition of dissolved organic matter...Migration and attenuation of agrochemical pollutants: insights from...The nitrogen isotope composition of groundwater nitrates from...

M.O. Rivett; J.W.N. Smith; S.R. Buss; P. Morgan

99

E-Print Network 3.0 - ammonium nitrate-fuel oil Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nitrate-fuel oil Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: ammonium nitrate-fuel oil Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 ORNL 2010-G01068jcn UT-B ID...

100

Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solution to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Determination of Uranium 7 Specific Gravity by Pycnometry 15-20 Free Acid by Oxalate Complexation 21-27 Determination of Thorium 28 Determination of Chromium 29 Determination of Molybdenum 30 Halogens Separation by Steam Distillation 31-35 Fluoride by Specific Ion Electrode 36-42 Halogen Distillate Analysis: Chloride, Bromide, and Iodide by Amperometric Microtitrimetry 43 Determination of Chloride and Bromide 44 Determination of Sulfur by X-Ray Fluorescence 45 Sulfate Sulfur by (Photometric) Turbidimetry 46 Phosphorus by the Molybdenum Blue (Photometric) Method 54-61 Silicon by the Molybdenum Blue (Photometric) Method 62-69 Carbon by Persulfate Oxidation-Acid Titrimetry 70 Conversion to U3O8 71-74 Boron by ...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination baseload nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Tracking the Sources of Nitrate in Groundwater Using Coupled Nitrogen and Boron Isotopes:? A Synthesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Studied were carried out in three different hydrogeological contexts in Francefractured bedrock (Arguenon, Brittany), deep alluvial groundwater (Pia, Pyrenees), and subsurface alluvial groundwater (Ile du Chambon, Allier)in order to determine whether, regardless of the hydrogeological context, the combined use of nitrogen and boron would allow both the identification of pollution sources and the semiquantification of their respective contributions to the observed NO3 levels in groundwater. ... For isotope measurements, the groundwater samples were collected in either 10-L jerry cans (for nitrogen isotopes determination) or 1-L bottles (for boron isotopes). ... The stable isotopes of the conservative element boron, 11B and 10B, have been employed as co-migrating isotopic tracers to trace potential sources of nitrate obsd. in groundwater pumped from a large capacity 0.167 m3/s irrigation well in the Avra Valley of southeastern Arizona. ...

David Widory; Emmanuelle Petelet-Giraud; Philippe Négrel; Bernard Ladouche

2004-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

102

Total Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Nitrate Measurements in the  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Total Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Nitrate Measurements in the Southwest Pacific during Austral Autumn, 1990: Results from NOAA/PMEL CGC-90 Cruise. Total Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Nitrate Measurements in the Southwest Pacific during Austral Autumn, 1990: Results from NOAA/PMEL CGC-90 Cruise. NDP-052 (1995) data Download the Data and ASCII Documentation files of NDP-052 PDF Download a PDF of NDP-052 image Contributed by Marilyn F. Lamb and Richard A. Feely Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory Seattle, Washington and Lloyd Moore and Donald K. Atwood Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory Miami, Florida Prepared by Alexander Kozyr* Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. *Energy, Environment, and Resources Center The University of Tennessee Knoxville, Tennessee Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 4420 Date Published: September 1995

103

Infrared absorption coefficients of gaseous chlorine nitrate at 296 K  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chlorine nitrate (ClONO{sub 2}) is a temporary reservoir species which couples the ClO{sub x} and NO{sub x} catalytic cycles responsible for ozone depletion in the stratosphere. The identification and quantitative estimation of ClONO{sub 2} in the stratosphere has been achieved using its characteristic absorptions around 1,292 cm{sup {minus}1}. Peak and integrated absorption coefficients of the {nu}{sub 1}, {nu}{sub 2}, {nu}{sub 3} and {nu}{sub 4} fundamental bands of chlorine nitrate were measured at resolutions of 0.13 cm{sup {minus}1} for both pure and pressure-broadened samples at 296 K. The results are compared to previous literature data.

Tuazon, E.C. (Univ. of California, Riverside (USA)); Wallington, T.J. (Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (USA))

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Role of methyl nitrate in plasma exhaust treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is growing interest in the use of a nonthermal plasma combined with a catalyst for NO{sub x} removal from diesel engine exhaust streams. Such exhaust streams contain excess oxygen (typically 6--10%), low concentrations of hydrocarbons (typically 100--1,000 ppm), and significant concentrations of water (typically 5--12%). Conversion of NO{sub x} to environmentally acceptable compounds, without requiring a scrubber or an added reductant, is the desired end result. In their research the authors observe the formation of substantial amounts of methyl nitrate (CH{sub 3}ONO{sub 2}) in the plasma-catalyst system. CH{sub 3}ONO{sub 2} was prepared and added to the gas blend on test equipment simulating a diesel exhaust gas. A dielectric barrier plasma discharge was followed by a zeolite-based catalyst. Methyl nitrate introduced upstream of the plasma discharge is largely unreacted upon passing through the plasma. CH{sub 3}ONO{sub 2} arriving at the catalyst is converted to methanol and NO{sub 2}. While methyl nitrate was shown to be formed in this system, it is not a significant intermediate in the mechanism of conversion of NO{sub x} to nitrogen.

Hoard, J.W.; Wallington, T.J.; Ball, J.C.; Hurley, M.D.; Wodzisz, K.; Balmer, M.L.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Watershed scale fungal community characterization along a pH gradient in a subsurface environment co-contaminated with uranium and nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to characterize fungal communities in a subsurface environment co-contaminated with uranium and nitrate at the watershed scale, and to determine the potential contribution of fungi to contaminant transformation (nitrate attenuation). The abundance, distribution and diversity of fungi in subsurface groundwater samples were determined using quantitative and semi-quantitative molecular techniques, including quantitative PCR of eukaryotic SSU rRNA genes and pyrosequencing of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. Potential bacterial and fungal denitrification was assessed in sediment-groundwater slurries amended with antimicrobial compounds and in fungal pure cultures isolated from subsurface. Our results demonstrate that subsurface fungal communities are dominated by members of the phylum Ascomycota, and a pronounced shift in fungal community composition occurs across the groundwater pH gradient at the field site, with lower diversity observed under acidic (pH < 4.5) conditions. Fungal isolates recovered from subsurface sediments were shown to reduce nitrate to nitrous oxide, including cultures of the genus Coniochaeta that were detected in abundance in pyrosequence libraries of site groundwater samples. Denitrifying fungal isolates recovered from the site were classified, and found to be distributed broadly within the phylum Ascomycota, and within a single genus within the Basidiomycota. Potential denitrification rate assays with sediment-groundwater slurries showed the potential for subsurface fungi to reduce nitrate to nitrous oxide under in situ acidic pH conditions.

Jasrotia, Puja [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Green, Stefan [University of Illinois, Chicago] [University of Illinois, Chicago; Canion, Andy [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Overholt, Will [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Prakash, Om [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Wafula, Dennis [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta; Hubbard, Daniela [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Watson, David B [ORNL] [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL] [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL] [ORNL; Kostka, [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Climate Change Update: Baseload Geothermal is One of the Lowest...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of electricity, geothermal energy has a broad range of other applications including district heating, industrial processes, and direct space heating. Not only are these...

107

Project Profile: Modular and Scalable Baseload Molten Salt Plant...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

salt receiver A distributed molten salt transport system Hybridization with natural gas or biofuels. Publications, Patents, and Awards J. E. Pacheco, C. Moursund, D. Rogers;...

108

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous magnesium nitrate Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in aqueous-phase atmospheric aerosols from... , a fundamental understanding of nitrate ions at the ... Source: Allen, Heather C.- Department of Chemistry, Ohio State University...

109

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous nitrate flowsheet Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in aqueous-phase atmospheric aerosols from... , a fundamental understanding of nitrate ions at the ... Source: Allen, Heather C.- Department of Chemistry, Ohio State University...

110

E-Print Network 3.0 - ammonium nitrate aerosols Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ON MINERAL DUSTS: CRYSTALLINE OR AQUEOUS? Summary: 02138, USA Keywords: Phase transition; Atmospheric Aerosols; Ammonium sulfate; Ammonium nitrate... that of ammonium...

111

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous nitrate solutions Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biology and Medicine 23 Evaluation for Biological Reduction of Nitrate and Perchlorate in Brine Water Using Summary: in high salt solution. One culture was capable of reducing up...

112

E-Print Network 3.0 - ammonium nitrates Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

an electron acceptor... production, but when either ... Source: Collection: Renewable Energy ; Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization 10 Nitrate accumulation Ammonium nitrogen...

113

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline nitrate solutions Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2010 www.atmos-chem-phys.net1039992010 Summary: . The model in- cludes explicit transport of size-resolved mineral dust and its alkalinity, nitrate... in terms of...

114

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic nitrate-dependent oxidation Sample...  

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of the experiment... nitrate- dependent Fe(II) ... Source: Roden, Eric E. - Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wisconsin at Madison Collection: Environmental...

115

Thermal characterisation of an innovative quaternary molten nitrate mixture for energy storage in CSP plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Enhancements to energy storage systems developed for solar thermoelectric technologies can yield considerable increases in efficiency for this type of renewable energy. Important improvements include the design of innovative storage fluids, such as molten salts possessing low melting points and high thermal stabilities. This research examines the design of an innovative quaternary molten nitrate mixture, with the goal of improving the solar salt used currently as an energy storage fluid in CSP plants. This quaternary salt, which contains different weight percentages of NaNO3, KNO3, LiNO3 and Ca(NO3)2, exhibits better physical and chemical properties than the binary solar salt (60% NaNO3+40% KNO3) currently used. The melting points, heat capacities and thermal stability of the quaternary mixtures were studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). In addition to DSC and TGA tests, viscosity and electrical conductivity measurements were carried out for the quaternary mixtures at different temperatures. The new salt was designed by taking into consideration the risk of solid species formation at high temperatures when calcium nitrate is present (which requires that the wt% does not exceed 20%) and the costs of LiNO3. These boundaries set the maximum wt% of LiNO3 to values below 15%. Finally it was determined that the proposed quaternary mixture, when used as a heat transfer fluid (HTF) in parabolic trough solar power plants, is able to expand plants? operating range to temperatures between 132 and 580 °C.

A.G. Fernández; S. Ushak; H. Galleguillos; F.J. Pérez

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Correction to ``Nitrate and colloid transport through coarse Hanford sediments under steady state,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Correction to ``Nitrate and colloid transport through coarse Hanford sediments under steady state), Correction to ``Nitrate and colloid transport through coarse Hanford sediments under steady state, variably and colloid transport through coarse Hanford sediments under steady state, variably saturated flow'' by Kelly

Flury, Markus

117

J. Phycol. 38, 971982 (2002) FIELD ASSAYS FOR MEASURING NITRATE REDUCTASE ACTIVITY IN ENTEROMORPHA SP.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and subsequent storage at 80 C preserved NR activity and allowed for later laboratory use of the optimized.; nitrate reductase; macroalgae; Mobile Bay; Ulva sp. Abbreviation: ASW, artificial seawater; FSW, filtered seawater; NR, nitrate reductase Macroalgal production is frequently limited by the availability

Sherman, Tim

118

Nitrate-responsive miR393/AFB3 regulatory module controls root system architecture in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environmental conditions is the modulation of root system architecture (RSA) in response to nitrate supplyNitrate-responsive miR393/AFB3 regulatory module controls root system architecture in ArabidopsisR393/AFB3 is a unique N- responsive module that controls root system architecture in response

Green, Pamela

119

Stainless steel corrosion by molten nitrates : analysis and lessons learned.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A secondary containment vessel, made of stainless 316, failed due to severe nitrate salt corrosion. Corrosion was in the form of pitting was observed during high temperature, chemical stability experiments. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy were all used to diagnose the cause of the failure. Failure was caused by potassium oxide that crept into the gap between the primary vessel (alumina) and the stainless steel vessel. Molten nitrate solar salt (89% KNO{sub 3}, 11% NaNO{sub 3} by weight) was used during chemical stability experiments, with an oxygen cover gas, at a salt temperature of 350-700 C. Nitrate salt was primarily contained in an alumina vessel; however salt crept into the gap between the alumina and 316 stainless steel. Corrosion occurred over a period of approximately 2000 hours, with the end result of full wall penetration through the stainless steel vessel; see Figures 1 and 2 for images of the corrosion damage to the vessel. Wall thickness was 0.0625 inches, which, based on previous data, should have been adequate to avoid corrosion-induced failure while in direct contact with salt temperature at 677 C (0.081-inch/year). Salt temperatures exceeding 650 C lasted for approximately 14 days. However, previous corrosion data was performed with air as the cover gas. High temperature combined with an oxygen cover gas obviously drove corrosion rates to a much higher value. Corrosion resulted in the form of uniform pitting. Based on SEM and EDS data, pits contained primarily potassium oxide and potassium chromate, reinforcing the link between oxides and severe corrosion. In addition to the pitting corrosion, a large blister formed on the side wall, which was mainly composed of potassium, chromium and oxygen. All data indicated that corrosion initiated internally and moved outward. There was no evidence of intergranular corrosion nor were there any indication of fast pathways along grain boundaries. Much of the pitting occurred near welds; however this was the hottest region in the chamber. Pitting was observed up to two inches above the weld, indicating independence from weld effects.

Kruizenga, Alan Michael

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Corrosion of Iron Stainless Steels in Molten Nitrate Salt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Energy storage for concentrating solar power (CSP) is a major area of research that seeks to lower the levelized cost of electricity within the aggressive SunShot goals of 6¢/kW-hrth[1–3]. One viable approach is sensible thermal energy storage (TES), which currently utilizes molten nitrate binary salt, stored at 575 °C in the hot tank of a two tank system [4,5]. Increasing the temperature limit within the hot tank requires a detailed understanding of materials corrosion behavior, in addition to salt thermal stability properties. High temperature nickel based alloys are the logical choice for strength and corrosion resistance as elevated temperatures will increase corrosion kinetics, however, the cost of nickel based alloys are nearly four times more expensive than iron based steels [6]. For this reason iron based stainless steels, specifically 321SS and 347SS (nominally Fe-17Cr-9Ni), were chosen for investigation at several temperatures in nitrate salt. 316SS, an elementally similar alloy, was susceptible to stress corrosion cracking while tested at Solar Two [4]. It was suggested that alloys with stabilizing additions of niobium (347SS) or titanium (321SS) would mitigate this deleterious behavior. Flat coupon samples were immersed in binary nitrate salts at temperatures of 400, 500, 600, and 680 °C, with air sparging on all tests. Samples were nominally removed at intervals of 500, 1000, 2000, and 3000 hours to acquire data on time varying weight gain information while simultaneously employing metallography to identify corrosion mechanisms occurring within the melt. Corrosion rates varied dramatically with temperature according to an Arrhenius-type behavior. 347SS and 321SS had very little oxidation for 400 and 500 °C, indicative of a protective corrosion scale and low corrosion kinetics. Data at 600 °C showed that 321SS tended toward linear oxidation behavior based on oxide spallation which was observed on the samples upon removal. Corrosion products at 500 °C had phases of iron oxide, with obvious chromium depletion as observed in energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) scans. 600 °C corrosion layers were primarily iron oxide with obvious phases of sodium ferrite on the outer surface. 680 °C marked an excessive rate of corrosion with metal loss in both alloys.

Alan Kruizenga; David Gill

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination baseload nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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121

Methane, Nonmethane Hydrocarbons, Alkyl Nitrates, and Chlorinated Carbon  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Trace Gases in Whole-Air Samples Atmospheric Trace Gases in Whole-Air Samples Methane, Nonmethane Hydrocarbons, Alkyl Nitrates, and Chlorinated Carbon Compounds including 3 Chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-11, CFC-12, and CFC-113) in Whole-air Samples graphics Graphics data Data Investigator Donald Blake Department of Chemistry, University of California Irvine, California, 92697 USA Period of Record April 1979 - December 2012 Methods Whole-air samples are collected in conditioned, evacuated, 2-L stainless steel canisters; each canister is filled to ambient pressure over a period of about 1 minute (approximately 20 seconds to 2 minutes). These canisters are returned to the University of California at Irvine for chromatographic analysis. Analysis for methane includes gas chromatography with flame ionization, as

122

Analysis of Enriched Uranyl Nitrate in Nested Annular Tank Array  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two series of experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory during the 1980s using highly enriched (93%) uranyl nitrate solution in annular tanks. [1, 2] Tanks were of typical sizes found in nuclear production plants. Experiments looked at tanks of varying radii in a co-located set of nested tanks, a 1 by 2 array, and a 1 by 3 array. The co-located set of tanks had been analyzed previously [3] as a benchmark for inclusion within the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments. [4] The current study represents the benchmark analysis of the 1 by 3 array of a series of nested annular tanks. Of the seventeen configurations performed in this set of experiments, twelve were evaluated and nine were judged as acceptable benchmarks.

John D. Bess; James D. Cleaver

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Studies on the reverse osmosis treatment of uranyl nitrate solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aqueous effluent generated in uranium processing, particularly in the nuclear fuel fabrication step, contains mainly uranium nitrate. This requires treatment before discharge into the environment to meet stringent standards. This paper presents the performance of cellulose acetate membranes with regard to rejection of uranium under reverse osmotic conditions for feed concentrations up to 200 mg/l of uranium, which corresponds to the levels normally prevalent in the effluents. The use of additives like the disodium salt of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and sodium sulfate for the improvement of reverse osmosis performance of the above membranes was also investigated. In the light of the experimental results, the suitability of reverse osmosis for the decontamination of uranium effluents is discussed.

Prabhakar, S.; Panicker, S.T.; Misra, B.M.; Ramani, P.S. (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Role of Nitrate in Conditioning Aquifer Sediments for Technetium Bioreduction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Earth System Science Institute, School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT, U.K., Williamson Research Centre for Molecular Environmental Science, School of Earth, Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL, U.K., and Centre for Radiochemistry Research, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL, U.K. ... These results have implications for Tc-cycling in contaminated environments where nitrate has been considered undesirable, but where it may enhance Fe(III)-reduction via a novel pH “conditioning” step. ... Wilkins, M. J.; Livens, F. R.; Vaughan, D. J.; Beadle, I.; Lloyd, J. R. The influence of microbial redox cycling on radionuclide mobility in the subsurface at a low-level radioactive waste storage site Geobiology 2007, 5, 293– 301 ...

Gareth T. W. Law; Andrea Geissler; Christopher Boothman; Ian T. Burke; Francis R. Livens; Jonathan R. Lloyd; Katherine Morris

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

125

FUMIGATION, GROSS NITROGEN TRANSFORMATIONS, N-15, NITRATE, RATES, SOIL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FUMIGATION, GROSS NITROGEN TRANSFORMATIONS, N-15, FUMIGATION, GROSS NITROGEN TRANSFORMATIONS, N-15, NITRATE, RATES, SOIL 1909 Pushnik, J.C., R.S. Demaree, J.L.J. Houpis, W.B. Flory, S.M. Bauer, and P.D. Anderson. 1995. The effect of elevated carbon dioxide on a Sierra-Nevadan dominant species: Pinus ponderosa. Journal of Biogeography 22(2-3):249-254. The impact of increasing atmospheric CO2 has not been fully evaluated on western coniferous forest species. Two year old seedlings of Pinus ponderosa were grown in environmentally controlled chambers under increased CO2 conditions (525 mu L L(-1) and 700 mu L L(-1)) for 6 months. These trees exhibited morphological, physiological and biochemical alterations when compared to our controls (350 mu L L(- 1)). Analysis of whole plant biomass distribution has shown no

126

Selective and quantitative nitrate electroreduction to ammonium using a porous copper electrode in an electrochemical flow cell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,version1-10Jul2014 #12;3 1. Introduction Nitrate ions (NO3 - ) contamination of ground and surface water and physiochemical methods are used for nitrate removal from contaminated water but show drastic limits are costly [10] and produce secondary brine wastes, because the nitrate are only separated but not destroyed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

127

Application of municipal sludge (biosolids) for agricultural purposes and groundwater nitrate concentrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the more popular means of handling sewage sludge from municipalities is its application to agricultural lands. A variety of crops are grown with the expectation that plants will utilize the nitrogen. However, a complex scenario allows some of the nitrate to move below root depth and eventually to the water table at depths of up to 30 ft. The City of Raleigh, NC injects sewage sludge ( residuals'', biosolids'') into soils derived largely from the Rolesville Granite in an area of typical rolling Piedmont topography. A 1975 background study of part of the site demonstrated differences in groundwater quality between areas farmed over a period of years and areas dominated by second-growth pine and harwood forests. Groundwater quality data collected semiannually between 1982 and 1988 show gradual buildup of nitrate in some fields; in others groundwater quality apparently remains unaffected by nitrate from the sludge. Monitoring well placement may play a role in these differences. Minimum time from the sludge application to an increase in groundwater nitrate is from 9 to 12 months. An ongoing study of a 12-acre field which lay fallow for a number of years prior to sludge application in 1990 demonstrates that some nitrate does move downward fairly rapidly, its movement being recorded in both the saprolite and groundwater. Comparison of nitrate content of groundwater from monitoring wells at a nearby dairy farm shows that normal agricultural practices may also increase the nitrate content of the shallow groundwater.

Welby, C.W. (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Standard test method for gamma energy emission from fission products in uranium hexafluoride and uranyl nitrate solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This test method covers the measurement of gamma energy emitted from fission products in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and uranyl nitrate solution. It is intended to provide a method for demonstrating compliance with UF6 specifications C 787 and C 996 and uranyl nitrate specification C 788. 1.2 The lower limit of detection is 5000 MeV Bq/kg (MeV/kg per second) of uranium and is the square root of the sum of the squares of the individual reporting limits of the nuclides to be measured. The limit of detection was determined on a pure, aged natural uranium (ANU) solution. The value is dependent upon detector efficiency and background. 1.3 The nuclides to be measured are106Ru/ 106Rh, 103Ru,137Cs, 144Ce, 144Pr, 141Ce, 95Zr, 95Nb, and 125Sb. Other gamma energy-emitting fission nuclides present in the spectrum at detectable levels should be identified and quantified as required by the data quality objectives. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its us...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Staining of in vivo subsurface degradation in dental composites with silver nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A previously reported technique for staining areas of degradation in dental composite restorations was evaluated in 51 removed restorations. The staining reagent was silver nitrate, which penetrated the degraded subsurface as ionic silver and was subsequently developed into colored deposits of metallic silver. Several artefacts were recognized that resulted in an apparent image of subsurface stain. Most importantly, the presence of a layer of adsorbed silver on the edge of the specimen exaggerated the extent of staining. In order for the true depth of stain to be determined, thin sections of the materials should first be examined with a stereomicroscope to distinguish any contribution from adsorbed silver on the specimen edge. With this regimen, no stain was present in 41% of the restorations, and in a further 30%, the depth of stain was less than 50 microns. In two composites, the depth of stain was greater than 900 microns, and in a number of specimens, localized stain was found in association with attrition scars. Energy-dispersive x-ray analysis indicated that the amount of silver present in the degraded layers was very small. Overall, the results indicated that the staining technique is useful in the study of composite degradation.

Mair, L.H. (Univ. of Liverpool (England))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Phase equilibrium conditions for simulated landfill gas hydrate formation in aqueous solutions of tetrabutylammonium nitrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Hydrate phase equilibrium conditions for the simulated landfill gas (LFG) of methane and carbon dioxide (50 mol% methane, 50 mol% carbon dioxide) were investigated with the pressure range of (1.90 to 13.83) MPa and temperature range of (280.0 to 288.3) K at (0.050, 0.170, 0.340, and 0.394) mass fraction (w) of tetrabutylammonium nitrate (TBANO3). The phase boundary between liquid–vapor–hydrate (L–V–H) phases and liquid–vapor (L–V) phases was determined by employing an isochoric pressure-search method. The phase equilibrium data measured showed that TBANO3 appeared a remarkable promotion effect at w TBANO 3  = 0.394, corresponding to TBANO3 · 26H2O, but inhibition effect at w TBANO 3  = (0.050, or 0.170) on the semiclathrate hydrate formation. In addition, the application of TBANO3 at 0.340 mass fraction, corresponding to TBANO3 · 32H2O, displayed promotion effect at lower pressures (below 6.38 MPa) and inhibition effect at higher pressures (above 6.38 MPa).

Ling-Li Shi; De-Qing Liang; Dong-Liang Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

On the Chemla effect in molten alkali nitrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Chemla effect concerns the strong composition dependence of the internal ionic mobilities of cations in mixtures of two molten salts with a common anion in which the mobility of the large cation can be higher than the small one at low concentrations of the latter. Molecular dynamics simulations of molten ( Li Cs)NO 3 ( Li K)NO 3 ( Li Na)NO 3 ( Na Cs)NO 3 each at two different compositions at a given temperature and also pure LiNO 3 and pure KNO 3 have been performed with the aim of reproducing the Chemla effect. The key role played by anion polarization on the Chemla effect in molten alkali nitrates is demonstrated by comparing the calculated mobilities using nonpolarizable and polarizable models. Polarization effects were included in the simulations by using a previously proposed fluctuating charge model (FCM) for the NO 3 ? anion. It is shown that a single potential model for a ( M 1 M 2 ) NO 3 mixture gives the correct composition dependence of the M 1 and the M 2 mobilities provided that polarization effects are included in the model. The FCM is thus transferable between different systems but not its nonpolarizable counterpart. Structure and dynamics of the simulated systems are discussed in light of proposed models for the Chemla effect.

