National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for determination acoustic effects

  1. Acoustic Effects of Hydrokinetic Tidal Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polagye, Brian

    2011-11-01

    This presentation from the Water Peer Review highlights one of the program's marine and hyrokinetics environmental projects to determine the likely acoustic effects from a tidal energy device.

  2. Wax Point Determinations Using Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bostick, D.T.; Jubin, R.T.; Schmidt, T.W.

    2001-06-01

    The thermodynamic characterization of the wax point of a given crude is essential in order to maintain flow conditions that prevent plugging of undersea pipelines. This report summarizes the efforts made towards applying an Acoustic Cavity Resonance Spectrometer (ACRS) to the determination of pressures and temperatures at which wax precipitates from crude. Phillips Petroleum Company, Inc., the CRADA participant, supplied the ACRS. The instrumentation was shipped to Dr. Thomas Schmidt of ORNL, the CRADA contractor, in May 2000 after preliminary software development performed under the guidance of Dr. Samuel Colgate and Dr. Evan House of the University of Florida, Gainesville, Fl. Upon receipt it became apparent that a number of modifications still needed to be made before the ACRS could be precisely and safely used for wax point measurements. This report reviews the sequence of alterations made to the ACRS, as well as defines the possible applications of the instrumentation once the modifications have been completed. The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Phillips Petroleum Company, Inc. (Participant) and Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation (Contractor) was the measurement of the formation of solids in crude oils and petroleum products that are commonly transported through pipelines. This information is essential in the proper design, operation and maintenance of the petroleum pipeline system in the United States. Recently, new petroleum discoveries in the Gulf of Mexico have shown that there is a potential for plugging of undersea pipeline because of the precipitation of wax. It is important that the wax points of the expected crude oils be well characterized so that the production facilities for these new wells are capable of properly transporting the expected production. The goal of this work is to perform measurements of solids formation in crude oils and petroleum products supplied by the Participant. It is anticipated that these data will be used in the design of new production facilities and in the development of thermodynamic models that describe the behavior of wax-saturated petroleum.

  3. Effect of multiperforated plates on the acoustic modes in combustors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendez, Simon

    related to the wave equation in the frequency domain, and is able to provide the acoustic modes effect on acoustics [5], [1], which is enhanced by the presence of a mean bias flow [6]. Acoustic waves in the presence of an acoustic wave and is well adapted to be inserted in the Helmholtz solver. It was validated

  4. Effects of residual stress on the thin-film elastic moduli calculated from surface acoustic wave spectroscopy experimentsB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effects of residual stress on the thin-film elastic moduli calculated from surface acoustic wave stress affects the values of thin-film elastic moduli determined from surface acoustic wave spectroscopy surface acoustic wave measurements may be analyzed to obtain additional information about the mechanical

  5. Acoustically determined linear piezoelectric response of lithium niobate up to 1100?V

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patel, N.; Branch, D. W.; Cular, S.; Schamiloglu, E.

    2014-04-21

    We present a method to measure high voltages using the piezoelectric crystal lithium niobate without using voltage dividers. A 36° Y-X cut lithium niobate crystal was coupled to two acoustic transducers, where direct current voltages were applied from 128–1100?V. The time-of-flight through the crystal was determined to be linearly dependent on the applied voltage. A model was developed to predict the time-delay in response to the applied voltage. The results show a sensitivity of 17 fs/V with a measurement error of 1 fs/V was achievable using this method. The sensitivity of this method can be increased by measuring the acoustic wave after multiple passes through the crystal. This method has many advantages over traditional techniques such as: favorable scalability for larger voltages, ease of use, cost effectiveness, and compactness.

  6. Polyaniline nanofiber based surface acoustic wave gas sensors - Effect of nanofiber diameter on H-2 response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadek, A Z; Baker, Christina Opimo; Powell, D A; Wlodarski, W; Kaner, R B; Kalantar-zadeh, K

    2007-01-01

    Nano?ber Based Surface Acoustic Wave Gas Sensors—Effect ofYX LiNbO 3 sur- face-acoustic-wave transducers. The sensorsrapidly mixed, surface acoustic wave (SAW). I. I NTRODUCTION

  7. Observations of dust acoustic waves driven at high frequencies: Finite dust temperature effects and wave interference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merlino, Robert L.

    Observations of dust acoustic waves driven at high frequencies: Finite dust temperature effects An experiment has been performed to study the behavior of dust acoustic waves driven at high frequencies f 100 are observed--interference effects between naturally excited dust acoustic waves and driven dust acoustic waves

  8. Effective fractional acoustic wave equations in random multiscale media Josselin Garnier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solna, Knut

    Effective fractional acoustic wave equations in random multiscale media Josselin Garnier satisfaction of the Kramers-Kronig relations. The physical model is a one-dimensional acoustic wave equation@math.uci.edu Fractional wave equations in multiscale media 1 #12;II. ACOUSTIC WAVE PROPAGATION IN RANDOM MEDIA A. Acoustic

  9. Polyaniline nanofiber based surface acoustic wave gas sensors - Effect of nanofiber diameter on H-2 response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadek, A Z; Baker, Christina Opimo; Powell, D A; Wlodarski, W; Kaner, R B; Kalantar-zadeh, K

    2007-01-01

    acoustic wave due to piezoelectric effects. The center frequency of a SAW device is given by the equation

  10. Method for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, D.N.; Anthony, B.W.

    1997-02-25

    A method is described for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein. A direct correlation between the octane rating of gasoline and the frequency of corresponding acoustic resonances therein has been experimentally observed. Therefore, the octane rating of a gasoline sample can be directly determined through speed of sound measurements instead of by the cumbersome process of quantifying the knocking quality of the gasoline. Various receptacle geometries and construction materials may be employed. Moreover, it is anticipated that the measurements can be performed on flowing samples in pipes, thereby rendering the present method useful in refineries and distilleries. 3 figs.

  11. Method for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM); Anthony, Brian W. (Clearfield, PA)

    1997-01-01

    A method for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein. A direct correlation between the octane rating of gasoline and the frequency of corresponding acoustic resonances therein has been experimentally observed. Therefore, the octane rating of a gasoline sample can be directly determined through speed of sound measurements instead of by the cumbersome process of quantifying the knocking quality of the gasoline. Various receptacle geometries and construction materials may be employed. Moreover, it is anticipated that the measurements can be performed on flowing samples in pipes, thereby rendering the present method useful in refineries and distilleries.

  12. TEMPERATURE AND LOAD EFFECTS ON ACOUSTIC EMISSION SIGNALS FOR STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING APPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    TEMPERATURE AND LOAD EFFECTS ON ACOUSTIC EMISSION SIGNALS FOR STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING. KEYWORDS : Structural Health Monitoring, Acoustic Emission, Environmental and Operational Conditions2014 Author manuscript, published in "EWSHM - 7th European Workshop on Structural Health Monitoring

  13. Effect of the open roof on low frequency acoustic propagation in street canyons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Effect of the open roof on low frequency acoustic propagation in street canyons O. Richoux, C of the effect of open roof on acoustic propagation along a 3D urban canyon. The experimental study is led Domain approach adapted to take into account the acoustic radiation losses due to the street open roof

  14. Hydrocarbon saturation determination using acoustic velocities obtained through casing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moos, Daniel (Houston, TX)

    2010-03-09

    Compressional and shear velocities of earth formations are measured through casing. The determined compressional and shear velocities are used in a two component mixing model to provides improved quantitative values for the solid, the dry frame, and the pore compressibility. These are used in determination of hydrocarbon saturation.

  15. Effects of harmonic phase on nonlinear surface acoustic waves in the (111) plane of cubic crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effects of harmonic phase on nonlinear surface acoustic waves in the (111) plane of cubic crystals of surface acoustic waves SAWs in the 001 surface cut of nonpiezo- electric, cubic crystals. The present 2002 Spectral evolution equations are used to perform numerical studies of nonlinear surface acoustic

  16. Distributions of sperm whales along the continental slope in the northwestern and central Gulf of Mexico as determined from an acoustic survey 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Troy Daniel

    1997-01-01

    up to 80% of their time on deep dives, and vocalize in a predictable manner while diving, their distributions can be estimated qualitatively using acoustic sampling techniques. Acoustic sperm whale distributions were determined via a passive towed...

  17. Generation and amplification of acoustic waves by thermal process - 2. Thermoacoustics effects in combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abugov, D.I.; Obrezkov, O.I.

    1980-01-01

    Results are presented of a theoretical analysis of thermoacoustic effects observed during combustion, i.e., turbulent flame noise, amplification of acoustic waves by the combustion front, and acoustic instability of combustion in through-flow chambers. Relations are obtained which describe these phenomena. 8 refs.

  18. Optics, Acoustics and Stress in Situ (OASIS): Effects of Aggregation, Vertical Structure, and Relation to Physical Forcing.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    Optics, Acoustics and Stress in Situ (OASIS): Effects of Aggregation, Vertical Structure. Arlington, VA 22203-1995 TITLE: Optics, Acoustics and Stress in Situ (OASIS): Effects of Aggregation of Research and Sponsored Programs #12;Abstract Nearbed optical and acoustical properties in coastal waters

  19. MONITORING POWER PLANT EFFICIENCY USING THE MICROWAVE-EXCITED THERMAL-ACOUSTIC EFFECT TO MEASURE UNBURNED CARBON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert C. Brown; Robert J. Weber; Jeffrey J. Swetelitsch

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this project is to explore microwave-excited thermal-acoustic (META) phenomena for quantitative analysis of granular and powdered materials, with the culmination of the research to be an on-line carbon-in-ash monitor for coal-fired power plants. This technique of analyzing unburned carbon in fly ash could be a less tedious and time consuming method as compared to the traditional LOI manual procedure. Phase 1 of the research focused on off-line single-frequency thermal-acoustic measurements where an off-line fly ash monitor was constructed that could operate as analytical tool to explore instrument and methodology parameters for quantifying the microwave-excited thermal-acoustic effect of carbon in fly ash, and it was determined that the off-line thermal-acoustic technique could predict the carbon content of a random collection of fly ashes with a linear correlation constant of R{sup 2} = 0.778. Much higher correlations are expected for fly ashes generated from a single boiler. Phase 2 of the research developing a methodology to generate microwave spectra of various powders, including fly ash, coal, and inorganic minerals, and to determine if these microwave spectra could be used for chemical analyses. Although different minerals produced different responses, higher resolution microwave spectra would be required to be able to distinguish among minerals. Phase 3 of the research focused on the development of an on-line fly ash monitor that could be adapted to measure either a thermal-acoustic or thermal-elastic response to due microwave excitation of fly ash. The thermal-acoustic response was successfully employed for this purpose but the thermal-elastic response was too weak to yield a useful on-line device.

  20. Testing the effectiveness of an acoustic deterrent for gray whales along the Oregon coast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lagerquist, Barbara; Winsor, Martha; Mate, Bruce

    2012-12-31

    This study was conducted to determine whether a low-powered sound source could be effective at deterring gray whales from areas that may prove harmful to them. With increased interest in the development of marine renewal energy along the Oregon coast the concern that such development may pose a collision or entanglement risk for gray whales. A successful acoustic deterrent could act as a mitigation tool to prevent harm to whales from such risks. In this study, an acoustic device was moored on the seafloor in the pathway of migrating gray whales off Yaquina Head on the central Oregon coast. Shore-based observers tracked whales with a theodolite (surveyor’s tool) to accurately locate whales as they passed the headland. Individual locations of different whales/whale groups as well as tracklines of the same whale/whale groups were obtained and compared between times with the acoustic device was transmitting and when it was off. Observations were conducted on 51 d between January 1 and April 15, 2012. A total of 143 individual whale locations were collected for a total of 243 whales, as well as 57 tracklines for a total of 142 whales. Inclement weather and equipment problems resulted in very small sample sizes, especially during experimental periods, when the device was transmitting. Because of this, the results of this study were inconclusive. We feel that another season of field testing is warranted to successfully test the effectiveness of the deterrent, but recommend increasing the zone of influence to 3 km to ensure the collection of adequate sample sizes. Steps have been taken to acquire the necessary federal research permit modification to authorize the increased zone of influence and to modify the acoustic device for the increased power. With these changes we are confident we will be able to determine whether the deterrent is effective at deflecting gray whales. A successful deterrent device may serve as a valuable mitigation tool to protect gray whales, and other baleen whales, in the event that marine energy development poses a collision or entanglement risk.

  1. arXiv:cond-mat/9609250v227Sep1996 Acousto-optic effects of surface acoustic waves in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München

    arXiv:cond-mat/9609250v227Sep1996 Acousto-optic effects of surface acoustic waves in semiconductor acoustic waves. Ex- perimentally, we study the photoluminescence (PL) of an undoped strained InGaAs/GaAs quantum well on which surface acoustic waves are propagated in the GHz regime. We observe a pronounced

  2. Dynamical Energy Analysis - determining wave energy distributions in complex vibro-acoustical structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregor Tanner

    2008-03-12

    We propose a new approach towards determining the distribution of mechanical and acoustic wave energy in complex built-up structures. The technique interpolates between standard Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) and full ray tracing containing both these methods as limiting case. By writing the flow of ray trajectories in terms of linear phase space operators, it is suggested here to reformulate ray-tracing algorithms in terms of boundary operators containing only short ray segments. SEA can now be identified as a low resolution ray tracing algorithm and typical SEA assumptions can be quantified in terms of the properties of the ray dynamics. The new technique presented here enhances the range of applicability of standard SEA considerably by systematically incorporating dynamical correlations wherever necessary. Some of the inefficiencies inherent in typical ray tracing methods can be avoided using only a limited amount of the geometrical ray information. The new dynamical theory - Dynamical Energy Analysis (DEA) - thus provides a universal approach towards determining wave energy distributions in complex structures.

  3. An innovative acoustic sensor for first in-pile fission gas release determination - REMORA 3 experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenkrantz, E.; Ferrandis, J. Y.; Augereau, F.; Lambert, T.; Fourmentel, D.; Tiratay, X.

    2011-07-01

    A fuel rod has been instrumented with a new design of an acoustic resonator used to measure in a non destructive way the internal rod plenum gas mixture composition. This ultrasonic sensor has demonstrated its ability to operate in pile during REMORA 3 irradiation experiment carried out in the OSIRIS Material Testing Reactor (CEA Saclay, France). Due to very severe experimental conditions such as temperature rising up to 150 deg.C and especially, high thermal fluence level up to 3.5 10{sup 19} n.cm{sup 2}, the initial sensor gas speed of sound efficiency measurement was strongly reduced due to the irradiation effects on the piezo-ceramic properties. Nevertheless, by adding a differential signal processing method to the initial data analysis procedure validated before irradiation, the gas resonance peaks were successfully extracted from the output signal. From these data, the molar fractions variations of helium and fission gas were measured from an adapted Virial state equation. Thus, with this sensor, the kinetics of gas release inside fuel rods could be deduced from the in-pile measurements and specific calculations. These data will also give information about nuclear reaction effect on piezo-ceramics sensor under high neutron and gamma flux. (authors)

  4. Simple model of photo acoustic system for greenhouse effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fukuhara, Akiko; Ogawa, Naohisa

    2010-01-01

    The simple theoretical basis for photo acoustic (PA) system for studying infrared absorption properties of greenhouse gases is constructed. The amplitude of sound observed in PA depends on the modulation frequency of light pulse. Its dependence can be explained by our simple model. According to this model, sound signal has higher harmonics. The theory and experiment are compared in third and fifth harmonics by spectrum analysis. The theory has the analogy with electric circuits. This analogy helps students for understanding the PA system.

  5. Visco-thermal effects in acoustic metamaterials: from total transmission to total reflection and high absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molerón, Miguel; Daraio, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically and experimentally investigate visco-thermal effects on the acoustic propagation through metamaterials consisting of rigid slabs with subwavelength slits embedded in air. We demonstrate that this unavoidable loss mechanism is not merely a refinement, but it plays a dominant role in the actual acoustic response of the structure. Specifically, in the case of very narrow slits, the visco-thermal losses avoid completely the excitation of Fabry-Perot resonances, leading to 100% reflection. This is exactly opposite to the perfect transmission predicted in the idealised lossless case. Moreover, for a wide range of geometrical parameters, there exists an optimum slit width at which the energy dissipated in the structure can be as high as 50%. This work provides a clear evidence that visco-thermal effects are necessary to describe realistically the acoustic response of locally resonant metamaterials.

  6. Effects of Noise on Sound Detection and Acoustic Communication in Fishes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ladich, Friedrich

    Chapter 4 Effects of Noise on Sound Detection and Acoustic Communication in Fishes Friedrich Ladich, and vocalizing animals. Fish hearing sensitivity declines when exposed to high noise levels or in the presence of masking noise, in particular, in taxa possessing hearing enhancements. Most vocal fishes commu- nicate

  7. Locating interfaces in vertically-layered materials and determining concentrations in mixed materials utilizing acoustic impedance measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Langlois, G.N.

    1983-09-13

    Measurement of the relative and actual value of acoustic characteristic impedances of an unknown substance, location of the interfaces of vertically-layered materials, and the determination of the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material are disclosed. A highly damped ultrasonic pulse is transmitted into one side of a reference plate, such as a tank wall, where the other side of the reference plate is in physical contact with the medium to be measured. The amplitude of a return signal, which is the reflection of the transmitted pulse from the interface between the other side of the reference plate and the medium, is measured. The amplitude value indicates the acoustic characteristic impedance of the substance relative to that of the reference plate or relative to that of other tested materials. Discontinuities in amplitude with repeated measurements for various heights indicate the location of interfaces in vertically-layered materials. Standardization techniques permit the relative acoustic characteristic impedance of a substance to be converted to an actual value. Calibration techniques for mixtures permit the amplitude to be converted to the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material. 6 figs.

  8. Locating interfaces in vertically-layered materials and determining concentrations in mixed materials utilizing acoustic-impedance measurements. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1981-06-10

    Measurement of the relative and actual value of acoustic characteristic impedances of an unknown substance, location of the interfaces of vertically-layered materials, and the determination of the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material are presented. A highly damped ultrasonic pulse is transmitted into one side of a reference plate, such as a tank wall, where the other side of the reference plate is in physical contact with the medium to be measured. The amplitude of a return signal, which is the reflection of the transmitted pulse from the interface between the other side of the reference plate and the medium, is measured. The amplitude value indicates the acoustic characteristic impedance of the substance relative to that of the reference plate or relative to that of other tested materials. Discontinuities in amplitude with repeated measurements for various heights indicate the location of interfaces in vertically-layered materials. Standardization techniques permit the relative acoustic characteristic impedance of a substance to be converted to an actual value. Calibration techniques for mixtures permit the amplitude to be converted to the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material.

  9. Locating interfaces in vertically-layered materials and determining concentrations in mixed materials utilizing acoustic impedance measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Langlois, Gary N. (Richland, WA)

    1983-09-13

    Measurement of the relative and actual value of acoustic characteristic impedances of an unknown substance, location of the interfaces of vertically-layered materials, and the determination of the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material. A highly damped ultrasonic pulse is transmitted into one side of a reference plate, such as a tank wall, where the other side of the reference plate is in physical contact with the medium to be measured. The amplitude of a return signal, which is the reflection of the transmitted pulse from the interface between the other side of the reference plate and the medium, is measured. The amplitude value indicates the acoustic characteristic impedance of the substance relative to that of the reference plate or relative to that of other tested materials. Discontinuities in amplitude with repeated measurements for various heights indicate the location of interfaces in vertically-layered materials. Standardization techniques permit the relative acoustic characteristic impedance of a substance to be converted to an actual value. Calibration techniques for mixtures permit the amplitude to be converted to the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material.

  10. The effect of acoustics on an ethanol spray flame in a propane-fired pulse combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubey, R.K.; Black, D.L.; McQuay, M.Q. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.] [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.; Carvalho, J.A. Jr. [Inst. Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Cachoeira Paulista, Sao Paulo (Brazil). Lab. Associado de Comubustao e Propulsao] [Inst. Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Cachoeira Paulista, Sao Paulo (Brazil). Lab. Associado de Comubustao e Propulsao

    1997-07-01

    The influence of an acoustic field on the combustion characteristics of a hydrogen-stabilized ethanol spray flame has been experimentally investigated using a phase-Doppler particle analyzer in a propane-fired, Rijke-tube, pulse combustor. The controlled sinusoidal acoustic field in the combustor had a sound pressure level of 155 dB and a frequency of 80 Hz. Experiments were performed to study the effect of oscillations on Sauter-mean and arithmetic-mean diameters, droplet velocity, and droplet number density for the present operating conditions of the Rijke-tube combustor. Similar measurements were also performed on a water spray in the propane-fired reactor to study the effect of the acoustic field on the atomization process for the nozzle type used. Spectral analysis of the droplet axial velocity component for the oscillating conditions revealed a dominant frequency equal to the frequency of the sinusoidal acoustic wave in the combustor. The Sauter-mean diameter of the ethanol spray decreased by 15%, on average, in the presence of the acoustic field because of enhanced evaporation, while the droplet arrival rate at the probe volume increased due to changes in the flame structure. Analysis of the measured size distributions indicated that under an oscillating flow there was a larger population of droplets in the diameter range of 3--20 {micro}m. Experiments conducted with the water spray indicated that the oscillations did affect droplet size distributions in the ethanol spray due to enhanced evaporation caused by the relocation of the flame front inside and around the spray cone.

  11. The effect of boundaries on the ion acoustic beam-plasma instability in experiment and simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rapson, Christopher, E-mail: chris.rapson@ipp.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)] [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Grulke, Olaf [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany)] [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Matyash, Konstantin [Institut für Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt Universität, Domstr. 10a, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)] [Institut für Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt Universität, Domstr. 10a, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Klinger, Thomas [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany) [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Institut für Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt Universität, Domstr. 10a, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    The ion acoustic beam-plasma instability is known to excite strong solitary waves near the Earth's bow shock. Using a double plasma experiment, tightly coupled with a 1-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation, the results presented here show that this instability is critically sensitive to the experimental conditions. Boundary effects, which do not have any counterpart in space or in most simulations, unavoidably excite parasitic instabilities. Potential fluctuations from these instabilities lead to an increase of the beam temperature which reduces the growth rate such that non-linear effects leading to solitary waves are less likely to be observed. Furthermore, the increased temperature modifies the range of beam velocities for which an ion acoustic beam plasma instability is observed.

  12. Echolocation-based foraging by harbor porpoises and sperm whales, including effects of noise and acoustic propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeRuiter, Stacy L

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis, I provide quantitative descriptions of toothed whale echolocation and foraging behavior, including assessment of the effects of noise on foraging behavior and the potential influence of ocean acoustic ...

  13. ACOUSTIC VOCALIZATIONS OF DOLPHINS AND EFFECTS OF ANTHROPOGENIC NOISE 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bosquez, Joclyn Destiny

    2013-09-25

    analyses carried out in Hong Kong, I describe potential variations among communication between local delphinids due to effects of ambient noise and propose improvements and/or regulations that can help decrease man-made noise....

  14. Acoustic wave propagation and stochastic effects in metamaterial absorbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, J. Willatzen, M.

    2014-07-28

    We show how stochastic variations of the effective parameters of anisotropic structured metamaterials can lead to increased absorption of sound. For this, we derive an analytical model based on the Bourret approximation and illustrate the immediate connection between material disorder and attenuation of the averaged field. We demonstrate numerically that broadband absorption persists at oblique irradiation and that the influence of red noise comprising short spatial correlation lengths increases the absorption beyond what can be archived with a structured but ordered system.

  15. Effect of the open roof on low frequency acoustic propagation in street canyons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richoux, Olivier; Pelat, Adrien; Félix, Simon; Lihoreau, Bertrand

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental, numerical and analytical study of the effect of open roof on acoustic propagation along a 3D urban canyon. The experimental study is led by means of a street scale model. The numerical results are performed with a 2D Finite Difference in Time Domain approach adapted to take into account the acoustic radiation losses due to the street open roof. An analytical model, based on the modal decomposition of the pressure field in a horizontal plane mixed with a 2D image sources model to describe the attenuation along the street, is also proposed. Results are given for several frequencies in the low frequency domain (1000-2500 Hz). The comparison of the three approaches shows a good agreement until f=100 Hz at full scale, the analytical model and the 2D numerical simulation adapted to 3D permit to modelize the acoustic propagation along a street. For higher frequency, experimental results show that the leakeage, due to the street open roof, is not anymore uniformly distributed on a...

  16. Determination of elastic properties of a MnO{sub 2} coating by surface acoustic wave velocity dispersion analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sermeus, J.; Glorieux, C.; Sinha, R.; Vereecken, P. M.; Vanstreels, K.

    2014-07-14

    MnO{sub 2} is a material of interest in the development of high energy-density batteries, specifically as a coating material for internal 3D structures, thus ensuring rapid energy deployment. Its electrochemical properties have been mapped extensively, but there are, to the best of the authors' knowledge, no records of the elastic properties of thin film MnO{sub 2}. Impulsive stimulated thermal scattering (ISTS), also known as the heterodyne diffraction or transient grating technique, was used to determine the Young's modulus (E) and porosity (?) of a 500?nm thick MnO{sub 2} coating on a Si(001) substrate. ISTS is an all optical method that is able to excite and detect surface acoustic waves (SAWs) on opaque samples. From the measured SAW velocity dispersion, the Young's modulus and porosity were determined to be E?=?25?±?1?GPa and ?=42±1%, respectively. These values were confirmed by independent techniques and determined by a most-squares analysis of the carefully fitted SAW velocity dispersion. This study demonstrates the ability of the presented technique to determine the elastic parameters of a thin, porous film on an anisotropic substrate.

  17. Surgically Implanted JSATS Micro-Acoustic Transmitters Effects on Juvenile Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Tag Expulsion and Survival, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodley, Christa M.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Carter, Kathleen M.; Wagner, Katie A.; Royer, Ida M.; Knox, Kasey M.; Kim, Jin A.; Gay, Marybeth E.; Weiland, Mark A.; Brown, Richard S.

    2011-09-16

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate survival model assumptions associated with a concurrent study - Acoustic Telemetry Evaluation of Dam Passage Survival and Associated Metrics at John Day, The Dalles, and Bonneville Dams, 2010 by Thomas Carlson and others in 2010 - in which the Juvenile Salmonid Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was used to estimate the survival of yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead (O. mykiss) migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The micro-acoustic transmitter used in these studies is the smallest acoustic transmitter model to date (12 mm long x 5 mm wide x 4 mm high, and weighing 0.43 g in air). This study and the 2010 study by Carlson and others were conducted by researchers from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the University of Washington for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, to meet requirements set forth by the 2008 FCRPS Biological Opinion. In 2010, we compared survival, tag burden, and tag expulsion in five spring groups of yearling Chinook salmon (YCH) and steelhead (STH) and five summer groups of subyearling Chinook salmon (SYC) to evaluate survival model assumptions described in the concurrent study. Each tagging group consisted of approximately 120 fish/species, which were collected and implanted on a weekly basis, yielding approximately 600 fish total/species. YCH and STH were collected and implanted from late April to late May (5 weeks) and SYC were collected and implanted from mid-June to mid-July (5 weeks) at the John Day Dam Smolt Monitoring Facility. The fish were collected once a week, separated by species, and assigned to one of three treatment groups: (1) Control (no surgical treatment), (2) Sham (surgical implantation of only a passive integrated transponder [PIT] tag), and (3) Tagged (surgical implantation of JSATS micro-acoustic transmitter [AT] and PIT tags). The test fish were held for 30 days in indoor circular tanks at the Bonneville Dam Juvenile Monitoring Facility. Overall mortality ranged weekly from 45 to 72% for YCH, 55 to 83% for STH, and 56 to 84% for SYC. The high background mortality in all groups and species made it difficult to discern tag effects. However, for YCH, STH, and SYC, the Tagged treatment groups had the highest overall mean mortality - 62%, 79%, and 76%, respectively. Fungal infections were found on 35% of all fish. Mean tag burden for the Tagged treatment group was relatively low for YCH (1.7%) and moderate for SYC (4.2%), while STH had a very low mean tag burden (0.7%). Tag burden was significantly higher in the Tagged treatment group for all species when compared to the Sham treatment group because of the presence of two tags. Surgeon performance did not contribute to the difference in mortality between the Sham and Tagged treatment groups. Tag expulsion from fish that survived to the end of the 30-day experiment was low but occurred in all species, with only two PIT tags and one AT lost, one tag per species. The high background mortality in this experiment was not limited to a treatment, temperature, or month. The decreased number of surviving fish influenced our experimental results and thus analyses. For future research, we recommend that a more natural exposure to monitor tag effects and other factors, such as swimming ability and predator avoidance, be considered to determine the effects of AT- and PIT- implantation on fishes.

  18. The Effect of Abnormal Granulation on Acoustic Wave Travel Times and Mode Frequencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Petrovay; R. Erdelyi; M. J. Thompson

    2007-02-02

    Observations indicate that in plage areas (i.e. in active regions outside sunspots) acoustic waves travel faster than in quiet sun, leading to shortened travel times and higher p-mode frequencies. While it is clear that the ultimate cause of any difference between quiet sun and plage is the presence of magnetic fields of order 100 G in the latter, the mechanism by which the magnetic field exerts its influence has not yet been conclusively identified. One possible such mechanism is suggested by the observation that granular motions in plage areas tend to be slightly ``abnormal'', dampened compared to quiet sun. In this paper we consider the effect that abnormal granulation observed in active regions should have on the propagation of acoustic waves. Any such effect is found to be limited to a shallow surface layer where sound waves propagate nearly vertically. The magnetically suppressed turbulence implies higher sound speeds, leading to shorter travel times. This time shift Dt is independent of the travel distance, while it shows a characteristic dependence on the assumed plage field strength. As a consequence of the variation of the acoustic cutoff with height, Dt is expected to be significantly higher for higher frequency waves within the observed regime of 3-5 mHz. The lower group velocity near the upper reflection point further leads to an increased envelope time shift, as compared to the phase shift. $p$-mode frequencies in plage areas are increased by a corresponding amount, Dnu/nu = nu*Dt. These characteristics of the time and frequency shifts are in accordance with observations. The calculated overall amplitude of the time and frequency shifts are comparable to, but still significantly (factor of 2 to 5) less than suggested by measurements.

  19. Galaxy Bias and its Effects on the Baryon Acoustic Oscillations Measurements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mehta, Kushal T; Seo, Hee-Jong; Eckel, Jonathan; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Metchnik, Marc; Pinto, Philip; Xu, Xiaoying

    2011-05-31

    The baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature in the clustering of matter in the universe serves as a robust standard ruler and hence can be used to map the expansion history of the universe. We use high force resolution simulations to analyze the effects of galaxy bias on the measurements of the BAO signal. We apply a variety of Halo Occupation Distributions (HODs) and produce biased mass tracers to mimic different galaxy populations. We investigate whether galaxy bias changes the non-linear shifts on the acoustic scale relative to the underlying dark matter distribution presented by Seo et al. (2009). For themore »less biased HOD models (b < 3), we do not detect any shift in the acoustic scale relative to the no-bias case, typically 0.10% {+-} 0.10%. However, the most biased HOD models (b > 3) show a shift at moderate significance (0.79% {+-} 0.31% for the most extreme case). We test the one-step reconstruction technique introduced by Eisenstein et al. (2007) in the case of realistic galaxy bias and shot noise. The reconstruction scheme increases the correlation between the initial and final (z = 1) density fields achieving an equivalent level of correlation at nearly twice the wavenumber after reconstruction. Reconstruction reduces the shifts and errors on the shifts. We find that after reconstruction the shifts from the galaxy cases and the dark matter case are consistent with each other and with no shift. The 1{sigma} systematic errors on the distance measurements inferred from our BAO measurements with various HODs after reconstruction are about 0.07%-0.15%.« less

  20. Galaxy Bias and its Effects on the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Measurments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mehta, Kushal T.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Eckel, Jonathan; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Metchnik, Marc; Pinto, Philip; Xu, Xiaoying

    2011-06-20

    The baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature in the clustering of matter in the universe serves as a robust standard ruler and hence can be used to map the expansion history of the universe. We use high force resolution simulations to analyze the effects of galaxy bias on the measurements of the BAO signal. We apply a variety of Halo Occupation Distributions (HODs) and produce biased mass tracers to mimic different galaxy populations. We investigate whether galaxy bias changes the non-linear shifts on the acoustic scale relative to the underlying dark matter distribution presented by Seo et al. (2009). For themore »less biased HOD models (b 3) show a shift at moderate significance (0.79% ± 0.31% for the most extreme case). We test the one-step reconstruction technique introduced by Eisenstein et al. (2007) in the case of realistic galaxy bias and shot noise. The reconstruction scheme increases the correlation between the initial and final (z = 1) density fields achieving an equivalent level of correlation at nearly twice the wavenumber after reconstruction. Reconstruction reduces the shifts and errors on the shifts. We find that after reconstruction the shifts from the galaxy cases and the dark matter case are consistent with each other and with no shift. The 1? systematic errors on the distance measurements inferred from our BAO measurements with various HODs after reconstruction are about 0.07%-0.15%.« less

  1. GALAXY BIAS AND ITS EFFECTS ON THE BARYON ACOUSTIC OSCILLATION MEASUREMENTS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mehta, Kushal T.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Eckel, Jonathan; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Metchnik, Marc; Pinto, Philip; Xu, Xiaoying

    2011-06-20

    The baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature in the clustering of matter in the universe serves as a robust standard ruler and hence can be used to map the expansion history of the universe. We use high force resolution simulations to analyze the effects of galaxy bias on the measurements of the BAO signal. We apply a variety of Halo Occupation Distributions (HODs) and produce biased mass tracers to mimic different galaxy populations. We investigate whether galaxy bias changes the non-linear shifts on the acoustic scale relative to the underlying dark matter distribution presented by Seo et al. (2009). For themore »less biased HOD models (b 3) show a shift at moderate significance (0.79% ± 0.31% for the most extreme case). We test the one-step reconstruction technique introduced by Eisenstein et al. (2007) in the case of realistic galaxy bias and shot noise. The reconstruction scheme increases the correlation between the initial and final (z = 1) density fields achieving an equivalent level of correlation at nearly twice the wavenumber after reconstruction. Reconstruction reduces the shifts and errors on the shifts. We find that after reconstruction the shifts from the galaxy cases and the dark matter case are consistent with each other and with no shift. The 1? systematic errors on the distance measurements inferred from our BAO measurements with various HODs after reconstruction are about 0.07%-0.15%.« less

  2. Apparatus and method for non-contact, acoustic resonance determination of intraocular pressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM); Wray, William O. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus and method for measuring intraocular pressure changes in an eye under investigation by detection of vibrational resonances therein. An ultrasonic transducer operating at its resonant frequency is amplitude modulated and swept over a range of audio frequencies in which human eyes will resonate. The output therefrom is focused onto the eye under investigation, and the resonant vibrations of the eye observed using a fiber-optic reflection vibration sensor. Since the resonant frequency of the eye is dependent on the pressure therein, changes in intraocular pressure may readily be determined after a baseline pressure is established.

  3. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Squeeze and Nonlinear Effects in Trivelpiece-Gould and Electron Acoustic Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    Acoustic Waves A dissertation submitted in partial satisfaction of the requirements for the degree Doctor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv Chapter 1 Effect of squeeze on electrostatic Trivelpice-Gould wave damping 1 1.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 3.2.1 Traveling plasma modes, large detuning . . . . . . . . 106 3.2.2 Standing plasma waves

  4. Effect of drift-acoustic waves on magnetic island stability in slab geometry R. Fitzpatrick and F. L. Waelbroeck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    plasma confinement because heat and particles are able to travel radially from one side of an islandEffect of drift-acoustic waves on magnetic island stability in slab geometry R. Fitzpatrick and F island stability in slab geometry R. Fitzpatrick and F. L. Waelbroeck Department of Physics, Institute

  5. Landau damping effects on dust-acoustic solitary waves in a dusty negative-ion plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barman, Arnab; Misra, A. P. E-mail: apmisra@gmail.com

    2014-07-15

    The nonlinear theory of dust-acoustic waves (DAWs) with Landau damping is studied in an unmagnetized dusty negative-ion plasma in the extreme conditions when the free electrons are absent. The cold massive charged dusts are described by fluid equations, whereas the two-species of ions (positive and negative) are described by the kinetic Vlasov equations. A Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation with Landau damping, governing the dynamics of weakly nonlinear and weakly dispersive DAWs, is derived following Ott and Sudan [Phys. Fluids 12, 2388 (1969)]. It is shown that for some typical laboratory and space plasmas, the Landau damping (and the nonlinear) effects are more pronounced than the finite Debye length (dispersive) effects for which the KdV soliton theory is not applicable to DAWs in dusty pair-ion plasmas. The properties of the linear phase velocity, solitary wave amplitudes (in presence and absence of the Landau damping) as well as the Landau damping rate are studied with the effects of the positive ion to dust density ratio (?{sub pd}) as well as the ratios of positive to negative ion temperatures (?) and masses (m)

  6. Microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography: applications and corrections for the effects of acoustic heterogeneities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Xing

    2009-05-15

    This research is primarily focused on developing potential applications for microwaveinduced thermoacoustic tomography and correcting for image degradations caused by acoustic heterogeneities. Microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography was first...

  7. Effects of internal waves on low frequency, long range, acoustic propagation in the deep ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Jinshan

    2007-01-01

    This thesis covers a comprehensive analysis of long-range, deep-ocean, low-frequency, sound propagation experimental results obtained from the North Pacific Ocean. The statistics of acoustic fields after propagation through ...

  8. Acoustic oscillations of rapidly rotating polytropic stars. II. Effects of the Coriolis and centrifugal accelerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Reese; F. Lignières; M. Rieutord

    2006-09-26

    Context: With the launch of space missions devoted to asteroseismology (like COROT), the scientific community will soon have accurate measurements of pulsation frequencies in many rapidly rotating stars. Aims: The present work focuses on the effects of rotation on pulsations of rapidly rotating stars when both the Coriolis and centrifugal accelerations require a non-perturbative treatment. Method: We develop a 2-dimensional spectral numerical approach which allows us to compute acoustic modes in centrifugally distorted polytropes including the full influence of the Coriolis force. This method is validated through comparisons with previous studies, and the results are shown to be highly accurate. Results: In the frequency range considered and with COROT's accuracy, we establish a domain of validity for perturbative methods, thus showing the need for complete calculations beyond v.sin i = 50 km/s for a R = 2.3 R_\\odot, M = 1.9 M_\\odot polytropic star. Furthermore, it is shown that the main differences between complete and perturbative calculations come essentially from the centrifugal distortion.

  9. Effects of biogenic silica on acoustic and physical properties of clay-rich marine sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tribble, J.S.; Mackenzie, F.T.; Urmos, J.; O'Brien, D.K.; Manghnani, M.H. )

    1992-06-01

    The physical properties of marine sediments are influenced by compaction and diagenesis during burial. Changes in mineralogy, chemistry, density, porosity, and microfabric all affect a sediment's acoustic and electrical properties. Sediments from the Japan Trench illustrate the dependence of physical properties on biogenic silica content. Increased opal-A content is correlated with increased porosity and decreased grain density and compressional velocity. Variations with depth in opal-A concentration are therefore reflected in highly variable and, at times, inverse velocity-depth gradients. The diagenetic conversion of opal-A to opal-CT and finally to quartz was investigated at a site in the San Miguel Gap, California. Distinct changes in microfabric, particularly in the porosity distribution, accompany the diagenetic reactions and contribute to a sharp velocity discontinuity at the depth of the opal-A to opal-CT conversion. Evaluation of this reaction at several sites indicates a systematic dependence on temperature and age in clay-rich and moderately siliceous sediments. In ocean margin regions, sediments are buried rapidly, and opal-A may be converted to opal-CT in less than 10 m.y. Temperatures of conversion range from 30{degree} to 50{degree}C. Much longer times (>40 m.y.) are required to complete the conversion in open ocean deposits which are exposed to temperatures less than 15{degree}C. In the absence of silica diagenesis, velocity-depth gradients of most clay-rich and moderately siliceous sediments fall in the narrow range of 0.15 to 0.25 km/s/km which brackets the gradient (0.18 km/s/km) determined for a type pelagic clay section. Relationships such as these can be useful in unraveling the history of a sediment sequence, including the evolution with time of reservoir properties and seismic signatures.

  10. Quasi-normal acoustic oscillations in the Michel flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaverra, Eliana; Sarbach, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    We study spherical and nonspherical linear acoustic perturbations of the Michel flow, which describes the steady radial accretion of a perfect fluid into a nonrotating black hole. The dynamics of such perturbations are governed by a scalar wave equation on an effective curved background geometry determined by the acoustic metric, which is constructed from the spacetime metric and the particle density and four-velocity of the fluid. For the problem under consideration in this article the acoustic metric has the same qualitative features as an asymptotically flat, static and spherically symmetric black hole, and thus it represents a natural astrophysical analogue black hole. As for the case of a scalar field propagating on a Schwarzschild background, we show that acoustic perturbations of the Michel flow exhibit quasi-normal oscillations. Based on a new numerical method for determining the solutions of the radial mode equation, we compute the associated frequencies and analyze their dependency on the radii of t...

  11. Effects of obliqueness and strong electrostatic interaction on linear and nonlinear propagation of dust-acoustic waves in a magnetized strongly coupled dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shahmansouri, M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Arak University, Arak 38156- 8 8349 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Arak University, Arak 38156- 8 8349 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mamun, A. A. [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka-1342 (Bangladesh)] [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka-1342 (Bangladesh)

    2014-03-15

    Linear and nonlinear propagation of dust-acoustic waves in a magnetized strongly coupled dusty plasma is theoretically investigated. The normal mode analysis (reductive perturbation method) is employed to investigate the role of ambient/external magnetic field, obliqueness, and effective electrostatic dust-temperature in modifying the properties of linear (nonlinear) dust-acoustic waves propagating in such a strongly coupled dusty plasma. The effective electrostatic dust-temperature, which arises from strong electrostatic interactions among highly charged dust, is considered as a dynamical variable. The linear dispersion relation (describing the linear propagation characteristics) for the obliquely propagating dust-acoustic waves is derived and analyzed. On the other hand, the Korteweg-de Vries equation describing the nonlinear propagation of the dust-acoustic waves (particularly, propagation of dust-acoustic solitary waves) is derived and solved. It is shown that the combined effects of obliqueness, magnitude of the ambient/external magnetic field, and effective electrostatic dust-temperature significantly modify the basic properties of linear and nonlinear dust-acoustic waves. The results of this work are compared with those observed by some laboratory experiments.

