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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detergents synthetic fibers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Correlating Detergent Fiber Analysis and Dietary Fiber Analysis Data for Corn Stover  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There exist large amounts of detergent fiber analysis data [neutral detergent fiber (NDF), acid detergent fiber (ADF), acid detergent lignin (ADL)] for many different potential cellulosic ethanol feedstocks, since these techniques are widely used for the analysis of forages. Researchers working in the area of cellulosic ethanol are interested in the structural carbohydrates in a feedstock (principally glucan and xylan), which are typically determined by acid hydrolysis of the structural fraction after multiple extractions of the biomass. These so-called dietary fiber analysis methods are significantly more involved than detergent fiber analysis methods. The purpose of this study was to determine whether it is feasible to correlate detergent fiber analysis values to glucan and xylan content determined by dietary fiber analysis methods for corn stover. In the detergent fiber analysis literature cellulose is often estimated as the difference between ADF and ADL, while hemicellulose is often estimated as the difference between NDF and ADF. Examination of a corn stover dataset containing both detergent fiber analysis data and dietary fiber analysis data predicted using near infrared spectroscopy shows that correlations between structural glucan measured using dietary fiber techniques and cellulose estimated using detergent techniques, and between structural xylan measured using dietary fiber techniques and hemicellulose estimated using detergent techniques are high, but are driven largely by the underlying correlation between total extractives measured by fiber analysis and NDF/ADF. That is, detergent analysis data is correlated to dietary fiber analysis data for structural carbohydrates, but only indirectly; the main correlation is between detergent analysis data and solvent extraction data produced during the dietary fiber analysis procedure.

Wolfrum, E. J.; Lorenz, A. J.; deLeon, N.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

SODEOPEC: Soaps, Detergents, Oleochemicals...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book contains updated material from some of the salient presentations at the Soaps, Detergents, and Oleochemicals (1997) and SODEOPEC (2002) conferences. SODEOPEC: Soaps, Detergents, Oleochemicals... Surfactants and Detergents aocs articles Detergen

3

Behavior of Concrete Panels Reinforced with Synthetic Fibers, Mild Steel, and GFRP Composites Subjected to Blasts  

SciTech Connect

The paper presents experimental data generated for calibrating finite element models to predict the performance of reinforced concrete panels with a wide range of construction details under blast loading. The specimens were 1.2 m square panels constructed using Normal Weight Concrete (NWC) or Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC). FRC consisted of macro-synthetic fibers dispersed in NWC. Five types of panels were tested: NWC panels with steel bars; FRC panels without additional reinforcement; FRC panels with steel bars; NWC panels with glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) bars; and NWC panels reinforced with steel bars and external GFRP laminates on both faces. Each panel type was constructed with three thicknesses: 152 mm, 254 mm, and 356 mm. FRC panels with steel bars had the best performance for new construction. NWC panels reinforced with steel bars and external GFRP laminates on both faces had the best performance for strengthening or rehabilitation of existing structures. The performance of NWC panels with GFRP bars was strongly influenced by the bar spacing. The behavior of the panels is classified in terms of damage using immediate occupancy, life safety, and near collapse performance levels. Preliminary dynamic simulations are compared to the experimental results.

C. P. Pantelides; T. T. Garfield; W. D. Richins; T. K. Larson; J. E. Blakeley

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

6th World Conference on Detergents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Archive of 6th World Conference on Detergents. 6th World Conference on Detergents Montreux , Switzerland 6th World Conference on Detergents ...

5

Keeping up with detergent chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The detergent industry is highly competitive, mostly recession proof, and, thanks to chemistry, always changing ever so slightly. It has been years, however, since cleaning chemistry has been the driving force in detergent innovation. Instead, the environm

6

Surfactants and Detergents Distinguished Service Award  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recognizing outstanding, commendable service to the surfactants, detergents and soaps industry. eligibility and application Surfactants and Detergents Distinguished Service Award Surfactants and Detergents aocs articles Detergents division divisions fabr

7

Formulating Detergents and Personal Care ProductsChapter 13 Perfume in Detergent and Personal Care Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Formulating Detergents and Personal Care Products Chapter 13 Perfume in Detergent and Personal Care Products Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 13 Perfu

8

Surfactants and Detergents Division Newsletter 11/12  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Read the November newsletter from the Surfactants and Detergents Division. Surfactants and Detergents Division Newsletter 11/12 Surfactants and Detergents Division detergents division divisions fabric fats home care laundry detergent member membership oi

9

Surfactant and Detergent Division List  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Name AffiliationCity, State, CountrySurfactants & Detergents Division2013 Members464 Members as of October 1, 2013, Process Plus LLCCincinnati, OH, USAAbdurahman, SadegWashington State UniversityPullman, WA, USAAbend, SvenKolb Distribution LtdHedingen, Swi

10

Surfactants and Detergents Division Student Award  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aids graduate student travel to AOCS Annual Meeting & Expo to present a paper. Surfactants and Detergents Division Student Award Divisions achievement agricultural analytical application award awards biotechnology detergents distinguished divisio

11

Multi-chord fiber-coupled interferometry of supersonic plasma jets andcomparisons with synthetic data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multi-chord fiber-coupled interferometer [Merritt et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 033506 (2012)] is being used to make time-resolved density measurements of supersonic argon plasma jets on the Plasma Liner Experiment [Hsu et al., Bull. Amer. Phys. Soc. 56, 307 (2011)]. The long coherence length of the laser (> 10 m) allows signal and reference path lengths to be mismatched by many meters without signal degradation, making for a greatly simplified optical layout. Measured interferometry phase shifts are consistent with a partially ionized plasma in which an initially positive phase shift becomes negative when the ionization fraction drops below a certain threshold. In this case, both free electrons and bound electrons in ions and neutral atoms contribute to the index of refraction. This paper illustrates how the interferometry data, aided by numerical modeling, are used to derive total jet density, jet propagation velocity ({approx} 15-50 km/s), jet length ({approx} 20-100 cm), and 3D expansion.

Merritt, Elizabeth C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lynn, Alan G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gilmore, Mark A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thoma, Carsten [Voss Scientific LLC; Loverich, John [Tech-X Corporation; Hsu, Scott C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

12

Formulating Detergents and Personal Care ProductsChapter 3 Detergent Powders, Bars, Pastes, and Tablets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Formulating Detergents and Personal Care Products Chapter 3 Detergent Powders, Bars, Pastes, and Tablets Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents AOCS Press 31AE8E3D42D3E14DDBA41DE5FCD66625 AOCS Press

13

Proceedings of the 5th World Conference on Detergents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

5th World Conference on Detergents, includes CD-ROM. Proceedings of the 5th World Conference on Detergents Surfactants and Detergents aocs articles Detergents division divisions fabric fats home care jaocs journal jsd laundry methods oils papers personal

14

Formulating Detergents and Personal Care ProductsChapter 1 The Main Surfactants Used in Detergents and Personal Care Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Formulating Detergents and Personal Care Products Chapter 1 The Main Surfactants Used in Detergents and Personal Care Products Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press Downloadable pdf o

15

6th World Conference on Detergents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentations from the 6th World Conference on Detergents, Defining and Designing our Future , 9-12 October 2006, Montreux, Switzerland. ...

16

Biobased Surfactants and DetergentsChapter 8 Lung Surfactants Formulation Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biobased Surfactants and Detergents Chapter 8 Lung Surfactants Formulation Evaluation Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press   Downloadable pdf of Chapter 8 Lung Surfactan

17

Formulating Detergents and Personal Care ProductsChapter 20 Latest Trends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Formulating Detergents and Personal Care Products Chapter 20 Latest Trends Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 20 Latest Trends from ...

18

Formulating Detergents and Personal Care ProductsChapter 18 Quality Assurance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Formulating Detergents and Personal Care Products Chapter 18 Quality Assurance Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 18 Quality Assurance from ...

19

Formulating Detergents and Personal Care ProductsChapter 12 Manufacturing Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Formulating Detergents and Personal Care Products Chapter 12 Manufacturing Process Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 12 Manufacturing Process from

20

Formulating Detergents and Personal Care ProductsChapter 15 Storage Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Formulating Detergents and Personal Care Products Chapter 15 Storage Tests Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 15 Storage Tests from ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detergents synthetic fibers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Surfactants and Detergents Division Newsletter March 201/span>3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Read the March newsletter from the Surfactants and Detergents Division. Surfactants and Detergents Division Newsletter March 201/span>3 Membership Information achievement application award Awards distinguished division Divisions fats job Join lipid lipi

22

Surfactants and Detergents Division Newsletter November 201/span>3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Read the November newsletter from the Surfactants and Detergents Division. Surfactants and Detergents Division Newsletter November 201/span>3 Membership Information achievement application award Awards distinguished division Divisions fats job Join lipi

23

Soap Manufacturing TechnologyChapter 1 The History of Soaps and Detergents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soap Manufacturing Technology Chapter 1 The History of Soaps and Detergents Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press Downloadable pdf of\tChapter 1 The History of Soaps and Detergents fro

24

Biobased Surfactants and Detergents Synthesis, Properties, and ApplicationsChapter 4 Advances in Bioprocess Development of Rhamnolipid and Sophorolipid Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biobased Surfactants and Detergents Synthesis, Properties, and Applications Chapter 4 Advances in Bioprocess Development of Rhamnolipid and Sophorolipid Production Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press

25

Biobased Surfactants and DetergentsChapter 9 Self-Assembling Properties of Glycolipid Biosurfactants and Their Functional Developments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biobased Surfactants and Detergents Chapter 9 Self-Assembling Properties of Glycolipid Biosurfactants and Their Functional Developments Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press   Dow

26

Biobased Surfactants and Detergents Synthesis, Properties, and ApplicationsChapter 3 Mannosylerythritol Lipids: Production and Downstream Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biobased Surfactants and Detergents Synthesis, Properties, and Applications Chapter 3 Mannosylerythritol Lipids: Production and Downstream Processing Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press  

27

Biobased Surfactants and Detergents Synthesis, Properties, and ApplicationsChapter 6 Lipopeptide Biosurfactants and Their Use in Oil Recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biobased Surfactants and Detergents Synthesis, Properties, and Applications Chapter 6 Lipopeptide Biosurfactants and Their Use in Oil Recovery Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press   ...

28

Biobased Surfactants and Detergents Synthesis, Properties, and ApplicationsChapter 16 Interfacial Properties of Sugar-based Surfactants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biobased Surfactants and Detergents Synthesis, Properties, and Applications Chapter 16 Interfacial Properties of Sugar-based Surfactants Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press   D

29

Biobased Surfactants and Detergents Synthesis, Properties, and ApplicationsChapter 2 Production and Modification of Sophorolipids from Agricultural Feedstocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biobased Surfactants and Detergents Synthesis, Properties, and Applications Chapter 2 Production and Modification of Sophorolipids from Agricultural Feedstocks Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press &

30

Formulating Detergents and Personal Care ProductsChapter 7 Other Hard Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Formulating Detergents and Personal Care Products Chapter 7 Other Hard Surfaces Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents AOCS 9CE4DE402B3089F3925D609F04945DF5 Press Downloadable pdf of

31

Formulating Detergents and Personal Care ProductsChapter 10 Oral Care Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Formulating Detergents and Personal Care Products Chapter 10 Oral Care Products Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 10 Oral Care Products from ...

32

Formulating Detergents and Personal Care ProductsChapter 11 Product Performance Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Formulating Detergents and Personal Care Products Chapter 11 Product Performance Evaluation Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents AOCS C40438897CE3EDE1D489B325B910F465 Press Downloadable pd

33

Formulating Detergents and Personal Care ProductsChapter 8 Skin Care Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Formulating Detergents and Personal Care Products Chapter 8 Skin Care Products Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press Downloadable pdf of\tChapter 8 Skin Care Products from ...

34

Formulating Detergents and Personal Care ProductsChapter 9 Hair Care Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Formulating Detergents and Personal Care Products Chapter 9 Hair Care Products Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press Downloadable pdf of\tChapter 9 Hair Care Products from ...

35

Formulating Detergents and Personal Care ProductsChapter 6 Hand and Machine Dishwashing Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Formulating Detergents and Personal Care Products Chapter 6 Hand and Machine Dishwashing Products Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press Downloadable pdf of\tChapter 6 Hand and Machine

36

Biobased Surfactants and Detergents: Synthesis, Properties, and Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This must-have book covers biosurfactants: synthesis and applications. Contents include how to reduce manufacturing and purification costs, impurities, and by-products. Biobased Surfactants and Detergents: Synthesis, Properties, and Applications Hardback

37

* Montreux 2010: 7th World Conference on Detergents DVD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentations from the Montreux 2010—the 7th World Conference on Detergents, New Strategies in a Dynamic Global Economy , 4-7 October 2010, Montreux, Switzerland. This DVD is a valuable collection of the dynamic presentations from the confer

38

Biobased Surfactants and Detergents Synthesis, Properties, and ApplicationsChapter 11 Selective Enzymatic Synthesis of N-Acylated Alkanolamine Emulsifiers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biobased Surfactants and Detergents Synthesis, Properties, and Applications Chapter 11 Selective Enzymatic Synthesis of N-Acylated Alkanolamine Emulsifiers Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press  

39

Formulating Detergents and Personal Care ProductsChapter 17 Consumer Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Formulating Detergents and Personal Care Products Chapter 17 Consumer Testing Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents AOCS FB280C5EE30E8C007D8BB3059AD25C79 Press Downloadable pdf of C

40

Synthetic fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In January 1982, the Department of Energy guaranteed a loan for the construction and startup of the Great Plains project. On August 1, 1985, the partnership defaulted on the $1.54 billion loan, and DOE acquired control of, and then title to, the project. DOE continued to operate the plant, through the ANG Coal Gasification Company, and sell synthetic fuel. The DOE's ownership and divestiture of the plant is discussed.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detergents synthetic fibers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Genetically engineered phage fibers and coatings for antibacterial applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multifunctionality can be imparted to protein-based fibers and coatings via either synthetic or biological approaches. Here, we demonstrate potent antimicrobial functionality of genetically engineered, phage-based fibers ...

Mao, Joan Y

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Biobased Surfactants and Detergents Synthesis, Properties, and ApplicationsChapter 1 Biobased Surfactants: Overview and Industrial State-of-the-Art  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biobased Surfactants and Detergents Synthesis, Properties, and Applications Chapter 1 Biobased Surfactants: Overview and Industrial State-of-the-Art Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press Downl

43

Biobased Surfactants and Detergents Synthesis, Properties, and ApplicationsChapter 14 Design of Vegetable Oil Metalworking Fluid Microemulsions Using Biobased Surfactants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biobased Surfactants and Detergents Synthesis, Properties, and Applications Chapter 14 Design of Vegetable Oil Metalworking Fluid Microemulsions Using Biobased Surfactants Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Pre

44

Biobased Surfactants and Detergents Synthesis, Properties, and ApplicationsChapter 7 Influence of Pulmonary Surfactant Protein Mimics on Model Lung Surfactant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biobased Surfactants and Detergents Synthesis, Properties, and Applications Chapter 7 Influence of Pulmonary Surfactant Protein Mimics on Model Lung Surfactant Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press &

45

Biobased Surfactants and Detergents Synthesis, Properties, and ApplicationsChapter 10 Basic Properties of Sucrose Fatty Acid Esters and Their Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biobased Surfactants and Detergents Synthesis, Properties, and Applications Chapter 10 Basic Properties of Sucrose Fatty Acid Esters and Their Applications Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press ...

46

Biobased Surfactants and Detergents Synthesis, Properties, and ApplicationsChapter 15 Polyol and Amino Acid-based Biosurfactants, Builders, and Hydrogels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biobased Surfactants and Detergents Synthesis, Properties, and Applications Chapter 15 Polyol and Amino Acid-based Biosurfactants, Builders, and Hydrogels Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press  

47

Biobased Surfactants and Detergents Synthesis, Properties, and ApplicationsChapter 12 Synthesis of Saccharide Fatty Acid Ester Biosurfactants Catalyzed by Lipase  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biobased Surfactants and Detergents Synthesis, Properties, and Applications Chapter 12 Synthesis of Saccharide Fatty Acid Ester Biosurfactants Catalyzed by Lipase Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press ...

48

Biobased Surfactants and Detergents Synthesis, Properties, and ApplicationsChapter 13 Synthesis, Aggregation Properties, and Applications of Biosurfactants Derived from Arginine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biobased Surfactants and Detergents Synthesis, Properties, and Applications Chapter 13 Synthesis, Aggregation Properties, and Applications of Biosurfactants Derived from Arginine Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergen

49

Synthetic HDL created  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scientists at Northwestern University (Evanston, Illinois, USA) have created a promising new weapon-synthetic high-density lipoprotein (HDL), the "good" cholesterol-that could help fight chronically high cholesterol levels. Synthetic HDL created ...

50

Washing of Cloth Contaminated with Radionuclides Using A Detergent-Free Laundry System  

SciTech Connect

In this study, we describe a new laundry system to wash clothes, including those contaminated with radionuclides, without using detergent. The main part of this system is electrolytic cell that consists of a cathode with a special coating of nickel, an anode of nickel, and a cation exchange membrane between the two electrodes. The electrolyte is supplied to the anode and the tap-water to the cathode. When an electricity of 5 volts and 25 amperes is applied to the electrodes, the processed water is produced from the cathode. This processed water containing no detergent was investigated experimentally with regard to its decontamination efficiency of radionuclides and detergency of soil as compared to the conventional washing using detergent. It was found that the processed water from this system has an ability to simultaneously remove radionuclides and soil from the cloth with good efficiency.