Mauro C. C. Ribeiro

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Development of electrochemical denitrification from waste water containing ammonium nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors developed processes to dentrify waste water containing ammonium nitrate discharged from the nuclear fuel manufacturing works and to recover nitric acid and ammonia. For denitrification they applied the operating method and the conditions of operation to make 0.4mM or less from NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} waste water of 1.5 M by 3 stages of electrodialysis cells. To recover nitric acid and ammonium water, they separated HNO{sub 3} solution of 6 M and NH{sub 4}OH solution with one unit of electrolysis cell, then absorbed NH{sub 3} gas from NH{sub 4}OH solution with water and applied the condition of operation to recover 8 M NH{sub 4}OH solution. The authors demonstrated that treatment and recovery can be carried out stably with actual waste water with a system through the combination of previously mentioned electrodialysis cells, electrolysis cells and an ammonia gas absorber. At present they are planning a plant where NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} waste water of 4,500 mol can be treated per day.

Sawa, Toshio; Hirose, Yasuo; Ishii, Yoshinori; Takatsudo, Atsushi; Wakasugi, Kazuhico; Hayashi, Hiroshi

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

133

Hugoniot and Shock Initiation Studies of Isopropyl Nitrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Isopropyl nitrate (IPN) is a liquid explosive of rather low energy. We have measured the sound speed and used it in the universal liquid Hugoniot to produce an estimated Hugoniot for this material. Gas?gun?driven multiple?magnetic?gauge measurements were made to measure a Hugoniot state at 6 GPa; it was in good agreement with the prediction. Two similar experiments were conducted at higher pressure inputs to study the shock?to?detonation transition in IPN; the high inputs required for initiation necessitated the use of a two?stage gun. One experiment with an input of 9.0 GPa into the IPN produced a run to detonation of about 3 mm and the in?situ particle velocity profiles showed the expected homogeneous initiation behavior of a growing wave behind the shock front that overtakes the front and decays to a steady detonation. The reactive wave in the shocked IPN appears to have achieved a steady superdetonation in both of the initiation experiments. This is the first time a steady superdetonation has been measured with in?situ gauges.

S. A. Sheffield; L. L. Davis; M. R. Baer; Ray Engelke; R. R. Alcon; A. M. Renlund

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Hugoniot and shock initiation studies of isopropyl nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isopropyl nitrate (IPN) is a liquid explosive of rather low energy. We have measured the sound speed and used it in the universal liquid Hugoniot to produce an estimated Hugoniot for this material. Gas-gun-driven, multiple-magnetic-gauge measurements were made to measure a Hugoniot state at 6 GPa; it was in good agreement with the prediction. Two similar experiments were conducted at higher pressure inputs to study the shock-to-detonation transition in IPN; the high inputs required for initiation necessitated the use of a two-stage gun. One experiment with an input of 9.0 GPa into the IPN produced a run to detonation of about 3 mm and the in-situ particle velocity profiles showed the expected homogeneous initiation behavior of a growing wave behind the shock front that overtakes the front and decays to a steady detonation. The reactive wave in the shocked IPN appears to have achieved a steady superdetonation in both of the initiation experiments. This is the first time a steady superdetonation has been measured with in-situ gauges.

Sheffield, S. A. (Stephen A.); Davis, L. L. (Lloyd L.); Baer, M. R. (Mel R.); Engelke, R. P. (Raymond P.); Alcon, R. R. (Robert R.); Renlund, Anita Mariana

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

A Conceptual Nitrate Transport Model and Its Application at Different Scales  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Liu et al. [12...] reported the calibration of a diffuse nitrate model (the DNMT model) at White Cart Water Catchment against the observed water quality...K 0 (the hydraulic conductivity at grou...

Shuming Liu; Peter Tucker; Martin Mansell

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Spring-neap modulation of internal tide mixing and vertical nitrate ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sep 1, 2007 ... Measurements of the intra-tidal and spring–neap variation in the vertical flux of nitrate into ... ultimately dissipates the energy of the internal tide.

2007-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

137

Ethylene oxidation by lithium nitrate in the presence of palladium acetate in acetic acid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Data are reported on variations of the gas phase volume and product accumulation in ethylene oxidation by lithium nitrate in acetic acid solutions, catalyzed by palladium acetate. An assumption is made on the rou...

N. I. Kuznetsova; A. F. Danilyuk…

138

Water purification of nitrates by low-pressure reverse osmosis method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper has investigated possibilities and basic regularities of water purification of nitrates by low pressure reverse osmosis. The negative influence of chlorides and sulfates ... made on expediency of using ...

V. V. Goncharuk; V. O. Osipenko…

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Sodium-Copper Exchange on Wyoming Montmorillonite in Chloride, Perchlorate, Nitrate, and Sulfate Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sodium-Copper Exchange on Wyoming Montmorillonite in Chloride, Perchlorate, Nitrate, and Sulfate. The copper exchange capacity (CuEC) and Na-Cu exchange reactions on Wyoming montmo- rillonite were studied

Sparks, Donald L.

140

Application of Artificially Immobilized Microorganisms to Nitrate Removal from Drinking Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Nitrate Removal from Drinking Water By Sean X. Liu andFor biological treatment of drinking water, several crucialalginate gel beads to drinking water treatment has proved to

Liu, Sean X; Hermanowicz, Slawomir W

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination baseload nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Herbicide and nitrate distribution in central Iowa rainfall  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Herbicides are detected in rainfall; however, these are a small fraction of the total applied. This study was designed to evaluate monthly and annual variation in atrazine (6-chloro-N-ethyl-N{prime}-(1-methylethyl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine), alachlor (2-chloro-N-(2,6-diethylphenyl)-N-(methoxymethyl)acetamide), metolachlor (2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N-(2-methoxy-1-methylethyl)acetamide), and NO{sub 3}-N concentrations in rainfall over Walnut Creek watershed south of Ames, IA. The study began in 1991 and continued through 1994. Within the watershed, two wet/dry precipitation samplers were positioned 4 km apart. Detections varied during the year with >90% of the herbicide detections occurring in April through early July. Concentrations varied among events from nondetectable amounts to concentrations of 154 {mu}g L{sup {minus}1}, which occurred when atrazine was applied during an extremely humid day immediately followed by rainfall of <10 mm that washed spray drift from the atmosphere. This was a local scale phenomenon, because the other collector had a more typical concentration of 1.7 {mu}g L{sup {minus}1} with an 8-mm rainfall. VAriation between the two collectors suggests that local scale meteorological processes affect herbicide movement. Yearly atrazine deposition totals were >100 {mu}g m{sup {minus}2} representing <0.1% of the amount applied. Nitrate-N concentrations in precipitation were uniformly distributed throughout the year and without annual variation in the concentrations. Deposition rates of NO{sub 3}-N were about 1.2 g m{sup {minus}2}. Annual loading onto the watershed was about 25% of the amount applied from all forms of N fertilizers. Movement and rates of deposition provide an understanding of the processes and magnitude of the impact of agriculture on the environment. 7 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Hatfield, J.L.; Prueger, J.H.; Pfeiffer, R.L. [National Soil Tilth Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Wesley, C.K. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium nitrate solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium nitrate solutions to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Plutonium by Controlled-Potential Coulometry Plutonium by Amperometric Titration with Iron(II) Plutonium by Diode Array Spectrophotometry Free Acid by Titration in an Oxalate Solution 8 to 15 Free Acid by Iodate Precipitation-Potentiometric Titration Test Method 16 to 22 Uranium by Arsenazo I Spectrophotometric Test Method 23 to 33 Thorium by Thorin Spectrophotometric Test Method 34 to 42 Iron by 1,10-Phenanthroline Spectrophotometric Test Method 43 to 50 Impurities by ICP-AES Chloride by Thiocyanate Spectrophotometric Test Method 51 to 58 Fluoride by Distillation-Spectrophotometric Test Method 59 to 66 Sulfate by Barium Sulfate Turbidimetric Test Method 67 to 74 Isotopic Composition by Mass Spectrom...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Impaired mitochondrial respiration and protein nitration in the rat hippocampus after acute inhalation of combustion smoke  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Survivors of massive inhalation of combustion smoke endure critical injuries, including lasting neurological complications. We have previously reported that acute inhalation of combustion smoke disrupts the nitric oxide homeostasis in the rat brain. In this study, we extend our findings and report that a 30-minute exposure of awake rats to ambient wood combustion smoke induces protein nitration in the rat hippocampus and that mitochondrial proteins are a sensitive nitration target in this setting. Mitochondria are central to energy metabolism and cellular signaling and are critical to proper cell function. Here, analyses of the mitochondrial proteome showed elevated protein nitration in the course of a 24-hour recovery following exposure to smoke. Mass spectrometry identification of several significantly nitrated mitochondrial proteins revealed diverse functions and involvement in central aspects of mitochondrial physiology. The nitrated proteins include the ubiquitous mitochondrial creatine kinase, F1-ATP synthase {alpha} subunit, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3), succinate dehydrogenase Fp subunit, and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC1) protein. Furthermore, acute exposure to combustion smoke significantly compromised the respiratory capacity of hippocampal mitochondria. Importantly, elevated protein nitration and reduced mitochondrial respiration in the hippocampus persisted beyond the time required for restoration of normal oxygen and carboxyhemoglobin blood levels after the cessation of exposure to smoke. Thus, the time frame for intensification of the various smoke-induced effects differs between blood and brain tissues. Taken together, our findings suggest that nitration of essential mitochondrial proteins may contribute to the reduction in mitochondrial respiratory capacity and underlie, in part, the brain pathophysiology after acute inhalation of combustion smoke.

Lee, Heung M.; Reed, Jason; Greeley, George H. [Department of Surgery, University of Texas Medical Branch (United States); Englander, Ella W. [Department of Surgery, University of Texas Medical Branch (United States); Shriners Hospitals for Children, Galveston, TX (United States)], E-mail: elenglan@utmb.edu

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Uranyl nitrate-exposed rat alveolar macrophages cell death: Influence of superoxide anion and TNF ? mediators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium compounds are widely used in the nuclear fuel cycle, military and many other diverse industrial processes. Health risks associated with uranium exposure include nephrotoxicity, cancer, respiratory, and immune disorders. Macrophages present in body tissues are the main cell type involved in the internalization of uranium particles. To better understand the pathological effects associated with depleted uranium (DU) inhalation, we examined the metabolic activity, phagocytosis, genotoxicity and inflammation on DU-exposed rat alveolar macrophages (12.5–200 ?M). Stability and dissolution of DU could differ depending on the dissolvent and in turn alter its biological action. We dissolved DU in sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO{sub 3} 100 mM) and in what we consider a more physiological vehicle resembling human internal media: sodium chloride (NaCl 0.9%). We demonstrate that uranyl nitrate in NaCl solubilizes, enters the cell, and elicits its cytotoxic effect similarly to when it is diluted in NaHCO{sub 3}. We show that irrespective of the dissolvent employed, uranyl nitrate impairs cell metabolism, and at low doses induces both phagocytosis and generation of superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup ?}). At high doses it provokes the secretion of TNF? and through all the range of doses tested, apoptosis. We herein suggest that at DU low doses O{sub 2}{sup ?} may act as the principal mediator of DNA damage while at higher doses the signaling pathway mediated by O{sub 2}{sup ?} may be blocked, prevailing damage to DNA by the TNF? route. The study of macrophage functions after uranyl nitrate treatment could provide insights into the pathophysiology of uranium?related diseases. -- Highlights: ? Uranyl nitrate effect on cultured macrophages is linked to the doses and independent of its solubility. ? At low doses uranyl nitrate induces generation of superoxide anion. ? At high doses uranyl nitrate provokes secretion of TNF?. ? Uranyl nitrate induces apoptosis through all the range of doses tested.

Orona, N.S. [School of Science and Technology, National University of General Martín, Avda Gral Paz 5445 (1650) San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [School of Science and Technology, National University of General Martín, Avda Gral Paz 5445 (1650) San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Tasat, D.R., E-mail: deborah.tasat@unsam.edu.ar [School of Science and Technology, National University of General Martín, Avda Gral Paz 5445 (1650) San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); School of Dentistry, University of Buenos Aires, M. T. de Alvear 2142 (1122), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

145

Crystal chemistry of new thorium nitrates and chromates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structures and infrared spectra of six novel thorium compounds are reported. Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(OH){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (1) crystallizes in space group C2/c, a=14.050(1), b=8.992(7), c=5.954(5) Å, ?=101.014(2)°. K{sub 2}Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 6} (2), P-3, a=13.606(1), c=6.641(6) Å. (C{sub 12}H{sub 28}N){sub 2}Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 6} (3), P21/c, a=14.643(4), b=15.772(5), c=22.316(5) Å, ?=131.01(1)°. KTh(NO{sub 3}){sub 5}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (4), P21/c, a=10.070(8), b=12.731(9), c=13.231(8) Å, ?=128.647(4)°. Th(CrO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (5), P21/n, a=12.731(1), b=9.469(8), c=12.972(1) Å, ?=91.793(2)°. K{sub 2}Th{sub 3}(CrO{sub 4}){sub 7}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10} (6), Ama2, a=19.302(8), b=15.580(6), c=11.318(6) Å. The coordination polyhedra about Th in these structures are diverse. Th is coordinated by 9 O atoms in 5 and 6, seven of which are from monodentate (CrO{sub 4}) tetrahedra and two are (H{sub 2}O). The Th in compound 1 is coordinated by ten O atoms, four of which are O atoms of two bidentate (NO{sub 3}) triangles and six of which are (OH) and (H{sub 2}O). In compounds 2, 3 and 4 the Th is coordinate by 12 O atoms. In 2 and 3 there are six bidentate (NO{sub 3}) triangles, and in 4 ten of the O atoms are part of five bidentate (NO{sub 3}) triangles and the others are (H{sub 2}O) groups. The structural units of these compounds consist of a chain of thorium and nitrate polyhedra (1), isolated thorium hexanitrate clusters (2, 3), an isolated thorium pentanitrate dihydrate cluster (4), and a sheet (6) and framework (5) of thorium and chromate polyhedra. These structures illustrate the complexity inherent in the crystal chemistry of Th.

Sigmon, Ginger E.; Burns, Peter C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Factors affecting the discharge lifetime of lithium-molten nitrate thermal battery cells using soluble cathode materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of soluble cathode materials in molten nitrate electrolyte thermal battery cells presents several problems related to cathode...? rich separator layer.

G. E. McManis; A. N. Fletcher; M. H. Miles

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

CX-000549: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

49: Categorical Exclusion Determination 49: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000549: Categorical Exclusion Determination Solubility Testing of Boron and Gadolinium in Nitric Acid CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/24/2009 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office The object of the test is to test solubility of boron and gadolinium in nitric acid for a range of conditions. Nitric acid from 0.3 to 5 moles will be combined with aluminum nitrate (Al(NO3)3) ranging from 1 to 3 moles with either gadolinium nitrate (Gd(NO3)3) or boric acid ranging from 1 to 5 grams per liter. Solutions will be held at constant temperature (20 degrees Celsius) and will be observed for visible solids potentially for several weeks. Solutions may be centrifuged or filtered to aid in determining

148

Low time resolution analysis of polar ice cores cannot detect impulsive nitrate events  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ice cores are archives of climate change and possibly large solar proton events (SPEs). Wolff et al. (2012) used a single event, a nitrate peak in the GISP2-H core, which McCracken et al. (2001a) time associated with the poorly quantified 1859 Carrington event, to discredit SPE-produced, impulsive nitrate deposition in polar ice. This is not the ideal test case. We critique the Wolff et al. analysis and demonstrate that the data they used cannot detect impulsive nitrate events because of resolution limitations. We suggest re-examination of the top of the Greenland ice sheet at key intervals over the last two millennia with attention to fine resolution and replicate sampling of multiple species. This will allow further insight into polar depositional processes on a sub-seasonal scale, including atmospheric sources, transport mechanisms to the ice sheet, post-depositional interactions, and a potential SPE association.

Smart, D F; Melott, A L; Laird, C M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

The reactivity of cesium nickel ferrocyanide towards nitrate and nitrite salts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beginning in late 1988, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) began an experimental program at the request of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to investigate the effects of temperature on the oxidation reaction between synthetic nickel cesium ferrocyanide (FeCN) and nitrates and nitrites representative of materials present in some of the Hanford single-shell tanks (SSTs). After completing a preliminary series of experiments in 1988, the program was expanded to include five tasks to evaluate the effect of selected compositional and operational parameters on the reaction and explosion temperatures of FeCN and nitrate and/or nitrite mixtures. 10 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

Burger, L.L.; Scheele, R.D.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

CX-005775: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5: Categorical Exclusion Determination 5: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005775: Categorical Exclusion Determination Synthesis of Inorganic Materials Using Microwave Reactor CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/07/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office A microwave accelerated reaction system (MARS) will be used to synthesize various metal oxides and oxyhydroxides from the corresponding metal nitrates (Aluminiun, Iron, Manganese, Nickel) and sodium hydroxide. In addition, sodium titanate materials will be synthesized from titanium isopropoxide and titanium dioxide. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-005775.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-002987: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004813: Categorical Exclusion Determination

151

[Task 1.] Biodenitrification of low nitrate solar pond waters using sequencing batch reactors. [Task 2.] Solidification/stabilization of high strength and biodenitrified heavy metal sludges with a Portland cement/flyash system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Process wastewater and sludges were accumulated on site in solar evaporation ponds during operations at the Department of Energy's Rocky Flats Plant (DOE/RF). Because of the extensive use of nitric acid in the processing of actinide metals, the process wastewater has high concentrations of nitrate. Solar pond waters at DOE/RF contain 300-60,000 mg NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}/L. Additionally, the pond waters contain varying concentrations of many other aqueous constituents, including heavy metals, alkali salts, carbonates, and low level radioactivity. Solids, both from chemical precipitation and soil material deposition, are also present. Options for ultimate disposal of the pond waters are currently being evaluated and include stabilization and solidification (S/S) by cementation. Removal of nitrates can enhance a wastes amenability to S/S, or can be a unit operation in another treatment scheme. Nitrate removal is also a concern for other sources of pollution at DOE/RF, including contaminated groundwater collected by interceptor trench systems. Finally, nitrate pollution is a problem at many other DOE facilities where actinide metals were processed. The primary objective of this investigation was to optimize biological denitrification of solar pond waters with nitrate concentrations of 300--2,100 mg NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}/L to below the drinking water standard of 45 mg NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}/L (10 mg N/L). The effect of pH upon process stability and denitrification rate was determined. In addition, the effect Cr(VI) on denitrification and fate of Cr(VI) in the presence of denitrifying bacteria was evaluated.

Figueroa, L.; Cook, N.E.; Siegrist, R.L.; Mosher, J.; Terry, S.; Canonico, S.

1995-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

152

Alkyl nitrate (C1-C3) depth profiles in the tropical Pacific Ocean E. E. Dahl,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and distribution of tropo- spheric ozone. Atmospheric alkyl nitrates are normally associated with polluted air free radical processes initiated by radioactive decay or cosmic rays, enzymatically mediated reactions expedition in the equatorial Pacific, an equatorial maximum in atmospheric ethyl and isopropyl nitrate

Saltzman, Eric

153

NITRATE UTILIZATION BY PHYTOPLANKTON IN LAKE SUPERIOR IS IMPAIRED BY LOW NUTRIENT (P, Fe) AVAILABILITY AND SEASONAL LIGHT LIMITATION--  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NITRATE UTILIZATION BY PHYTOPLANKTON IN LAKE SUPERIOR IS IMPAIRED BY LOW NUTRIENT (P, Fe utilization in this oligotrophic system. Clean sampling methods were used to collect water from Lake Superior during spring and summer 2004, and nitrate utilization was measured by monitoring bioreporter

Sterner, Robert W.

154

Change in Bacterial Community Structure during In Situ Biostimulation of Subsurface Sediment Cocontaminated with Uranium and Nitrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...403-410. 2 American Public Health Association. 1969...604-609. American Public Health Association, Washington...Geobacter species to remove uranium from the groundwater...nitrate, Fe(III), and uranium were extensively reduced...while nitrate was largely depleted. A large diversity of...

Nadia N. North; Sherry L. Dollhopf; Lainie Petrie; Jonathan D. Istok; David L. Balkwill; Joel E. Kostka

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Structural Changes of Bimetallic PdX/Cu (1-X) Nanocatalysts Developed for Nitrate Reduction of Drinking Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Drinking Water Huiping Xu1,2 , Ray Twesten3 , Kathryn Guy4 , John Shapley4 , Charles Werth5 , Anatoly alternative for nitrate removal in drinking water [1]. Fundamental understanding how the atomic arrangement for the purification of drinking water. INTRODUCTION Presently nitrate in drinking water is either not removed

Frenkel, Anatoly

156

CX-005861: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1: Categorical Exclusion Determination 1: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005861: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) Sludge Simulant Preparation CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/17/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office Sludge simulant is needed for rotary microfliter (RMF) testing. The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) sludge simulant is a blend of the following five major components: Iron-rich sludge simulant, specific supernate simulant, aluminum hydroxide solids, aluminum oxyhydroxide solids, and sodium oxalate solids. The specific supernate simulant has the following components: Sodium oxalate, aluminum nitrate, sodium phosphate, sodium sulfate, sodium nitrate, sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrite, and

157

Application of a modified denitrifying bacteria method for analyzing groundwater and vadose zone pore water nitrate at the Hanford Site, WA, USA.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

zone pore water nitrate at the Hanford Site, WA, USA. Woods,and Conrad, Mark The Hanford Site in southern WashingtonL have been reported for Hanford groundwaters, where nitrate

Woods, Katharine N.; Singleton, Michael J.; Conrad, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

California GAMA Special Study: An isotopic and dissolved gas investigation of nitrate source and transport to a public supply well in California's Central Valley  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study investigates nitrate contamination of a deep municipal drinking water production well in Ripon, CA to demonstrate the utility of natural groundwater tracers in constraining the sources and transport of nitrate to deep aquifers in the Central Valley. The goal of the study was to investigate the origin (source) of elevated nitrate and the potential for the deep aquifer to attenuate anthropogenic nitrate. The site is ideal for such an investigation. The production well is screened from 165-325 feet below ground surface and a number of nearby shallow and deep monitoring wells were available for sampling. Furthermore, potential sources of nitrate contamination to the well had been identified, including a fertilizer supply plant located approximately 1000 feet to the east and local almond groves. A variety of natural isotopic and dissolved gas tracers including {sup 3}H-{sup 3}He groundwater age and the isotopic composition of nitrate are applied to identify nitrate sources and to characterize nitrate transport. An advanced method for sampling production wells is employed to help identify contaminant contributions from specific screen intervals. Nitrate transport: Groundwater nitrate at this field site is not being actively denitrified. Groundwater parameters indicate oxic conditions, the dissolved gas data shows no evidence for excess nitrogen as the result of denitrification, and nitrate-N and -O isotope compositions do not display patterns typical of denitrification. Contaminant nitrate source: The ambient nitrate concentration in shallow groundwater at the Ripon site ({approx}12 mg/L as nitrate) is typical of shallow groundwaters affected by recharge from agricultural and urban areas. Nitrate concentrations in Ripon City Well 12 (50-58 mg/L as nitrate) are significantly higher than these ambient concentrations, indicating an additional source of anthropogenic nitrate is affecting groundwater in the capture zone of this municipal drinking water well. This study provides two new pieces of evidence that the Ripon Farm Services Plant is the source of elevated nitrate in Ripon City Well 12. (1) Chemical mass balance calculations using nitrate concentration, nitrate isotopic composition, and initial tritium activity all indicate that that the source water for elevated nitrate to Ripon City Well 12 is a very small component of the water produced by City Well 12 and thus must have extremely high nitrate concentration. The high source water nitrate concentration ({approx}1500 mg/L as nitrate) required by these mass balance calculations precludes common sources of nitrate such as irrigated agriculture, dairy wastewater, and septic discharge. Shallow groundwater under the Ripon Farm Services RFS plant does contain extremely high concentrations of nitrate (>1700 mg/L as nitrate). (2) Nitrogen and oxygen isotope compositions of nitrate indicate that the additional anthropogenic nitrate source to Ripon City Well 12 is significantly enriched in {delta}{sup 18}O-NO{sub 3}, an isotopic signature consistent with synthetic nitrate fertilizer, and not with human or animal wastewater discharge (i.e. dairy operations, septic system discharge, or municipal wastewater discharge), or with organic fertilizer. Monitoring wells on and near the RFS plant also have high {delta}{sup 18}O-NO{sub 3}, and the plant has handled and stored synthetic nitrate fertilizer that will have this isotopic signature. The results described here highlight the complexity of attributing nitrate found in long screened, high capacity wells to specific sources. In this case, the presence of a very high concentration source near the well site combined with sampling using multiple isotopic tracer techniques and specialized depth-specific techniques allowed fingerprinting of the source in the mixed-age samples drawn from the production well.

Singleton, M J; Moran, J E; Esser, B K; Roberts, S K; Hillegonds, D J

2010-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

159

Inhibition of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase by the Antitumor Agent Gallium Nitrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Gallium is known to bind to the iron transport protein transferrin...NSC 166828. gallium, tris(acetylacetonate). The gallium nitrate:transferrin...the binding of gallium to the iron transport protein transferrin...and incorporation into the iron storage protein ferritin...

Margareta M. Berggren; Leigh Ann Burns; Robert T. Abraham; and Garth Powis

1993-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

Nitrate and colloid transport through coarse Hanford sediments under steady state, variably saturated flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nitrate and colloid transport through coarse Hanford sediments under steady state, variably] At the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Reservation, colloid-facilitated transport is a potential of colloids through Hanford sediments under steady state, unsaturated flow conditions. We isolated colloids

Flury, Markus

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination baseload nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Applicability of Anaerobic Nitrate-Dependent Fe(II) Oxidation to Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery (MEOR)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Furthermore, both of the substrates of the NDFO organisms [Fe(II) and nitrate] and the various end products of the metabolism [Fe(III), nitrite, nitric oxide, and nitrous oxide] all have known anti-souring and sulfide-scouring activities. ... A glass wool pad was placed on the bottom of the bead beds to prevent beads from falling into the inlet tubing. ...