  12. Reducing the effects of acoustic heterogeneity with an iterative reconstruction method from experimental data in microwave induced thermoacoustic tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jinguo; Zhao, Zhiqin Song, Jian; Chen, Guoping; Nie, Zaiping; Liu, Qing-Huo

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: An iterative reconstruction method has been previously reported by the authors of this paper. However, the iterative reconstruction method was demonstrated by solely using the numerical simulations. It is essential to apply the iterative reconstruction method to practice conditions. The objective of this work is to validate the capability of the iterative reconstruction method for reducing the effects of acoustic heterogeneity with the experimental data in microwave induced thermoacoustic tomography. Methods: Most existing reconstruction methods need to combine the ultrasonic measurement technology to quantitatively measure the velocity distribution of heterogeneity, which increases the system complexity. Different to existing reconstruction methods, the iterative reconstruction method combines time reversal mirror technique, fast marching method, and simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique to iteratively estimate the velocity distribution of heterogeneous tissue by solely using the measured data. Then, the estimated velocity distribution is used subsequently to reconstruct the highly accurate image of microwave absorption distribution. Experiments that a target placed in an acoustic heterogeneous environment are performed to validate the iterative reconstruction method. Results: By using the estimated velocity distribution, the target in an acoustic heterogeneous environment can be reconstructed with better shape and higher image contrast than targets that are reconstructed with a homogeneous velocity distribution. Conclusions: The distortions caused by the acoustic heterogeneity can be efficiently corrected by utilizing the velocity distribution estimated by the iterative reconstruction method. The advantage of the iterative reconstruction method over the existing correction methods is that it is successful in improving the quality of the image of microwave absorption distribution without increasing the system complexity.

  13. EFFECT OF COMBUSTOR INLET GEOMETRY ON ACOUSTIC SIGNATURE AND FLOW FIELD BEHAVIOUR OF THE LOW SWIRL INJECTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Therkelsen, Peter L.; Littlejohn, David; Cheng, Robert K.; Portillo, J. Enrique; Martin, Scott M.

    2009-11-30

    Low Swirl Injector (LSI) technology is a lean premixed combustion method that is being developed for fuel-flexible gas turbines. The objective of this study is to characterize the fuel effects and influences of combustor geometry on the LSI's overall acoustic signatures and flowfields. The experiments consist of 24 flames at atmospheric condition with bulk flows ranging between 10 and 18 m/s. The flames burn CH{sub 4} (at {phi} = 0.6 & 0.7) and a blend of 90% H{sub 2} - 10% CH{sub 4} by volume (at {phi} = 0.35 & 0.4). Two combustor configurations are used, consisting of a cylindrical chamber with and without a divergent quarl at the dump plane. The data consist of pressure spectral distributions at five positions within the system and 2D flowfield information measured by Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV). The results show that acoustic oscillations increase with U{sub 0} and {phi}. However, the levels in the 90% H{sub 2} flames are significantly higher than in the CH{sub 4} flames. For both fuels, the use of the quarl reduces the fluctuating pressures in the combustion chamber by up to a factor of 7. The PIV results suggest this to be a consequence of the quarl restricting the formation of large vortices in the outer shear layer. A Generalized Instability Model (GIM) was applied to analyze the acoustic response of baseline flames for each of the two fuels. The measured frequencies and the stability trends for these two cases are predicted and the triggered acoustic mode shapes identified.

  14. Acoustic cryocooler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, G.W.; Martin, R.A.; Radebaugh, R.

    1989-09-26

    An acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effective to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15-60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintain a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K. 3 figs.

  15. Acoustic cryocooler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, G.W.; Martin, R.A.; Radebaugh, R.

    1990-09-04

    This patent describes an acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effect to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15--60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintain a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K.

  16. Acoustic cryocooler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, Gregory W.; Martin, Richard A.; Radenbaugh, Ray

    1990-01-01

    An acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effective to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15-60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintian a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K.

  17. On the effect of perforated plates on the acoustics of annular combustors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicoud, Franck

    the influence of perforated plates on the acoustic modes in aeronautical gas turbines combustion chambers quantity I. Introduction In order to cut down pollutant emissions, industrial gas turbine combustion and dilution holes [14, 15]. In aeronautical gas turbines, walls of recent combustion chambers are generally

  18. Effects of acoustic heterogeneities on transcranial brain imaging with microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lihong

    -induced thermoacoustic tomography Xing Jin Department of Biomedical Engineering, Texas A&M University, 3120 TAMU, College: thermoacoustic tomography, transcranial brain imaging, acoustic heterogeneities I. INTRODUCTION Microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography TAT is a noninvasive and nonionizing imaging modality that can dif- ferentiate

  19. Computational and experimental techniques for coupled acoustic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and shown to be an effective means of testing acoustic loading on simple test structures. The tube is capable of creating a semi-infinite acoustic field due to nonreflecting...

  20. Multi-reflective acoustic wave device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andle, Jeffrey C.

    2006-02-21

    An acoustic wave device, which utilizes multiple localized reflections of acoustic wave for achieving an infinite impulse response while maintaining high tolerance for dampening effects, is disclosed. The device utilized a plurality of electromechanically significant electrodes disposed on most of the active surface. A plurality of sensors utilizing the disclosed acoustic wave mode device are also described.

  1. Investigation of the Acoustic Properties of Piezoelectric Diaphragms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Investigation of the Acoustic Properties of Piezoelectric Diaphragms R.F. Need, D.F. Bahr, M-canceling headphones and similar applications. ·The purpose of this study was to determine what effect, if any, the PZT of the diaphragm. Experiment: ·Lead zirconate titanate, PZT, is a piezoelectric material meaning it mechanically

  2. Backcoupling of acoustic streaming on the temperature field inside high-intensity discharge lamps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwieger, Joerg; Wolff, Marcus; Manders, Freddy; Suijker, Jos

    2015-01-01

    Operating high-intensity discharge lamps in the high frequency range (20-300 kHz) provides energy-saving and cost reduction potentials. However, commercially available lamp drivers do not make use of this operating strategy because light intensity fluctuations and even lamp destruction are possible. The reason for the fluctuating discharge arc are acoustic resonances in this frequency range that are excited in the arc tube. The acoustic resonances in turn generate a fluid flow that is caused by the acoustic streaming effect. Here, we present a 3D multiphysics model to determine the influence of acoustic streaming on the temperature field in the vicinity of an acoustic eigenfrequency. In that case a transition from stable to instable behavior occurs. The model is able to predict when light flicker can be expected. The results are in very good accordance with accompanying experiments.

  3. Filamentation instability of current-driven dust ion-acoustic waves in a collisional dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niknam, A. R. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Haghtalab, T.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M. [Physics Department, Birjand University, Birjand 97179-63384 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    A theoretical investigation has been made of the dust ion-acoustic filamentation instability in an unmagnetized current-driven dusty plasma by using the Lorentz transformation formulas. The effect of collision between the charged particles with neutrals and their thermal motion on this instability is considered. Developing the filamentation instability of the current-driven dust ion-acoustic wave allows us to determine the period and the establishment time of the filamentation structure and threshold for instability development.

  4. Effects of Tidal Turbine Noise on Fish Task 2.1.3.2: Effects on Aquatic Organisms: Acoustics/Noise - Fiscal Year 2011 - Progress Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halvorsen, Michele B.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2011-09-30

    Naturally spawning stocks of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) that utilize Puget Sound are listed as threatened (http://www.nwr.noaa.gov/ESA-Salmon-Listings/Salmon-Populations/ Chinook/CKPUG.cfm). Plans exist for prototype tidal turbines to be deployed into their habitat. Noise is known to affect fish in many ways, such as causing a threshold shift in auditory sensitivity or tissue damage. The characteristics of noise, its spectra and level, are important factors that influence the potential for the noise to injure fish. For example, the frequency range of the tidal turbine noise includes the audiogram (frequency range of hearing) of most fish. This study (Effects on Aquatic Organisms, Subtask 2.1.3.2: Acoustics) was performed during FY 2011 to determine if noise generated by a 6-m-diameter open-hydro turbine might affect juvenile Chinook salmon hearing or cause barotrauma. After they were exposed to simulated tidal turbine noise, the hearing of juvenile Chinook salmon was measured and necropsies performed to check for tissue damage. Experimental groups were (1) noise exposed, (2) control (the same handling as treatment fish but without exposure to tidal turbine noise), and (3) baseline (never handled). Preliminary results indicate that low levels of tissue damage may have occurred but that there were no effects of noise exposure on the auditory systems of the test fish.

  5. 38 | Acoustics Today | Winter 2015 Acoustic Cloaking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norris, Andrew

    is called transformation acoustics (TA). he technical details of TA convert the acoustic wave equation from that the transformed medium must display acoustic anisotropy. he wave speed in the hori- zontal direction is unchanged of acoustic wave relection in Figure 1 captures the essence of TA. he incident wave relects from a ixed

  6. Micro acoustic spectrum analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schubert, W. Kent; Butler, Michael A.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Anderson, Larry F.

    2004-11-23

    A micro acoustic spectrum analyzer for determining the frequency components of a fluctuating sound signal comprises a microphone to pick up the fluctuating sound signal and produce an alternating current electrical signal; at least one microfabricated resonator, each resonator having a different resonant frequency, that vibrate in response to the alternating current electrical signal; and at least one detector to detect the vibration of the microfabricated resonators. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer can further comprise a mixer to mix a reference signal with the alternating current electrical signal from the microphone to shift the frequency spectrum to a frequency range that is a better matched to the resonant frequencies of the microfabricated resonators. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer can be designed specifically for portability, size, cost, accuracy, speed, power requirements, and use in a harsh environment. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer is particularly suited for applications where size, accessibility, and power requirements are limited, such as the monitoring of industrial equipment and processes, detection of security intrusions, or evaluation of military threats.

  7. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T. (Palo Alto, CA); Chou, Ching H. (Palo Alto, CA)

    1990-01-01

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens.

  8. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Chou, C.H.

    1990-03-20

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system is described in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens. 9 figs.

  9. Method and apparatus for generating acoustic energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guerrero, Hector N. (Evans, GA)

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for generating and emitting amplified coherent acoustic energy. A cylindrical transducer is mounted within a housing, the transducer having an acoustically open end and an acoustically closed end. The interior of the transducer is filled with an active medium which may include scattering nuclei. Excitation of the transducer produces radially directed acoustic energy in the active medium, which is converted by the dimensions of the transducer, the acoustically closed end thereof, and the scattering nuclei, to amplified coherent acoustic energy directed longitudinally within the transducer. The energy is emitted through the acoustically open end of the transducer. The emitted energy can be used for, among other things, effecting a chemical reaction or removing scale from the interior walls of containment vessels.

  10. Pitch determination considering laryngealization effects in spoken dialogs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niemann, H; Denzler, J; Kahles, B; Kompe, A; Kießling, A; Nöth, E; Strom, Volker

    1994-01-01

    A frequent phenomen in spoken dialogs of the information seeking type are short elliptic utterances whose mood (declarative or interrogative) can only be distinguished by intonation. The main acoustic evidence is conveyed ...

  11. Acoustically Enhanced Boiling Heat Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. W. Douglas; M. K. Smith; A. Glezer

    2008-01-07

    An acoustic field is used to increase the critical heat flux (CHF) of a flat-boiling-heat-transfer surface. The increase is a result of the acoustic effects on the vapor bubbles. Experiments are performed to explore the effects of an acoustic field on vapor bubbles in the vicinity of a rigid-heated wall. Work includes the construction of a novel heater used to produce a single vapor bubble of a prescribed size and at a prescribed location on a flatboiling surface for better study of an individual vapor bubble's reaction to the acoustic field. Work also includes application of the results from the single-bubble heater to a calibrated-copper heater used for quantifying the improvements in CHF.

  12. Effects of Induced Acoustic Vibrations on Droplet Shedding on Hybrid Micro-structured Surfaces 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, Chen-Ling

    2014-04-28

    during condensation. However, use of hybrid surfaces in condensation leads to a strong pinning effect that takes place between the condensing droplets and the hydrophobic-hydrophillic edge, leading to a significant contact angle hysteresis effect...

  13. Prediction of a non-uniform freestream velocity distribution for counterrotating propeller configurations and the effect on performance/acoustic 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Christopher Shane

    1993-01-01

    A methodology for predicting the performance and acoustics of counterrotating propeller configurations was enhanced by incorporating a method for computing the non-uniform freestream velocity distribution entering the propeller disc plane due...

  14. Effect of Landau damping on alternative ion-acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized plasma consisting of warm adiabatic ions and non-thermal electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Jayasree; Das, K P

    2015-01-01

    Bandyopadhyay and Das [Phys. Plasmas, 9, 465-473, 2002] have derived a nonlinear macroscopic evolution equation for ion acoustic wave in a magnetized plasma consisting of warm adiabatic ions and non-thermal electrons including the effect of Landau damping. In that paper they have also derived the corresponding nonlinear evolution equation when coefficient of the nonlinear term of the above mentioned macroscopic evolution equation vanishes, the nonlinear behaviour of the ion acoustic wave is described by a modified macroscopic evolution equation. But they have not considered the case when the coefficient is very near to zero. This is the case we consider in this paper and we derive the corresponding evolution equation including the effect of Landau damping. Finally, a solitary wave solution of this macroscopic evolution is obtained, whose amplitude is found to decay slowly with time.

  15. Acoustic Characterization of Mesoscale Objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chinn, D; Huber, R; Chambers, D; Cole, G; Balogun, O; Spicer, J; Murray, T

    2007-03-13

    This report describes the science and engineering performed to provide state-of-the-art acoustic capabilities for nondestructively characterizing mesoscale (millimeter-sized) objects--allowing micrometer resolution over the objects entire volume. Materials and structures used in mesoscale objects necessitate the use of (1) GHz acoustic frequencies and (2) non-contacting laser generation and detection of acoustic waves. This effort demonstrated that acoustic methods at gigahertz frequencies have the necessary penetration depth and spatial resolution to effectively detect density discontinuities, gaps, and delaminations. A prototype laser-based ultrasonic system was designed and built. The system uses a micro-chip laser for excitation of broadband ultrasonic waves with frequency components reaching 1.0 GHz, and a path-stabilized Michelson interferometer for detection. The proof-of-concept for mesoscale characterization is demonstrated by imaging a micro-fabricated etched pattern in a 70 {micro}m thick silicon wafer.

  16. Determining effects of turbine blades on fluid motion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Linn, Rodman Ray (Los Alamos, NM); Koo, Eunmo (Los Alamos, NM)

    2012-05-01

    Disclosed is a technique for simulating wind interaction with wind turbines. A turbine blade is divided into radial sections. The effect that each of these radial sections has on the velocities in Eulerian computational cells they overlap is determined. The effect is determined using Lagrangian techniques such that the calculations need not include wind components in the radial direction. A force on each radial section of turbine blade is determined. This force depends on the axial and azimuthal components of the fluid flow in the computational cell and the geometric properties of the turbine blade. The force on the turbine blade is fed back to effect the fluid flow in the computational cell for the next time step.

  17. Determining effects of turbine blades on fluid motion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Linn, Rodman Ray (Los Alamos, NM); Koo, Eunmo (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-05-31

    Disclosed is a technique for simulating wind interaction with wind turbines. A turbine blade is divided into radial sections. The effect that each of these radial sections has on the velocities in Eulerian computational cells they overlap is determined. The effect is determined using Lagrangian techniques such that the calculations need not include wind components in the radial direction. A force on each radial section of turbine blade is determined. This force depends on the axial and azimuthal components of the fluid flow in the computational cell and the geometric properties of the turbine blade. The force on the turbine blade is fed back to effect the fluid flow in the computational cell for the next time step.

  18. Acoustic transducer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drumheller, Douglas S. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    1997-01-01

    An acoustic transducer comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers.

  19. Acoustic transducer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1997-12-30

    An acoustic transducer is described comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2,000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers. 4 figs.

  20. Acoustic paramagnetic logging tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vail, III, William B. (Bothell, WA)

    1988-01-01

    New methods and apparatus are disclosed which allow measurement of the presence of oil and water in geological formations using a new physical effect called the Acoustic Paramagnetic Logging Effect (APLE). The presence of petroleum in formation causes a slight increase in the earth's magnetic field in the vicinity of the reservoir. This is the phenomena of paramagnetism. Application of an acoustic source to a geological formation at the Larmor frequency of the nucleons present causes the paramagnetism of the formation to disappear. This results in a decrease in the earth3 s magnetic field in the vicinity of the oil bearing formation. Repetitively frequency sweeping the acoustic source through the Larmor frequency of the nucleons present (approx. 2 kHz) causes an amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field which is a consequence of the APLE. The amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field is measured with an induction coil gradiometer and provides a direct measure of the amount of oil and water in the excitation zone of the formation . The phase of the signal is used to infer the longitudinal relaxation times of the fluids present, which results in the ability in general to separate oil and water and to measure the viscosity of the oil present. Such measurements may be preformed in open boreholes and in cased well bores.

  1. Thermoacoustic effects in supercritical fluids near the critical point: Resonance, piston effect, and acoustic emission and reflection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermoacoustic effects in supercritical fluids near the critical point: Resonance, piston effect-8502 Received 31 August 2007; published 26 December 2007 We present a general theory of thermoacoustic phenomena

  2. Acoustic transducer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drumheller, Douglas S. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    2000-01-01

    An active acoustic transducer tool for use down-hole applications. The tool includes a single cylindrical mandrel including a shoulder defining the boundary of a narrowed portion over which is placed a sandwich-style piezoelectric tranducer assembly. The piezoelectric transducer assembly is prestressed by being placed in a thermal interference fit between the shoulder of the mandrel and the base of an anvil which is likewise positioned over the narrower portion of the mandrel. In the preferred embodiment, assembly of the tool is accomplished using a hydraulic jack to stretch the mandrel prior to emplacement of the cylindrical sandwich-style piezoelectric transducer assembly and anvil. After those elements are positioned and secured, the stretched mandrel is allowed to return substantially to its original (pre-stretch) dimensions with the result that the piezoelectric transducer elements are compressed between the anvil and the shoulder of the mandrel.

  3. Quasi-normal acoustic oscillations in the Michel flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eliana Chaverra; Manuel D. Morales; Olivier Sarbach

    2015-06-09

    We study spherical and nonspherical linear acoustic perturbations of the Michel flow, which describes the steady radial accretion of a perfect fluid into a nonrotating black hole. The dynamics of such perturbations are governed by a scalar wave equation on an effective curved background geometry determined by the acoustic metric, which is constructed from the spacetime metric and the particle density and four-velocity of the fluid. For the problem under consideration in this article the acoustic metric has the same qualitative features as an asymptotically flat, static and spherically symmetric black hole, and thus it represents a natural astrophysical analogue black hole. As for the case of a scalar field propagating on a Schwarzschild background, we show that acoustic perturbations of the Michel flow exhibit quasi-normal oscillations. Based on a new numerical method for determining the solutions of the radial mode equation, we compute the associated frequencies and analyze their dependency on the radii of the event and sonic horizons and the angular momentum number. Our results for the fundamental frequencies are compared to those obtained from an independent numerical Cauchy evolution, finding good agreement between the two approaches. When the radius of the sonic horizon is large compared to the event horizon radius, we find that the quasi-normal frequencies scale approximately like the surface gravity associated with the sonic horizon.

  4. Acoustic oscillations in rapidly rotating polytropic stars I. Effects of the centrifugal distortion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Lignieres; M. Rieutord; D. Reese

    2006-04-13

    A new non-perturbative method to compute accurate oscillation modes in rapidly rotating stars is presented. In this paper, the effect of the centrifugal force is fully taken into account while the Coriolis force is neglected. This assumption is valid when the time scale of the oscillation is much shorter than the inverse of the rotation rate and is expected to be suitable for high radial order p-modes of $\\delta$ Scuti stars. Axisymmetric p-modes have been computed in uniformly rotating polytropic models of stars. In the frequency and rotation range considered, we found that as rotation increases (i) the asymptotic structure of the non-rotating frequency spectrum is first destroyed then replaced by a new form of organization (ii) the mode amplitude tends to concentrate near the equator (iii) differences with perturbative methods become significant as soon as the rotation rate exceeds about fifteen percent of the Keplerian limit. The implications for the seismology of rapidly rotating stars are then discussed.

  5. 15th AIAA Aeroacoustics Conference, 11-13 May, 2009, Miami Damping Effect of Perforated Plates on the Acoustics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicoud, Franck

    and Astronautics #12;I. Introduction In order to cut down pollutant emissions, industrial gas turbine combustion on the prediction of combustion instabilities.5,6 In aeronautical gas turbines, walls of recent combustion chambers aims at showing the influence of perforated plates on the acoustic modes in aeronautical gas turbines

  6. Vehicle Speed Estimation using Acoustic Wave Patterns Volkan Cevher, Member, IEEE, Rama Chellappa, Fellow, IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cevher, Volkan

    1 Vehicle Speed Estimation using Acoustic Wave Patterns Volkan Cevher, Member, IEEE, Rama Chellappa length, and tire track length by jointly estimating its acoustic wave pattern with a single passive acoustic sensor that records the vehicle's drive-by noise. The acoustic wave pattern is determined using

  7. Multipurpose Acoustic Sensor for Downhole Fluid Monitoring

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Novel sensor design based on acoustics. Determine in real-timeand in a single sensor packagemultiple parameters: temperature, pressure, fluid flow; and fluid properties, such as density, viscosity, fluid composition.

  8. Inverse determination of effective mechanical properties of adhesive bondlines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hass, Philipp; Mendoza, Miller; Herrmann, Hans J; Niemz, Peter

    2015-01-01

    A new approach for determining effective mechanical bondline properties using a combined experimental-numerical modal analysis technique is proposed. After characterizing clear spruce wood boards, an adhesive layer is applied to the boards surfaces. The shift of the eigenfrequencies resulting from the adhesive layer together with information on the bondline geometry can then be used to inversely determine the mechanical properties of the adhesive layer using Finite Element Models. The calculated values for clear wood as well as for the adhesive layer lie within reasonable ranges, thus demonstrating the methods potential.

  9. Speaker verification system using acoustic data and non-acoustic data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gable, Todd J. (Walnut Creek, CA); Ng, Lawrence C. (Danville, CA); Holzrichter, John F. (Berkeley, CA); Burnett, Greg C. (Livermore, CA)

    2006-03-21

    A method and system for speech characterization. One embodiment includes a method for speaker verification which includes collecting data from a speaker, wherein the data comprises acoustic data and non-acoustic data. The data is used to generate a template that includes a first set of "template" parameters. The method further includes receiving a real-time identity claim from a claimant, and using acoustic data and non-acoustic data from the identity claim to generate a second set of parameters. The method further includes comparing the first set of parameters to the set of parameters to determine whether the claimant is the speaker. The first set of parameters and the second set of parameters include at least one purely non-acoustic parameter, including a non-acoustic glottal shape parameter derived from averaging multiple glottal cycle waveforms.

  10. Acoustic Based Sketch Recognition 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Wenzhe

    2012-10-19

    investigate this new area, which we call acoustic based sketch recognition, and evaluate the possibilities of using it as a new interaction technique. We focus specifically on building a recognition engine for acoustic sketch recognition. We first propose a...

  11. Performance Assessment of Suture Type in Juvenile Chinook Salmon Surgically Implanted with Acoustic Transmitters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deters, Katherine A.; Brown, Richard S.; Carter, Kathleen M.; Boyd, James W.

    2009-02-27

    The objective of this study was to determine the best overall suture material to close incisions from the surgical implantation of Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) acoustic microtransmitters in subyearling Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. The effects of seven suture materials, four surgeons, and two water temperatures on suture retention, incision openness, tag retention, tissue inflammation, and tissue ulceration were quantified. The laboratory study, conducted by researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, supports a larger effort under way for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, aimed at determining the suitability of acoustic telemetry for estimating short- and longer-term (30-60 days) juvenile-salmonid survival at Columbia and Snake River dams and through the lower Columbia River.

  12. Effects of liquid pore water on acoustic wave propagation in snow as a Biot-type porous material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidler, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    A method to estimate phase velocity and attenuation of acoustic waves in the presence of liquid water in a snowpack is presented. The method is based on Biot's theory of wave propagation in porous materials. Empirical relations and a priori information is used to characterize snow as a porous material as a function of porosity. Plane wave theory and an equivalent pore fluid are used to solve Biot's differential equations and to asses the impact of the air and water in the pore space. The liquid water in the pore space of a snow pack reduces the velocity of the first compressional wave by roughly 300 m/s for every 0.1 increase in liquid water saturation. Also the attenuation of the compressional waves is increased with increasing liquid water content. Two end member models for compaction are evaluated to asses the importance of an independent density measurement for an estimate of liquid pore water saturation in snow with acoustic waves. The two end members correspond to no compaction at all and to a melting s...

  13. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr.; Younane Abousleiman

    2004-04-01

    The research during this project has concentrated on developing a correlation between rock deformation mechanisms and their acoustic velocity signature. This has included investigating: (1) the acoustic signature of drained and undrained unconsolidated sands, (2) the acoustic emission signature of deforming high porosity rocks (in comparison to their low porosity high strength counterparts), (3) the effects of deformation on anisotropic elastic and poroelastic moduli, and (4) the acoustic tomographic imaging of damage development in rocks. Each of these four areas involve triaxial experimental testing of weak porous rocks or unconsolidated sand and involves measuring acoustic properties. The research is directed at determining the seismic velocity signature of damaged rocks so that 3-D or 4-D seismic imaging can be utilized to image rock damage. These four areas of study are described in the report: (1) Triaxial compression experiments have been conducted on unconsolidated Oil Creek sand at high confining pressures. (2) Initial experiments on measuring the acoustic emission activity from deforming high porosity Danian chalk were accomplished and these indicate that the AE activity was of a very low amplitude. (3) A series of triaxial compression experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of induced stress on the anisotropy developed in dynamic elastic and poroelastic parameters in rocks. (4) Tomographic acoustic imaging was utilized to image the internal damage in a deforming porous limestone sample. Results indicate that the deformation damage in rocks induced during laboratory experimentation can be imaged tomographically in the laboratory. By extension the results also indicate that 4-D seismic imaging of a reservoir may become a powerful tool for imaging reservoir deformation (including imaging compaction and subsidence) and for imaging zones where drilling operation may encounter hazardous shallow water flows.

  14. Electromagnetic acoustic transducer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alers, George A. (Albuquerque, NM); Burns, Jr., Leigh R. (Albuquerque, NM); MacLauchlan, Daniel T. (Sandia Park, NM)

    1988-01-01

    A noncontact ultrasonic transducer for studying the acoustic properties of a metal workpiece includes a generally planar magnetizing coil positioned above the surface of the workpiece, and a generally planar eddy current coil between the magnetizing coil and the workpiece. When a large current is passed through the magnetizing coil, a large magnetic field is applied to the near-surface regions of the workpiece. The eddy current coil can then be operated as a transmitter by passing an alternating current therethrough to excite ultrasonic waves in the surface of the workpiece, or operated as a passive receiver to sense ultrasonic waves in the surface by measuring the output signal. The geometries of the two coils can be varied widely to be effective for different types of ultrasonic waves. The coils are preferably packaged in a housing which does not interfere with their operation, but protects them from a variety of adverse environmental conditions.

  15. SU-E-T-318: The Effect of Patient Positioning Errors On Target Coverage and Cochlear Dose in Stereotactic Radiosurgery Treatment of Acoustic Neuromas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dellamonica, D.; Luo, G.; Ding, G.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Setup errors on the order of millimeters may cause under-dosing of targets and significant changes in dose to critical structures especially when planning with tight margins in stereotactic radiosurgery. This study evaluates the effects of these types of patient positioning uncertainties on planning target volume (PTV) coverage and cochlear dose for stereotactic treatments of acoustic neuromas. Methods: Twelve acoustic neuroma patient treatment plans were retrospectively evaluated in Brainlab iPlan RT Dose 4.1.3. All treatment beams were shaped by HDMLC from a Varian TX machine. Seven patients had planning margins of 2mm, five had 1–1.5mm. Six treatment plans were created for each patient simulating a 1mm setup error in six possible directions: anterior-posterior, lateral, and superiorinferior. The arcs and HDMLC shapes were kept the same for each plan. Change in PTV coverage and mean dose to the cochlea was evaluated for each plan. Results: The average change in PTV coverage for the 72 simulated plans was ?1.7% (range: ?5 to +1.1%). The largest average change in coverage was observed for shifts in the patient's superior direction (?2.9%). The change in mean cochlear dose was highly dependent upon the direction of the shift. Shifts in the anterior and superior direction resulted in an average increase in dose of 13.5 and 3.8%, respectively, while shifts in the posterior and inferior direction resulted in an average decrease in dose of 17.9 and 10.2%. The average change in dose to the cochlea was 13.9% (range: 1.4 to 48.6%). No difference was observed based on the size of the planning margin. Conclusion: This study indicates that if the positioning uncertainty is kept within 1mm the setup errors may not result in significant under-dosing of the acoustic neuroma target volumes. However, the change in mean cochlear dose is highly dependent upon the direction of the shift.

  16. DETERMINATION OF PHOTOVOLTAIC EFFECTIVE CAPACITY FOR Richard Perez for Clean Power Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard R.

    DETERMINATION OF PHOTOVOLTAIC EFFECTIVE CAPACITY FOR NEW JERSEY Richard Perez for Clean Power) requirements. #12;DETERMINATION OF PHOTOVOLTAIC EFFECTIVE CAPACITY FOR NEW JERSEY The ELCC metric dispatchable power plant. 2 #12;DETERMINATION OF PHOTOVOLTAIC EFFECTIVE CAPACITY FOR NEW JERSEY 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

  17. Geodesic acoustic modes in a fluid model of tokamak plasma : the effects of finite beta and collisionality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Rameswar; Gurcan, Ozgur D; Hennequin, Pascale; Vermare, L; Morel, Pierre; Singh, Raghvendra

    2015-01-01

    Starting from the Braginskii equations, relevant for the tokamak edge region, a complete set of nonlinear equations for the geodesic acoustic modes (GAM) has been derived which includes collisionality, plasma beta and external sources of particle, momentum and heat. Local linear analysis shows that the GAM frequency increases with collisionality at low radial wave number $k_{r}$ and decreases at high $k_{r}$. GAM frequency also decreases with plasma beta. Radial profiles of GAM frequency for two Tore Supra shots, which were part of a collisionality scan, are compared with these calculations. Discrepency between experiment and theory is observed, which seems to be explained by a finite $k_{r}$ for the GAM when flux surface averaged density $\\langle n \\rangle$ and temperature $\\langle T \\rangle$ are assumed to vanish. It is shown that this agreement is incidental and self-consistent inclusion of $\\langle n \\rangle$ and $\\langle T \\rangle$ responses enhances the disagreement more with $k_r$ at high $k_{r}$ . So ...

  18. Effective Use of Molecular Recognition in Gas Sensing: Results from Acoustic Wave and In-Situ FTIR Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodenhofer, K,; Gopel, W.; Hierlemann, A.; Ricco, A.J.

    1998-12-09

    To probe directly the analyte/film interactions that characterize molecular recognition in gas sensors, we recorded changes to the in-situ surface vibrational spectra of specifically fictionalized surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices concurrently with analyte exposure and SAW measurement of the extent of sorption. Fourier-lmnsform infrared external- reflectance spectra (FTIR-ERS) were collected from operating 97-MH2 SAW delay lines during exposure to a range of analytes as they interacted with thin-film coatings previously shown to be selective: cyclodextrins for chiral recognition, Ni-camphorates for Lewis bases such as pyridine and organophosphonates, and phthalocyanines for aromatic compounds. In most cases where specific chemical interactions-metal coordination, "cage" compound inclusion, or z stacking-were expected, analyte dosing caused distinctive changes in the IR spectr~ together with anomalously large SAW sensor responses. In contrast, control experiments involving the physisorption of the same analytes by conventional organic polymers did not cause similar changes in the IR spectra, and the SAW responses were smaller. For a given conventional polymer, the partition coefficients (or SAW sensor signals) roughly followed the analyte fraction of saturation vapor pressure. These SAW/FTIR results support earlier conclusions derived from thickness-shear mode resonator data.

  19. Heating by Acoustic Waves of Multiphase Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doron Chelouche

    2007-08-02

    We study the emission and dissipation of acoustic waves from cool dense clouds in pressure equilibrium with a hot, volume-filling dilute gas component. In our model, the clouds are exposed to a source of ionizing radiation whose flux level varies with time, forcing the clouds to pulsate. We estimate the rate at which acoustic energy is radiated away by an ensemble of clouds and the rate at which it is absorbed by, and dissipated in, the hot dilute phase. We show that acoustic energy can be a substantial heating source of the hot gas phase when the mass in the cool component is a substantial fraction of the total gas mass. We investigate the applicability of our results to the multiphase media of several astrophysical systems, including quasar outflows and cooling flows. We find that acoustic heating can have a substantial effect on the thermal properties of the hot phase in those systems.

  20. Fresnel approximations for acoustic fields of rectangularly symmetric sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mast, T. Douglas

    Fresnel approximations for acoustic fields of rectangularly symmetric sources T. Douglas Masta for determining the acoustic fields of rectangularly symmetric, baffled, time-harmonic sources under the Fresnel. The expressions presented are generalized to three different Fresnel approximations that correspond, respectively

  1. Determination

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    M. M. Beheary, and K. M. Abdel-Moneim, "Effect of dust on the Transpar- ent Cover of Solar Collectors," Energy Conversion and Management, vol. 47, no. 18-19, pp. 3192-3203,...

  2. Device and method for generating a beam of acoustic energy from a borehole, and applications thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N; Pantea, Cristian; Nihei, Kurt T; Schmitt, Denis P; Skelt, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    In some aspects of the invention, a method of generating a beam of acoustic energy in a borehole is disclosed. The method includes generating a first acoustic wave at a first frequency; generating a second acoustic wave at a second frequency different than the first frequency, wherein the first acoustic wave and second acoustic wave are generated by at least one transducer carried by a tool located within the borehole; transmitting the first and the second acoustic waves into an acoustically non-linear medium, wherein the composition of the non-linear medium produces a collimated beam by a non-linear mixing of the first and second acoustic waves, wherein the collimated beam has a frequency based upon a difference between the first frequency and the second frequency; and transmitting the collimated beam through a diverging acoustic lens to compensate for a refractive effect caused by the curvature of the borehole.

  3. Acoustic Simulation COMP 768 Presentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Ming C.

    ) · Variation of pressure governed by Helmholtz's Acoustic Wave Equation (a PDE) · Use a numerical method;Auralization 7[Funkhouser03] #12;Acoustic Phenomena · In reality, sound waves exhibit: ­ Reflection (specular · Statistical Acoustics · Hybrid Acoustics 10 #12;Numerical Simulation · Sound modeled as pressure waves: P(x, t

  4. Acoustic cooling engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hofler, Thomas J. (Los Alamos, NM); Wheatley, John C. (Los Alamos, NM); Swift, Gregory W. (Santa Fe, NM); Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM)

    1988-01-01

    An acoustic cooling engine with improved thermal performance and reduced internal losses comprises a compressible fluid contained in a resonant pressure vessel. The fluid has a substantial thermal expansion coefficient and is capable of supporting an acoustic standing wave. A thermodynamic element has first and second ends and is located in the resonant pressure vessel in thermal communication with the fluid. The thermal response of the thermodynamic element to the acoustic standing wave pumps heat from the second end to the first end. The thermodynamic element permits substantial flow of the fluid through the thermodynamic element. An acoustic driver cyclically drives the fluid with an acoustic standing wave. The driver is at a location of maximum acoustic impedance in the resonant pressure vessel and proximate the first end of the thermodynamic element. A hot heat exchanger is adjacent to and in thermal communication with the first end of the thermodynamic element. The hot heat exchanger conducts heat from the first end to portions of the resonant pressure vessel proximate the hot heat exchanger. The hot heat exchanger permits substantial flow of the fluid through the hot heat exchanger. The resonant pressure vessel can include a housing less than one quarter wavelength in length coupled to a reservoir. The housing can include a reduced diameter portion communicating with the reservoir. The frequency of the acoustic driver can be continuously controlled so as to maintain resonance.

  5. Acoustic well cleaner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maki, Jr., Voldi E. (11904 Bell Ave., Austin, TX 78759-2415); Sharma, Mukul M. (Dept. of Petroleum Engr. Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX 78712)

    1997-01-21

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for cleaning the wellbore and the near wellbore region. A sonde is provided which is adapted to be lowered into a borehole and which includes a plurality of acoustic transducers arranged around the sonde. Electrical power provided by a cable is converted to acoustic energy. The high intensity acoustic energy directed to the borehole wall and into the near wellbore region, redissolves or resuspends the material which is reducing the permeability of the formation and/or restricting flow in the wellbore.

  6. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium. 2 figs.

  7. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wheatley, John C. (Los Alamos, NM); Swift, Gregory W. (Los Alamos, NM); Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM)

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium.

  8. Effects of tone on the three-way laryngeal distinction in Korean: An acoustic and aerodynamic comparison of the Seoul and South Kyungsang dialects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hyunjung; Jongman, Allard

    2012-08-01

    The three-way laryngeal distinction among voiceless Korean stops has been well documented for the Seoul dialect. The present study compares the acoustic and aerodynamic properties of this stop series between two dialects, non-tonal Seoul and tonal...

  9. Experimental determination of the effective strong coupling constant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexandre Deur; Volker Burkert; Jian-Ping Chen; Wolfgang Korsch

    2005-09-15

    We extract an effective strong coupling constant from low Q2 data on the Bjorken sum. Using sum rules, we establish its Q2-behavior over the complete Q2-range. The result is compared to effective coupling constants extracted from different processes and to calculations based on Schwinger-Dyson equations, hadron spectroscopy or lattice QCD. Although the connection between the experimentally extracted effective coupling constant and the calculations is not clear, the results agree surprisingly well.

  10. A determination of the effective thickness of a liquid deuterium target for a quasielastic scattering experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turkewitz, Jared Ripley

    2010-01-01

    The effective thickness of a liquid deuterium target was determined by measuring the yield of the neutron-deuteron elastic scattering cross section. The flux of incident neutrons was determined by a fission ionization ...

  11. Anisotropic and Negative Acoustic Index Metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fok, Lee Ren

    2010-01-01

    the standard wave equation, conventional acoustic imaging isdifferential equations for EM and acoustic waves can bemagnetic field. Equation 1.5 describes fluid acoustic waves

  12. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, G.A.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a compact acoustic refrigeration system that actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment.

  13. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Gloria A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1992-01-01

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits (22), in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine (12, 14) includes first thermodynamic elements (12) for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator (16, 26, 28) includes second thermodynamic elements (16) located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements (16) and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements (16). A resonator volume (18) cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16), first heat pipes (24, 26) transfer heat from the heat load (22) to the second thermodynamic elements (16) and second heat pipes (28, 32) transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to the borehole environment.

  14. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, G.A.

    1992-11-24

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment. 18 figs.

  15. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 88, 024303 (2013) Tunable active acoustic metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummer, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    PHYSICAL REVIEW B 88, 024303 (2013) Tunable active acoustic metamaterials Bogdan-Ioan Popa,* Lucian July 2013) We describe and demonstrate an architecture for active acoustic metamaterials whose types of unit cells that generate metamaterials in which either the effective density or bulk modulus

  16. Multiple Simultaneous Acoustic Source Localization in Urban Terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maróti, Miklós

    acoustic sources, eliminate multipath effects, tolerate multiple sensor failures while providing good civilian infrastructure (power and communication network), and robustness against node failures. Figure 1. depicts the acoustic events generated by a typical rifle shot. The muzzle blast produces a spherical wave

  17. Acoustic correlates of word stress in American English

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Okobi, Anthony O. (Anthony Obiesie), 1976-

    2006-01-01

    Acoustic parameters that differentiate between primary stress and non-primary full vowels were determined using two-syllable real and novel words and specially constructed novel words with identical syllable compositions. ...

  18. Signal processing for fiber optic acoustic sensor system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Juhong

    2000-01-01

    pulses from a single mode laser. Signals from multiple sensors in the array are separated and demultiplexed. The acoustic pressure information is determined by processing the returned optical pulses using a fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer as an optical...

  19. Acoustic Behavior of Flow From Fracture To Wellbore 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Kyle

    2015-04-23

    Acoustic sensing technology has a long history of being implemented in the oil and gas industry; from the early days of measuring seismic activity to determine oil and gas reserve to the present day technology such as fiber optic Distributed...

  20. Creating and studying ion acoustic waves in ultracold neutral plasmasa) T. C. Killian,1,b)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    Creating and studying ion acoustic waves in ultracold neutral plasmasa) T. C. Killian,1,b) P. Mc online 23 March 2012) We excite ion acoustic waves in ultracold neutral plasmas by imprinting density of IAWs in UNPs, including the effects of strong coupling, was published16 and ion-acoustic shock waves

  1. Acoustic modeling of perforated plates with bias flow for Large-Eddy Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendez, Simon

    Acoustic modeling of perforated plates with bias flow for Large-Eddy Simulations S. Mendez a,, J. D of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA. Abstract The study of the acoustic effect of perforated to provide data on the flow around a perforated plate and the associated acoustic damping is demonstrated

  2. Quantum Acoustics with Surface Acoustic Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Aref; Per Delsing; Maria K. Ekström; Anton Frisk Kockum; Martin V. Gustafsson; Göran Johansson; Peter Leek; Einar Magnusson; Riccardo Manenti

    2015-06-04

    It has recently been demonstrated that surface acoustic waves (SAWs) can interact with superconducting qubits at the quantum level. SAW resonators in the GHz frequency range have also been found to have low loss at temperatures compatible with superconducting quantum circuits. These advances open up new possibilities to use the phonon degree of freedom to carry quantum information. In this paper, we give a description of the basic SAW components needed to develop quantum circuits, where propagating or localized SAW-phonons are used both to study basic physics and to manipulate quantum information. Using phonons instead of photons offers new possibilities which make these quantum acoustic circuits very interesting. We discuss general considerations for SAW experiments at the quantum level and describe experiments both with SAW resonators and with interaction between SAWs and a qubit. We also discuss several potential future developments.

  3. Dual excitation acoustic paramagnetic logging tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vail, W.B. III.

    1989-02-14

    New methods and apparatus are disclosed which allow measurement of the presence of oil and water in geological formations using a new physical effect called the Acoustic Paramagnetic Logging Effect (APLE). The presence of petroleum in formation causes a slight increase in the earth's magnetic field in the vicinity of the reservoir. This is the phenomena of paramagnetism. Application of an acoustic source to a geological formation at the Larmor frequency of the nucleons present causes the paramagnetism of the formation to disappear. This results in a decrease in the earth's magnetic field in the vicinity of the oil bearing formation. Repetitively frequency sweeping the acoustic source through the Larmor frequency of the nucleons present (approx. 2 kHz) causes an amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field which is a consequence of the APLE. The amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field is measured with an induction coil gradiometer and provides a direct measure of the amount of oil and water in the excitation zone of the formation. The phase of the signal is used to infer the longitudinal relaxation times of the fluids present, which results in the ability in general to separate oil and water and to measure the viscosity of the oil present. Such measurements may be performed in open boreholes and in cased well bores. The Dual Excitation Acoustic Paramagnetic Logging Tool employing two acoustic sources is also described. 6 figs.