Yim, S. P.; Ahn, B. G.; Lee, H. J.; Shon, J. S.; Chung, H.; Kim, K. J.; Kim, H. J.; Park, J. H.; Lee, W. S.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

51

Design and implementation of nanoscale fiber mechanical testing apparatus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The rapid growth in the synthetic manufacturing industry demands higher resolution mechanical testing devices, capable of working with nanoscale fibers. A new device has been developed to perform single-axis tensile tests ...

Brayanov, Jordan, 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Synthetic Aperture Radar -- Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Contacts Synthetic Aperture Radar Sandia synthetic aperture radar image of Washington, DC Sandia synthetic aperture radar image of Washington, DC Sandia synthetic...

53

Synthetic and Mechanistic Chemistry publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Synthetic and Mechanistic Synthetic and Mechanistic publications Research into alternative forms of energy, especially energy security, is one of the major national...

54

Future Synthetic Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 During this presentation, we will give some background on Gas To Liquids - the synthetic fuel used in transport- its beneficial emission properties...

55

Biodegradable synthetic bone composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides for a biodegradable synthetic bone composition comprising a biodegradable hydrogel polymer scaffold comprising a plurality of hydrolytically unstable linkages, and an inorganic component; such as a biodegradable poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate)/hydroxyapatite (pHEMA/HA) hydrogel composite possessing mineral content approximately that of human bone.

Liu, Gao; Zhao, Dacheng; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

(Computational) synthetic biology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ultimate goal of systems biology is the development of executable in silico models of cells and organisms. Systems biology attempts to provide an integrative methodology, which while able to cope with -on the one hand- the data deluge that is being ... Keywords: algorithmic systems biology, executable biology, infobiotics, p systems, synthetic biology, systems biology

Natalio Krasnogor

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synthetic aperture radar interferometry is an imaging technique for measuring the topography of a surface, its changes over time, and other changes in the detailed characteristics of the surface. By exploiting the phase of the coherent radar signal, interferometry has transformed radar remote sensing from a largely interpretive science to a quantitative tool, with applications in cartography, geodesy, land cover characterization, and natural hazards. This paper reviews the techniques of interferometry, systems and limitations, and applications in a rapidly growing area of science and engineering.

Paul A. Rosen; Scott Hensley; Ian R. Joughin; Fuk K. Li; Søren N. Madsen; Senior Member; Ernesto Rodríguez; Richard M. Goldstein

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Synthetic fuels: production and products  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief primer on synthetic fuels is given. The paper includes brief descriptions of generic conversion technologies that can be used to convert various raw materials such as coal, oil shale, tar sands, peat, and biomass into synthetic fuels similar in character to petroleum-derived fuels currently in commerce. References for additional information on synthetic fuel processes and products are also given in the paper.

Singh, S.P.N.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Synthetic fuels: production and products  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief review on synthetic fuels is given. The paper includes brief descriptions of generic conversion technologies that can be used to convert various raw materials such as coal, oil shale, tar sands, peat and biomass into synthetic fuels similar in character to petroleum-derived fuels currently in commerce. Because the subject is vast and the space is limited, references for additional information on synthetic fuel processes and products are also given in the paper. 24 references.

Singh, S.P.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Coupling detergent lysis/clean-up methodology with intact protein fractionation for enhanced proteome characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The expanding use of surfactants for proteome sample preparations has prompted the need to systematically optimize the application and removal of these MS-deleterious agents prior to proteome measurements. Here we compare four different detergent clean-up methods (Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) precipitation, Chloroform/Methanol/Water (CMW) extraction, commercial detergent removal spin column method (DRS) and filter-aided sample preparation(FASP)) with respect to varying amounts of protein biomass in the samples, and provide efficiency benchmarks with respect to protein, peptide, and spectral identifications for each method. Our results show that for protein limited samples, FASP outperforms the other three clean-up methods, while at high protein amount all the methods are comparable. This information was used in a dual strategy of comparing molecular weight based fractionated and unfractionated lysates from three increasingly complex samples (Escherichia coli, a five microbial isolate mixture, and a natural microbial community groundwater sample), which were all lysed with SDS and cleaned up using FASP. The two approaches complemented each other by enhancing the number of protein identifications by 8%-25% across the three samples and provided broad pathway coverage.

Sharma, Ritin [ORNL; Dill, Brian [ORNL; Chourey, Karuna [ORNL; Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detergents synthetic fibers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Synthetic skins with humanlike warmth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthetic skins with humanlike characteristics, such as a warm touch, may be able to ease the social stigma associated with the use of prosthetic hands by enabling the user to conceal its usage during social touching situations. Similarly for social ... Keywords: prosthetics, rehabilitation robotics, social robotics, synthetic skin, warm skin

John-John Cabibihan; Rangarajan Jegadeesan; Saba Salehi; Shuzhi Sam Ge

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Polyethylene fiber drawing optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polymer fiber drawing creates fibers with enhanced thermal conductivity and strength compared to bulk polymer because drawing aligns the molecular chains. I optimize the polymer fiber drawing method in order to achieve ...

Chiloyan, Vazrik

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Multimaterial acoustic fibers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The emergence of multimaterial fibers that combine a multiplicity of solid materials with disparate electrical, optical, and mechanical properties into a single fiber presents new opportunities for extending fiber applications ...

Chocat, Noémie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Synthetic and Mechanistic Chemistry publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Synthetic and Mechanistic Chemistry » Synthetic and Mechanistic Chemistry » Synthetic and Mechanistic Synthetic and Mechanistic publications Research into alternative forms of energy, especially energy security, is one of the major national security imperatives of this century. Get Expertise Dave Thorn Chemistry Program Manager Email Josh Smith Chemistry Communications Email "Research into alternative forms of energy, of which biofuels is a key component, is one of the major national security imperatives of this century. Energy security is vital to our future national security and the efficient functioning of our market economy." -LANL Director Charles McMillan Harshini Mukundan, Hongzhi Xie, Aaron S. Anderson, W. Kevin Grace, John E. Shively, and Basil I. Swanson, "Optimizing a waveguide-based sandwich immunoassay for tumor biomarkers: Evaluating fluorescent labels and functional surfaces," Bioconjugate Chemistry 20(2), 222-230 (2009).

65

SYNTHETIC SLING FAILURE - EVALUATIONS & RECOMMENDATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The information and evaluations provided in this report were compiled to address the recurring problem of synthetic sling failure. As safety is the number one priority in all work aspects, a solution must be devised to prevent accidents from occurring. A total of thirteen cases regarding synthetic sling failure were evaluated in order to determine their causes, effects, and preventative measures. From the collected data, it was found that all cases in which the synthetic sling contacted the edge of its load resulted in sling failure. It is required that adequate synthetic sling protection devices be used to protect slings in any lift where the sling comes in direct contact with the edge or corner of its load. However, there are no consensus codes or standards stating the type, material, or purpose of the type of protective device used to protect the sling from being cut. Numerous industry standards and codes provide vague descriptions on how to protect synthetic slings. Without a clear, concise statement of how to protect synthetic slings, it is common for inadequate materials and sling protection devices to be used in an attempt to meet the intent of these requirements. The use of an inadequate sling protection device is the main cause of synthetic sling failure in all researched cases. Commercial sling protection devices come in many shapes and sizes, and have a variety of names, as well as advertised uses. 'Abrasion pads' and 'wear protectors' are two different names for products with the same intended purpose. There is no distinguishable way to determine the extent of sling protection which these devices will provide, or what specific scenarios they are made for. This creates room for error in a field where error is unacceptable. This report provides a recommended action for hoisting and rigging activities which require synthetic slings to contact a load, as well as recommended changes to industry standards which will benefit overall industry safety.

MACKEY TC; HENDERSON CS

2009-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

66

Characterisation of the Surfactant Shell Stabilising Calcium Carbonate Dispersions in Overbased Detergent Additives: Molecular Modelling and Spin-Probe-ESR Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The surfactant shell stabilising the calcium cabonate core in overbased detergent additives of lubricant base oils was characterised by computational and experimental methods, comprising classical force-field based molecular simulations and spin-probe ...

Francesco Frigerio; Luciano Montanari

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Future Prospects of Synthetic Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is important for the future of this nation to reach the goal of demonstrated definition and quantification of the parameters which influence the ability to use this country's vast resources of coal and oil shale for production of synthetic fuels which can contribute to the nation's future energy needs. Those parameters are: technical, environmental, and economic viability. In the final analysis, the key word is economics; can, or when can synthetic fuels compete in the marketplace? A commercial synthetic fuels plant requires a multi-billion dollar capital investment. It is the purpose of this paper to discuss the risk elements of a synthetic fuels venture and to speculate on what impact the current environment, e.g. governmental policy, world crude market prices, and general economic climate may have on the timetable for achievement of the aforementioned goal. In June 1980 the author presented a paper at the AIChE Meeting in Philadelphia, Pa. entitled 'Synthetic Fuels - Their Problems and Their Promises.' The opening paragraph of that paper started as follows: 'For three decades, since the days of World War II, a U.S. synthetic fuels industry has several times verged on becoming a reality but never succeeding, the ups and downs resembling a sine wave of variable frequency. As of this writing we are at the crest of the wave. Is this the time it will happen? For the good of the nation hopefully the answer will be yes.' It is the purpose of this paper, some 20 months later, to examine what has transpired in that time interval and to speculate, in the light of those events, about their impact on the likelihood of the answer still being 'yes' and on the timing as to when it may occur. To set the stage for consideration of the importance of recent events and to put them in perspective, it is necessary to return again to the earlier paper where some of the impediments to the establishment of a U.S. synfuels industry were discussed. In essence what was said was that the principal impediments were: economic, environmental, and regulatory, and since both the economic and regulatory aspects exert some direct and/or indirect influence on cost, the problem really reduced to the single most important factor--project economics. Synthetic fuels simply are expensive to produce!

Fryback, M. G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Ceramic fiber reinforced filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A filter for removing particulate matter from high temperature flowing fluids, and in particular gases, that is reinforced with ceramic fibers. The filter has a ceramic base fiber material in the form of a fabric, felt, paper of the like, with the refractory fibers thereof coated with a thin layer of a protective and bonding refractory applied by chemical vapor deposition techniques. This coating causes each fiber to be physically joined to adjoining fibers so as to prevent movement of the fibers during use and to increase the strength and toughness of the composite filter. Further, the coating can be selected to minimize any reactions between the constituents of the fluids and the fibers. A description is given of the formation of a composite filter using a felt preform of commercial silicon carbide fibers together with the coating of these fibers with pure silicon carbide. Filter efficiency approaching 100% has been demonstrated with these filters. The fiber base material is alternately made from aluminosilicate fibers, zirconia fibers and alumina fibers. Coating with Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 is also described. Advanced configurations for the composite filter are suggested.

Stinton, David P. (Knoxville, TN); McLaughlin, Jerry C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lowden, Richard A. (Powell, TN)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Fiber bundle fluorescence endomicroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An improved design for fiber bundle fluorescence endomicroscopy is demonstrated. Scanned illumination and detection using coherent fiber bundles with 30,000 elements with 3 ?m resolution enables high speed imaging with ...

Tsai, Tsung-Han

70

Conducting fiber compression tester  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention measures the resistance across a conductive fiber attached to a substrate place under a compressive load to determine the amount of compression needed to cause the fiber to fail. 3 figs.

DeTeresa, S.J.

1989-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

71

Omnidirectional fiber optic tiltmeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tiltmeter is provided which is useful in detecting very small movements such as earth tides. The device comprises a single optical fiber, and an associated weight affixed thereto, suspended from a support to form a pendulum. A light source, e.g., a light emitting diode, mounted on the support transmits light through the optical fiber to a group of further optical fibers located adjacent to but spaced from the free end of the single optical fiber so that displacement of the single optical fiber with respect to the group will result in a change in the amount of light received by the individual optical fibers of the group. Photodetectors individually connectd to the fibers produce corresponding electrical outputs which are differentially compared and processed to produce a resultant continuous analog output representative of the amount and direction of displacement of the single optical fiber.

Benjamin, B.C.; Miller, H.M.

1983-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

72

Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery -- Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery Sandia has collected and real-time processed over 400,000 synthetic aperture radar images. The following is a selection of imagery available for...

73

Synthetic LDL as targeted drug delivery vehicle  

SciTech Connect

The present invention provides a synthetic LDL nanoparticle comprising a lipid moiety and a synthetic chimeric peptide so as to be capable of binding the LDL receptor. The synthetic LDL nanoparticle of the present invention is capable of incorporating and targeting therapeutics to cells expressing the LDL receptor for diseases associated with the expression of the LDL receptor such as central nervous system diseases. The invention further provides methods of using such synthetic LDL nanoparticles.

Forte, Trudy M. (Berkeley, CA); Nikanjam, Mina (Richmond, CA)

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

74

Fusion reactors for synthetic fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some of the types of processes now being considered for synthetic fuels production from fusion energy, together with an example of each type are listed. The process efficiency is defined as the chemical energy in the generated hydrogen (at the higher heating value (HHV)) divided by the total fusion energy release, including alpha particles and secondary neutron reactions in the blanket. Except where specifically noted, both high and low temperature blanket heats are counted as part of total fusion energy release.

Powell, J.R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Synthetic thermoelectric materials comprising phononic crystals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Synthetic thermoelectric materials comprising phononic crystals can simultaneously have a large Seebeck coefficient, high electrical conductivity, and low thermal conductivity. Such synthetic thermoelectric materials can enable improved thermoelectric devices, such as thermoelectric generators and coolers, with improved performance. Such synthetic thermoelectric materials and devices can be fabricated using techniques that are compatible with standard microelectronics.

El-Kady, Ihab F; Olsson, Roy H; Hopkins, Patrick; Reinke, Charles; Kim, Bongsang

2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

76

Fiber optic monitoring device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information. 4 figures.

Samborsky, J.K.

1993-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

77

Fiber optic monitoring device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information.

Samborsky, J.K.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

78

Fiber coating method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A coating is applied to reinforcing fibers arranged into a tow by coaxially aligning the tow with an adjacent separation layer and winding or wrapping the tow and separation layer onto a support structure in an interleaved manner so that the separation layer separates a wrap of the tow from an adjacent wrap of the tow. A coating can then be uniformly applied to the reinforcing fibers without defects caused by fiber tow to fiber tow contact. The separation layer can be a carbon fiber veil.

Corman, Gregory Scot (Ballston Lake, NY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Fiber coating method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A coating is applied to reinforcing fibers arranged into a tow by coaxially aligning the tow with an adjacent separation layer and winding or wrapping the tow and separation layer onto a support structure in an interleaved manner so that the separation layer separates a wrap of the tow from an adjacent wrap of the tow. A coating can then be uniformly applied to the reinforcing fibers without defects caused by fiber tow to fiber tow contact. The separation layer can be a carbon fiber veil.

Corman, Gregory Scot (Ballston Lake, NY)

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

Fiber optic laser rod  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser rod is formed from a plurality of optical fibers, each forming an individual laser. Synchronization of the individual fiber lasers is obtained by evanescent wave coupling between adjacent optical fiber cores. The fiber cores are dye-doped and spaced at a distance appropriate for evanescent wave coupling at the wavelength of the selected dye. An interstitial material having an index of refraction lower than that of the fiber core provides the optical isolation for effective lasing action while maintaining the cores at the appropriate coupling distance. 2 figs.

Erickson, G.F.

1988-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detergents synthetic fibers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Fiber optic moisture sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for sensing moisture changes by utilizing optical fiber technology. One embodiment uses a reflective target at the end of an optical fiber. The reflectance of the target varies with its moisture content and can be detected by a remote unit at the opposite end of the fiber. A second embodiment utilizes changes in light loss along the fiber length. This can be attributed to changes in reflectance of cladding material as a function of its moisture content. It can also be affected by holes or inserts interposed in the cladding material and/or fiber. Changing light levels can also be coupled from one fiber to another in an assembly of fibers as a function of varying moisture content in their overlapping lengths of cladding material.

Kirkham, R.R.

1984-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

82

Synthetic carbonaceous fuels and feedstocks  

SciTech Connect

This invention relates to the use of a three compartment electrolytic cell in the production of synthetic carbonaceous fuels and chemical feedstocks such as gasoline, methane and methanol by electrolyzing an aqueous sodium carbonate/bicarbonate solution, obtained from scrubbing atmospheric carbon dioxide with an aqueous sodium hydroxide solution, whereby the hydrogen generated at the cathode and the carbon dioxide liberated in the center compartment are combined thermocatalytically into methanol and gasoline blends. The oxygen generated at the anode is preferably vented into the atmosphere, and the regenerated sodium hydroxide produced at the cathode is reused for scrubbing the CO.sub.2 from the atmosphere.

Steinberg, Meyer (Huntington Station, NY)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Fiber composite flywheel rim  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A flywheel comprising a hub having at least one radially projecting disc, an annular rim secured to said disc and providing a surface circumferential to said hub, a first plurality of resin-impregnated fibers wound about said rim congruent to said surface, and a shell enclosing said first plurality of fibers and formed by a second plurality of resin-impregnated fibers wound about said rim tangentially to said surface. 2 figs.

Davis, D.E.; Ingham, K.T.