Hongbo Zhu; Han K. Carlson; John D. Coates

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

162

Bacterially mediated removal of phosphorus and cycling of nitrate and sulfate in the waste stream  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with an increase in ammonia showing there had to be an additional P removal process at the same timeBacterially mediated removal of phosphorus and cycling of nitrate and sulfate in the waste stream sludge Phosphorus removal Denitrification Apatite formation Sulfur cycling a b s t r a c t Simultaneous

Benning, Liane G.

163

Alkyl nitrate (C 1 -C 3 ) depth profiles in the tropical Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concentrations with a [ iPr]/[Et] ratio of 0.1±0.0. Noat all depths with an [iPr]/[Et] ratio of 0.2 ± 0.0. Thiswith ethyl nitrate with an [iPr]/[Et] ratio of 0.2 ± 0.0.

Dahl, E. E; Yvon-Lewis, S. A; Saltzman, E. S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Gas/particle partitioning of total alkyl nitrates observed with TD-LIF in Bakersfield  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

total AN (gas + aerosol) and ANaer show that on average 21% of ANs are in the condensed phaseGas/particle partitioning of total alkyl nitrates observed with TD-LIF in Bakersfield A. W. Rollins samples. These measurements show that ANs are a ubiquitous component of the OA with the ­ONO2 subunit

Cohen, Ronald C.

165

Quantifying uncertainty in nitrate pollution from land application of sewage sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uncertainty associated with nitrate-nitrogen pollution of ground water from sludge applications was investigated. Three alternative planning models were proposed. The models estimate annual loads and concentrations of nitrate-nitrogen in percolation. Published data from four field studies that included aerobic and anaerobic sludge and surface- and soil-incorporated applications were used for model testing. Point and stochastic validation procedures were used. The models were generally conservative. For three data sets average relative errors were approximately +/- 25% for all three models. The fourth data set had average relative errors of 100-500%. Wilcoxon Signed Rank test results (at ..cap alpha.. = 5%) suggested point-model predictions and observations were drawn from similar distributions. Stochastic validation tests also suggested that observations were samples from distributions of predictions. The models were tested as uncalibrated approximations of nitrate percolation. All three appear sufficiently accurate for planning application systems. A planning procedure was developed which utilizes analytically approximated probability distributions of nitrate loads and concentrations. Distributions are specified with analytical moment expressions and a normal distribution function limited to be non-negative.

Mummert, M.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Carbon 14 Production From Ammonium Nitrate Solution in the Chain-reacting Pile  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...expected, there is also dissolved in the solution a small residual amount of C1402 which can be recovered easily by 0M14 AC PILC FIG. 1. C14 factory using circulating solution of ammonium nitrate. that most of the C14 would be evolved from such a solution...

L. D. NORRIS; ARTHUR H. SNELL

1947-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

167

High-Resolution In Situ Analysis of Nitrate and Phosphate in the Oligotrophic Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-Resolution In Situ Analysis of Nitrate and Phosphate in the Oligotrophic Ocean ... Upon power up, the instrument will sequentially execute all commands in the current method until termination by lack of further commands or power interruption. ... The SEAS instrument was connected to a CTD and a PAR sensor, powered on deck, and lowered to 30 m depth. ...

Lori R. Adornato; Eric A. Kaltenbacher; Danielle R. Greenhow; Robert H. Byrne

2007-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

168

Acetate Production from Oil under Sulfate-Reducing Conditions in Bioreactors Injected with Sulfate and Nitrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sulfate- and nitrate- reducing bacteria from an oil field in Argentina. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 74 :4324-4335. 34. Callbeck...6908-6917. 41. Gieg, LM , KE Duncan and JM Suflita. 2008. Bioenergy production via microbial conversion of residual oil to natural...

Cameron M. Callbeck; Akhil Agrawal; Gerrit Voordouw

2013-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

169

The structure of the complex formed by tetrahethylamalondiamide and lanthanum(III) nitrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The structure of the complex LaL2(NO3)3 [L = (C2H5)2NCOCH2CON(C2H5)2] has been investigated. It has been shown that the lanthanum is 10 coordinate with two bidentate L ligands and three bidentate nitrate groups.

Paul Byers; Michael G.B. Drew; Michael J. Hudson; Neil S. Isaacs; Charles Madic

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Application of a modified denitrifying bacteria method for analyzing groundwater and vadose zone pore water nitrate at the Hanford Site, WA, USA.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Hanford Site, WA, USA. Woods, Katharine N. ; Singleton,reside at DOE sites across the USA. Nitrate concentrations >

Woods, Katharine N.; Singleton, Michael J.; Conrad, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

The Arabidopsis Nitrate Transporter NRT1.8 Functions in Nitrate Removal from the Xylem Sap and Mediates Cadmium Tolerance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Plants grew vertically for an additional 7 to 10 d, at which point root elongation was determined RNA Gel Blotting and RT-PCR...1995). Mechanisms of cadmium mobility and accumulation in Indian mustard. Plant Physiol. 109 : 1427-1433. Sanita di Toppi...

Jian-Yong Li; Yan-Lei Fu; Sharon M. Pike; Juan Bao; Wang Tian; Yu Zhang; Chun-Zhu Chen; Yi Zhang; Hong-Mei Li; Jing Huang; Le-Gong Li; Julian I. Schroeder; Walter Gassmann; Ji-Ming Gong

2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

172

1,4818 pour le nitrate d'uranyle). Les diffrents m-langes prsentaient sensiblement la mme densit.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

434 1,4818 pour le nitrate d'uranyle). Les différents mé- langes présentaient sensiblement la mème pour des solutions de nitrate d'uranyle dont la densité a été reliée au moyen de chlorure ferrique nitrate d'uranyle sans chlorure fer- rique. En résumé, la mesure précise de l'activité des so- lutions de

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

173

Summary of aluminum nitrate tests at the F/H-ETF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biofouling of the Norton ceramic filters in the F/H Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) has been minimized by bacterial control strategies on the influent streams. However, enough bacteria still exists in the routine influent to impact the filter performance. One method of remediating biofouling in routine influent, initially observed in laboratory tests on simulant solutions, involves addition of aluminum nitrate to the influent wastewater. Tests on actual feed at the ETF using aluminum nitrate showed significantly improved performance, with increases in filter permeability of up to four-fold compared to the baseline case. These improvements were only realized after modifications to the pH adjustment system were completed which minimized upsets in the pH of the feed solutions.

McCabe, D.J.; Wiggins, A.W.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Summary of aluminum nitrate tests at the F/H-ETF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biofouling of the Norton ceramic filters in the F/H Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) has been minimized by bacterial control strategies on the influent streams. However, enough bacteria still exists in the routine influent to impact the filter performance. One method of remediating biofouling in routine influent, initially observed in laboratory tests on simulant solutions, involves addition of aluminum nitrate to the influent wastewater. Tests on actual feed at the ETF using aluminum nitrate showed significantly improved performance, with increases in filter permeability of up to four-fold compared to the baseline case. These improvements were only realized after modifications to the pH adjustment system were completed which minimized upsets in the pH of the feed solutions.

McCabe, D.J.; Wiggins, A.W.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Using Multiple Chemical Indicators to Assess Sources of Nitrate and Age of Groundwater in a Karstic Spring Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...important implications regarding sources of nitrate and other agrochemical contaminants in the spring basin. Conversely, spring-water...Lexington, KY, 151 p. Deines, P., 1980, The carbon isotope composition of reduced organic carbon: In Fritz, P. and Fontes, J...

Brian Katz; Rick Copeland; Tom Greenhalgh; Ron Ceryak; Warren Zwanka

176

Aqueous nitrate waste treatment: Technology comparison, cost/benefit, and market analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to provide information necessary for the Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate the practical utility of the Nitrate to Ammonia and Ceramic or Glass (NAC/NAG/NAX) process, which is under development in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The NAC/NACx/NAX process can convert aqueous radioactive nitrate-laden waste to a glass, ceramic, or grout solid waste form. The tasks include, but are not limited to, the following: Identify current commercial technologies to meet hazardous and radiological waste disposal requirements. The technologies may be thermal or non-thermal but must be all inclusive (i.e., must convert a radionuclide-containing nitrate waste with a pH around 12 to a stable form that can be disposed at permitted facilities); evaluate and compare DOE-sponsored vitrification, grouting, and minimum additive waste stabilization projects for life-cycle costs; compare the technologies above with respect to material costs, capital equipment costs, operating costs, and operating efficiencies. For the NAC/NAG/NAX process, assume aluminum reactant is government furnished and ammonia gas may be marketed; compare the identified technologies with respect to frequency of use within DOE for environmental management applications with appropriate rationale for use; Assess the potential size of the DOE market for the NAC/NAG/NAX process; assess and off-gas issues; and compare with international technologies, including life-cycle estimates.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

A Tof-SIMS analysis of the effect of lead nitrate on rare earth flotation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The influence of lead nitrate on rare earth flotation in the presence of hydroxamates as collectors has been investigated by a combination of micro-flotation tests and time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) surface chemical analysis. Micro-flotation tests identified a link between lead nitrate dose and an improved grade of REE minerals for concentrates. The testing also identified differences in the flotation behaviour of light rare earth (LREEs, La or Ce bearing minerals) and Y and Zr bearing minerals. TOF-SIMS analyses evaluated the variability in surface components on undifferentiated REE grains from the concentrates and tails samples in response to the varied lead nitrate dosing in micro-flotation tests. The surface analyses showed that both the REE grains and gangue phases reporting to the concentrate have higher relative surface proportions of both Pb and collectors as compared to those reporting to the tails. It is noted that the lead does not appear to be associated with an increase in collector adsorption, so the grade of REE can go up is not by selective adsorption of collectors. The significantly higher intensity of Pb species identified on the surface of the concentrate would suggest that lead addition can actually reverse the surface charge making it efficient for collectors to adsorb onto surfaces that they could not easily close to. It is also possible PbOH+ potentially acting as a point activator.

Liuyin Xia; Brian Hart; Brandon Loshusan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Effect of Phosphate, Fluoride, and Nitrate on Gibbsite Dissolution Rate and Solubility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory tests have been completed with simulated tank waste samples to investigate the effects of phosphate, fluoride, and nitrate on the dissolution rate and equilibrium solubility of gibbsite in sodium hydroxide solution at 22 and 40{degrees}C. Results are compared to relevant literature data and to computer model predictions. The presence of sodium nitrate (3 M) caused a reduction in the rate of gibbsite dissolution in NaOH, but a modest increase in the equilibrium solubility of aluminum. The increase in solubility was not as large, though, as the increase predicted by the computer model. The presence of phosphate, either as sodium phosphate or sodium fluoride phosphate, had a negligible effect on the rate of gibbsite dissolution, but caused a slight increase in aluminum solubility. The magnitude of the increased solubility, relative to the increase caused by sodium nitrate, suggests that the increase is due to ionic strength (or water activity) effects, rather than being associated with the specific ion involved. The computer model predicted that phosphate would cause a slight decrease in aluminum solubility, suggesting some Al-PO4 interaction. No evidence was found of such an interaction.

Herting, Daniel L. [Washington River Protection Solutions LLC (United States)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

179

Agricultural Chemical Movement through a Field-Size Watershed in Iowa:? Surface Hydrology and Nitrate Losses in Discharge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Agricultural Chemical Movement through a Field-Size Watershed in Iowa:? Surface Hydrology and Nitrate Losses in Discharge ... In this paper, we illustrate another aspect of the “water quality profile” conceptual model (4) for assessing impacts of farming systems using an analysis of the surface hydrology and nitrate distribution in surface runoff, headcut seepage, and basin drainage from a high relief landscape. ... Surface runoff resulting from snowmelt occurs whenever solar-radiated heat penetrates the snow and heats the soil surface beneath it. ...

Thomas R. Steinheimer; Kenwood D. Scoggin; Larry A. Kramer

1998-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

180

The influence of dose-rest cycles on the nitrate concentration of deep percolate below septic fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(1970), however, observed that the introduction of oxygen into an otherwise anaerobic system containing adsorbed ammonium caused the formation of nitrates in the presence of nitrifying bacteria. Bouwer (1970) stated that sewage contains a large... quantity of nitrogen, most of which is in the ammonium form. Gillham and Webber (1969) showed that barnyards, which contained livestock manure, could be leached by rainwater and contribute up to 90% of the nitrates found in the aquifer below the yard...

Allison, John Bryan

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination baseload nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Root system architecture determines fitness in an Arabidopsis mutant in competition for immobile phosphate ions but not for nitrate ions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...rate of 9000 seeds per square metre onto a grid of plots representing a 3 3 fac- torial...sub-divided into nine sub-plots in a 3 3 grid. Sub-plots were 0.33 m 0.33 m but...the fossil record for root systems is mini- mal, although it is known that the earliest...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

The effect of penetration factor, deposition, and environmental factors on the indoor concentration of PM2.5 sulfate, nitrate, and carbon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Indoor exposure to particles of outdoor origin constitutes an important exposure pathway. We conducted an intensive set of indoor particle measurements in an unoccupied house under differing operating conditions. Real-time measurements were conducted both indoors and outdoors, including PM2.5 nitrate, sulfate, and carbon. Because the time-scale of the fluctuations in outdoor particle concentrations and meteorological conditions are often similar to the time constant for building air exchange, a steady state concentration may never be reached. The time-series experimental data were used to determine the effect of changes in air exchange rate and indoor/outdoor temperature and relative humidity differences on indoor particle concentrations. A multivariate regression was performed to investigate the difference between measured indoor concentrations and results from a simple time-dependent physical model. Environmental conditions had a significant effect on indoor concentrations of all three PM2.5 species, but did not explain all of the model variation.

Thatcher, T.L.; Lunden, M.M.; Sextro, R.G.; Hering, S.; Brown, N.J.

2002-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

183

Modeling of the simultaneous extraction of nitric acid and uranyl nitrate with tri-n-butyl phosphate. Application to extraction operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mathematical model developed for the equilibrium HNO{sub 3}-UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}-tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)-diluent is the basis of the computation of distribution isotherms. The isotherms are used to study the influence of TBP concentration on two chosen operation parameters, distribution coefficients and number of theoretical stages, for the selected flow sheets. It is established that an increase in TBP concentration leads to a decrease in the number of theoretical stages for the extraction flow sheets but to their increase for the striping flow sheets. Given diagrams can be used to determine the efficiency of extraction processes. Agreement with available literature calculations on the number of theoretical stages supports the use of the model in the computation of distribution isotherms, of the system quoted above, in a wide range of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and TBP concentrations.

Comor, J.J.; Tolic, A.S.; Kopecni, M.M.; Petkovic, D.M. [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Yugoslavia). Chemical Dynamics Lab.] [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Yugoslavia). Chemical Dynamics Lab.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

61 - 4870 of 31,917 results. 61 - 4870 of 31,917 results. Download CX-010239: Categorical Exclusion Determination Low-Cost Gas Heat Pump for Building Space Heating CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 02/14/2013 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-010239-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-010503: Categorical Exclusion Determination Baseload Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant Design CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6, B5.17 Date: 06/03/2013 Location(s): Colorado, Colorado Offices(s): Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-010503-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-010504: Categorical Exclusion Determination Installation of Additional Wind Turbine and Tower at NWTC Site 3.2 CX(s) Applied: B5.18 Date: 06/03/2013

185

The gas-phase bis-uranyl nitrate complex [(UO2)2(NO3)5]-: infrared spectrum and structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The infrared spectrum of the bis-uranyl nitrate complex [(UO2)2(NO3)5]- was measured in the gas phase using multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD). Intense absorptions corresponding to the nitrate symmetric and asymmetric vibrations, and the uranyl asymmetric vibration were observed. The nitrate v3 vibrations indicate the presence of nitrate in a bridging configuration bound to both uranyl cations, and probably two distinct pendant nitrates in the complex. The coordination environment of the nitrate ligands and the uranyl cations were compared to those in the mono-uranyl complex. Overall, the uranyl cation is more loosely coordinated in the bis-uranyl complex [(UO2)2(NO3)5]- compared to the mono-complex [UO2(NO3)3]-, as indicated by a higher O-U-O asymmetric stretching (v3) frequency. However, the pendant nitrate ligands are more strongly bound in the bis-complex than they are in the mono-uranyl complex, as indicated by the v3 frequencies of the pendant nitrate, which are split into nitrosyl and O-N-O vibrations as a result of bidentate coordination. These phenomena are consistent with lower electron density donation per uranyl by the nitrate bridging two uranyl centers compared to that of a pendant nitrate in the mono-uranyl complex. The lowest energy structure predicted by density functional theory (B3LYP functional) calculations was one in which the two uranyl molecules bridged by a single nitrate coordinated in a bis-bidentate fashion. Each uranyl molecule was coordinated by two pendant nitrate ligands. The corresponding vibrational spectrum was in excellent agreement with the IRMPD measurement, confirming the structural assignment.

Groenewold, G. S.; van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Oomens, Jos; De Jong, Wibe A.; McIIwain, Michael E.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

The gas-phase bis-uranyl nitrate complex [(UO2)(2)(NO3)(5)](-): infrared spectrum and structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The infrared spectrum of the bis-uranyl nitrate complex [(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 5}]{sup -} was measured in the gas phase using multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD). Intense absorptions corresponding to the nitrate symmetric and asymmetric vibrations, and the uranyl asymmetric vibration were observed. The nitrate nu3 vibrations indicate the presence of nitrate in a bridging configuration bound to both uranyl cations, and probably two distinct pendant nitrates in the complex. The coordination environment of the nitrate ligands and the uranyl cations were compared to those in the mono-uranyl complex. Overall, the uranyl cation is more loosely coordinated in the bis-uranyl complex [(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 5}]{sup -} compared to the mono-complex [UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}]{sup -}, as indicated by a higher O-U-O asymmetric stretching (nu3) frequency. However, the pendant nitrate ligands are more strongly bound in the bis-complex than they are in the mono-uranyl complex, as indicated by the {nu}{sub 3} frequencies of the pendant nitrate, which are split into nitrosyl and O-N-O vibrations as a result of bidentate coordination. These phenomena are consistent with lower electron density donation per uranyl by the nitrate bridging two uranyl centers compared to that of a pendant nitrate in the mono-uranyl complex. The structure was calculated using density functional theory (B3LYP functional), which produced a structure in which the two uranyl molecules bridged by a single nitrate coordinated in a bis-bidentate fashion. Each uranyl molecule was coordinated by two pendant nitrate ligands. The corresponding vibrational spectrum was in excellent agreement with the IRMPD measurement, confirming the structural assignment.

Gary S. Groenewold; Michael J. van Stipdonk; Jos Oomens; Wibe de Jong; Michael E. McIlwain

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Safe handling of TBP and nitrates in the nuclear process industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A laboratory and literature study was made of the reactions of tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) with nitric acid and nitrates. Its goal was to establish safe conditions for solvent extraction processes involving these chemicals. The damaging explosions at the Tomsk-7 PUREX plant in Russia graphically illustrated the potential hazard involved in such operations. The study has involved a review of prior and contemporary experiments, and new experiments to answer particular questions about these reactions. TBP extracts nitric acid and some metal nitrates from aqueous solutions. The resulting liquid contains both oxidant and reductant, and can react exothermically if heated sufficiently. Safe handling of these potentially reactive materials involves not only limiting the heat generated by the chemical reaction, but also providing adequate heat removal and venting. Specifically, the following recommendations are made to ensure safety: (1) tanks in which TBP-nitrate complexes are or may be present should be adequately vented to avoid pressurization. Data are supplied as a basis for adequacy; (2) chemically degraded TBP, or TBP that has sat a long time in the presence of acids or radiation, should be purified before use in solvent extraction; (3) evaporators in which TBP might be introduced should be operated at a controlled temperature, and their TBP content should be limited; (4) evaporator bottoms that may contain TBP should be cooled under conditions that ensure heat removal. Finally, process design should consider the potential for such reactions, and operators should be made aware of this potential, so that it is considered during training and process operation.

Hyder, M.L.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

In-Situ Silver Acetylide Silver Nitrate Explosive Deposition Measurements Using X-Ray Fluorescence.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Light Initiated High Explosive facility utilized a spray deposited coating of silver acetylide - silver nitrate explosive to impart a mechanical shock into targets of interest. A diagnostic was required to measure the explosive deposition in - situ. An X - ray fluorescence spectrometer was deployed at the facility. A measurement methodology was developed to measure the explosive quantity with sufficient accuracy. Through the use of a tin reference material under the silver based explosive, a field calibration relationship has been developed with a standard deviation of 3.2 % . The effect of the inserted tin material into the experiment configuration has been explored.

Covert, Timothy T.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Neutron scattering study of two-magnon states in the quantum magnet copper nitrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report measurements of the two-magnon states in a dimerized antiferromagnetic chain material, copper nitrate [Cu(NO3)2?2.5D2O]. Using inelastic neutron scattering we have measured the one- and two-magnon excitation spectra in a large single crystal. The data are in excellent agreement with a perturbative expansion of the alternating Heisenberg Hamiltonian from the strongly dimerized limit. The expansion predicts a two-magnon bound state for q?(2n+1)?d which is consistent with the neutron scattering data.

D. A. Tennant; C. Broholm; D. H. Reich; S. E. Nagler; G. E. Granroth; T. Barnes; K. Damle; G. Xu; Y. Chen; B. C. Sales

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

190

Instrument Development and Measurements of the Atmospheric Pollutants Sulfur Dioxide, Nitrate Radical, and Nitrous Acid by Cavity Ring-down Spectroscopy and Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A. , A method of nitrogen dioxide and sulphur dioxidedetermination of nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide in theDOAS) have measured nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ), nitrate

Medina, David Salvador

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Standard test method for isotopic abundance analysis of uranium hexa?uoride and uranyl nitrate solutions by multi-collector, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Standard test method for isotopic abundance analysis of uranium hexa?uoride and uranyl nitrate solutions by multi-collector, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Method and apparatus for nitrogen oxide determination  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method and apparatus for determining nitrogen oxide content in a high temperature process gas, which involves withdrawing a sample portion of a high temperature gas containing nitrogen oxide from a source to be analyzed. The sample portion is passed through a restrictive flow conduit, which may be a capillary or a restriction orifice. The restrictive flow conduit is heated to a temperature sufficient to maintain the flowing sample portion at an elevated temperature at least as great as the temperature of the high temperature gas source, to thereby provide that deposition of ammonium nitrate within the restrictive flow conduit cannot occur. The sample portion is then drawn into an aspirator device. A heated motive gas is passed to the aspirator device at a temperature at least as great as the temperature of the high temperature gas source. The motive gas is passed through the nozzle of the aspirator device under conditions sufficient to aspirate the heated sample portion through the restrictive flow conduit and produce a mixture of the sample portion in the motive gas at a dilution of the sample portion sufficient to provide that deposition of ammonium nitrate from the mixture cannot occur at reduced temperature. A portion of the cooled dilute mixture is then passed to analytical means capable of detecting nitric oxide.

Hohorst, Frederick A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Effects of elevated CO2 concentration on growth and water usage of tomato seedlings under different ammonium/nitrate ratios  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration is generally expected to enhance photosynthesis and growth of agricultural C3 vegetable crops, and therefore results in an increase in crop yield. However, little is known about the combined effect of elevated CO2 and N species on plant growth and development. Two growth-chamber experiments were conducted to determine the effects of NH4+/NO3? ratio and elevated CO2 concentration on the physiological development and water use of tomato seedlings. Tomato was grown for 45 d in containers with nutrient solutions varying in NH4+/NO3? ratios and CO2 concentrations in growth chambers. Results showed that plant height, stem thickness, total dry weight, dry weight of the leaves, stems and roots, G value (total plant dry weight/seedling days), chlorophyll content, photosynthetic rate, leaf-level and whole plant-level water use efficiency and cumulative water consumption of tomato seedlings were increased with increasing proportion of NO3? in nutrient solutions in the elevated CO2 treatment. Plant biomass, plant height, stem thickness and photosynthetic rate were 67%, 22%, 24% and 55% higher at elevated CO2 concentration than at ambient CO2 concentration, depending on the values of NH4+/NO3? ratio. These results indicated that elevating CO2 concentration did not mitigate the adverse effects of 100% NH4+-N (in nutrient solution) on the tomato seedlings. At both CO2 levels, NH4+/NO3? ratios of nutrient solutions strongly influenced almost every measure of plant performance, and nitrate-fed plants attained a greater biomass production, as compared to ammonium-fed plants. These phenomena seem to be related to the coordinated regulation of photosynthetic rate and cumulative water consumption of tomato seedlings.

Juan LI; Jian-min ZHOU; Zeng-qiang DUAN

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Treatment of nitrate-rich water in a baffled membrane bioreactor (BMBR) employing waste derived materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Nitrate removal in submerged membrane bioreactors (MBRs) is limited as intensive aeration (for maintaining adequate dissolved oxygen levels and for membrane scouring) deters the formation of anoxic zones essential for biological denitrification. The present study employs baffled membrane bioreactor (BMBR) to overcome this constraint. Treatment of nitrate rich water (synthetic and real groundwater) was investigated. Sludge separation was achieved using ceramic membrane filters prepared from waste sugarcane bagasse ash. A complex external carbon source (leachate from anaerobic digestion of food waste) was used to maintain an appropriate C/N ratio. Over 90% COD and 95% NO3–N reduction was obtained. The bagasse ash filters produced a clear permeate, free of suspended solids. Sludge aggregates were observed in the reactor and were linked to the high extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) content. Lower sludge volume index (40 mL/g compared to 150 mL/g for seed sludge), higher settling velocity (47 m/h compared to 10 m/h for seed sludge) and sludge aggregates (0.7 mm aggregates compared to <0.2 mm for seed sludge) was observed. The results demonstrate the potential of waste-derived materials viz. food waste leachate and bagasse ash filters in water treatment.