  4. Dual excitation acoustic paramagnetic logging tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vail, III, William B. (Bothell, WA)

    1989-01-01

    New methods and apparatus are disclosed which allow measurement of the presence of oil and water in gelogical formations using a new physical effect called the Acoustic Paramagnetic Logging Effect (APLE). The presence of petroleum in formation causes a slight increase in the earth's magnetic field in the vicinity of the reservoir. This is the phenomena of paramagnetism. Application of an acoustic source to a geological formation at the Larmor frequency of the nucleous present causes the paramagnetism of the formation to disappear. This results in a decrease in the earth's magnetic field in the vicinity of the oil bearing formation. Repetitively frequency sweeping the acoustic source through the Larmor frequency of the nucleons present (approx. 2 kHz) causes an amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field which is a consequence of the APLE. The amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field is measured with an induction coil gradiometer and provides a direct measure of the amount of oil and water in the excitation zone of the formation. The phase of the signal is used to infer the longitudinal relaxation times of the fluids present, which results in the ability in general to separate oil and water and to measure the viscosity of the oil present. Such measurements may be preformed in open boreholes and in cased well bores. The Dual Excitation Acoustic Paramagnetic Logging Tool employing two acoustic sources is also described.

  5. Acoustic Kappa-Density Fluctuation Waves in Suprathermal Kappa Function Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael R. Collier; Aaron Roberts; Adolfo Vinas

    2007-10-20

    We describe a new wave mode similar to the acoustic wave in which both density and velocity fluctuate. Unlike the acoustic wave in which the underlying distribution is Maxwellian, this new wave mode occurs when the underlying distribution is a suprathermal kappa function and involves fluctuations in the power law index, kappa. This wave mode always propagates faster than the acoustic wave with an equivalent effective temperature and becomes the acoustic wave in the Maxwellian limit as kappa goes to infinity.

  6. The Effects of Irradiance in Determining the Vertical Distribution of Elk Kelp Pelagophycus porra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fejtek, Stacie Michelle

    2008-01-01

    microscopic stages to higher irradiances appears to be theH. (1996). “Effect of high irradiance on recruitment of theTHESIS The Effects of Irradiance in Determining the Vertical

  7. THE ACOUSTIC CUTOFF FREQUENCY OF THE SUN AND THE SOLAR MAGNETIC ACTIVITY CYCLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jimenez, A.; Palle, P. L.; Garcia, R. A.

    2011-12-20

    The acoustic cutoff frequency-the highest frequency for acoustic solar eigenmodes-is an important parameter of the solar atmosphere as it determines the upper boundary of the p-mode resonant cavities. At frequencies beyond this value, acoustic disturbances are no longer trapped but are traveling waves. Interference among them gives rise to higher-frequency peaks-the pseudomodes-in the solar acoustic spectrum. The pseudomodes are shifted slightly in frequency with respect to p-modes, making possible the use of pseudomodes to determine the acoustic cutoff frequency. Using data from the GOLF and VIRGO instruments on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory spacecraft, we calculate the acoustic cutoff frequency using the coherence function between both the velocity and intensity sets of data. By using data gathered by these instruments during the entire lifetime of the mission (1996 until the present), a variation in the acoustic cutoff frequency with the solar magnetic activity cycle is found.

  8. Effective heritability of targets of sex-ratio selection under environmental sex determination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janzen, Fredric

    Effective heritability of targets of sex-ratio selection under environmental sex determination S. E, 2008; Robinson et al., 2009). In many organisms, sex of the offspring is determined by environmental-by-environment interaction; nest-site choice; phenotypic plasticity; sex ratio; temperature-dependent sex determination

  9. Acoustic subwavelength imaging of subsurface objects with acoustic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    liuxiaojun@nju.edu.cn 1 ; State Key Laboratory of Acoustics, Institute of Acoustics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 2 ; Zhou, Chen ; Wei, Qi ; Wu, DaJian 1 +...

  10. EFFECTIVE MATERIALS PROPERTIES: DETERMINATION AND APPLICATION IN MECHANICAL DESIGN AND OPTIMIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    EFFECTIVE MATERIALS PROPERTIES: DETERMINATION AND APPLICATION IN MECHANICAL DESIGN AND OPTIMIZATION M. Grujicic, G. Cao and G. M. Fadel Department of Mechanical Engineering Program in Materials for determination of effective mechanical, thermal and thermo-mechanical properties of multi-phase materials

  11. Centrifugal-Barrier Effects and Determination of the Interaction Radius

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ning Wu

    2013-05-21

    The interaction radius of a resonance is an important physical quantity to describe the structure of a resonance. But, for a long time, physicists do not find a reliable way to measure the magnitude of the interaction radius of a resonance. In this paper, a method is proposed to measure the interaction radius in physics analysis. It is found that the centrifugal barrier effects have great influence to physical results obtained in the PWA fit, and the interaction radius of some resonances can be well measured in the fit.

  12. Acoustic metafluids made from three acoustic fluids Andrew N. Norrisa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norris, Andrew

    . It was subsequently demonstrated that the same methods should work for the acoustic wave equation.3,4 The acoustic by the possibility of acoustic cloaking. The first electromag- netic wave cloaking device2 uses transformation of coordi- nates in the governing wave equation to steer energy around the cloaked object

  13. The Acoustic Oceanographic Buoy A Light Acoustic Data Acquisition System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jesus, Sérgio M.

    The Acoustic Oceanographic Buoy A Light Acoustic Data Acquisition System Cristiano Soares Sea Trials Description Conclusion and Acknowledgements Introduction The Acoustic Oceanographic Buoy transmission. · Surface buoy with small dimensions (1.2m body plus 1.8m mast) and weight (45kg). · A vertical

  14. Laser and acoustic lens for lithotripsy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Visuri, Steven R. (Livermore, CA); Makarewicz, Anthony J. (San Ramon, CA); London, Richard A. (Orinda, CA); Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter (Pleasanton, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2002-01-01

    An acoustic focusing device whose acoustic waves are generated by laser radiation through an optical fiber. The acoustic energy is capable of efficient destruction of renal and biliary calculi and deliverable to the site of the calculi via an endoscopic procedure. The device includes a transducer tip attached to the distal end of an optical fiber through which laser energy is directed. The transducer tip encapsulates an exogenous absorbing dye. Under proper irradiation conditions (high absorbed energy density, short pulse duration) a stress wave is produced via thermoelastic expansion of the absorber for the destruction of the calculi. The transducer tip can be configured into an acoustic lens such that the transmitted acoustic wave is shaped or focused. Also, compressive stress waves can be reflected off a high density/low density interface to invert the compressive wave into a tensile stress wave, and tensile stresses may be more effective in some instances in disrupting material as most materials are weaker in tension than compression. Estimations indicate that stress amplitudes provided by this device can be magnified more than 100 times, greatly improving the efficiency of optical energy for targeted material destruction.

  15. Acoustic emission intrusion detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carver, Donald W. (Knoxville, TN); Whittaker, Jerry W. (Knoxville, TN)

    1980-01-01

    An intrusion detector is provided for detecting a forcible entry into a secured structure while minimizing false alarms. The detector uses a piezoelectric crystal transducer to sense acoustic emissions. The transducer output is amplified by a selectable gain amplifier to control the sensitivity. The rectified output of the amplifier is applied to a Schmitt trigger circuit having a preselected threshold level to provide amplitude discrimination. Timing circuitry is provided which is activated by successive pulses from the Schmitt trigger which lie within a selected time frame for frequency discrimination. Detected signals having proper amplitude and frequency trigger an alarm within the first complete cycle time of a detected acoustical disturbance signal.

  16. Generation of Sound Bullets with a Nonlinear Acoustic Lens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandro Spadoni; Chiara Daraio

    2009-08-31

    Acoustic lenses are employed in a variety of applications, from biomedical imaging and surgery, to defense systems, but their performance is limited by their linear operational envelope and complexity. Here we show a dramatic focusing effect and the generation of large amplitude, compact acoustic pulses (sound bullets) in solid and fluid media, enabled by a tunable, highly nonlinear acoustic lens. The lens consists of ordered arrays of granular chains. The amplitude, size and location of the sound bullets can be controlled by varying static pre-compression on the chains. We support our findings with theory, numerical simulations, and corroborate the results experimentally with photoelasticity measurements. Our nonlinear lens makes possible a qualitatively new way of generating high-energy acoustic pulses, enabling, for example, surgical control of acoustic energy.

  17. Optimization of Concurrent Deployments of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System and Other Hydroacoustic Equipment at John Day Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Khan, Fenton; Kim, Jina; Lamarche, Brian L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Choi, Eric Y.; Faber, Derrek M.; Wilberding, Matthew C.; Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Fischer, Eric S.; Cushing, Aaron W.

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the results of the acoustic optimization study conducted at John Day Dam during January and February 2008. The goal of the study was to optimize performance of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) by determining deployment and data acquisition methods to minimize electrical and acoustic interference from various other acoustic sampling devices. Thereby, this would allow concurrent sampling by active and passive acoustic methods during the formal evaluations of the prototype surface flow outlets at the dam during spring and summer outmigration seasons for juvenile salmonids. The objectives for the optimization study at John Day Dam were to: 1. Design and test prototypes and provide a total needs list of pipes and trolleys to deploy JSATS hydrophones on the forebay face of the powerhouse and spillway. 2. Assess the effect on mean percentage decoded of JSATS transmissions from tags arrayed in the forebay and detected on the hydrophones by comparing: turbine unit OFF vs. ON; spill bay OPEN vs. CLOSED; dual frequency identification sonar (DIDSON) and acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) both OFF vs. ON at a spill bay; and, fixed-aspect hydroacoustic system OFF vs. ON at a turbine unit and a spill bay. 3. Determine the relationship between fixed-aspect hydroacoustic transmit level and mean percentage of JSATS transmissions decoded. The general approach was to use hydrophones to listen for transmissions from JSATS tags deployed in vertical arrays in a series perpendicular to the face of the dam. We used acoustic telemetry equipment manufactured by Technologic and Sonic Concepts. In addition, we assessed old and new JSATS signal detectors and decoders and two different types of hydrophone baffling. The optimization study consisted of a suite of off/on tests. The primary response variable was mean percentage of tag transmissions decoded. We found that there was no appreciable adverse effect on mean percentage decoded for JSATS transmitters from: turbine operations; spillway operations; DIDSON/ADCP acoustic energy; and PAS hydroacoustic systems at transmit level of -12 dB, although there was a significant impact at all higher transmit levels (-11 to -6 dB). The main conclusion from this optimization study is that valid JSATS telemetry data can be collected simultaneously with a DIDSON/ADCP and a PAS hydroacoustic system at transmit level -12 dB. Multiple evaluation tools should be considered to increase the robustness and thoroughness of future fish passage evaluations at John Day and other dams.

  18. Determination of applied stresses in rails using the acoustoelastic effect of ultrasonic waves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gokhale, Shailesh Ashok

    2009-05-15

    This research develops a procedure to determine the applied stresses in rails using the acoustoelastic effect of ultrasonic waves. Acoustoelasticity is defined as the stress dependency of ultrasonic wave speed or wave polarization. Analytical models...

  19. Development of a geothermal acoustic borehole televiewer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heard, F.E.; Bauman, T.J.

    1983-08-01

    Most geothermal wells are drilled in hard rock formations where fluid flow is through systems of open fractures. Productivity of these wells is usually determined by the extent of intersection of the wellbore with the fracture system. A need exists for fracture mapping methods and tools which can operate in a geothermal environment. In less hostile environments, the acoustic borehole televiewer has been shown to be a useful tool for determining location, orientation, and characterization of fractures as they intersect the borehole and for general wellbore and casing inspection. The development conducted at Sandia National Laboratories to adapt an acoustic borehole televiewer for operation in a geothermal environment is described. The modified instrument has been successfully tested at temperatures as high as 280/sup 0/C and pressures up to 5000 psi, and used successfully to map fractures and casing damage in geothermal wells.

  20. Nonlinear characterization of a single-axis acoustic levitator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrade, Marco A. B.; Ramos, Tiago S.; Okina, Fábio T. A.; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2014-04-15

    The nonlinear behavior of a 20.3 kHz single-axis acoustic levitator formed by a Langevin transducer with a concave radiating surface and a concave reflector is experimentally investigated. In this study, a laser Doppler vibrometer is applied to measure the nonlinear sound field in the air gap between the transducer and the reflector. Additionally, an electronic balance is used in the measurement of the acoustic radiation force on the reflector as a function of the distance between the transducer and the reflector. The experimental results show some effects that cannot be described by the linear acoustic theory, such as the jump phenomenon, harmonic generation, and the hysteresis effect. The influence of these nonlinear effects on the acoustic levitation of small particles is discussed.

  1. Improved Bacterial and Viral Recoveries from 'Complex' Samples using Electrophoretically Assisted Acoustic Focusing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ness, K; Rose, K; Jung, B; Fisher, K; Mariella, Jr., R P

    2008-03-27

    Automated front-end sample preparation technologies can significantly enhance the sensitivity and reliability of biodetection assays [1]. We are developing advanced sample preparation technologies for biowarfare detection and medical point-of-care diagnostics using microfluidic systems with continuous sample processing capabilities. Here we report an electrophoretically assisted acoustic focusing technique to rapidly extract and enrich viral and bacterial loads from 'complex samples', applied in this case to human nasopharyngeal samples as well as simplified surrogates. The acoustic forces capture and remove large particles (> 2 {micro}m) such as host cells, debris, dust, and pollen from the sample. We simultaneously apply an electric field transverse to the flow direction to transport small ({le} 2 {micro}m), negatively-charged analytes into a separate purified recovery fluid using a modified H-filter configuration [Micronics US Patent 5,716,852]. Hunter and O'Brien combined transverse electrophoresis and acoustic focusing to measure the surface charge on large particles, [2] but to our knowledge, our work is the first demonstration combining these two techniques in a continuous flow device. Marina et al. demonstrated superimposed dielectrophoresis (DEP) and acoustic focusing for enhanced separations [3], but these devices have limited throughput due to the rapid decay of DEP forces. Both acoustic standing waves and electric fields exert significant forces over the entire fluid volume in microchannels, thus allowing channels with larger dimensions (> 100 {micro}m) and high throughputs (10-100 {micro}L/min) necessary to process real-world volumes (1 mL). Previous work demonstrated acoustic focusing of microbeads [4] and biological species [5] in various geometries. We experimentally characterized our device by determining the biological size-cutoff where acoustic radiation pressure forces no longer transport biological particles. Figure 1 shows images of E.Coli ({approx}1 {micro}m) and yeast ({approx}4-5 {micro}m) flowing in a microchannel (200 {micro}m deep, 500 {micro}m wide) at a flow rate of 10 {micro}L/min. The E.Coli does not focus in the acoustic field while the yeast focuses at the channel centerline. This result suggests the acoustic size-cutoff for biological particles in our device lies between 2 and 3 {micro}m. Transverse electrophoresis has been explored extensively in electric field flow fractionation [6] and isoelectric focusing devices [7]. We demonstrated transverse electrophoretic transport of a wide variety of negatively-charged species, including fluorophores, beads, viruses, E.Coli, and yeast. Figure 2 shows the electromigration of a fluorescently labeled RNA virus (MS2) from the lower half of the channel to the upper half region with continuous flow. We demonstrated the effectiveness of our electrophoretically assisted acoustic focusing device by separating virus-like particles (40 nm fluorescent beads, selected to aid in visualization) from a high background concentration of yeast contaminants (see Figure 3). Our device allows for the efficient recovery of virus into a pre-selected purified buffer while background contaminants are acoustically captured and removed. We also tested the device using clinical nasopharyngeal samples, both washes and lavages, and demonstrated removal of unknown particulates (>2 ?m size) from the sample. Our future research direction includes spiking known amounts of bacteria and viruses into clinical samples and performing quantitative off-chip analysis (real-time PCR and flow cytometry).

  2. Acoustic stabilization of electric arc instabilities in nontransferred plasma torches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rat, V.; Coudert, J. F.

    2010-03-08

    Electric arc instabilities in dc plasma torches lead to nonhomogeneous treatments of nanosized solid particles or liquids injected within thermal plasma jets. This paper shows that an additional acoustic resonator mounted on the cathode cavity allows reaching a significant damping of these instabilities, particularly the Helmholtz mode of arc oscillations. The acoustic resonator is coupled with the Helmholtz resonator of the plasma torch limiting the amplitude of arc voltage variations. It is also highlighted that this damping is dependent on friction effects in the acoustic resonator.

  3. Method and apparatus for sizing and separating warp yarns using acoustical energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheen, Shuh-Haw (Naperville, IL); Chien, Hual-Te (Naperville, IL); Raptis, Apostolos C. (Downers Grove, IL); Kupperman, David S. (Oak Park, IL)

    1998-01-01

    A slashing process for preparing warp yarns for weaving operations including the steps of sizing and/or desizing the yarns in an acoustic resonance box and separating the yarns with a leasing apparatus comprised of a set of acoustically agitated lease rods. The sizing step includes immersing the yarns in a size solution contained in an acoustic resonance box. Acoustic transducers are positioned against the exterior of the box for generating an acoustic pressure field within the size solution. Ultrasonic waves that result from the acoustic pressure field continuously agitate the size solution to effect greater mixing and more uniform application and penetration of the size onto the yarns. The sized yarns are then separated by passing the warp yarns over and under lease rods. Electroacoustic transducers generate acoustic waves along the longitudinal axis of the lease rods, creating a shearing motion on the surface of the rods for splitting the yarns.

  4. The roles of cloud drop effective radius and LWP in determining rain properties in marine stratocumulus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    The roles of cloud drop effective radius and LWP in determining rain properties in marine that adding cloud condensation nuclei to marine stratocumulus can prevent their breakup from closed into open in terms of cloud drop effective radius (re). Rain is initiated when re near cloud top is around 12­14 mm

  5. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ANTENNAS AND PROPAGATION, VOL. 51, NO. 7, JULY 2003 1499 Acoustic and Electromagnetic Wave Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarabandi, Kamal

    and Electromagnetic Wave Interaction: Estimation of Doppler Spectrum From an Acoustically Vibrated Metallic Circular spectrum could provide an effective means of buried object identification, where acoustic waves are used being mechanically vibrated by an incident acoustic wave. If the buried objects have unique

  6. Analytical integration of the moments in the diagonal form fast multipole boundary element method for 3-D acoustic wave problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yijun

    : Received 26 February 2011 Accepted 28 July 2011 Keywords: 3-D acoustic wave problems Helmholtz equation acoustic wave problems based on the Burton­Miller boundary integral equation (BIE) formulation. Analytical integral equation (BIE) formulation can be used to analyze acoustic wave problems effectively

  7. Nonlinear propagation and control of acoustic waves in phononic superlattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiménez, Noé; Picó, Rubén; García-Raffi, Lluís M; Sánchez-Morcillo, Víctor J

    2015-01-01

    The propagation of intense acoustic waves in a one-dimensional phononic crystal is studied. The medium consists in a structured fluid, formed by a periodic array of fluid layers with alternating linear acoustic properties and quadratic nonlinearity coefficient. The spacing between layers is of the order of the wavelength, therefore Bragg effects such as band-gaps appear. We show that the interplay between strong dispersion and nonlinearity leads to new scenarios of wave propagation. The classical waveform distortion process typical of intense acoustic waves in homogeneous media can be strongly altered when nonlinearly generated harmonics lie inside or close to band gaps. This allows the possibility of engineer a medium in order to get a particular waveform. Examples of this include the design of media with effective (e.g. cubic) nonlinearities, or extremely linear media (where distortion can be cancelled). The presented ideas open a way towards the control of acoustic wave propagation in nonlinear regime.

  8. Guided acoustic wave inspection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chinn, Diane J.

    2004-10-05

    A system for inspecting a conduit for undesirable characteristics. A transducer system induces guided acoustic waves onto said conduit. The transducer system detects the undesirable characteristics of the conduit by receiving guided acoustic waves that contain information about the undesirable characteristics. The conduit has at least two sides and the transducer system utilizes flexural modes of propagation to provide inspection using access from only the one side of the conduit. Cracking is detected with pulse-echo testing using one transducer to both send and receive the guided acoustic waves. Thinning is detected in through-transmission testing where one transducer sends and another transducer receives the guided acoustic waves.

  9. Truck acoustic data analyzer system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haynes, Howard D.; Akerman, Alfred; Ayers, Curtis W.

    2006-07-04

    A passive vehicle acoustic data analyzer system having at least one microphone disposed in the acoustic field of a moving vehicle and a computer in electronic communication the microphone(s). The computer detects and measures the frequency shift in the acoustic signature emitted by the vehicle as it approaches and passes the microphone(s). The acoustic signature of a truck driving by a microphone can provide enough information to estimate the truck speed in miles-per-hour (mph), engine speed in rotations-per-minute (RPM), turbocharger speed in RPM, and vehicle weight.

  10. Three-Dimensional Nonlinear Acoustical Holography 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Yaying

    2013-05-06

    nonlinear acoustic holography procedure is derived for reconstructing steady-state acoustic pressure fields by applying perturbation and renormalization methods to nonlinear, dissipative, pressure-based Westervelt Wave Equation (WWE). The nonlinear acoustic...

  11. Acoustic Character Of Hydraulic Fractures In Granite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paillet, Frederick I.

    1983-01-01

    Hydraulic fractures in homogeneous granitic rocks were logged with conventional acoustic-transit-time, acoustic-waveform, and acoustic-televiewer logging systems. Fractured intervals ranged in depth from 45 to 570m. and ...

  12. Multipurpose Acoustic Sensor for Downhole Fluid Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pantea, Cristian

    2012-05-04

    The projects objectives and purpose are to: (1) development a multipurpose acoustic sensor for downhole fluid monitoring in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) reservoirs over typical ranges of pressures and temperatures and demonstrate its capabilities and performance for different EGS systems; (2) determine in real-time and in a single sensor package several parameters - temperature, pressure, fluid flow and fluid properties; (3) needed in nearly every phase of an EGS project, including Testing of Injection and Production Wells, Reservoir Validation, Inter-well Connectivity, Reservoir Scale Up and Reservoir Sustainability. (4) Current sensors are limited to operating at lower temperatures, but the need is for logging at high temperatures. The present project deals with the development of a novel acoustic-based sensor that can work at temperatures up to 374 C, in inhospitable environments.

  13. An injectable acoustic transmitter for juvenile salmon

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Li, Huidong; Xiao, Jie; Myjak, Mitchell J.; Lu, Jun; Martinez, Jayson J.; Woodley, Christa M.; Weiland, Mark A.; Eppard, Matthew B.

    2015-01-29

    Salmon recovery, and the potential detrimental effects of dams on fish, has been attracting national attention in due to great environmental and economic implications. Acoustic Telemetry has been the primary method for studying salmon passage. However, the size of the existing transmitters limits the minimum size of fish that can be studied, introducing bias to the study results. We developed the first acoustic fish transmitter that can be implanted by injection instead of surgery. The new injectable transmitter offers improved performance and 30% weight reduction. Because the new transmitter costs significantly less to use, substantially reduces adverse effects of implantation,more »and provides additional biological benefits for tagged fish, it will become the enabling technology for studying migration behavior and survival of species and sizes of fish that have never been studied before. This will lead to critical information for salmon recovery and the development of fish-friendly hydroelectric systems.« less

  14. Anisotropic and Negative Acoustic Index Metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fok, Lee Ren

    2010-01-01

    density and acoustic metamaterials. Physica B 394, 256 (resonant acoustic metamaterials. Phys. Rev. B 76, 144302 (celestial mechanics in metamaterials. Nat. Phys. 5, 687 (

  15. Investigation and Analytical Description of Acoustic Production...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Investigation and Analytical Description of Acoustic Production by Magneto-Acoustic Mixing Technology Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become...

  16. Acoustic evidence of airway opening during recruitment in excised dog lungs Z. Hantos,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alencar, Adriano Mesquita

    Acoustic evidence of airway opening during recruitment in excised dog lungs Z. Hantos,1 J. Tolnai,1. Majumdar, and B. Suki. Acoustic evidence of airway opening during recruitment in excised dog lungs. J Appl-volume curve in the normal lung are primarily determined by airway reopen- ings via avalanches rather than

  17. Systems and methods of monitoring acoustic pressure to detect a flame condition in a gas turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ziminsky, Willy Steve (Simpsonville, SC); Krull, Anthony Wayne (Anderson, SC); Healy, Timothy Andrew (Simpsonville, SC), Yilmaz, Ertan (Glenville, NY)

    2011-05-17

    A method may detect a flashback condition in a fuel nozzle of a combustor. The method may include obtaining a current acoustic pressure signal from the combustor, analyzing the current acoustic pressure signal to determine current operating frequency information for the combustor, and indicating that the flashback condition exists based at least in part on the current operating frequency information.

  18. The electron geodesic acoustic mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakrabarti, N. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Calcutta 700 064 (India); Guzdar, P. N. [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Kaw, P. K. [Institute for Plasma Research Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2012-09-15

    In this report, a novel new mode, named the electron geodesic acoustic mode, is presented. This mode can occur in toroidal plasmas like the conventional geodesic acoustic mode (GAM). The frequency of this new mode is much larger than that of the conventional GAM by a factor equal to the square root of the ion to electron mass ratio.

  19. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Collins, H.D.; Busse, L.J.; Lemon, D.K.

    1983-10-25

    This device relates to the concept of and means for performing Acoustic Emission Linear Pulse Holography, which combines the advantages of linear holographic imaging and Acoustic Emission into a single non-destructive inspection system. This unique system produces a chronological, linear holographic image of a flaw by utilizing the acoustic energy emitted during crack growth. The innovation is the concept of utilizing the crack-generated acoustic emission energy to generate a chronological series of images of a growing crack by applying linear, pulse holographic processing to the acoustic emission data. The process is implemented by placing on a structure an array of piezoelectric sensors (typically 16 or 32 of them) near the defect location. A reference sensor is placed between the defect and the array.

  20. Effect of water washing on oxalic acid content of various fodders and its determination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Effect of water washing on oxalic acid content of various fodders and its determination A Kumar CS that high oxalic acid content, producing oxalate toxicity and interfering with the calcium metabolism, reduces milk yield. If these fodders are washed with water, soluble oxalates are released up to a safe

  1. Effects of Shear Rate on Propagation of Blood Clotting Determined Using Microfluidics and Numerical Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    Effects of Shear Rate on Propagation of Blood Clotting Determined Using Microfluidics and Numerical-ismagilov@uchicago.edu Abstract: This paper describes microfluidic experiments with human blood plasma and numerical simulations removed. In addition, these results demonstrate the utility of simplified mechanisms and microfluidics

  2. How Hurricane Attributes Determine the Extent of Environmental Effects: Multiple Hurricanes and Different Coastal Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    How Hurricane Attributes Determine the Extent of Environmental Effects: Multiple Hurricanes Program, 1926 Victoria Avenue, Fort Myers, Florida 33901 ABSTRACT: The most recent spate of hurricanes characteristics of hurricanes interact with human land use to lead to various types and degrees of environmental

  3. Opto-acoustic thrombolysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Celliers, Peter (Berkeley, CA); Da Silva, Luiz (Danville, CA); Glinsky, Michael (Livermore, CA); London, Richard (Orinda, CA); Maitland, Duncan (Livermore, CA); Matthews, Dennis (Moss Beach, CA); Fitch, Pat (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01

    This invention is a catheter-based device for generating an ultrasound excitation in biological tissue. Pulsed laser light is guided through an optical fiber to provide the energy for producing the acoustic vibrations. The optical energy is deposited in a water-based absorbing fluid, e.g. saline, thrombolytic agent, blood or thrombus, and generates an acoustic impulse in the fluid through thermoelastic and/or thermodynamic mechanisms. By pulsing the laser at a repetition rate (which may vary from 10 Hz to 100 kHz) an ultrasonic radiation field can be established locally in the medium. This method of producing ultrasonic vibrations can be used in vivo for the treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans, particularly for dissolving thrombus or treating vasospasm. The catheter can also incorporate thrombolytic drug treatments as an adjunct therapy and it can be operated in conjunction with ultrasonic detection equipment for imaging and feedback control and with optical sensors for characterization of thrombus type and consistency.

  4. Pulse combusted acoustic agglomeration apparatus and process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mansour, Momtaz N. (Columbia, MD); Chandran, Ravi (Ellicott City, MD)

    1994-01-01

    An improved apparatus and process for removal of particulates entrained in a gas stream are provided. The removal process employs a pulse combustor to provide an acoustic pressure wave to acoustically enhance agglomeration of particulates which may be collected and removed using a conventional separation apparatus. The apparatus may be employed as a direct fired system for improved operation of gas-operated equipment such as a gas turbine, or may, alternatively, be employed as an add-on subsystem for combustion exhaust clean-up. Additionally, added particulates may include a sorbent for effecting sorption of other contaminants such as sulfur. Various other particulates for contaminant removal may also be introduced into the system as exemplified by alkali-gettering agents.

  5. Pulse combusted acoustic agglomeration apparatus and process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mansour, Momtaz N. (Columbia, MD)

    1993-01-01

    An improved apparatus and process for removal of particulates entrained in a gas stream are provided. The removal process employs a pulse combustor to provide an acoustic pressure wave to acoustically enhance bimodal agglomeration of particulates which may be collected and removed using a conventional separation apparatus. A particulate having a size different from the size of the particulate in the gas stream to be cleaned is introduced into the system to effectuate the bimodal process. The apparatus may be employed as a direct fired system for improved operation of gas-operated equipment such as a gas turbine, or may, alternatively, be employed as an add-on subsystem for combustion exhaust clean-up. Additionally, the added particulate may be a sorbent for effecting sorption of other contaminants such as sulfur. Various other particulates for contaminant removal may also be introduced into the system as exemplified by alkali-gettering agents.

  6. Temperature dependence of bulk viscosity in water using acoustic spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. J. Holmes; N. G. Parker; M. J. W. Povey

    2010-02-16

    Despite its fundamental role in the dynamics of compressible fluids, bulk viscosity has received little experimental attention and there remains a paucity of measured data. Acoustic spectroscopy provides a robust and accurate approach to measuring this parameter. Working from the Navier-Stokes model of a compressible fluid one can show that the bulk viscosity makes a significant and measurable contribution to the frequency-squared acoustic attenuation. Here we employ this methodology to determine the bulk viscosity of Millipore water over a temperature range of 7 to 50 degrees Celsius. The measured attenuation spectra are consistent with the theoretical predictions, while the bulk viscosity of water is found to be approximately three times larger than its shear counterpart, reinforcing its significance in acoustic propagation. Moreover, our results demonstrate that this technique can be readily and generally applied to fluids to accurately determine their temperature dependent bulk viscosities.

  7. Computational dynamics of acoustically-driven microsphere systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glosser, Connor A; Dault, Daniel L; Piermarocchi, Carlo; Shanker, Balasubramaniam

    2015-01-01

    We propose a computational framework for the self-consistent dynamics of a microsphere system driven by a pulsed acoustic field in an ideal fluid. Our framework combines a molecular dynamics integrator describing the dynamics of the microsphere system with a time-dependent integral equation solver for the acoustic field that makes use of fields represented as surface expansions in spherical harmonic basis functions. The presented approach allows us to describe the inter-particle interaction induced by the field as well as the dynamics of trapping in counter-propagating acoustic pulses. The integral equation formulation leads to equations of motion for the microspheres describing the effect of non-dissipative drag forces. We show (1) that the field-induced interactions between the microspheres give rise to effective dipolar interactions, with effective dipoles defined by their velocities, and (2) that the dominant effect of an ultrasound pulse through a cloud of microspheres gives rise mainly to a translation ...

  8. Effect of trapped electron on the dust ion acoustic waves in dusty plasma using time fractional modified Korteweg-de Vries equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nazari-Golshan, A.; Nourazar, S. S.; Department of Mechanical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran

    2013-10-15

    The time fractional modified Korteweg-de Vries (TFMKdV) equation is solved to study the nonlinear propagation of small but finite amplitude dust ion-acoustic (DIA) solitary waves in un-magnetized dusty plasma with trapped electrons. The plasma is composed of a cold ion fluid, stationary dust grains, and hot electrons obeying a trapped electron distribution. The TFMKdV equation is derived by using the semi-inverse and Agrawal's methods and then solved by the Laplace Adomian decomposition method. Our results show that the amplitude of the DIA solitary waves increases with the increase of time fractional order ?, the wave velocity v{sub 0}, and the population of the background free electrons ?. However, it is vice-versa for the deviation from isothermality parameter b, which is in agreement with the result obtained previously.

  9. Multi-scale Modeling Approach to Acoustic Emission during Plastic Deformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jagadish Kumar; G. Ananthakrishna

    2011-02-20

    We address the long standing problem of the origin of acoustic emission commonly observed during plastic deformation. We propose a frame-work to deal with the widely separated time scales of collective dislocation dynamics and elastic degrees of freedom to explain the nature of acoustic emission observed during the Portevin-Le Chatelier effect. The Ananthakrishna model is used as it explains most generic features of the phenomenon. Our results show that while acoustic emission bursts correlated with stress drops are well separated for the type C serrations, these bursts merge to form nearly continuous acoustic signals with overriding bursts for the propagating type A bands.

  10. Experimental Investigation of Mass Sensing With Surface Acoustic Wave Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Frank Dickinson

    2010-01-01

    Colin, “1927- Surface acoustic wave devices for mobile andColin, “1927- Surface acoustic wave devices and their signalhorizontal surface acoustic waves (SH-SAW) sensor. Figure 9.

  11. Acoustic characteristics of English fricatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jongman, Allard; Wayland, Ratree; Wong, Serena

    2000-09-01

    This study constitutes a large-scale comparative analysis of acoustic cues for classification of place of articulation in fricatives. To date, no single metric has been found to classify fricative place of articulation with a high degree of accuracy...

  12. Transport Theory for Acoustic Waves with Reflection and Transmission at Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bal, Guillaume

    Transport Theory for Acoustic Waves with Reflection and Transmission at Interfaces Guillaume Bal systematically transport theoretic boundary conditions for acoustic wave reflection and transmission from a rough to energy transport in the high frequency limit and cal­ culate, in addition, the effect of the random rough

  13. Computationally efficient parabolic equation solutions to seismo-acoustic problems involving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Computationally efficient parabolic equation solutions to seismo-acoustic problems involving thin converged solutions. In this paper, a seismo-acoustic parabolic equation solution is derived utilizing require finer grids to fully sample effects due to elasticity within the layer. As shear wave speeds

  14. Quantum-corrected finite entropy of noncommutative acoustic black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. A. Anacleto; F. A. Brito; G. C. Luna; E. Passos; J. Spinelly

    2015-01-31

    In this paper we consider the generalized uncertainty principle in the tunneling formalism via Hamilton-Jacobi method to determine the quantum-corrected Hawking temperature and entropy for 2+1-dimensional noncommutative acoustic black holes. In our results we obtain an area entropy, a correction logarithmic in leading order, a correction term in subleading order proportional to the radiation temperature associated with the noncommutative acoustic black holes and an extra term that depends on a conserved charge. Thus, as in the gravitational case, there is no need to introduce the ultraviolet cut-off and divergences are eliminated.

  15. Quantum-corrected finite entropy of noncommutative acoustic black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anacleto, M A; Luna, G C; Passos, E; Spinelly, J

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we consider the generalized uncertainty principle in the tunneling formalism via Hamilton-Jacobi method to determine the quantum-corrected Hawking temperature and entropy for 2+1-dimensional noncommutative acoustic black holes. In our results we obtain an area entropy, a correction logarithmic in leading order, a correction term in subleading order proportional to the radiation temperature associated with the noncommutative acoustic black holes and an extra term that depends on a conserved charge. Thus, as in the gravitational case, there is no need to introduce the ultraviolet cut-off and divergences are eliminated.

  16. Auto-acoustic compaction in steady shear flows: experimental evidence for the suppression of shear dilatancy by internal acoustic vibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van der Elst, Nicholas J; Brodsky, Emily E; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Johnson, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    by internal acoustic vibration Nicholas J. van der Elst, 1by internal acoustic vibration, J. Geophys. Res. , 117,generated acoustic vibration. By examining the response to

  17. The role of estrogen in turtle sex determination and the effect of PCBs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crews, D.; Bergeron, J.M. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); McLachlan, J.A. [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Gonadal sex is fixed at fertilization by specific chromosomes, a process known as genotypic sex determination (GSD). Only after the gonad is formed do hormones begin to exert an influence that modifies specific structures that eventually will differ between the sexes. Many egg-laying reptiles do not exhibit GSD but rather depend on the temperature of the incubating egg to determine the gonadal sex of the offspring, a process termed temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD). Research on TSD indicates that gonadal sex is not irrevocably set by the genetic composition inherited at fertilization but depends ultimately on which genes encoding for steroidogenic enzymes and hormone receptors are activated during the midtrimester of embryonic development by temperature. Incubation temperature modifies the activity as well as the temporal and spatial sequence of enzymes and hormone receptors to determine gonad type. Estrogen is the physiologic equivalent of incubation temperature and the proximate cue that initiates female sex determination. increasing evidence indicates some polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) compounds are capable of disrupting reproductive and endocrine function in fish, birds, and mammals, including humans. Reproductive disorders resulting from exposure to these xenobiotic compounds may include reductions in fertility, hatch rate in fish and birds, and viability of offspring, as well as alterations in hormone levels or adult sexual behaviors. Research on the mechanism through which these compounds may be acting to alter reproductive function indicates estrogenic activity, by which the compounds may be altering sexual differentiation. In TSD turtles, the estrogenic effect of some PCBs reverses gonadal sex in individuals incubating at an otherwise male-producing temperature. Furthermore, certain PCBs are synergistic in their effect at very low concentrations. 19 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Contour mode resonators with acoustic reflectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olsson, Roy H. (Albuquerque, NM); Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Tuck, Melanie R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-06-10

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) resonator is disclosed which has a linear or ring-shaped acoustic resonator suspended above a substrate by an acoustic reflector. The acoustic resonator can be formed with a piezoelectric material (e.g. aluminum nitride, zinc oxide or PZT), or using an electrostatically-actuated material. The acoustic reflector (also termed an acoustic mirror) uses alternating sections of a relatively low acoustic impedance Z.sub.L material and a relatively high acoustic impedance Z.sub.H material to isolate the acoustic resonator from the substrate. The MEM resonator, which can be formed on a silicon substrate with conventional CMOS circuitry, has applications for forming oscillators, rf filters, and acoustic sensors.

  19. Reflective echo tomographic imaging using acoustic beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kisner, Roger; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J

    2014-11-25

    An inspection system includes a plurality of acoustic beamformers, where each of the plurality of acoustic beamformers including a plurality of acoustic transmitter elements. The system also includes at least one controller configured for causing each of the plurality of acoustic beamformers to generate an acoustic beam directed to a point in a volume of interest during a first time. Based on a reflected wave intensity detected at a plurality of acoustic receiver elements, an image of the volume of interest can be generated.

  20. Systems and methods for biometric identification using the acoustic properties of the ear canal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bouchard, A.M.; Osbourn, G.C.

    1998-07-28

    The present invention teaches systems and methods for verifying or recognizing a person`s identity based on measurements of the acoustic response of the individual`s ear canal. The system comprises an acoustic emission device, which emits an acoustic source signal s(t), designated by a computer, into the ear canal of an individual, and an acoustic response detection device, which detects the acoustic response signal f(t). A computer digitizes the response (detected) signal f(t) and stores the data. Computer-implemented algorithms analyze the response signal f(t) to produce ear-canal feature data. The ear-canal feature data obtained during enrollment is stored on the computer, or some other recording medium, to compare the enrollment data with ear-canal feature data produced in a subsequent access attempt, to determine if the individual has previously been enrolled. The system can also be adapted for remote access applications. 5 figs.

  1. Systems and methods for biometric identification using the acoustic properties of the ear canal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bouchard, Ann Marie (Albuquerque, NM); Osbourn, Gordon Cecil (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention teaches systems and methods for verifying or recognizing a person's identity based on measurements of the acoustic response of the individual's ear canal. The system comprises an acoustic emission device, which emits an acoustic source signal s(t), designated by a computer, into the ear canal of an individual, and an acoustic response detection device, which detects the acoustic response signal f(t). A computer digitizes the response (detected) signal f(t) and stores the data. Computer-implemented algorithms analyze the response signal f(t) to produce ear-canal feature data. The ear-canal feature data obtained during enrollment is stored on the computer, or some other recording medium, to compare the enrollment data with ear-canal feature data produced in a subsequent access attempt, to determine if the individual has previously been enrolled. The system can also be adapted for remote access applications.

  2. Existence domains of slow and fast ion-acoustic solitons in two-ion space plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maharaj, S. K.; Bharuthram, R.; Singh, S. V. Lakhina, G. S.

    2015-03-15

    A study of large amplitude ion-acoustic solitons is conducted for a model composed of cool and hot ions and cool and hot electrons. Using the Sagdeev pseudo-potential formalism, the scope of earlier studies is extended to consider why upper Mach number limitations arise for slow and fast ion-acoustic solitons. Treating all plasma constituents as adiabatic fluids, slow ion-acoustic solitons are limited in the order of increasing cool ion concentrations by the number densities of the cool, and then the hot ions becoming complex valued, followed by positive and then negative potential double layer regions. Only positive potentials are found for fast ion-acoustic solitons which are limited only by the hot ion number density having to remain real valued. The effect of neglecting as opposed to including inertial effects of the hot electrons is found to induce only minor quantitative changes in the existence regions of slow and fast ion-acoustic solitons.

  3. CX-006240: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Acoustic Effects of Hydrokinetic Tidal TurbinesCX(s) Applied: B3.1, B3.3Date: 07/15/2011Location(s): WashingtonOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  4. Elastic interface acoustic waves in twinned crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michel Destrade

    2013-04-30

    A new type of Interface Acoustic Waves (IAW) is presented, for single-crystal orthotropic twins bonded symmetrically along a plane containing only one common crystallographic axis. The effective boundary conditions show that the waves are linearly polarized at the interface, either transversally or longitudinally. Then the secular equation is obtained in full analytical form using new relationships for the displacement-traction quadrivector at the interface. For Gallium Arsenide and for Silicon, it is found that the IAWs with transverse (resp. longitudinal) polarization at the interface are of the Stoneley (resp. leaky) type.

  5. Single Channel Estimation Algorithm for Acoustic OFDM Communication Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, David; Barbieri, Alan; Mitra, Urbashi

    2007-01-01

    for Acoustic OFDM Communication Systems David Lin, Alanultrawideband communication System Hardware Hardwaremultiple-output systems underwater acoustic communication

  6. Acoustic sand detector for fluid flowstreams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beattie, Alan G. (Corrales, NM); Bohon, W. Mark (Frisco, TX)

    1993-01-01

    The particle volume and particle mass production rate of particulate solids entrained in fluid flowstreams such as formation sand or fracture proppant entrained in oil and gas production flowstreams is determined by a system having a metal probe interposed in a flow conduit for transmitting acoustic emissions created by particles impacting the probe to a sensor and signal processing circuit which produces discrete signals related to the impact of each of the particles striking the probe. The volume or mass flow rate of particulates is determined from making an initial particle size distribution and particle energy distribution and comparing the initial energy distribution and/or the initial size distribution with values related to the impact energies of a predetermined number of recorded impacts. The comparison is also used to recalibrate the system to compensate for changes in flow velocity.