1987-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

84

Fiber composite flywheel rim  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A flywheel 2 comprising a hub 4 having at least one radially projecting disc 6, an annular rim 14 secured to said disc and providing a surface circumferential to said hub, a first plurality of resin-impregnated fibers 22 wound about said rim congruent to said surface, and a shell 26 enclosing said first plurality of fibers and formed by a second plurality of resin-impregnated fibers wound about said rim tangentially to said surface.

Davis, Donald E. (Thousand Oaks, CA); Ingham, Kenneth T. (Woodland Hills, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Carbon Fiber Electronic Interconnects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Carbon fiber is an emerging material in electrical and electronics industry. It has been used as contact in many applications, such as switch, potentiometer, and… (more)

Deng, Yuliang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Definition: Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) utilizes SAR images from two different time periods to generate maps of surface deformation. The technique can potentially measure millimeter-scale changes in the Earth's surface.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Also Known As InSAR, IfSAR Related Terms Synthetic Aperture Radar, radar, sustainability References ↑ Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry to Measure Earth's Surface Topography and Its Deformation (Burgmann et al. 2000) ↑ Improved Visulaization of Satellite Radar InSAR Observed Structural Controls at Producing Geothermal Field Using Modeled Horizontal Surface Displacements(Opplinger et al. 2006)

87

Synthetic Cells Shed Biological Insights While Delivering ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthetic Cells Shed Biological Insights While Delivering Battery Power. ... Image of two artificial cells that can act as a tiny battery. ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Synthetic Genomics Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Synthetic Genomics Inc. Place La Jolla, California Sector Hydro, Hydrogen, Renewable Energy Product California-based company planning to create new types of...

89

ROLE OF FIBER MODIFICATION IN NATURAL FIBER COMPOSITE PROCESSING  

SciTech Connect

The prediction and characterization of the adhesion between fiber, surface treatment, and polymer is critical to the success of large-scale natural fiber based polymer composites in automotive semi-structural application. The two primary factors limiting the use of natural fiber in polymer composites are fiber moisture uptake and fiber degradation during high-temperature processing. In this study, we have developed several fiber surface modification techniques and analyzed the fiber-polymer adhesion of modified fibers to more clearly understand the critical parameters controlling moisture uptake, swelling, and fiber degradation due to interfacial structure. We will present a overview of surface modification techniques we have applied to date for hemp fiber sources, and illustrate a path to characterize surface modification effects on natural fiber adhesion in thermoplastic composites.

Fifield, Leonard S.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Gutowska, Anna; Simmons, Kevin L.; Holbery, Jim

2005-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

90

Diamond fiber field emitters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode formed of at least one diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon composite fiber, said composite fiber having a non-diamond core and a diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon coating on said non-diamond core, and electronic devices employing such a field emission electron emitter.

Blanchet-Fincher, Graciela B. (Wilmington, DE); Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Devlin, David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Eaton, David F. (Wilmington, DE); Silzars, Aris K. (Landenburg, PA); Valone, Steven M. (Santa Fe, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Carbon Nanotubes Grown on Various Fibers - Oak Ridge National ...  

fiber materials inlcuding quartz wool fibers, carbon fibers, and activated carbon fibers. In each example a chloride solution of Fe, ...

92

Low Cost Carbon Fiber Production Carbon Fiber Manufacturing Cost Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low Cost Carbon Fiber Production Carbon Fiber Manufacturing Cost Modeling Oak Ridge National been identified by carbon fiber manufacturers as a market with substantial growth potential. When manufactured with carbon fiber as opposed to traditional materials such as steel, automotive parts are able

93

Hybrid Fiber Optics  

SciTech Connect

Instruments and devices based on optical fiber were originally simple and passive. That has changed. A variety of devices uses optical fiber for sensing, communications and various optoelectronic functions. This paper discusses the creation of a hybrid optical fiber that incorporates not just the light transmission function but other types of materials and new multiple fiber arrangements. Recent experiences with a fiber draw tower reveal new possibilities for achieving multifunctional devices able to perform diverse instrumentation sensing applications. This is achievable even with feature sizes, when desired, on the nanoscale. For instance, fiber comprised of one or more light guides and one or more electrically conducting wires is feasible. This combination of optical fiber and metal wire may be termed a wiber . The wiber could determine temperature and proximity to surfaces, detect radio-frequency radiation, and provide electrical power. At the same time, a wiber would have the capability to simultaneously transmit light where the light is utilized to sense temperature and proximity and give illumination. There are many possible uses--depending on design and configuration--cutting across many technologies and programs.

Allison, Stephen W [ORNL; Simpson, John T [ORNL; Gillies, George [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Fiber optic hydrogen sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and method for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading, by a single spectrophotometer.

Buchanan, B.R.; Prather, W.S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Encoded Fiber-Optic Microsphere Arrays for Probing ProteinCarbohydrate Interactions**  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biosensors Encoded Fiber-Optic Microsphere Arrays for Probing Protein­Carbohydrate Interactions, such as robotic printing and fluorescence scanning devices. In the past year, several systems were described that present both natural and synthetically derived carbohydrate structures in array formats.[3] These systems

Ratner, Daniel M.

96

Multimaterial rectifying device fibers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electronic and optoelectronic device processing is commonly thought to be incompatible with much simpler thermal drawing techniques used in optical fiber production. The incorporation of metals, polymer insulators, and ...

Orf, Nicholas D

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Guidelines for Using Synthetic Slings for Lifting and Rigging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Guidelines for Using Synthetic Slings for Lifting and Rigging" provides nuclear and fossil maintenance personnel with information on the use of synthetic slings. This information will assist personnel in the identification, protection, and inspection of synthetic slings.

2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

98

Fiber optic detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a portable fiber optic detector that senses the presence of specific target chemicals by exchanging the target chemical for a fluorescently-tagged antigen that is bound to an antibody which is in turn attached to an optical fiber. Replacing the fluorescently-tagged antigen reduces the fluorescence so that a photon sensing detector records the reduced light level and activates an appropriate alarm or indicator.

Partin, J.K.; Ward, T.E.; Grey, A.E.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

99

Foundational platform for mammalian synthetic biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The emergent field of synthetic biology is different from many other biological engineering efforts, in that its roots, design principles, and forward engineering perspective have been adopted from electrical engineering ...

Davidsohn, Noah (Noah Justin)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Bio-Synthetic Wall Systems Visualization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bio-Synthetic Wall Systems Visualization Speaker(s): Maria-Paz Gutierrez Date: December 16, 2008 - 10:00am Location: 90-3075 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Michael Donn...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detergents synthetic fibers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Definition: Synthetic Aperture Radar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aperture Radar Aperture Radar Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Synthetic Aperture Radar Synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) is an active microwave remote sensing technology that measures the phase difference between a radar wave emitted from an antennae attached to a satellite or aircraft to generate high-resolution images of a surface.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Also Known As SAR Related Terms radar References ↑ Synthetic Aperature Radar: Systems and Signal Processing (Curlander and McDonough - 1991 - book) fue LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. l cell, Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Synthetic_Aperture_Radar&oldid=493069" Category: Definitions What links here Related changes

102

The Synthetic Dual-Doppler Analysis Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthetic dual-Doppler (SDD) is a single-Doppler analysis technique that combines measurements from two different times, provided the viewing angle changes significantly. In this study, the viability of the SDD technique is investigated through ...

Brian A. Klimowski; John D. Marwitz

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Synthetic analogs of bacterial quorum sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Bacterial quorum-sensing molecule analogs having the following structures: ##STR00001## and methods of reducing bacterial pathogenicity, comprising providing a biological system comprising pathogenic bacteria which produce natural quorum-sensing molecule; providing a synthetic bacterial quorum-sensing molecule having the above structures and introducing the synthetic quorum-sensing molecule into the biological system comprising pathogenic bacteria. Further is provided a method of targeted delivery of an antibiotic, comprising providing a synthetic quorum-sensing molecule; chemically linking the synthetic quorum-sensing molecule to an antibiotic to produce a quorum-sensing molecule-antibiotic conjugate; and introducing the conjugate into a biological system comprising pathogenic bacteria susceptible to the antibiotic.

Iyer, Rashi S.; Ganguly, Kumkum; Silks, Louis A.

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

104

Predatory sequence learning for synthetic characters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The process of mammalian predatory sequence development offers a number of insights relevant to the goal of designing synthetic characters that can quickly and easily learn complicated and interesting behavior. We propose ...

Berlin, Matthew Roberts, 1980-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Authentic teaching and learning through synthetic biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synthetic biology is an emerging engineering discipline that, if successful, will allow well-characterized biological components to be predictably and reliably built into robust organisms that achieve specific functions. ...

Kuldell, Natalie

106

Enhanced radiation resistant fiber optics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing an optical fiber having enhanced radiation resitance is provided, the process including maintaining an optical fiber within a hydrogen-containing atmosphere for sufficient time to yield a hydrogen-permeated optical fiber having an elevated internal hydrogen concentration, and irradiating the hydrogen-permeated optical fiber at a time while the optical fiber has an elevated internal hydrogen concentration with a source of ionizing radiation. The radiation source is typically a cobalt-60 source and the fiber is pre-irradiated with a dose level up to about 1000 kilorads of radiation.

Lyons, P.B.; Looney, L.D.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

107

Natural Fiber Composites: A Review  

SciTech Connect

The need for renewable fiber reinforced composites has never been as prevalent as it currently is. Natural fibers offer both cost savings and a reduction in density when compared to glass fibers. Though the strength of natural fibers is not as great as glass, the specific properties are comparable. Currently natural fiber composites have two issues that need to be addressed: resin compatibility and water absorption. The following preliminary research has investigated the use of Kenaf, Hibiscus cannabinus, as a possible glass replacement in fiber reinforced composites.

Westman, Matthew P.; Fifield, Leonard S.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Laddha, Sachin; Kafentzis, Tyler A.

2010-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

108

Surfactant/detergent titration analysis method and apparatus for machine working fluids, surfactant-containing wastewater and the like  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an improved method and related apparatus for quantitatively analyzing machine working fluids and other aqueous compositions such as wastewater which contain various mixtures of cationic, neutral, and/or anionic surfactants, soluble soaps, and the like. The method utilizes a single-phase, non-aqueous, reactive titration composition containing water insoluble bismuth nitrate dissolved in glycerol for the titration reactant. The chemical reaction of the bismuth ion and glycerol with the surfactant in the test solutions results in formation of micelles, changes in micelle size, and the formation of insoluble bismuth soaps. These soaps are quantified by physical and chemical changes in the aqueous test solution. Both classical potentiometric analysis and turbidity measurements have been used as sensing techniques to determine the quantity of surfactant present in test solutions. This method is amenable to the analysis of various types of new, in-use, dirty or decomposed surfactants and detergents. It is a quick and efficient method utilizing a single-phase reaction without needing a separate extraction from the aqueous solution. It is adaptable to automated control with simple and reliable sensing methods. The method is applicable to a variety of compositions with concentrations from about 1% to about 10% weight. It is also applicable to the analysis of waste water containing surfactants with appropriate pre-treatments for concentration. 1 fig.

Smith, D.D.; Hiller, J.M.

1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

109

Surfactant/detergent titration analysis method and apparatus for machine working fluids, surfactant-containing wastewater and the like  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an improved method and related apparatus for quantitatively analyzing machine working fluids and other aqueous compositions such as wastewater which contain various mixtures of cationic, neutral, and/or anionic surfactants, soluble soaps, and the like. The method utilizes a single-phase, non-aqueous, reactive titration composition containing water insoluble bismuth nitrate dissolved in glycerol for the titration reactant. The chemical reaction of the bismuth ion and glycerol with the surfactant in the test solutions results in formation of micelles, changes in micelle size, and the formation of insoluble bismuth soaps. These soaps are quantified by physical and chemical changes in the aqueous test solution. Both classical potentiometric analysis and turbidity measurements have been used as sensing techniques to determine the quantity of surfactant present in test solutions. This method is amenable to the analysis of various types of new, in-use, dirty or decomposed surfactants and detergents. It is a quick and efficient method utilizing a single-phase reaction without needing a separate extraction from the aqueous solution. It is adaptable to automated control with simple and reliable sensing methods. The method is applicable to a variety of compositions with concentrations from about 1% to about 10% weight. It is also applicable to the analysis of waste water containing surfactants with appropriate pre-treatments for concentration.

Smith, Douglas D. (Knoxville, TN); Hiller, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Optical fiber switch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Optical fiber switches operated by electrical activation of at least one laser light modulator through which laser light is directed into at least one polarizer are used for the sequential transport of laser light from a single laser into a plurality of optical fibers. In one embodiment of the invention, laser light from a single excitation laser is sequentially transported to a plurality of optical fibers which in turn transport the laser light to separate individual remotely located laser fuel ignitors. The invention can be operated electro-optically with no need for any mechanical or moving parts, or, alternatively, can be operated electro-mechanically. The invention can be used to switch either pulsed or continuous wave laser light.

Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM); Lester, Charles S. (San Juan Pueblo, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Fiber-Optic Sensing Technology  

SciTech Connect

This article offers a basic review of fiber-optic sensing technology, or more specifically, fiber-optic sensing technology as applied to the qualitative or quantitative identification of a chemical sample, and how it works,

Milnes, M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Baylor, L.C.; Bave, S.

1996-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

112

Optical and optoelectronic fiber devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ability to integrate materials with disparate electrical, thermal, and optical properties into a single fiber structure enabled the realization of fiber devices with diverse and complex functionalities. Amongst those, ...

Shapira, Ofer, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Automated fiber pigtailing machine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The Automated Fiber Pigtailing Machine (AFPM) aligns and attaches optical fibers to optoelectronic (OE) devices such as laser diodes, photodiodes, and waveguide devices without operator intervention. The so-called pigtailing process is completed with sub-micron accuracies in less than 3 minutes. The AFPM operates unattended for one hour, is modular in design and is compatible with a mass production manufacturing environment. This machine can be used to build components which are used in military aircraft navigation systems, computer systems, communications systems and in the construction of diagnostics and experimental systems. 26 figs.

Strand, O.T.; Lowry, M.E.

1999-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

114

Silicon fiber optic sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A Fabry-Perot cavity is formed by a partially or wholly reflective surface on the free end of an integrated elongate channel or an integrated bounding wall of a chip of a wafer and a partially reflective surface on the end of the optical fiber. Such a constructed device can be utilized to detect one or more physical parameters, such as, for example, strain, through the optical fiber using an optical detection system to provide measuring accuracies of less than aboutb0.1%.

Pocha, Michael D. (Livermore, CA); Swierkowski, Steve P. (Livermore, CA); Wood, Billy E. (Livermore, CA)

2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

115

Carbon Fiber Consortium | Partnerships | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial Partnerships Carbon Fiber Consortium Manufacturing Industrial Partnerships Staff Partnerships Home | Connect with ORNL | For Industry | Partnerships | Industrial...

116

Fiber-optic pressure sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressure wave sensor utilizing fiber optic interferometry techniques to determine pressure in a bar. Light from a fiber optic coil around the bar is mixed with light from a reference optical fiber to produce interference fringes as a function of time. These fringes over time are related to the pressure versus time existing in the bar. 2 figs.

Dingus, R.S.

1989-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

117

Aerogel-clad optical fiber  

SciTech Connect

An optical fiber is surrounded by an aerogel cladding. For a low density aerogel, the index of refraction of the aerogel is close to that of air, which provides a high numerical aperture to the optical fiber. Due to the high numerical aperture, the aerogel clad optical fiber has improved light collection efficiency. 4 figs.

Sprehn, G.A.; Hrubesh, L.W.; Poco, J.F.; Sandler, P.H.

1997-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

118

Drying of fiber webs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and an apparatus for high-intensity drying of fiber webs or sheets, such as newsprint, printing and writing papers, packaging paper, and paperboard or linerboard, as they are formed on a paper machine. The invention uses direct contact between the wet fiber web or sheet and various molten heat transfer fluids, such as liquified eutectic metal alloys, to impart heat at high rates over prolonged durations, in order to achieve ambient boiling of moisture contained within the web. The molten fluid contact process causes steam vapor to emanate from the web surface, without dilution by ambient air; and it is differentiated from the evaporative drying techniques of the prior industrial art, which depend on the uses of steam-heated cylinders to supply heat to the paper web surface, and ambient air to carry away moisture, which is evaporated from the web surface. Contact between the wet fiber web and the molten fluid can be accomplished either by submersing the web within a molten bath or by coating the surface of the web with the molten media. Because of the high interfacial surface tension between the molten media and the cellulose fiber comprising the paper web, the molten media does not appreciately stick to the paper after it is dried. Steam generated from the paper web is collected and condensed without dilution by ambient air to allow heat recovery at significantly higher temperature levels than attainable in evaporative dryers.