Subhankar Basu; Saurabh K. Singh; Prahlad K. Tewari; Vidya S. Batra; Malini Balakrishnan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

CX-002688: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

688: Categorical Exclusion Determination 688: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002688: Categorical Exclusion Determination Biomass Production and Nitrogen Recovery in 21st Century Riparian Buffers CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 06/10/2010 Location(s): Murdock, Nebraska Office(s): Science, Argonne Site Office Collect soil samples, and place small soil moisture samplers approximately 4 feet below ground surface near and away from Argonne-planted phytoremediation trees. Collect soil moisture samples from the installed samplers and ship overnight to Argonne Lab for chemical analysis of nitrate, dissolved nitrous oxide and methane, and other standard chemistry. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-002688.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-001384: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001383: Categorical Exclusion Determination

196

Water Structure at the Air-Aqueous Interface of Divalent Cation and Nitrate Solutions Man Xu, Rick Spinney, and Heather C. Allen*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Structure at the Air-Aqueous Interface of Divalent Cation and Nitrate Solutions Man Xu, Rick, Columbus, Ohio 43210 ReceiVed: July 24, 2008; ReVised Manuscript ReceiVed: December 4, 2008 The water surface structure of aqueous magnesium, calcium, and strontium nitrate solutions with six to seven water

197

Evaluation of a solar intermittent refrigeration system for ice production operating with ammonia/lithium nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel solar intermittent refrigeration system for ice production developed in the Centro de Investigacion en Energia of the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico is presented. The system operates with the ammonia/lithium nitrate mixture. The system developed has a nominal capacity of 8 kg of ice/day. It consists of a cylindrical parabolic collector acting as generator-absorber. Evaporator temperatures as low as -11 C were obtained for several hours with solar coefficients of performance up to 0.08. It was found that the coefficient of performance increases with the increment of solar radiation and the solution concentration. A dependency of the coefficient of performance was not founded against the cooling water temperature. Also it was found that the maximum operating pressure increases meanwhile the generation temperature decreases with an increase of the solution concentration. (author)

Rivera, W.; Moreno-Quintanar, G.; Best, R. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 34, 62580 Temixco, Mor. (Mexico); Rivera, C.O.; Martinez, F. [Facultad de Ingenieria Campus Coatzacoalcos, Universidad Veracruzana, Av. Universidad Km 7.5, 96530 Coatzacoalcos, Ver. (Mexico)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

Microstructural Characterization of Colloid-Derived Bimetallic Pd-Cu Nanocatalysts Supported on -Al2O3 for Nitrate Reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Center of Advanced Materials for the Purification of Water with Systems, University of Illinois at Urbana of Advanced Materials for Purification of Water with Systems, University of Illinois at Urbana to develop heterogeneous catalysts as a viable water purification method. The rates of nitrate and nitrite

Frenkel, Anatoly

199

Draft Genome Sequence for Microbacterium laevaniformans Strain OR221, a Bacterium Tolerant to Metals, Nitrate, and Low pH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbacterium laevaniformans strain OR221 was isolated from subsurface sediments obtained from the Field Research Center (FRC) in Oak Ridge, TN. It was characterized as a bacterium tolerant to heavy metals such as uranium, nickel, cobalt, cadmium, as well as nitrate and low pH. We present its draft genome sequence.

Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Panikov, Nikolai [ORNL; Ariyawansa, Thilini [Northeastern University; Klingeman, Dawn Marie [ORNL; Johnson, Courtney M [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Utturkar, Sagar M [ORNL; Epstein, Slava [Northeastern University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Spatial and diurnal variability in reactive nitrogen oxide chemistry as reflected in the isotopic composition of atmospheric nitrate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

exchange between gas-phase precursors and variability in reactive nitrogen sources. These findings product of NOx in the atmosphere. Due to its exceptionally high solubility in water, nitrate is rapidly deSpatial and diurnal variability in reactive nitrogen oxide chemistry as reflected in the isotopic

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination baseload nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Size effect of hematite and corundum inclusions on the efflorescence relative humidities of aqueous ammonium nitrate particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Structure: Aerosols and particles (0345, 4801); 0345 Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Pollution ammonium nitrate particles Jeong-Ho Han Department of Environmental Chemistry, Atmospheric Science Division by the saturation of the aqueous solution with respect to the solid. INDEX TERMS: 0305 Atmospheric Composition

202

Safe conditions for contacting nitric acid or nitrates with tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to a request from DOE-SR, the current state of knowledge of the reactions between TBP and aqueous nitrate solutions is critically reviewed, and recommendations are made for the safe operation of SRS separations equipment in which this combination of chemicals may be present. The existing limits for evaporation are validated. Guidelines are presented for cases in which general limits do not apply. The rate of reaction between nitric acid and TBP appears to be controlled by the rate of TBP hydrolysis. The hydrolysis reaction produces dibutyl phosphate and n-butanol. The hydrolysis rate is a strong function of temperature, and becomes very fast at temperatures in the range 130{degrees} to 150{degrees}C. The resulting n-butanol is volatile at high temperatures, boiling at 117.5{degrees}C, but is also subject to exothermic oxidation by nitric acid or nitrates. If oxidation occurs before the n-butanol evaporates, the heat of oxidation may exceed local cooling by convection. The resulting heating will further accelerate the reaction, leading to an energetic runaway and possibly (in confined systems) an explosion. Extensive experiments and practice have shown that in a well-mixed and well-vented aqueous system such as an evaporator, at moderate acidities and temperatures below 130{degrees}C, the heat of reaction is adequately removed by vaporization of steam. In general, the heating will be so slow that natural processes provide adequate cooling at temperatures below 80{degrees}C. Above this temperature, care should be taken to ensure that adequate cooling is available for the amount of TBP that may be present. Experiments suggest that in well-ventilated systems n-butanol evaporation and convective cooling are sufficient to control the reaction at temperatures up to 120{degrees}C.

Hyder, M.L

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Baseload CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Heat Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

November 13, 2012 | Wong November 13, 2012 | Wong * Conduct laboratory studies on reaction thermodynamics and kinetics of the sulfur generating disproportionation reaction. Effect of various potential catalysts and means to separate the reaction products will be investigated. A kinetic equation for process design will be defined. * Improve the solar reactor design and catalyst performance to increase SO 3 to SO 2 conversion fraction * Preliminary process component design and experimental validation for the three process steps. Carry out process integration design between the CSP plant, the sulfur processing and storage plant and the electricity generation unit. * Design and flowsheet studies to assess the system economics, its environmental impact and pathways to ascertain safe operations of

204

Baseload CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Heat Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

May 15, 2013 | Wong May 15, 2013 | Wong * Conduct laboratory studies on reaction thermodynamics and kinetics of the sulfur generating disproportionation reaction. Effect of various potential catalysts and means to separate the reaction products will be investigated. A kinetic equation for process design will be defined. * Improve the solar reactor design and catalyst performance to increase SO 3 to SO 2 conversion fraction * Preliminary process component design and experimental validation for the three process steps. Carry out process integration design between the CSP plant, the sulfur processing and storage plant and the electricity generation unit. * Design and flowsheet studies to assess the system economics, its environmental impact and pathways to ascertain safe operations of

205

Climate Change Update: Baseload Geothermal is One of the Lowest Emitting Energy Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Geothermal energy – energy derived from the heat of the earth – has the ability to produce electricity consistently around the clock, draws a small environmental footprint, and emits little or no greenhouse gases (GHG).

206

Development of an Advanced, Low-Cost parabolic Trough Collector for Baseload Operation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

207

Using Encapsulated Phase Change Material for Thermal Energy Storage for Baseload CSP  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

208

Baseload CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Heat Storage- FY13 Q1  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document summarizes the progress of this General Atomics project, funded by SunShot, for the first quarter of fiscal year 2013.

209

Baseload CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Heat Storage- FY12 Q4  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document summarizes the progress of this General Atomics project, funded by SunShot, for the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2012.

210

Baseload CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Heat Storage- FY13 Q2  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document summarizes the progress of this General Atomics project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

211

Life cycle assessment of base-load heat sources for district heating system options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose There has been an increased interest in utilizing renewable energy sources in district heating systems. District heating systems are centralized systems that provide heat for residential and commercial buildings in a community. While various renewable and conventional energy sources can be used in such systems, many stakeholders are interested in choosing the feasible option with the least environmental impacts. This paper evaluates and compares environmental burdens of alternative energy source options for the base load of a district heating center in Vancouver, British Columbia (BC) using the life cycle assessment method. The considered energy sources include natural gas, wood pellet, sewer heat, and ground heat. Methods The life cycle stages considered in the LCA model cover all stages from fuel production, fuel transmission/transportation, construction, operation, and finally demolition of the district heating system. The impact categories were analyzed based on the IMPACT 2002+ method. Results and discussion On a life-cycle basis, the global warming effect of renewable energy options were at least 200 kgeqCO2 less than that of the natural gas option per MWh of heat produced by the base load system. It was concluded that less than 25% of the upstream global warming impact associated with the wood pellet energy source option was due to transportation activities and about 50% of that was resulted from wood pellet production processes. In comparison with other energy options, the wood pellets option has higher impacts on respiratory of inorganics, terrestrial ecotoxicity, acidification, and nutrification categories. Among renewable options, the global warming impact of heat pump options in the studied case in Vancouver, BC, were lower than the wood pellet option due to BC's low carbon electricity generation profile. Ozone layer depletion and mineral extraction were the highest for the heat pump options due to extensive construction required for these options. Conclusions Natural gas utilization as the primary heat source for district heat production implies environmental complications beyond just the global warming impacts. Diffusing renewable energy sources for generating the base load district heat would reduce human toxicity, ecosystem quality degradation, global warming, and resource depletion compared to the case of natural gas. Reducing fossil fuel dependency in various stages of wood pellet production can remarkably reduce the upstream global warming impact of using wood pellets for district heat generation.

Ghafghazi, Saeed [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sowlati, T. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Melin, Staffan [Delta Research Corporation

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Effect of nanoparticle dispersion on specific heat capacity of a binary nitrate salt eutectic for concentrated solar power applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study we investigate nanoparticle dispersions in a molten binary nitrate salt eutectic. It has been recently reported that nanoparticle dispersions in molten salt mixtures can significantly enhance the specific heat capacity of the salt mixtures. These molten salt mixtures can be used as heat transfer fluid (HTF)/thermal energy storage (TES) in a concentrated solar power (CSP) plant and enhancing their specific heat capacity can significantly reduce the cost of electricity produced by CSP. However, the mechanism for the enhanced specific heat capacity is still under investigation and has not been clearly explained. In this paper, we investigate the effect of nanoparticle size on the specific heat capacity of nanoparticle/molten salt eutectic mixture. Four different sizes of nanoparticles (5 nm, 10 nm, 30 nm, and 60 nm) were dispersed in a molten nitrate salt eutectic at 1% concentration by weight. The molten nitrate salt eutectic consisted of sodium nitrate (NaNO3) and potassium nitrate (KNO3) at compositions of 60% and 40% by weight. A modulated differential scanning calorimeter (MDSC) was employed to measure the specific heat capacity of the pure molten salt eutectic and the nanomaterials (pure molten salt eutectic mixed with nanoparticles). The specific heat capacity of the nanomaterials was enhanced with increase of nanoparticle size. The observed enhancement was found to be 8% for 5 nm, 12% for 10 nm, 19% for 30 nm and 27% for the 60 nm. Material characterization analyses were carried out to investigate microstructural change of the nanomaterials. It was observed that special nanostructures were formed by molten salt mixtures in the nanomaterial samples and the amount of observed nanostructures was increased with the measured specific heat capacity. This indicates that nanostructures formed in the nanomaterials may be responsible for the enhanced specific heat capacity of the nanomaterials.

Bharath Dudda; Donghyun Shin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

CX-009000: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0: Categorical Exclusion Determination 0: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009000: Categorical Exclusion Determination "High Quality, Low Cost Bulk Gallium Nitride (GaN) Substrates Grown by the Electrochemical Solution Growth Method CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08/20/2012 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): Golden Field Office The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to provide federal funding to MEMC Electronic Materials, Inc. MEMC would conduct research and development activities for a two phase project to develop a new process method for growing large bulk gallium nitrate (GaN) crystals at low cost with improved functional properties." CX-009000.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-000845: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 3,

214

CX-004449: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

449: Categorical Exclusion Determination 449: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004449: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bench Scale Testing to Provide Data on Precipitation Control in the Cesium Nitric Acid Recovery Process CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 10/15/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WPT) project is completing solubility models for nitrate salts to evaluate control of the Cesium Nitric Acid Recovery Process (CNP) in order to avoid precipitation of solids in the evaporator concentrate. In order to do this, bench scale tests to determine salt solubility in nitric acid solutions at expected feed and final evaporated concentrations will be done. This work will provide the necessary data to verify predicted salt solubilities and basic

215

CX-003632: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3632: Categorical Exclusion Determination 3632: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003632: Categorical Exclusion Determination Analysis of Evaporator Scale Sample CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/10/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office We will perform an analysis of samples of scale removed from the Gravity Drain Line (GDL) and the pot of the 2H Evaporator. The analysis will support the development of a Nuclear Criticality Safety Analysis (NCSA) for evaporator operation and chemical cleaning. Previous chemical cleaning operations were performed using a nitric acid flow sheet that involved copious amounts of depleted uranyl nitrate used as a neutron poison. Current interest and focus is on a chemical cleaning operation involving only a sodium hydroxide solution. Therefore, testing will involve

216

CX-003639: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

639: Categorical Exclusion Determination 639: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003639: Categorical Exclusion Determination Salt Disposition Integration Portfolio (SDIP) Phase 2 Testing CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07/30/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office This task will dissolve 566.3 kilograms of sodium nitrate in distilled (DI) water to a volume of 1041 liters in each of four batches to be produced sequentially per a Research and Development (R&D) Direction in 786-A for the Salt Disposition Integration Portfolio (SDIP) Phase 2 Testing using the same apparatus as EEC Number TC-A-2010-035 located inside a secondary containment. This material will be stored in 300 gallon totes purchased for this purpose and stored in a secondary containment until the SDIP Test

217

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous nitrate plutonium Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ameri- cium... on suitable practice. Key words Radiochemistry, radioecology, strontium, uranium, plutonium, americium, curium... determination ......

218

Simulation of detonation of ammonium nitrate fuel oil mixture confined by aluminum: edge angles for DSD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Non-ideal high explosives are typically porous, low-density materials with a low detonation velocity (3--5 km/s) and long detonation reaction zone ({approx} cms). As a result, the interaction of a non-ideal high explosive with an inert confiner can be markedly different than for a conventional high explosive. Issues arise, for example, with light stiff confiners where the confiner can drive the high explosive (HE) through a Prandtl-Meyer fan at the HE/confiner interface rather than the HE driving the confiner. For a non-ideal high explosive confined by a high sound speed inert such that the detonation velocity is lower than the inert sound speed, the flow is subsonic and thus shockless in the confiner. In such cases, the standard detonation shock dynamics methodology, which requires a positive edge-angle be specified at the HE/confiner interface in order that the detonation shape be divergent, cannot be directly utilized. In order to study how detonation shock dynamics can be utilized in such cases, numerical simulations of the detonation of ammonium nitrate-fuel oil (ANFO) confined by aluminum 6061 are conducted.

Short, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Quirk, James J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kiyanda, Charles B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jackson, Scott I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Briggs, Matthew E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shinas, Micheal A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Combined uranous nitrate production consisting of undivided electrolytic cell and divided electrolytic cell (Electrolysis ? Electrolytic cell)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrochemical reduction of uranyl nitrate is a green, mild way to make uranous ions. Undivided electrolyzers whose maintenance is less but their conversion ratio and current efficiency are low, have been chosen. However, at the beginning of undivided electrolysis, high current efficiency can also be maintained. Divided electrolyzers' conversion ratio and current efficiency is much higher because the re-oxidation of uranous on anode is avoided, but their maintenance costs are more, because in radioactive environment the membrane has to be changed after several operations. In this paper, a combined method of uranous production is proposed which consists of 2 stages: undivided electrolysis (early stage) and divided electrolysis (late stage) to benefit from the advantages of both electrolysis modes. The performance of the combined method was tested. The results show that in combined mode, after 200 min long electrolysis (80 min undivided electrolysis and 120 min divided electrolysis), U(IV) yield can achieve 92.3% (500 ml feed, U 199 g/l, 72 cm{sup 2} cathode, 120 mA/cm{sup 2}). Compared with divided mode, about 1/3 working time in divided electrolyzer is reduced to achieve the same U(IV) yield. If 120 min long undivided electrolysis was taken, more than 1/2 working time can be reduced in divided electrolyzer, which means that about half of the maintenance cost can also be reduced. (authors)

Yuan, Zhongwei; Yan, Taihong; Zheng, Weifang; Li, Xiaodong; Yang, Hui; Xian, Liang [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O.Box 275-26, Beijing 102413 (China)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Critical Parameters of Complex Geometries of Intersecting Cylinders Containing Uranyl Nitrate Solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

About three dozen previously unreported critical configurations are presented for very complex geometries filled with high concentration enriched uranyl nitrate solution. These geometries resemble a tall, thin Central Column (or trunk of a ''tree'') having long, thin arms (or ''branches'') extending up to four directions off the column. Arms are equally spaced from one another in vertical planes, and that spacing ranges from arms in contact to quite wide spacings. Both the Central Column and the many different arms are critically safe by themselves with each, alone, is filled with fissile solution; but, in combination, criticality occurs due to the interactions between arms and the column. Such neutronic interactions formed the principal focus of this study. While these results are fresh to the nuclear criticality safety industry and to those seeking novel experiments against which to validate computer codes, the experiments, themselves, are not recent. Over 100 experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory between September, 1967, and February of the following year.

J. B. Briggs (INEEL POC); R. E. Rothe

1999-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination baseload nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The Effect of Time and Rate of Application of Nitrate of Soda on the Yield of Cotton.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIHENT STATIDJ A. R. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY. TEXAS BULLETIN NO. 490 MARCH, 1934 .--' --7 , The Effect of Time and Rate of Application of Nitrate of Soda on the Yield of Cotton - AGRICULTURAL... .................................................................... Effect of Fertilizers on Shedding 17 ...................... Earliness .......... 18 . Summary and Conclusions 19 BULLETIN NO. 490 MARCH, 1934 EFFECT OF TIME AND RATE OF APPLICATION IJITRATE OF SODA ON THE YIELD OF COTTON The main object...

Reynolds, E. B. (Elbert Brunner); Langley, B. C. (Bryon Caldwell); Johnson, P. R. (Paul Rufus)

1934-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Linking specific heterotrophic bacterial populations to bioreduction of uranium and nitrate using stable isotope probing in contaminated subsurface sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shifts in terminal electron-accepting processes during biostimulation of uranium-contaminated sediments were linked to the composition of stimulated microbial populations using DNA-based stable isotope probing. Nitrate reduction preceded U(VI) and Fe(III) reduction in [{sup 13}C]ethanol-amended microcosms. The predominant, active denitrifying microbial groups were identified as members of the Betaproteobacteria, whereas Actinobacteria dominated under metal-reducing conditions.

Akob, Denise M. [Florida State University; Kerkhof, Lee [Rutgers University; Kusel, Kirsten [Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Jena Germany; Watson, David B [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Kostka, Joel [Florida State University

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Enhanced Growth of Acidovorax sp. Strain 2AN during Nitrate-Dependent Fe(II) Oxidation in Batch and Continuous-Flow Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Fig. 3b). Acetate was depleted at day 2 and was replenished...Multiple influences of nitrate on uranium solubility during bioremediation of uranium-contaminated subsurface...18th ed. American Public Health Association, Washington...

Anirban Chakraborty; Eric E. Roden; Jürgen Schieber; Flynn Picardal

2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

224

Electrochemical reductions of Hg(II), ruthenium-nitrosyl complex, chromate, and nitrate in a strong alkaline solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrochemistry of low-level nuclear wastes, the reductions of Hg(II), [RuNO(NO{sub 2}){sub 4}OH]{sup 2{minus}}, CrO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, and NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} in 1.33 M NaOH solution have been studied primarily at nickel electrodes for electrocatalytic advantages. Hg(II) was reduced to Hg metal [equilibrium potential of 0.099 V vs NHE (normal hydrogen electrode)]. The ruthenium-nitrosyl complex, [RuNO(NO{sub 2}){sub 4}OH]{sup 2{minus}}, was reduced to Ru metal (half-wave potential of {minus}0.38 V vs NHE). Chromate was reduced to chromic hydroxide (equilibrium potential of {minus}0.24 V vs NHE). Nitrate reduction has two different regions of Tafel behavior from which reduction mechanisms are proposed. The exchange current densities for the nitrate reduction at Ni, Pb, Fe, and graphite were measured and the competition of the nitrate reduction with the hydrogen evolution investigated.

Bockris, J.O`M.; Kim, J. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Description of Rhodanobacter denitrificans sp. nov., isolated from nitrate-rich zones of a contaminated aquifer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bacterial strains 2APBS1T and 116-2 were isolated from the subsurface of a nuclear legacy waste site where sediments are co-contaminated with large amounts of acidity, nitrate, metal radionuclides and other heavy metals. A combination of physiological and genetic assays indicated that these strains represent the first members of the Rhodanobacter genus shown to be capable of complete denitrification. Cells of strain 2APBS1T and 116-2 were Gram negative, non-spore-forming, rods, 3-5 micro;m long and 0.25-0.5 m in diameter. The isolates were facultative anaerobes, and had temperature and pH optima for growth at 30 C and pH 6.5, respectively, and could tolerate up to 2.0 % NaCl, though growth improved in its absence. Strains 2APBS1T and 116-2 contained fatty acid profiles and 100 % Q-8 ubiquinone, that are characteristic features of the genus Rhodanobacter. Although strains 2APBS1T and 116-2 share high SSU rRNA gene sequence similarity to R. thiooxydans (>99%), DNA-DNA hybridization values were substantially below the 70% threshold used to designate novel species. Thus, based on genotypic, phylogenetic, chemotaxonomic and physiological differences, strains 2APBS1T and 116-2 are considered to represent a novel species of the genus Rhodanobacter, for which the name Rhodanobacter denitrificans sp. nov is proposed. The type strain is 2APBS1T (=DSM 23569T =JCM 17641T). Strain 116-2 (=DSM 24678 = JCM 17642) is a reference strain.

Prakash, Om [Florida State University; Green, Stefan [Florida State University; Jasrotia, Puja [Florida State University; Overholt, Will [Florida State University; Canion, Andy [Florida State University; Watson, David B [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL; Kostka, Joel [Florida State University

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Description of Rhodanobacter denitrificans sp. nov., isolated from nitrate-rich zones of a contaminated aquifer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bacterial strains 2APBS1T and 116-2 were isolated from the subsurface of a nuclear legacy waste site where sediments are co-contaminated with large amounts of acidity, nitrate, metal radionuclides and other heavy metals. A combination of physiological and genetic assays indicated that these strains represent the first members of the Rhodanobacter genus shown to be capable of complete denitrification. Cells of strain 2APBS1T and 116-2 were Gram negative, non-spore-forming, rods, 3-5 micro;m long and 0.25-0.5 m in diameter. The isolates were facultative anaerobes, and had temperature and pH optima for growth at 30 C and pH 6.5, respectively, and could tolerate up to 2.0 % NaCl, though growth improved in its absence. Strains 2APBS1T and 116-2 contained fatty acid profiles and 100 % Q-8 ubiquinone, that are characteristic features of the genus Rhodanobacter. Although strains 2APBS1T and 116-2 share high SSU rRNA gene sequence similarity to R. thiooxydans (>99%), DNA-DNA hybridization values were substantially below the 70% threshold used to designate novel species. Thus, based on genotypic, phylogenetic, chemotaxonomic and physiological differences, strains 2APBS1T and 116-2 are considered to represent a novel species of the genus Rhodanobacter, for which the name Rhodanobacter denitrificans sp. nov is proposed. The type strain is 2APBS1T (=DSM 23569T =JCM 17641T). Strain 116-2 (=DSM 24678 = JCM 17642) is a reference strain.

Prakash, Om [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Green, Stefan [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Jasrotia, Puja [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Overholt, Will [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Canion, Andy [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Watson, David B [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL; Kostka, [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Highly Enriched Uranyl Nitrate in Annular Tanks with Concrete Reflection: 1 x 3 Line Array of Nested Pairs of Tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of seven experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory beginning in August, 1980 (References 1 and 2). Highly enriched uranyl nitrate solution was introduced into a 1-3 linear array of nested stainless steel annular tanks. The tanks were inside a concrete enclosure, with various moderator and absorber materials placed inside and/or between the tanks. These moderators and absorbers included boron-free concrete, borated concrete, borated plaster, and cadmium. Two configurations included placing bottles of highly enriched uranyl nitrate between tanks externally. Another experiment involved nested hemispheres of highly enriched uranium placed between tanks externally. These three configurations are not evaluated in this report. The experiments evaluated here are part of a series of experiments, one set of which is evaluated in HEU-SOL-THERM-033. The experiments in this and HEU-SOL-THERM-033 were performed similarly. They took place in the same room and used the same tanks, some of the same moderators and absorbers, some of the same reflector panels, and uranyl nitrate solution from the same location. There are probably additional similarities that existed that are not identified here. Thus, many of the descriptions in this report are either the same or similar to those in the HEU-SOL-THERM-033 report. Seventeen configurations (sixteen of which were critical) were performed during seven experiments; six of those experiments are evaluated here with thirteen configurations. Two configurations were identical, except for solution height, and were conducted to test repeatability. The solution heights were averaged and the two were evaluated as one configuration, which gives a total of twelve evaluated configurations. One of the seventeen configurations was subcritical. Of the twelve critical configurations evaluated, nine were judged as acceptable as benchmarks.