  7. The North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory deep-water acoustic propagation experiments in the Philippine Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    The North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory deep-water acoustic propagation experiments in the Philippine in the Philippine Sea during 2009­2011 investigated deep-water acoustic propagation and ambient noise of spanning the water column in the deep ocean. The acoustic transmissions and ambient noise were also

  8. Acoustical Society of America International Student Challenge Problem in Acoustic Signal Processing 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Processing 2014 Student Entry Evaluation Report by the Technical Committee on Signal Processing in Acoustics in Acoustic Signal Processing," Acoustics Today, Volume 10, Issue 2, pp 2629, Spring 2014 (available the opportunity to distinguish themselves by solving a challenging problem in acoustic signal processing

  9. Acoustic vector-sensor array processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kitchens, Jonathan Paul

    2010-01-01

    Existing theory yields useful performance criteria and processing techniques for acoustic pressure-sensor arrays. Acoustic vector-sensor arrays, which measure particle velocity and pressure, offer significant potential but ...

  10. Acoustic data transmission through a drill string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1988-04-21

    Acoustical signals are transmitted through a drill string by canceling upward moving acoustical noise and by preconditioning the data in recognition of the comb filter impedance characteristics of the drill string. 5 figs.

  11. Acoustical Communications for Wireless Downhole Telemetry Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farraj, Abdallah

    2012-08-22

    This dissertation investigates the use of advanced acoustical communication techniques for wireless downhole telemetry systems. Using acoustic waves for downhole telemetry systems is investigated in order to replace the wired communication systems...

  12. Pinniped hearing in a changing acoustic environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cunningham, Kane Alexander

    2015-01-01

    in high-frequency, high-energy marine acoustic technologies—of high-frequency, high-energy marine technologies such asproliferation of high-energy acoustic marine technologies

  13. Mitigation of Acoustic Resonance using Electrically Shunted Loudspeakers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleming, Andrew J.

    motivated a diverse literature on the active control of low-frequency reverberant noise. The field of non the dissipation of acoustic energy. The designed electrical impedance that effectively renders the speaker to an experimental duct system. The paper is concluded in Section 4. E-mail: andrew.fleming@newcastle.edu.au Smart

  14. Passive and Active Acoustics Using an Autonomous Wave Glider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    localization. These tests were performed using commercial off-the-shelf acoustic positioning hardware in, e-mail: bsb@hawaii.edu. wave glider is a wave-propelled unmanned surface vessel (USV to be an effective tool for understanding marine mammals and monitoring ship traffic (as well as a variety

  15. Feasibility of acoustic neutrino detection in ice: First results from the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Böser; C. Bohm; F. Descamps; J. Fischer; A. Hallgren; R. Heller; S. Hundertmark; K. Krieger; R. Nahnhauer; M. Pohl; P. B. Price; K. -H. Sulanke; D. Tosi; J. Vandenbroucke

    2007-08-15

    Astrophysical neutrinos in the EeV range (particularly those generated by the interaction of cosmic rays with the cosmic microwave background) promise to be a valuable tool to study astrophysics and particle physics at the highest energies. Much could be learned from temporal, spectral, and angular distributions of ~100 events, which could be collected by a detector with ~100 km^3 effective volume in a few years. Scaling the optical Cherenkov technique to this scale is prohibitive. However, using the thick ice sheet available at the South Pole, the radio and acoustic techniques promise to provide sufficient sensitivity with sparse instrumentation. The best strategy may be a hybrid approach combining all three techniques. A new array of acoustic transmitters and sensors, the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup, was installed in three IceCube holes in January 2007. The purpose of SPATS is to measure the attenuation length, background noise, and sound speed for 10-100 kHz acoustic waves. Favorable results would pave the way for a large hybrid array. SPATS is the first array to study the possibility of acoustic neutrino detection in ice, the medium expected to be best for the purpose. First results from SPATS are presented.

  16. DIFFUSING ACOUSTIC WAVE TRANSPORT AND SPECTROSCOPY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page, John

    1 Chapter DIFFUSING ACOUSTIC WAVE TRANSPORT AND SPECTROSCOPY J.H. PAGE, M.L. COWAN Dept. of Physics waves, multiple scattering, energy velocity, Diffusing Acoustic Wave Spectroscopy. Abstract the diffusive transport of ultrasonic waves, and then describe a new ultrasonic technique, Diffusing Acoustic

  17. Ronald Edward Kumon NONLINEAR SURFACE ACOUSTIC WAVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Copyright by Ronald Edward Kumon 1999 #12;NONLINEAR SURFACE ACOUSTIC WAVES IN CUBIC CRYSTALS THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN December 1999 #12;NONLINEAR SURFACE ACOUSTIC WAVES IN CUBIC CRYSTALS Approved Zabolotskaya for teaching me the intricacies of nonlinear surface acoustic waves and for their continuing

  18. Research equipment: Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gizeli, Electra

    Research equipment: Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) devices: Operating frequencies @50MHz, 104MHz, 110 outputs measuring the real-time change of the phase and amplitude of the acoustic wave. More specifically with Dissipation monitoring (QCM-D): Qsense D-300 for real-time acoustic measurements at low frequencies (5-35MHz

  19. Localization of Classical Waves I: Acoustic Waves.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Localization of Classical Waves I: Acoustic Waves. Alexander Figotin \\Lambda Department, 1997 Abstract We consider classical acoustic waves in a medium described by a position dependent mass the existence of localized waves, i.e., finite energy solutions of the acoustic equations with the property

  20. Acoustics Beyond the Wave Equation Paul Pereira

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    Acoustics Beyond the Wave Equation Paul Pereira November 20, 2003 #12;2 1 Navier-Stokes Equation). The traditional study of acoustics concerns itself with the linearized equations of fluid mechanics, however. The fundamental equations of Nonlinear Acoustics are those of fluid dynamics, a mathematical description of which

  1. AOB -Acoustic Oceanographic Buoy: concept and feasibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jesus, Sérgio M.

    AOB - Acoustic Oceanographic Buoy: concept and feasibility S.M. Jesus1, C. Soares1, A.J. Silva1, J Spezia, Italy Abstract-- The AOB - Acoustic Oceanographic Buoy is the single node of a network of "smart" buoys for acoustic surveil- lance, Rapid Environmental Assessment (REA) and underwater communications

  2. Methods and apparatus for non-acoustic speech characterization and recognition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holzrichter, John F. (Berkeley, CA)

    1999-01-01

    By simultaneously recording EM wave reflections and acoustic speech information, the positions and velocities of the speech organs as speech is articulated can be defined for each acoustic speech unit. Well defined time frames and feature vectors describing the speech, to the degree required, can be formed. Such feature vectors can uniquely characterize the speech unit being articulated each time frame. The onset of speech, rejection of external noise, vocalized pitch periods, articulator conditions, accurate timing, the identification of the speaker, acoustic speech unit recognition, and organ mechanical parameters can be determined.

  3. Laser-induced acoustic wave generation/propagation/interaction in water in various internal channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    induced plane acoustic wave generation, propagation andinduced acoustic wave generation/propagation/interaction insingle acoustic wave generation, propagation, interaction

  4. Vibrational stark effects to identify ion pairing and determine reduction potentials in electrolyte-free environments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mani, Tomoyasu; Grills, David C.; Miller, John R.

    2015-01-02

    A recently-developed instrument for time-resolved infrared detection following pulse radiolysis has been used to measure the ?(C?N) IR band of the radical anion of a CN-substituted fluorene in tetrahydrofuran. Specific vibrational frequencies can exhibit distinct frequency shifts due to ion-pairing, which can be explained in the framework of the vibrational Stark effect. Measurements of the ratio of free ions and ion-pairs in different electrolyte concentrations allowed us to obtain an association constant and free energy change for ion-pairing. As a result, this new method has the potential to probe the geometry of ion-pairing and allows the reduction potentials of moleculesmore »to be determined in the absence of electrolyte in an environment of low dielectric constant.« less

  5. Video Tracking Using Acoustic Triangulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivanov, Alexander

    2012-05-03

    This study focuses on the detection and triangulation of sound sources. Specifically, we focus on the detection of sound in order to track a person’s position with a video camera. Acoustic tracking, an alternative to visual tracking, is relatively...

  6. VIDEO TRACKING USING ACOUSTIC TRIANGULATION 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raducanu, Alexandru

    2012-05-03

    This study focuses on the detection and triangulation of sound sources. Specifically, we focus on the detection of sound in order to track a person’s position with a video camera. Acoustic tracking, an alternative to visual tracking, is relatively...

  7. The effect of standard ambient conditions used for the determination of road load to predict vehicle fuel economy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Love, Michael Lee

    1982-01-01

    THE EFFECT OF STANDARD AN1BIENT CONDITIONS USED FOR THE DETERMINATION OF ROAD LOAD TO PREDICT VEHICLE FUEL ECONOMY A Thesis by Michael Lee Love Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 198Z Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering THE EFFECT OF STANDARD AMBIENT CONDITIONS USED FOR THE DETERMINATION OF ROAD LOAD TO PREDICT VEHICLE FUEL ECONOMY A Thesis by Michael Lee Love Approved...

  8. Determination of effective axion masses in the helium-3 buffer of CAST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruz, J

    2011-11-18

    The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) is a ground based experiment located in Geneva (Switzerland) searching for axions coming from the Sun. Axions, hypothetical particles that not only could solve the strong CP problem but also be one of the favored candidates for dark matter, can be produced in the core of the Sun via the Primakoff effect. They can be reconverted into X-ray photons on Earth in the presence of strong electromagnetic fields. In order to look for axions, CAST points a decommissioned LHC prototype dipole magnet with different X-ray detectors installed in both ends of the magnet towards the Sun. The analysis of the data acquired during the first phase of the experiment yielded the most restrictive experimental upper limit on the axion-to-photon coupling constant for axion masses up to about 0.02 eV/c{sup 2}. During the second phase, CAST extends its mass sensitivity by tuning the electron density present in the magnetic field region. Injecting precise amounts of helium gas has enabled CAST to look for axion masses up to 1.2 eV/c{sup 2}. This paper studies the determination of the effective axion masses scanned at CAST during its second phase. The use of a helium gas buffer at temperatures of 1.8 K has required a detailed knowledge of the gas density distribution. Complete sets of computational fluid dynamic simulations validated with experimental data have been crucial to obtain accurate results.

  9. Low-income DSM Programs: Methodological approach to determining the cost-effectiveness of coordinated partnerships

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, M.A.; Hill, L.J.

    1994-05-01

    As governments at all levels become increasingly budget-conscious, expenditures on low-income, demand-side management (DSM) programs are being evaluated more on the basis of efficiency at the expense of equity considerations. Budgetary pressures have also caused government agencies to emphasize resource leveraging and coordination with electric and gas utilities as a means of sharing the expenses of low-income programs. The increased involvement of electric and gas utilities in coordinated low-income DSM programs, in turn, has resulted in greater emphasis on estimating program cost-effectiveness. The objective of this study is to develop a methodological approach to estimate the cost- effectiveness of coordinated low-income DSM programs, given the special features that distinguish these programs from other utility-operated DSM programs. The general approach used in this study was to (1) select six coordinated low-income DSM programs from among those currently operating across the United States, (2) examine the main features of these programs, and (3) determine the conceptual and pragmatic problems associated with estimating their cost-effectiveness. Three types of coordination between government and utility cosponsors were identified. At one extreme, local agencies operate {open_quotes}parallel{close_quotes} programs, each of which is fully funded by a single sponsor (e.g., one funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the other by a utility). At the other extreme are highly {open_quotes}coupled{close_quotes} programs that capitalize on the unique capabilities and resources offered by each cosponsor. In these programs, agencies employ a combination of utility and government funds to deliver weatherization services as part of an integrated effort. In between are {open_quotes}supplemental{close_quotes} programs that utilize resources to supplement the agency`s government-funded weatherization, with no changes to the operation of that program.

  10. Magneto-Acoustic Wave Oscillations in Solar Spicules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Ajabshirizadeh; E. Tavabi; S. Koutchmy

    2008-06-09

    Some observations suggest that solar spicules show small amplitude and high frequency oscillations of magneto-acoustic waves, which arise from photospheric granular forcing. We apply the method of MHD seismology to determine the period of kink waves. For this purposes, the oscillations of a magnetic cylinder embedded in a field-free environment is investigated. Finally, diagnostic diagrams displaying the oscillatory period in terms of some equilibrium parameters are provided to allow a comparison between theoretical results and those coming from observations.

  11. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr., Ph.D.; Younane Abousleiman, Ph.D.; Musharraf Zaman, Ph.D., P.E.

    2002-04-30

    Three major goals were accomplished during this phase. First, a study was completed of the effects of stress-induced changes in anisotropic elastic moduli in sandstone. Second, a new method for measuring the anisotropic poroelastic moduli from acoustic data was developed. Third, a series of triaxial experiments were conducted on unconsolidated sands to identify pressure/stress conditions where liquefaction occurs under high confining pressures. Stress-induced changes in anisotropic Young's moduli and shear moduli were observed during deformational pathway experiments. A new method was made for the acquisition of compressional and shear wave velocities along a series of 3-dimensional raypaths through a core sample as it is subjected to deformation. Three different deformational pathway experiments were conducted. During the hydrostatic deformation experiment, little or no anisotropy was observed in either the Young's moduli or shear moduli. Significant deformational anisotropies were observed in both moduli during the uniaxial strain test and the triaxial compression experiment but each had a different nature. During the triaxial experiment the axial and lateral Young's moduli and shear moduli continued to diverge as load was applied. During the uniaxial strain experiment the anisotropy was ''locked in'' early in the loading phase but then remained steady as both the confining pressure and axial stress were applied. A new method for measuring anisotropic Biot's effective stress parameters has also been developed. The method involves measuring the compressional and shear wave velocities in the aforementioned acoustic velocity experiments while varying stress paths. For a stress-induced transversely isotropic medium the acoustic velocity data are utilized to calculate the five independent elastic stiffness components. Once the elastic stiffness components are determined these can be used to calculate the anisotropic Biot's effective stress parameters, {alpha}{sub v} and {alpha}{sub h}, using the equations of Abousleiman et al. (1996). A series of experiments have been conducted, on an initially inherently isotropic Berea sandstone rock sample, to dynamically determine these anisotropic Biot's parameters during deformational pathway experiments. Data acquired during hydrostatic, triaxial, and uniaxial strain pathway experiments indicates that Biot's effective stress parameter changes significantly if the applied stresses are not hydrostatic. Variations, as large as 20% between the axial (vertical) and lateral (horizontal) Biot's effective stress parameters, were observed in some experiments. A series of triaxial compression experiments have been conducted on unconsolidated sand (Oil Creek sand) to determine the pressure/stress conditions which would be favorable for liquefaction. Liquefaction of geopressured sands is thought to be one of the major causative mechanisms of damaging shallow water flows. The experiments were developed to determine if: (1) liquefaction could be made to occur in this particular sand at high confining pressures, and (2) the state of liquefication had the same nature at high pressure conditions typical of shallow water flows as it does in low confining pressure soil mechanics tests. A series of undrained triaxial experiments were successfully used to document that the Oil Creek sand could undergo liquefaction. The nature (i.e., the shape of the deformational pathway in mean pressure/shear stress space) was very similar to those observed in soil mechanics experiments. The undrained triaxial experiments also indicated that this sand would strain soften at relatively high confining pressures--a necessary precursor to liquefaction. These experiments serve as a starting point for a series of acoustic experiments to determine the signature of compressional and shear wave properties as the sand packs approach the state of liquefaction (and shallow water flows).

  12. Determining the Effectiveness of Incorporating Geographic Information Into Vehicle Performance Algorithms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sera White

    2012-04-01

    This thesis presents a research study using one year of driving data obtained from plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) located in Sacramento and San Francisco, California to determine the effectiveness of incorporating geographic information into vehicle performance algorithms. Sacramento and San Francisco were chosen because of the availability of high resolution (1/9 arc second) digital elevation data. First, I present a method for obtaining instantaneous road slope, given a latitude and longitude, and introduce its use into common driving intensity algorithms. I show that for trips characterized by >40m of net elevation change (from key on to key off), the use of instantaneous road slope significantly changes the results of driving intensity calculations. For trips exhibiting elevation loss, algorithms ignoring road slope overestimated driving intensity by as much as 211 Wh/mile, while for trips exhibiting elevation gain these algorithms underestimated driving intensity by as much as 333 Wh/mile. Second, I describe and test an algorithm that incorporates vehicle route type into computations of city and highway fuel economy. Route type was determined by intersecting trip GPS points with ESRI StreetMap road types and assigning each trip as either city or highway route type according to whichever road type comprised the largest distance traveled. The fuel economy results produced by the geographic classification were compared to the fuel economy results produced by algorithms that assign route type based on average speed or driving style. Most results were within 1 mile per gallon ({approx}3%) of one another; the largest difference was 1.4 miles per gallon for charge depleting highway trips. The methods for acquiring and using geographic data introduced in this thesis will enable other vehicle technology researchers to incorporate geographic data into their research problems.

  13. IEEE JOURNAL OF OCEANIC ENGINEERING, VOL. 0510, NO. 2, APRIL 1985 123 Reciprocal Acoustic Transmissions: Instrumentation for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Transmissions: Instrumentation for Mesoscale Monitoring of Ocean Currents PETER F. WORCESTER, ROBERT C. SPINDEL in opposite directionsbetweentwo pointsin midocean, one can separate the effects of ocean currents on acoustic to measure ocean currents. Acoustic transceivers have been designedand built to measure the mean currents

  14. Thermo-acoustic wave propagation and reflection near the liquid-gas critical point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, P

    2008-01-01

    Thermo-acoustic wave propagation and reflection near liquid-gas critical point is studied, and our results are compared to a recent ultra-sensitive interferometry measurement in near-critical CO2 [Y. Miura et al. Phys. Rev. E 74, 010101(2006)], which suggests the dominance of the thermo-acoustic nature of the piston effect on the time scale of microseconds. New features regarding the reflection patterns of thermo-acoustic waves near the critical point are revealed by proper inclusion of the critically diverging bulk viscosity.

  15. Cylindrical acoustic levitator/concentrator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaduchak, Gregory (Los Alamos, NM); Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A low-power, inexpensive acoustic apparatus for levitation and/or concentration of aerosols and small liquid/solid samples having particulates up to several millimeters in diameter in air or other fluids is described. It is constructed from a commercially available, hollow cylindrical piezoelectric crystal which has been modified to tune the resonance frequency of the breathing mode resonance of the crystal to that of the interior cavity of the cylinder. When the resonance frequency of the interior cylindrical cavity is matched to the breathing mode resonance of the cylindrical piezoelectric transducer, the acoustic efficiency for establishing a standing wave pattern in the cavity is high. The cylinder does not require accurate alignment of a resonant cavity. Water droplets having diameters greater than 1 mm have been levitated against the force of gravity using; less than 1 W of input electrical power. Concentration of aerosol particles in air is also demonstrated.

  16. PASSIVE WIRELESS SURFACE ACOUSTIC WAVE SENSORS FOR MONITORING SEQUESTRATION SITES CO2 EMISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yizhong; Chyu, Minking; Wang, Qing-Ming

    2012-11-30

    University of Pittsburgh’s Transducer lab has teamed with the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) to conduct a comprehensive study to develop/evaluate low-cost, efficient CO2 measuring technologies for geological sequestration sites leakage monitoring. A passive wireless CO2 sensing system based on surface acoustic wave technology and carbon nanotube nanocomposite was developed. Surface acoustic wave device was studied to determine the optimum parameters. Delay line structure was adopted as basic sensor structure. CNT polymer nanocomposite was fabricated and tested under different temperature and strain condition for natural environment impact evaluation. Nanocomposite resistance increased for 5 times under pure strain, while the temperature dependence of resistance for CNT solely was -1375ppm/?. The overall effect of temperature on nanocomposite resistance was -1000ppm/?. The gas response of the nanocomposite was about 10% resistance increase under pure CO2. The sensor frequency change was around 300ppm for pure CO2. With paralyne packaging, the sensor frequency change from relative humidity of 0% to 100% at room temperature decreased from over 1000ppm to less than 100ppm. The lowest detection limit of the sensor is 1% gas concentration, with 36ppm frequency change. Wireless module was tested and showed over one foot transmission distance at preferred parallel orientation.

  17. VOLUME 84, NUMBER 26 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 26 JUNE 2000 Air Bubbles in Water: A Strongly Multiple Scattering Medium for Acoustic Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : A Strongly Multiple Scattering Medium for Acoustic Waves M. Kafesaki,1, * R. S. Penciu,2, and E. N. Economou1 structure and transmission properties for acoustic waves propagating in bubbly water. We prove scattering effects, and is applicable to acoustic wave propa- gation in media consisting of nonoverlapping

  18. VOLUME 86, NUMBER 21 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 21 MAY 2001 Spiraling Bubbles: How Acoustic and Hydrodynamic Forces Compete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    of a standing acoustic wave. An ordinary dif- ferential equation (ODE) approach, based on a balance be- tween Acoustic and Hydrodynamic Forces Compete Judith Rensen,1 Dennis Bosman,1 Jacques Magnaudet,2 Claus to study the effect of acoustic forces on individual bubbles in shear flows have been carried out

  19. The effects of machine parameters on residual stress determined using micro-Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sparks, R.G.; Enloe, W.S.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01

    The effects of machine parameters on residual stresses in single point diamond turned silicon and germanium have been investigated using micro-Raman spectroscopy. Residual stresses were sampled across ductile feed cuts in < 100 > silicon and germanium which were single point diamond turned using a variety of feed rates, rake angles and clearance angles. High spatial resolution micro-Raman spectra (1{mu}m spot) were obtained in regions of ductile cutting where no visible surface damage was present. The use of both 514-5nm and 488.0nm excitation wavelengths, by virtue of their differing characteristic penetration depths in the materials, allowed determinations of stress profiles as a function of depth into the sample. Previous discussions have demonstrated that such Raman spectra will exhibit asymmetrically broadened peaks which are characteristic of the superposition of a continuum of Raman scatterers from the various depths probed. Depth profiles of residual stress were obtained using computer deconvolution of the resulting asymmetrically broadened raman spectra.

  20. The Roles of Cloud Drop Effective Radius and LWP in Determining Rain Properties in Marine Stratocumulus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenfeld, Daniel; Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J.

    2012-07-04

    Numerical simulations described in previous studies showed that adding cloud condensation nuclei to marine stratocumulus can prevent their breakup from closed into open cells. Additional analyses of the same simulations show that the suppression of rain is well described in terms of cloud drop effective radius (re). Rain is initiated when re near cloud top is around 12-14 um. Cloud water starts to get depleted when column-maximum rain intensity (Rmax) exceeds 0.1 mm h-1. This happens when cloud-top re reaches 14 um. Rmax is mostly less than 0.1 mm h-1 at re<14 um, regardless of the cloud water path, but increases rapidly when re exceeds 14 um. This is in agreement with recent aircraft observations and theoretical observations in convective clouds so that the mechanism is not limited to describing marine stratocumulus. These results support the hypothesis that the onset of significant precipitation is determined by the number of nucleated cloud drops and the height (H) above cloud base within the cloud that is required for cloud drops to reach re of 14 um. In turn, this can explain the conditions for initiation of significant drizzle and opening of closed cells providing the basis for a simple parameterization for GCMs that unifies the representation of both precipitating and non-precipitating clouds as well as the transition between them. Furthermore, satellite global observations of cloud depth (from base to top), and cloud top re can be used to derive and validate this parameterization.

  1. Frustrated total internal reflection acoustic field sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kallman, Jeffrey S. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A frustrated total internal reflection acoustic field sensor which allows the acquisition of the acoustic field over an entire plane, all at once. The sensor finds use in acoustic holography and acoustic diffraction tomography. For example, the sensor may be produced by a transparent plate with transparent support members tall enough to support one or more flexible membranes at an appropriate height for frustrated total internal reflection to occur. An acoustic wave causes the membrane to deflect away from its quiescent position and thus changes the amount of light that tunnels through the gap formed by the support members and into the membrane, and so changes the amount of light reflected by the membrane. The sensor(s) is illuminated by a uniform tight field, and the reflection from the sensor yields acoustic wave amplitude and phase information which can be picked up electronically or otherwise.

  2. Acoustic resonance phase locked photoacoustic spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Bomse, David S.; Silver, Joel A.

    2003-08-19

    A photoacoustic spectroscopy method and apparatus for maintaining an acoustic source frequency on a sample cell resonance frequency comprising: providing an acoustic source to the sample cell to generate a photoacoustic signal, the acoustic source having a source frequency; continuously measuring detection phase of the photoacoustic signal with respect to source frequency or a harmonic thereof; and employing the measured detection phase to provide magnitude and direction for correcting the source frequency to the resonance frequency.

  3. Acoustic resonance frequency locked photoacoustic spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Bomse, David S.; Silver, Joel A.

    2003-09-09

    A photoacoustic spectroscopy method and apparatus for maintaining an acoustic source frequency on a sample cell resonance frequency comprising: providing an acoustic source to the sample cell, the acoustic source having a source frequency; repeatedly and continuously sweeping the source frequency across the resonance frequency at a sweep rate; and employing an odd-harmonic of the source frequency sweep rate to maintain the source frequency sweep centered on the resonance frequency.

  4. Acoustic concentration of particles in fluid flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ward, Michael D. (Los Alamos, NM); Kaduchak, Gregory (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-11-23

    An apparatus for acoustic concentration of particles in a fluid flow includes a substantially acoustically transparent membrane and a vibration generator that define a fluid flow path therebetween. The fluid flow path is in fluid communication with a fluid source and a fluid outlet and the vibration generator is disposed adjacent the fluid flow path and is capable of producing an acoustic field in the fluid flow path. The acoustic field produces at least one pressure minima in the fluid flow path at a predetermined location within the fluid flow path and forces predetermined particles in the fluid flow path to the at least one pressure minima.

  5. Wind Turbine Acoustic Noise A white paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Wind Turbine Acoustic Noise A white paper Prepared by the Renewable Energy Research Laboratory...................................................................... 8 Sound from Wind Turbines .............................................................................................. 10 Sources of Wind Turbine Sound

  6. A Platform for Collaborative Acoustic Signal Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanbiao Wang; Lewis Girod; Nithya Ramanathan

    2005-01-01

    Graphic ori- ented signal processing language - gospl,” incollaborative acoustic signal processing, and demonstrateembedded system for signal processing and the recent work on

  7. Laser Doppler Velocimetry for Joint Measurements of Acoustic and Mean Flow Velocities : LMS-based Algorithm and CRB Calculation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Laurent; Degroot, Anne; Lionet, Louis; 10.1109/TIM.2008.917670

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a least mean square (LMS) algorithm for the joint estimation of acoustic and mean flow velocities from laser doppler velocimetry (LDV) measurements. The usual algorithms used for measuring with LDV purely acoustic velocity or mean flow velocity may not be used when the acoustic field is disturbed by a mean flow component. The LMS-based algorithm allows accurate estimations of both acoustic and mean flow velocities. The Cram\\'er-Rao bound (CRB) of the associated problem is determined. The variance of the estimators of both acoustic and mean flow velocities is also given. Simulation results of this algorithm are compared with the CRB and the comparison leads to validate this estimator.

  8. Effect of cooler electrons on a compressive ion acoustic solitary wave in a warm ion plasma — Forbidden regions, double layers, and supersolitons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghosh, S. S.; Sekar Iyengar, A. N.

    2014-08-15

    It is observed that the presence of a minority component of cooler electrons in a three component plasma plays a deterministic role in the evolution of solitary waves, double layers, or the newly discovered structures called supersolitons. The inclusion of the cooler component of electrons in a single electron plasma produces sharp increase in nonlinearity in spite of a decrease in the overall energy of the system. The effect maximizes at certain critical value of the number density of the cooler component (typically 15%–20%) giving rise to a hump in the amplitude variation profile. For larger amplitudes, the hump leads to a forbidden region in the ambient cooler electron concentration which dissociates the overall existence domain of solitary wave solutions in two distinct parameter regime. It is observed that an inclusion of the cooler component of electrons as low as < 1% affects the plasma system significantly resulting in compressive double layers. The solution is further affected by the cold to hot electron temperature ratio. In an adequately hotter bulk plasma (i.e., moderately low cold to hot electron temperature ratio), the parameter domain of compressive double layers is bounded by a sharp discontinuity in the corresponding amplitude variation profile which may lead to supersolitons.

  9. Method of measuring reactive acoustic power density in a fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1985-09-03

    A method for determining reactive acoustic power density level and its direction in a fluid using a single sensor is disclosed. In the preferred embodiment, an apparatus for conducting the method, which is termed a thermoacoustic couple, consists of a stack of thin, spaced apart polymeric plates, selected ones of which include multiple bimetallic thermocouple junctions positioned along opposite end edges thereof. The thermocouple junctions are connected in series in the nature of a thermopile, and are arranged so as to be responsive to small temperature differences between the opposite edges of the plates. The magnitude of the temperature difference, as represented by the magnitude of the electrical potential difference generated by the thermopile, is found to be directly related to the level of acoustic power density in the gas. 5 figs.

  10. Method of measuring reactive acoustic power density in a fluid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1985-01-01

    A method for determining reactive acoustic power density level and its direction in a fluid using a single sensor is disclosed. In the preferred embodiment, an apparatus for conducting the method, which is termed a thermoacoustic couple, consists of a stack of thin, spaced apart polymeric plates, selected ones of which include multiple bimetallic thermocouple junctions positioned along opposite end edges thereof. The thermocouple junctions are connected in series in the nature of a thermopile, and are arranged so as to be responsive to small temperature differences between the opposite edges of the plates. The magnitude of the temperature difference, as represented by the magnitude of the electrical potential difference generated by the thermopile, is found to be directly related to the level of acoustic power density in the gas.

  11. Method for chemically analyzing a solution by acoustic means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beller, L.S.

    1997-04-22

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for determining a type of solution and the concentration of that solution by acoustic means. Generally stated, the method consists of: immersing a sound focusing transducer within a first liquid filled container; locating a separately contained specimen solution at a sound focal point within the first container; locating a sound probe adjacent to the specimen, generating a variable intensity sound signal from the transducer; measuring fundamental and multiple harmonic sound signal amplitudes; and then comparing a plot of a specimen sound response with a known solution sound response, thereby determining the solution type and concentration. 10 figs.

  12. Method for chemically analyzing a solution by acoustic means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beller, Laurence S. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining a type of solution and the concention of that solution by acoustic means. Generally stated, the method consists of: immersing a sound focusing transducer within a first liquid filled container; locating a separately contained specimen solution at a sound focal point within the first container; locating a sound probe adjacent to the specimen, generating a variable intensity sound signal from the transducer; measuring fundamental and multiple harmonic sound signal amplitudes; and then comparing a plot of a specimen sound response with a known solution sound response, thereby determining the solution type and concentration.

  13. AN ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC-CINEFLUOROGRAPHIC-ACOUSTIC STUDY OF DYNAMIC VOWEL PRODUCTION*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AN ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC-CINEFLUOROGRAPHIC-ACOUSTIC STUDY OF DYNAMIC VOWEL PRODUCTION* Peter J. Alfonso of electromyographic (EMG), cinefluorographic, and acoustic data, that describe the positioning of various articulators

  14. Shear horizontal surface acoustic wave microsensor for Class...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Shear horizontal surface acoustic wave microsensor for Class A viral and bacterial detection. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Shear horizontal surface acoustic wave...

  15. Investigation and Analytical Description of Acoustic Production by Magneto-Acoustic Mixing Technology

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Henderson, Hunter Bryant; Rios, Orlando; Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Manuel, Michele V.

    2015-05-07

    Magneto-Acoustic Mixing Technology (MAMT) is a novel manufacturing method that combines two magnetic fields to produce high-intensity sonication for liquid-state materials processing. This method may be adapted to the manufacture of various materials that benefit from a combination of high temperature, magnetic fields, and acoustic energy. In this work, the acoustic generation mechanism is described in detail and found to be dependent on the skin depth of the induction currents. Analytical models of acoustic pressure are derived, based on two mutually exclusive vibration modes, crucible vibration and melt vibration. Additionally, grain size evidence of acoustic pressure distribution is presented asmore »model validation.« less

  16. Characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from sound sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holzrichter, John F. (Berkeley, CA); Ng, Lawrence C. (Danville, CA)

    2007-03-13

    A system for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate and animate sound sources. Electromagnetic sensors monitor excitation sources in sound producing systems, such as animate sound sources such as the human voice, or from machines, musical instruments, and various other structures. Acoustical output from these sound producing systems is also monitored. From such information, a transfer function characterizing the sound producing system is generated. From the transfer function, acoustical output from the sound producing system may be synthesized or canceled. The systems disclosed enable accurate calculation of transfer functions relating specific excitations to specific acoustical outputs. Knowledge of such signals and functions can be used to effect various sound replication, sound source identification, and sound cancellation applications.

  17. Determining an Appropriate Method to Simulate Pump Shear on the Diatom Nitzschia sp. and a Methodology to Quantify the Effects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lassig, Jarrett

    2012-12-13

    , there was no statistical difference between strains. While effective, this method would be impractical for a commercial algae cultivation facility as the viscometer in this study costs approximately $100,000. Therefore, tests were performed to determine if a rotary mixer...

  18. Acoustic Enhancement of Surface Diffusion Chengping Wu,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    provides an attractive alternative to thermal activation in thin film growth on heat-sensitive substrates to the thermal activation in thin film growth on heat-sensitive substrates. 2. MECHANISMS OF ACOUSTIC ACTIVATION, Russia *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: The idea of acoustic activation of surface diffusion

  19. Thermoacoustic Stirling Engine --An acoustic amplifier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    Thermoacoustic Stirling Engine -- An acoustic amplifier: ambient heat exchanger (water) stacked kW sound hot diesel exhaust hot diesel exhaust 34" 24" Thermoacoustic Stirling Engine -- An acoustic to ambient air 0º 120º 240º 2 kW electricity Thermoacoustic Energy Conversion Waste or prime heat sound

  20. Acoustically enhanced heat exchange and drying apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bramlette, T.T.; Keller, J.O.

    1987-07-10

    A heat transfer drying apparatus includes an acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber for receiving material to be dried. The chamber includes a first heat transfer gas inlet, a second heat transfer gas inlet, a material inlet, and a gas outlet which also serves as a dried material and gas outlet. A non-pulsing first heat transfer gas source provides a first drying gas to the acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber through the first heat transfer gas inlet. A valveless, continuous second heat transfer gas source provides a second drying gas to the acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber through the second heat transfer gas inlet. The second drying gas also generates acoustic waves which bring about acoustical coupling with the gases in the acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber. The second drying gas itself oscillates at an acoustic frequency of approximately 180 Hz due to fluid mechanical motion in the gas. The oscillations of the second heat transfer gas coupled to the first heat transfer gas in the acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber enhance heat and mass transfer by convection within the chamber. 3 figs.

  1. ACOUSTIC FORMING FOR ENHANCED DEWATERING AND FORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cyrus K Aidun

    2007-11-30

    The next generation of forming elements based on acoustic excitation to increase drainage and enhances formation both with on-line control and profiling capabilities has been investigated in this project. The system can be designed and optimized based on the fundamental experimental and computational analysis and investigation of acoustic waves in a fiber suspension flow and interaction with the forming wire.

  2. aging,Bioengineering, AcousticsCircuitsand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Tonghun

    Biom edicalIm aging,Bioengineering, AcousticsCircuitsand SignalProcessing Com m unicationsand) #12;Biom edicalIm aging,Bioengineering, Acoustics Circuitsand SignalProcessing Com m unicationsand. M. L. Oelze T. J. Overbye ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING (2 OF 3) #12;Biom edicalIm aging,Bioengineering

  3. Method and system for generating a beam of acoustic energy from a borehole, and applications thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson Paul A. (Santa Fe, NM); Ten Cate, James A. (Los Alamos, NM); Guyer, Robert (Reno, NV); Le Bas, Pierre-Yves (Los Alamos, NM); Vu, Cung (Houston, TX); Nihei, Kurt (Oakland, CA); Schmitt, Denis P. (Katy, TX); Skelt, Christopher (Houston, TX)

    2012-02-14

    A compact array of transducers is employed as a downhole instrument for acoustic investigation of the surrounding rock formation. The array is operable to generate simultaneously a first acoustic beam signal at a first frequency and a second acoustic beam signal at a second frequency different than the first frequency. These two signals can be oriented through an azimuthal rotation of the array and an inclination rotation using control of the relative phases of the signals from the transmitter elements or electromechanical linkage. Due to the non-linearity of the formation, the first and the second acoustic beam signal mix into the rock formation where they combine into a collimated third signal that propagates in the formation along the same direction than the first and second signals and has a frequency equal to the difference of the first and the second acoustic signals. The third signal is received either within the same borehole, after reflection, or another borehole, after transmission, and analyzed to determine information about rock formation. Recording of the third signal generated along several azimuthal and inclination directions also provides 3D images of the formation, information about 3D distribution of rock formation and fluid properties and an indication of the dynamic acoustic non-linearity of the formation.

  4. Experimental design to determine the effect of temperature and Mach number on entropy noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hake, Mariah I. (Mariah Inez)

    2014-01-01

    The Osney Laboratory sought to create an entropy noise test rig that could determine the relationship between entropy noise and the flow parameters of temperature change and nozzle Mach number. The apparatus simulates ...

  5. Microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olsson, Roy H. (Albuquerque, NM); El-Kady, Ihab F. (Albuquerque, NM); McCormick, Frederick (Albuquerque, NM); Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Fleming, legal representative, Carol (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-11-23

    A microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device comprises a periodic two-dimensional array of scatterers embedded within the matrix material membrane, wherein the scatterer material has a density and/or elastic constant that is different than the matrix material and wherein the periodicity of the array causes destructive interference of the acoustic wave within an acoustic bandgap. The membrane can be suspended above a substrate by an air or vacuum gap to provide acoustic isolation from the substrate. The device can be fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. Such microfabricated bulk wave phononic bandgap devices are useful for acoustic isolation in the ultrasonic, VHF, or UHF regime (i.e., frequencies of order 1 MHz to 10 GHz and higher, and lattice constants of order 100 .mu.m or less).

  6. Microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olsson, Roy H.; El-Kady, Ihab F.; McCormick, Frederick; Fleming, James G.; Fleming, Carol

    2010-06-08

    A microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device comprises a periodic two-dimensional array of scatterers embedded within the matrix material membrane, wherein the scatterer material has a density and/or elastic constant that is different than the matrix material and wherein the periodicity of the array causes destructive interference of the acoustic wave within an acoustic bandgap. The membrane can be suspended above a substrate by an air or vacuum gap to provide acoustic isolation from the substrate. The device can be fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. Such microfabricated bulk wave phononic bandgap devices are useful for acoustic isolation in the ultrasonic, VHF, or UHF regime (i.e., frequencies of order 1 MHz to 10 GHz and higher, and lattice constants of order 100 .mu.m or less).

  7. Piezoelectric materials used in underwater acoustic transducers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Huidong; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-07-07

    Piezoelectric materials have been used in underwater acoustic transducers for nearly a century. In this paper, we reviewed four different types of piezoelectric materials: piezoelectric ceramics, single crystals, composites, and polymers, which are widely used in underwater acoustic transducers nowadays. Piezoelectric ceramics are the most dominant material type and are used as a single-phase material or one of the end members in composites. Piezoelectric single crystals offer outstanding electromechanical response but are limited by their manufacturing cost. Piezoelectric polymers provide excellent acoustic impedance matching and transducer fabrication flexibility although their piezoelectric properties are not as good as ceramics and single crystals. Composites combined the merits of ceramics and polymers and are receiving increased attention. The typical structure and electromechanical properties of each type of materials are introduced and discussed with respect to underwater acoustic transducer applications. Their advantages and disadvantages are summarized. Some of the critical design considerations when developing underwater acoustic transducers with these materials are also touched upon.

  8. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Acoustic Neuromas: What Happens Long Term?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roos, Daniel E., E-mail: daniel.roos@health.sa.gov.au [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); University of Adelaide School of Medicine, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Potter, Andrew E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Brophy, Brian P. [Department of Neurosurgery, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); University of Adelaide School of Medicine, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the clinical outcomes for acoustic neuroma treated with low-dose linear accelerator stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) >10 years earlier at the Royal Adelaide Hospital using data collected prospectively at a dedicated SRS clinic. Methods and Materials: Between November 1993 and December 2000, 51 patients underwent SRS for acoustic neuroma. For the 44 patients with primary SRS for sporadic (unilateral) lesions, the median age was 63 years, the median of the maximal tumor diameter was 21 mm (range, 11-34), and the marginal dose was 14 Gy for the first 4 patients and 12 Gy for the other 40. Results: The crude tumor control rate was 97.7% (1 patient required salvage surgery for progression at 9.75 years). Only 8 (29%) of 28 patients ultimately retained useful hearing (interaural pure tone average {<=}50 dB). Also, although the Kaplan-Meier estimated rate of hearing preservation at 5 years was 57% (95% confidence interval, 38-74%), this decreased to 24% (95% confidence interval, 11-44%) at 10 years. New or worsened V and VII cranial neuropathy occurred in 11% and 2% of patients, respectively; all cases were transient. No case of radiation oncogenesis developed. Conclusions: The long-term follow-up data of low-dose (12-14 Gy) linear accelerator SRS for acoustic neuroma have confirmed excellent tumor control and acceptable cranial neuropathy rates but a continual decrease in hearing preservation out to {>=}10 years.

  9. Ion acoustic solitary waves and double layers in a plasma with two temperature electrons featuring Tsallis distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shalini, Saini, N. S.

    2014-10-15

    The propagation properties of large amplitude ion acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) are studied in a plasma containing cold fluid ions and multi-temperature electrons (cool and hot electrons) with nonextensive distribution. Employing Sagdeev pseudopotential method, an energy balance equation has been derived and from the expression for Sagdeev potential function, ion acoustic solitary waves and double layers are investigated numerically. The Mach number (lower and upper limits) for the existence of solitary structures is determined. Positive as well as negative polarity solitary structures are observed. Further, conditions for the existence of ion acoustic double layers (IADLs) are also determined numerically in the form of the critical values of q{sub c}, f and the Mach number (M). It is observed that the nonextensivity of electrons (via q{sub c,h}), concentration of electrons (via f) and temperature ratio of cold to hot electrons (via ?) significantly influence the characteristics of ion acoustic solitary waves as well as double layers.