Warren, David W. (9253 Glenoaks Blvd., Sun Valley, CA 91352)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Drying of fiber webs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and an apparatus are disclosed for high-intensity drying of fiber webs or sheets, such as newsprint, printing and writing papers, packaging paper, and paperboard or linerboard, as they are formed on a paper machine. The invention uses direct contact between the wet fiber web or sheet and various molten heat transfer fluids, such as liquefied eutectic metal alloys, to impart heat at high rates over prolonged durations, in order to achieve ambient boiling of moisture contained within the web. The molten fluid contact process causes steam vapor to emanate from the web surface, without dilution by ambient air; and it is differentiated from the evaporative drying techniques of the prior industrial art, which depend on the uses of steam-heated cylinders to supply heat to the paper web surface, and ambient air to carry away moisture, which is evaporated from the web surface. Contact between the wet fiber web and the molten fluid can be accomplished either by submersing the web within a molten bath or by coating the surface of the web with the molten media. Because of the high interfacial surface tension between the molten media and the cellulose fiber comprising the paper web, the molten media does not appreciatively stick to the paper after it is dried. Steam generated from the paper web is collected and condensed without dilution by ambient air to allow heat recovery at significantly higher temperature levels than attainable in evaporative dryers. 6 figs.

Warren, D.W.

1997-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

Synthetic heparin-binding factor analogs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain, and preferably two peptide chains branched from a dipeptide branch moiety composed of two trifunctional amino acid residues, which peptide chain or chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a linker, which may be a hydrophobic linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

Pena, Louis A. (Poquott, NY); Zamora, Paul O. (Gaithersburg, MD); Lin, Xinhua (Plainview, NY); Glass, John D. (Shoreham, NY)

2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detergents synthetic fibers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Structure of the surface of synthetic titanosilica  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ESCA), high-resolution NMR (on /sup 29/Si nuclei), and mass spectrometry have been used to investigate a synthetic titanosilica (TS) containing 28-37% titanium dioxide. It has been found that titanium siloxane bonds can form in synthetic TS, regardless of the fact that silicon-oxygen polyhedra predominate in the surface layer. The presence of titanium ions in the surface layer of TS leads to its significant rearrangement; this reduces significantly the concentration of centers for the strong adsorption of water.

Zarko, V.I.; Brei, V.V.; Chuiko, A.A.; Gorlov, Y.I.; Kozub, G.M.; Senkevich, A.I.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Fiber-optic voltage sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fiber optic voltage sensor is described which includes a source of light, a reference fiber for receiving a known percentage of the light and an electrostrictive element having terminals across which is applied, a voltage to be measured. The electrostrictive element is responsive to the applied voltage to assume an altered physical state. A measuring fiber also receives a known percentage of light from the light source and is secured about the electrostrictive element. The measuring fiber is provided with a cladding and exhibits an evanescent wave in the cladding. The measuring fiber has a known length which is altered when the electrostrictive element assumes its altered physical state. A differential sensor is provided which senses the intensity of light in both the reference fiber and the measuring fiber and provides an output indicative of the difference between the intensities.

Wood, C.B.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

123

Radiation damage in optical fibers  

SciTech Connect

While plastic-clad-silica (PCS) fiber shows the greatest radiation resistance, PCS fiber has been difficult to reliably connectorize for routine field operations. For this reason, all-glass fibers have been studied as an alternative to PCS. Based on available literature and some preliminary tests at Los Alamos, we have concentrated on fluorosilicate clad, step index, pure silica core fibers. This paper reviews recent laboratory data for these fibers relative to the PCS fibers. This paper also discusses use of a fiber (or any optical medium) on a Cerenkov radiation-to-light transducer. Since the radiation induces attenuation in the medium, the light output is not proportional to the radiation input. The nonlinearity introduced by this attenuation is calculated.

Lyons, P.B.; Looney, L.D.; Ogle, J.W.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Fiber-optic voltage sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fiber optic voltage sensor is described which includes a source of light, a reference fiber for receiving a known percentage of the light and an electrostrictive element having terminals across which is applied, a voltage to be measured. The electrostrictive element is responsive to the applied voltage to assume an altered physical state. A measuring fiber also receives a known percentage of light from the light source and is secured about the electrostrictive element. The measuring fiber is provided with a cladding and exhibits an evanescent wave in the cladding. The measuring fiber has a known length which is altered when the electrostrictive element assumes its altered physical state. A differential sensor is provided which senses the intensity of light in both the reference fiber and the measuring fiber and provides an output indicative of the difference between the intensities.

Wood, C.B.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Immobilization of radioiodine in synthetic boracite  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear waste storage product is disclosed in which radioiodine is incorporated in a synthetic boracite. The boracite may be prepared by reacting a transition metal iodide with an alkali horate under mild hydrothermal conditions, drying the reaction product, and then hot pressing.

Babad, H.; Strachan, D.M.

1982-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

126

Synthetic fuel production by indirect coal liquefaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the production of a synthetic crude oil product by direct contact of coal with an appropriate catalyst, with abundant domestic coal resources but lim- ited oil and gas resources, the conversion of coal into liquid in South Africa (for Fischer- Tropsch fuels). Also, the US Department of Energy an- nounced its financial

127

Synthetic fuels, carbon dioxide and climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The observed increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) has been attributed to the use of fossil fuels. There is concern that the generation and use of synthetic fuels derived from oil shale and coal will accelerate the increase of CO2.

Alex R. Sapre; John R. Hummel; Ruth A. Reck

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Relative chemical composition of selected synthetic crudes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A knowledge of the composition of synthetic crudes can provide an important input into the assessment of occupational exposure monitoring requirements for the coal conversion and oil shale industries. This paper summarizes comparative compositional studies of coal- and shale-derived crude oils with petroleum crude oils as a reference point.

Griest, W.H.; Guerin, M.R.; Clark, B.R.; Ho, C.; Rubin, I.B.; Jones, A.R.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Experimentally driven verification of synthetic biological circuits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a framework that allows us to construct and formally analyze the behavior of synthetic gene circuits from specifications in a high level language used in describing electronic circuits. Our back-end synthesis tool automatically generates genetic-regulatory ...

Boyan Yordanov; Evan Appleton; Rishi Ganguly; Ebru Aydin Gol; Swati Banerjee Carr; Swapnil Bhatia; Traci Haddock; Calin Belta; Douglas Densmore

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Surfactants & detergents publications - Springer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jan 29, 1987 ... personal care products such as hair shampoos and ... products on the environment is presented. ... narrow-range ethoxylated alco- hols.

131

Fiber Optic Velocity Interferometry  

SciTech Connect

This paper explores the use of a new velocity measurement technique that has several advantages over existing techniques. It uses an optical fiber to carry coherent light to and from a moving target. A Fabry-Perot interferometer, formed by a gradient index lens and the moving target, produces fringes with a frequency proportional to the target velocity. This technique can measure velocities up to 10 km/s, is accurate, portable, and completely noninvasive.

Neyer, Barry T.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Impact Resistance of Carbon Fiber and Metallic Glass Fiber Metal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The combination of thin metallic sheets with carbon fiber composite results in a ... Ceramic Textile Composites under In Situ Loading at Ultrahigh Temperatures.

133

BIODEGRADATION OF COMPOSITE NONWOVENS MADE OF NATURAL FIBERS AND SYNTHETIC POLYMERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

marketing materials, especially in building and automobile insulation markets [6-10]. The extent of nonwoven

134

Spotlight-Mode Synthetic Aperture Radar: A Signal Processing Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the Publisher:Spotlight-mode Synthetic Aperture Radar: A Signal Processing Approach describes an important mode of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging, known as spotlight-mode SAR. By treating the subject via the principles of signal processing, ...

Paul Thompson; Daniel E. Wahl; Paul H. Eichel; Dennis C. Ghiglia; Charles V. Jakowatz

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Aspects of the political economy of development and synthetic biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What implications might synthetic biology’s potential as a wholly new method of production have for the world economy, particularly developing countries? Theories of political economy predict that synthetic biology can ...

Wellhausen, Rachel

136

System for testing optical fibers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for measuring a combination of optical transmission properties of fiber optic waveguides. A polarized light pulse probe is injected into one end of the optical fiber. Reflections from discontinuities within the fiber are unpolarized whereas reflections of the probe pulse incident to its injection remain polarized. The polarized reflections are prevented from reaching a light detector whereas reflections from the discontinuities reaches the detector. 2 figs.

Golob, J.E.; Looney, L.D.; Lyons, P.B.; Nelson, M.A.; Davies, T.J.

1980-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

Preparation of silicon carbide fibers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Silicon carbide fibers suitable for use in the fabrication of dense, high-strength, high-toughness SiC composites or as thermal insulating materials in oxidizing environments are fabricated by a new, simplified method wherein a mixture of short-length rayon fibers and colloidal silica is homogenized in a water slurry. Water is removed from the mixture by drying in air at 120/sup 0/C and the fibers are carbonized by (pyrolysis) heating the mixture to 800 to 1000/sup 0/C in argon. The mixture is subsequently reacted at 1550 to 1900/sup 0/C in argon to yield pure ..beta..-SiC fibers.

Wei, G.C.

1983-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

138

Fusion as a source of synthetic fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the near-term, coal derived synthetic fuels will be used; but in the long-term, resource depletion and environmental effects will mandate synthetic fuels from inexhaustible sources - fission, fusion, and solar. Of the three sources, fusion appears uniquely suited for the efficient production of hydrogen-based fuels, due to its ability to directly generate very high process temperatures (up to approx. 2000/sup 0/C) for water splitting reactions. Fusion-based water splitting reactions include high temperature electrolysis (HTE) of steam, thermochemical cycles, hybrid electrochemical/thermochemical, and direct thermal decomposition. HTE appears to be the simplest and most efficient process with efficiencies of 50 to 70% (fusion to hydrogen chemical energy), depending on process conditions.

Powell, J.R.; Fillo, J.A.; Steinberg, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Radiance: Synthetic Imaging System | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Radiance: Synthetic Imaging System Radiance: Synthetic Imaging System Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: RADIANCE Agency/Company /Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: radsite.lbl.gov/radiance/ Cost: Free References: Radiance[1] Logo: RADIANCE RADIANCE is a highly accurate ray-tracing software system for UNIX computers that is licensed at no cost in source form. Radiance was developed with primary support from the U.S. Department Of Energy and additional support from the Swiss Federal Government. Radiance is a suite of programs for the analysis and visualization of lighting in design. Input files specify the scene geometry, materials, luminaires,time, date

140

BglBrick vectors and datasheets; a synthetic biology platform for gene expression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and datasheets: A synthetic biology platform for genepart by the Synthetic Biology Engineering Research Center,94720, USA. 6 Synthetic Biology Engineering Research Center,

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detergents synthetic fibers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Metabolic engineering of microorganisms for biofuels production: from bugs to synthetic biology to fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DK, Weiss R: Synthetic biology: new engineering rules for anfrom bugs to synthetic biology to fuels Sung Kuk Lee, Howardengineering and synthetic biology will provide new tools for

Kuk Lee, Sung

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Carbon Fiber Cluster Strategy | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Fiber Cluster Strategy SHARE Carbon Fiber Cluster Strategy ORNL has a 40-year history in R&D on fiber-reinforced composite materials, and has been leading DOE's low-cost...

143

Fiber optic systems for mobile platforms II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book contains papers presented at the symposium of International Society for Optical Engineering. Topics covered/include: Fiber optic pressure sensor for internal combustion engine; Automotive fiber optic technology: application issues; and Fiber optic guided missile.

Lewis, N.E.; Moore, E.L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Nanocharacterization of electrocoated polymers on carbon fibers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electropolymerization of carbazole and its copolymers onto carbon fibers were performed by potentiodynamic and potentiostatic methods. Electrocoated polymer thin films on carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFME) were characterized by combination of a variety ... Keywords: Carbon fibers, Electropolymerization, Nanomodification

A. Sezai Sarac

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Fiber Tracking Cylinder Nesting  

SciTech Connect

The fiber tracker consists of 8 concentric carbon fiber cylinders of varying diameters, from 399mm to 1032.2mm and two different lengths. 1.66 and 2.52 meters. Each completed cylinder is covered over the entire o.d. with scintillating fiber ribbons with a connector on each ribbon. These ribbons are axial (parallel to the beam line) at one end and stereo (at 3 deg. to the beam line) at the other. The ribbon connectors have dowel pins which are used to match with the connectors on the wave guide ribbons. These dowel pins are also used during the nesting operation, locating and positioning measurements. The nesting operation is the insertion of one cylinder into another, aligning them with one another and fastening them together into a homogeneous assembly. For ease of assembly. the nesting operation is accomplished working from largest diameter to smallest. Although the completed assembly of all 8 cylinders glued and bolted together is very stiff. individual cylinders are relatively flexible. Therefore. during this operation, No.8 must be supported in a manner which maintains its integrity and yet allows the insertion of No.7. This is accomplished by essentially building a set of dummy end plates which replicate a No.9 cylinder. These end plates are mounted on a wheeled cart that becomes the nesting cart. Provisions for a protective cover fastened to these rings has been made and will be incorporated in finished product. These covers can be easily removed for access to No.8 and/or the connection of No.8 to No.9. Another wheeled cart, transfer cart, is used to push a completed cylinder into the cylinder(s) already mounted in the nesting cart.

Stredde, H.; /Fermilab

1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

146

Fiber optic geophysical sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figs.

Homuth, E.F.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Fiber optic geophysical sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figs.

Homuth, E.F.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

148

Implementation Challenges for Sintered Silicon Carbide Fiber ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sintered silicon carbide fiber bonded ceramics have been fabricated by the hot pressing and sintering of silicon carbide fibers. However, in this system ...

149

Thermoplastic Composite with Vapor Grown Carbon Fiber.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Vapor grown carbon fiber (VGCF) is a new class of highly graphitic carbon nanofiber and offers advantages of economy and simpler processing over continuous-fiber composites.… (more)

Lee, Jaewoo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Study of radiation hardness of optical fibers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Optical fiber manufacturing is a multibillion dollar industry today, and optical fibers have found diverse applications, such as telecommunication, medicine, nuclear and chemical industries, and… (more)

Thomas, Rayburn D

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

CFTF | Carbon Fiber Technology Facility | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BTRIC CNMS CSMB CFTF Working with CFTF HFIR MDF NTRC OLCF SNS Carbon Fiber Technology Facility Home | User Facilities | CFTF CFTF | Carbon Fiber Technology Facility SHARE Oak...

152

A PRECISION ANALOG FIBER OPTIC TRANSMISSION SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optical Fibers for Transmission, John Wiley and Sons, 9.Laboratories, Transmission Systems for Communications, BellANALOG FIBER OPTIC TRANSMISSION SYSTEM G. Stover M.S. Thesis

Stover, G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Fiber optic refractive index monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sensor for measuring the change in refractive index of a liquid uses the lowest critical angle of a normal fiber optic to achieve sensitivity when the index of the liquid is significantly less than the index of the fiber core. Another embodiment uses a liquid filled core to ensure that its index is approximately the same as the liquid being measured.

Weiss, Jonathan David (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

System for testing optical fibers  

SciTech Connect

A system for nondestructively determining the attenuation coefficient, .alpha.(.lambda.), of low-loss optical fiber wave guides. Cerenkov light pulses are generated at a plurality of locations in the fiber by a beam of charged particles. The transit times of selected spectral components and their intensities are utilized to unfold the .alpha.(.lambda.) values over the measured spectrum.

Davies, Terence J. (Santa Barbara, CA); Franks, Larry A. (Santa Barbara, CA); Nelson, Melvin A. (Santa Barbara, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Quantitive DNA Fiber Mapping  

SciTech Connect

Several hybridization-based methods used to delineate single copy or repeated DNA sequences in larger genomic intervals take advantage of the increased resolution and sensitivity of free chromatin, i.e., chromatin released from interphase cell nuclei. Quantitative DNA fiber mapping (QDFM) differs from the majority of these methods in that it applies FISH to purified, clonal DNA molecules which have been bound with at least one end to a solid substrate. The DNA molecules are then stretched by the action of a receding meniscus at the water-air interface resulting in DNA molecules stretched homogeneously to about 2.3 kb/{micro}m. When non-isotopically, multicolor-labeled probes are hybridized to these stretched DNA fibers, their respective binding sites are visualized in the fluorescence microscope, their relative distance can be measured and converted into kilobase pairs (kb). The QDFM technique has found useful applications ranging from the detection and delineation of deletions or overlap between linked clones to the construction of high-resolution physical maps to studies of stalled DNA replication and transcription.

Lu, Chun-Mei; Wang, Mei; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Weier, Jingly F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.

2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

156

Fiber Grating Environmental Sensing System  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fiber grating environmental measurement systems are comprised of sensors that are configured to respond to changes in moisture or chemical content of the surrounding medium through the action of coatings and plates inducing strain that is measured. These sensors can also be used to monitor the interior of bonds for degradation due to aging, cracking, or chemical attack. Means to multiplex these sensors at high speed and with high sensitivity can be accomplished by using spectral filters placed to correspond to each fiber grating environmental sensor. By forming networks of spectral elements and using wavelength division multiplexing arrays of fiber grating sensors may be processed in a single fiber line allowing distributed high sensitivity, high bandwidth fiber optic grating environmental sensor systems to be realized.

Schulz, Whitten L. (Fairview, OR); Udd, Eric (Fairview, OR)

2003-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

157

FIBER LENGTH DISTRIBUTION MEASUREMENT FOR LONG GLASS AND CARBON FIBER REINFORCED INJECTION MOLDED THERMOPLASTICS  

SciTech Connect

Procedures for fiber length distribution (FLD) measurement of long fiber reinforced injection molded thermoplastics were refined for glass and carbon fibers. Techniques for sample selection, fiber separation, digitization and length measurement for both fiber types are described in detail. Quantitative FLD results are provided for glass and carbon reinforced polypropylene samples molded with a nominal original fiber length of 12.7 mm (1/2 in.) using equipment optimized for molding short fiber reinforced thermoplastics.