James Cleaver; John D. Bess; Nathan Devine; Fitz Trumble

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING MINERALIZATION FOR HIGH ORGANIC AND NITRATE WASTE STREAMS FOR THE GLOBAL NUCLEAR ENERGY PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste streams that may be generated by the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) Advanced Energy Initiative may contain significant quantities of organics (0-53 wt%) and/or nitrates (0-56 wt%). Decomposition of high nitrate streams requires reducing conditions, e.g. organic additives such as sugar or coal, to reduce the NO{sub x} in the off-gas to N{sub 2} to meet the Clean Air Act (CAA) standards during processing. Thus, organics will be present during waste form stabilization regardless of which GNEP processes are chosen, e.g. organics in the feed or organics for nitrate destruction. High organic containing wastes cannot be stabilized with the existing HLW Best Developed Available Technology (BDAT) which is HLW vitrification (HLVIT) unless the organics are removed by preprocessing. Alternative waste stabilization processes such as Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) operate at moderate temperatures (650-750 C) compared to vitrification (1150-1300 C). FBSR converts organics to CAA compliant gases, creates no secondary liquid waste streams, and creates a stable mineral waste form that is as durable as glass. For application to the high Cs-137 and Sr-90 containing GNEP waste streams a single phase mineralized Cs-mica phase was made by co-reacting illite clay and GNEP simulated waste. The Cs-mica accommodates up to 30% wt% Cs{sub 2}O and all the GNEP waste species, Ba, Sr, Rb including the Cs-137 transmutation to Ba-137. For reference, the cesium mineral pollucite (CsAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}), currently being studied for GNEP applications, can only be fabricated at {ge} 1000 C. Pollucite mineralization creates secondary aqueous waste streams and NO{sub x}. Pollucite is not tolerant of high concentrations of Ba, Sr or Rb and forces the divalent species into different mineral host phases. The pollucite can accommodate up to 33% wt% Cs{sub 2}O.

Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M

2008-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

229

DETERMINATION OF CORROSION INHIBITOR CRITERIA FOR TYPE III IIIA TANKS DURING SALT DISSOLUTION OPERATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preparation of high level waste for vitrification involves in part the dissolution of salt cake from the carbon steel storage tanks. The salt crystals composing this cake are high in nitrate concentration with the interstitial liquid being high in hydroxide and nitrite concentration. During the salt dissolution process, a stage is reached in which the inhibitors, hydroxide and nitrite, are insufficient to prevent nitrate stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and fall outside the requirements of the corrosion control program. Additional inhibitors, which are necessary to meet the requirements, may be counterproductive to the efficiency of the process and waste minimization. Corrosion testing was initiated to better characterize the necessary inhibitor concentration for high nitrate waste during salt dissolution processing. A four-phase test program is being conducted: (1) electrochemical characterization, (2) accelerated or polarized U-bend testing, (3) long-term (non-polarized) U-bend testing and (4) vapor space U-bend tests. Electrochemical testing, which included cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP), linear polarization resistance (LPR) and open-circuit potential (OCP) measurements, was performed to identify stress corrosion cracking susceptibility, to characterize pitting resistance and to determine the general corrosion rate. Polarized U-bend tests were utilized to assess the effect of minimum inhibitor concentrations and heat treatment on SCC and to determine test parameters for future long-term U-bend testing. Results from CPP, LPR and OCP tests demonstrated that carbon steel formed a protective oxide film and the potential became electropositive during exposure to the waste at all inhibitor concentrations. The tenacity of this film improved as the inhibitor concentration level was increased and the temperature was decreased. This passive film increased the resistance to localized corrosion significantly. Therefore if any of these inhibitor levels are selected for storage of dissolved salt solutions, no changes to the service life estimates that were based on general corrosion are necessary. The breakdown potential for SCC as well as the other electrochemical parameters were independent of nitrate concentration (4.5-8.5 M). The breakdown potential, however, was strongly affected by temperature (i.e., 25 and 50 C) and inhibitor concentration. These results indicate that for this nitrate concentration range a critical inhibitor level is necessary for minimizing the occurrence of SCC. The polarized U-bend tests were in good agreement with the electrochemical tests. The U-bend testing clearly demonstrated that the heat treating of the samples clearly improved the SCC resistance of A537 carbon steel even at the low inhibitor concentration (0.01 M hydroxide and 0.01 M nitrite). This concentration was insufficient to prevent cracking for any tested nitrate concentration (4.5-8.5 M). At a 7 M nitrate concentration, SCC was prevented for inhibitor concentrations as low as 0.3 M hydroxide and 0.1 M nitrite. The current inhibitor requirements for a waste containing 7 M nitrate are 0.6 M hydroxide and 1.1 M hydroxide and nitrite. Thus, a considerable reduction in the amount of inhibitor necessary may be attained. It will also be recommended that the temperature of the dissolved salt solution be maintained below 50 C.

Wiersma, B

2008-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

230

Laboratory performance testing of an extruded bitumen containing a surrogate, sodium nitrate-based, low-level aqueous waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory results of a comprehensive, regulatory performance test program, utilizing an extruded bitumen and a surrogate, sodium nitrate-based waste, have been compiled at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Using a 53 millimeter, Werner and Pfleiderer extruder, operated by personnel of WasteChem Corporation of Paramus, New Jersey, laboratory-scale, molded samples of type three, air blown bitumen were prepared for laboratory performance testing. A surrogate, low-level, mixed liquid waste, formulated to represent an actual on-site waste at ORNL, containing about 30 wt % sodium nitrate, in addition to eight heavy metals, cold cesium and strontium was utilized. Samples tested contained three levels of waste loading: that is, forty, fifty and sixty wt % salt. Performance test results include the ninety day ANS 16.1 leach test, with leach indices reported for all cations and anions, in addition to the EP Toxicity test, at all levels of waste loading. Additionally, test results presented also include the unconfined compressive strength and surface morphology utilizing scanning electron microscopy. Data presented include correlations between waste form loading and test results, in addition to their relationship to regulatory performance requirements.

Mattus, A.J.; Kaczmarsky, M.M.

1986-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Soil temperature is an important regulatory control on dissolved organic carbon supply and uptake of soil solution nitrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The role of abiotic processes on dissolved organic matter (DOM) production is often underappreciated. However, abiotic processes appear to be especially important in subsoils where, with increasing depth, microbial activity declines and soil organic matter (SOM) becomes a progressively more important contributor to DOM. Within three soil depths (20, 40, and 60 cm) in a temperate forest, soil temperature was positively associated with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration (R2 = 0.23–0.77) and the DOM humification index (R2 = 0.35–0.72) for soil solutions in slow and fast flowpaths. With increasing soil temperature from 5 to 24 °C, average DOC concentrations increased by 86% at 20 cm, 12% at 40 cm and 12% at 60 cm soil depths. Our data suggest that DOM supply, especially in subsoils, is temperature dependent. We attribute this to the influence of temperature on DOM replenishment through direct processes such as SOM dissolution, diffusion and exchange reactions as well as indirect processes such as rhizodeposition and exoenzyme activity. In contrast, negative relationships (R2 = 0.71–0.88) between temperature and nitrate concentrations in subsoil suggested that the temperature-dependent supply of DOM drives microbial processes such as dissimilatory and assimilatory nitrate consumption.

Ehsan R. Toosi; John P. Schmidt; Michael J. Castellano

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Water sorption behaviour of highly swelling (carboxy methylcellulose-g-polyacrylamide) hydrogels and release of potassium nitrate as agrochemical  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Novel types of highly swelling hydrogels have been prepared by grafting crosslinked polyacrylamide chains onto carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) via a free radical polymerization method. The hydrogels were characterized by IR spectral analysis and by evaluating various network parameters such as average molecular weight between crosslinks (Mc), crosslink density (q) and the number of elastically effective chains (Vc). The hydrogels showed enormous swelling in aqueous medium and displayed swelling characteristics which were highly dependent on the chemical composition of the hydrogel and pH and ionic strength of the medium in which the hydrogel was immersed. The kinetics of water uptake and the water transport mechanism were studied as a function of the composition of the hydrogel and the pH of the medium. The hydrogels were also loaded with potassium nitrate as a model agrochemical and their potential for controlled release of potassium nitrate was judged by measuring conductivity. Various kinetic parameters such as the diffusion coefficient and swelling exponents were also calculated.

A.K Bajpai; Anjali Giri

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Soil Nitrogen Mineralization Potential for Improved Fertilizer Recommendations and Decreased Nitrate Contamination of Groundwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to determine optimum conditions for estimating soil microbial biomass (SMB) from previously dried soils and to identify a quick, reliable biochemical predictor of soil N mineralization potential. Initial evaluations were conducted on a Weswood silty clay loam...

Franzluebbers, Alan; Haney, Richard; Hons, Frank

234

MOLECULAR APPROACHES FOR IN SITU IDENTIFCIATION OF NITRATE UTILIZATION BY MARINE BACTERIA AND PHYTOPLANKTON  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traditionally, the importance of inorganic nitrogen (N) for the nutrition and growth of marine phytoplankton has been recognized, while inorganic N utilization by bacteria has received less attention. Likewise, organic N has been thought to be important for heterotrophic organisms but not for phytoplankton. However, accumulating evidence suggests that bacteria compete with phytoplankton for nitrate (NO3-) and other N species. The consequences of this competition may have a profound effect on the flux of N, and therefore carbon (C), in ocean margins. Because it has been difficult to differentiate between N uptake by heterotrophic bacterioplankton versus autotrophic phytoplankton, the processes that control N utilization, and the consequences of these competitive interactions, have traditionally been difficult to study. Significant bacterial utilization of DIN may have a profound effect on the flux of N and C in the water column because sinks for dissolved N that do not incorporate inorganic C represent mechanisms that reduce the atmospheric CO2 drawdown via the ?biological pump? and limit the flux of POC from the euphotic zone. This project was active over the period of 1998-2007 with support from the DOE Biotechnology Investigations ? Ocean Margins Program (BI-OMP). Over this period we developed a tool kit of molecular methods (PCR, RT-PCR, Q-PCR, QRT-PCR, and TRFLP) and combined isotope mass spectrometry and flow-cytometric approaches that allow selective isolation, characterization, and study of the diversity and genetic expression (mRNA) of the structural gene responsible for the assimilation of NO3- by heterotrophic bacteria (nasA). As a result of these studies we discovered that bacteria capable of assimilating NO3- are ubiquitous in marine waters, that the nasA gene is expressed in these environments, that heterotrophic bacteria can account for a significant fraction of total DIN uptake in different ocean margin systems, that the expression of nasA is differentially regulated in genetically distinct NO3- assimilating bacteria, and that the best predictors of nasA gene expression are either NO3- concentration or NO3- uptake rates. These studies provide convincing evidence of the importance of bacterial utilization of NO3-, insight into controlling processes, and provide a rich dataset that are being used to develop linked C and N modeling components necessary to evaluate the significance of bacterial DIN utilization to global C cycling. Furthermore, as a result of BI-OMP funding we made exciting strides towards institutionalizing a research and education based collaboration between the Skidaway Institute of Oceanography (SkIO) and Savannah State University (SSU), an historically black university within the University System of Georgia with undergraduate and now graduate programs in marine science. The BI-OMP program, in addition to supporting undergraduate (24) graduate (10) and postdoctoral (2) students, contributed to the development of a new graduate program in Marine Sciences at SSU that remains an important legacy of this project. The long-term goals of these collaborations are to increase the capacity for marine biotechnology research and to increase representation of minorities in marine, environmental and biotechnological sciences.

Frischer, Marc E. [Skidaway Institute of Oceanography; Verity, Peter G.; Gilligan, Mathew R.; Bronk, Deborah A.; Zehr, Jonathan P.; Booth, Melissa G.

2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

235

What determines cell size?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as: Marshall WF, et al. : What determines cell size? BMC7007/10/101 FORUM Open Access What determines cell size?biologists have been wondering what determines the size of

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Utilization of Common Automotive Three-Way NO{sub x} Reduction Catalyst for Managing Off- Gas from Thermal Treatment of High-Nitrate Waste - 13094  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studsvik's Thermal Organic Reduction (THOR) steam reforming process has been tested and proven to effectively treat radioactive and hazardous wastes streams with high nitrate contents to produce dry, stable mineral products, while providing high conversion (>98%) of nitrates and nitrites directly to nitrogen gas. However, increased NO{sub x} reduction may be desired for some waste streams under certain regulatory frameworks. In order to enhance the NO{sub x} reduction performance of the THOR process, a common Three-Way catalytic NO{sub x} reduction unit was installed in the process gas piping of a recently completed Engineering Scale Technology Demonstration (ESTD). The catalytic DeNO{sub x} unit was located downstream of the main THOR process vessel, and it was designed to catalyze the reduction of residual NO{sub x} to nitrogen gas via the oxidation of the hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and volatile organic compounds that are inherent to the THOR process gas. There was no need for auxiliary injection of a reducing gas, such as ammonia. The unit consisted of four monolith type catalyst sections positioned in series with a gas mixing section located between each catalyst section. The process gas was monitored for NO{sub x} concentration upstream and downstream of the catalytic DeNO{sub x} unit. Conversion efficiencies ranged from 91% to 97% across the catalytic unit, depending on the composition of the inlet gas. Higher concentrations of hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the THOR process gas increased the NO{sub x} reduction capability of the catalytic DeNO{sub x} unit. The NO{sub x} destruction performance of THOR process in combination with the Three-Way catalytic unit resulted in overall system NO{sub x} reduction efficiencies of greater than 99.9% with an average NO{sub x} reduction efficiency of 99.94% for the entire demonstration program. This allowed the NO{sub x} concentration in the ESTD exhaust gas to be maintained at less than 40 parts per million (ppm), dry basis with an average concentration of approximately 17 ppm, dry basis. There were no signs of catalyst deactivation throughout the 6 day demonstration program, even under the high steam (>50%) content and chemically reducing conditions inherent to the THOR process. Utilization of the common Three-Way automotive catalyst may prove to be a cost effective method for improving NO{sub x} emissions from thermal treatment processes that utilize similar processing conditions. This paper will discuss the details of the implementation and performance of the Three-Way catalytic DeNO{sub x} unit at the THOR ESTD, as well as a discussion of future work to determine the long-term durability of the catalyst in the THOR process. (authors)

Foster, Adam L.; Ki Song, P.E. [Studsvik, Inc. 5605 Glenridge Drive Suite 705, Atlanta, GA 30342 (United States)] [Studsvik, Inc. 5605 Glenridge Drive Suite 705, Atlanta, GA 30342 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Supporting Information Role of nitrate in conditioning aquifer sediments for technetium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

131 343 6723 Fax: +44 113 343 6716 Email address: k.morris@leeds.ac.uk #12;2 Table 1. Synthetic groundwater base composition..............................................S8 Table 2. Synthetic groundwater. Quantity of PCR determined Geobacteraceae genomic DNA...................S24 #12;3 1.1. Sample collection

Burke, Ian

238

Nitrated and oxygenated derivatives of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the ambient air of two  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; Size distribution; Atmospheric pollution; POVA (POllution des Vallées, published in "Atmospheric Environment 42, 173 (2008) 55 à 64" DOI : 10.1016/j.atmosenv.2007.10.008 #12 was determined during the intensive sampling campaigns of the POVA (POllution des Vallées Alpines) research

Boyer, Edmond

239

Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as uranyl nitrate hexahydrate. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will have two missions: (1) convert HEU materials to pure HEU uranyl nitrate (UNH) and (2) blend pure HEU UNH with depleted and natural UNH to produce HEU UNH crystals. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. To the extent practical, the chemical and isotopic concentrations of blended LEU product will be held within the specifications required for LWR fuel. Such blended LEU product will be offered to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) to be sold as feed material to the commercial nuclear industry. Otherwise, blended LEU Will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

NONE

1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

240

Alcaligenes defragrans sp. nov., Description of Four Strains Isolated on Alkenoic Monoterpenes ((+)-menthene, ?-pinene, 2-carene, and ?-phellandrene) and Nitrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Summary Four pseudomonad strains 51Men, 54Pin, 62Car and 65Phen were recently isolated on the monoterpenes (+)-menthene, ?-pinene, 2-carene and ?-phellandrene as sole carbon source and nitrate as electron acceptor. These bacteria were characterised. The motile, mesophilic, Gram-negative rods had a strictly respiratory metabolism. Monoterpenes as carbon sources were completely mineralised to carbon dioxide. The physiology of all strains was very similar, but displayed an individual utilisation preference for the isolation substrate. The fatty acid composition of whole cells showed a high degree of similarity to that of Alcaligenes faecalis. Comparative 16S rDNA data analysis placed the isolates into the beta-subclass of Proteobacteria in a common offshoot together with Alcaligenes and Bordetella species. On the basis of these characteristics, the strains are described as a new species belonging to the genus Alcaligenes, A. defragrans sp. nov., with strain 54Pin (DSM 12141T) as type strain.

S. Foss; U. Heyen; J. Harder

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination baseload nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Effect of temperature on the extraction of nitric acid and plutonium(IV) nitrate with 30 vol% tributyl phosphate (TBP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The author's own and published data were evaluated for characterizing the effect of temperature on the distribution of nitric acid and plutonium(IV). The solutes were distributed between 30 vol% TBP in an aliphatic diluent and aqueous solutions containing nitric acid and zero to macro amounts of plutonium(IV) and uranyl nitrates. The temperature dependence of the distribution ratios is described with empirical model equations and examples of the dependence in the absence and presence of uranium(VI) are given. Taking infinite dilution of all solutes of the system as a standard state, the enthalpy change of the extraction reaction could be estimated as -17 kJ/mol for nitric acid, but no numerical estimate was possible for plutonium(IV).

Kolarik, Z.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Denitrification, Dissimilatory Reduction of Nitrate to Ammonium, and Nitrification in a Bioturbated Estuarine Sediment as Measured with 15N and Microsensor Techniques  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...using Bunsen solubility coefficients...Details of both gas chromatographic...stagnant water. Diffusion...inorganic nitrogen compounds...nitrate in water using ammonia...measurement of nitrogen gas fluxes from...1970. The solubility of nitrogen, oxygen and argon in water and seawater...

Svend Jørgen Binnerup; Kim Jensen; Niels Peter Revsbech; Mikael Hjorth Jensen; Jan Sørensen

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Effect of the TBP and Water on the Complexation of Uranyl Nitrate and the Dissolution of Nitric Acid into Supercritical CO2. A Theoretical Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

started from "random" mixtures of water, TBP, nitric acid, and uranyl nitrate, complexation of uranyl to dissolve nitric acid in the supercritical phase. Indeed, without TBP, nitric acid alone self aggregates via containing the acid and uranyl salts. The simulations show that a high TBP/nitric acid ratio is needed

Boyer, Edmond

244

Ammonium Concentrations in Produced Waters from a Mesothermic Oil Field Subjected to Nitrate Injection Decrease through Formation of Denitrifying Biomass and Anammox Activity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sulfate- and nitrate-reducing bacteria from an oil field in Argentina. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 74: 4324-4335. 12 Haveman...injection, p. 370-388. In J. D. Wall et al. (ed.), Bioenergy. ASM Press, Washington, DC. 39 Voordouw, G., A. A...

Sabrina L. Cornish Shartau; Marcy Yurkiw; Shiping Lin; Aleksandr A. Grigoryan; Adewale Lambo; Hyung-Soo Park; Bart P. Lomans; Erwin van der Biezen; Mike S. M. Jetten; Gerrit Voordouw

2010-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

245

The Arabidopsis Ethylene/Jasmonic Acid-NRT Signaling Module Coordinates Nitrate Reallocation and the Trade-Off between Growth and Environmental Adaptation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Instructions for Authors ( www.plantcell.org ) is: Ji-Ming Gong ( jmgong@sibs.ac.cn ). [W] Online version contains Web-only data. [OPEN] Articles can be viewed online without a subscription. Stress-induced nitrate allocation to roots serves...

Guo-Bin Zhang; Hong-Ying Yi; Ji-Ming Gong

2014-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

246

The Arabidopsis Nitrate Transporter NRT2.4 Plays a Double Role in Roots and Shoots of Nitrogen-Starved Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...analyzed using the ANCA-MS system (PDZ Europa). Influx...The mobile phase was pumped at a rate of 1 mL/min...laevis Oocyte Expression System The pGEM-T Easy vector...L.] Merr.) seed storage protein gene in transgenic...high-affinity nitrate uptake system in Arabidopsis. Physiology...

Takatoshi Kiba; Ana-Belen Feria-Bourrellier; Florence Lafouge; Lina Lezhneva; Stéphanie Boutet-Mercey; Mathilde Orsel; Virginie Bréhaut; Anthony Miller; Françoise Daniel-Vedele; Hitoshi Sakakibara; Anne Krapp

2012-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

247

Increased nitration and carbonylation of proteins in MRL +/+ mice exposed to trichloroethene: Potential role of protein oxidation in autoimmunity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Even though reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) are implicated as mediators of autoimmune diseases (ADs), little is known about contribution of protein oxidation (carbonylation and nitration) in the pathogenesis of such diseases. The focus of this study was, therefore, to establish a link between protein oxidation and induction and/or exacerbation of autoimmunity. To achieve this, female MRL +/+ mice were treated with trichloroethene (TCE), an environmental contaminant known to induce autoimmune response, for 6 or 12 weeks (10 mmol/kg, i.p., every 4{sup th} day). TCE treatment resulted in significantly increased formation of nitrotyrosine (NT) and induction of iNOS in the serum at both 6 and 12 weeks of treatment, but the response was greater at 12 weeks. Likewise, TCE treatment led to greater NT formation, and iNOS protein and mRNA expression in the livers and kidneys. Moreover, TCE treatment also caused significant increases ({approx}3 fold) in serum protein carbonyls (a marker of protein oxidation) at both 6 and 12 weeks. Significantly increased protein carbonyls were also observed in the livers and kidneys (2.1 and 1.3 fold, respectively) at 6 weeks, and to a greater extent at 12 weeks (3.5 and 2.1 fold, respectively) following TCE treatment. The increases in TCE-induced protein oxidation (carbonylation and nitration) were associated with significant increases in Th1 specific cytokine (IL-2, IFN-{gamma}) release into splenocyte cultures. These results suggest an association between protein oxidation and induction/exacerbation of autoimmune response. The results present a potential mechanism by which oxidatively modified proteins could contribute to TCE-induced autoimmune response and necessitates further investigations for clearly establishing the role of protein oxidation in the pathogenesis of ADs.

Wang Gangduo; Wang Jianling; Ma Huaxian [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, 2.319 Mary Moody Northen, Galveston, TX 77555-0438 (United States); Khan, M. Firoze [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, 2.319 Mary Moody Northen, Galveston, TX 77555-0438 (United States)], E-mail: mfkhan@utmb.edu

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

SunShot Initiative: Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Storage for Baseload CSP Plants Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Storage for Baseload CSP Plants Terrafore logo Photo of gray balls grouped together. 10 to 15 millimeter capsules provide high heat transfer surface. Terrafore, under the Baseload CSP FOA, is developing novel encapsulated phase change materials (PCM) for use in thermal storage applications to significantly reduce the LCOE for baseload CSP plants. Approach Terrafore is determining a cost-effective way to produce small 10 mm to 15 mm capsules containing phase change material (PCM salt) in a suitable shell material. Large numbers of these PCM capsules provide high-heat transfer surface and store heat as sensible and latent heat of fusion of salt. The capsules with different PCMs inside the shell are stacked inside a single tank to provide a cascaded storage to effectively use the latent heat of fusion of salts over the solar collection temperature range.

249

Standard test method for quantitative determination of americium 241 in plutonium by Gamma-Ray spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This test method covers the quantitative determination of americium 241 by gamma-ray spectrometry in plutonium nitrate solution samples that do not contain significant amounts of radioactive fission products or other high specific activity gamma-ray emitters. 1.2 This test method can be used to determine the americium 241 in samples of plutonium metal, oxide and other solid forms, when the solid is appropriately sampled and dissolved. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Organic tank safety project: Preliminary results of energetics and thermal behavior studies of model organic nitrate and/or nitrite mixtures and a simulated organic waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a result of years of production and recovery of nuclear defense materials and subsequent waste management at the Hanford Site, organic-bearing radioactive high-level wastes (HLW) are currently stored in large (up to 3. ML) single-shell storage tanks (SSTs). Because these wastes contain both fuels (organics) and the oxidants nitrate and nitrite, rapid energetic reactions at certain conditions could occur. In support of Westinghouse Hanford Company`s (WHC) efforts to ensure continued safe storage of these organic- and oxidant-bearing wastes and to define the conditions necessary for reactions to occur, we measured the thermal sensitivities and thermochemical and thermokinetic properties of mixtures of selected organics and sodium nitrate and/or nitrite and a simulated Hanford organic-bearing waste using thermoanalytical technologies. These thermoanalytical technologies are used by chemical reactivity hazards evaluation organizations within the chemical industry to assess chemical reaction hazards.

Scheele, R.D.; Sell, R.L.; Sobolik, J.L.; Burger, L.L.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Draft General Conformity Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

I I Draft General Conformity Determination U.S. Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service MMS Cape Wind Energy Project January 2009 Final EIS Appendix I Draft General Conformity Determination Draft General Conformity Determination Cape Wind Energy Project Prepared by Minerals Management Service Herndon, VA November 2008 i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION TO THE PROPOSED ACTION............................................................... 1 2.0 GENERAL CONFORMITY REGULATORY BACKGROUND .......................................... 2 2.1 GENERAL CONFORMITY REQUIREMENTS.................................................................... 2 2.2 GENERAL CONFORMITY APPLICABILITY.....................................................................