  10. Dynamics of a spherical particle in an acoustic field: A multiscale approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Jin-Han, E-mail: J.H.Xie@ed.ac.uk; Vanneste, Jacques [School of Mathematics and Maxwell Institute for Mathematical Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-15

    A rigid spherical particle in an acoustic wave field oscillates at the wave period but has also a mean motion on a longer time scale. The dynamics of this mean motion is crucial for numerous applications of acoustic microfluidics, including particle manipulation and flow visualisation. It is controlled by four physical effects: acoustic (radiation) pressure, streaming, inertia, and viscous drag. In this paper, we carry out a systematic multiscale analysis of the problem in order to assess the relative importance of these effects depending on the parameters of the system that include wave amplitude, wavelength, sound speed, sphere radius, and viscosity. We identify two distinguished regimes characterised by a balance among three of the four effects, and we derive the equations that govern the mean particle motion in each regime. This recovers and organises classical results by King [“On the acoustic radiation pressure on spheres,” Proc. R. Soc. A 147, 212–240 (1934)], Gor'kov [“On the forces acting on a small particle in an acoustical field in an ideal fluid,” Sov. Phys. 6, 773–775 (1962)], and Doinikov [“Acoustic radiation pressure on a rigid sphere in a viscous fluid,” Proc. R. Soc. London A 447, 447–466 (1994)], clarifies the range of validity of these results, and reveals a new nonlinear dynamical regime. In this regime, the mean motion of the particle remains intimately coupled to that of the surrounding fluid, and while viscosity affects the fluid motion, it plays no part in the acoustic pressure. Simplified equations, valid when only two physical effects control the particle motion, are also derived. They are used to obtain sufficient conditions for the particle to behave as a passive tracer of the Lagrangian-mean fluid motion.

  11. Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves Robert L. Merlino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merlino, Robert L.

    Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves Robert L. Merlino Department of Physics and Astronomy and experimental work on dust acoustic waves is given. The basic physics of the dust acoustic wave and some findings and outstanding problems are also presented. Keywords: dusty plasmas, dust acoustic waves PACS: 52

  12. Localization of acoustic sources utilizing a decentralized particle filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerstoft, Peter

    localization scheme. Several sensors are embedded in an acoustic wave field. We assume that the field variables of interest are governed by a discrete-time spatial-distributed state-space equation. In particular, acoustic] of a source in a spatio-temporal field [3­8]. We assume an acoustic in-door scenario. The acoustic-wave

  13. Multiple-frequency acoustic wave devices for chemical sensing and materials characterization in both gas and liquid phase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, S.J.; Ricco, A.J.

    1993-08-10

    A chemical or intrinsic physical property sensor is described comprising: (a) a substrate; (b) an interaction region of said substrate where the presence of a chemical or physical stimulus causes a detectable change in the velocity and/or an attenuation of an acoustic wave traversing said region; and (c) a plurality of paired input and output interdigitated electrodes patterned on the surface of said substrate where each of said paired electrodes has a distinct periodicity, where each of said paired electrodes is comprised of an input and an output electrode; (d) an input signal generation means for transmitting an input signal having a distinct frequency to a specified input interdigitated electrode of said plurality so that each input electrode receives a unique input signal, whereby said electrode responds to said input signal by generating an acoustic wave of a specified frequency, thus, said plurality responds by generating a plurality of acoustic waves of different frequencies; (e) an output signal receiving means for determining an acoustic wave velocity and an amplitude of said acoustic waves at several frequencies after said waves transverses said interaction region and comparing these values to an input acoustic wave velocity and an input acoustic wave amplitude to produce values for perturbations in acoustic wave velocities and for acoustic wave attenuation as a function of frequency, where said output receiving means is individually coupled to each of said output interdigitated electrode; (f) a computer means for analyzing a data stream comprising information from said output receiving means and from said input signal generation means to differentiate a specified response due to a perturbation from a subsequent specified response due to a subsequent perturbation to determine the chemical or intrinsic physical properties desired.

  14. Copper vapor laser acoustic thermometry system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Galkowski, Joseph J. (Livermore, CA)

    1987-01-01

    A copper vapor laser (CVL) acoustic thermometry system is disclosed. The invention couples an acoustic pulse a predetermined distance into a laser tube by means of a transducer and an alumina rod such that an echo pulse is returned along the alumina rod to the point of entry. The time differential between the point of entry of the acoustic pulse into the laser tube and the exit of the echo pulse is related to the temperature at the predetermined distance within the laser tube. This information is processed and can provide an accurate indication of the average temperature within the laser tube.

  15. Acoustically enhanced heat exchange and drying apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bramlette, T. Tazwell (Livermore, CA); Keller, Jay O. (Oakland, CA)

    1989-01-01

    A heat transfer apparatus includes a first chamber having a first heat transfer gas inlet, a second heat transfer gas inlet, and an outlet. A first heat transfer gas source provides a first gas flow to the first chamber through the first heat transfer gas inlet. A second gas flow through a second chamber connected to the side of the first chamber, generates acoustic waves which bring about acoustical coupling of the first and second gases in the acoustically augmented first chamber. The first chamber may also include a material inlet for receiving material to be dried, in which case the gas outlet serves as a dried material and gas outlet.

  16. Acoustic-wave sensor apparatus for analyzing a petroleum-based composition and sensing solidification of constituents therein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spates, J.J.; Martin, S.J.; Mansure, A.J.

    1997-08-26

    An acoustic-wave sensor apparatus and method are disclosed. The apparatus for analyzing a normally liquid petroleum-based composition includes at least one acoustic-wave device in contact with the petroleum-based composition for sensing or detecting the presence of constituents (e.g. paraffins or petroleum waxes) therein which solidify upon cooling of the petroleum-based composition below a cloud-point temperature. The acoustic-wave device can be a thickness-shear-mode device (also termed a quartz crystal microbalance), a surface-acoustic-wave device, an acoustic-plate-mode device or a flexural plate-wave device. Embodiments of the present invention can be used for measuring a cloud point, a pour point and/or a freeze point of the petroleum-based composition, and for determining a temperature characteristic of each point. Furthermore, measurements with the acoustic-wave sensor apparatus can be made off-line by using a sample having a particular petroleum-based composition; or in-situ with the petroleum-based composition contained within a pipeline or storage tank. The acoustic-wave sensor apparatus has uses in many different petroleum technology areas, including the recovery, transport, storage, refining and use of petroleum and petroleum-based products. 7 figs.

  17. Acoustic-wave sensor apparatus for analyzing a petroleum-based composition and sensing solidification of constituents therein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spates, James J. (Albuquerque, NM); Martin, Stephen J. (Albuquerque, NM); Mansure, Arthur J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-01-01

    An acoustic-wave sensor apparatus and method. The apparatus for analyzing a normally liquid petroleum-based composition includes at least one acoustic-wave device in contact with the petroleum-based composition for sensing or detecting the presence of constituents (e.g. paraffins or petroleum waxes) therein which solidify upon cooling of the petroleum-based composition below a cloud-point temperature. The acoustic-wave device can be a thickness-shear-mode device (also termed a quartz crystal mircrobalance), a surface-acoustic-wave device, an acoustic-plate-mode device or a flexural plate-wave device. Embodiments of the present invention can be used for measuring a cloud point, a pour point and/or a freeze point of the petroleum-based composition, and for determining a temperature characteristic of each point. Furthermore, measurements with the acoustic-wave sensor apparatus can be made off-line by using a sample having a particular petroleum-based composition; or in-situ with the petroleum-based composition contained within a pipeline or storage tank. The acoustic-wave sensor apparatus has uses in many different petroleum technology areas, including the recover transport, storage, refining and use of petroleum and petroleum-based products.

  18. Design Parameters of a Miniaturized Piezoelectric Underwater Acoustic Transmitter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Huidong; Deng, Zhiqun; Yuan, Yong; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-07-02

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) project supported by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, has yielded the smallest acoustic fish tag transmitter commercially available to date. In order to study even smaller fish populations and make the transmitter injectable by needles, the JSATS acoustic micro transmitter needs to be further downsized. As part of the transmitter downsizing effort some of the design parameters of the lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramic tube transducer in the transmitter were studied, including the type of PZT, the backing material, the necessary drive voltage, the transmitting bandwidth and the length of the transducer. It was found that, to satisfy the 156-dB source level requirement of JSATS, a square wave with a 10-volt amplitude is required to drive 'soft' PZT transducers. PZT-5H demonstrated the best source level performance. For Navy types I and II, 16 volts or 18 volts were needed. Ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM) closed-cell foam was found to be the backing material providing the highest source level. The effect of tube length on the source level is also demonstrated in this paper, providing quantitative information for downsizing of small piezoelectric transmitters.

  19. Analysis of Shear-horizontal Vibrations of Crystal Plates for Acoustic Wave Resonators and Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Bo

    2010-01-01

    field excited liquid acoustic wave sensor,? IEEE Trans.3 high-frequency bulk acoustic wave sensor,? IEEE Trans.field excited liquid acoustic wave sensor,? IEEE Trans.

  20. Distortion of low-frequency acoustic signals by interaction with the moving ocean surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Stephen Dennis

    2008-01-01

    foundation of acoustic wave equation solution techniques,transformed acoustic wave equation with delta function-range-independent acoustic wave equation with point-source

  1. Iterative finite-difference solution analysis of acoustic wave equation in the Laplace-Fourier domain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Um, E.S.

    2013-01-01

    mod- eling of the acoustic wave equation: Geophysics, 39,solution analysis of acoustic wave equation in the Laplace-solutions to the acoustic wave equation in the Laplace-

  2. Site specific passive acoustic detection and densities of humpback whale calls off the coast of California /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helble, Tyler Adam

    2013-01-01

    61 3.2 Passive acoustic recording of transiting humpback100 Chapter 4 Calibrating passive acoustic monitoring: whaledensity estimates from passive acoustics . . . . . . .

  3. Description of Stellar Acoustic Modes Using the Local Wave Concept

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. A. P. Nghiem

    2006-06-26

    An understanding of stellar acoustic oscillations is attempted, using the local wave concept in semi-analytical calculations. The local homogeneity approximation allows to obtain simplified equations that can nevertheless describe the wave behavior down to the central region, as the gravitational potential perturbation is not neglected. Acoustic modes are calculated as classical standing waves in a cavity, by determining the cavity limits and the wave phases at these limits. The internal boundary condition is determined by a fitting with an Airy function. The external boundary condition is defined as the limit where the spatial variation of the background is important compared to the wavelength. This overall procedure is in accordance with the JWKB approximation. When comparing the results with numerical calculations, some drawbacks of the isothermal atmosphere approximation are revealed. When comparing with seismic observations of the Sun, possible improvements at the surface of solar models are suggested. The present semi-analytical method can potentially predict eigenfrequencies at the precision of +-3microHz in the range 800-5600 microHz, for the degrees l=0-10. A numerical calculation using the same type of external boundary conditions could reach a global agreement with observations better than 1 microHz. This approach could contribute to better determine the absolute values of eigenfrequencies for asteroseismology.

  4. ORNUGWPO-019 Determination of Effective Porosity of Mudrocks-A Feasibility Study

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report: AchievementsTemperatures Year 6Report) | SciTechORNUGWPO-019 Determination

  5. "VOICING" IN ENGLISH: A CATALOG OF ACOUSTIC FEATURES SIGNALING Ibl VERSUS Ipl IN TROCHEES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    "VOICING" IN ENGLISH: A CATALOG OF ACOUSTIC FEATURES SIGNALING Ibl VERSUS Ipl IN TROCHEES Leigh properties can be counted that may play a role in determining whether a listener reports hearing one of an earlier draft. [HASKINS LABORATORIES: Status Report on Speech Research SR-86/87 (1986)J 45 #12;Lisker

  6. Institute of Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    Institute of Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics Large Kundt's tubes Click to insert the image of the facility or test-rig Application area Facility Mechanical Property measurement Physical

  7. Institute of Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    Institute of Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics Sound Transmission Lab Click to insert the image of the facility or test-rig Application area Facility Mechanical Property measurement Physical

  8. acoustic anisotropy vs. depth, A:162, 306

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /aluminum ratio; thorium/aluminum ratio; titanium/aluminum ratio; uranium/alu- minum ratio; vanadium acoustic anisotropy anoxic environment deposition, A:260, 262 lithologic units, A:59, 116­118 synthesis, A

  9. Surface acoustic wave dust deposition monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fasching, G.E.; Smith, N.S. Jr.

    1988-02-12

    A system is disclosed for using the attenuation of surface acoustic waves to monitor real time dust deposition rates on surfaces. The system includes a signal generator, a tone-burst generator/amplifier connected to a transmitting transducer for converting electrical signals into acoustic waves. These waves are transmitted through a path defining means adjacent to a layer of dust and then, in turn, transmitted to a receiving transducer for changing the attenuated acoustic wave to electrical signals. The signals representing the attenuated acoustic waves may be amplified and used in a means for analyzing the output signals to produce an output indicative of the dust deposition rates and/or values of dust in the layer. 8 figs.

  10. Determination of effective water vapor diffusion coefficient in pemfc gas diffusion layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kandlikar, Satish

    . In this investigation, the effect of microporous layer (MPL) coatings, GDL thickness, and polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE TGP-H GDL samples are tested experimentally with and without MPL coatings and varying PTFE loadings, and 750 sccm. MPL coatings and increasing levels of PTFE content introduce significant resistance

  11. Determining the Effectiveness of Graphic-aided Portable Changeable Message Signs in Highway Work Zones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yilei

    2012-08-31

    the effectiveness of graphic-aided PCMS in reducing vehicle speeds in the upstream of one-lane two-way rural highway work zones. Field experiments and surveys were designed and conducted in two phases. Field experiment Phase I was performed to compare...

  12. AN ACOUSTICALLY DRIVEN MAGNETIZED TARGET FUSION REACTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laberge, Michel [General Fusion Inc., Vancouver (Canada)

    2009-07-26

    We propose a new acoustic compression scheme for a MTF power plant. A strong acoustic wave is produced by piston impacts. The wave focuses in liquid PbLi to compress a pre-formed FRC plasma. Simulations indicate the possibility of building an economical 60 MWe power plant. A proof-of-principle experiment produces a small D-D fusion yield of 2000 neutrons per shot.

  13. A Methodology to Integrate Magnetic Resonance and Acoustic Measurements for Reservoir Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parra, J.O.

    2001-01-26

    The objective of this project was to develop an advanced imaging method, including pore scale imaging, to integrate magnetic resonance (MR) techniques and acoustic measurements to improve predictability of the pay zone in two hydrocarbon reservoirs. This was accomplished by extracting the fluid property parameters using MR laboratory measurements and the elastic parameters of the rock matrix from acoustic measurements to create poroelastic models of different parts of the reservoir. Laboratory measurements were compared with petrographic analysis results to determine the relative roles of petrographic elements such as porosity type, mineralogy, texture, and distribution of clay and cement in creating permeability heterogeneity.

  14. Load controller and method to enhance effective capacity of a photovoltaic power supply using a dynamically determined expected peak loading

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard

    2005-05-03

    A load controller and method are provided for maximizing effective capacity of a non-controllable, renewable power supply coupled to a variable electrical load also coupled to a conventional power grid. Effective capacity is enhanced by monitoring power output of the renewable supply and loading, and comparing the loading against the power output and a load adjustment threshold determined from an expected peak loading. A value for a load adjustment parameter is calculated by subtracting the renewable supply output and the load adjustment parameter from the current load. This value is then employed to control the variable load in an amount proportional to the value of the load control parameter when the parameter is within a predefined range. By so controlling the load, the effective capacity of the non-controllable, renewable power supply is increased without any attempt at operational feedback control of the renewable supply.

  15. Tunable damper for an acoustic wave guide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rogers, Samuel C. (Knoxville, TN)

    1984-01-01

    A damper for tunably damping acoustic waves in an ultrasonic waveguide is provided which may be used in a hostile environment such as a nuclear reactor. The area of the waveguide, which may be a selected size metal rod in which acoustic waves are to be damped, is wrapped, or surrounded, by a mass of stainless steel wool. The wool wrapped portion is then sandwiched between tuning plates, which may also be stainless steel, by means of clamping screws which may be adjusted to change the clamping force of the sandwiched assembly along the waveguide section. The plates are preformed along their length in a sinusoidally bent pattern with a period approximately equal to the acoustic wavelength which is to be damped. The bent pattern of the opposing plates are in phase along their length relative to their sinusoidal patterns so that as the clamping screws are tightened a bending stress is applied to the waveguide at 180.degree. intervals along the damping section to oppose the acoustic wave motions in the waveguide and provide good coupling of the wool to the guide. The damper is tuned by selectively tightening the clamping screws while monitoring the amplitude of the acoustic waves launched in the waveguide. It may be selectively tuned to damp particular acoustic wave modes (torsional or extensional, for example) and/or frequencies while allowing others to pass unattenuated.

  16. Use of co-combustion bottom ash to design an acoustic absorbing material for highway noise barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arenas, Celia; Leiva, Carlos; Vilches, Luis F.

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • The particle size of bottom ash influenced the acoustic behavior of the barrier. • The best sound absorption coefficients were measured for larger particle sizes. • The maximum noise absorption is displaced to lower frequencies for higher thickness. • A noise barrier was designed with better properties than commercial products. • Recycling products from bottom ash no present leaching and radioactivity problems. - Abstract: The present study aims to determine and evaluate the applicability of a new product consisting of coal bottom ash mixed with Portland cement in the application of highway noise barriers. In order to effectively recycle the bottom ash, the influence of the grain particle size of bottom ash, the thickness of the panel and the combination of different layers with various particle sizes have been studied, as well as some environmental properties including leachability (EN-12457-4, NEN-7345) and radioactivity tests. Based on the obtained results, the acoustic properties of the final composite material were similar or even better than those found in porous concrete used for the same application. According to this study, the material produced presented no environmental risk.

  17. Acoustic Emission Source Location in Unidirectional Carbon-Fibre-Reinforced Plastic Plates Using Virtually Trained Artificial Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caprino, G.; Lopresto, V.; Leone, C.; Papa, I. [Department of Materials and Production Engineering, University of Naples 'Federico II', Piazzale Tecchio, 80, 80125, Naples (Italy)

    2010-06-02

    Acoustic emission source location in a unidirectional carbon-fibre-reinforced plastic plate was attempted employing Artificial Neural Network (ANN) technology. The acoustic emission events were produced by a lead break, and the response wave received by piezoelectric sensors, type VS150-M resonant at 150 kHz. The waves were detected by a Vallen AMSY4 eight-channel instrumentation. The time of arrival, determined through the conventional threshold crossing technique, was used to measure the dependence of wave velocity on fibre orientation. A simple empirical formula, relying on classical lamination and suggested by wave propagation theory, was able to accurately model the experimental trend. Based on the formula, virtual training and testing data sets were generated for the case of a plate monitored by three transducers, and adopted to select two potentially effective ANN architectures. For final validation, experimental tests were carried out, positioning the source at predetermined points evenly distributed within the plate area. A very satisfactory correlation was found between the actual source locations and the ANN predictions.

  18. Apparatus for separating particles utilizing engineered acoustic contrast capture particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaduchak, Gregory; Ward, Michael D

    2014-10-21

    An apparatus for separating particles from a medium includes a capillary defining a flow path therein that is in fluid communication with a medium source. The medium source includes engineered acoustic contrast capture particle having a predetermined acoustic contrast. The apparatus includes a vibration generator that is operable to produce at least one acoustic field within the flow path. The acoustic field produces a force potential minima for positive acoustic contrast particles and a force potential minima for negative acoustic contrast particles in the flow path and drives the engineered acoustic contrast capture particles to either the force potential minima for positive acoustic contrast particles or the force potential minima for negative acoustic contrast particles.

  19. Apparatus for separating particles utilizing engineered acoustic contrast capture particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaduchak, Gregory (Los Alamos, NM); Ward, Michael D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-12-27

    An apparatus for separating particles from a medium includes a capillary defining a flow path therein that is in fluid communication with a medium source. The medium source includes engineered acoustic contrast capture particle having a predetermined acoustic contrast. The apparatus includes a vibration generator that is operable to produce at least one acoustic field within the flow path. The acoustic field produces a force potential minima for positive acoustic contrast particles and a force potential minima for negative acoustic contrast particles in the flow path and drives the engineered acoustic contrast capture particles to either the force potential minima for positive acoustic contrast particles or the force potential minima for negative acoustic contrast particles.

  20. Method and apparatus for acoustic plate mode liquid-solid phase transition detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blair, Dianna S. (Albuquerque, NM); Freye, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM); Hughes, Robert C. (Albuquerque, NM); Martin, Stephen J. (Albuquerque, NM); Ricco, Antonio J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for sensing a liquid-solid phase transition event is provided which comprises an acoustic plate mode detecting element placed in contact with a liquid or solid material which generates a high-frequency acoustic wave that is attenuated to an extent based on the physical state of the material is contact with the detecting element. The attenuation caused by the material in contact with the acoustic plate mode detecting element is used to determine the physical state of the material being detected. The method and device are particularly suited for detecting conditions such as the icing and deicing of wings of an aircraft. In another aspect of the present invention, a method is provided wherein the adhesion of a solid material to the detecting element can be measured using the apparatus of the invention.

  1. On the Origin of Negative Density and Modulus in Acoustic Metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Oliver B

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a review and fundamental physical interpretation for the effective densities and moduli of acoustic metamaterials. We introduce the terminology of hidden force and hidden source of volume: the effective density or modulus is negative when the hidden force or source of volume operates in antiphase to, respectively, the force or volume change that would be obtained in their absence. We demonstrate this ansatz for some established acoustic metamaterials with elements based on membranes, Helmholtz resonators, springs and masses. The hidden force for membrane-based acoustic metamaterials, for instance, is the force from the membrane tension. The hidden source for a Helmholtz-resonator-based metamaterial is the extra air volume injected from the resonator cavity. We also explain the analogous concepts for pure mass-and-spring systems, in which case hidden forces can arise from masses and springs fixed inside other masses, whereas hidden sources - more aptly termed hidden expanders of displacemen...

  2. Microfluidic pumping through miniaturized channels driven by ultra-high frequency surface acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shilton, Richie J.; Travagliati, Marco; Beltram, Fabio; Cecchini, Marco

    2014-08-18

    Surface acoustic waves (SAWs) are an effective means to pump fluids through microchannel arrays within fully portable systems. The SAW-driven acoustic counterflow pumping process relies on a cascade phenomenon consisting of SAW transmission through the microchannel, SAW-driven fluid atomization, and subsequent coalescence. Here, we investigate miniaturization of device design, and study both SAW transmission through microchannels and the onset of SAW-driven atomization up to the ultra-high-frequency regime. Within the frequency range from 47.8 MHz to 754?MHz, we show that the acoustic power required to initiate SAW atomization remains constant, while transmission through microchannels is most effective when the channel widths w???10??, where ? is the SAW wavelength. By exploiting the enhanced SAW transmission through narrower channels at ultra-high frequencies, we discuss the relevant frequency-dependent length scales and demonstrate the scaling down of internal flow patterns and discuss their impact on device miniaturization strategies.

  3. Detection of nonlinear picosecond acoustic pulses by time-resolved Brillouin scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gusev, Vitalyi E.

    2014-08-14

    In time-resolved Brillouin scattering (also called picosecond ultrasonic interferometry), the time evolution of the spatial Fourier component of an optically excited acoustic strain distribution is monitored. The wave number is determined by the momentum conservation in photon-phonon interaction. For linear acoustic waves propagating in a homogeneous medium, the detected time-domain signal of the optical probe transient reflectivity shows a sinusoidal oscillation at a constant frequency known as the Brillouin frequency. This oscillation is a result of heterodyning the constant reflection from the sample surface with the Brillouin-scattered field. Here, we present an analytical theory for the nonlinear reshaping of a propagating, finite amplitude picosecond acoustic pulse, which results in a time-dependence of the observed frequency. In particular, we examine the conditions under which this information can be used to study the time-evolution of the weak-shock front speed. Depending on the initial strain pulse parameters and the time interval of its nonlinear transformation, our theory predicts the detected frequency to either be monotonically decreasing or oscillating in time. We support these theoretical predictions by comparison with available experimental data. In general, we find that picosecond ultrasonic interferometry of nonlinear acoustic pulses provides access to the nonlinear acoustic properties of a medium spanning most of the GHz frequency range.

  4. Load controller and method to enhance effective capacity of a photovotaic power supply using a dynamically determined expected peak loading

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard (Delmar, NY)

    2003-04-01

    A load controller and method are provided for maximizing effective capacity of a non-controllable, renewable power supply coupled to a variable electrical load also coupled to a conventional power grid. Effective capacity is enhanced by monitoring power output of the renewable supply and loading, and comparing the loading against the power output and a load adjustment threshold determined from an expected peak loading. A value for a load adjustment parameter is calculated by subtracting the renewable supply output and the load adjustment parameter from the current load. This value is then employed to control the variable load in an amount proportional to the value of the load control parameter when the parameter is within a predefined range. By so controlling the load, the effective capacity of the non-controllable, renewable power supply is increased without any attempt at operational feedback control of the renewable supply. The expected peak loading of the variable load can be dynamically determined within a defined time interval with reference to variations in the variable load.

  5. 11. Acoustic waves and shocks 11.1 Acoustic waves of low amplitude

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pohl, Martin Karl Wilhelm

    11. Acoustic waves and shocks 11.1 Acoustic waves of low amplitude Let us consider an adiabatic (or velocity of sound waves is constant. Does that still hold for sound waves of finite amplitude? Equation 11. This is the result of the non-linear nature of the hydrodynamical equations. On should note that wave damping, e

  6. Direct observation of dynamic surface acoustic wave controlled carrier injection into single quantum posts using phase-resolved optical spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Völk; F. Knall; F. J. R. Schülein; T. A. Truong; H. Kim; P. M. Petroff; A. Wixforth; H. J. Krenner

    2010-11-26

    A versatile stroboscopic technique based on active phase-locking of a surface acoustic wave to picosecond laser pulses is used to monitor dynamic acoustoelectric effects. Time-integrated multi-channel detection is applied to probe the modulation of the emission of a quantum well for different frequencies of the surface acoustic wave. For quantum posts we resolve dynamically controlled generation of neutral and charged excitons and preferential injection of holes into localized states within the nanostructure.

  7. Method of and apparatus for determining deposition-point temperature

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mansure, A.J.; Spates, J.J.; Martin, S.J.

    1998-10-27

    Acoustic-wave sensor apparatus and method are disclosed for analyzing a normally liquid petroleum-based composition for monitoring deposition-point temperature. The apparatus includes at least one acoustic-wave device such as SAW, QCM, FPM, TSM or APM type devices in contact with the petroleum-based composition for sensing or detecting the surface temperature at which deposition occurs and/or rate of deposition as a function of temperature by sensing an accompanying change in frequency, phase shift, damping voltage or damping current of an electrical oscillator to a known calibrated condition. The acoustic wave device is actively cooled to monitor the deposition of constituents such as paraffins by determining the point at which solids from the liquid composition begin to form on the acoustic wave device. The acoustic wave device can be heated to melt or boil off the deposits to reset the monitor and the process can be repeated. 5 figs.

  8. Method of and apparatus for determining deposition-point temperature

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mansure, Arthur J. (Albuquerque, NM); Spates, James J. (Albuquerque, NM); Martin, Stephen J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01

    Acoustic-wave sensor apparatus and method for analyzing a normally liquid petroleum-based composition for monitoring deposition-point temperature. The apparatus includes at least one acoustic-wave device such as SAW, QCM, FPM, TSM or APM type devices in contact with the petroleum-based composition for sensing or detecting the surface temperature at which deposition occurs and/or rate of deposition as a function of temperature by sensing an accompanying change in frequency, phase shift, damping voltage or damping current of an electrical oscillator to a known calibrated condition. The acoustic wave device is actively cooled to monitor the deposition of constituents such as paraffins by determining the point at which solids from the liquid composition begin to form on the acoustic wave device. The acoustic wave device can be heated to melt or boil off the deposits to reset the monitor and the process can be repeated.

  9. Synthesis of anisotropic swirling surface acoustic waves by inverse filter, towards integrated generators of acoustical vortices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riaud, Antoine; Charron, Eric; Bussonnière, Adrien; Matar, Olivier Bou

    2015-01-01

    From radio-electronics signal analysis to biological samples actuation, surface acoustic waves (SAW) are involved in a multitude of modern devices. Despite this versatility, SAW transducers developed up to date only authorize the synthesis of the most simple standing or progressive waves such as plane and focused waves. In particular, acoustical integrated sources able to generate acoustical vortices (the analogue of optical vortices) are missing. In this work, we propose a flexible tool based on inverse filter technique and arrays of SAW transducers enabling the synthesis of prescribed complex wave patterns at the surface of anisotropic media. The potential of this setup is illustrated by the synthesis of a 2D analog of 3D acoustical vortices, namely "swirling surface acoustic waves". Similarly to their 3D counterpart, they appear as concentric structures of bright rings with a phase singularity in their center resulting in a central dark spot. Swirling SAW can be useful in fragile sensors whose neighborhood...

  10. Determination of effective mechanical properties of a double-layer beam by means of a nano-electromechanical transducer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hocke, Fredrik; Pernpeintner, Matthias; Gross, Rudolf, E-mail: rudolf.gross@wmi.badw.de [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich, D-80799 München (Germany); Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Zhou, Xiaoqing; Kippenberg, Tobias J. [École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Schliesser, Albert [École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Huebl, Hans, E-mail: hans.huebl@wmi.badw.de [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich, D-80799 München (Germany)

    2014-09-29

    We investigate the mechanical properties of a doubly clamped, double-layer nanobeam embedded into an electromechanical system. The nanobeam consists of a highly pre-stressed silicon nitride and a superconducting niobium layer. By measuring the mechanical displacement spectral density both in the linear and the nonlinear Duffing regime, we determine the pre-stress and the effective Young's modulus of the nanobeam. An analytical double-layer model quantitatively corroborates the measured values. This suggests that this model can be used to design mechanical multilayer systems for electro- and optomechanical devices, including materials controllable by external parameters such as piezoelectric, magnetostrictive, or in more general multiferroic materials.

  11. Method and apparatus of spectro-acoustically enhanced ultrasonic detection for diagnostics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan (Knoxville, TN); Norton, Stephen J. (Raleigh, NC)

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus for detecting a discontinuity in a material includes a source of electromagnetic radiation has a wavelength and an intensity sufficient to induce an enhancement in contrast between a manifestation of an acoustic property in the material and of the acoustic property in the discontinuity, as compared to when the material is not irradiated by the electromagnetic radiation. An acoustic emitter directs acoustic waves to the discontinuity in the material. The acoustic waves have a sensitivity to the acoustic property. An acoustic receiver receives the acoustic waves generated by the acoustic emitter after the acoustic waves have interacted with the material and the discontinuity. The acoustic receiver also generates a signal representative of the acoustic waves received by the acoustic receiver. A processor, in communication with the acoustic receiver and responsive to the signal generated by the acoustic receiver, is programmed to generate informational output about the discontinuity based on the signal generated by the acoustic receiver.

  12. Ion acoustic solitons/double layers in two-ion plasma revisited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lakhina, G. S. Singh, S. V. Kakad, A. P.

    2014-06-15

    Ion acoustic solitons and double layers are studied in a collisionless plasma consisting of cold heavier ion species, a warm lighter ion species, and hot electrons having Boltzmann distributions by Sagdeev pseudo-potential technique. In contrast to the previous results, no double layers and super-solitons are found when both the heavy and lighter ion species are treated as cold. Only the positive potential solitons are found in this case. When the thermal effects of the lighter ion species are included, in addition to the usual ion-acoustic solitons occurring at M?>?1 (where the Mach number, M, is defined as the ratio of the speed of the solitary wave and the ion-acoustic speed considering temperature of hot electrons and mass of the heavier ion species), slow ion-acoustic solitons/double layers are found to occur at low Mach number (M?acoustic mode is actually a new ion-ion hybrid acoustic mode which disappears when the normalized number density of lighter ion species tends to 1 (i.e., no heavier species). An interesting property of the new slow ion-acoustic mode is that at low number density of the lighter ion species, only negative potential solitons/double layers are found whereas for increasing densities there is a transition first to positive solitons/double layers, and then only positive solitons. The model can be easily applicable to the dusty plasmas having positively charged dust grains by replacing the heavier ion species by the dust mass and doing a simple normalization to take account of the dust charge.

  13. Scattering of acoustic waves by a magnetic cylinder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Gizon; L.; S. M. Hanasoge; A. C. Birch

    2008-03-26

    With the aim of studying magnetic effects in time-distance helioseismology, we use the first-order Born approximation to compute the scattering of acoustic plane waves by a magnetic cylinder embedded in a uniform medium. We show, by comparison with the exact solution, that the travel-time shifts computed in the Born approximation are everywhere valid to first order in the ratio of the magnetic to the gas pressures. We also show that, for arbitrary magnetic field strength, the Born approximation is not valid in the limit where the radius of the magnetic cylinder tends to zero.

  14. Landau Damping of Geodesic Acoustic Mode in Toroidally Rotating Tokamaks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ren, Haijun

    2015-01-01

    Geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) is analyzed by using gyro-kinetic equations applicable to low-frequency microinstabilities in a rotating axisymmetric plasma. Dispersion relation of GAM in the presence of arbitrary Mach number is analytically dervied. Toroidal rotation plays the same effects on the GAM regardless of the orientation of equilibrium flow. It is shown that the toroidal Mach number increases the GAM frequency and dramatically decreases the Landau damping rate. Classical gyro-kinetic equation is examined to be not suitable for describing the GAM in a torodially rotating tokamak plasma even for very small Mach number.

  15. Asymptotic analysis of high-frequency acoustic modes in rapidly rotating stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Lignieres; B. Georgeot

    2009-03-10

    The asteroseismology of rapidly rotating pulsating stars is hindered by our poor knowledge of the effect of the rotation on the oscillation properties. Here we present an asymptotic analysis of high-frequency acoustic modes in rapidly rotating stars. We study the Hamiltonian dynamics of acoustic rays in uniformly rotating polytropic stars and show that the phase space structure has a mixed character, regions of chaotic trajectories coexisting with stable structures like island chains or invariant tori. In order to interpret the ray dynamics in terms of acoustic mode properties, we then use tools and concepts developed in the context of quantum physics. Accordingly, the high-frequency acoustic spectrum is a superposition of frequency subsets associated with dynamically independent phase space regions. The sub-spectra associated with stable structures are regular and can be modelled through EBK quantization methods while those associated with chaotic regions are irregular but with generic statistical properties. The results of this asymptotic analysis are successfully confronted with the properties of numerically computed high-frequency acoustic modes. The implications for the asteroseismology of rapidly rotating stars are discussed.

  16. Acoustic clouds: standing sound waves around a black hole analogue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carolina L. Benone; Luis C. B. Crispino; Carlos Herdeiro; Eugen Radu

    2015-01-28

    Under certain conditions sound waves in fluids experience an acoustic horizon with analogue properties to those of a black hole event horizon. In particular, a draining bathtub-like model can give rise to a rotating acoustic horizon and hence a rotating black hole (acoustic) analogue. We show that sound waves, when enclosed in a cylindrical cavity, can form stationary waves around such rotating acoustic black holes. These acoustic perturbations display similar properties to the scalar clouds that have been studied around Kerr and Kerr-Newman black holes; thus they are dubbed acoustic clouds. We make the comparison between scalar clouds around Kerr black holes and acoustic clouds around the draining bathtub explicit by studying also the properties of scalar clouds around Kerr black holes enclosed in a cavity. Acoustic clouds suggest the possibility of testing, experimentally, the existence and properties of black hole clouds, using analog models.

  17. EUV detection of high-frequency surface acoustic waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siemens, Mark

    We use coherent extreme ultraviolet radiation to probe surface acoustic wave propagation in nickel-on-sapphire nanostructures. We observe no acoustic dispersion over SAW wavelengths down to 200 nm, meaning the SAW propagation ...

  18. Search for Acoustic Signals from Ultra-High Energy Neutrinos...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Search for Acoustic Signals from Ultra-High Energy Neutrinos in 1500 Km3 of Sea Water Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Search for Acoustic Signals from Ultra-High Energy...

  19. 13.853 Computational Ocean Acoustics, Spring 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Henrik

    Wave equations for fluid and visco-elastic media. Wave-theory formulations of acoustic source radiation and seismo-acoustic propagation in stratified ocean waveguides. Wavenumber Integration and Normal Mode methods for ...

  20. Anisotropic Complementary Acoustic Metamaterial for Canceling out Aberrating Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Chen

    In this paper, we investigate a type of anisotropic, acoustic complementary metamaterial (CMM) and its application in restoring acoustic fields distorted by aberrating layers. The proposed quasi two-dimensional (2D), ...

  1. Acoustic measurement of the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well flow rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camilli, Richard

    On May 31, 2010, a direct acoustic measurement method was used to quantify fluid leakage rate from the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well prior to removal of its broken riser. This method utilized an acoustic imaging sonar and ...

  2. Ultrafast photo-acoustic spectroscopy of super-cooled liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klieber, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Picosecond laser ultrasonic techniques for acoustic wave generation and detection were adapted to probe longitudinal and transverse acoustic waves in liquids at gigahertz frequencies. The experimental effort was designed ...

  3. 13.811 Advanced Structural Dynamics and Acoustics, Spring 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Henrik

    Foundations of 3D elasticity. Fluid and elastic wave equations. Elastic and plastic waves in rods and beams. Waves in plates. Interaction with an acoustic fluid. Dynamics and acoustics of cylindrical shells. Radiation and ...

  4. Dust-acoustic filamentation of a current-driven dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khorashadizadeh, S. M.; Haghtalab, T. [Physics Department, Birjand University, Birjand, 97179-63384 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Niknam, A. R. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran, 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    The thermal motion effect of charged particles in the filamentation of a current-driven dusty plasma in the dust-acoustic frequency region is investigated by using the Lorentz transformed conductivity of the dusty plasma components and the total dielectric permittivity tensor of the dusty plasma in the laboratory frame. Obtaining the dispersion relation for dust-acoustic waves and considering the filamentation instability, the establishment time of the filamentation structure and the instability development threshold are derived. Moreover, it is shown that the current layer divides into separate current filaments.

  5. System and method for characterizing synthesizing and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holzrichter, John F. (Berkeley, CA); Burnett, Greg C. (Livermore, CA); Ng, Lawrence C. (Danville, CA)

    2003-01-01

    A system and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources is disclosed. Propagating wave electromagnetic sensors monitor excitation sources in sound producing systems, such as machines, musical instruments, and various other structures. Acoustical output from these sound producing systems is also monitored. From such information, a transfer function characterizing the sound producing system is generated. From the transfer function, acoustical output from the sound producing system may be synthesized or canceled. The methods disclosed enable accurate calculation of matched transfer functions relating specific excitations to specific acoustical outputs. Knowledge of such signals and functions can be used to effect various sound replication, sound source identification, and sound cancellation applications.

  6. System and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holzrichter, John F; Burnett, Greg C; Ng, Lawrence C

    2013-05-21

    A system and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources is disclosed. Propagating wave electromagnetic sensors monitor excitation sources in sound producing systems, such as machines, musical instruments, and various other structures. Acoustical output from these sound producing systems is also monitored. From such information, a transfer function characterizing the sound producing system is generated. From the transfer function, acoustical output from the sound producing system may be synthesized or canceled. The methods disclosed enable accurate calculation of matched transfer functions relating specific excitations to specific acoustical outputs. Knowledge of such signals and functions can be used to effect various sound replication, sound source identification, and sound cancellation applications.

  7. System and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holzrichter, John F. (Berkeley, CA); Burnett, Greg C. (Livermore, CA); Ng, Lawrence C. (Danville, CA)

    2007-10-16

    A system and method for characterizing, synthesizing, and/or canceling out acoustic signals from inanimate sound sources is disclosed. Propagating wave electromagnetic sensors monitor excitation sources in sound producing systems, such as machines, musical instruments, and various other structures. Acoustical output from these sound producing systems is also monitored. From such information, a transfer function characterizing the sound producing system is generated. From the transfer function, acoustical output from the sound producing system may be synthesized or canceled. The methods disclosed enable accurate calculation of matched transfer functions relating specific excitations to specific acoustical outputs. Knowledge of such signals and functions can be used to effect various sound replication, sound source identification, and sound cancellation applications.

  8. Ion acoustic solitons in dense magnetized plasmas with nonrelativistic and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons and positrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadiq, Safeer; Mahmood, S.; Haque, Q.; Ali, Munazza Zulfiqar

    2014-09-20

    The propagation of electrostatic waves in a dense magnetized electron-positron-ion (EPI) plasma with nonrelativistic and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons and positrons is investigated. The linear dispersion relation is obtained for slow and fast electrostatic waves in the EPI plasma. The limiting cases for ion acoustic wave (slow) and ion cyclotron wave (fast) are also discussed. Using the reductive perturbation method, two-dimensional propagation of ion acoustic solitons is found for both the nonrelativistic and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons and positrons. The effects of positron concentration, magnetic field, and mass of ions on ion acoustic solitons are shown in numerical plots. The proper form of Fermi temperature for nonrelativistic and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons and positrons is employed, which has not been used in earlier published work. The present investigation is useful for the understanding of linear and nonlinear electrostatic wave propagation in the dense magnetized EPI plasma of compact stars. For illustration purposes, we have applied our results to a pulsar magnetosphere.

  9. Long-range Acoustic Interactions in Insect Swarms: An Adaptive Gravity Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorbonos, Dan; Puckett, James G; Ni, Rui; Ouellette, Nicholas T; Gov, Nir S

    2015-01-01

    The collective motion of groups of animals emerges from the net effect of the interactions between individual members of the group. In many cases, such as birds, fish, or ungulates, these interactions are mediated by sensory stimuli that predominantly arise from nearby neighbors. But not all stimuli in animal groups are short range. Here, we consider mating swarms of midges, which interact primarily via long-range acoustic stimuli. We exploit the similarity in form between the decay of acoustic and gravitational sources to build a model for swarm behavior. By accounting for the adaptive nature of the midges' acoustic sensing, we show that our "adaptive gravity" model makes mean-field predictions that agree well with experimental observations of laboratory swarms. Our results highlight the role of sensory mechanisms and interaction range in collective animal behavior. The adaptive interactions that we present here open a new class of equations of motion, which may appear in other biological contexts.

  10. Depolarized guided acoustic wave Brillouin scattering in hollow-core photonic crystal fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong, Wenjia Elser née; Elser, Dominique; Heim, Bettina; Marquardt, Christoph; Leuchs, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    By performing quantum-noise-limited optical heterodyne detection, we observe polarization noise in light after propagation through a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF). We compare the noise spectrum to the one of a standard fiber and find an increase of noise even though the light is mainly transmitted in air in a hollow-core PCF. Combined with our simulation of the acoustic vibrational modes in the hollow-core PCF, we are offering an explanation for the polarization noise with a variation of guided acoustic wave Brillouin scattering (GAWBS). Here, instead of modulating the strain in the fiber core as in a solid core fiber, the acoustic vibrations in hollow-core PCF influence the effective refractive index by modulating the geometry of the photonic crystal structure. This induces polarization noise in the light guided by the photonic crystal structure.

  11. Depolarized guided acoustic wave Brillouin scattering in hollow-core photonic crystal fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenjia Elser née Zhong; Birgit Stiller; Dominique Elser; Bettina Heim; Christoph Marquardt; Gerd Leuchs

    2015-08-06

    By performing quantum-noise-limited optical heterodyne detection, we observe polarization noise in light after propagation through a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF). We compare the noise spectrum to the one of a standard fiber and find an increase of noise even though the light is mainly transmitted in air in a hollow-core PCF. Combined with our simulation of the acoustic vibrational modes in the hollow-core PCF, we are offering an explanation for the polarization noise with a variation of guided acoustic wave Brillouin scattering (GAWBS). Here, instead of modulating the strain in the fiber core as in a solid core fiber, the acoustic vibrations in hollow-core PCF influence the effective refractive index by modulating the geometry of the photonic crystal structure. This induces polarization noise in the light guided by the photonic crystal structure.