Kunc, Vlastimil [ORNL; Frame, Barbara J [ORNL; Nguyen, Ba N. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); TuckerIII, Charles L. [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Velez-Garcia, Gregorio [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Fiber optic hydrogen sensor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the development of fiber optic hydrogen and temperature sensors for monitoring dissolved hydrogen gas in transformer oil. The concentration of hydrogen gas is a measure of the corona and spark discharge within the transformer and reflects the state of health of the transformer. Key features of the instrument include use of palladium alloys to enhance hydrogen sensitivity, a microprocessor controlled instrument with RS-232, liquid crystal readout, and 4-20 ma. current loop interfaces. Calibration data for both sensors can be down loaded to the instrument through the RS-232 interface. This project was supported by the Technology Transfer Initiative in collaboration with J. W. Harley, Inc. through the mechanism of a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA).

Butler, M.A.; Sanchez, R.; Dulleck, G.R.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Ethanol extraction of phytosterols from corn fiber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present invention provides a process for extracting sterols from a high solids, thermochemically hydrolyzed corn fiber using ethanol as the extractant. The process includes obtaining a corn fiber slurry having a moisture content from about 20 weight percent to about 50 weight percent solids (high solids content), thermochemically processing the corn fiber slurry having high solids content of 20 to 50% to produce a hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry, dewatering the hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, washing the residual corn fiber, dewatering the washed, hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, and extracting the residual corn fiber with ethanol and separating at least one sterol.

Abbas, Charles (Champaign, IL); Beery, Kyle E. (Decatur, IL); Binder, Thomas P. (Decatur, IL); Rammelsberg, Anne M. (Decatur, IL)

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

160

Synthetic Aperture Radar Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSInSAR) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Synthetic Aperture Radar Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSInSAR) Synthetic Aperture Radar Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSInSAR) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Synthetic Aperture Radar Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSInSAR) Author Parviz Tarikhi Published N/A, 2010 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Synthetic Aperture Radar Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSInSAR) Citation Parviz Tarikhi. Synthetic Aperture Radar Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSInSAR) [Internet]. 2010. Tunis, Tunisia. N/A. [cited 2013/09/17]. Available from: http://parviztarikhi.files.wordpress.com/2010/05/3psinsar-i-parviz_tarikhi.pdf Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Synthetic_Aperture_Radar_Persistent_Scatterer_Interferometry_(PSInSAR)&oldid=682949"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detergents synthetic fibers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

PRODUCTION OF FOAMS, FIBERS AND PITCHES USING A COAL EXTRACTION PROCESS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored project developed processes for converting coal feedstocks to carbon products, including coal-derived pitch, coke foams and fibers based on solvent extraction processes. A key technology is the use of hydrogenation accomplished at elevated temperatures and pressures to obtain a synthetic coal pitch. Hydrogenation, or partial direct liquefaction of coal, is used to modify the properties of raw coal such that a molten synthetic pitch can be obtained. The amount of hydrogen required to produce a synthetic pitch is about an order of magnitude less than the amount required to produce synthetic crude oil. Hence the conditions for synthetic pitch production consume very little hydrogen and can be accomplished at substantially lower pressure. In the molten state, hot filtration or centrifugation can be used to separate dissolved coal chemicals from mineral matter and insolubles (inertinite), resulting in the production of a purified hydrocarbon pitch. Alternatively, if hydrogenation is not used, aromatic hydrocarbon liquids appropriate for use as precursors to carbon products can obtained by dissolving coal in a solvent. As in the case for partial direct liquefaction pitches, undissolved coal is removed via hot filtration or centrifugation. Excess solvent is boiled off and recovered. The resultant solid material, referred to as Solvent Extracted Carbon Ore or SECO, has been used successfully to produce artificial graphite and carbon foam.

Chong Chen; Elliot B. Kennel; Liviu Magean; Pete G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

2004-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

162

Scintillator fiber optic long counter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A flat response position sensitive neutron detector capable of providing neutron spectroscopic data utilizing scintillator fiber optic filaments embedded in a neutron moderating housing having an open end through which neutrons enter to be detected is described. 11 figures.

McCollum, T.; Spector, G.B.

1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

163

Experimental deformation of natural and synthetic dolomite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural and hot isostatically pressed dolomite aggregates were experimentally deformed at effective pressures of Pe = 50 ?? 400 MPa, temperatures of 400 ?? 850??C, and strain rates of ?& = 1.2x10-4 s-1 to 1.2x10-7 s-1. Coarse- and fine-grained dolomite deformed at low temperature (T ? 700??C for coarse-grained natural dolomite, T < 700??C for fine-grained natural and synthetic dolomite) exhibit mechanical behavior that is nearly plastic; differential stresses are insensitive to strain rate, fitted either by a power law no?????????=??????31&& with n values that range from 12 to 49 or an exponential law ([31exp )] ??????=o&& with exponential law term ? values from 0.023 to 0.079 MPa-1. Microstructures of samples deformed at low temperatures include mechanical twins, and undulatory extinction suggesting that twin glide and dislocation slip are the predominant deformation mechanisms. At high temperatures (T ? 800??C) flow strengths of coarse- and fine-grained dolomite depend more strongly on strain-rate and exhibit pronounced temperature dependencies. Microstructures of coarse-grained dolomite samples deformed at T ? 800??C include undulatory extinction and fine recrystallized grains suggesting that recovery and dynamic recrystallization contribute to dislocation creep at these conditions. By comparison with lower temperature deformation, mechanical twinning is unimportant. Fine-grained synthetic dolomite deformed at high temperature (T ? 700??C) exhibits nearly linear (Newtonian) viscous behavior, with n = 1.28 (??0.15) consistent with grain boundary (Coble) diffusion creep. At low temperatures (T ? 700??C) coarse-grained dolomite exhibits higher strengths at higher temperatures which cannot be described by an Arrhenius relation, while fine-grained dolomite strengths show little or no temperature dependence. At high temperatures (T ? 800??C), dislocation creep of coarse-grained dolomite can be described by a thermally activated power law ??????????????????=RTHno*31exp??????&& with H*/n = 60 kJ/mol, or by an exponential law ()[]??????????=RTHo*31expexp?????&& with H*/? = 25447 kJ/mol. At high temperatures, diffusion creep of fine-grained synthetic dolomite can be described by ?????????????????????????=RTHdno*313exp??????&& with H* = 280 ??45 kJ/mol. Taken together, the flow laws for coarse- and fine-grained dolomites constrain the high temperature conditions over which crystal plasticity, dislocation creep, and diffusion creep dominate.

Davis, Nathan Ernest

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Light diffusing fiber optic chamber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A light diffusion system for transmitting light to a target area. The light is transmitted in a direction from a proximal end to a distal end by an optical fiber. A diffusing chamber is operatively connected to the optical fiber for transmitting the light from the proximal end to the distal end and transmitting said light to said target area. A plug is operatively connected to the diffusing chamber for increasing the light that is transmitted to the target area.

Maitland, Duncan J. (Lafayette, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Inversion of synthetic aperture radar interferograms for sources...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inversion of synthetic aperture radar interferograms for sources of production-related subsidence at the Dixie Valley geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

166

Mineralization of Synthetic Polymer Scaffolds: A Bottom-Up ...  

Mineralization of Synthetic Polymer Scaffolds: A Bottom-Up Approach for the Development of Artificial Bone Jie Song,*,†,‡ Viengkham Malathong,† and Carolyn R ...

167

What is Synthetic Aperture Radar? -- Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What is Synthetic Aperture Radar? Environmental monitoring, earth-resource mapping, and military systems require broad-area imaging at high resolutions. Many times the imagery must...

168

Fusion: an energy source for synthetic fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and supplement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approx. 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of approx. 50 to 70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets. Fusion/coal symbiotic systems appear economically promising for the first generation of commercial fusion synfuels plants. Coal production requirements and the environmental effects of large-scale coal usage would be greatly reduced by a fusion/coal system. In the long term, there could be a gradual transition to an inexhaustible energy system based solely on fusion.

Fillo, J A; Powell, J; Steinberg, M

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Chemical basis for photomutagenicity in synthetic fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Photomutagens (chemicals that enhance the mutagenicity of near uv-visible radiation) have been detected in a variety of experimental coal- and oil shale-derived synthetic fuels using S. typhimurium strain TA98 and fluorescent light. In this study, photomutagenic activity was measured among synfuel samples that included crude and hydrotreated shale oil, coal oil distillation fractions, and chemical class fractions of coal and shale oils. Photomutagenic activity was found to increase with increasing boiling point and was cencentrated in fractions enriched in neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). These results point to high molecular weight neutral PAH constitutents as important photomutagenic components among the samples tested. The photomutagenic activities of the materials tested correlate well with the previously reported tumorigenic activities of the same samples on mouse skin but correlate poorly with the previously reported mutagenic activities in the conventional Salmonella/mammalian-microsome mutagenicity test in which neutral PAH fractions were inactive.

Selby, C.P.; Calkins, J.; Enoch, H.G.; Wright, C.W.; Wilson, B.W.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

(M) A SURVEY OF SYNTHETIC FUELISHNESS*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nuclear fission reactor plants, through "burn-up " of nuclear fuels, have all beenusedtoprovideheatfor direct use inhanes, institutions and industry, and to generate mechanical and electrical power using the Otto, Diesel and Rankine heat cycles. These fuels are considered to be natural since they are found innatureandareusedaftervaryingdegrees of processing, enrichment or refinement. Other energy sources includehydropxer,windpower, geothmlheatandheator electricity converted fransolar energy captured in stationary flat plate, one-axis tracking linear-trough and two-axis tracking spherical, parabolic or heliostatic collectors. These sources of energy also existinnature, butarenot fuels sinceburn-up is not required. This leaves ahostof fuels which canbe synthesized frannaturalrnaterials using an equal n&xx of electrical or chemical processes. These synthetic or manufactured fuels include coal gas, fuel oils derived fran coal, solid fuel residuals, methane derived fran sewage or kelp, ethanol derived fran fenxntation of grains, methanol derived fran destructive distillation of wood, and

F. F. Hall

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Environmental data energy technology characterizations: synthetic fuels  

SciTech Connect

Environmental Data Energy Technology Characterizations are publications which are intended to provide policy analysts and technical analysts with basic environmental data associated with key energy technologies. This publication provides documentation on synthetic fuels (coal-derived and oil shale). The transformation of the energy in coal and oil shale into a more useful form is described in this publication in terms of major activity areas in the synthetic fuel cycles, that is, in terms of activities which produce either an energy product or a fuel leading to the production of an energy product in a different form. The activities discussed in this document are coal liquefaction, coal gasification, in-situ gasification, and oil shales. These activities represent both well-documented and advanced activity areas. The former activities are characterized in terms of actual operating data with allowance for future modification where appropriate. Emissions are assumed to conform to environmental standards. The advanced activity areas examined are those like coal liquefaction and in-situ retorting of oil shale. For these areas, data from pilot or demonstration plants were used where available; otherwise, engineering studies provided the data. The organization of the chapters in this volume is designed to support the tabular presentation in the summary volume. Each chapter begins with a brief description of the activity under consideration. The standard characteristics, size, availability, mode of functioning and place in the fuel cycle are presented. Next, major legislative and/or technological factors influencing the commercial operation of the activity are offered. Discussions of resources consumed, residuals produced, and economics follow. To aid in comparing and linking the different activity areas, data for each area are normalized to 10/sup 12/ Btu of energy output from the activity.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Fiber optic temperature sensor  

SciTech Connect

Our fiber optic temperature measurement sensor and system is a major improvement over methods currently in use in most industrial processes, and it delivers all of the attributes required simplicity, accuracy, and cost efficiency-to help improve all of these processes. Because temperature is a basic physical attribute of nearly every industrial and commercial process, our system can eventually result in significant improvements in nearly every industrial and commercial process. Many finished goods, and the materials that go into them, are critically dependent on the temperature. The better the temperature measurement, the better quality the goods will be and the more economically they can be produced. The production and transmission of energy requires the monitoring of temperature in motors, circuit breakers, power generating plants, and transmission line equipment. The more reliable and robust the methods for measuring these temperature, the more available, stable, and affordable the supply of energy will become. The world is increasingly realizing the threats to health and safety of toxic or otherwise undesirable by products of the industrial economy in the environment. Cleanup of such contamination often depends on techniques that require the constant monitoring of temperature in extremely hazardous environments, which can damage most conventional temperature sensors and which are dangerous for operating personnel. Our system makes such monitoring safer and more economical.

Rabold, D.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Optical fiber inspection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A remote optical inspection system including an inspection head. The inspection head has a passageway through which pellets or other objects are passed. A window is provided along the passageway through which light is beamed against the objects being inspected. A plurality of lens assemblies are arranged about the window so that reflected light can be gathered and transferred to a plurality of coherent optical fiber light guides. The light guides transfer the light images to a television or other image transducer which converts the optical images into a representative electronic signal. The electronic signal can then be displayed on a signal viewer such as a television monitor for inspection by a person. A staging means can be used to support the objects for viewing through the window. Routing means can be used to direct inspected objects into appropriate exit passages for accepted or rejected objects. The inspected objects are advantageously fed in a singular manner to the staging means and routing means. The inspection system is advantageously used in an enclosure when toxic or hazardous materials are being inspected. 10 figs.

Moore, F.W.

1985-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

174

Optical fiber inspection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A remote optical inspection system including an inspection head. The inspection head has a passageway through which pellets or other objects are passed. A window is provided along the passageway through which light is beamed against the objects being inspected. A plurality of lens assemblies are arranged about the window so that reflected light can be gathered and transferred to a plurality of coherent optical fiber light guides. The light guides transfer the light images to a television or other image transducer which converts the optical images into a representative electronic signal. The electronic signal can then be displayed on a signal viewer such as a television monitor for inspection by a person. A staging means can be used to support the objects for viewing through the window. Routing means can be used to direct inspected objects into appropriate exit passages for accepted or rejected objects. The inspected objects are advantageously fed in a singular manner to the staging means and routing means. The inspection system is advantageously used in an enclosure when toxic or hazardous materials are being inspected.

Moore, Francis W. (Richland, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Hydrogen Optical Fiber Sensors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Optically-based hydrogen sensors promise to deliver an added level of safety as hydrogen and fuel cell technologies enter the mainstream. More importantly, they offer reduced power consumption and lower cost, which are desirable for mass production applications such as automobiles and consumer appliances. This program addressed two of the major challenges previously identified in porous optrode-based optical hydrogen sensors: sensitivity to moisture (ambient humidity), and interference from the oxygen in air. Polymer coatings to inhibit moisture and oxygen were developed in conjunction with newer and novel hydrogen sensing chemistries. The results showed that it is possible to achieve sensitive hydrogen detection and rapid response with minimal interference from oxygen and humidity. As a result of this work, a new and more exciting avenue of investigation was developed: the elimination of the porous optrode and deposition of the sensor chemistry directly into the polymer film. Initial results have been promising, and open up a wider range of potential applications from extended optical fiber sensing networks, to simple plastic "stickers" for use around the home and office.

Lieberman, Robert A.; Beshay, Manal; Cordero, Steven R.

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

176

Effective elastoplastic damage mechanics for fiber-reinforced composites with evolutionary complete fiber debonding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

unidirectional silicon-carbide fiber (Textron SCS-6, withFor simplicity, the silicon-carbide fibers are assumed to be

Ju, Jiann-Wen W; Ko, Y F; Ruan, H N

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Inversion of synthetic aperture radar interferograms for sources of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inversion of synthetic aperture radar interferograms for sources of Inversion of synthetic aperture radar interferograms for sources of production-related subsidence at the Dixie Valley geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Inversion of synthetic aperture radar interferograms for sources of production-related subsidence at the Dixie Valley geothermal field Authors Bill Foxall and D. W. Vasco Published Journal Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 2008 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Inversion of synthetic aperture radar interferograms for sources of production-related subsidence at the Dixie Valley geothermal field Citation Bill Foxall,D. W. Vasco. 2008. Inversion of synthetic aperture radar interferograms for sources of production-related subsidence at the Dixie

178

Synthetic Aperture Radar Movie Gallery -- Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Synthetic Aperture Radar Movie Gallery Synthetic Aperture Radar Movie Gallery This gallery features movies of Sandia National Laboratories' synthetic aperture radar imagery of Albuquerque, New Mexico and Washington, DC. Sandia's Twin-Otter SAR produced these high-resolution stripmap images in real time. (Note: The movies below have been downsampled greatly to make them suitable for viewing on the world wide web. These movies are not recommended for modems of speeds less than 56 kbps due to their large file sizes.) Albuquerque, NM Area Movies Sandia National Laboratories' Twin-Otter SAR produced these Ku-Band 0.3 and 1.0 meter resolution images of Albuquerque, NM in real time. Synthetic aperture radar movie of west Gibson Blvd 0.3 meter airborne synthetic aperture radar movie from I-25 to Maxwell along Gibson Blvd. (Length: 30 seconds)

179

Buried fiber optic intrusion sensor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A distributed fiber optic intrusion sensor capable of detecting intruders from the pressure of their weight on the earth's surface was investigated in the laboratory and in field tests. The presence of an intruder above or in proximity to the buried sensor induces a phase shift in light propagating along the fiber which allows for the detection and localization of intrusions. Through the use of an ultra-stable erbium-doped fiber laser and phase sensitive optical time domain reflectometry, disturbances were monitored in long (several km) lengths of optical fiber. Narrow linewidth and low frequency drift in the laser were achieved through a combination of optical feedback and insulation of the laser cavity against environmental effects. The frequency drift of the laser, characterized using an all-fiber Mach Zehnder interferometer, was found to be less than 1 MHz/min, as required for operation of the intrusion detection system. Intrusions were simulated in a laboratory setting using a piezoelectric transducer to produce a controllable optical phase shift at the 2 km point of a 12 km path length. Interrogation of the distributed sensor was accomplished by repetitively gating light pulses from the stable laser into the sensing fiber. By monitoring the Rayleigh backscattered light with a photodetector and comparing traces with and without an induced phase shift, the phase disturbances were detected and located. Once the feasibility of such a sensor was proven in the laboratory, the experimental set up was transferred to Texas A&M's Riverside Campus. At the test site, approximately 40 meters of fiber optic cable were buried in a triangle perimeter and then spliced into the 12 km path length which was housed inside the test facility. Field tests were conducted producing results comparable to those found in the laboratory. Intrusions over this buried fiber were detectable on the ?-OTDR trace and could be localized to the intrusion point. This type of sensor has the potential benefits of heightened sensitivity, covertness, and greatly reduced cost over the conventional seismic, acoustic, infrared, magnetic, and fiber optic sensors for monitoring long (multi-km) perimeters.