252

Preparation of LiNi 0.5 Mn 1.5 O 4 for Lithium Batteries Via Solid?State Redox Method using Nitrate and Acetate Based Reactants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

LiNi 0.5 Mn 1.5 O 4 is a potential cathode material for 5 V batteries. This material was prepared by the solid?state redox method using nitrate and acetate based reactants. The precursor material was obtained when the mixture reactants was heated at 500°?C for 10 hours and calcined at different temperatures in the range between 650 and 950°?C for 12 hours. The structures of the synthesized materials were verified with X? ray diffraction (XRD) measurement and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The charge?discharge technique was determined using Solartron 1470. As calcination temperature increases the well?ordered crystal growth oriented to [1 1 1] direction shows a clear octahedral morphology which is the characteristic of the typical cubic spinel. The Li / LiNi 0.5 Mn 1.5 O 4 prepared from acetate based reactants calcined at 750°?C for 12 h delivered the discharge capacity of 140 mAh/g.

A. Mat; K. S. Sulaiman; M. A. Sulaiman; M. F. Hasim

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Solidification/Stabilization of High Nitrate and Biodenitrified Heavy Metal Sludges with a Portland Cement/Flyash System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pond 207C at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) contains process wastewaters characterized by high levels of nitrates and other salts, heavy metal contamination, and low level alpha activity. The purpose of this research was to investigate the feasibility of treating a high-nitrate waste, contaminated with heavy metals, with a coupled dewateriug and S/S process, as well as to investigate the effects of biodenitrification pretreatment on the S/S process. Pond 207C residuals served as the target waste. A bench-scale treatability study was conducted to demonstrate an S/S process that would minimize final product volume without a significant decrease in contaminant stabilization or loss of desirable physical characteristics. The process formulation recommended as a result a previous S/S treatability study conducted on Pond 207C residuals was used as the baseline formulation for this research. Because the actual waste was unavailable due to difficulties associated with radioactive waste handling and storage, a surrogate waste, of known composition and representative of Pond 207C residuals, was used throughout this research. The contaminants of regulatory concern added to the surrogate were cadmium, chromium, nickel, and silver. Product volume reduction was achieved by dewatering the waste prior to S/S treatment. The surrogate was dewatered by evaporation at 60 to 80 C to total solids contents from 43% to 78% by weight, and treated with Portland cement and fly ash. Two cement to flyash ratios were tested, 2:1 and 1:2, by weight. Contaminant leachability testing was conducted with a 0.5 water to pozzolan (the cement/flyash mixture) ratio and both cement to flyash ratios. Each product was tested for unconfined compressive strength (UCS) and for contaminant leachability by the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP). At the highest solids content achieved by dewatering, 78% solids by weight, the predicted final waste form volume f or Pond 207C residuals after S/S processing was reduced by over 60 A when compared to the baseline process. All tested process formulations produced final waste forms with an average UCS of 100 psi or greater. Percent fixation of Chrome (VI) increased at higher solids contents. Fixation of nickel varied from over 87% to 69%, and cadmium fixation was greater than 99% at every solids content tested. Silver TCLP extract concentrations were below detection limits in all cases except for one anomalous measurement. Final product volume reduction was not achieved with coupled dewatering and S/S processing after biodenitrification pretreatment. The waste slurry became too viscous to mix with reagents after dewatering to approximately 55% solids. Fixation of contaminant constituents and final product UCSs were similar to the results of S/S processing without biodenitrification. Due to the lack of volume reduction, biodenitrification was not successful as a pretreatment for S/S processing under the test conditions of this research.

Canonico, J.S.

1995-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

254

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation and Recycle of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disposal of high-level nuclear waste is horrendously expensive, in large part because the actual radioactive matter in the tanks has been diluted over 1000-fold by ordinary inorganic chemicals. Treatment processes themselves can exacerbate the problem by adding further volume to the waste. Waste retrieval and sludge washing, for example, will require copious amounts of sodium hydroxide. If the needed sodium hydroxide could be separated from the waste and recycled, however, the addition of fresh sodium hydroxide could be avoided, ultimately reducing the final waste volume and associated disposal costs. The major objective of this research is to explore new liquid-liquid extraction approaches to the selective separation of sodium hydroxide from alkaline high-level wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford and Savannah River sites. Consideration is also given to separating potassium and abundant anions, including nitrate, nitrite, aluminate, and carbonate. Salts of these ions represent possible additional value for recycle, alternative disposal, or even use as commodity chemicals. A comprehensive approach toward understanding the extractive chemistry of these salts is envisioned, involving systems of varying complexity, from use of simple solvents to new bifunctional host molecules for ion-pair recognition. These extractants will ideally require no adjustment of the waste composition and will release the extracted salt into water, thereby consuming no additional chemicals and producing no additional waste volume. The overall goal of this research is to provide a scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of new liquid-liquid extraction chemistry applicable to the bulk reduction of the volume of tank waste can be evaluated.

Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation and Recycle of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to explore new liquid-liquid extraction approaches to the selective separation of major sodium salts from alkaline high-level wastes stored in underground tanks at Hanford, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge sites. Disposal of high level waste is horrendously expensive, in large part because the actual radioactive matter in the tanks has been diluted over 1000-fold by ordinary inorganic chemicals. Since the residual bulk chemicals must still undergo expensive treatment and disposal after most of the hazardous radionuclides have been removed, large cost savings will result from processes that reduce the overall waste volume. It is proposed that major cost savings can be expected if sodium hydroxide needed for sludge washing can be obtained from the waste itself, thus avoiding the addition of yet another bulk chemical to the waste and still further increase of the waste volume and disposal cost. Secondary priority is given to separating potassium an d abundant anions, including nitrate, nitrite, aluminate, and carbonate. Salts of these ions represent possible additional value for recycle, alternative disposal, or even use as commodity chemicals. A comprehensive approach toward understanding the extractive chemistry of these salts is envisioned, involving systems of varying complexity, from use of simple solvents to new bifunctional host molecules for ion-pair recognition. These extractants will ideally require no adjustment of the waste composition and will release the extracted salt into water, thereby consuming no additional chemicals and producing no additional waste volume. The overall goal of this research is to provide a scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of new liquid-liquid extraction chemistry applicable to the bulk reduction of the volume of tank waste can be evaluated.

Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.; Bryan, Jeffrey C.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation and Recycle of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disposal of high- level waste is horrendously expensive, in large part because the actual radioactive matter in the tanks has been diluted over 1000-fold by ordinary inorganic chemicals. Treatment processes themselves can exacerbate the problem by adding further volume to the waste. Waste retrieval and sludge washing, for example, will require copious amounts of sodium hydroxide. If the needed sodium hydroxide could be separated from the waste and recycled, however, the addition of fresh sodium hydroxide could be avoided, ultimately reducing the final waste volume and associated disposal costs. The major objective of this research is to explore new liquid- liquid extraction approaches to the selective separation of sodium hydroxide from alkaline high-level wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford and Savannah River sites. Consideration is also given to separating potassium and abundant anions, including nitrate, nitrite, aluminate, and carbonate. Salts of these ions represent possible additional value for recycle, alternative disposal, or even use as commodity chemicals. A comprehensive approach toward understanding the extractive chemistry of these salts is envisioned, involving systems of varying complexity, from use of simple solvents to new bifunctional host molecules for ion-pair recognition. These extractants will ideally require no adjustment of the waste composition and will release the extracted salt into water, thereby consuming no additional chemicals and producing no additional waste volume. The overall goal of this research is to provide a scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of new liquid-liquid extraction chemistry applicable to the bulk reduction of the volume of tank waste can be evaluated.

Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Interim Action Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Interim Action Determination Interim Action Determination Processing of Plutonium Materials from the DOE Standard 3013 Surveillance Program in H-Canyon at the Savannah River Site The Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SPD SEIS, DOE/EIS-0283-S2). DOE is evaluating alternatives for disposition of non-pit plutonium that is surplus to the national

258

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECONOMIC ISSUES Baseload Electricity Baseload electricity production in the Gulf Coast States relies primarily on oil, natural gas, and coal.

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Determining age of whales  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Determining age of whales Determining age of whales Name: Bruce W Walkey Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: While browsing through the Internet, I came upon a question by two fifth grade students. Their question got me thinking and now I pose it to you. How can you determine the age of whales? Since they are mammals, can the methods that are used on humans be used on whales? What are some tests that can be done on bones or tissues to determine age? Looking forward to your reply. Replies: Although it is difficult to determine the age of whales (unless they are born in captivity and we know their birth date), several methods have been commonly used: 1) (if female) the examination of the ovaries 2) Examination of the ridges on baleen, which are not uniform in size and analogous to tree rings. The problem with this is that baleen wears away over time. 3) Studying layers of ossification in an ear bone is probably the most accurate method of aging, since internal bones don't wear away. The biggest problem with aging methods is that they usually require that you are dissecting the animal, and often, we would like a method of aging for live active animals. The best we can do here is to compare the size and markings of whales of known age to those found in the wild. Great question!

260

Detonation in Ammonium Nitrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Gelatine. Its behaviour was recorded by placing lead plates under the charge, and the detonation velocity measured by the Dautriche method at the larger cartridge diameters and with a streak ... wave died out quickly. The velocities were as follows:

STEWART PATERSON; JEAN M. DAVIDSON

1962-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination baseload nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Drinking Water Problems: Nitrates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Extension Specialist, Rebecca H. Melton, Extension Assistant, Michael F. Hare, Senior Natural Resources Specialist Pesticide Programs Division, Janie Hopkins, Manager Groundwater Monitoring Section, Texas Water Development Board, Bruce J. Lesikar, Professor... and Extension Specialist, Rebecca H. Melton, Extension Assistant, Michael F. Hare, Senior Natural Resources Specialist Pesticide Programs Division, Janie Hopkins, Manager Groundwater Monitoring Section, Texas Water Development Board, Bruce J. Lesikar, Professor...

Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

262

Nitrate accumulation in soils and in plant parts of sorghum and oats as influenced by sources and rates of nitrogen fertilizers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Accumulation in the Soil Profile Residual soil NO atter removal by the first crop Residual soil NO after removal by the second crop Residual soil NO after. 15 years in Coastal bermudagrass plo s 21 2 J. 21 41 41 46 50 DI, CUSSION Nitrate... in hydroxylamine reductase. Wright and Trautman (65) and Nightingale (39) have indicated that deficiencies or imbalance of other nutrients such as K, S, and Fe may cause NO build-up. 3 According to Benne (4), injury of the pl. ant tissues resulted in a drastic...

Costa, Cassimiro Vaz

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Gender determination in populus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gender, the expression of maleness or femaleness, in dioecious plants has been associated with changes in morphology, physiology, ecological position, and commercial importance of several species, including members of the Salicaceae family. Various mechanisms have been proposed to explain the expression of gender in Salicaceae, including sex chromosomes, simple Mendelian genes, quantitative genes, environment, and genotype-by-environment interactions. Published reports would favor a genetic basis for gender. The objective of this study was to identify molecular markers associated with gender in a segregating family of hybrid poplars. Bulked segregant analysis and chi-squared analysis were used to test for the occurrence of sex chromosomes, individual loci, and chromosome ratios (i.e., ploidy levels) as the mechanisms for gender determination. Examination of 2488 PCR based RAPD markers from 1219 primers revealed nine polymorphic bands between male and female bulked samples. However, linkage analysis indicated that none of these markers were significantly associated with gender. Chisquared results for difference in male-to-female ratios between diploid and triploid genotypes also revealed no significant differences. These findings suggest gender is not controlled via sex chromosomes, simple Mendelian loci or ratios of autosome to gender-determining loci. It is possible that gender is determined genetically by regions of the genome not sampled by the tested markers or by a complex of loci operating in an additive threshold manner or in an epistatic manner. It is also possible that gender is determined environmentally at an early zygote stage, canalizing gender expression.

McLetchie, D.N. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences; Tuskan, G.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

264

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

North Oakes tap of the Edgeley to Forman 69 kV line North Oakes tap of the Edgeley to Forman 69 kV line Description of Proposed Action: Central Power Electric Cooperative is proposing to tap into the Western Area Power Administration (Western) Edgeley to Forman 69 kV transmission line with a new substation to meet load growth in the Southeastern North Dakota area. Number and Title of Categorical Exclusions Being Applied: 10 CFR 1021.410 Subpart D, Appendix B, B4.11: Construction of electric power substations ... or modification of existing substations and support facilities. Regulatory Requirements for CX Determination: The DOE Guidelines for Compliance with the Regulatory Requirements for the National Environmental Policy Act at 10 CFR 1021.410(b), require the following determinations be made in order for a proposed action to be categorically

265

NEWTON: Determining Material Degradation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Determining Material Degradation Determining Material Degradation Name: Hamish Status: student Grade: 6-8 Location: CA Country: USA Date: Summer 2013 Question: I am working on a science project about photo-degradation of plastic film. My question is how much degraded a plastic film should be to say that it was 100% photo-degraded? The plastic film I am photo-degrading is turning into dust when I touch it, what level of degradation is that? Replies: Hi Hamish, Thanks for the question. You will need to define what you mean by photo-degraded. 100% photo-degraded could be that the film becomes translucent and lets through only blurry images. Or it could mean that the film turns to dust when you touch it. As long as you clearly state in your science project what you mean by 100% photo-degraded, you will be doing a good job.

266

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Circle substation expansion Circle substation expansion Description of Proposed Action: Expansion of the Circle substation approximately 4 acres to the south for the purpose of adding additional bays for the Keystone XL pipeline project. Number and Title of Categorical Exclusions Being Applied: 10 CFR 1021.410 Subpart D, Appendix B, B4.11: Construction of electric power substations ... or modification of existing substations and support facilities. Regulatory Requirements for CX Determination: The DOE Guidelines for Compliance with the Regulatory Requirements for the National Environmental Policy Act at 10 CFR 1021.410(b), require the following determinations be made in order for a proposed action to be categorically excluded from National Environmentally Policy Act (NEPA) review:

267

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Addition of a new substation near Lake Bowdoin, MT. Addition of a new substation near Lake Bowdoin, MT. Description of Proposed Action: Addition of a new substation near Lake Bowdoin on Western's Fort Peck to Havre 161 k V transmission line for the purpose of providing power for a Keystone XL pipeline project pump station. Number and Title of Categorical Exclusions Being Applied: 10 CFR 1021.410 Subpart D, Appendix B, B4.11: Construction of electric power substations ... or modification of existing substations and support facilities. Regulatory Requirements for CX Determination: The DOE Guidelines for Compliance with the Regulatory Requirements for the National Environmental Policy Act at 10 CFR 1021.41 O(b), require the following determinations be made in order for a proposed action to be categorically

268

Mental Health, Determinants of  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this article, the authors first review differences between mental health and physical health conditions and explicitly consider how the health production function can be applied to mental health. They then review the research on the determinants of mental health, focusing on the contributions of economists to this literature. They focus on three important inputs to mental health production: income, macroeconomic conditions, and employment.

E. Golberstein; S.H. Busch

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Letcher to Mitchell 115 kV transmission line to Western's Letcher to Mitchell 115 kV transmission line to Western's Letcher substation. Description of Proposed Action: Interconnection of Northwestern Energy's 115 kV Letcher to Mitchell transmission line at Western's Letcher substation. Northwestern Energy is proposing to build a 14.5 mile transmission line between their Mitchell substation and Western's Letcher substation to shore up reliability of their electrical system in the area. Number and Title of Categorical Exclusions Being Applied: 10 CFR 1021.410 Subpart D, Appendix B, B4.11: Construction of electric power substations ... or modification of existing substations and support facilities. Regulatory Requirements for CX Determination: The DOE Guidelines for Compliance with the Regulatory Requirements for the National Environmental Policy Act at 10 CFR 1021.41 O(b), require the

270

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Movement of the Shirley Pump substation to a new site away from Movement of the Shirley Pump substation to a new site away from Yellowstone River and replacement of the Shirley Pump substation transformer. Description of Proposed Action: Move the existing Shirley Pump substation approximately 200 meters to the southeast away from its current location and the Yellowstone River as well as replace the aging transformer with a new one. Number and Title of Categorical Exclusions Being Applied: 10 CPR 1021.410 Subpart D, Appendix B, B4.11: Construction of electric power substations ... or modification of existing substations and support facilities. Regulatory Requirements for CX Determination: The DOE Guidelines for Compliance with the Regulatory Requirements for the National Environmental Policy Act at 10 CPR 1021.41 O(b),

271

Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

t t Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Proposed Action Title: (0471-1563) University of South Florida - Development of a Low Cost Thermal Energy Storage System Using Phase Change Materials with Enhanced Radiation Heat Transfer Program or Field Office: Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy Location(s) (City/County/State): Tampa, FL Proposed Action Description: Funding will support development of low cost, industrially scalable capsules containing high-temperature phase change materials (PCMs) for use in thermal energy storage (TES) systems to enable continuous power supply from concentrated solar thermal and nuclear power plants. No nuclear research and development activities will take place under this project. ARPA-E has undertaken a review of the work to be performed

272

Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

n rgy n rgy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Proposed Action Title: (0474-1555) University of Colorado - Boulder - Wafer-Level Sub-Module Integrated DCfDC Converter Program or Field Office: Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy LocationCs) CCity/County/State): Colorado, Maine, Virginia Proposed Action Description: Funding will support development of a planar, wafer-level sub-module integrated converter (SubMIC) device that can be integrated into various types of photovoltaic (PV) modules to enable low-cost maximum power point tracking at high power processing efficiencies. Proposed work consists of indoor laboratory-based research and development (R&D), microfabrication activities, and analytical research, including: (1) simulated modeling and design of SubMIC components and integrated units, (2) development, fabrication, testing, and optimization

273

Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1537) Utah State University - 1537) Utah State University - Robust Cell-Level Modeling and Control of Large Battery Packs Program or Field Office: Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy LocationCs) CCity/County/State): Logan, UT; Colorado Springs, CO; Boulder, CO; Golden, CO; Dearborn, MI Proposed Action Description: Funding will support efforts to develop a novel battery pack architecture supported by algorithms to drive analysis, feedback, and operability. Proposed work will consist of: (1) performing a requirements analysis to determine optimal theoretical design for the battery pack; (2) design and theoretical optimization of the necessary algorithms to control and monitor the cells in the pack; (3) creation , testing, and analysis of a proof-of- concept unit; and (4) application of the algorithmic controls to a commercial battery pack to analyze performance.

274

Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ergy ergy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Proposed Action Title: (0472-1569) G~tomics - Double Sator Switched Reluctance Motor (DSSRM) Technology Progi'am or Field Office: Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy Location(s) (City/County/State): San Diego, CA Proposed Action Description: General Atomics, in conjunction with the University of Texas-Dallas (UT Dallas), proposes to develop double-stator switched reluctance motor (DSSRM) for electric vehicles (EVs) that will eliminate the use of permanent magnet-based motors that rely on rare earth metals in EVs. General Atomics' application was selected for an initial 18-month period (Phase 1) of funding. The ARPA-E Program Director may decide to negotiate and fund project activities for an additional 18-month period (Phase II) after evaluating the work performed in Phase I. ARPA-E has not obligated

275

Ultratrace determination of curium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development of a method for detection of curium at near single atom levels is being undertaken as a part of the Advanced Concepts Project at Argonne National Laboratory with funding from the US Department of Energy, Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation. Ultratrace determination of curium, with the ability to quantify the fraction that is curium-242, provides a signature method of detecting clandestine reprocessing of recently irradiated uranium targets. Curium initially present in any of a variety of materials such as air filters, solid or liquid process waste, soil, flora, or fauna can be recovered via current chemical separations processing techniques. Using the ultratrace method being developed, such recovered curium will be quantified with thousand-fold higher sensitivity than the best currently available method which is alpha counting. This high sensitivity arises because, on average, a given trivalent curium (Cm{sup 3+}) ion can emit a very large number of fluorescence photons before alpha decay occurs.

Beitz, J.V.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

y y Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Proposed Action Title: (0471-1595) Regents of the University of Minnesota - Thermal Fuel: Solar Fuels via Partial Redox Cycles with Heat Recovery Program or Field Office: Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy LocationCs) CCity/County/State): Minnesota, California, and Colorado. Proposed Action Description: Funding will support development of a dual zone solar thermochemical reactor to produce fuel using ceria-based reactive materials in partial redox cycles and high heat recovery levels through counter-circulation of solid state components. Proposed work consists of indoor laboratory-based research and development, including: (1) designing, fabricating, and characterizing an optimized ceria-based reactive element for use in the reactor to enable maximum fuel productivity and durability; (2) designing and fabricating a

277

Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of n y of n y Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Proposed Action Title: (0471-1607) University of Florida - Solar Thermochemical Fuel Production via a Novel Low Pressure, Magnetically Stabilized, Non-Volatile Iron Oxide Looping Process Program or Field Office: Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy LocationCs) CCity/County/State): Gainesville, FL Proposed Action Description: University of Florida proposes to develop a novel solar thermochemical reactor with inputs of water, recycled carbon dioxide (C02), and concentrated solar energy to cost-effectively produce Syngas, a renewable, carbon-neutral fuel. Project activities will include: (1) modeling, design, and fabrication of a high efficiency 1 OkW reactor prototype; (2) test analysis of bench-scale

278

Cat Dish Bacteria Determination  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dish Bacteria Determination Dish Bacteria Determination Name: Ashlyn Status: student Grade: 6-8 Location: FL Country: USA Date: Summer 2011 Question: Is there a simple way to measure bacteria in cat's water dishes without doing something with Agar? To measure bacteria in a water bowl, do I need to use a microscope? I am thinking of using different materials (metal, plastic, and glass) to see which of those has the grows the most bacteria. Replies: Hello Ashlyn, That is a very good idea for a science project. Usually the best way to do a quantitative analysis of bacteria content is to take a measured amount of a liquid, plate it out on some type of agar and do a colony count. This will give a basic indication of bacterial load, but not differentiate the types of bacteria. The most common type of bacteria that causes a pink film to form on water bowls and showers, etc. is Serratia marcescens. It is a fairly harmless organism that reacts with standing water. It may only adhere to the walls of the container and not be 'free floating' in the water. A microscope would not likely help unless you were able to do special stains to help see the bacteria. You might also want to add stoneware or ceramic to your list. Just so you know stoneware or ceramic make the best containers for cats to drink out of. It keeps the water fresher: Maybe less bacteria? You might just have to rely on a visual inspection of the containers to see which has more pink per surface area.

279

Determinations | Building Energy Codes Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Regulations Regulations Site Map Printable Version Development Adoption Compliance Regulations Determinations Federal Buildings Manufactured Housing Resource Center Determinations Commercial Determinations Residential Determinations Final Determination on ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 On October 19, 2011, DOE issued a final determination that ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 would achieve greater energy efficiency in buildings subject to the standard than if they were built to ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007. View the complete final determination notice that appeared in the Federal Register on October 19, 2011. View the complete preliminary determination notice that appeared in the Federal Register on July 20, 2011. State Certification This final determination is being published before the two year deadline

280

/sup 252/Cf-source-driven neutron noise measurements of subcriticality for a slab tank containing aqueous Pu-U nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to study nuclear criticality safety related to the development of fast breeder technology, /sup 252/Cf-source-driven neutron noise analysis measurements were performed with a Pu-U nitrate solution in a slab tank of various heights and thickness varying 11.43 cm to 19.05 cm. The results and conclusions of these experiments are (1) a capability to measure the subcriticality of a multiplying system of slab geometry to a k/sub eff/ as low as 0.7 was demonstrated, (2) calculated neutron multiplication factors agreed with those from the experiments within approx.0.02, and (3) the applicability of the method for plutonium solution systems was demonstrated. This paper describes measurements in which the height of the slab was varied for a fixed thickness and the thickness varied for a fixed height, which are the first applications of this measurement method to slab geometry.

Mihalczo, J.T.; Blakeman, E.D.; Ragan, G.E.; Kryter, R.C.; Robinson, R.C.; Seino, H.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination baseload nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Scandium nitrate-nitric acid-water-tributyl phosphate system. III. IR spectra of scandium extracts from concentrated nitric acid solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Equilibrium organic phases in extraction systems consisting of tributyl phosphate (TBP) (neat or 1 M in CCl{sub 4}) and 8-12 M nitric acid containing scandium or scandium-free have been studied by IR spectroscopy. Extracted complex contains 3, 4, or 5 nitric acid molecules per Sc atom in the case of extraction from 8.3, 10.9, and 12.2 M HNO{sub 3}, respectively, and corresponds to the formula Sc(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{center_dot}mHNO{sub 3}{center_dot}3TBP. Nitric acid molecules are incorporated into extracted complex via H-bond between oxygen atom of coordinated nitrate ion and acid proton.

Nikitina, G.P.; Egorova, V.P.; Listopadov, A.A. [Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)] [and others

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

GIS-based methodologies for assessing nitrate,nitrite and ammonium distributions across a major UK basin,the Humber Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(4), 823833 (2004) EGU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GIS-based methodologies for assessing nitrate,nitrite and ammonium distributions across a major UK basin,the Humber 823 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(4), 823833 (2004) © EGU GIS a Geographical Information System (GIS) framework. This basin contains diverse characteristics, from areas

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

283

Application of single ion activity coefficients to determine solvent extraction mechanism for components of high level nuclear waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The TRUEX solvent extraction process is being developed to remove and concentrate transuranic (TRU) elements from high-level and TRU radioactive wastes currently stored at US Department of Energy sites. Phosphoric acid is one of the chemical species of concern at the Hanford site where bismuth phosphate was used to recover plutonium. The mechanism of phosphoric acid extraction with TRUEX-NPH solvent at 25{degrees}C was determined by phosphoric acid distribution ratios, which were measured by using phosphoric acid radiotracer and a variety of aqueous phases containing different concentrations of nitric acid and nitrate ions. A model was developed for predicting phosphoric acid distribution ratios as a function of the thermodynamic activities of nitrate ion and hydrogen ion. The Generic TRUEX Model (GTM) was used to calculate these activities based on the Bromley method. The derived model supports CMPO and TBP extraction of a phosphoric acid-nitric acid complex and a CMPO-phosphoric acid complex in TRUEX-NPH solvent.