  12. Nonlinear dust acoustic waves in a mixed nonthermal high energy-tail electron distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Younsi, Smain; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2008-07-15

    Large amplitude as well as weakly nonlinear dust acoustic waves in a mixed nonthermal high-energy-tail electron distribution are investigated. The effects of charge variation and electron deviation from Boltzmann distribution on the large amplitude dust acoustic soliton are then considered. The dust charge variation leads to an additional enlargement of the dust acoustic soliton, which is more pronounced as the electrons evolve far away from Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. Under certain conditions, the dust charge fluctuation may provide an alternate physical mechanism causing anomalous dissipation, the strength of which becomes important and may prevail over that of dispersion as the suprathermal character of the plasma becomes important. The results complement and provide new insights into our previously published results on this problem [K. Aoutou, M. Tribeche, and T. H. Zerguini, Phys. Plasmas 15, 013702 (2008)].

  13. ECOLOGY AND BEHAVIOR Acoustic Indicators for Targeted Detection of Stored Product and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by infrared sensors, microphones, and a piezoelectric sensor in a small arena to evaluate effects of insect Pests by Inexpensive Infrared, Acoustic, and Vibrational Detection of Movement R. W. MANKIN,1 R. D crawling, but could be detected when scraping. Sound and vibration sensors detected brief, 3Ð10-ms impulses

  14. Transport Theory for Acoustic Waves with Reflection and Transmission at Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryzhik, Lenya

    Transport Theory for Acoustic Waves with Reflection and Transmission at Interfaces Guillaume Bal \\Lambda Joseph B. Keller y George Papanicolaou z Leonid Ryzhik x February 13, 1999 Abstract Transport transport in the high frequency limit, and the Born expansion is used to calculate the effect of the random

  15. Transport Theory for Acoustic Waves with Reflection and Transmission at Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papanicolaou, George C.

    Transport Theory for Acoustic Waves with Reflection and Transmission at Interfaces Guillaume Bal \\Lambda Joseph B. Keller y George Papanicolaou z Leonid Ryzhik x March 8, 1999 Abstract Transport transport in the high frequency limit, and the Born expansion is used to calculate the effect of the random

  16. IEEE SENSORS JOURNAL, VOL. 7, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2007 213 Polyaniline Nanofiber Based Surface Acoustic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IEEE SENSORS JOURNAL, VOL. 7, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2007 213 Polyaniline Nanofiber Based Surface Acoustic Wave Gas Sensors--Effect of Nanofiber Diameter on H2 Response Abu Z. Sadek, Student Member, IEEE, Christina O. Baker, David A. Powell, Member, IEEE, Wojtek Wlodarski, Member, IEEE, Richard B. Kaner

  17. LOW DISTORTION ACOUSTIC NOISE SUPPRESSION USING A PERCEPTUAL MODEL FOR SPEECH SIGNALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kabal, Peter

    LOW DISTORTION ACOUSTIC NOISE SUPPRESSION USING A PERCEPTUAL MODEL FOR SPEECH SIGNALS Joachim, such as musical noise, and distortion of the speech signal. By employing an auditory model, psychoacoustic effects. By using techniques from audio enhancement and a sophisticated perceptual model, a large degree of noise

  18. Design of a system to measure light scattering from individual cells excited by an acoustic wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigio, Irving J.

    , and the detected frequencies are consistent with theoretical predictions. © 2008 Optical Society of America OCIS. Micheletto, and Y. Kawakami, "Acoustical nanometre-scale vibrations of live cells detected by a near ultrashort electric pulsing," Proc. 3rd Int'l. Workshop on Biological Effect of EMFs, 56-65 (2004). 14. D. B

  19. Age, sex, and vowel dependencies of acoustic measures related to the voice sourcea)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alwan, Abeer

    Age, sex, and vowel dependencies of acoustic measures related to the voice sourcea) Markus Iseli 2007; accepted 24 January 2007 The effects of age, sex, and vocal tract configuration on the glottal-source interaction. All talkers show a dependency of F0 on sex and on F3, and of H1 * -A3 * on vowel type. For low

  20. Oscillatory Flame Response in Acoustically Coupled Fuel Droplet Combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sevilla Esparza, Cristhian Israel

    2013-01-01

    acoustic excitation. The thermoacoustic instability fosteredgain motivation from thermoacoustic phenomena pervasive into the quantification of thermoacoustic instabil- ity in an

  1. Broad-band acoustic hyperbolic metamaterial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Chen; Sui, Ni; Wang, Wenqi; Cummer, Steven A; Jing, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic metamaterials (AMMs) are engineered materials, made from subwavelength structures, that exhibit useful or unusual constitutive properties. There has been intense research interest in AMMs since its first realization in 2000 by Liu et al. A number of functionalities and applications have been proposed and achieved using AMMs. Hyperbolic metamaterials are one of the most important types of metamaterials due to their extreme anisotropy and numerous possible applications, including negative refraction, backward waves, spatial filtering, and subwavelength imaging. Although the importance of acoustic hyperbolic metamaterials (AHMMs) as a tool for achieving full control of acoustic waves is substantial, the realization of a broad-band and truly hyperbolic AMM has not been reported so far. Here, we demonstrate the design and experimental characterization of a broadband AHMM that operates between 1.0 kHz and 2.5 kHz.

  2. Active micromixer using surface acoustic wave streaming

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branch; Darren W. (Albuquerque, NM), Meyer; Grant D. (Ithaca, NY), Craighead; Harold G. (Ithaca, NY)

    2011-05-17

    An active micromixer uses a surface acoustic wave, preferably a Rayleigh wave, propagating on a piezoelectric substrate to induce acoustic streaming in a fluid in a microfluidic channel. The surface acoustic wave can be generated by applying an RF excitation signal to at least one interdigital transducer on the piezoelectric substrate. The active micromixer can rapidly mix quiescent fluids or laminar streams in low Reynolds number flows. The active micromixer has no moving parts (other than the SAW transducer) and is, therefore, more reliable, less damaging to sensitive fluids, and less susceptible to fouling and channel clogging than other types of active and passive micromixers. The active micromixer is adaptable to a wide range of geometries, can be easily fabricated, and can be integrated in a microfluidic system, reducing dead volume. Finally, the active micromixer has on-demand on/off mixing capability and can be operated at low power.

  3. High-precision determination of low-energy effective parameters for a two-dimensional Heisenberg quantum antiferromagnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, F.-J.; Wiese, U.-J.

    2011-04-15

    The two-dimensional (2D) spin-(1/2) Heisenberg antiferromagnet with exchange coupling J is investigated on a periodic square lattice of spacing a at very small temperatures using the loop-cluster algorithm. Monte Carlo data for the staggered and uniform susceptibilities are compared with analytic results obtained in the systematic low-energy effective field theory for the staggered magnetization order parameter. The low-energy parameters of the effective theory, i.e., the staggered magnetization density M{sub s}=0.307 43(1)/a{sup 2}, the spin stiffness {rho}{sub s}=0.180 81(11)J, and the spin wave velocity c=1.6586(3)Ja, are determined with very high precision. Our study may serve as a test case for the comparison of lattice quantum chromodynamics Monte Carlo data with analytic predictions of the chiral effective theory for pions and nucleons, which is vital for the quantitative understanding of the strong interaction at low energies.

  4. Excitation of nonlinear electron acoustic waves Francesco Valentini

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    Excitation of nonlinear electron acoustic waves Francesco Valentini Dipartimento di Fisica and INFM acoustic waves EAWs and the stability of the EAWs against decay. An EAW is a nonlinear wave- linear wave structures can exist in a plasma, even at low amplitude. They called these waves electron-acoustic

  5. Trapping and Frequency Variability in Electron Acoustic Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    Trapping and Frequency Variability in Electron Acoustic Waves C.F. Driscoll, F. Anderegg, D 92093 USA Abstract. Electron Acoustic Waves (EAWs) with a phase velocity less than twice the plasma. Keywords: add some here PACS: 52.27.Jt, 52.35.Fp, 52.35.Sb Electron Acoustic Waves (EAWs) are the low

  6. Diffusing acoustic wave spectroscopy M. L. Cowan,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page, John

    Diffusing acoustic wave spectroscopy M. L. Cowan,1 I. P. Jones,1, * J. H. Page,1,2, and D. A. Weitz called diffusing acoustic wave spec- troscopy DAWS . In this technique, the motion of the scatterers e the particle velocity correlation function. Potential appli- cations of diffusing acoustic wave spectroscopy

  7. Excitation and Decay of Electron Acoustic Waves Francesco Valentini

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    Excitation and Decay of Electron Acoustic Waves Francesco Valentini , Thomas M. O'Neil and Daniel H) simulation is used to investigate the excitation of electron acoustic waves (EAWs) by a driver electric field structures can exist in a plasma even at low amplitude. They called these waves electron-acoustic waves (EAW

  8. May 31, 2005 Reflection Of Microwave Pulses From Acoustic Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May 31, 2005 . Reflection Of Microwave Pulses From Acoustic Waves: Summary of Experimental of an acoustic wave as a reflecting virtual interface for propagating impulses. It is by now well accepted (e.g., see [2, 7, 11, 14]) that acoustic pressure waves will interact with electromagnetic signals in ways

  9. 2011201120112011 2011 Symposium on Piezoelectricity, Acoustic waves, and Device Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Baoquan

    2011201120112011 2011 Symposium on Piezoelectricity, Acoustic waves, and Device Application://web.siat.ac.cn/spawda2011/ 1 2011 2011 12 9 -11 IEEE Theory of Piezoelectricity; Bulk and Surface Acoustic Waves; MEMS, Acoustic waves, and Device Application 12121212 9999 ----11111111 Dec. 9-11, Shenzhen Institutes

  10. Cell separation using tilted-angle standing surface acoustic waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dao, Ming

    Cell separation using tilted-angle standing surface acoustic waves Xiaoyun Dinga,1 , Zhangli Pengb for studying cell properties, disease diagnostics, and therapeutics. Cell sorting by acoustic waves offers diagnostics. In this work, we introduce a unique configuration of tilted-angle standing surface acoustic waves

  11. Experimental Investigation of Electron-Acoustic Waves in Electron Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    Experimental Investigation of Electron-Acoustic Waves in Electron Plasmas Andrey A. Kabantsev , F Electron-acoustic wave (EAW) solutions of the linearized electrostatic Vlasov equations have usually been USA 92093-0319 Dipt. di Fisica and INFM, Univ. della Calabria, 87036 Rende, Italy Abstract. Electron-acoustic

  12. DIFFUSING ACOUSTIC WAVE SPECTROSCOPY: FIELD FLUCTUATION SPECTROSCOPY WITH MULTIPLY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page, John

    DIFFUSING ACOUSTIC WAVE SPECTROSCOPY: FIELD FLUCTUATION SPECTROSCOPY WITH MULTIPLY SCATTERED Martyrs, B.P. 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9, France Abstract. Diffusing Acoustic Wave Spectroscopy (DAWS that acoustic waves, and ultrasonic waves in particular, are playing in understanding the rich diversity of wave

  13. ACOUSTIC PLANE WAVE A. CHRISTOFFEL EQUATIONS FOR ISOTROPIC AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Thomas S.

    Appendix 3 ACOUSTIC PLANE WAVE PROPERTIES A. CHRISTOFFEL EQUATIONS FOR ISOTROPIC AND ANISOTROPICI/; + - 2cl(/xl.y (C1:1 + (1'13 + (el:l + (c1:1 + T ACOUSTIC PLANE WAVE PROI'ERTIES 385 ORTHORHOMBIC ell- 0 + C SIIl- () 2 44 ! a quasishear wave, (\\ 'II (~ _ \\1/( (J~, ACOUSTIC PLANE WAVE PROPERTIES 387 (k

  14. Acoustics 2000 1 The Two Dimensional Numerical Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -difference methods have often been used. This report terms the wave equations suited to waves in fluids, acoustic, Sven Treitel, and Alford, 1976) but the acoustic wave equations have also been used for geophysical. Key features of the model at present are: (i) The use of acoustic wave equation (ii) Time domain

  15. Theory of High Frequency Acoustic Wave Scattering by Turbulent Flames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lieuwen, Timothy C.

    of the wave equation and assumes that the smallest scales of flame wrinkling are much larger than the acoustic the integral equation approach used in this paper to assess other characteristics of acoustic waveTheory of High Frequency Acoustic Wave Scattering by Turbulent Flames TIM LIEUWEN* School

  16. Development of an acoustic wave sensor for biological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turova, Varvara

    -Jacobi equation can be rewritten as or Application to the propagation of surface acoustic waves Velocity contour . Comparison with the eikonal equation yields the condition Acoustic waves in anisotropic crystals obeyMotivation Development of an acoustic wave sensor for biological and medical applications

  17. Technical Report 2010-2 Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics in Acoustic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Negrut, Dan

    and architectural acoustics can be addressed by solving the linear wave equation with an appropriate numericalTechnical Report 2010-2 Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics in Acoustic Simulations Philipp Hahn, Dan Lagrangian technique, called Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), as a method for acoustic simulation

  18. A Computational Model for Sound Field Absorption by Acoustic Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . We then formulate the acoustic wave equation with the absorption boundary coeÆcient in the frequency the sound absorption property of arrays of micro-acoustic actuators at a control surface. We use the waveA Computational Model for Sound Field Absorption by Acoustic Arrays H. T. Banks #3; D. G. Cole z K

  19. Quantitative Thermo-acoustics and related problems Guillaume Bal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biasutti, Michela

    Quantitative Thermo-acoustics and related problems Guillaume Bal Department of Applied Physics of Mathematics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 E-mail: tzhou@math.washington.edu Abstract. Thermo-acoustic in tissues with the good resolution properties of ultrasounds. Thermo-acoustic imaging may be decomposed

  20. An acoustic wave equation based on viscoelasticity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrzej Hanyga

    2014-01-30

    An acoustic wave equation for pressure accounting for viscoelastic attenuation is derived from viscoelastic equations of motion. It is assumed that the relaxation moduli are completely monotonic. The acoustic equation differs significantly from the equations proposed by Szabo (1994) and in several other papers. Integral representations of dispersion and attenuation are derived. General properties and asymptotic behavior of attenuation and dispersion in the low and high frequency range are studied. The results are compatible with experiments. The relation between the asymptotic properties of attenuation and wavefront singularities is examined. The theory is applied to some classes of viscoelastic models and to the quasi-linear attenuation reported in seismology.

  1. Acoustic microscope surface inspection system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T. (Palo Alto, CA); Parent, Philippe (Chilly-Mazarin, FR); Reinholdtsen, Paul A. (Seattle, WA)

    1991-01-01

    An acoustic microscope surface inspection system and method in which pulses of high frequency electrical energy are applied to a transducer which forms and focuses acoustic energy onto a selected location on the surface of an object and receives energy from the location and generates electrical pulses. The phase of the high frequency electrical signal pulses are stepped with respected to the phase of a reference signal at said location. An output signal is generated which is indicative of the surface of said selected location. The object is scanned to provide output signals representative of the surface at a plurality of surface locations.

  2. Acoustic microscope surface inspection system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Parent, P.; Reinholdtsen, P.A.

    1991-02-26

    An acoustic microscope surface inspection system and method are described in which pulses of high frequency electrical energy are applied to a transducer which forms and focuses acoustic energy onto a selected location on the surface of an object and receives energy from the location and generates electrical pulses. The phase of the high frequency electrical signal pulses are stepped with respect to the phase of a reference signal at said location. An output signal is generated which is indicative of the surface of said selected location. The object is scanned to provide output signals representative of the surface at a plurality of surface locations. 7 figures.

  3. A study to determine the effectiveness of the leadership advisory board in meeting the needs of visioning and advocacy for the Texas agrilife extension service 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ripley, Jeffrey Paul

    2009-05-15

    This study sought to determine and evaluate the effectiveness of the Leadership Advisory Board structure and its membership at meeting the needs of Visioning and Advocacy for Texas AgriLife Extension Service. The research ...

  4. Accuracy of cosmological parameters using the baryon acoustic scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thepsuriya, Kiattisak; Lewis, Antony E-mail: antony@cosmologist.info

    2015-01-01

    Percent-level measurements of the comoving baryon acoustic scale standard ruler can be used to break degeneracies in parameter constraints from the CMB alone. The sound horizon at the epoch of baryon drag is often used as a proxy for the scale of the peak in the matter density correlation function, and can conveniently be calculated quickly for different cosmological models. However, the measurements are not directly constraining this scale, but rather a measurement of the full correlation function, which depends on the detailed evolution through decoupling. We assess the level of reliability of parameter constraints based on a simple approximation of the acoustic scale compared to a more direct determination from the full numerical two-point correlation function. Using a five-parameter fitting technique similar to recent BAO data analyses, we find that for standard ?CDM models and extensions with massive neutrinos and additional relativistic degrees of freedom, the approximation is at better than 0.15% for most parameter combinations varying over reasonable ranges.

  5. Application of electro acoustics for dewatering pharmaceutical sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golla, P.S.; Johnson, H.W. ) Senthilnathan, P.R. )

    1992-02-01

    Application of electro acoustic principles for dewatering has been developed by Battelle Institute. The Department of Energy, Battelle Institute, and Ashbrook-Simon-Hartley, have jointly developed an Electro Acoustic Dewatering press (EAD press). The EAD press applies a combination of mechanical pressure, electrical current and ultrasonics. This press is utilized after conventional dewatering devices and can remove up to 50% water from filtered sludge cake at a fraction of the cost incurred in existing thermal drying devices. The dominant mechanism of sludge dewatering by EAD press is electro-osmosis due to the application of a direct current field. Electro-osmosis is caused by an electrical double layer of oppositely charged ions formed at the solid liquid interface, which is characterized by zeta potential. The ultrasonic fields help electro-osmosis by consolidation of the filter cake and by release of inaccessible liquid. The EAD press has been tested successfully on a variety of materials including apple pomace, corn gluten, sewage sludge, and coal fines. A three week long full scale trial was conducted successfully at a pharmaceutical industry to determine the application of this technology for dewatering waste activated sludge.

  6. Vibrational stark effects to identify ion-pairing and determine reduction potentials in electrolyte-free environments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mani, Tomoyasu [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Grills, David C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Miller, John R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-01-28

    A recently-developed instrument for time-resolved infrared detection following pulse radiolysis has been used to measure the ?(C?N) IR band of the radical anion of a CN-substituted fluorene in tetrahydrofuran. Specific vibrational frequencies can exhibit distinct frequency shifts due to ion-pairing, which can be explained in the framework of the vibrational Stark effect. Measurements of the ratio of free ions and ion-pairs in different electrolyte concentrations allowed us to obtain an association constant and free energy change for ion-pairing. This new method has the potential to probe the geometry of ion-pairing and allows the reduction potentials of molecules to be determined in the absence of electrolyte in an environment of low dielectric constant.

  7. Method and apparatus for acoustic imaging of objects in water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, Vance A.; Telschow, Kenneth L.

    2005-01-25

    A method, system and underwater camera for acoustic imaging of objects in water or other liquids includes an acoustic source for generating an acoustic wavefront for reflecting from a target object as a reflected wavefront. The reflected acoustic wavefront deforms a screen on an acoustic side and correspondingly deforms the opposing optical side of the screen. An optical processing system is optically coupled to the optical side of the screen and converts the deformations on the optical side of the screen into an optical intensity image of the target object.

  8. Determination of saccharides and ethanol from biomass conversion using Raman spectroscopy: Effects of pretreatment and enzyme composition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shih, Chien-Ju

    2010-05-16

    This dissertation focuses on the development of facile and rapid quantitative Raman spectroscopy measurements for the determination of conversion products in producing bioethanol from corn stover. Raman spectroscopy was chosen to determine glucose, xylose and ethanol in complex hydrolysis and fermentation matrices. Chapter 1 describes the motives and main goals of this work, and includes an introduction to biomass, commonly used pretreatment methods, hydrolysis and fermentation reactions. The principles of Raman spectroscopy, its advantages and applications related to biomass analysis are also illustrated. Chapter 2 and 3 comprise two published or submitted manuscripts, and the thesis concludes with an appendix. In Chapter 2, a Raman spectroscopic protocol is described to study the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose by measuring the main product in hydrolysate, glucose. Two commonly utilized pretreatment methods were investigated in order to understand their effect on glucose measurements by Raman spectroscopy. Second, a similar method was set up to determine the concentration of ethanol in fermentation broth. Both of these measurements are challenged by the presence of complex matrices. In Chapter 3, a quantitative comparison of pretreatment protocols and the effect of enzyme composition are studied using systematic methods. A multipeak fitting algorithm was developed to analyze spectra of hydrolysate containing two analytes: glucose and xylose. Chapter 4 concludes with a future perspective of this research area. An appendix describes a convenient, rapid spectrophotometric method developed to measure cadmium in water. This method requires relatively low cost instrumentation and can be used in microgravity, such as space shuttles or the International Space Station. This work was performed under the supervision of Professor Marc Porter while at Iowa State University. Research related to producing biofuel from bio-renewable resources, especially bioethanol from biomass, has grown significantly in the past decade due to the high demand and rising costs of fossil fuels. More than 3 percent of the energy consumption in the U.S. is derived from renewable biomass, mostly through industrial heat and steam production by the pulp and paper industry, and electricity generation from municipal solid waste (MSW) and forest industry residues. The utilization of food-based biomass to make fuels has been widely criticized because it may increase food shortages throughout the world and raise the cost of food. Thus, nonfood-based and plentiful lignocellulosic feedstocks, such as corn stover, perennial grass, bagasse, sorghum, wheat/rice straw, herbaceous and woody crops, have great potential to be new bio-renewable sources for energy production. Given that many varieties of biomass are available, there is need for a rapid, simple, high-throughput method to screen the conversion of many plant varieties. The most suitable species for each geographic region must be determined, as well as the optimal stage of harvest, impacts of environmental conditions (temperature, soil, pH, etc.). Various genetically modified plants should be studied in order to establish the desired biomass in bioethanol production. The main screening challenge, however, is the complexity of plant cell wall structures that make reliable and sensitive analysis difficult. To date, one of the most popular methods to produce lignocellulosic ethanol is to perform enzymatic hydrolysis followed by fermentation of the hydrolysate with yeast. There are several vital needs related to the field of chemistry that have been suggested as primary research foci needed to effectively improve lignocellulosic ethanol production. These topics include overcoming the recalcitrance of cellulosic biomass, the pervasiveness of pretreatment, advanced biological processing and better feedstocks. In this thesis, a novel approach using Raman spectroscopy has been developed to address important issues related to bioethanol generation, which will aid the research aimed to solve the topics m

  9. Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic Tomography, Satellite Altimetry, and Modeling The ATOC to thermal expansion. Interpreting climate change signals from fluctuations in sea level is therefore in the advective heat flux. Changes in oceanic heat storage are a major expected element of future climate shifts

  10. A feasibility study of in vivo applications of single beam acoustic tweezers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ying, E-mail: yli582@usc.edu; Lee, Changyang; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk [NIH Transducer Resource Center and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-1111 (United States)

    2014-10-27

    Tools that are capable of manipulating micro-sized objects have been widely used in such fields as physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine. Several devices, including optical tweezers, atomic force microscope, micro-pipette aspirator, and standing surface wave type acoustic tweezers have been studied to satisfy this need. However, none of them has been demonstrated to be suitable for in vivo and clinical studies. Single beam acoustic tweezers (SBAT) is a technology that uses highly focused acoustic beam to trap particles toward the beam focus. Its feasibility was first theoretically and experimentally demonstrated by Lee and Shung several years ago. Since then, much effort has been devoted to improving this technology. At present, the tool is capable of trapping a microparticle as small as 1 ?m, as well as a single red blood cell. Although in comparing to other microparticles manipulating technologies, SBAT has advantages of providing stronger trapping force and deeper penetration depth in tissues, and producing less tissue damage, its potential for in vivo applications has yet been explored. It is worth noting that ultrasound has been used as a diagnostic tool for over 50 years and no known major adverse effects have been observed at the diagnostic energy level. This paper reports the results of an initial attempt to assess the feasibility of single beam acoustic tweezers to trap microparticles in vivo inside of a blood vessel. The acoustic intensity of SBAT under the trapping conditions that were utilized was measured. The mechanical index and thermal index at the focus of acoustic beam were found to be 0.48 and 0.044, respectively, which meet the standard of commercial diagnostic ultrasound system.

  11. Low Frequency Acoustic Resonance Studies of the Liquid-Vapor Transition in Silica Aerogel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobias Herman; John Beamish

    2005-06-30

    Fluid phase transitions in porous media are a powerful probe of the effect of confinement and disorder on phase transitions. Aerogel may provide a model system in which to study the effect of dilute impurities on a variety of phase transitions. In this paper we present a series of low frequency acoustic experiments on the effect of aerogel on the liquid-vapor phase transition. Acoustic resonators were used to study the liquid-vapor transition in two fluids (helium and neon) and in two different porosity aerogels (95% and 98%). While effective coexistence curves could be mapped out, the transition was sometimes difficult to pinpoint, leading to doubt as to whether this transition can be treated as an equilibrium macroscopic phase transition at all.

  12. Piezooptic Coefficients and Acoustic Wave Velocities in Sn2P2S6 Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Mys; I. Martynyuk-Lototska; A. Grabar; Yu. Vysochanskii; R. Vlokh

    2007-06-28

    Piezooptic coefficients of Sn2P2S6 crystals are experimentally determined for l=623.8 nm and T=293 K with the aid of interferometric technique. The components of the elastic stiffness tensor for these crystals are calculated on the basis of studies for the acoustic wave velocities. It is shown that acoustooptic figure of merit can achieve extremely high values for Sn2P2S6 crystals (M2 - 2x10-12s3/kg2).

  13. A layered surface acoustic wave gas sensor based on a polyaniline/In2O3 nanofibre composite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadek, A Z; Wlodarski, W; Shin, K; Kaner, Richard B; Kalantar-zadeh, K

    2006-01-01

    based layered surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor has beenA layered surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer isof the propagating acoustic wave by causing a change in the

  14. Comparison of Optical, Radio, and Acoustical Detectors for Ultrahigh-Energy Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. B. Price

    1995-10-24

    For electromagnetic cascades induced by electron-neutrinos in South Pole ice, the effective volume per detector element (phototube, radio antenna, or acoustic transducer) as a function of cascade energy is estimated, taking absorption and scattering into account. A comparison of the three techniques shows that the optical technique is most effective for energies below ~0.5 PeV, that the radio technique shows promise of being the most effective for higher energies, and that the acoustic method is not competitive. Due to the great transparency of ice, the event rate of AGN ne-induced cascades is an order of magnitude greater than in water. For hard source spectra, the rate of Glashow resonance events may be much greater than the rate for non-resonant energies. The radio technique will be particularly useful in the study of Glashow events and in studies of sources with very hard energy spectra.

  15. Acoustic data transmission through a drillstring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1992-07-07

    A method and apparatus for acoustically transmitting data along a drillstring are presented. In accordance with one embodiment of the present invention, acoustic data signals are conditioned to counteract distortions caused by the drillstring. Preferably, this conditioning step comprises multiplying each frequency component of the data signal by exp ([minus]ikL) where L is the transmission length of the drillstring, k is the wave number in the drillstring at the frequency of each component and i is ([minus]1)[sup 1/2]. In another embodiment of this invention, data signals having a frequency content in at least one passband of the drillstring are generated preferably traveling in only one direction (e.g., up the drillstring) while echoes in the drillstring resulting from the data transmission are suppressed. 20 figs.

  16. Methods And Apparatus For Acoustic Fiber Fractionation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brodeur, Pierre (Smyrna, GA)

    1999-11-09

    Methods and apparatus for acoustic fiber fractionation using a plane ultrasonic wave field interacting with water suspended fibers circulating in a channel flow using acoustic radiation forces to separate fibers into two or more fractions based on fiber radius, with applications of the separation concept in the pulp and paper industry. The continuous process relies on the use of a wall-mounted, rectangular cross-section piezoelectric ceramic transducer to selectively deflect flowing fibers as they penetrate the ultrasonic field. The described embodiment uses a transducer frequency of approximately 150 kHz. Depending upon the amount of dissolved gas in water, separation is obtained using a standing or a traveling wave field.

  17. NW-MILO Acoustic Data Collection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matzner, Shari; Myers, Joshua R.; Maxwell, Adam R.; Jones, Mark E.

    2010-02-17

    There is an enduring requirement to improve our ability to detect potential threats and discriminate these from the legitimate commercial and recreational activity ongoing in the nearshore/littoral portion of the maritime domain. The Northwest Maritime Information and Littoral Operations (NW-MILO) Program at PNNL’s Coastal Security Institute in Sequim, Washington is establishing a methodology to detect and classify these threats - in part through developing a better understanding of acoustic signatures in a near-shore environment. The purpose of the acoustic data collection described here is to investigate the acoustic signatures of small vessels. The data is being recorded continuously, 24 hours a day, along with radar track data and imagery. The recording began in August 2008, and to date the data contains tens of thousands of signals from small vessels recorded in a variety of environmental conditions. The quantity and variety of this data collection, with the supporting imagery and radar track data, makes it particularly useful for the development of robust acoustic signature models and advanced algorithms for signal classification and information extraction. The underwater acoustic sensing system is part of a multi-modal sensing system that is operating near the mouth of Sequim Bay. Sequim Bay opens onto the Straight of Juan de Fuca, which contains part of the border between the U.S. and Canada. Table 1 lists the specific components used for the NW-MILO system. The acoustic sensor is a hydrophone permanently deployed at a mean depth of about 3 meters. In addition to a hydrophone, the other sensors in the system are a marine radar, an electro-optical (EO) camera and an infra-red (IR) camera. The radar is integrated with a vessel tracking system (VTS) that provides position, speed and heading information. The data from all the sensors is recorded and saved to a central server. The data has been validated in terms of its usability for characterizing the signatures of small vessels. The sampling rate of 8 kHz and low pass filtering to 2 kHz results in an alias-free signal in the frequency band that is appropriate for small vessels. Calibration was performed using a Lubell underwater speaker so that the raw data signal levels can be converted to sound pressure. Background noise is present due to a nearby pump and as a result of tidal currents. More study is needed to fully characterize the noise, but it does not pose an obstacle to using the acoustic data for the purposes of vessel detection and signature analysis. The detection range for a small vessel was estimated using the calibrated voltage response of the system and a cylindrical spreading model for transmission loss. The sound pressure of a typical vessel with an outboard motor was found to be around 140 dB mPa, and could theoretically be detected from 10 km away. In practical terms, a small vessel could reliably be detected from 3 - 5 km away. The data is archived in netCDF files, a standard scientific file format that is "self describing". This means that each data file contains the metadata - timestamps, units, origin, etc. - needed to make the data meaningful and portable. Other file formats, such as XML, are also supported. A visualization tool has been developed to view the acoustic data in the form of spectrograms, along with the coincident radar track data and camera images.

  18. Acoustic cloaking theory BY ANDREW N. NORRIS*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norris, Andrew

    composition of the cloak is not uniquely defined, but the phase speed and wave velocity of the pseudo-acoustic is for the infinitesimal pressure p(x, t) that satisfies the scalar wave equation in the surrounding fluid, V2 pKp Z 0: ð1 that the modified wave equation in u mimics the exterior equation (1.1) in the entire region U. This is achieved

  19. Acoustic enhancement for photo detecting devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, Thomas G; Senesac, Lawrence R; Van Neste, Charles W

    2013-02-19

    Provided are improvements to photo detecting devices and methods for enhancing the sensitivity of photo detecting devices. A photo detecting device generates an electronic signal in response to a received light pulse. An electro-mechanical acoustic resonator, electrically coupled to the photo detecting device, damps the electronic signal and increases the signal noise ratio (SNR) of the electronic signal. Increased photo detector standoff distances and sensitivities will result.

  20. Electrochemical-acoustic time of flight: in operando correlation of physical dynamics with battery charge and health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsieh, AG; Bhadra, S; Hertzberg, BJ; Gjeltema, PJ; Goy, A; Fleischer, JW; Steingart, DA

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that a simple acoustic time-of-flight experiment can measure the state of charge and state of health of almost any closed battery. An acoustic conservation law model describing the state of charge of a standard battery is proposed, and experimental acoustic results verify the simulated trends; furthermore, a framework relating changes in sound speed, via density and modulus changes, to state of charge and state of health within a battery is discussed. Regardless of the chemistry, the distribution of density within a battery must change as a function of state of charge and, along with density, the bulk moduli of the anode and cathode changes as well. The shifts in density and modulus also change the acoustic attenuation in a battery. Experimental results indicating both state-of-charge determination and irreversible physical changes are presented for two of the most ubiquitous batteries in the world, the lithium-ion 18650 and the alkaline LR6 (AA). Overall, a one-or two-point acoustic measurement can be related to the interaction of a pressure wave at multiple discrete interfaces within a battery, which in turn provides insights into state of charge, state of health, and mechanical evolution/degradation.

  1. Extremely Low-Loss Acoustic Phonons in a Quartz Bulk Acoustic Wave Resonator at Millikelvin Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxim Goryachev; Daniel L. Creedon; Eugene N. Ivanov; Serge Galliou; Roger Bourquin; Michael E. Tobar

    2012-04-02

    Low-loss, high frequency acoustic resonators cooled to millikelvin temperatures are a topic of great interest for application to hybrid quantum systems. When cooled to 20 mK, we show that resonant acoustic phonon modes in a Bulk Acoustic Wave (BAW) quartz resonator demonstrate exceptionally low loss (with $Q$-factors of order billions) at frequencies of 15.6 and 65.4 MHz, with a maximum $f.Q$ product of 7.8$\\times10^{16}$ Hz. Given this result, we show that the $Q$-factor in such devices near the quantum ground state can be four orders of magnitude better than previously attained. Such resonators possess the low losses crucial for electromagnetic cooling to the phonon ground state, and the possibility of long coherence and interaction times of a few seconds, allowing multiple quantum gate operations.

  2. Electret Acoustic Transducer Array For Computerized Ultrasound Risk Evaluation System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Thomas L. (Livermore, CA); Fisher, Karl A. (Brentwood, CA)

    2005-08-09

    An electret-based acoustic transducer array is provided and may be used in a system for examining tissue. The acoustic transducer array is formed with a substrate that has a multiple distinct cells formed therein. Within each of the distinct cells is positioned an acoustic transducing element formed of an electret material. A conductive membrane is formed over the distinct cells and may be flexible.

  3. Experimental determination of the fracture toughness via microscratch tests: Application to polymers, ceramics, and metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akono, Ange-Therese

    This article presents a novel microscratch technique for the determination of the fracture toughness of materials from scratch data. While acoustic emission and optical imaging devices provide quantitative evidence of ...

  4. Geodesic Acoustic Mode in Toroidally Rotating Anisotropic Tokamaks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ren, Haijun

    2015-01-01

    Effects of anisotropy on the geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) is analyzed by using gyro-kinetic equations applicable to low-frequency microinstabilities in a toroidally rotating tokamak plasma. Dispersion relation in the presence of arbitrary Mach number $M$, anisotropy strength $\\sigma$, and the temperature ration $\\tau$ is analytically derived. It is shown that when $\\sigma$ is less than $ 3 + 2 \\tau$, the increased electron temperature with fixed ion parallel temperature increases the normalized GAM frequency. When $\\sigma$ is larger than $ 3 + 2 \\tau$, the increasing of electron temperature decreases the GAM frequency. The anisotropy $\\sigma$ always tends to enlarge the GAM frequency. The Landau damping rate is dramatically decreased by the increasing $\\tau$ or $\\sigma$.

  5. Stopbands in the existence domains of acoustic solitons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nsengiyumva, F. Hellberg, M. A. Mace, R. L.; Verheest, F.

    2014-10-15

    A fully nonlinear Sagdeev pseudopotential approach is used to study the existence domain of fast mode ion-acoustic solitons in a three-species plasma composed of cold and warm adiabatic positive ion species and Boltzmann electrons. It is shown that for appropriate values of the cold-to-warm ion charge-to-mass ratio, ?, and the effective warm ion-to-electron temperature ratio, ?, there is a range in cold to warm ion charge density ratio, f, over which a stopband in soliton speed exists. Solitons do not propagate in the stopband, although they can occur for both higher and lower speeds. The stopbands are associated with a limiting curve of the existence domain that is double-valued in speed for a range of values of f. Analytical estimates of the upper and lower limits of ? and ? that support stopbands are found. It is suggested that, inter alia, the analysis should be applicable to the solar wind plasma.

  6. Accurate determination of the Boltzmann constant by Doppler spectroscopy: Towards a new definition of the kelvin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darquié, Benoît; Sow, Papa Lat Tabara; Lemarchand, Cyril; Triki, Meriam; Tokunaga, Sean; Bordé, Christian J; Chardonnet, Christian; Daussy, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Accurate molecular spectroscopy in the mid-infrared region allows precision measurements of fundamental constants. For instance, measuring the linewidth of an isolated Doppler-broadened absorption line of ammonia around 10 $\\mu$m enables a determination of the Boltzmann constant k B. We report on our latest measurements. By fitting this lineshape to several models which include Dicke narrowing or speed-dependent collisional effects, we find that a determination of k B with an uncertainty of a few ppm is reachable. This is comparable to the best current uncertainty obtained using acoustic methods and would make a significant contribution to any new value of k B determined by the CODATA. Furthermore, having multiple independent measurements at these accuracies opens the possibility of defining the kelvin by fixing k B, an exciting prospect considering the upcoming redefinition of the International System of Units.

  7. Data Mining Applied to Acoustic Bird Species Recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vilches, Erika; Escobar, Ivan A.; Vallejo, E E; Taylor, C E

    2006-01-01

    11] Witten, I. ; Frank, E. ; Data Mining: Practical MachineData Mining Applied to Acoustic Bird Species Recognitionthe application of data mining techniques to the problem of

  8. Data Mining Applied to Acoustic Bird Species Recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vilches, Erika; Escobar, Ivan A.; Vallejo, E E; Taylor, C E

    2006-01-01

    I. ; Frank, E. ; Data Mining: Practical Machine LearningData Mining Applied to Acoustic Bird Species Recognitionthe application of data mining techniques to the problem of

  9. COMPARISON OF ACOUSTIC AND ELECTRICAL IMAGE LOGS FROM THE COSO...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    COMPARISON OF ACOUSTIC AND ELECTRICAL IMAGE LOGS FROM THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings:...

  10. Detection of coherent acoustic oscillations in a quantum electromechanical resonator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München

    Detection of coherent acoustic oscillations in a quantum electromechanical resonator Florian W electromechanical QEM systems, such as nano- mechanical resonators, the different eigenstates correspond

  11. High-frequency surface acoustic wave propagation in nanaostructures characterized by coherent extreme ultraviolet beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siemens, M.

    2009-01-01

    measurement of surface acoustic waves in thin metal filmsthe generation of surface acoustic waves of high frequency,”and S. M. Cherif, “Surface acoustic waves in the ghz range

  12. Iterative finite-difference solution analysis of acoustic wave equation in the Laplace-Fourier domain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Um, E.S.

    2013-01-01

    mod- eling of the acoustic wave equation: Geophysics, 39,and C. Shin, 2011, 3D acoustic wave form inversion in thesolution analysis of acoustic wave equation in the Laplace-

  13. Dispersion relations for acoustic waves in heterogeneous multi-layered structures contacting with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turova, Varvara

    Dispersion relations for acoustic waves in heterogeneous multi-layered structures contacting application for the computation of the velocity of acoustic waves excited in complicated multi: Multi-layered structures, Surface acoustic waves, Dispersion relations, Homogenization, Biosensor

  14. Ocean acoustic wave propagation and ray method correspondence: Internal wave fine structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomsovic, Steve

    Ocean acoustic wave propagation and ray method correspondence: Internal wave fine structure 2004 Acoustic wave fields propagating long ranges through the ocean are refracted As acoustic waves propagate long ranges through the deep ocean, they are refracted by inhomogeneities

  15. Laser-induced acoustic wave generation/propagation/interaction in water in various internal channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    induced short plane acoustic wave focusing in water. Appl.Laser induced plane acoustic wave generation, propagationAT I O N Laser-induced acoustic wave generation/propagation/

  16. Acoustic scattering by axisymmertic finite-length bodies with application to fish : measurement and modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reeder, D. Benjamin (Davis Benjamin), 1966-

    2002-01-01

    This thesis investigates the complexities of acoustic scattering by finite bodies in general and by fish in particular through the development of an advanced acoustic scattering model and detailed laboratory acoustic ...

  17. Acoustic And Elastic Reverse-Time Migration: Novel Angle-Domain Imaging Conditions And Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, Rui

    2013-01-01

    by solving acoustic wave equation with an explosion source (condition of the acoustic wave equation: ? ? 2 u g ? x ,solves the acoustic two-way wave equation ? 2 2 ? 2 ? 2 ?

  18. A latent-variable modelling approach to the acoustic-to-articulatory mapping problem. I 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carreira-Perpinan, Miguel A; Renals, Steve

    1999-01-01

    We present a latent variable approach to the acoustic-to-articulatory mapping problem, where different vocal tract configurations can give rise to the same acoustics. In latent variable modelling, the combined acoustic and ...

  19. Soundfield simulation : the prediction and validation of acoustical behavior with compute models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saad, Omar, 1974-

    2004-01-01

    In the past, acoustical consultants could only try to convince the client/architect that with calculations and geometrical plots they could create an acoustically superb space. Now, by modeling the significant acoustical ...

  20. Noise correction of turbulent spectra obtained from Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durgesh, Vibhav; Thomson, Jim; Richmond, Marshall C.; Polagye, Brian

    2014-03-02

    Accurately estimated auto-spectral density functions are essential for characterization of turbulent flows, and they also have applications in computational fluid dynamics modeling, site and inflow characterization for hydrokinetic turbines, and inflow turbulence generation. The Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) provides single-point temporally resolved data, that are used to characterize turbulent flows in rivers, seas, and oceans. However, ADV data are susceptible to contamination from various sources, including instrument noise, which is the intrinsic limit to the accuracy of acoustic velocity measurements. Due to the presence of instrument noise, the spectra obtained are altered at high frequencies. The focus of this study is to develop a robust and effective method for accurately estimating auto-spectral density functions from ADV data by reducing or removing the spectral contribution derived from instrument noise. For this purpose, the “Noise Auto-Correlation” (NAC) approach was developed, which exploits the correlation properties of instrument noise to identify and remove its contribution from spectra. The spectra estimated using the NAC approach exhibit increased fidelity and a slope of -5/3 in the inertial range, which is typically observed for turbulent flows. Finally, this study also compares the effectiveness of low-pass Gaussian filters in removing instrument noise with that of the NAC approach. For the data used in this study, both the NAC and Gaussian filter approaches are observed to be capable of removing instrument noise at higher frequencies from the spectra. However, the NAC results are closer to the expected frequency power of -5/3 in the inertial sub-range.