Maier, Eric William

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes work to develop CFCC's for various applications in the Industries of the Future (IOF) and power generation areas. Performance requirements range from relatively modest for hot gas filters to severe for turbine combustor liners and infrared burners. The McDermott Technology Inc. (MTI) CFCC program focused on oxide/oxide composite systems because they are known to be stable in the application environments of interest. The work is broadly focused on dense and porous composite systems depending on the specific application. Dense composites were targeted at corrosion resistant components, molten aluminum handling components and gas turbine combustor liners. The development work on dense composites led to significant advances in fiber coatings for oxide fibers and matrix densification. Additionally, a one-step fabrication process was developed to produce low cost composite components. The program also supported key developments in advanced oxide fibers that resulted in an improved version of Nextel 610 fiber (commercially available as Nextel 650) and significant progress in the development of a YAG/alumina fiber. Porous composite development focused on the vacuum winding process used to produce hot gas filters and infrared burner components.

R. A. Wagner

2002-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detergents synthetic fibers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Graphitized-carbon fiber/carbon char fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for recovery of intact graphitic fibers from fiber/polymer composites is described. The method comprises first pyrolyzing the graphite fiber/polymer composite mixture and then separating the graphite fibers by molten salt electrochemical oxidation.

Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA)

2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

182

Synthetic aperture radar processing with tiered subapertures  

SciTech Connect

Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is used to form images that are maps of radar reflectivity of some scene of interest, from range soundings taken over some spatial aperture. Additionally, the range soundings are typically synthesized from a sampled frequency aperture. Efficient processing of the collected data necessitates using efficient digital signal processing techniques such as vector multiplies and fast implementations of the Discrete Fourier Transform. Inherent in image formation algorithms that use these is a trade-off between the size of the scene that can be acceptably imaged, and the resolution with which the image can be made. These limits arise from migration errors and spatially variant phase errors, and different algorithms mitigate these to varying degrees. Two fairly successful algorithms for airborne SARs are Polar Format processing, and Overlapped Subaperture (OSA) processing. This report introduces and summarizes the analysis of generalized Tiered Subaperture (TSA) techniques that are a superset of both Polar Format processing and OSA processing. It is shown how tiers of subapertures in both azimuth and range can effectively mitigate both migration errors and spatially variant phase errors to allow virtually arbitrary scene sizes, even in a dynamic motion environment.

Doerry, A.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Synthetic Aperture Radar Dept.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Cellulosic Fiber Composites Using Protein Hydrolysates and Methods ...  

Technology Marketing Summary This technology relates to cellulosic fiber composites using protein hydrolysates. Description Cellulosic fiber composites currently use ...

184

Applications of fiber optics in physical protection  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this NUREG is to provide technical information useful for the development of fiber-optic communications and intrusion detection subsystems relevant to physical protection. There are major sections on fiber-optic technology and applications. Other topics include fiber-optic system components and systems engineering. This document also contains a glossary, a list of standards and specifications, and a list of fiber-optic equipment vendors.

Buckle, T.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Piezoelectric Fiber Fabrication for Magnetoelectric Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical Properties of Bifeo3: Polar Oxides for Fundamental Science and Solar Energy Applications · Piezoelectric Fiber Fabrication for Magnetoelectric Sensors

186

Chapter 31. Microfluidic Fiber Lasers Microfluidic Fiber Lasers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the water/oil interface. We have shown that in maintaining the same pump beam energy, the fiber laser can based pressure sensors. Custom made hermetic optical coupler oil Pump Light Radially Emitted Laser Light hermetic optical coupler oil Pump Light Radially Emitted Laser Light from R6G-doped water plug Microfluidic

187

Optical fiber reliability models M. John Matthewson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Systems containing optical fiber have design lives on the order of decades so that models for assessing and promising areas for future work are proposed. 1. INTRODUCTION Mechanical failure of optical fiber must tail can be controlled by proof testing the fiber which truncates the distribution (dashed line

Matthewson, M. John

188

Low Cost Carbon Fiber From Renewable Resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles has shown that, by lowering overall weight, the use of carbon fiber composites could dramatically decrease domestic vehicle fuel consumption. For the automotive industry to benefit from carbon fiber technology, fiber production will need to be substantially increased and fiber price decreased to $7/kg. To achieve this cost objective, alternate precursors to pitch and polyacrylonitrile (PAN) are being investigated as possible carbon fiber feedstocks. Additionally, sufficient fiber to provide 10 to 100 kg for each of the 13 million cars and light trucks produced annually in the U.S. will require an increase of 5 to 50-fold in worldwide carbon fiber production. High-volume, renewable or recycled materials, including lignin, cellulosic fibers, routinely recycled petrochemical fibers, and blends of these components, appear attractive because the cost of these materials is inherently both low and insensitive to changes in petroleum price. Current studies have shown that a number of recycled and renewable polymers can be incorporated into melt-spun fibers attractive as carbon fiber feedstocks. Highly extrudable lignin blends have attractive yields and can be readily carbonized and graphitized. Examination of the physical structure and properties of carbonized and graphitized fibers indicates the feasibility of use in transportation composite applications.

Compere, A.L.

2001-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

189

Synthetic fuel utilization. Final report. Task 330  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The presence of large coal resources in this country provided the spur for consideration of liquids derived from hydrogenation of coal in the search for alternate liquid fuels to replace petroleum. Previous developments particularly in German industry beginning in 1910 and reaching a capacity of approximately four million tons of products a year by 1944 and more recently a series of plants in South Africa have shown the practicability of coal liquefaction. A few more advanced processes have been developed variously to bench, pilot or commercial scale from among the thirty or more which were subject to study. Limitation in the amount of hydrogen used in these for reasons of economy and processing facility results in products containing major amounts of aromatics as well as significant portions of the sulfur and nitrogen of the coal feed. Combustion of the largely aromatic liquids can present problems in commercial burners designed for petroleum fuels, and combustion staging used to reduce NO/sub x/ emissions with the latter may encounter difficulties from sooting in the coal-derived fuels, which occurs readily with aromatics. This report presents a review of such problems in utilization of synthetic fuels from coal, emphasizing basic engineering and scientific studies which have been made. A research program involving a number of universities, industrial laboratories, and non-profit research institutions was carried out under the direction of the Department of Energy's Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. This program is also reviewed. The major subjects covered are those of liquefaction product composition and properties, fuel spray and droplet processes, synfuel pyrolysis, combustion mechanics, soot formation, and pollutant emission. Recommendations concerning needs for investigation are made from an evaluation of the current status of the field and the results obtained in the program. 15 references, 1 figure, 7 tables.

Singer, S.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Computational optimization of synthetic water channels.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Membranes for liquid and gas separations and ion transport are critical to water purification, osmotic energy generation, fuel cells, batteries, supercapacitors, and catalysis. Often these membranes lack pore uniformity and robustness under operating conditions, which can lead to a decrease in performance. The lack of uniformity means that many pores are non-functional. Traditional membranes overcome these limitations by using thick membrane materials that impede transport and selectivity, which results in decreased performance and increased operating costs. For example, limitations in membrane performance demand high applied pressures to deionize water using reverse osmosis. In contrast, cellular membranes combine high flux and selective transport using membrane-bound protein channels operating at small pressure differences. Pore size and chemistry in the cellular channels is defined uniformly and with sub-nanometer precision through protein folding. The thickness of these cellular membranes is limited to that of the cellular membrane bilayer, about 4 nm thick, which enhances transport. Pores in the cellular membranes are robust under operating conditions in the body. Recent efforts to mimic cellular water channels for efficient water deionization produced a significant advance in membrane function. The novel biomimetic design achieved a 10-fold increase in membrane permeability to water flow compared to commercial membranes and still maintained high salt rejection. Despite this success, there is a lack of understanding about why this membrane performs so well. To address this lack of knowledge, we used highperformance computing to interrogate the structural and chemical environments experienced by water and electrolytes in the newly created biomimetic membranes. We also compared the solvation environments between the biomimetic membrane and cellular water channels. These results will help inform future efforts to optimize and tune the performance of synthetic biomimetic membranes for applications in water purification, energy, and catalysis.

Rogers, David Michael; Rempe, Susan L. B.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

High temperature mineral fiber binder  

SciTech Connect

A modified phenol formaldehyde condensate is reacted with boric acid and cured in the presence of a polyfunctional nitrogeneous compound to provide a binder for mineral wool fibers which is particularly suited for thermal insulation products intended for high temperature service.

Miedaner, P.M.

1980-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

192

Synthetic Nano-Low Density Lipoprotein as Targeted Drug Delivery Vehicle for Glioblastoma Multiforme  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synthetic Nano-Low Density Lipoprotein as Targeted Drugmicroemulsion; peptide; nano-low density lipoproteintherapeutic agents. A synthetic nano-LDL (nLDL) particle was

Nikanjam, Mina; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Bjornstad, Kathleen A.; Shu, Xiao; Budinger, Thomas F.; Forte, Trudy M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Anisotropic fiber alignment in composite structures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High strength material composite structures are formed with oriented fibers to provide controlled anisotropic fibers. Fibers suspended in non-dilute concentrations (e.g., up to 20 volume percent for fibers having an aspect ratio of 20) in a selected medium are oriented by moving an axially spaced array of elements in the direction of desired fiber alignment. The array elements are generally perpendicular to the desired orientation. The suspension medium may also include sphere-like particles where the resulting material is a ceramic. 5 figures.

Graham, A.L.; Mondy, L.A.; Guell, D.C.

1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

194

Fiber-type dosimeter with improved illuminator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A single-piece, molded plastic, Cassigrainian-type condenser arrangement is incorporated in a tubular-shaped personal pocket dosimeter of the type which combines an ionization chamber with an optically-read fiber electrometer to provide improved illumination of the electrometer fiber. The condenser routes incoming light from one end of the dosimeter tubular housing around a central axis charging pin assembly and focuses the light at low angles to the axis so that it falls within the acceptance angle of the electrometer fiber objective lens viewed through an eyepiece lens disposed in the opposite end of the dosimeter. This results in improved fiber illumination and fiber image contrast.

Fox, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Fiber-type dosimeter with improved illuminator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A single-piece, molded plastic, Cassigrainian-type condenser arrangement is incorporated in a tubular-shaped personal pocket dosimeter of the type which combines an ionization chamber with an optically-read fiber electrometer to provide improved illumination of the electrometer fiber. The condenser routes incoming light from one end of the dosimeter tubular housing around a central axis charging pin assembly and focuses the light at low angles to the axis so that it falls within the acceptance angle of the electrometer fiber objective lens viewed through an eyepiece lens disposed in the opposite end of the dosimeter. This results in improved fiber illumination and fiber image contrast.

Fox, R.J.

1985-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

196

Anisotropic fiber alignment in composite structures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High strength material composite structures are formed with oriented fibers to provide controlled anisotropic fibers. Fibers suspended in non-dilute concentrations (e.g., up to 20 volume percent for fibers having an aspect ratio of 20) in a selected medium are oriented by moving an axially spaced array of elements in the direction of desired fiber alignment. The array elements are generally perpendicular to the desired orientation. The suspension medium may also include sphere-like particles where the resulting material is a ceramic.

Graham, A.L.; Mondy, L.A.; Guell, D.C.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

197

Slurry growth and gas retention in synthetic Hanford waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work seeks to establish chemical and physical processes responsible for the generation and retention of gases within waste from a particular high-level waste tank on the Hanford Site, Tank 101-SY, through the use of synthetic wastes on a laboratory scale. The goal of these activities is to support the development of mitigation/remediation strategies for Tank 101-SY. Laboratory studies of aged synthetic waste have shown that gas generation occurs thermally at a significant level at current tank temperatures. Gas compositions include the same gases produced in actual tank waste, primarily N{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, and H{sub 2}. Gas stoichiometries have been shown to be greatly influenced by several organic and inorganic constituents within the synthetic waste. Retention of gases in the synthetic waste is in the form of bubble attachment to solid particles.

Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.; Scheele, R.D.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Synthetic scaffolds and protein assemblies for engineering applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S-layer proteins, which naturally self-assemble on the exterior of cells, provide an interesting basis for the creation of synthetic scaffolds. In this thesis, I created a plasmid which produces a recombinant form of a ...

Norville, Julie Erin, 1980-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Slurry growth and gas retention in synthetic Hanford waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work seeks to establish chemical and physical processes responsible for the generation and retention of gases within waste from a particular high-level waste tank on the Hanford Site, Tank 101-SY, through the use of synthetic wastes on a laboratory scale. The goal of these activities is to support the development of mitigation/remediation strategies for Tank 101-SY. Laboratory studies of aged synthetic waste have shown that gas generation occurs thermally at a significant level at current tank temperatures. Gas compositions include the same gases produced in actual tank waste, primarily N[sub 2], N[sub 2]O, and H[sub 2]. Gas stoichiometries have been shown to be greatly influenced by several organic and inorganic constituents within the synthetic waste. Retention of gases in the synthetic waste is in the form of bubble attachment to solid particles.

Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.; Scheele, R.D.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Development of a synthetic phase contrast imaging diagnostic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A “synthetic diagnostic” has been developed to calculate the expected experimental response of phase contrast imaging (PCI), a scattering diagnostic used to measure density fluctuations in laboratory plasmas, to a tokamak ...

Rost, Jon C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detergents synthetic fibers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

What rough beast? Synthetic Biology and the Future of Biosecurity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synthetic biology seeks to create modular biological parts that can be assembled into useful devices, allowing the modification of biological systems with greater reliability, at lower cost, with greater speed, and by a ...

Mohr, Scott C.

202

A Butterfly Algorithm for Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In spite of an extensive literature on fast algorithms for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging, it is not currently known if it is possible to accurately form an image from N data points in provable near-linear time ...

Demanet, Laurent

203

Defossiling Fuel: How Synthetic Biology Can Transform Biofuel Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Defossiling Fuel: How Synthetic Biology Can Transform Biofuel Production David F. Savage , Jeffrey through natural intermediates to final molecule is long, and biofuel production is perhaps the ultimate engineering, economic, political, and environmental realities. Are biofuels sustainable? Consider U

204

Estimating Urban Canopy Parameters Using Synthetic Aperture Radar Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces a remote sensing–based approach to rapidly derive urban morphological characteristics using radar satellite data. The approach is based on the expectation that the magnitude of the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) backscatter ...

Indumathi Jeyachandran; Steven J. Burian; Stephen W. Stetson

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Synthetic Biology Offers New Hope For Malaria Victims  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

March 24, 2004 science beat | current article | lab a-z index | lab home Synthetic Biology Offers New Hope For Malaria Victims Contact: Lynn Yarris, lcyarris@lbl.gov x-ray...

206

Retroactivity, modularity, and insulation in synthetic biology circuits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A central concept in synthetic biology is the reuse of well-characterized modules. Modularity simplifies circuit design by allowing for the decomposition of systems into separate modules for individual construction. Complex ...

Lin, Allen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Biofuel production by in vitro synthetic enzymatic pathway biotransformation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

49; 49; NO. OF PAGES 7 Please cite this article in press as: Zhang Y-H P., et al. Biofuel production by in vitro synthetic enzymatic pathway biotransformation, Curr Opin Biotechnol (2010), doi:10.1016/j.copbio.2010.05.005 Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Biofuel production by in vitro synthetic enzymatic pathway biotransformation Y-H Percival Zhang 1,2,3 , Jibin Sun 4 and Jian-Jiang Zhong 5 Cell-free synthetic pathway biotransformation (SyPaB) is the implementation of complicated biochemical reactions by in vitro assembling a number of enzymes or their complexes and coenzymes. Assembly of numerous enzymes without cellular membrane, gene regulation, or undesired pathway can circumvent some of the obstacles to modifying living microorganisms. Several synthetic pathways for the production of liquid biofuels - alcohols and hydrocarbon precursors (polyols)

208

Extension and Validation of a Gulf Stream Geosat Synthetic Geoid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An extended synthetic geoid for the western North Atlantic Ocean was constructed by employing Geosat altimeter data, concurrent dynamic model forecasts, and climatology. Estimates of the absolute dynamic topography from the altimeter were ...