Nunez, L.; Vandegrift, G.F.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

284

Determining the Fate of Herbicides in the Ogallala Aquifer.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nitrate ancl tritium were injected into Well 1 during a previous study, both materials proved to be accurate tracers (7, 8). Recharge began at 10:20 a.m. October 28 ancl continued for 10 days, with the chemicals being con- tinuously fed... would be pumped back within a few months. The results with herbicides are similar to those of an earlier study at the Research Center in which nitrate and DDT were pollution parameters, and tritium was the recharge water tracer (7, 8). The ni...

Schneider, A. D.; Wiese, A. F.; Jones, O. R.; Mathers, A. C.

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Thauera linaloolentis sp. nov. and Thauera terpenica sp. nov., Isolated on Oxygen-containing Monoterpenes (Linalool, Menthol, and Eucalyptol and Nitrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Summary The monoterpenes menthol, linalool, and eucalyptol were recently used as sole electron donor and carbon source for the isolation of three denitrifying bacterial strains 21Mol, 47Lol, and 58Eu. The motile, mesophilic, Gram-negative rods had a strictly respiratory metabolism. Monoterpenes were completely mineralised to carbon dioxide, nitrate was reduced to dinitrogen. Strain 47Lol utilised aliphatic monoterpenes, strain 21Mol oxygenated monocyclic monoterpenes, and strain 58Eu the bicyclic eucalyptol and monocyclic monoterpene alkenes. The fatty acid composition of the strains indicated an allocation to the rRNA group III of pseudomonads. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses revealed that the new isolates can be assigned as members of the genus Thauera within the beta subclass of Proteobacteria. DNA-DNA hybridisation studies indicated a relateness of 68.5% between strains 21Mol and 58Eu which shared 36.0% and 40.6% DNA similarity with strain 47Lol. The strains are described as new species belonging to the genus Thauera, strain 47Lol (DSM 12138T) as T. linaloolentis sp. nov. and strains 21Mol and 58Eu as T. terpenica sp. nov. with strain 58Eu (DSM 12139T) as type strain.

S. Foss; J. Harder

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Assimilation of surface data in a one-dimensional physical-biogeochemical model of the surface ocean: 2. Adjusting a simple trophic model to chlorophyll, temperature, nitrate, and pCO{sub 2} data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper builds on a previous work which produced a constrained physical-biogeochemical model of the carbon cycle in the surface ocean. Three issues are addressed: (1) the results of chlorophyll assimilation using a simpler trophic model, (2) adjustment of parameters using the simpler model and data other than surface chlorophyll concentrations, and (3) consistency of the main carbon fluxes derived by the simplified model with values from the more complex model. A one-dimensional vertical model coupling the physics of the ocean mixed layer and a description of biogeochemical processes with a simple trophic model was used to address these issues. Chlorophyll concentration, nitrate concentration, and temperature were used to constrain the model. The surface chlorophyll information was shown to be sufficient to constrain primary production within the photic layer. The simultaneous assimilation of chlorophyll, nitrate, and temperature resulted in a significant improvement of model simulation for the data used. Of the nine biological and physical parameters which resulted in significant variations of the simulated chlorophyll concentration, seven linear combinations of the mode parameters were constrained. The model fit was an improvement on independent surface chlorophyll and nitrate data. This work indicates that a relatively simple biological model is sufficient to describe carbon fluxes. Assimilation of satellite or climatological data coulc be used to adjust the parameters of the model for three-dimensional models. It also suggests that the main carbon fluxes driving the carbon cycle within surface waters could be derived regionally from surface information. 38 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs.

Prunet, P.; Minster, J.F.; Echevin, V. [Laboratoire CNES-CNRS, Toulouse (France)] [and others] [Laboratoire CNES-CNRS, Toulouse (France); and others

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation and Recycle of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research has focused on new liquid-liquid extraction chemistry applicable to separation of major sodium salts from alkaline tank waste. It was the overall goal to provide the scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of liquid-liquid extraction chemistry for bulk reduction of the volume of tank waste can be evaluated. Sodium hydroxide represented the initial test case and primary focus. It is a primary component of the waste1 and has the most value for recycle. A full explanation of the relevance of this research to USDOE Environmental Management needs will be given in the Relevance, Impact, and Technology Transfer section below. It should be noted that this effort was predicated on the need for sodium removal primarily from low-activity waste, whereas evolving needs have shifted attention to volume reduction of the high-activity waste. The results of the research to date apply to both applications, though treatment of high-activity wastes raises new questions that will be addressed in the renewal period. Toward understanding the extractive chemistry of sodium hydroxide and other sodium salts, it was the intent to identify candidate extractants and determine their applicable basic properties regarding selectivity, efficiency, speciation, and structure. A hierarchical strategy was to be employed in which the type of liquid-liquid-extraction system varied in sophistication from simple, single-component solvents to solvents containing designer host molecules. As an aid in directing this investigation toward addressing the fundamental questions having the most value, a conceptualization of an ideal process was advanced. Accordingly, achieving adequate selectivity for sodium hydroxide represented a primary goal, but this result is worthwhile for waste applications only if certain conditions are met.

Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Bryan, Jeffrey C.; Haverlock, Tamara J.

2002-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

288

DETERMINATION OF CORROSION INHIBITOR CRITERIA FOR TYPE III/IIIA TANKS DURING SALT DISSOLUTION OPERATIONS INTERIM REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preparation of high level waste for vitrification involves in part the dissolution of salt cake from the carbon steel storage tanks. During dissolution, a point is reached in which the corrosion inhibitors, hydroxide and nitrite, are diluted below established guidelines, and nitrate stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is possible. Because the addition of inhibitors may be counterproductive to process efficiency and waste minimization, corrosion testing was initiated to revisit and possibly revise the guidelines for inhibitor limits. The bases for the work summarized in this status report are results from previously-completed phases of study. In the first two phases of study, several reduced-inhibitor levels were tested in HLW simulants with nitrate concentrations ranging from 4.5 M to 8.5 M. The first two phases of work determined, among other things, the reduced-inhibitor levels and solution chemistries in which heat-treated and non-heat-treated A537 carbon steel is susceptible to SCC, crevice corrosion, and pitting. The work covered in this current task both builds on and verifies the conclusions of the previous work. The current work involves testing of low levels of inhibitors in HLW simulants with 5.5 M to 8.5 M nitrate concentrations. Stressed U-bend specimens, both polarized and non-polarized, were tested. Non-polarized U-bend testing is ongoing, with the U-bends currently in test for 100 days. The purpose of the testing is to determine SCC susceptibility in the vapor space (VS) and liquid air interface (LAI) regions of the HLW tanks under conditions expected during salt dissolution, and also to verify previous accelerated testing. The simulated wastes being tested have nitrate concentrations of 5.5 M and 8.5 M and inhibitor levels of 0.01 M/0.01 M hydroxide/nitrite and 0.1 M/ 0.1 M hydroxide/nitrite. The open circuit potential measurements being monitored and the corrosion morphology of the U-bends are in agreement with results and observations of previous phases of work. No SCC has occurred in the first 100 days of testing. The LAI specimens experienced minor corrosion at the liquid line with corrosion products visible on the weld material and in the heat-affected zones on either side of the welds. The VS specimens are more evenly and slightly more corroded. Polarized U-bend testing is complete after approximately 80 days of testing. No SCC occurred, but the results are inconclusive due to a competing, unexpected galvanic corrosion mechanism that interfered in the last 50 days of testing. No cracking was indicated during the first month. The tests will be repeated in order to satisfy the original objective which was to determine the effect of grinding HLW tank welds and heat treating the tanks had on corrosion. Both the non-polarized and polarized U-bend tests will continue. Additionally, cyclic polarization (CP) testing will be performed to examine the effects of surface oxides on corrosion and the differences in corrosion susceptibility between welded and un-welded areas.

Counts, K; Bruce Wiersma, B; John Mickalonis, J

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

289

National Mining Association Experimental Determination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Mining Association Experimental Determination of Radon Fluxes over Water #12;Introduction research funded by the National Mining Association (NMA) regarding radon fluxes from water surfaces surfaces at uranium recovery operations are insignificant and approximate background soil fluxes for most

290

Structure Determination of Echovirus 1  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the structure determination of echovirus 1, subtle interactions between crystallographic and non-crystallographic symmetries caused the space group to be ambiguous, but also allowed significant short cuts in the molecular-replacement calculations.

Filman, D.J.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Structure determination of porcine haemoglobin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To investigate a potential candidate material for making artificial red blood cells for supplement blood transfusion, the crystal structure of porcine haemoglobin was determined up to 1.8 ? resolution.

Lu, T.-H.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Determining Cropland Share Rental Arrangements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many crop producers rely heavily on rented land in their farming operations. With this publication, they can learn more about determining crop shares and the principles of crop share leases....

Dhuyvetter, Kevin C.; Kastens, Terry L.; Outlaw, Joe

1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

293

Determining the Appropriate Asset Allocation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Asset allocation largely determines the success of one's investments. This publication explains the different types of assets and how to choose the ones that best suit your goals and investment timeline....

Johnson, Jason; Polk, Wade

2002-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

294

CX-010493: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Determining Distribution Coefficients by Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/14/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

295

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Minnesota | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

December 5, 2013 CX-011428: Categorical Exclusion Determination Staged, High-Pressure Oxy-Combustion Technology: Development and Scale-Up - Phase II CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date:...

296

Elementary Determinants for Electrical Engineers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... electrical engineering, determinants are useful, and Prof. Fleming showed many years ago how the resistances of networks can be computed by their means. The very complicated formulae which telephone ...

1923-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

297

Gender determination of avian embryo  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a method for gender determination of avian embryos. During the embryo incubation process, the outer hard shells of eggs are drilled and samples of allantoic fluid are removed. The allantoic fluids are directly introduced into an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) for analysis. The resulting spectra contain the relevant marker peaks in the positive or negative mode which correlate with unique mobilities which are sex-specific. This way, the gender of the embryo can be determined.

Daum, Keith A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Atkinson, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

CX-011104: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-011104: Categorical Exclusion Determination Coupled Thermo-Mechanical and Photo-Chemical Degradation Mechanisms that Determine the Reliability and...

299

Standard test method for determination of impurities in nuclear grade uranium compounds by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This test method covers the determination of 67 elements in uranium dioxide samples and nuclear grade uranium compounds and solutions without matrix separation by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The elements are listed in Table 1. These elements can also be determined in uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UNH), uranium hexafluoride (UF6), triuranium octoxide (U3O8) and uranium trioxide (UO3) if these compounds are treated and converted to the same uranium concentration solution. 1.2 The elements boron, sodium, silicon, phosphorus, potassium, calcium and iron can be determined using different techniques. The analyst's instrumentation will determine which procedure is chosen for the analysis. 1.3 The test method for technetium-99 is given in Annex A1. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish ...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Nitrogen Oxides in the Nocturnal Boundary Layer: Chemistry of Nitrous Acid (HONO) and the Nitrate Radical (N03)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Summary Chemical processes occurring at night in the lowest part of the urban atmosphere, the so called nocturnal boundary layer (NBL), can influence the composition of the atmosphere during the night as well as the following day. They may impact the budgets of some of the most important pollutants, such as ozone and nitrogen oxides, as well as influence size and composition of particular matter. Few studies have thus far concentrated on the nocturnal chemistry of the urban NBL, most likely due to the strong influence of vertical transport and mixing, which requires the measurement of trace gas profiles instead of simple point observations. Motivated by our lack of observations and understanding of nocturnal chemistry, the focus of this project was the study of the vertical distribution of trace gases and the altitude dependence of nocturnal chemistry under polluted conditions through field observations and modeling studies. The analysis of three field experiments (TEXAQS, Houston, 2000; Phoenix Sunrise Ozone Experiment, 2001; NAPOX, Boston, 2002), two of which were performed in this project, showed that ozone concentrations typically increase with height in the lowest 150m, while NO2 typically decreases. NO3, the dominant nocturnal radical species, showed much higher concentrations in the upper part of the NBL, and was often not present at the ground. With the help of a one-dimensional chemical transport model, developed in this project, we found that the interaction of ground emissions of NOx and hydrocarbons, together with their vertical transport, is responsible for the vertical profiles. The dominant chemical reactions influencing ozone, NO2 and NO3 are the reaction of ozone and NO3 with freshly emitted NO. Sensitivity studies with our model showed that the magnitude of the trace gas gradients depend both on the emission rates and the vertical stability of the NBL. Observations and model analysis clearly show that nocturnal chemistry in urban areas is altitude dependent. Measurements at one altitude, for example at the ground, where most air quality monitoring stations are located, are not representative for the rest of the NBL. Our model also revealed that radical chemistry is, in general, altitude dependent at night. We distinguish three regions: an unreactive, NO rich, ground layer; an upper, O3 and NO3 dominated layer, and a reactive mixing layer, where RO2 radicals are mixed from aloft with NO from the ground. In this reactive layer an active radical chemistry and elevated OH radical levels can be found. The downward transport of N2O5 and HO2NO2, followed by their thermal decay, was also identified as a radical source in this layer. Our observations also gave insight into the formation of HONO in the NBL. Based on our field experiments we were able to show that the NO2 to HONO conversion was relative humidity dependent. While this fact was well known, we found that it is most likely the uptake of HONO onto surfaces which is R.H. dependent, rather than the NO2 to HONO conversion. This finding led to the proposal of a new NO2 to HONO conversion mechanism, which is based on solid physical chemical principles. Noteworthy is also the observation of enhanced NO2 to HONO conversion during a dust storm event in Phoenix. The final activity in our project investigated the influence of the urban canopy, i.e. building walls and surfaces, on nocturnal chemistry. For the first time the surface area of a city was determined based on a Geographical Information System database of the city of Santa Monica. The surface to volume areas found in this study showed that, in the 2 lower part of the NBL, buildings provide a much larger surface area than the aerosol. In addition, buildings take up a considerable amount of the volume near the ground. The expansion of our model and sensitivity studies based on the Santa Monica data revealed that the surface area of buildings considerably influences HONO levels in urban areas. The volume reduction leads to a decrease of O3 and an increase of NO2 near the ground due to the stronger impact o

Jochen Stutz

2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination baseload nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Experimental observations of detonation in ammonium-nitrate-fuel-oil (ANFO) surrounded by a high-sound speed, shockless, aluminum confiner  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detonations in explosive mixtures of ammonium-nitrate-fuel-oil (ANFO) confined by aluminum allow for transport of detonation energy ahead of the detonation front due to the aluminum sound speed exceeding the detonation velocity. The net effect of this energy transport on the detonation is unclear. It could enhance the detonation by precompressing the explosive near the wall. Alternatively, it could desensitize the explosive by crushing porosity required for shock initiation or destroying confinement ahead of the detonation. As these phenomena are not well understood, most numerical explosive models are unable to account for them. But with slowly detonating, non-ideal high explosive (NIHE) systems becoming increasing prevalent, proper understanding and prediction of the performance of these metal-confined NIHE systems is desirable. Experiments are discussed that measured the effect of this ANFO detonation energy transported upstream of the front by an aluminum confining tube. Detonation velocity, detonation front curvature, and aluminum response are recorded as a function of confiner wall thickness and length. Front curvature profiles display detonation acceleration near the confining surface, which is attributed to energy transported upstream modifying the flow. Average detonation velocities were seen to increase with increasing confiner thickness due to the additional inertial confinement of the reaction zone flow. Significant radial sidewall tube motion was observed immediately ahead of the detonation. Axial motion was also detected which interfered with the front curvature measurements in some cases. It was concluded that the confiner was able to transport energy ahead of the detonation and that this transport has a definite effect on the detonation.

Jackson, Scott I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Klyanda, Charles B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Short, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

CX-012303: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-012303: Categorical Exclusion Determination Post Combustion Carbon Capture Using Polyethylenimine (PEI) Functionalized Titanate Nanotubes CX(s)...

303

CX-007854: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-007854: Categorical Exclusion Determination Streamlining Solar Standards & Processes: The Southern California Rooftop Solar Challenge CX(s)...

304

CX-000292: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-000292: Categorical Exclusion Determination A Novel Biogas Desulphurization Sorbent Technology for Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell - Based Combined...

305

CX-000293: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-000293: Categorical Exclusion Determination A Novel Biogas Desulphurization Sorbent Technology for Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell - Based Combined...

306

CX-000294: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-000294: Categorical Exclusion Determination A Novel Biogas Desulphurization Sorbent Technology for Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell- Based Combined...

307

CX-001996: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001996: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma State Energy Program (SEP) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) - Washita...

308

CX-001998: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001998: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma State Energy Program (SEP) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) - Shawnee...

309

CX-004730: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004730: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma State Energy Program American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Oklahoma Municipal...

310

CX-007573: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007573: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma State Energy Program American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Oklahoma Municipal...

311

CX-008602: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008602: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma State Energy Program- Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority Large Systems Request AO...

312

CX-007412: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007412: Categorical Exclusion Determination OKLAHOMA State Energy Program American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Oklahoma Municipal...

313

CX-009009: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009009: Categorical Exclusion Determination "Oklahoma State Energy Program American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Oklahoma Municipal...

314

CX-000771: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000771: Categorical Exclusion Determination New York Revised Narrative Information Worksheet for Energy Efficiency Program for...

315

CX-012223: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

& Publications CX-012402: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-012224: Categorical Exclusion Determination National Offshore Wind Energy Grid Interconnection Study (NOWEGIS)...

316

CX-001459: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001459: Categorical Exclusion Determination Air Quality VIII: An International Conference on Carbon Management, Mercury, Trace Elements,...

317

CX-012136: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-012136: Categorical Exclusion Determination Distributed Fiber Optic Arrays: Integrated Temperature and Seismic Sensing for Detection of Carbon...

318

CX-011013: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-011013: Categorical Exclusion Determination Distributed Fiber Optic Arrays: Integrated Temperature and Seismic Sensing for Detection of Carbon...

319

CX-011017: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-011017: Categorical Exclusion Determination Distributed Fiber Optic Arrays: Integrated Temperature and Seismic Sensing for Detection of Carbon...

320

CX-006140: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-006140: Categorical Exclusion Determination Revised Market Title for Energy Efficiency Program for Municipalities, Schools, Hospitals, Public...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination baseload nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

CX-000669: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

69: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000669: Categorical Exclusion Determination Illinois Energy Conservation Plan for State Facilities - Capital Development Board Projects...

322

CX-000670: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

70: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000670: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant State of Illinois Categorical Exclusion...

323

CX-009310: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009310: Categorical Exclusion Determination Optimization of Reservoir Storage Capacity in Different Depositional Environments (Rock...

324

CX-001473: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-001473: Categorical Exclusion Determination Direct Coal Liquefaction Process Development Date: 04022010 Location(s): Grand Forks, North...

325

CX-003975: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003975: Categorical Exclusion Determination State Energy Program - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Green Jobs Training Program -...

326

CX-011555: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-011555: Categorical Exclusion Determination Managing Zirconium Chemistry and Phase Compatibility in Combined Process Separations for Minor Actinide...

327

Determine Institutional Change Sustainability Goals | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Determine Institutional Change Sustainability Goals Determine Institutional Change Sustainability Goals Institutional Change Continuous Improvement Cycle The first step in the...

328

CX-002556: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-002556: Categorical Exclusion Determination Technical Consultant Services to Assist City In Development of Energy Efficiency and Conservation...

329

CX-001278: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001278: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Efficiency (EE) and Conservation Strategy, Technical Consultant, Revolving Loan...

330

CX-011610: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-011610: Categorical Exclusion Determination Mission Support Alliance Annual Categorical Exclusion for Training Exercises and Simulations under 10 CFR...

331

CX-011607: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-011607: Categorical Exclusion Determination Mission Support Alliance Annual Categorical Exclusion for Air Conditioning Systems for Existing Equipment...

332

CX-011598: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-011598: Categorical Exclusion Determination Mission Support Alliance Annual Categorical Exclusion for Building and Equipment Instrumentation under 10 CFR...

333

CX-009661: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-009661: Categorical Exclusion Determination Mission Support Alliance Annual Categorical Exclusion for Installation or Relocation of Machinery and...

334

CX-009664: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-009664: Categorical Exclusion Determination Mission Support Alliance Annual Categorical Exclusion for Routine Maintenance and Custodial Services under 10...

335

CX-011602: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-011602: Categorical Exclusion Determination Mission Support Alliance Annual Categorical Exclusion for Disconnection of Utilities under 10 CFR 1021,...

336

CX-011601: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-011601: Categorical Exclusion Determination Mission Support Alliance Annual Categorical Exclusion for Installation or Relocation of Machinery and...

337

CX-011597: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-011597: Categorical Exclusion Determination Mission Support Alliance Annual Categorical Exclusion for Facility Safety and Environmental Improvements under...

338

CX-011608: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-011608: Categorical Exclusion Determination Mission Support Alliance Annual Categorical Exclusion for Routine Maintenance and Custodial Services under 10...

339

CX-009657: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-009657: Categorical Exclusion Determination "Mission Support Alliance Annual Categorical Exclusion for Site Characterization and Environmental Monitoring...

340

CX-009656: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-009656: Categorical Exclusion Determination Mission Support Alliance Annual Categorical Exclusion for Facility Safety and Environmental Improvements...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination baseload nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

CX-011596: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-011596: Categorical Exclusion Determination Mission Support Alliance Annual Categorical Exclusion for Site Characterization and Environmental Monitoring...

342

CX-009662: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-009662: Categorical Exclusion Determination Mission Support Alliance Annual Categorical Exclusion for Training Exercises and Simulations under 10 CFR...

343

CX-009655: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-009655: Categorical Exclusion Determination Mission Support Alliance Annual Categorical Exclusion for Building and Equipment Instrumentation under 10 CFR...

344

CX-011604: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-011604: Categorical Exclusion Determination Mission Support Alliance Annual Categorical Exclusion for Polychlorinated Biphenyl Removal under 10 CFR 1021,...

345

CX-009668: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-009668: Categorical Exclusion Determination Mission Support Alliance Annual Categorical Exclusion for Polychlorinated Biphenyl Removal under 10 CFR 1021,...

346

Determining solar abundances using helioseismology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recent downward revision of solar photospheric abundances of Oxygen and other heavy elements has resulted in serious discrepancies between solar models and solar structure as determined through helioseismology. In this work we investigate the possibility of determining the solar heavy-element abundance without reference to spectroscopy by using helioseismic data. Using the dimensionless sound-speed derivative in the solar convection zone, we find that the heavy element abundance, Z, of 0.0172 +/- 0.002, which is closer to the older, higher value of the abundances.

H. M. Antia; Sarbani Basu

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

347

Conservation screening curves to compare efficiency investments to power plants: Applications to commercial sector conservation programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

7¢/kWh Gas Turbine 5¢/kWh Combined-Cycle Oil Baseload Coal7¢/kWh Gas Turbine 5¢/kWh Combined-Cycle Oi Baseload Coalof Supply Technologies CT Combined- Cycle Oil Baseload Coal

Koomey, Jonathan; Rosenfeld, Arthur H.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Review Process to be determined  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Program Proposals The request for Authorization to Plan (ATP) must be submitted through the above reviewChancellor VCAA Dean Review Process to be determined within each College Review by Campus-Wide Curriculum Review Body Review by Graduate Council Recommend Approval/Disapproval Refer for Revision Refer

Olsen, Stephen L.

349

CX-011193: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination for Indoor, Small- and Pilot-Scale Research and Development CX(s) Applied: A9, B1.7, B3.6, B3.10, B3.12, B3.15, B5.1, B5.15 Date: 08/05/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): Berkeley Site Office

350

CX-100019: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Determination of Rare Earths in Geothermal Brines and Evaluation of Potential Extraction Techniques CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.6 Date: 12/13/2011 Location(s): California Offices(s): Golden Field Office Technology Office: Geothermal Technologies Award Number: DE-EE6750

351

CHARACTERISTICS Nitrated compounds constitute a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compounds. If there is a chance of an explosive reaction, conduct the operation behind a blast shield

Wilcock, William

352

Nitrate Losses from Disturbed Ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...or large masses of nutrient-poor...com-petition between plants and decompo-sers...levels prior to treatment. Any or all...nitrifiers and plant roots for ammonium...Purchase, Plant Soil 41, 541...in Municipal Wastewater and Disturbed...to assure the balance of the na-tional...

Peter M. Vitousek; James R. Gosz; Charles C. Grier; Jerry M. Melillo; William A. Reiners; Robert L. Todd

1979-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

353

Drinking Water Problems: Nitrates (Spanish)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Todos los suministros p?blicos de agua deben respetar estos reglamentos. Aunque a los pozos de agua privados no se les requiere cumplir con los Est?ndares Nacionales para el Agua Potable, los propietarios de pozos privados Problemas del del agua potable...- dad de su agua. Al igual que no se les permite a los proveedores p?blicos de agua suministrar agua que exceda el MCL al p?blico, los propietarios de pozos pri- vados no deben utilizar agua que exceda el MCL para el consumo humano. ?C?mo se exponen...

Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2006-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

354

DOE Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

MI-TRIBE-MATCH-E-BE-NASH-SHE-WISH BAND OF POTTAWATOMI MI-TRIBE-MATCH-E-BE-NASH-SHE-WISH BAND OF POTTAWATOMI INDIANS Location: Tribe MI-TRIBE-MATCH- E-BE-NASH-SHE- WISH BAND OF POTTAWATOMI INDIANS MI American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Match-E-Be-Nash-She-Wish Tribe of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan proposes to conduct energy audits and life cycle cost analyses for several Tribal homes (approximately 25). The proposed actions would involve planning and conducting energy audits, which may include environmental monitoring to determine building energy efficiency, for residential and Tribal buildings. Electricity and fuel consumption and associated costs would be determined. The audits are intended to identify potential energy savings. Conditions: None

355

Estimated Cost Description Determination Date:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and posted 2/10/2011 and posted 2/10/2011 *Title, Location Estimated Cost Description Determination Date: uncertain Transmittal to State: uncertain EA Approval: uncertain $50,000 FONSI: uncertain Determination Date: uncertain Transmittal to State: uncertain EA Approval: uncertain FONSI: uncertain Total Estimated Cost $70,000 Attachment: Memo, Moody to Marcinowski, III, SUBJECT: NEPA 2011 APS for DOE-SRS, Dated: Annual NEPA Planning Summary Environmental Assessments (EAs) Expected to be Initiated in the Next 12 Months Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) Jan-11 Estimated Schedule (**NEPA Milestones) South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) issued a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Industrial Stormwater General Permit (IGP) # SCR000000 November 12, with an effective date of January

356

DOE Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Project Title CA-TRIBE-LOS COYOTES BAND OF CAHUILLA AND CUPENO INDIANS Location: Tribe CA-TRIBE-LOS COYOTES BAND OF CAHUILLA AND CUPENO INDIANS CA American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Los Coyotes Band of Cahuilla and Cupeno Indians of California proposes to replace tribal members'

357

DOE Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: TRIBAL ENERGY PROGRAM Project Title SD-TEP-ROSEBUD SIOUX TRIBE Location: Tribal ROSEBUD SIOUX TRIBE SD American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Rosebud Sioux Tribe (RST) and Citizens Wind propose to complete the required pre-construction activities necessary to secure funding for the proposed 190 MW North Antelope Highlands wind farm,

358

DOE Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: TRIBAL ENERGY PROGRAM NV Project Title NV-TEP-FALLON PAIUTE-SHOSHONE Location: Tribal FALLON PAIUTE-SHOSHONE American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Fallon Paiute-Shoshone Tribe proposes to develop a sustainable energy park utilizing renewable energy resources at the Tribe's Reservation in Churchill County, Nevada. This proposed energy park

359

Method for determining gene knockouts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for determining candidates for gene deletions and additions using a model of a metabolic network associated with an organism, the model includes a plurality of metabolic reactions defining metabolite relationships, the method includes selecting a bioengineering objective for the organism, selecting at least one cellular objective, forming an optimization problem that couples the at least one cellular objective with the bioengineering objective, and solving the optimization problem to yield at least one candidate.

Maranas, Costa D; Burgard, Anthony R; Pharkya, Priti

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

360

Toeplitz determinants with merging singularities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study asymptotic behavior for determinants of $n\\times n$ Toeplitz matrices corresponding to symbols with two Fisher-Hartwig singularities at the distance $2t\\ge0$ from each other on the unit circle. We obtain large $n$ asymptotics which are uniform for $0gas, and a conjecture of Fyodorov and Keating on the second moment of powers of the characteristic polynomials of random matrices.

T. Claeys; I. Krasovsky

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination baseload nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

DOE Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: TRIBAL ENERGY PROGRAM OK Project Title OK-TEP-CHEROKEE NATION BUSINESSES Location: Tribal CHEROKEE NATION BUSINESSES American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Cherokee Wind Energy Development proposed project is for development, design, and installation of a 127.5 megawatt wind farm to offset Tribal electrical load; sell excess electricity to local, regional, and

362

Emission Controls Versus Meteorological Conditions in Determining Aerosol Concentrations in Beijing during the 2008 Olympic Games  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of emission control measures were undertaken in Beijing and the adjacent provinces in China during the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games on August 8th-24th, 2008. This provides a unique opportunity for investigating the effectiveness of emission controls on air pollution in Beijing. We conducted a series of numerical experiments over East Asia for the period of July to September 2008 using a coupled meteorology-chemistry model (WRF-Chem). Model can generally reproduce the observed variation of aerosol concentrations. Consistent with observations, modeled concentrations of aerosol species (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, organic carbon, total particulate matter) in Beijing were decreased by 30-50% during the Olympic period compared to the other periods in July and August in 2008 and the same period in 2007. Model results indicate that emission controls were effective in reducing the aerosol concentrations by comparing simulations with and without emission controls. However, our analysis suggests that meteorological conditions (e.g., wind direction and precipitation) are at least as important as emission controls in producing the low aerosol concentrations appearing during the Olympic period. Transport from the regions surrounding Beijing determines the temporal variation of aerosol concentrations in Beijing. Based on the budget analysis, we suggest that emission control strategy should focus on the regional scale instead of the local scale to improve the air quality over Beijing.

Gao, Yi; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhao, Chun; Zhang, Meigen

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

363

Development of an Advanced, Low-Cost parabolic Trough Collector...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Development of an Advanced, Low-Cost parabolic Trough Collector for Baseload Operation Development of an Advanced, Low-Cost parabolic Trough Collector for Baseload Operation This...

364

Project Profile: Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload Power Project Profile: Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload Power Infinia logo Infinia,...

365

Determination of nanomolar levels of nutrients in seawater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Nutrients (phosphate, nitrate, nitrite, ammonium and silicate) exert strong controls on oceanic primary productivity. In oligotrophic areas, which cover approximately 40% of the world's oceans, nutrient concentrations can drop to nanomolar levels or lower due to biological uptake, so highly sensitive methods and technologies are urgently needed for nutrient measurements in such areas. In this work, we review procedures for phosphate and nitrite/nitrate analyses published since the review of Patey et al. [32], and procedures for analysis of ammonium and silicate at nanomolar levels. Our review includes aspects of measurement protocols that bear strongly on the quality of analyses of trace nutrients, including contamination of reagents, sample storage, and preparation of nutrient-free seawater. This review excludes methods that have limits of detection greater than 1?µM, and methods that are not specific to seawater.

Jian Ma; Lori Adornato; Robert H. Byrne; Dongxing Yuan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

CX-007816: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Exclusion Determination CX-007816: Categorical Exclusion Determination Strategic Petroleum Reserve Bi-Annual Electrical Preventative Maintenance CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 02...

367

CX-009794: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-009794: Categorical Exclusion Determination Strategic Petroleum Reserve Site Subsidence Surveys, 2013-2017 CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 01022013...

368

CX-009151: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-009151: Categorical Exclusion Determination Simpson College Boiler Plant De-Centralization CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 09242012 Location(s): Iowa...

369

CX-002964: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002964: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wind Energy and Sustainable Energy Solutions CX(s) Applied: B3.11, A9 Date: 07092010...

370

CX-012137: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-012137: Categorical Exclusion Determination Modular Carbon Dioxide Capture Facility Decommission - Building 84, Room 124 CX(s) Applied: B3.6...

371

CX-003442: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-003442: Categorical Exclusion Determination Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture for Existing Post-Combustion Boilers by Self-Concentrating Amine...

372

CX-011274: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-011274: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ion Advanced Solvent Carbon Dioxide Capture Pilot Project CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 09262013 Location(s):...

373

CX-000586: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-000586: Categorical Exclusion Determination 25A1455 - Carbon Dioxide Capture with Enzyme Synthetic Analogue Date: 12152009 Location(s):...

374

CX-011273: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-011273: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ion Advanced Solvent Carbon Dioxide Capture Pilot Project CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09262013 Location(s):...

375

CX-003443: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-003443: Categorical Exclusion Determination Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture for Existing Post-Combustion Boilers by Self-Concentrating Amine...

376

CX-011786: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-011786: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ion Advanced Solvent Carbon Dioxide Capture Pilot Project CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 02192014 Location(s):...

377

CX-011805: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

05: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-011805: Categorical Exclusion Determination Carbon Dioxide Capture By Cold Membrane Operation with Actual Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue Gas...

378

CX-011276: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-011276: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ion Advanced Solvent Carbon Dioxide Capture Pilot Project CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09262013 Location(s):...

379

CX-011785: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-011785: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ion Advanced Solvent Carbon Dioxide Capture Pilot Project CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 02192014 Location(s):...

380

CX-009354: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-009354: Categorical Exclusion Determination High Resolution 3D Laser Imaging for Inspection, Maintenance, Repair and Operations - Phase II CX(s) Applied:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination baseload nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

CX-009331: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-009331: Categorical Exclusion Determination High Resolution 3D Laser Imaging for Inspection, Maintenance, Repair and Operations Phase II CX(s) Applied:...

382

CX-010658: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-010658: Categorical Exclusion Determination Analytical Development Laser Maintenance CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06172013 Location(s): South Carolina...

383

CX-000538: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

538: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000538: Categorical Exclusion Determination Laser Spectroscopy - Setup, Maintenance, and Instrumentation Development CX(s) Applied: B3.6...

384

CX-007858: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-007858: Categorical Exclusion Determination Southwest Solar Transformation Initiative CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 01272012 Location(s):...

385

CX-011102: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-011102: Categorical Exclusion Determination American Solar Transformation Initiative CX(s) Applied: A11 Date: 08092013 Location(s):...

386

CX-008699: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-008699: Categorical Exclusion Determination Old Highway Bridge Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 06122012 Location(s): Washington...

387

CX-001799: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-001799: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pennsylvania Ethanol-85 Corridor Project - Moyer Kutztown Station CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 04202010...

388

CX-003471: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-003471: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pennsylvania Ethanol Fuel (E85) Corridor Project - Lew's Service Center CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 0823...

389

CX-012247: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Determination CX-012247: Categorical Exclusion Determination Installation of Solar Photovoltaic Systems CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.16 Date: 06182014 Location(s): Wisconsin, Wisconsin...

390

CX-004384: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-004384: Categorical Exclusion Determination Grant Rebate Program for Renewable Energy Projects at StateLocal Government Facilities - Front...

391

CX-012261: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-012261: Categorical Exclusion Determination An Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois CX(s)...

392

CX-011390: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

0: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-011390: Categorical Exclusion Determination Solar Panels and Environmental Education CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.14 Date: 12162013...

393

CX-009004: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

04: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009004: Categorical Exclusion Determination "Solar Panels on Hudson County Facilities CX(s) Applied: B5.16 Date: 08272012 Location(s):...

394

CX-007082: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-007082: Categorical Exclusion Determination Provide Telecommunications Cable to Buildings 6750 and 6753 CX(s) Applied: B1.7 Date: 06092011...

395

CX-012164: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-012164: Categorical Exclusion Determination Vapor Space Corrosion Testing of Carbon Steel CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04292014 Location(s): South...

396

CX-007925: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-007925: Categorical Exclusion Determination Severe Environment Corrosion and Erosion Research Facility CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 02222012 Location(s):...

397

CX-008642: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-008642: Categorical Exclusion Determination H-Canyon Dissolver Corrosion Rate Assessment CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05252012 Location(s): South Carolina...

398

CX-006048: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-006048: Categorical Exclusion Determination Severe Environmental Corrosion & Erosion Research Facility (SECERF) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06082011...

399

CX-006471: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-006471: Categorical Exclusion Determination Air Awareness Campaign Electric Car Charging Station CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 08042011 Location(s): Greenville,...

400

CX-003588: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003588: Categorical Exclusion Determination Synthesis of Renewable Biofuels from Biomass CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08242010 Location(s):...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination baseload nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

CX-007647: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-007647: Categorical Exclusion Determination Template Synthesis of Nanostructures CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12292011 Location(s): South Carolina...

402

CX-011391: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-011391: Categorical Exclusion Determination Municipal Complex Solar Power Project CX(s) Applied: B3.14 Date: 12102013 Location(s): New Jersey...

403

CX-000335: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-000335: Categorical Exclusion Determination Carolinas Blue Skies & Green Jobs Initiative CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 12102009 Location(s): Asheville, North...

404

CX-000334: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-000334: Categorical Exclusion Determination Carolinas Blue Skies & Green Jobs Initiative CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 12102009 Location(s): Raleigh, North...

405

CX-000333: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-000333: Categorical Exclusion Determination Carolinas Blue Skies & Green Jobs Initiative CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 12102009 Location(s): Charlotte, North...

406

CX-000336: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-000336: Categorical Exclusion Determination Carolinas Blue Skies & Green Jobs Initiative CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 12102009 Location(s): Durham, North Carolina...

407

CX-008801: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-008801: Categorical Exclusion Determination Water Tanks Demolition and Deactivation (D&D) Projects CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 06042012...

408

CX-002029: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

29: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002029: Categorical Exclusion Determination Engine Generator for Enumclaw Dairy Manure Digester CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 04222010...

409

CX-002588: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-002588: Categorical Exclusion Determination A Novel Biogas Desulfurization Sorbent Technology for Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell-Based Combined Heat...

410

CX-001922: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

22: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001922: Categorical Exclusion Determination Biogas to Regenerative Thermal Oxidizer CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 03312010...

411

CX-010029: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-010029: Categorical Exclusion Determination Environmental Biotechnology General Laboratory Operations CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01172013 Location(s):...

412

CX-007904: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007904: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority Large Systems Request AD CX(s) Applied: B5.19 Date: 0210...

413

CX-011783: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-011783: Categorical Exclusion Determination Analytical Physics - Scanning Electron Microscope CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 02192014 Location(s):...

414

CX-004989: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-004989: Categorical Exclusion Determination Analytical Physics - Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01122011...

415

CX-011324: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-011324: Categorical Exclusion Determination Analytical Physics - Wavelength Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 10...

416

CX-004269: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-004269: Categorical Exclusion Determination Analytical Physics - Thermal Analysis CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 10202010 Location(s): Albany, Oregon...

417

CX-011798: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-011798: Categorical Exclusion Determination Analytical Physics - Thermal Analysis CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01302014 Location(s): Oregon...

418

CX-011799: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-011799: Categorical Exclusion Determination Analytical Physics - Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01302014...

419

CX-006459: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-006459: Categorical Exclusion Determination Analytical Physics - Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08082011...

420

CX-008011: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-008011: Categorical Exclusion Determination Install EMSL Super-Computer Power Infrastructure CX(s) Applied: B1.7 Date: 06302011 Location(s): Washington...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination baseload nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

CX-001004: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-001004: Categorical Exclusion Determination West Hackberry Site Security Detection Systems Upgrade (Install) CX(s) Applied: B2.2 Date: 03032010...

422

CX-010286: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-010286: Categorical Exclusion Determination High Temperature Solids Flow Verification Lab CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05082013 Location(s): West Virginia...

423

CX-004342: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-004342: Categorical Exclusion Determination Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Routine Maintenance Activities (Overarching) CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 10192010...

424

CX-012245: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Determination CX-012245: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hydro Research Foundation University Research Awards - Carnegie Mellon CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 06052014...

425

CX-012254: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Determination CX-012254: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hydro Research Foundation University Research Awards - Vanderbilt CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 05282014...

426

CX-012255: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Determination CX-012255: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hydro Research Foundation University Research Awards - University of Washington CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 0527...

427

CX-012252: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Determination CX-012252: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hydro Research Foundation University Research Awards- Cornell CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.16 Date: 05282014...

428

CX-012241: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Determination CX-012241: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hydro Research Foundation University Research Awards - MIT CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 06032014...

429

CX-012253: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Determination CX-012253: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hydro Research Foundation University Research Awards - OSU CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 05272014 Location(s):...

430

CX-012246: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Determination CX-012246: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hydro Research Foundation University Research Awards - University of Tennessee CX(s) Applied: B3.3 Date: 06...

431

CX-011183: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-011183: Categorical Exclusion Determination Line Upgrade on Bonneville Power Administration's Walla Walla-Pendleton Number 1 Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3...

432

CX-006800: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006800: Categorical Exclusion Determination Solar Grade Silicon from Agricultural Byproducts CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09152011...

433

CX-011068: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

68: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-011068: Categorical Exclusion Determination Additive Topology Optimized Manufacturing with Embedded Sensing CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08...

434

CX-004747: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Exclusion Determination CX-004747: Categorical Exclusion Determination Tacoma and Raver Substation Antenna Project CX(s) Applied: B1.19 Date: 12062010 Location(s): Pierce...

435

CX-010157: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-010157: Categorical Exclusion Determination Fairmount Substation Equipment Acquisition CX(s) Applied: B1.24 Date: 03272013 Location(s): Washington...

436

CX-010057: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-010057: Categorical Exclusion Determination Eugene Substation Protective Relay Installation CX(s) Applied: B1.7 Date: 01292013 Location(s):...

437

CX-008882: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-008882: Categorical Exclusion Determination Sno-King Substation Expansion CX(s) Applied: B4.11 Date: 08082012 Location(s): Washington...

438

CX-012001: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

01: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-012001: Categorical Exclusion Determination Meter Installation at Fossil Lake Solar Project CX(s) Applied: B1.7 Date: 04242014...

439

CX-012193: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-012193: Categorical Exclusion Determination "Slatt Substation Meter and Communication Equipment Installation CX(s) Applied: B1.7 Date: 05052014...

440

CX-000016: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-000016: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ross-Lexington 1 Meter Project CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 12172009 Location(s): Vancouver, Washington...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination baseload nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

CX-010133: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-010133: Categorical Exclusion Determination Establish Digital Density Meter Analytical Capability in 735-A, D-wing CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03112013...

442

CX-000374: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-000374: Categorical Exclusion Determination Novel Sorbents for Emission Control from Coal Combustion CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12112009 Location(s):...

443

CX-004126: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004126: Categorical Exclusion Determination Machine Shop Equipment Burn CX(s) Applied: B1.12 Date: 08022010 Location(s): New Mexico...

444

CX-008803: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-008803: Categorical Exclusion Determination Milling Machine Replacement Projects CX(s) Applied: B1.31 Date: 05142012 Location(s): Tennessee...

445

CX-010834: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-010834: Categorical Exclusion Determination 704-L Machine Shop Equipment Removal CX(s) Applied: B1.24 Date: 08012013 Location(s): South...

446

CX-009019: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009019: Categorical Exclusion Determination "Catalyst-Assisted Manufacture of Olefins from Natural Gas Liquids: Prototype Development CX(s)...

447

CX-010552: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-010552: Categorical Exclusion Determination Big George Substation Access Road Snow Prevention, Park County, Wyoming CX(s) Applied: B1.11 Date: 0620...

448

CX-007990: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-007990: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pearl Substation 500-Kilovolt 6 Bay Addition CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 02132012 Location(s):...

449

CX-011177: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-011177: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hebo Substation Access Road Maintenance CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 09132013 Location(s): Oregon...

450

CX-004894: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-004894: Categorical Exclusion Determination Peacock Substation Washed Out Area Repair CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 11122009 Location(s): Mohave...

451

CX-008383: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-008383: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cheyenne Substation West Control Building Roof Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04022012...

452

CX-011171: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-011171: Categorical Exclusion Determination Longview and Tillamook Substation Communication Upgrades CX(s) Applied: B1.7 Date: 09242013 Location(s): Washington,...

453

CX-012091: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-012091: Categorical Exclusion Determination Nogales Substation Temporary Laydown Yard CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03282013 Location(s): Arizona...

454

CX-008875: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-008875: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bingen Substation Sectionalizing Switches Disposition CX(s) Applied: B1.24 Date: 08272012...

455

CX-010405: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-010405: Categorical Exclusion Determination Idalia Substation Grounding and Drainage Improvements CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 05222013...

456

CX-009202: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-009202: Categorical Exclusion Determination Port Angeles Substation Equipment Additions CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 09142012 Location(s): Washington...

457

CX-007802: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-007802: Categorical Exclusion Determination Coolidge Substation Southeast Corner Gate and Fence Relocation Project CX(s) Applied: B1.11 Date: 0118...

458

CX-007993: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-007993: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hatwai 230-Kilovolt Substation Breaker Replacement CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 02092012 Location(s): Idaho...

459

CX-009802: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-009802: Categorical Exclusion Determination Lusk Rural Substation Control Building Construction CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 01162013 Location(s):...

460

CX-010579: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-010579: Categorical Exclusion Determination McLoughlin Substation Metering Panel Ownership Transfer CX(s) Applied: B1.24 Date: 07232013 Location(s):...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination baseload nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

CX-010686: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-010686: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cheyenne Substation KV2A 115-kilovolt Tie Line Installation CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 07022013...

462

CX-010761: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

1: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-010761: Categorical Exclusion Determination Green Gasoline from Wood using Carbona Gasification and Topsoe TIGAS Processes CX(s) Applied:...

463

CX-009133: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009133: Categorical Exclusion Determination New York Program Year 2012 Formula Grants - State Energy Program CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date:...

464

CX-000935: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-000935: Categorical Exclusion Determination Onondaga County, New York Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act...

465

CX-002167: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002167: Categorical Exclusion Determination New York State Alternative Fuel Vehicle and Infrastructure Deployment CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date:...

466

CX-002168: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002168: Categorical Exclusion Determination New York State Alternative Fuel Vehicle and Infrastructure Deployment CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date:...

467

CX-006748: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006748: Categorical Exclusion Determination New York State Alternative Fuel Vehicle and Infrastructure Deployment CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date:...

468

CX-007020: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007020: Categorical Exclusion Determination New York State Alternative Fuel Vehicle and Infrastructure Deployment CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date:...

469

CX-001403: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-001403: Categorical Exclusion Determination West New York Energy Efficiency Projects CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 04092010 Location(s): West New...

470

CX-003761: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-003761: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ramgen Supersonic Shock Wave Compression and Engine Technology CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09032010 Location(s):...

471

CX-009134: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

34: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009134: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wave Energy Technology- New Zealand Multi-Mode Wave Energy Converter Advancement Project...

472

CX-005120: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-005120: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wavebob Advanced Wave Energy Conversion Project CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 01272011 Location(s):...

473

CX-100173 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

3 Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-100173 Categorical Exclusion Determination Biomass Conversion to Acrylonitrile Monomer-Precursor for Production of Carbon Fibers Award...

474

CX-007003: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-007003: Categorical Exclusion Determination Missile System Low-Earth Orbit Nanosatellite Integrated Defense Autonomous System Component Development CX(s)...

475

CX-004161: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-004161: Categorical Exclusion Determination Reduction of Heavy Oil Viscosity Using Solid Sorbents CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09292010 Location(s):...

476

CX-005200: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-005200: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hull Offshore Wind Research and Development CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 02162011 Location(s): Hull,...

477

CX-002377: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002377: Categorical Exclusion Determination Offshore Wind Technology Data Collection Project CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 05132010...

478

CX-002869: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002869: Categorical Exclusion Determination California-Tribe-Enterprise Rancheria CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 Date: 07012010 Location(s):...

479

CX-009516: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-009516: Categorical Exclusion Determination Tualatin River Pipeline Crossing Site- Monitoring Well Redevelopment CX(s) Applied: B4.9 Date: 11082012...

480

CX-001009: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-001009: Categorical Exclusion Determination Strategic Biomass Initiative CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 03012010 Location(s): Mississippi Office(s):...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "determination baseload nitrate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

CX-003573: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-003573: Categorical Exclusion Determination Strategic Biomass Solutions
CX(s) Applied: A9
Date: 08252010
Location(s):...

482

CX-003164: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-003164: Categorical Exclusion Determination Optimization of Biomass Production Across a Landscape CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 07262010 Location(s):...

483

CX-006024: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-006024: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wallowa County Integrated Biomass Energy Center CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 05312011 Location(s): Wallowa County,...

484

CX-006230: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-006230: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wallowa County Integrated Biomass Energy Center CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 07182011 Location(s): Wallowa County,...

485

CX-005901: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-005901: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ammonia Production from Electricity, Water, and Nitrogen CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05162011...

486

CX-005054: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-005054: Categorical Exclusion Determination Gas Hydrate Production Test (Phase III - AdministrativePlanningModeling Tasks) CX(s) Applied: A2,...

487

CX-000919: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-000919: Categorical Exclusion Determination Packwood Lake Hydroelectric Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 02252010 Location(s): Washington Office(s):...

488

CX-008446: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008446: Categorical Exclusion Determination Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Operating on Alternative and Renewable Fuels CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date:...

489

CX-008445: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008445: Categorical Exclusion Determination Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Operating on Alternative and Renewable Fuels CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date:...

490

CX-100134 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

4 Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-100134 Categorical Exclusion Determination Test Procedures for Measuring Energy Efficiency of Consumer Products and Industrial Equipment...

491

CX-012114: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

4: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-012114: Categorical Exclusion Determination Test Procedures for Measuring Energy Efficiency of Consumer Products and Industrial Equipment...

492

CX-011096: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-011096: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wave Energy Test - New Zealand Multi-Mode Technology Demonstration at the US Navy's Wave Energy Test...

493

CX-007707: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

07: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007707: Categorical Exclusion Determination Massachusetts Institute of Technology - Thermal Fuel: HybriSol Hybrid Nanostructure for...

494

CX-010757: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-010757: Categorical Exclusion Determination The New England Solar cost-Reduction Challenge Partnership CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 08152013...

495

CX-006559: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-006559: Categorical Exclusion Determination Dedham Municipal Solar Project CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 Date: 08222011 Location(s): Dedham, Massachusetts...

496

CX-006141: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-006141: Categorical Exclusion Determination Revised Market Title for Renewable Energy Program CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 06142011...

497

CX-010694: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-010694: Categorical Exclusion Determination Waste Heat-to-Power in Small-Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander for Organic Rankine Bottoming...

498

CX-009338: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-009338: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cost-Effective Treatment of Produced Water Using Co-Produced Energy Sources Phase II: Field Scale Demonstration and...

499

CX-009340: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-009340: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cost-Effective Treatment of Produced Water Using Co-Produced Energy Sources Phase II: Field Scale Demonstration and...

500

CX-003921: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-003921: Categorical Exclusion Determination Mobile Sediment Analysis Laboratory CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09232010 Location(s): Morgantown,...