  1. Argon–oxygen dc magnetron discharge plasma probed with ion acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saikia, Partha, E-mail: partha.008@gmail.com; Saikia, Bipul Kumar; Goswami, Kalyan Sindhu [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research, Nazirakhat, Sonapur, Kamrup, Assam 782 402 (India); Phukan, Arindam [Madhabdev College, Narayanpur, Lakhimpur, Assam 784164 (India)

    2014-05-15

    The precise determination of the relative concentration of negative ions is very important for the optimization of magnetron sputtering processes, especially for those undertaken in a multicomponent background produced by adding electronegative gases, such as oxygen, to the discharge. The temporal behavior of an ion acoustic wave excited from a stainless steel grid inside the plasma chamber is used to determine the relative negative ion concentration in the magnetron discharge plasma. The phase velocity of the ion acoustic wave in the presence of negative ions is found to be faster than in a pure argon plasma, and the phase velocity increases with the oxygen partial pressure. Optical emission spectroscopy further confirms the increase in the oxygen negative ion density, along with a decrease in the argon positive ion density under the same discharge conditions. The relative negative ion concentration values measured by ion acoustic waves are compared with those measured by a single Langmuir probe, and a similarity in the results obtained by both techniques is observed.

  2. Axisymmetric scattering of an acoustical Bessel beam by a rigid fixed spheroid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitri, F G

    2015-01-01

    Based on the partial-wave series expansion (PWSE) method in spherical coordinates, a formal analytical solution for the acoustic scattering of a zeroth-order Bessel acoustic beam centered on a rigid fixed (oblate or prolate) spheroid is provided. The unknown scattering coefficients of the spheroid are determined by solving a system of linear equations derived for the Neumann boundary condition. Numerical results for the modulus of the backscattered pressure (\\theta = \\pi) in the near-field and the backscattering form function in the far-field for both prolate and oblate spheroids are presented and discussed, with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio (i.e., the ratio of the major axis over the minor axis of the spheroid), the half-cone angle of the Bessel beam \\beta, and the dimensionless frequency. The plots display periodic oscillations (versus the dimensionless frequency) due to the interference of specularly reflected waves in the backscattering direction with circumferential Franz' waves circumnavigati...

  3. Analytic studies of dispersive properties of shear Alfvén and acoustic wave spectra in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chavdarovski, Ilija; Zonca, Fulvio; Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R. Frascati, C.P. 65-00044 Frascati

    2014-05-15

    The properties of the low frequency shear Alfvén and acoustic wave spectra in toroidal geometry are examined analytically and numerically considering wave particle interactions with magnetically trapped and circulating particles, using the theoretical model described in [I. Chavdarovski and F. Zonca, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 51, 115001 (2009)] and following the framework of the generalized fishbone-like dispersion relation. Effects of trapped particles as well as diamagnetic effects on the frequencies and damping rates of the beta-induced Alfvén eigenmodes, kinetic ballooning modes and beta-induced Alfvén-acoustic eigenmodes are discussed and shown to be crucial to give a proper assessment of mode structure and stability conditions. Present results also demonstrate the mutual coupling of these various branches and suggest that frequency as well as mode polarization are crucial for their identification on the basis of experimental evidence.

  4. Acoustic Telemetry Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival Proportions at John Day Dam, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiland, Mark A.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Kim, Jin A.; Johnson, Gary E.; Fischer, Eric S.; Khan, Fenton; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Faber, Derrek M.; Carter, Kathleen M.; Boyd, James W.; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, J. R.; Monter, Tyrell J.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Wilberding, Matthew C.; Meyer, Matthew M.

    2011-09-28

    The overall purpose of the acoustic telemetry study at JDA during 2009 was to determine the best configuration and operation for JDA prior to conducting BiOp performance standard tests. The primary objective was to determine the best operation between 30% and 40% spill treatments. Route-specific and JDA to TDA forebay survival estimates, passage distribution, and timing/behavior metrics were used for comparison of 30% to a 40% spill treatments. A secondary objective was to evaluate the performance of TSWs installed in spill bays 15 and 16 and to estimate fish survival rates and passage efficiencies under 30% and 40% spill-discharge treatments each season.

  5. Site specific passive acoustic detection and densities of humpback whale calls off the coast of California /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helble, Tyler Adam

    2013-01-01

    a solution to the acoustic wave equation, and therefore iswave equation, in which the solution is reduced in computational complexity by assuming the outgoing acoustic

  6. Linear acoustic sensitivity kernels and their applications in shallow water environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Bikramjit

    2011-01-01

    have on acoustic propagation via the wave equation. TSKwave equation has been previously explored with respect to travel-time sensitivity of peak-arrivals in ocean acoustic

  7. Seismic and Acoustic Investigations of Rock Fall Initiation, Processes, and Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmer, Valerie Louise

    2011-01-01

    Seismic  and  Acoustic  Investigations  of  Rock  Fall  Initiation,  Processes,  Seismic  and  Acoustic  Investigations  of  Rock  Fall  Initiation,  Processes,  other  seismic  sources  was  an  iterative  process.    

  8. Evaluation of the effects of contaminant injection location and injection method on the determination of overall relative room ventilation efficiency 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen Dale

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to evaluate an emerging concept called ventilation effectiveness at several points in a real room. Ventilation effectiveness was calculated using the pulse and step-up injection methods which were performed in four...

  9. Nonlinear ion-acoustic structures in a nonextensive electron–positron–ion–dust plasma: Modulational instability and rogue waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Shimin; Research Group MAC, Centrum Wiskunde and Informatica, Amsterdam, 1098XG ; Mei, Liquan; Center for Computational Geosciences, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, 710049 ; Sun, Anbang

    2013-05-15

    The nonlinear propagation of planar and nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) ion-acoustic waves in an unmagnetized electron–positron–ion–dust plasma with two-electron temperature distributions is investigated in the context of the nonextensive statistics. Using the reductive perturbation method, a modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation is derived for the potential wave amplitude. The effects of plasma parameters on the modulational instability of ion-acoustic waves are discussed in detail for planar as well as for cylindrical and spherical geometries. In addition, for the planar case, we analyze how the plasma parameters influence the nonlinear structures of the first- and second-order ion-acoustic rogue waves within the modulational instability region. The present results may be helpful in providing a good fit between the theoretical analysis and real applications in future spatial observations and laboratory plasma experiments. -- Highlights: ? Modulational instability of ion-acoustic waves in a new plasma model is discussed. ? Tsallis’s statistics is considered in the model. ? The second-order ion-acoustic rogue wave is studied for the first time.

  10. Event identification by acoustic signature recognition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dress, W.B.; Kercel, S.W.

    1995-07-01

    Many events of interest to the security commnnity produce acoustic emissions that are, in principle, identifiable as to cause. Some obvious examples are gunshots, breaking glass, takeoffs and landings of small aircraft, vehicular engine noises, footsteps (high frequencies when on gravel, very low frequencies. when on soil), and voices (whispers to shouts). We are investigating wavelet-based methods to extract unique features of such events for classification and identification. We also discuss methods of classification and pattern recognition specifically tailored for acoustic signatures obtained by wavelet analysis. The paper is divided into three parts: completed work, work in progress, and future applications. The completed phase has led to the successful recognition of aircraft types on landing and takeoff. Both small aircraft (twin-engine turboprop) and large (commercial airliners) were included in the study. The project considered the design of a small, field-deployable, inexpensive device. The techniques developed during the aircraft identification phase were then adapted to a multispectral electromagnetic interference monitoring device now deployed in a nuclear power plant. This is a general-purpose wavelet analysis engine, spanning 14 octaves, and can be adapted for other specific tasks. Work in progress is focused on applying the methods previously developed to speaker identification. Some of the problems to be overcome include recognition of sounds as voice patterns and as distinct from possible background noises (e.g., music), as well as identification of the speaker from a short-duration voice sample. A generalization of the completed work and the work in progress is a device capable of classifying any number of acoustic events-particularly quasi-stationary events such as engine noises and voices and singular events such as gunshots and breaking glass. We will show examples of both kinds of events and discuss their recognition likelihood.

  11. Acoustic emission: The first half century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drouillard, T.F.

    1994-08-01

    The technology of acoustic emission (AE) is approaching the half century mark, having had its beginning in 1950 with the work of Joseph Kaiser. During the 1950s and 1960s researchers delved into the fundamentals of acoustic emission, developed instrumentation specifically for AE, and characterized the AE behavior of many materials. AE was starting to be recognized for its unique capabilities as an NDT method for monitoring dynamic processes. In the decade of the 1970s research activities became more coordinated and directed with the formation of the working groups, and its use as an NDT method continued to increase for industrial applications. In the 1980s the computer became a basic component for both instrumentation and data analysis, and today it has sparked a resurgence of opportunities for research and development. Today we are seeing a transition to waveform-based AE analysis and a shift in AE activities with more emphasis on applications than on research. From the beginning, we have been fortunate to have had so many dedicated savants with different fields of expertise contribute in a collective way to bring AE to a mature, fully developed technology and leave a legacy of knowledge recorded in its literature. AE literature has been a key indicator of the amount of activity, the proportion of research to application, the emphasis on what was of current interest, and the direction AE has taken. The following is a brief survey of the history of acoustic emission with emphasis on development of the infrastructure over the past half century.

  12. Processing of acoustical signals via a wavelet-based analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matsinos, Evangelos

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, details are given on the implementation of a wavelet-based analysis tailored to the processing of acoustical signals. The family of the suitable wavelets (`Reimann wavelets') are obtained in the time domain from a Fourier transform, extracted in Ref.~\\cite{r1} after invoking theoretical principles and time-frequency localisation constraints. A scheme is set forth to determine the optimal values of the parameters of this type of wavelet on the basis of the goodness of the reproduction of a $30$-s audio file containing harmonic signals corresponding to six successive $A$ notes of the chromatic musical scale, from $A_2$ to $A_7$. The quality of the reproduction over about six and a half octaves is investigated. Finally, details are given on the incorporation of the re-assignment method in the analysis framework, as the means a) to determine the important contributions of the wavelet transforms and b) to suppress noise present in the signal.

  13. Computational method for acoustic wave focusing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. G. Ramm; S. Gutman

    2006-10-12

    Scattering properties of a material are changed when the material is injected with small acoustically soft particles. It is shown that its new scattering behavior can be understood as a solution of a potential scattering problem with the potential $q$ explicitly related to the density of the small particles. In this paper we examine the inverse problem of designing a material with the desired focusing properties. An algorithm for such a problem is examined from the theoretical as well as from the numerical perspective.

  14. Sound Science: Taking Action with Acoustics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Sinha, Dipen

    2014-07-21

    From tin whistles to sonic booms, sound waves interact with each other and with the medium through which they travel. By observing these interactions, we can identify substances that are hidden in sealed containers and obtain images of buried objects. By manipulating the ability of sound to push matter around, we can create novel structures and unique materials. Join the Lab's own sound hound, Dipen Sinha, as he describes how he uses fundamental research in acoustics for solving problems in industry, security and health.

  15. Acoustic Emission from Breaking Bamboo Chopstick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun-Ting Tsai; Panpan Huang; Li-Min Wang; Zhengning Yang; Chin-De Chang; Tzay-Ming Hong

    2015-09-02

    The acoustic emission from breaking a bamboo chopstick or a bundle of spaghetti is found to exhibit similar behavior as the famous seismic laws of Gutenberg-Richter, Omori, and Bath. By use of a force-sensitive detector, we establish a positive correlation between the sound intensity and the magnitude of tremor. We also succeed at deriving these power laws analytically without invoking the concept of phase transition or self-organized criticality. In essence, geometry is more important than mechanics at rendering the statistical behavior of this crackling sound.

  16. Deep Neural Networks for Acoustic Modeling in Speech Recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortes, Corinna

    1 Deep Neural Networks for Acoustic Modeling in Speech Recognition Geoffrey Hinton, Li Deng, Dong states as output. Deep neural networks with many hidden layers, that are trained using new methods have views of four research groups who have had recent successes in using deep neural networks for acoustic

  17. Measuring the Kuroshio Current with ocean acoustic tomography Naokazu Taniguchia)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Measuring the Kuroshio Current with ocean acoustic tomography Naokazu Taniguchia) Graduate School 29 April 2013) Ocean current profiling using ocean acoustic tomography (OAT) was conducted proportional to temperature) and current in the ocean (Munk et al., 1995). Other than coastal sea studies (e

  18. NOISE AND ROOM ACOUSTICS DISTORTED SPEECH RECOGNITION BY HMM COMPOSITION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takiguchi, Tetsuya

    NOISE AND ROOM ACOUSTICS DISTORTED SPEECH RECOGNITION BY HMM COMPOSITION Satoshi NAKAMURA, Tetsuya method of an additive noise to that of the convolutional room acoustics distortion. The HMM composition, 2)Composition of distorted speech and noise HMMs in linear spectral domain. The speaker dependent

  19. Acoustic Cloaking in a Mean Flow Siyang Zhong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Xun

    towards sound waves. Existing acoustic cloak designs were originally formulated in a stationary medium Acoustic cloak is a metamaterial that shields the cloaked objects from sound waves. The idea of cloaking wave equation. When an object exists, the physical domain can be mapped to the virtual domain

  20. ACOUSTIC WAVE TRAPPING IN ONE-DIMENSIONAL AXISYMMETRIC ARRAYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ACOUSTIC WAVE TRAPPING IN ONE- DIMENSIONAL AXISYMMETRIC ARRAYS by M. MCIVER (Department of the wave numbers of Rayleigh-Bloch modes for an array of circular plates. An integral equation for the acoustic wave-field in the neighbourhood of such an array is obtained and solved with the use of a Galerkin

  1. Mobile Interaction with Remote Worlds: The Acoustic Periscope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balan, Radu V.

    1 Mobile Interaction with Remote Worlds: The Acoustic Periscope Justinian Rosca Sandra Sudarsky, a periscope is an optical device that allows one to view and navigate the external environment. The acoustic periscope idea. In order to assemble the required func- tionality we resort to audio signal processing (in

  2. Bulk Acoustic Resonator Based on Piezoelectric ZnO Belts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    Bulk Acoustic Resonator Based on Piezoelectric ZnO Belts Brent A. Buchine, William L. Hughes, F, a bulk acoustic resonator based on ZnO belts is demonstrated. This device shows a great deal of promise-like geometry, making them ideal candidates as SMR, FBAR, and beam resonators.13 However, handling belts can

  3. DIRECTIONAL PROPAGATION CANCELLATION FOR ACOUSTIC COMMUNICATION ALONG THE DRILL STRING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DIRECTIONAL PROPAGATION CANCELLATION FOR ACOUSTIC COMMUNICATION ALONG THE DRILL STRING Sinan along the drill string to the surface. Normal drilling operations produce in-band acoustic noise at intensities comparable to the transducer output while lossy propagation through the drill string and surface

  4. Montana State University Proprietary 1 Summary of Gun Shot Acoustics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maher, Robert C.

    Montana State University Proprietary 1 Summary of Gun Shot Acoustics Robert C. Maher, Montana State University 4 April 2006 Audio recordings of gun shots can provide information about the gun location interpreting such recordings arises from reverberation (overlapping acoustic signal reflections) due to the gun

  5. ACOUSTIC STUDY OF THE UD / GAMESA WIND TURBINE PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    ACOUSTIC STUDY OF THE UD / GAMESA WIND TURBINE PROJECT LEWES, DELAWARE January 2009 #12;ACOUSTIC STUDY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE / GAMESA WIND TURBINE PROJECT LEWES, DELAWARE Prepared for SUMMARY The University of Delaware (UD), Lewes proposes to locate a Gamesa G90 2.0MW wind turbine

  6. On acoustic cavitation of slightly subcritical bubbles Anthony Harkin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaper, Tasso J.

    . When the mean pressure in the liquid is reduced to a value below the vapor pressure, the Blake analysis than the Blake critical radius, in the presence of time-periodic acoustic pressure fields the accuracy of these predictions. Finally, the implications of these findings for acoustic pressure fields

  7. Mean Flow Acoustic Correlations for Dual-Stream Asymmetric Jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papamoschou, Dimitri

    Mean Flow ­ Acoustic Correlations for Dual-Stream Asymmetric Jets Preben E. Nielsen* and Dimitri dual-stream jets for the exhaust of turbofan engines has demonstrated the potential for noise acoustic and mean-flow measurements, of several fan-flow deflector configurations in a subscale dual-stream

  8. Optimal control techniques for thermo-acoustic tomography Maitine Bergounioux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . These hybrid systems use an electromagnetic pulse as an input and record ultrasound waves as an output-acoustic tomography (TAT) when the heating is realized by means of microwaves, and of photo-acoustic tomography (PAT) when optical heating is used. While in TAT waves of radio frequency range are used to trigger

  9. Acoustic wave propagation in two-phase heterogeneous porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. I. Osypik; N. I. Pushkina; Ya. M. Zhileikin

    2015-03-19

    The propagation of an acoustic wave through two-phase porous media with spatial variation in porosity is studied. The evolutionary wave equation is derived, and the propagation of an acoustic wave is numerically analyzed in application to marine sediments with various physical parameters.

  10. Resonant acoustic transducer system for a well drilling string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nardi, Anthony P. (Burlington, MA)

    1981-01-01

    For use in transmitting acoustic waves propated along a well drilling string, a piezoelectric transducer is provided operating in the relatively low loss acoustic propagation range of the well drilling string. The efficiently coupled transmitting transducer incorporates a mass-spring-piezoelectric transmitter combination permitting a resonant operation in the desired low frequency range.

  11. Resonant acoustic transducer system for a well drilling string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kent, William H. (Westford, MA); Mitchell, Peter G. (Concord, MA)

    1981-01-01

    For use in transmitting acoustic waves propagated along a well drilling string, a piezoelectric transducer is provided operating in the relatively low loss acoustic propagation range of the well drilling string. The efficiently coupled transmitting transducer incorporates a mass-spring-piezoelectric transmitter combination permitting resonant operation in the desired low frequency range.

  12. National Center for Physical Acoustics The University of Mississippi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gui, Lichuan

    Skals Inst. Biol., U. South. Denmark, Odense, Denmark #12;National Center for Physical Acoustics of wing-beat motions is crucial in developing a model for sound production · Long-focal-length, high The University of Mississippi 1986 Note that acoustic energy is clearly observable to at least 40 kHz. #12

  13. STOCHASTIC SEISMIC EMISSION FROM ACOUSTIC GLORIES AND THE QUIET SUN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Douglas C.

    STOCHASTIC SEISMIC EMISSION FROM ACOUSTIC GLORIES AND THE QUIET SUN A.-C. DONEA1, C. LINDSEY2 and D; accepted 8 January 2000) Abstract. Helioseismic images of multipolar active regions show enhanced seismic'. The acoustic glories contain elements that sustain an average seismic emission 50% greater than similar

  14. Acoustic Transmission Loss of Perforated Plates Vincent Phong1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papamoschou, Dimitri

    Acoustic Transmission Loss of Perforated Plates Vincent Phong1 and Dimitri Papamoschou2 University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, USA A study has been conducted on the acoustic response of perforated plates coefficient of the perforate. The theoretical analysis is based on planar wave propagation through a single

  15. Acoustic velocity measurements in materials using a regenerative method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Laine, Edwin F. (Alamo, CA)

    1986-01-01

    Acoustic energy is propagated through earth material between an electro-acoustic generator and a receiver which converts the received acoustic energy into electrical signals. A closed loop is formed by a variable gain amplifier system connected between the receiver and the generator. The gain of the amplifier system is increased until sustained oscillations are produced in the closed loop. The frequency of the oscillations is measured as an indication of the acoustic propagation velocity through the earth material. The amplifier gain is measured as an indication of the acoustic attenuation through the earth materials. The method is also applicable to the non-destructive testing of structural materials, such as steel, aluminum and concrete.

  16. Acoustic-velocity measurements in materials using a regenerative method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Laine, E.F.

    1982-09-30

    Acoustic energy is propatated through earth material between an electro-acoustic generator and a receiver which converts the received acoustic energy into electrical signals. A closed loop is formed by a variable gain amplifier system connected between the receiver and the generator. The gain of the amplifier system is increased until sustained oscillations are produced in the closed loop. The frequency of the oscillations is measured as an indication of the acoustic propagation velocity through the earth material. The amplifier gain is measured as an indication of the acoustic attenuation through the earth materials. The method is also applicable to the non-destructive testing of structural materials, such as steel, aluminum and concrete.

  17. HADES - Hydrophone for Acoustic Detection at South Pole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin Semburg; for the IceCube Collaboration

    2008-11-07

    The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) is located in the upper part of the optical neutrino observatory IceCube, currently under construction. SPATS consists of four strings at depths between 80 m and 500 m below the surface of the ice with seven stages per string. Each stage is equipped with an acoustic sensor and a transmitter. Three strings (string A-C) were deployed in the austral summer 2006/07. SPATS was extended by a fourth string (string D) with second generation sensors and transmitters in 2007/08. One second generation sensor type HADES (Hydrophone for Acoustic Detection at South Pole) consists of a ring-shaped piezo-electric element coated with polyurethane. The development of the sensor, optimization of acoustic transmission by acoustic impedance matching and first in-situ results will be discussed.

  18. Scaling and dimensional analysis of acoustic streaming jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moudjed, B.; Botton, V.; Henry, D.; Ben Hadid, H.

    2014-09-15

    This paper focuses on acoustic streaming free jets. This is to say that progressive acoustic waves are used to generate a steady flow far from any wall. The derivation of the governing equations under the form of a nonlinear hydrodynamics problem coupled with an acoustic propagation problem is made on the basis of a time scale discrimination approach. This approach is preferred to the usually invoked amplitude perturbations expansion since it is consistent with experimental observations of acoustic streaming flows featuring hydrodynamic nonlinearities and turbulence. Experimental results obtained with a plane transducer in water are also presented together with a review of the former experimental investigations using similar configurations. A comparison of the shape of the acoustic field with the shape of the velocity field shows that diffraction is a key ingredient in the problem though it is rarely accounted for in the literature. A scaling analysis is made and leads to two scaling laws for the typical velocity level in acoustic streaming free jets; these are both observed in our setup and in former studies by other teams. We also perform a dimensional analysis of this problem: a set of seven dimensionless groups is required to describe a typical acoustic experiment. We find that a full similarity is usually not possible between two acoustic streaming experiments featuring different fluids. We then choose to relax the similarity with respect to sound attenuation and to focus on the case of a scaled water experiment representing an acoustic streaming application in liquid metals, in particular, in liquid silicon and in liquid sodium. We show that small acoustic powers can yield relatively high Reynolds numbers and velocity levels; this could be a virtue for heat and mass transfer applications, but a drawback for ultrasonic velocimetry.

  19. Acoustic Mine Detection UsingAcoustic Mine Detection Using the Navy' CASS/GRAB Modelthe Navy' CASS/GRAB Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Peter C.

    Acoustic Mine Detection UsingAcoustic Mine Detection Using the Navy' CASS/GRAB Modelthe Navy' CASS hunting component of the U.S. Navy's Mine Hunting and Countermeasure ships. #12;Detection Sonar and MOODS. Global GDEM has a 30'30' resolution U.S. Navy's Operationally important areas contain resolutions

  20. Extraordinary acoustic transmission mediated by Helmholtz resonators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koju, Vijay; Rowe, Ebony; Robertson, William M.

    2014-07-15

    We demonstrate perfect transmission of sound through a rigid barrier embedded with Helmholtz resonators. The resonators are confined within a waveguide and they are oriented such that one neck protrudes onto each side of the barrier. Perfect sound transmission occurs even though the open area of the necks is less than 3% of the barrier area. Maximum transmission occurs at the resonant frequency of the Helmholtz resonator. Because the dimensions of the Helmholtz resonators are much smaller than the resonant wavelength, the transmission is independent of the direction of sound on the barrier and of the relative placement of the necks. Further, we show that the transmitted sound experiences a continuous phase transition of ? radians as a function of frequency through resonance. In simulations of adjacent resonators with slightly offset resonance frequencies, the phase difference leads to destructive interference. By expanding the simulation to a linear array of tuned Helmholtz resonators we show that it is possible to create an acoustic lens. The ability of Helmholtz resonator arrays to manipulate the phase of a plane acoustic wave enables a new class of sonic beam-forming devices analogous to diffractive optics.

  1. Opto-acoustic transducer for medical applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benett, W.; Celliers, P.; Da Silva, L.; Glinsky, M.; London, R.; Maitland, D.; Matthews, D.; Krulevich, P.; Lee, A.

    1999-08-31

    This invention is an optically activated transducer for generating acoustic vibrations in a biological medium. The transducer is located at the end of a fiber optic which may be located within a catheter. Energy for operating the transducer is provided optically by laser light transmitted through the fiber optic to the transducer. Pulsed laser light is absorbed in the working fluid of the transducer to generate a thermal pressure and consequent adiabatic expansion of the transducer head such that it does work against the ambient medium. The transducer returns to its original state by a process of thermal cooling. The motion of the transducer within the ambient medium couples acoustic energy into the medium. By pulsing the laser at a high repetition rate (which may vary from CW to 100 kHz) an ultrasonic radiation field can be established locally in the medium. This method of producing ultrasonic vibrations can be used in vivo for the treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans, particularly for dissolving thrombus. The catheter may also incorporate anti-thrombolytic drug treatments as an adjunct therapy and it may be operated in conjunction with ultrasonic detection equipment for imaging and feedback control. 7 figs.

  2. Thermo-Physical Modeling of W.I.S.E. Observed Asteroids; Determining the Diameter and Investigating the Yarkovsky Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angles, University of

    depleted through collisions and by ejection into the inner solar system while simultaneously being determined. 1 Introduction The largest population of Asteroid's in the inner solar system is the main belt population of solar sys- tem bodies known as near-Earth objects (NEOs), which are asteroids and comets

  3. A simple toy model of the advective-acoustic instability I. Perturbative approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Foglizzo

    2008-12-14

    Some general properties of the advective-acoustic instability are described and understood using a toy model which is simple enough to allow for analytical estimates of the eigenfrequencies. The essential ingredients of this model, in the unperturbed regime, are a stationary shock and a subsonic region of deceleration. For the sake of analytical simplicity, the 2D unperturbed flow is parallel and the deceleration is produced adiabatically by an external potential. The instability mechanism is determined unambiguously as the consequence of a cycle between advected and acoustic perturbations. The purely acoustic cycle, considered alone, is proven to be stable in this flow. Its contribution to the instability can be either constructive or destructive. A frequency cut-off is associated to the advection time through the region of deceleration. This cut-off frequency explains why the instability favours eigenmodes with a low frequency and a large horizontal wavelength. The relation between the instability occurring in this highly simplified toy model and the properties of SASI observed in the numerical simulations of stellar core-collapse is discussed. This simple set up is proposed as a benchmark test to evaluate the accuracy, in the linear regime, of numerical simulations involving this instability. We illustrate such benchmark simulations in a companion paper.

  4. Acoustically enhanced remediation of contaminated soils and ground water. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-01

    The Phase 1 laboratory bench-scale investigation results have shown that acoustically enhanced remediation (AER) technology can significantly accelerate the ground water remediation of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in unconsolidated soils. The testing also determined some of the acoustic parameters which maximize fluid and contaminant extraction rates. A technology merit and trade analysis identified the conditions under which AER could be successfully deployed in the field, and an analysis of existing acoustical sources and varying methods for their deployment found that AER technology can be successfully deployed in-situ. Current estimates of deployability indicate that a NAPL plume 150 ft in diameter can be readily remediated. This program focused on unconsolidated soils because of the large number of remediation sites located in this type of hydrogeologic setting throughout the nation. It also focused on NAPLs and low permeability soil because of the inherent difficult in the remediation of NAPLs and the significant time and cost impact caused by contaminated low permeability soils. This overall program is recommended for Phase 2 which will address the technology scaling requirements for a field scale test.

  5. Field Theory for Zero Sound and Ion Acoustic Wave in Astrophysical Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabadadze, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    We set up a field theory model to describe the longitudinal low energy modes in high density matter present in white dwarf stars. At the relevant scales, ions -- the nuclei of oxygen, carbon and helium -- are treated as heavy point-like spin-0 charged particles in an effective field theory approach, while the electron dynamics is described by the Dirac Lagrangian at the one-loop level. We show that there always exists a longitudinal gapless mode in the system irrespective whether the ions are in a plasma, crystal, or quantum liquid state. For certain values of the parameters, the gapless mode can be interpreted as a zero sound mode and, for other values, as an ion acoustic wave; we show that the zero sound and ion acoustic wave are complementary to each other. We discuss possible physical consequences of these modes for properties of white dwarfs.

  6. Field Theory for Zero Sound and Ion Acoustic Wave in Astrophysical Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory Gabadadze; Rachel A Rosen

    2015-07-24

    We set up a field theory model to describe the longitudinal low energy modes in high density matter present in white dwarf stars. At the relevant scales, ions -- the nuclei of oxygen, carbon and helium -- are treated as heavy point-like spin-0 charged particles in an effective field theory approach, while the electron dynamics is described by the Dirac Lagrangian at the one-loop level. We show that there always exists a longitudinal gapless mode in the system irrespective whether the ions are in a plasma, crystal, or quantum liquid state. For certain values of the parameters, the gapless mode can be interpreted as a zero sound mode and, for other values, as an ion acoustic wave; we show that the zero sound and ion acoustic wave are complementary to each other. We discuss possible physical consequences of these modes for properties of white dwarfs.

  7. Thermodynamic improvements for the space thermo-acoustic refrigerator (STAR). Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susalla, M.P.

    1988-06-01

    The objective of the STAR project is to test and space qualify a new continuous-cycle cryogenic refrigeration system for cooling of sensors and electronics which is based upon the newly discovered thermoacoustic heat-pumping effect. The new refrigerator has no sliding seals, a cycle frequency of about 300 Hz, and uses acoustic resonance to enhance the overall power density and efficiency. This thesis is concerned specifically with the design and testing of the thermodynamic element (or stack), which is responsible for the thermo-acoustic power conversion, and the testing of binary inert-gas mixtures as working fluids. Using the refrigerator's coefficient of performance relative to the ideal Carnot coefficient of performance as a measure of efficiency, a 93% improvement over previous designs.

  8. Ultralow frequency acoustic resonances and its potential for mitigating tsunami wave formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estrada, Hector

    2012-01-01

    Bubbles display astonishing acoustical properties since they are able to absorb and scatter large amounts of energy coming from waves whose wavelengths are two orders of magnitude larger than the bubble size. Thus, as the interaction distance between bubbles is much larger than the bubble size, clouds of bubbles exhibit collective oscillations which can scatter acoustic waves three orders magnitude larger than the bubble size. Here we propose bubble based systems which resonate at frequencies that match the time scale relevant for seismogenic tsunami wave generation and may mitigate the devastating effects of tsunami waves. Based on a linear approximation, our na\\"ive proposal may open new research paths towards the mitigation of tsunami waves generation.

  9. Requirements for the Effective Use of the Water Resources Scientific Information Center (WRSIC) -- Determined by Field Evaluation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbich, J. B.; Smith, E. B.; Benson, J. D.

    1969-11-15

    A field evaluation study of user requirements for effective use of the Water Resources Scientific Information Center (WRSIC) is described. The study included several components including an analysis of potential users ...

  10. Strontium Titanate DC Electric Field Switchable and Tunable Bulk Acoustic Wave Solidly Mounted Resonator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    York, Robert A.

    Strontium Titanate DC Electric Field Switchable and Tunable Bulk Acoustic Wave Solidly Mounted.3 0/0. Index Terms - Acoustic resonators, bulk acoustic wave devices, delay filters, ferroelectric,4] that can be exploited to realize voltage-switchable bulk-acoustic wave (BAW) devices for RF applications [5

  11. An Efficient GPU-based Time Domain Solver for the Acoustic Wave Equation Ravish Mehraa,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    An Efficient GPU-based Time Domain Solver for the Acoustic Wave Equation Ravish Mehraa,1 , Nikunj of the acoustic wave equation for the purpose of room acoustics is presented. It is based on adaptive rectangular. Keywords: Time-domain wave equation solver, Room acoustics, GPU-based algorithms. 1. Introduction

  12. Numerical Methods for Acoustic Problems with Complex Geometries Based on Cartesian Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuik, Kees

    by the linearized Euler equations. All properties of the acoustic waves are encoded in the dispersion relation.2 The Wave Equation and Acoustic Analogies . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 1.2.1 Linear Acoustic Wave Equation. An acoustic wave has a wavelength in space, as well

  13. Droplet Combustion and Non-Reactive Shear-Coaxial Jets with Transverse Acoustic Excitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teshome, Sophonias

    2012-01-01

    Related Works in Droplet Combustion . . . . . . . .of Acoustics on Droplet Combustion . . . . . . . . . . . .Fuel Droplet Combustion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  14. 3D acoustic imaging applied to the Baikal Neutrino Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. G. Kebkal; R. Bannasch; O. G. Kebkal; A. I. Panfilov; R. Wischnewski

    2008-11-07

    A hydro-acoustic imaging system was tested in a pilot study on distant localization of elements of the Baikal underwater neutrino telescope. For this innovative approach, based on broad band acoustic echo signals and strictly avoiding any active acoustic elements on the telescope, the imaging system was temporarily installed just below the ice surface, while the telescope stayed in its standard position at 1100 m depth. The system comprised an antenna with four acoustic projectors positioned at the corners of a 50 meter square; acoustic pulses were "linear sweep-spread signals" - multiple-modulated wide-band signals (10-22 kHz) of 51.2 s duration. Three large objects (two string buoys and the central electronics module) were localized by the 3D acoustic imaging, with a accuracy of ~0.2 m (along the beam) and ~1.0 m (transverse). We discuss signal forms and parameters necessary for improved 3D acoustic imaging of the telescope, and suggest a layout of a possible stationary bottom based 3D imaging setup. The presented technique may be of interest for neutrino telescopes of km3-scale and beyond, as a flexible temporary or as a stationary tool to localize basic telescope elements, while these are completely passive.

  15. Prediction of Acoustic Noise in Switched Reluctance Motor Drives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, CJ; Fahimi, B

    2014-03-01

    Prediction of acoustic noise distribution generated by electric machines has become an integral part of design and control in noise sensitive applications. This paper presents a fast and precise acoustic noise imaging technique for switched reluctance machines (SRMs). This method is based on distribution of radial vibration in the stator frame of the SRM. Radial vibration of the stator frame, at a network of probing points, is computed using input phase current and phase voltage waveforms. Sequentially, the acceleration of the probing network will be expanded to predict full acceleration on the stator frame surface, using which acoustic noise emission caused by the stator can be calculated using the boundary element method.

  16. Study of maximizing acoustic energy coupling to salt 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Yng-Jou

    1979-01-01

    STUDY OF MAXIMIZING ACOUSTIC ENERGY COUPLING TO SALT A Thesis by YNG-JOV HNANG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1979 Major... spaced a=0, N/2 and N, for D/%=16, with correlated photographed simulated images of the beam cross- section; the intense brightness means high acoustic pressure. 71 F I GURE 25 LIST OF FIGURES (con' t. ) Acoustic pressure on the axis of a piston...

  17. The dust acoustic waves in three dimensional scalable complex plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhukhovitskii, D I

    2015-01-01

    Dust acoustic waves in the bulk of a dust cloud in complex plasma of low pressure gas discharge under microgravity conditions are considered. The dust component of complex plasma is assumed a scalable system that conforms to the ionization equation of state (IEOS) developed in our previous study. We find singular points of this IEOS that determine the behavior of the sound velocity in different regions of the cloud. The fluid approach is utilized to deduce the wave equation that includes the neutral drag term. It is shown that the sound velocity is fully defined by the particle compressibility, which is calculated on the basis of the scalable IEOS. The sound velocities and damping rates calculated for different 3D complex plasmas both in ac and dc discharges demonstrate a good correlation with experimental data that are within the limits of validity of the theory. The theory provides interpretation for the observed independence of the sound velocity on the coordinate and for a weak dependence on the particle ...

  18. Apparatus and method for comparing corresponding acoustic resonances in liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Almos, NM)

    1999-01-01

    Apparatus and method for comparing corresponding acoustic resonances in liquids. The present invention permits the measurement of certain characteristics of liquids which affect the speed of sound therein. For example, a direct correlation between the octane rating of gasoline and the speed of sound in a gasoline sample has been experimentally observed. Therefore, changes in the speed of sound therein can be utilized as a sensitive parameter for determining changes in composition of a liquid sample. The present apparatus establishes interference patterns inside of a liquid without requiring the use of very thin, rigorously parallel ceramic discs, but rather uses readily available piezoelectric transducers attached to the outside surface of the usual container for the liquid and located on the same side thereof in the vicinity of one another. That is, various receptacle geometries may be employed, and the driving and receiving transducers may be located on the same side of the receptacle. The cell may also be constructed of any material that is inert to the liquid under investigation. A single-transducer embodiment, where the same transducer provides the excitation to the sample container and receives signals impressed therein, is also described.

  19. Apparatus and method for comparing corresponding acoustic resonances in liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, D.N.

    1999-03-23

    Apparatus and method are disclosed for comparing corresponding acoustic resonances in liquids. The present invention permits the measurement of certain characteristics of liquids which affect the speed of sound therein. For example, a direct correlation between the octane rating of gasoline and the speed of sound in a gasoline sample has been experimentally observed. Therefore, changes in the speed of sound therein can be utilized as a sensitive parameter for determining changes in composition of a liquid sample. The present apparatus establishes interference patterns inside of a liquid without requiring the use of very thin, rigorously parallel ceramic discs, but rather uses readily available piezoelectric transducers attached to the outside surface of the usual container for the liquid and located on the same side thereof in the vicinity of one another. That is, various receptacle geometries may be employed, and the driving and receiving transducers may be located on the same side of the receptacle. The cell may also be constructed of any material that is inert to the liquid under investigation. A single-transducer embodiment, where the same transducer provides the excitation to the sample container and receives signals impressed therein, is also described. 5 figs.

  20. Determination of the effective parameters of proton-$^{3}$He scattering on the basis of the neutron-triton scattering data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. P. Levashev

    2008-12-22

    We have studied the relations between the neutron-triton scattering lengths and effective ranges and the corresponding quantities for the p --$^{3}$He scattering in the framework of the potential model with an effective nucleon-nucleus interaction in the form of a $\\delta $-shell potential. It is shown that the Coulomb renormalization of the pure nuclear scattering lengths does not change the relation well established for the n + $^{3}$H system between the lengths: $A^{1} scattering lengths which give preference to set I of the phase analysis performed by E.A. George et al. (2003), which corresponds to the inequality $A^{1}_{nc} scattering lengths.

  1. Converting acoustic energy into useful other energy forms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Putterman, Seth J. (Sherman Oaks, CA); Barber, Bradley Paul (Northridge, CA); Hiller, Robert Anthony (Los Angeles, CA); Lofstedt, Ritva Maire Johanna (Los Angeles, CA)

    1997-01-01

    Sonoluminescence is an off-equilibrium phenomenon in which the energy of a resonant sound wave in a liquid is highly concentrated so as to generate flashes of light. The conversion of sound to light represents an energy amplification of eleven orders of magnitude. The flashes which occur once per cycle of the audible or ultrasonic sound fields can be comprised of over one million photons and last for less 100 picoseconds. The emission displays a clocklike synchronicity; the jitter in time between consecutive flashes is less than fifty picoseconds. The emission is blue to the eye and has a broadband spectrum increasing from 700 nanometers to 200 nanometers. The peak power is about 100 milliWatts. The initial stage of the energy focusing is effected by the nonlinear oscillations of a gas bubble trapped in the liquid. For sufficiently high drive pressures an imploding shock wave is launched into the gas by the collapsing bubble. The reflection of the shock from its focal point results in high temperatures and pressures. The sonoluminescence light emission can be sustained by sensing a characteristic of the emission and feeding back changes into the driving mechanism. The liquid is in a sealed container and the seeding of the gas bubble is effected by locally heating the liquid after sealing the container. Different energy forms than light can be obtained from the converted acoustic energy. When the gas contains deuterium and tritium there is the feasibility of the other energy form being fusion, namely including the generation of neutrons.

  2. A perspective on the CMB acoustic peak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. A. Marriage

    2002-03-11

    CMB angular spectrum measurements suggest a flat universe. This paper clarifies the relation between geometry and the spherical harmonic index of the first acoustic peak ($\\ell_{peak}$). Numerical and analytic calculations show that $\\ell_{peak}$ is approximately a function of $\\Omega_K/\\Omega_M$ where $\\Omega_K$ and $\\Omega_M$ are the curvature ($\\Omega_K > 0$ implies an open geometry) and mass density today in units of critical density. Assuming $\\Omega_K/\\Omega_M \\ll 1$, one obtains a simple formula for $\\ell_{peak}$, the derivation of which gives another perspective on the widely-recognized $\\Omega_M$-$\\Omega_\\Lambda$ degeneracy in flat models. This formula for near-flat cosmogonies together with current angular spectrum data yields familiar parameter constraints.

  3. Electromechanical transducer for acoustic telemetry system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drumheller, Douglas S. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    1993-01-01

    An improved electromechanical transducer is provided for use in an acoustic telemetry system. The transducer of this invention comprises a stack of ferroelectric ceramic disks interleaved with a plurality of spaced electrodes which are used to electrically pole the ceramic disks. The ceramic stack is housed in a metal tubular drill collar segment. The electrodes are preferably alternatively connected to ground potential and driving potential. This alternating connection of electrodes to ground and driving potential subjects each disk to an equal electric field; and the direction of the field alternates to match the alternating direction of polarization of the ceramic disks. Preferably, a thin metal foil is sandwiched between electrodes to facilitate the electrical connection. Alternatively, a thicker metal spacer plate is selectively used in place of the metal foil in order to promote thermal cooling of the ceramic stack.

  4. Analog circuit for controlling acoustic transducer arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drumheller, Douglas S. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    1991-01-01

    A simplified ananlog circuit is presented for controlling electromechanical transducer pairs in an acoustic telemetry system. The analog circuit of this invention comprises a single electrical resistor which replaces all of the digital components in a known digital circuit. In accordance with this invention, a first transducer in a transducer pair of array is driven in series with the resistor. The voltage drop across this resistor is then amplified and used to drive the second transducer. The voltage drop across the resistor is proportional and in phase with the current to the transducer. This current is approximately 90 degrees out of phase with the driving voltage to the transducer. This phase shift replaces the digital delay required by the digital control circuit of the prior art.

  5. Electromechanical transducer for acoustic telemetry system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1993-06-22

    An improved electromechanical transducer is provided for use in an acoustic telemetry system. The transducer of this invention comprises a stack of ferroelectric ceramic disks interleaved with a plurality of spaced electrodes which are used to electrically pole the ceramic disks. The ceramic stack is housed in a metal tubular drill collar segment. The electrodes are preferably alternatively connected to ground potential and driving potential. This alternating connection of electrodes to ground and driving potential subjects each disk to an equal electric field; and the direction of the field alternates to match the alternating direction of polarization of the ceramic disks. Preferably, a thin metal foil is sandwiched between electrodes to facilitate the electrical connection. Alternatively, a thicker metal spacer plate is selectively used in place of the metal foil in order to promote thermal cooling of the ceramic stack.