David L. Porter; Scott M. Glenn; Ella B. Dobson; Michael F. Crowley

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Side-emitting fiber optic position sensor  

SciTech Connect

A side-emitting fiber optic position sensor and method of determining an unknown position of an object by using the sensor. In one embodiment, a concentrated beam of light source illuminates the side of a side-emitting fiber optic at an unknown axial position along the fiber's length. Some of this side-illuminated light is in-scattered into the fiber and captured. As the captured light is guided down the fiber, its intensity decreases due to loss from side-emission away from the fiber and from bulk absorption within the fiber. By measuring the intensity of light emitted from one (or both) ends of the fiber with a photodetector(s), the axial position of the light source is determined by comparing the photodetector's signal to a calibrated response curve, look-up table, or by using a mathematical model. Alternatively, the side-emitting fiber is illuminated at one end, while a photodetector measures the intensity of light emitted from the side of the fiber, at an unknown position. As the photodetector moves further away from the illuminated end, the detector's signal strength decreases due to loss from side-emission and/or bulk absorption. As before, the detector's signal is correlated to a unique position along the fiber.

Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

210

Compensated vibrating optical fiber pressure measuring device  

SciTech Connect

A microbending optical fiber is attached under tension to a diaphragm to se a differential pressure applied across the diaphragm which it causes it to deflect. The fiber is attached to the diaphragm so that one portion of the fiber, attached to a central portion of the diaphragm, undergoes a change in tension; proportional to the differential pressure applied to the diaphragm while a second portion attached at the periphery of the diaphragm remains at a reference tension. Both portions of the fiber are caused to vibrate at their natural frequencies. Light transmitted through the fiber is attenuated by both portions of the tensioned sections of the fiber by an amount which increases with the curvature of fiber bending so that the light signal is modulated by both portions of the fiber at separate frequencies. The modulated light signal is transduced into a electrical signal. The separate modulation signals are detected to generate separate signals having frequencies corresponding to the reference and measuring vibrating sections of the continuous fiber, respectively. A signal proportional to the difference between these signals is generated which is indicative of the measured pressure differential across the diaphragm. The reference portion of the fiber is used to compensate the pressure signal for zero and span changes resulting from ambient temperature and humidity effects upon the fiber and the transducer fixture.

Fasching, George E. (Morgantown, WV); Goff, David R. (Christiansburg, VA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Interfacial Studies of Sized Carbon Fiber  

SciTech Connect

This study was performed to investigate the influence of sizing treatment on carbon fiber in respect of interfacial adhesion in composite materials, Epolam registered 2025. Fortafil unsized carbon fiber was used to performed the experiment. The fiber was commercially surface treated and it was a polyacrylonitrile based carbon fiber with 3000 filament per strand. Epicure registered 3370 was used as basic sizing chemical and dissolved in two types of solvent, ethanol and acetone for the comparison purpose. The single pull out test has been used to determine the influence of sizing on carbon fiber. The morphology of carbon fiber was observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The apparent interfacial strength IFSS values determined by pull out test for the Epicure registered 3370/ethanol sized carbon fiber pointed to a good interfacial behaviour compared to the Epicure registered 3370/acetone sized carbon fiber. The Epicure registered 3370/ethanol sizing agent was found to be effective in promoting adhesion because of the chemical reactions between the sizing and Epolam registered 2025 during the curing process. From this work, it showed that sized carbon fiber using Epicure registered 3370 with addition of ethanol give higher mechanical properties of carbon fiber in terms of shear strength and also provided a good adhesion between fiber and matrix compared to the sizing chemical that contain acetone as a solvent.

Shahrul, S. N.; Hartini, M. N.; Hilmi, E. A.; Nizam, A. [Nanomaterials Program, Advance Materials Centre (AMREC), SIRIM Berhad, Lot 34, Jalan Hi-Tech Park, 09000, Kulim, Kedah (Malaysia)

2010-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

212

Electrical Properties of Carbon Fiber Support Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon fiber support structures have become common elements of detector designs for high energy physics experiments. Carbon fiber has many mechanical advantages but it is also characterized by high conductivity, particularly at high frequency, with associated design issues. This paper discusses the elements required for sound electrical performance of silicon detectors employing carbon fiber support elements. Tests on carbon fiber structures are presented indicating that carbon fiber must be regarded as a conductor for the frequency region of 10 to 100 MHz. The general principles of grounding configurations involving carbon fiber structures will be discussed. To illustrate the design requirements, measurements performed with a silicon detector on a carbon fiber support structure at small radius are presented. A grounding scheme employing copper-kapton mesh circuits is described and shown to provide adequate and robust detector performance.

W. Cooper; C. Daly; M. Demarteau; J. Fast; K. Hanagaki; M. Johnson; W. Kuykendall; H. Lubatti; M. Matulik; A. Nomerotski; B. Quinn; J. Wang

2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

213

Electrical Properties of Carbon Fiber Support Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon fiber support structures have become common elements of detector designs for high energy physics experiments. Carbon fiber has many mechanical advantages but it is also characterized by high conductivity, particularly at high frequency, with associated design issues. This paper discusses the elements required for sound electrical performance of silicon detectors employing carbon fiber support elements. Tests on carbon fiber structures are presented indicating that carbon fiber must be regarded as a conductor for the frequency region of 10 to 100 MHz. The general principles of grounding configurations involving carbon fiber structures will be discussed. To illustrate the design requirements, measurements performed with a silicon detector on a carbon fiber support structure at small radius are presented. A grounding scheme employing copper-kapton mesh circuits is described and shown to provide adequate and robust detector performance.

Cooper, W; Demarteau, M; Fast, J; Hanagaki, K; Johnson, M; Kuykendall, W; Lubatti, H; Matulik, M; Nomerotski, A; Quinn, B; Wang, J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Synthetic environment employing a craft for providing user perspective reference  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multi-dimensional user oriented synthetic environment system allows application programs to be programmed and accessed with input/output device independent, generic functional commands which are a distillation of the actual functions performed by any application program. A shared memory structure allows the translation of device specific commands to device independent, generic functional commands. Complete flexibility of the mapping of synthetic environment data to the user is thereby allowed. Accordingly, synthetic environment data may be provided to the user on parallel user information processing channels allowing the subcognitive mind to act as a filter, eliminating irrelevant information and allowing the processing of increase amounts of data by the user. The user is further provided with a craft surrounding the user within the synthetic environment, which craft, imparts important visual referential an motion parallax cues, enabling the user to better appreciate distances and directions within the synthetic environment. Display of this craft in close proximity to the user's point of perspective may be accomplished without substantially degrading the image resolution of the displayed portions of the synthetic environment.

Maples, Creve (Albuquerque, NM); Peterson, Craig A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

215

Investigation of Polymer Resin/Fiber Compatibility in Natural Fiber Reinforced Composite Automotive Materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Natural fibers represent a lower density and potentially lower cost alternative to glass fibers for reinforcement of polymers in automotive composites. The high specific modulus and strength of bast fibers make them an attractive option to replace glass not only in non-structural automotive components, but also in semi-structural and structural components. Significant barriers to insertion of bast fibers in the fiber reinforced automotive composite market include the high moisture uptake of this lignocellulosic material relative to glass and the weak inherent interface between natural fibers and automotive resins. This work seeks to improve the moisture uptake and resin interfacing properties of natural fibers through improved fundamental understanding of fiber physiochemical architecture and development of tailored fiber surface modification strategies.

Fifield, Leonard S.; Huang, Cheng; Simmons, Kevin L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Patterned functional carbon fibers from polyethylene  

SciTech Connect

Patterned, continuous carbon fibers with controlled surface geometry were produced from a novel melt-processible carbon precursor. This portends the use of a unique technique to produce such technologically innovative fibers in large volume for important applications. The novelties of this technique include ease of designing and fabricating fibers with customized surface contour, the ability to manipulate filament diameter from submicron scale to a couple of orders of magnitude larger scale, and the amenable porosity gradient across the carbon wall by diffusion controlled functionalization of precursor. The geometry of fiber cross-section was tailored by using bicomponent melt-spinning with shaped dies and controlling the melt-processing of the precursor polymer. Circular, trilobal, gear-shaped hollow fibers, and solid star-shaped carbon fibers of 0.5 - 20 um diameters, either in self-assembled bundle form, or non-bonded loose filament form, were produced by carbonizing functionalized-polyethylene fibers. Prior to carbonization, melt-spun fibers were converted to a char-forming mass by optimizing the sulfonation on polyethylene macromolecules. The fibers exhibited distinctly ordered carbon morphologies at the outside skin compared to the inner surface or fiber core. Such order in carbon microstructure can be further tuned by altering processing parameters. Partially sulfonated polyethylene-derived hollow carbon fibers exhibit 2-10 fold surface area (50-500 m2/g) compared to the solid fibers (10-25 m2/g) with pore sizes closer to the inside diameter of the filaments larger than the sizes on the outer layer. These specially functionalized carbon fibers hold promise for extraordinary performance improvements when used, for example, as composite reinforcements, catalyst support media, membranes for gas separation, CO2 sorbents, and active electrodes and current collectors for energy storage applications.

Hunt, Marcus A [ORNL; Saito, Tomonori [ORNL; Brown, Rebecca H [ORNL; Kumbhar, Amar S [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Naskar, Amit K [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Carbon fibers from SRC pitch  

SciTech Connect

This invention relates to an improved method of manufacturing carbon fibers from a coal derived pitch. The improvement resides in the use of a solvent refined coal which has been hydrotreated and subjected to solvent extraction whereby the hetero atom content in the resulting product is less than 4.0% by weight and the softening point is between about 100.degree.-250.degree. F.

Greskovich, Eugene J. (Allentown, PA); Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Inheritance of cotton fiber length and distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fiber quality data from five upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) genotypes, which were grown at College Station, TX during 2001 and 2002, were subjected to diallel and generation means analyses to determine the potential for improvement of fiber length and to determine the inheritance of length distribution data. Four near-long staple (NLS) upland cotton genotypes and one short-staple genotype were crossed in all combinations, excluding reciprocals. Estimates of general (GCA) and specific combining ability (SCA) for fiber length based on Griffing�s diallel Model I, Method 4 were calculated for high volume instrumentation (HVI) upper-half mean (UHM) fiber length and advance fiber information system (AFIS) mean fiber length by weight (FLw), mean fiber length by number (FLn), upper quartile length by weight (Uqlw), fiber length distribution cross entropy (using 3 different standard or check distributions - CEA, CEB, and CEC), fiber length distribution kurtosis (FLwKurt), and fiber length distribution skewness (FLwSkew) for FLw. Across environments, GCA effects were significant for fiber length measurements of UHM, FLw, FLn, Uqlw, and SFCw and distribution measurements of CEA, CEB, FLwKurt, and FLwSkew. On the basis of GCA effects, TAM 94L-25 was the best parent to be used in a cross to improve upland fiber length, while Acala 1517-99 was the parent of choice to improve distribution among the 4 parents tested. The inheritance of AFIS fiber length measurements and distribution data was estimated using parents, F1, F2, and backcross generations. The magnitude and significance of the estimates for non-allelic effects in the parental combinations suggest that epistatic gene effects are present and important in the basic mechanism of AFIS fiber length and length distribution inheritance for the populations studied. Gene effects and variances for all AFIS fiber length and distribution data measurements were inherited differently in different environments and specific parental combination, suggesting environmentally specific mechanisms. Developing genotypes with enhanced fiber length and an optimal fiber length distribution should be a priority to improve spinning performance and product quality of U.S. upland cotton.

Braden, Chris Alan

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Improvement of Cotton Fiber Maturity and Assessment of Intra-Plant Fiber Variability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The temporal system of fruiting on the cotton plant lends itself to bolls at different fruiting sites developing under different environmental conditions and with varied source-sink relationships. To investigate this, intra-plant fiber quality was assessed in four upland cultivars at College Station, Texas for three years and at Lubbock, Texas for two years. It was concluded that fiber quality steadily declines from the bottom sympodial branches towards the upper branches. 'FiberMax 832' had the best fiber quality among all cultivars but it also had the highest degree of variability within the plants. 'Half and Half' and 'Acala 1517-99' appear to have the least amount of intra-plant variability of fiber quality. Bolls from the bottom region of the plant have higher trash content compared to the upper region. To test the impact of fiber quality variability on boll sampling techniques employed, ten sampling protocols were compared against each other for three years in College Station, Texas, for two upland cultivars. Results suggest that randomized boll samples containing 50 bolls worked well to estimate inherent fiber quality for most fiber traits while estimation of trash and lint percent was not predictable based on boll samples. One of the problems associated with intra-plant fiber variability was the presence of immature fibers. In order to determine the potential for improvement of fiber maturity and standard fineness, five upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) genotypes were subjected to a diallel analysis at College Station, Texas, in 2011. Four cultivars that tend to produce fine and mature fibers and one cultivar that tends to produce coarse fibers were intermated in all combinations, without reciprocals. Estimates of general (GCA) and specific combining ability (SCA) for fiber maturity ratio and standard fineness based on Griffing's diallel Model I, Method 4 were calculated for AFIS and fiber micronaire, length and strength measurements for High Volume Instrument (HVI). Four parents had significant GCA effects and Acala 1517-99 was found to be the best parent for improving standard fineness followed by FiberMax 832 and 'Tamcot HQ-95'. Tamcot HQ-95 was the best parent to improve fiber maturity ratio while 'Deltapine 90' was the best parent to reduce fiber maturity ratio. The specific cross between Acala 1517-99 and Tamcot HQ-95 had the best performance. Diallel analysis indicated that fiber maturity ratio was influenced by non-additive gene effects more than additive gene effects while fiber standard fineness was highly influenced by additive gene effects. Developing cultivars with optimal fiber standard fineness and maturity should be prioritized to address problems associated with neps and short fiber content and improve spinning performance of US cotton.

Kothari, Neha

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Conversion of Ultra High Performance Carbon Fiber  

Conversion of Ultra High Performance Carbon Fiber Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing rights to this intellectual property may

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detergents synthetic fibers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Finding Inspiration in Spider Silk Fibers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Finding Inspiration in Argiope Trifasciata Spider Silk Fibers. Manuel Elices, José Pérez-Rigueiro, Gustavo R. Plaza, and Gustavo V. Guinea ...

222

Remote Synchrotron Light Instrumentation Using Optical Fibers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

et al. , “Fiberoptics-based Instrumentation for Storage RingSYNCHROTRON LIGHT INSTRUMENTATION USING OPTICAL FIBERS * S.beam diagnostic instrumentation that measures longitudinal

De Santis, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

ELECTROSPUN POLYMER-FIBER SOLAR CELL.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A study of fabricating the first electrospun polymer-fiber solar cell with MEHPPV is presented. Motivation for the work and a brief history of solar cell… (more)

Nagata, Shinobu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Carbon Fiber Damage in Accelerator Beam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon fibers are commonly used as moving targets in Beam Wire Scanners. Because of their thermomechanical properties they are very resistant to particle beams. Their strength deteriorates with time due to radiation damage and low-cycle thermal fatigue. In case of high intensity beams this process can accelerate and in extreme cases the fiber is damaged during a single scan. In this work a model describing the fiber temperature, thermionic emission and sublimation is discussed. Results are compared with fiber damage test performed on SPS beam in November 2008. In conclusions the limits of Wire Scanner operation on high intensity beams are drawn.

Sapinski, M; Guerrero, A; Koopman, J; Métral, E

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Fact book: synthetic pipeline gas from coal. 1982 update  

SciTech Connect

This book illustrates the major advantages of synthetic pipeline gas from coal. Progress on many of the coal gasification projects envisioned over the past decade has been thwarted by regulatory, permitting, and financing delays. The rationale for developing a synthetic pipeline gas industry remains as strong as ever from the nation's viewpoint, and the pioneer US commercial scale high-Btu coal gasification plant is now under construction-the Great Plains coal gasification plant in North Dakota. Also, the US Synthetic Fuels Corporation is now operational and can move forward to provide the guarantees which are necessary to overcome the financial barriers to a commercial synfuels capability in the United States. Compared to other principal means of utilizing America's vast coal reserves, coal gasification uses coal and land more efficiently, uses less water, emits less air pollutants, requires less capital and results in a lower cost of energy to consumers. (DP)

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Gas Turbine Combustor Performance on Synthetic Fuels, Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume presents a summary of a project to determine the effects of burning currently available coal-derived and shale-derived synthetic liquid fuels in state-of-the-art gas turbine combustors. It describes the fuels tested, the effects of NO emission and of smoke formation and reduction, and a comparison of surrogate and synthetic fuels. The project concluded that a number of selected coal and shale oil fuels can be used in current turbines as soon as these fuels become available.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

A LASER-BASED MONODISPERSE CARBON FIBER GENERATOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L. (1979) "Release of Carbon Fibers from Burning Composites"2119, p. 29. NASA (1978) "Carbon Fiber Study" NASA TechnicalA. L. Jr. (1980) "A Carbon Fiber Exposure Test Facility and

Loo, Billy W.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Fiber optic inclination detector system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fiber optic inclination detector system for determining the angular displacement of an object from a reference surface includes a simple mechanical transducer which requires a minimum number of parts and no electrical components. The system employs a single light beam which is split into two light beams and provided to the transducer. Each light beam is amplitude modulated upon reflecting off the transducer to detect inclination. The power values associated with each of the reflected light beams are converted by a pair of photodetectors into voltage signals, and a microprocessor manipulates the voltage signals to provide a measure of the angular displacement between the object and the reference surface.