  6. Mapping of genes using a bovine BAC Library to determine their effects on economically important traits in cattle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herring, Kimberly Lynn

    1995-01-01

    ). The analyses did not show the genotype at KLHGHM to have an effect on any of the other traits measured (P>.05). Sex of calf was an important source of variation for all traits except REA, MARB and QG. Sire breed by dam breed combinations were significant for BW...

  7. Determination, correlation, and mechanistic interpretation of effects of hydrogen addition on laminar flame speeds of hydrocarbon–air mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, C. L.; Huang, Z. H.; Law, C. K.

    2010-08-30

    The stretch-affected propagation speeds of expanding spherical flames of n-butane–air mixtures with hydrogen addition were measured at atmospheric pressure and subsequently processed through a nonlinear regression analysis to yield the stretch-free laminar flame speeds. Based on a hydrogen addition parameter (RH) and an effective fuel equivalence ratio (?F), these laminar flame speeds were found to increase almost linearly with RH, for ?F between 0.6 and 1.4 and RHRH from 0 to 0.5, with the slope of the variation assuming a minimum around stoichiometry. These experimental results also agree well with computed values using a detailed reaction mechanism. Furthermore, a mechanistic investigation aided by sensitivity analysis identified that kinetic effects through the global activation energy, followed by thermal effects through the adiabatic flame temperature, have the most influence on the increase in the flame speeds and the associated linear variation with RH due to hydrogen addition. Nonequidiffusion effects due to the high mobility of hydrogen, through the global Lewis number, have the least influence. Further calculations for methane, ethene, and propane as the fuel showed similar behavior, leading to possible generalization of the phenomena and correlation.

  8. Determining the effect of seawater on the interfacial shear strength of fiber reinforced epoxies using the single fiber fragmentation test 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Barbara Ann

    1996-01-01

    applications. When technology for economical oil production at ocean depths of 2000 meters is available, exploration and production at these deep water locations will be stimulated. A concern to be resolved is the effect of seawater on the long-term durability...

  9. Inspection and recertification of gas filled composite pressure vessels using acoustic emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, J.R.; Temowchek, S.J. [Physical Acoustics Corp., Lawrenceville, NJ (United States)

    1998-12-31

    Corrosion resistance and light weight have made composite materials the best choice for many high pressure gas applications. However, progress has been hampered by the limitations of traditional NDT inspection methods and lack of understanding about failure mechanisms. One solution which has emerged is the use of Acoustic Emission to monitor the composite pressure vessel during periodic proof tests. The emission generated can be used to determine the existence of hidden mechanical defects and corrosion which may have significantly lowered the burst strength. A data base of over 4,000 NGV (natural gas vehicle) containers will be used to exemplify the usefulness of the method.

  10. Do heavy ions induce the bystander effect? : study to determine the induction of the bystander effect from Fe ion beam compared to X-rays in human keratinocytes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anzenberg, Vered

    2005-01-01

    The bystander effect is the observation that non-irradiated cells near a cell traversed by radiation express biological responses such as micronuclei formation and genomic instability. Most published studies of the bystander ...

  11. Baryon Acoustic Oscillations from the SDSS DR10 galaxies angular correlation function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carvalho, G C; Benetti, M; Carvalho, J C; Alcaniz, J S

    2015-01-01

    The 2-point angular correlation function $w(\\theta)$ (2PACF), where $\\theta$ is the angular separation between pairs of galaxies, provides the transversal Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) signal almost model-independently. In this paper we use 409,337 luminous red galaxies in the redshift range $z = [0.440,0.555]$ obtained from the tenth data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS DR10) to estimate $\\theta_{\\rm{BAO}}(z)$ from the 2PACF at six redshift {shells}. Since noise and systematics can hide the BAO signature in the $w - \\theta$ plane, we also discuss some criteria to localize the acoustic bump. We identify two sources of model-dependence in the analysis, namely, the value of the acoustic scale from Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) measurements and the correction in the $\\theta_{\\rm{BAO}}(z)$ position due to projection effects. Constraints on the dark energy equation-of-state parameter w$(z)$ from the $\\theta_{\\rm{BAO}}(z)$ diagram are derived, as well as from a joint analysis with current CMB ...

  12. Baryon Acoustic Oscillations from the SDSS DR10 galaxies angular correlation function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. C. Carvalho; A. Bernui; M. Benetti; J. C. Carvalho; J. S. Alcaniz

    2015-07-31

    The 2-point angular correlation function $w(\\theta)$ (2PACF), where $\\theta$ is the angular separation between pairs of galaxies, provides the transversal Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) signal almost model-independently. In this paper we use 409,337 luminous red galaxies in the redshift range $z = [0.440,0.555]$ obtained from the tenth data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS DR10) to estimate $\\theta_{\\rm{BAO}}(z)$ from the 2PACF at six redshift {shells}. Since noise and systematics can hide the BAO signature in the $w - \\theta$ plane, we also discuss some criteria to localize the acoustic bump. We identify two sources of model-dependence in the analysis, namely, the value of the acoustic scale from Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) measurements and the correction in the $\\theta_{\\rm{BAO}}(z)$ position due to projection effects. Constraints on the dark energy equation-of-state parameter w$(z)$ from the $\\theta_{\\rm{BAO}}(z)$ diagram are derived, as well as from a joint analysis with current CMB measurements. We find that the standard $\\Lambda$CDM model as well as some of its extensions are in good agreement with these $\\theta_{\\rm{BAO}}(z)$ measurements.

  13. Dust Acoustic Solitons in the Dusty Plasma of the Earth's Ionosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopnin, S.I.; Kosarev, I.N.; Popel, S.I.; Yu, M.Y.

    2005-03-15

    Stratified structures that are observed at heights of 80-95 km in the lower part of the Earth's ionosphere are known as noctilucent clouds and polar mesosphere summer echoes. These structures are thought to be associated with the presence of vast amounts of charged dust or aerosols. The layers in the lower ionosphere where there are substantial amounts of dust are called the dusty ionosphere. The dust grains can carry a positive or a negative charge, depending on their constituent materials. As a rule, the grains are ice crystals, which may contain metallic inclusions. A grain with a sufficiently large metallic content can acquire a positive charge. Crystals of pure ice are charged negatively. The distribution of the dust grains over their charges has a profound impact on the ionizational and other properties of dust structures in the dusty ionosphere. In the present paper, a study is made of the effect of the sign of the dust charge on the properties of dust acoustic solitons propagating in the dusty ionosphere. It is shown that, when the dust charge is positive, dust acoustic solitons correspond to a hill in the electron density and a well in the ion density. When the dust is charged negatively, the situation is opposite. These differences in the properties of dust acoustic solitons can be used to diagnose the plasmas of noctilucent clouds and polar mesosphere summer echoes.

  14. Mechanical and Acoustic Studies of Deep Ocean Glass Sphere Implosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Learned, John

    Mechanical and Acoustic Studies of Deep Ocean Glass Sphere Implosions P. W. Gorham, M. Rosen, J. W of the dynamics and kinematics of the events. The mechanical forces on the ancillary mooring hardware during

  15. An Acoustic Study of Underspecified Vowels in Turkish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lanfranca, Mark

    2012-05-31

    This paper examines the acoustics of underspecification and vowel harmony (VH) in Turkish. In Turkish, vowels in suffixes that change according to VH rules are widely believed to be underspecified for rounding and/or ...

  16. Experimental studies of the acoustic wave field near a borehole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Zhenya

    2013-01-01

    A monopole or a dipole source in a fluid borehole generates acoustic waves, part of which propagate along the borehole and the other part enter the formation propagating as P- or S-waves. The refracted waves propagating ...

  17. Speech coding, reconstruction and recognition using acoustics and electromagnetic waves

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holzrichter, John F. (Berkeley, CA); Ng, Lawrence C. (Danville, CA)

    1998-01-01

    The use of EM radiation in conjunction with simultaneously recorded acoustic speech information enables a complete mathematical coding of acoustic speech. The methods include the forming of a feature vector for each pitch period of voiced speech and the forming of feature vectors for each time frame of unvoiced, as well as for combined voiced and unvoiced speech. The methods include how to deconvolve the speech excitation function from the acoustic speech output to describe the transfer function each time frame. The formation of feature vectors defining all acoustic speech units over well defined time frames can be used for purposes of speech coding, speech compression, speaker identification, language-of-speech identification, speech recognition, speech synthesis, speech translation, speech telephony, and speech teaching.

  18. Universal Quantum Transducers based on Surface Acoustic Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin J. A. Schuetz; Eric M. Kessler; Geza Giedke; Lieven M. K. Vandersypen; Mikhail D. Lukin; J. Ignacio Cirac

    2015-10-06

    We propose a universal, on-chip quantum transducer based on surface acoustic waves in piezo-active materials. Because of the intrinsic piezoelectric (and/or magnetostrictive) properties of the material, our approach provides a universal platform capable of coherently linking a broad array of qubits, including quantum dots, trapped ions, nitrogen-vacancy centers or superconducting qubits. The quantized modes of surface acoustic waves lie in the gigahertz range, can be strongly confined close to the surface in phononic cavities and guided in acoustic waveguides. We show that this type of surface acoustic excitations can be utilized efficiently as a quantum bus, serving as an on-chip, mechanical cavity-QED equivalent of microwave photons and enabling long-range coupling of a wide range of qubits.

  19. Laser-excited acoustic oscillations in silver and bismuth nanowires 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerebtsov, Sergey N.; Kolomenskii, Alexandre A.; Liu, Haidong; Zhang, Hong; Ye, Zuxin; Luo, Zhiping; Wu, Wenhao; Paulus, Gerhard G.; Schuessler, Hans A.

    2007-01-01

    . The electronic and lattice contributions to the excitation of coherent acoustic phonons are described using a two-temperature model. The excitation is performed at different laser fluences, and the high density of optically induced excitations modifies the state...

  20. Multipole seismoelectric logging while drilling (LWD) for acoustic velocity measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Zhenya

    2012-01-01

    In seismoelectric well logging, an acoustic wave propagates along a borehole and induces electrical signals along the borehole wall. The apparent velocities of these seismoelectric signals are equal to the formation ...

  1. Acoustical study of the development of stop consonants in children

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imbrie, Annika Karin Karlsson

    2005-01-01

    This study focuses on the acoustic patterns of stop consonants and adjacent vowels as they develop in young children (ages 2;6-3;3) over a six month period. Speech is generated using a series of articulatory, laryngeal, ...

  2. Speech coding, reconstruction and recognition using acoustics and electromagnetic waves

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holzrichter, J.F.; Ng, L.C.

    1998-03-17

    The use of EM radiation in conjunction with simultaneously recorded acoustic speech information enables a complete mathematical coding of acoustic speech. The methods include the forming of a feature vector for each pitch period of voiced speech and the forming of feature vectors for each time frame of unvoiced, as well as for combined voiced and unvoiced speech. The methods include how to deconvolve the speech excitation function from the acoustic speech output to describe the transfer function each time frame. The formation of feature vectors defining all acoustic speech units over well defined time frames can be used for purposes of speech coding, speech compression, speaker identification, language-of-speech identification, speech recognition, speech synthesis, speech translation, speech telephony, and speech teaching. 35 figs.

  3. On reconstruction and time reversal in thermoacoustic tomography in acoustically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuchment, Peter

    On reconstruction and time reversal in thermoacoustic tomography in acoustically homogeneous of recent approaches to the reconstruction in thermoacoustic/photoacoustic tomography: backprojection of the problem of sound speed recovery is also provided. Keywords: Tomography, thermoacoustic, wave equation. AMS

  4. Acoustic-Gravity Waves Interacting with a Rectangular Trench

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kadri, Usama

    2015-01-01

    A mathematical solution of the two-dimensional linear problem of an acoustic-gravity wave interacting with a rectangular trench, in a compressible ocean, is presented. Expressions for the flow field on both sides of the ...

  5. Acoustic classification of buried objects with mobile sonar platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Joseph Richard, 1971-

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis, the use of highly mobile sonar platforms is investigated for the purpose of acoustically classifying compact objects on or below the seabed. The extension of existing strategies, including synthetic aperture ...

  6. Directing acoustic radiation using a phased array of piezoelectric transmitters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodgers, Daniel Michael

    2010-01-01

    This thesis presents an acoustic phased array system utilizing piezoelectric transducers. The system is capable of operating at arbitrary frequencies into the low megahertz range, with a trade-off between phase accuracy ...

  7. Robust minimum energy wireless routing for underwater acoustic communication networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stojanovic, Milica

    Marine robots are an increasingly attractive means for observing and monitoring the ocean, but underwater acoustic communications remain a major challenge. The channel exhibits long delay spreads with frequency-dependent ...

  8. Nonlinear acoustics experimental characterization of microstructure evolution in Inconel 617

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yao, Xiaochu; Liu, Yang; Lissenden, Cliff J. [Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2014-02-18

    Inconel 617 is a candidate material for the intermediate heat exchanger in a very high temperature reactor for the next generation nuclear power plant. This application will require the material to withstand fatigue-ratcheting interaction at temperatures up to 950°C. Therefore nondestructive evaluation and structural health monitoring are important capabilities. Acoustic nonlinearity (which is quantified in terms of a material parameter, the acoustic nonlinearity parameter, ?) has been proven to be sensitive to microstructural changes in material. This research develops a robust experimental procedure to track the evolution of damage precursors in laboratory tested Inconel 617 specimens using ultrasonic bulk waves. The results from the acoustic non-linear tests are compared with stereoscope surface damage results. Therefore, the relationship between acoustic nonlinearity and microstructural evaluation can be clearly demonstrated for the specimens tested.

  9. Acoustic emission from fiber reinforced plastic damaged hoop wrapped cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akhtar, A.; Kung, D.; Westbrook, D.R.

    2000-03-01

    Metal lined continuous fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) hoop wrapped cylinders with axial cuts to the FRP were modeled mathematically and tested experimentally. Steel lined and aluminum alloy lined glass FRP vessels were subjected to acoustic emission tests (AE) and hydraulic burst tests. The burst pressure decreased monotonically with the length of the axial cut. Acoustic emission increased initially with a decrease in burst pressure, and attained a maximum at an intermediate level of damage to the FRP. However, acoustic emission decreased when the level of damage was higher and the burst pressure was lower. Implications of the findings are discussed in the context of the search for an acoustic emission test method to inspect periodically the vessels used for the storage of compressed gaseous fuels on natural gas vehicles (NGV) and hydrogen vehicles.

  10. Neighborhood analysis methods in acoustic modeling for automatic speech recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh-Miller, Natasha, 1981-

    2010-01-01

    This thesis investigates the problem of using nearest-neighbor based non-parametric methods for performing multi-class class-conditional probability estimation. The methods developed are applied to the problem of acoustic ...

  11. Acoustical wave propagation in buried water filled pipes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kondis, Antonios, 1980-

    2005-01-01

    This thesis presents a comprehensive way of dealing with the problem of acoustical wave propagation in cylindrically layered media with a specific application in water-filled underground pipes. The problem is studied in ...

  12. Acoustic characterisation of ultrasound contrast agents at high frequency 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Chao

    2013-07-06

    This thesis aims to investigate the acoustic properties of ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) at high ultrasound frequencies. In recent years, there has been increasing development in the use of high frequency ultrasound ...

  13. Ion-acoustic cnoidal waves in a quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahmood, S.; Haas, F.

    2014-10-15

    Nonlinear ion-acoustic cnoidal wave structures are studied in an unmagnetized quantum plasma. Using the reductive perturbation method, a Korteweg-de Vries equation is derived for appropriate boundary conditions and nonlinear periodic wave solutions are obtained. The corresponding analytical solution and numerical plots of the ion-acoustic cnoidal waves and solitons in the phase plane are presented using the Sagdeev pseudo-potential approach. The variations in the nonlinear potential of the ion-acoustic cnoidal waves are studied at different values of quantum parameter H{sub e} which is the ratio of electron plasmon energy to electron Fermi energy defined for degenerate electrons. It is found that both compressive and rarefactive ion-acoustic cnoidal wave structures are formed depending on the value of the quantum parameter. The dependence of the wavelength and frequency on nonlinear wave amplitude is also presented.

  14. Higher Order Modes in Acoustic Logging While Drilling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chi, Shihong

    2005-01-01

    In multipole acoustic logging while drilling (LWD), the fundamental modes dominate recorded waveforms. Higher order modes may also appear and complicate the processing of LWD data. In dipole LWD measurements, the dipole ...

  15. Acoustic Waveform Logging - Advances In Theory And Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, C. H.

    Full-waveform acoustic logging has made significant advances in both theory and application in recent years, and these advances have greatly increased the capability of log analysts to measure the physical properties of ...

  16. Diagnosis of Fracture Flow Conditions with Acoustic Sensing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Roberto

    2014-07-10

    Distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) is an emerging technology in hydraulic fracture diagnosis. Current uses of DAS systems have been limited to qualitative analysis that pinpoint noise sources, such as injection into formation or production from a...

  17. Optical transition radiation in presence of acoustic waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. R. Mkrtchyan; V. V. Parazian; A. A. Saharian

    2010-10-14

    Transition radiation from relativistic electrons is investigated in an ultrasonic superlattice excited in a finite thickness plate. In the quasi-classical approximation formulae are derived for the vector potential of the electromagnetic field and for the spectral-angular distribution of the radiation intensity. The acoustic waves generate new resonance peaks in the spectral and angular distribution of the radiation intensity. The heights of the peaks can be tuned by choosing the parameters of the acoustic wave.

  18. Acoustic energy-driven fluid pump and method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janus, Michael C.; Richards, George A.; Robey, Edward H.

    1997-12-01

    Bulk fluid motion is promoted in a gaseous fluid contained within a conduit system provided with a diffuser without the need for a mean pressure differential across the conduit system. The contacting of the gaseous fluid with unsteady energy at a selected frequency and pressure amplitude induces fluid flow through the conical diffuser. The unsteady energy can be provided by pulse combustors, thermoacoustic engines, or acoustic energy generators such as acoustic speakers.

  19. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, Wenyuan (Oakdale, MN); Huizinga, John S. (Dellwood, MN)

    2010-03-16

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  20. Effects of QCD radiation on inclusive variables for determining the scale of new physics at hadron colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Papaefstathiou; Bryan Webber

    2009-07-10

    We examine the effects of QCD initial-state radiation on a class of quantities, designed to probe the mass scale of new physics at hadron colliders, which involve longitudinal as well as transverse final-state momenta. In particular, we derive universal functions that relate the invariant mass and energy distribution of the visible part of the final state to that of the underlying hard subprocess. Knowledge of this relationship may assist in checking hypotheses about new processes, by providing additional information about their scales. We compare our results with those of Monte Carlo studies and find good general agreement.

  1. Integrated acoustic phase separator and multiphase fluid composition monitoring apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Dipen N

    2014-02-04

    An apparatus and method for down hole gas separation from the multiphase fluid flowing in a wellbore or a pipe, for determining the quantities of the individual components of the liquid and the flow rate of the liquid, and for remixing the component parts of the fluid after which the gas volume may be measured, without affecting the flow stream, are described. Acoustic radiation force is employed to separate gas from the liquid, thereby permitting measurements to be separately made for these two components; the liquid (oil/water) composition is determined from ultrasonic resonances; and the gas volume is determined from capacitance measurements. Since the fluid flows around and through the component parts of the apparatus, there is little pressure difference, and no protection is required from high pressure differentials.

  2. Quasi-normal acoustic oscillations in the transonic Bondi flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eliana Chaverra; Olivier Sarbach

    2015-09-17

    In recent work, we analyzed the dynamics of spherical and nonspherical acoustic perturbations of the Michel flow, describing the steady radial accretion of a relativistic perfect fluid into a nonrotating black hole. We showed that such perturbations undergo quasi-normal oscillations and computed the corresponding complex frequencies as a function of the black hole mass M and the radius r_c of the sonic horizon. It was found that when r_c is much larger than the Schwarzschild radius r_H = 2GM/c^2 of the black hole, these frequencies scale like the surface gravity of the analogue black hole associated with the acoustic metric. In this work, we analyze the Newtonian limit of the Michel solution and its acoustic perturbations. In this limit, the flow outside the sonic horizon reduces to the transonic Bondi flow, and the acoustic metric reduces to the one introduced by Unruh in the context of experimental black hole evaporation. We show that for the transonic Bondi flow, Unruh's acoustic metric describes an analogue black hole and compute the associated quasi-normal frequencies. We prove that they do indeed scale like the surface gravity of the acoustic black hole, thus providing an explanation for our previous results in the relativistic setting.

  3. Sensor development and calibration for acoustic neutrino detection in ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karg, Timo; Laihem, Karim; Semburg, Benjamin; Tosi, Delia

    2009-01-01

    A promising approach to measure the expected low flux of cosmic neutrinos at the highest energies (E > 1 EeV) is acoustic detection. There are different in-situ test installations worldwide in water and ice to measure the acoustic properties of the medium with regard to the feasibility of acoustic neutrino detection. The parameters of interest include attenuation length, sound speed profile, background noise level and transient backgrounds. The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) has been deployed in the upper 500 m of drill holes for the IceCube neutrino observatory at the geographic South Pole. In-situ calibration of sensors under the combined influence of low temperature, high ambient pressure, and ice-sensor acoustic coupling is difficult. We discuss laboratory calibrations in water and ice. Two new laboratory facilities, the Aachen Acoustic Laboratory (AAL) and the Wuppertal Water Tank Test Facility, have been set up. They offer large volumes of bubble free ice (3 m^3) and water (11 m^3) for the devel...

  4. Acoustic Energy: An Innovative Technology for Stimulating Oil Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edgar, Dorland E.; Peters, Robert W.; Johnson, Donald O.; Paulsen, P. David; Roberts, Wayne

    2006-04-30

    The objective of this investigation was to demonstrate the effectiveness of sonication in reducing the viscosity of heavy crude oils. Sonication is the use of acoustic or sound energy to produce physical and/or chemical changes in materials, usually fluids. The goal of the first project phase was to demonstrate a proof of concept for the project objective. Batch tests of three commercially available, single-weight oils (30-, 90-, and 120-wt) were performed in the laboratory. Several observations and conclusions were made from this series of experiments. These include the following: (1) In general, the lower the acoustic frequency, the greater the efficiency in reducing the viscosity of the oils; (2) Sonication treatment of the three oils resulted in reductions in viscosity that ranged from a low of 31% to a high of 75%; and (3) The results of the first phase of the project successfully demonstrated that sonication could reduce the viscosity of oils of differing viscosity. The goal of the second project phase was to demonstrate the ability of sonication to reduce the viscosity of three crude oils ranging from a light crude to a heavy crude. The experiments also were designed to examine the benefits of two proprietary chemical additives used in conjunction with sonication. Acoustic frequencies ranging from 800 Hz to 1.6 kHz were used in these tests, and a reactor chamber was designed for flow-through operation with a capacity of one gallon (3.8 liters). The three crude oils selected for use in the testing program were: (1) a heavy crude from California with a viscosity of approximately 65,000 cP (API gravity about 12{sup o}), (2) a crude from Alabama with a significant water content and a viscosity of approximately 6,000 cP (API gravity about 22 {sup o}), and (3) a light crude from the Middle East with a viscosity of approximately 700 cP (API gravity about 32{sup o}). The principal conclusions derived from the second project phase include the following: (1) The application of acoustic energy (sonication) significantly reduced the viscosity of crude oils, and the amount of viscosity reduction resulting is greater for more viscous, heavy crude oils than it is for less viscous, light crude oils. (2) Test results showed that after being heated, resulting viscosity reductions were not sustained following treatment to the extent that post-sonication reductions were sustained. (3) The maximum viscosity reductions in Oils 1, 2, and 3 due to sonication were 43%, 76%, and 6%, respectively. Samples of Oil 2 associated with larger viscosity reductions often exhibited a definite water separation layer follow the tests, whereas reductions of approximately 23% were measured when this separation was not observed. (4) It was observed that neither horn design nor the reduction of input power by 25% had very little effect on the ability of sonication to alter crude oil viscosity. (5) The chemical additives produced a range of viscosity reduction from 37% to a maximum of 94% with the largest reductions being facilitated by the abundant water present Oil 2. If the Oil 2 results are not considered, the maximum reduction was 73%. The effects of the additives and sonication are enhanced by each other. (6) In only one test did the viscosity return to as much as 50% of the pre-treatment value during a period of 30 days following treatment; recovery was much less in all other cases. Therefore, more than half of the viscosity reduction was maintained for a month without additional treatment. (7) Possible applications, market potential, and economic value of the implementation of a mature sonication technology within the petroleum industry were identified, and it was estimated that the potential exists that more than a billion barrels of oil could be upgraded or produced annually as a result. The project results successfully demonstrated that sonication alone and in combination with chemical additives can effectively reduce the viscosity of crude oils having a broad range of viscosity/API gravity values. Several recommendations are made for follow-on

  5. Temporal analysis of acoustic emission from a plunged granular bed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daisuke Tsuji; Hiroaki Katsuragi

    2015-09-18

    The statistical property of acoustic emission (AE) events from a plunged granular bed is analyzed by means of actual time and natural time analyses. These temporal analysis methods allow us to investigate the details of AE events that follow a power-law distribution. In the actual time analysis, the calm time distribution and the decay of the event-occurrence density after the largest event (i.e., Omori-Utsu law) are measured. Although the former always shows a power-law form, the latter does not always obey a power law. Markovianity of the event-occurrence process is also verified using a scaling law by assuming that both of them exhibit power laws. We find that the effective shear strain rate is a key parameter to classify the emergence rate of power-law nature and Markovianity in the granular AE events. For the natural time analysis, the existence of self organized critical (SOC) states is revealed by calculating the variance of natural time $\\chi_k$, where $k$th natural time of N events is defined as $\\chi_k=k/N$. In addition, the energy difference distribution can be fitted by a $q$-Gaussian form, which is also consistent with the criticality of the system.

  6. An investigation of thermally driven acoustical oscillations in helium systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuerst, J.D.

    1990-08-01

    The phenomenon of thermal-acoustic oscillation is seen to arise spontaneously in gas columns subjected to steep temperature gradients, particularly in tubes connecting liquid helium reservoirs with the ambient environment. This if often the arrangement for installed cryogenic instrumentation and is accompanied by undesirably large heat transfer rates to the cold region. Experimental data are collected and matched to theoretical predictions of oscillatory behavior; these results are in good agreement with the analytical model and with previously collected data. The present experiment places the open ends of oscillating tubes of the various lengths and cross sections in communication with flowing helium in the subcooled, 2-phase, or superheated state while the other ends are maintained at some controlled, elevated temperature. Assorted cold end conditions are achieved through adjustments to the Fermilab Tevatron satellite test refrigerator to which the test cryostat is connected. The warm, closed ends of the tubes are maintained by isothermal baths of liquid nitrogen, ice water, and boiling water. The method is contrasted to previous arrangements whereby tubes are run from room temperature into or adjacent to a stagnant pool of liquid helium. Additionally, the effect of pulsations in the flowing helium stream is explored through operation of the refrigerator's wet and dry expanders during data collection. These data confirm the theory to which try were compared and support its use in the design of cryogenic sensing lines for avoidance of thermoacoustic oscillation.

  7. Accounting for baryonic effects in cosmic shear tomography: Determining a minimal set of nuisance parameters using PCA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eifler, Tim; Krause, Elisabeth; Dodelson, Scott; Zentner, Andrew; Hearin, Andrew; Gnedin, Nickolay

    2014-05-28

    Systematic uncertainties that have been subdominant in past large-scale structure (LSS) surveys are likely to exceed statistical uncertainties of current and future LSS data sets, potentially limiting the extraction of cosmological information. Here we present a general framework (PCA marginalization) to consistently incorporate systematic effects into a likelihood analysis. This technique naturally accounts for degeneracies between nuisance parameters and can substantially reduce the dimension of the parameter space that needs to be sampled. As a practical application, we apply PCA marginalization to account for baryonic physics as an uncertainty in cosmic shear tomography. Specifically, we use CosmoLike to run simulated likelihood analyses on three independent sets of numerical simulations, each covering a wide range of baryonic scenarios differing in cooling, star formation, and feedback mechanisms. We simulate a Stage III (Dark Energy Survey) and Stage IV (Large Synoptic Survey Telescope/Euclid) survey and find a substantial bias in cosmological constraints if baryonic physics is not accounted for. We then show that PCA marginalization (employing at most 3 to 4 nuisance parameters) removes this bias. Our study demonstrates that it is possible to obtain robust, precise constraints on the dark energy equation of state even in the presence of large levels of systematic uncertainty in astrophysical processes. We conclude that the PCA marginalization technique is a powerful, general tool for addressing many of the challenges facing the precision cosmology program.

  8. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr., Ph.D.; Musharraf Zaman, Ph.D.; Younane Abousleiman, Ph.D.

    2001-04-01

    The oil and gas industry has encountered significant problems in the production of oil and gas from weak rocks (such as chalks and limestones) and from unconsolidated sand formations. Problems include subsidence, compaction, sand production, and catastrophic shallow water sand flows during deep water drilling. Together these cost the petroleum industry hundreds of millions of dollars annually. The goals of this first quarterly report is to document the progress on the project to provide data on the acoustic imaging and mechanical properties of soft rock and marine sediments. The project is intended to determine the geophysical (acoustic velocities) rock properties of weak, poorly cemented rocks and unconsolidated sands. In some cases these weak formations can create problems for reservoir engineers. For example, it cost Phillips Petroleum 1 billion dollars to repair of offshore production facilities damaged during the unexpected subsidence and compaction of the Ekofisk Field in the North Sea (Sulak 1991). Another example is the problem of shallow water flows (SWF) occurring in sands just below the seafloor encountered during deep water drilling operations. In these cases the unconsolidated sands uncontrollably flow up around the annulus of the borehole resulting in loss of the drill casing. The $150 million dollar loss of the Ursa development project in the U.S. Gulf Coast resulted from an uncontrolled SWF (Furlow 1998a,b; 1999a,b). The first three tasks outlined in the work plan are: (1) obtain rock samples, (2) construct new acoustic platens, (3) calibrate and test the equipment. These have been completed as scheduled. Rock Mechanics Institute researchers at the University of Oklahoma have obtained eight different types of samples for the experimental program. These include: (a) Danian Chalk, (b) Cordoba Cream Limestone, (c) Indiana Limestone, (d) Ekofisk Chalk, (e) Oil Creek Sandstone, (f) unconsolidated Oil Creek sand, and (g) unconsolidated Brazos river sand. These weak rocks and sands are intended to represent analogs to the formations that present oil and gas engineers with problems during oil and gas production and drilling operations. A series of new axial acoustic sensors have been constructed (and tested) to allow measurement of compressional and shear wave velocities during high pressure triaxial tests on these weak rock and sand samples. In addition, equipment to be utilized over the next 18 months of the project have tested and calibrated. These include the load frames, triaxial pressure cells, pressure sensors, load cells, extensometers, and oscilloscopes have been calibrated and tested. The multichannel acoustic emission and acoustic pulse transmission systems have also been tested. Graduate research assistant, research faculty, and the laboratory technician have begun Tasks 4 and 5 which involve preparing the sand samples and rock samples for testing. The construction of the lateral acoustic sensors has also been started during this quarter as outlined in the project timeline. With the equipment having been tested and calibrated, and the samples now being prepared, the experiments are on schedule to be started in April, 2001.

  9. Acoustic detection of Immiscible Liquids in Sand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geller, Jil T.; Kowalsky, Michael B.; Seifert, Patricia K.; Nihei, Kurt T.

    1999-03-01

    Laboratory cross-well P-wave transmission at 90 kHz was measured in a 61 cm diameter by 76 cm tall water-saturated sand pack, before and after introducing a non-aqueous phase organic liquid (NAPL) (n-dodecane). In one experiment NAPL was introduced to form a lens trapped by a low permeability layer; a second experiment considered NAPL residual trapped behind the front of flowing NAPL. The NAPL caused significant changes in the travel time and amplitude of first arrivals, as well as the generation of diffracted waves arriving after the direct wave. The spatial variations in NAPL saturation obtained from excavation at the end of the experiment correlated well with the observed variations in the P-wave amplitudes and travel times. NAPL residual saturation changes from NAPL flow channels of 3 to 4% were detectable and the 40 to 80% NAPL saturation in the NAPL lens was clearly visible at acoustic frequencies. The results of these experiments demonstrate that small NAPL saturations may be more easily detected with amplitude rather than travel time data, but that the relationships between the amplitude changes and NAPL saturation maybe more complex than those for velocity.

  10. Characterization of isotropic solids with nonlinear surface acoustic wave pulses Al. A. Kolomenskii and H. A. Schuessler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuessler, Hans

    Characterization of isotropic solids with nonlinear surface acoustic wave pulses Al. A. Kolomenskii acoustic wave SAW pulses in two isotropic materials, polycrystalline aluminum and synthetic fused silica Studies of nonlinear properties of surface acoustic waves SAW's recently attracted substantial interest

  11. Determination of the effect of different additives in coking blends using a combination of in situ high-temperature {sup 1}H NMR and rheometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miguel C. Diaz; Karen M. Steel; Trevor C. Drage; John W. Patrick; Colin E. Snape [Nottingham University, Nottingham (United Kingdom). Nottingham Fuel and Energy Centre, School of Chemical, Environmental and Mining Engineering

    2005-12-01

    High-temperature {sup 1}H NMR and rheometry measurements were carried out on 4:1 wt/wt blends of a medium volatile bituminous coal with two anthracites, two petroleum cokes, charcoal, wood, a low-temperature coke breeze, tyre crumb, and active carbon to determine the effects on fluidity development to identify the parameters responsible for these effects during pyrolysis and to study possible relationships among the parameters derived from these techniques. Positive, negative, and neutral effects were identified on the concentration of fluid material. Small positive effects (ca. 5-6%) were caused by blending the coal with petroleum cokes. Charcoal, wood, and active carbon all exerted negative effects on concentration (18-27% reduction) and mobility (12-25% reduction in T2) of the fluid phase, which have been associated with the inert character and high surface areas of these additives that adsorb the fluid phase of the coal. One of the anthracites and the low-temperature coke breeze caused deleterious effects to a lesser extent on the concentration (7-12%) and mobility (13-17%) of the fluid material, possibly due to the high concentration of metals in these additives (ca. 11% ash). Despite the high fluid character of tyre crumb at the temperature of maximum fluidity of the coal (73%), the mobility of the fluid phase of the blend was lower than expected. The comparison of {sup 1}H NMR and rheometry results indicated that to account for the variations in minimum complex viscosity for all the blends, both the maximum concentration of fluid phase and the maximum mobility of the fluid material had to be considered. For individual blends, two exponential relationships have been found between the complex viscosity and the concentration of solid phase in both the softening and resolidification stages but the parameters are different for each blend. 30 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Jump Chaotic Behaviour of Ultra Low Loss Bulk Acoustic Wave Cavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxim Goryachev; Warrick G. Farr; Serge Galliou; Michael E. Tobar

    2014-06-16

    We demonstrate a previously unobserved nonlinear phenomenon in an ultra-low loss quartz Bulk Acoustic Wave cavity ($Q>3\\times10^9$), which only occurs below 20 milli-Kelvin in temperature and under relatively weak pumping. The phenomenon reveals the emergence of several stable equilibria (at least two foci and two nodes) and jumps between these quasi states at random times. The degree of this randomness as well as separations between levels can be controlled by the frequency of the incident carrier signal. It is demonstrated that the nature of the effect lays beyond the standard Duffing model.

  13. Jump chaotic behaviour of ultra low loss bulk acoustic wave cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goryachev, Maxim, E-mail: maxim.goryachev@uwa.edu.au; Farr, Warrick G.; Tobar, Michael E. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley WA 6009 (Australia); Galliou, Serge [Department of Time and Frequency, FEMTO-ST Institute, ENSMM, 26 Chemin de l'Épitaphe 25000 Besançon (France)

    2014-08-11

    We demonstrate a previously unobserved nonlinear phenomenon in an ultra-low loss quartz bulk acoustic wave cavity (Q>3>10{sup 9}), which only occurs below 20 mK in temperature and under relatively weak pumping. The phenomenon reveals the emergence of several stable equilibria (at least two foci and two nodes) and jumps between these quasi states at random times. The degree of this randomness as well as separations between levels can be controlled by the frequency of the incident carrier signal. It is demonstrated that the nature of the effect lies beyond the standard Duffing model.

  14. Tsunamis in Galaxy Clusters: Heating of Cool Cores by Acoustic Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yutaka Fujita; Takeru Ken Suzuki; Keiichi Wada

    2003-09-30

    Using an analytical model and numerical simulations, we show that acoustic waves generated by turbulent motion in intracluster medium effectively heat the central region of a so-called ``cooling flow'' cluster. We assume that the turbulence is generated by substructure motion in a cluster or cluster mergers. Our analytical model can reproduce observed density and temperature profiles of a few clusters. We also show that waves can transfer more energy from the outer region of a cluster than thermal conduction alone. Numerical simulations generally support the results of the analytical study.

  15. Temperature Effect on Acoustics of Supersonic Impinging Jet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    impinging jets have been of interest both from an applications and a fundamental fluid mechanics point for Advanced Aero-Propulsion, Florida A&M University/Florida State University College of Engineering, Tallahassee, FL 32310 Paul A. Ragaller2 Department of Mechanical Engineering Massachusetts Institute

  16. Search for Acoustic Signals from Ultra-High Energy Neutrinos in 1500 km^3 of Sea Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naoko Kurahashi; Justin Vandenbroucke; Giorgio Gratta

    2010-07-30

    An underwater acoustic sensor array spanning ~1500 km^3 is used to search for cosmic-ray neutrinos of ultra-high energies (UHE, E > 10^18 eV). Approximately 328 million triggers accumulated over an integrated 130 days of data taking are analysed. The sensitivity of the experiment is determined from a Monte Carlo simulation of the array using recorded noise conditions and expected waveforms. Two events are found to have properties compatible with showers in the energy range 10^24 to 5x10^24 eV and 10^22 to 5x10^22 eV. Since the understanding of impulsive backgrounds is limited, a flux upper limit is set providing the most sensitive limit on UHE neutrinos using the acoustic technique.

  17. Acoustic Monitoring of Beluga Whale Interactions with Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worthington, Monty

    2014-02-05

    Cook Inlet, Alaska is home to some of the greatest tidal energy resources in the U.S., as well as an endangered population of beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas). Successfully permitting and operating a tidal power project in Cook Inlet requires a biological assessment of the potential and realized effects of the physical presence and sound footprint of tidal turbines on the distribution, relative abundance, and behavior of Cook Inlet beluga whales. ORPC Alaska, working with the Project Team—LGL Alaska Research Associates, University of Alaska Anchorage, TerraSond, and Greeneridge Science—undertook the following U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) study to characterize beluga whales in Cook Inlet – Acoustic Monitoring of Beluga Whale Interactions with the Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project (Project). ORPC Alaska, LLC, is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC, (collectively, ORPC). ORPC is a global leader in the development of hydrokinetic power systems and eco-conscious projects that harness the power of ocean and river currents to create clean, predictable renewable energy. ORPC is developing a tidal energy demonstration project in Cook Inlet at East Foreland where ORPC has a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) preliminary permit (P-13821). The Project collected baseline data to characterize pre-deployment patterns of marine mammal distribution, relative abundance, and behavior in ORPC’s proposed deployment area at East Foreland. ORPC also completed work near Fire Island where ORPC held a FERC preliminary permit (P-12679) until March 6, 2013. Passive hydroacoustic devices (previously utilized with bowhead whales in the Beaufort Sea) were adapted for study of beluga whales to determine the relative abundance of beluga whale vocalizations within the proposed deployment areas. Hydroacoustic data collected during the Project were used to characterize the ambient acoustic environment of the project site pre-deployment to inform the FERC pilot project process. The Project compared results obtained from this method to results obtained from other passive hydrophone technologies and to visual observation techniques performed simultaneously. This Final Report makes recommendations on the best practice for future data collection, for ORPC’s work in Cook Inlet specifically, and for tidal power projects in general. This Project developed a marine mammal study design and compared technologies for hydroacoustic and visual data collection with potential for broad application to future tidal and hydrokinetic projects in other geographic areas. The data collected for this Project will support the environmental assessment of future Cook Inlet tidal energy projects, including ORPC’s East Foreland Tidal Energy Project and any tidal energy developments at Fire Island. The Project’s rigorous assessment of technology and methodologies will be invaluable to the hydrokinetic industry for developing projects in an environmentally sound and sustainable way for areas with high marine mammal activity or endangered populations. By combining several different sampling methods this Project will also contribute to the future preparation of a comprehensive biological assessment of ORPC’s projects in Cook Inlet.

  18. Separation of acoustic waves in isentropic flow perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Henke

    2015-02-22

    The present contribution investigates the mechanisms of sound generation and propagation in the case of highly-unsteady flows. Based on the linearisation of the isentropic Navier-Stokes equation around a new pathline-averaged base flow, it is demonstrated for the first time that flow perturbations of a non-uniform flow can be split into acoustic and vorticity modes, with the acoustic modes being independent of the vorticity modes. Therefore, we can propose this acoustic perturbation as a general definition of sound. As a consequence of the splitting result, we conclude that the present acoustic perturbation is propagated by the convective wave equation and fulfils Lighthill's acoustic analogy. Moreover, we can define the deviations of the Navier-Stokes equation from the convective wave equation as true sound sources. In contrast to other authors, no assumptions on a slowly varying or irrotational flow are necessary. Using a symmetry argument for the conservation laws, an energy conservation result and a generalisation of the sound intensity are provided.

  19. Heat-driven acoustic cooling engine having no moving parts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wheatley, John C. (Los Alamos, NM); Swift, Gregory W. (Santa Fe, NM); Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM); Hofler, Thomas J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1989-01-01

    A heat-driven acoustic cooling engine having no moving parts receives heat from a heat source. The acoustic cooling engine comprises an elongated resonant pressure vessel having first and second ends. A compressible fluid having a substantial thermal expansion coefficient and capable of supporting an acoustic standing wave is contained in the resonant pressure vessel. The heat source supplies heat to the first end of the vessel. A first heat exchanger in the vessel is spaced-apart from the first end and receives heat from the first end. A first thermodynamic element is adjacent to the first heat exchanger and converts some of the heat transmitted by the first heat exchanger into acoustic power. A second thermodynamic element has a first end located spaced-apart from the first thermodynamic element and a second end farther away from the first thermodynamic element than is its first end. The first end of the second thermodynamic element heats while its second end cools as a consequence of the acoustic power. A second heat exchanger is adjacent to and between the first and second thermodynamic elements. A heat sink outside of the vessel is thermally coupled to and receives heat from the second heat exchanger. The resonant pressure vessel can include a housing less than one-fourth wavelength in length coupled to a reservoir. The housing can include a reduced diameter portion communicating with the reservoir.

  20. Optical Generation of Gigahertz-Frequency Shear Acoustic Waves in Liquid Glycerol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrieu, S.

    Picosecond laser ultrasonic techniques for acoustic wave generation and detection have been employed to probe shear acoustic waves in liquid glycerol at gigahertz frequencies. The experimental approach uses a unique laser ...