Cwalinski, J.P.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

229

Method and Apparatus for Three-Dimensional Carbon Fiber Production  

UCF researchers have discovered a method for producing three-dimensional carbon fibers. These novel fibers have a surface area approximately two ...

230

Fiber Bridging Model for Reinforced-Carbon-Carbon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Professor K. K. Chawla Honorary Symposium on Fibers, Foams and ... fiber bridging and resistance-curve behavior in reinforced-carbon-carbon (

231

Carbon fiber/vinylester composites in the marine environment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this research, the degradation of carbon fiber/vinylester composites in marine environments was experimentally investigated. Additionally, two types of carbon fiber surface treatments, namely Polyhedral… (more)

Vinci, Chris J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Novel method for carbon nanofilament growth on carbon fibers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Carbon nanofilaments were grown on the surface of microscale carbon-fibers at relatively low temperature using palladium as a catalyst to create multiscale fiber reinforcing structures… (more)

Garcia, Daniel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Carbon Fiber Technology Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Carbon Fiber Technology Facility Low-Cost Carbon Fiber | Proposal Guidelines Proposal Guidelines Proposals should be no more than 5 single spaced...

234

Three-dimensional carbon fibers and method and apparatus for ...  

Method and Apparatus for Three-Dimensional Carbon Fiber Production: Abstract: This invention relates to novel three-dimensional (3D) carbon fibers which are original ...

235

Quantum state tomography of a fiber-based source of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 2. RP Feynman, RB Leighton, RB and ML Sands, The Feynman Lectures ... fiber because the centro- symmetry of single-mode fiber glass allows no ...

2010-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

236

Fiber optic probe having fibers with endfaces formed for improved coupling efficiency and method using same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fiber optic probe is disclosed for detecting scattered light, with transmitting and receiving fibers having slanted ends and bundled together to form a bevel within the tip of the probe. The probe comprises a housing with a transparent window across its tip for protecting the transmitting and receiving fibers held therein. The endfaces of the fibers are slanted, by cutting, polishing and the like, so that they lie in a plane that is not perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the respective fiber. The fibers are held in the tip of the probe using an epoxy and oriented so that lines normal to the slanted endfaces are divergent with respect to one another. The epoxy, which is positioned substantially between the transmitting and receiving fibers, is tapered so that the transmitting fiber, the epoxy and the receiving fiber form a bevel of not more than 20 degrees. The angled fiber endfaces cause directing of the light cones toward each other, resulting in improved light coupling efficiency. A light absorber, such as carbon black, is contained in the epoxy to reduce crosstalk between the transmitting and receiving fibers. 3 figures.

O`Rourke, P.E.; Livingston, R.R.

1995-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

237

Fiber optic probe having fibers with endfaces formed for improved coupling efficiency and method using same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fiber optic probe for detecting scattered light, with transmitting and receiving fibers having slanted ends and bundled together to form a bevel within the tip of the probe. The probe comprises a housing with a transparent window across its tip for protecting the transmitting and receiving fibers held therein. The endfaces of the fibers are slanted, by cutting, polishing and the like, so that they lie in a plane that is not perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the respective fiber. The fibers are held in the tip of the probe using an epoxy and oriented so that lines normal to the slanted endfaces are divergent with respect to one another. The epoxy, which is positioned substantially between the transmitting and receiving fibers, is tapered so that the transmitting fiber, the epoxy and the receiving fiber form a bevel of not more than 20 degrees. The angled fiber endfaces cause directing of the light cones toward each other, resulting in improved light coupling efficiency. A light absorber, such as carbon black, is contained in the epoxy to reduce crosstalk between the transmitting and receiving fibers.

O' Rourke, Patrick E. (Martinez, GA); Livingston, Ronald R. (Aiken, SC)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Virtual klingler dissection: putting fibers into context  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fiber tracking is a standard tool to estimate the course of major white matter tracts from diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) data. In this work, we aim at supporting the visual analysis of classical streamlines from fiber tracking ...

T. Schultz; N. Sauber; A. Anwander; H. Theisel; H.-P. Seidel

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

The Transport Properties of Activated Carbon Fibers  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons.

di Vittorio, S. L.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Endo, M.; Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

1990-07-00T23:59:59.000Z

240

Assessment of fiber optic pressure sensors  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a six-month Phase 1 study to establish the state-of-the-art in fiber optic pressure sensing and describes the design and principle of operation of various fiber optic pressure sensors. This study involved a literature review, contact with experts in the field, an industrial survey, a site visit to a fiber optic sensor manufacturer, and laboratory testing of a fiber optic pressure sensor. The laboratory work involved both static and dynamic performance tests. In addition, current requirements for environmental and seismic qualification of sensors for nuclear power plants were reviewed to determine the extent of the qualification tests that fiber optic pressure sensors may have to meet before they can be used in nuclear power plants. This project has concluded that fiber optic pressure sensors are still in the research and development stage and only a few manufacturers exist in the US and abroad which supply suitable fiber optic pressure sensors for industrial applications. Presently, fiber optic pressure sensors are mostly used in special applications for which conventional sensors are not able to meet the requirements.

Hashemian, H.M.; Black, C.L.; Farmer, J.P. [Analysis and Measurement Services Corp., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detergents synthetic fibers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Fiber-optic voltage sensor with cladded fiber and evanescent wave variation detection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fiber optic voltage sensor is described which includes a source of light, a reference fiber for receiving a known percentage of the light and an electrostrictive element having terminals across which is applied, a voltage to be measured. The electrostrictive element is responsive to the applied voltage to assume an altered physical state. A measuring fiber also receives a known percentage of light from the light source and is secured about the electrostrictive element. The measuring fiber is provided with a cladding and exhibits an evanescent wave in the cladding. The measuring fiber has a known length which is altered when the electrostrictive element assumes its altered physical state. A differential sensor is provided which senses the intensity of light in both the reference fiber and the measuring fiber and provides an output indicative of the difference between the intensities.

Wood, Charles B. (Lakewood, CO)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Fiber-optic voltage sensor with cladded fiber and evanescent wave variation detection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fiber optic voltage sensor is described which includes a source of light, a reference fiber for receiving a known percentage of the light and an electrostrictive element having terminals across which is applied, a voltage to be measured. The electrostrictive element is responsive to the applied voltage to assume an altered physical state. A measuring fiber also receives a known percentage of light from the light source and is secured about the electrostrictive element. The measuring fiber is provided with a cladding and exhibits an evanescent wave in the cladding. The measuring fiber has a known length which is altered when the electrostrictive element assumes its altered physical state. A differential sensor is provided which senses the intensity of light in both the reference fiber and the measuring fiber and provides an output indicative of the difference between the intensities. 3 figs.

Wood, C.B.

1992-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

243

Online fiber-optic spectrophotometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Plant operates two radio-chemical separations areas to recover uranium and plutonium from nuclear reactor fuel and target assemblies. Chemical processes in these areas are controlled based on laboratory analysis of samples extracted from the process. While analytical results from the laboratory are reliable, the process of pulling samples, transporting them to the laboratory, analyzing them, and then reporting results is time consuming and potentially exposes many workers to highly radioactive solutions. To improve the timeliness of chemical information and reduce personnel radiation exposure, the Savannah River Laboratory has developed an online fiber optic spectrophotometer which combines three new technologies, fiber optics, diode array spectrophotometers, and multivariate data analysis. The analyzer monitors the uranium and nitrate concentration of seven aqueous process streams in a uranium purification process. The analyzer remotely controls the sampling of each process stream and monitors the relative flow rate through each sampler. Spectrophotometric data from the analyzer is processed by multivariate data analysis to give both uranium and nitrate concentrations as well as an indication of the quality of the data.

Van Hare, D.R.; O'Rourke, P.E.; Prather, W.S.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Remotely readable fiber optic compass  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A remotely readable fiber optic compass. A sheet polarizer is affixed to a magnet rotatably mounted in a compass body, such that the polarizer rotates with the magnet. The optical axis of the sheet polarizer is preferably aligned with the north-south axis of the magnet. A single excitation light beam is divided into four identical beams, two of which are passed through the sheet polarizer and through two fixed polarizing sheets which have their optical axes at right angles to one another. The angle of the compass magnet with respect to a fixed axis of the compass body can be determined by measuring the ratio of the intensities of the two light beams. The remaining ambiguity as to which of the four possible quadrants the magnet is pointing to is resolved by the second pair of light beams, which are passed through the sheet polarizer at positions which are transected by two semicircular opaque strips formed on the sheet polarizer. The incoming excitation beam and the four return beams are communicated by means of optical fibers, giving a remotely readable compass which has no electrical parts.

Migliori, A.; Swift, G.W.; Garrett, S.L.

1985-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

245

Method for preparing polyaniline fibers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline. In order to process high quality fibers and other articles possessing good mechanical properties, it is known that solution concentrations of the chosen polymer should be in the range from 15-30% (w/w). Moreover, it is desirable to use the highest molecular weight consistent with the solubility properties of the polymer. However, such solutions are inherently unstable, forming gels before processing can be achieved. The present invention describes the addition gel inhibitors (GIs) to the polymer solution, thereby permitting high concentrations (>15% (w/w)) of high molecular weight ((M.sub.w)>120,000, and (M.sub.n)>30,000) emeraldine base (EB) polyaniline to be dissolved. Secondary amines have been used for this purpose in concentrations which are small compared to those which might otherwise be used in a cosolvent role therefor. The resulting solutions are useful for generating excellent fibers, films, coatings and other objects, since the solutions are stable for significant time periods, and the GIs are present in too small concentrations to cause polymer deterioration. It is demonstrated that the GIs found to be useful do not act as cosolvents, and that gelation times of the solutions are directly proportional to the concentration of GI. In particular, there is a preferred concentration of GI, which if exceeded causes structural and electrical conductivity degradation of resulting articles. Heating of the solutions significantly improves solubility.

Mattes, Benjamin R. (Santa Fe, NM); Wang, Hsing-Lin (Los Alamos, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Composition and Biodegradation of a Synthetic Oil Spilled on the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

characteristics. Composition and natural attenuation of the spilled aviation diesel fuel are discussed in JaraulaComposition and Biodegradation of a Synthetic Oil Spilled on the Perennial Ice Cover of LakeAeroshell500.Molecularcompositionsoftheoilswereanalyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and compared

Priscu, John C.

247

Synthetic gene design with a large number of hidden stops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hidden stops are nucleotide triples TAA, TAG and TGA that appear on the second and third reading frames of a protein coding gene. Recent studies suggested the important role of hidden stops in preventing misread of mRNA. We study the problem of designing ... Keywords: back translation, bioinformatics, codons, gene design, hidden stops, mRNA, protein coding genes, synthetic biology

Vinhthuy Phan; Sudip Saha; Ashutosh Pandey; Tit-Yee Wong

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Evaluation of administrative procedures at the Synthetic Fuels Corporation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Synthetic Fuels Corporation has improved its administrative procedures, but further actions are needed to strengthen contracting practices and internal financial controls. Pertinent recommendations are made in this report. This report also discusses the evolution of the Corporations's current salary structure and the activities of the Office of the Inspector General.

Not Available

1982-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

249

Directed evolution: an evolving and enabling synthetic biology tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Directed evolution: an evolving and enabling synthetic biology tool Ryan E Cobb1 , Tong Si1 systems has heretofore rendered rational design prohibitively difficult. As a result, directed evolution large libraries of variants. This review highlights the most recent advances in the use of directed

Zhao, Huimin

250

Synthetic aperture design for increased SAR image rate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High resolution SAR images of a target scene at near video rates can be produced by using overlapped, but nevertheless, full-size synthetic apertures. The SAR images, which respectively correspond to the apertures, can be analyzed in sequence to permit detection of movement in the target scene.

Bielek, Timothy P. (Albuquerque, NM); Thompson, Douglas G. (Albuqerque, NM); Walker, Bruce C. (Albuquerque, NM)

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

251

2006 Special Issue: Synthetic computational models of selective attention  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computational modeling plays an important role to understand the mechanisms of attention. In this framework, synthetic computational models can uniquely contribute to integrate different explanatory levels and neurocognitive findings, with special reference ... Keywords: Awareness, Meditation states, Processing levels, Selective attention, Synchronization

Antonino Raffone

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

The Measurement of Precipitation with Synthetic Aperture Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radar equation for the measurement of precipitation by SAR is identical to that for a conventional radar. The achievable synthetic beamwidth, ?s, is proportional to ?v/U, the ratio of the spread of the precipitation Doppler spectrum to the ...

David Atlas; Richard K. Moore

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

SPE-163690-MS Synthetic, Geomechanical Logs for Marcellus Shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SPE-163690-MS Synthetic, Geomechanical Logs for Marcellus Shale M. O. Eshkalak, SPE, S. D of hydrocarbons from the reservoirs, notably shale, is attributed to realizing the key fundamentals of reservoir and mineralogy is crucial in order to identify the "right" pay-zone intervals for shale gas production. Also

Mohaghegh, Shahab

254

Low Cost Carbon Fiber.pub  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Fiber Production Carbon Fiber Production Carbon Fiber Manufacturing Cost Modeling Oak Ridge National Laboratory managed by UT-Battelle, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract number DE-AC05-00OR22725 Research Areas Freight Flows Passenger Flows Supply Chain Efficiency Transportation: Energy Environment Safety Security Vehicle Technologies Research Brief Background The automotive industry has long been identified by carbon fiber manufacturers as a market with substantial growth potential. When manufactured with carbon fiber as opposed to traditional materials such as steel, automotive parts are able to achieve requisite levels of strength and stiffness with significantly less overall vehicle weight. These potential large reductions in vehicle weight, in turn, afford the

255

Lower Cost, Higher Performance Carbon Fiber  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

David (Dave) Warren David (Dave) Warren Field Technical Manager Transportation Materials Research Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2009, M/S 8050 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-8050 Phone: 865-574-9693 Fax: 865-574-0740 Email: WarrenCD@ORNL.GOV Lower Cost, Higher Performance Carbon Fiber 14 February 2011 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Presentation_name Questions for Today Materials How can the cost of carbon fiber suitable for higher performance applications (H 2 Storage) be developed? H 2 Storage requirements implies Aerospace grade fibers. Can we build off of work previously done for more modest structural applications? To accurately answer: We need to know the minimum performance and maximum cost requirements of the fiber not simply the properties of current fiber.

256

Methods And Apparatus For Acoustic Fiber Fractionation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus for acoustic fiber fractionation using a plane ultrasonic wave field interacting with water suspended fibers circulating in a channel flow using acoustic radiation forces to separate fibers into two or more fractions based on fiber radius, with applications of the separation concept in the pulp and paper industry. The continuous process relies on the use of a wall-mounted, rectangular cross-section piezoelectric ceramic transducer to selectively deflect flowing fibers as they penetrate the ultrasonic field. The described embodiment uses a transducer frequency of approximately 150 kHz. Depending upon the amount of dissolved gas in water, separation is obtained using a standing or a traveling wave field.

Brodeur, Pierre (Smyrna, GA)

1999-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

257

Carbon fiber manufacturing via plasma technology  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosed invention introduces a novel method of manufacturing carbon and/or graphite fibers that avoids the high costs associated with conventional carbonization processes. The method of the present invention avoids these costs by utilizing plasma technology in connection with electromagnetic radiation to produce carbon and/or graphite fibers from fully or partially stabilized carbon fiber precursors. In general, the stabilized or partially stabilized carbon fiber precursors are placed under slight tension, in an oxygen-free atmosphere, and carbonized using a plasma and electromagnetic radiation having a power input which is increased as the fibers become more carbonized and progress towards a final carbon or graphite product. In an additional step, the final carbon or graphite product may be surface treated with an oxygen-plasma treatment to enhance adhesion to matrix materials.

Paulauskas, Felix L. (Knoxville, TN); Yarborough, Kenneth D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Meek, Thomas T. (Knoxville, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Multilayered thermal insulation formed of zirconia bonded layers of zirconia fibers and metal oxide fibers and method for making same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multilayered thermal insulating composite is formed of a first layer of zirconia-bonded zirconia fibers for utilization near the hot phase or surface of a furnace or the like. A second layer of zirconia-bonded metal oxide fibers is attached to the zirconia fiber layer by a transition layer formed of intermingled zirconia fibers and metal oxide fibers. The thermal insulation is fabricated by vacuum molding with the layers being sequentially applied from aqueous solutions containing the fibers to a configured mandrel. A portion of the solution containing the fibers forming the first layer is intermixed with the solution containing the fibers of the second layer for forming the layer of mixed fibers. The two layers of fibers joined together by the transition layer are saturated with a solution of zirconium oxynitrate which provides a zirconia matrix for the composite when the fibers are sintered together at their nexi.

Wrenn, Jr., George E. (Clinton, TN); Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E. (Farragut, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Fiber optic D dimer biosensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fiber optic sensor for D dimer (a fibrinolytic product) can be used in vivo (e.g., in catheter-based procedures) for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States. It has been estimated that strokes and stroke-related disorders cost Americans between $15-30 billion annually. Relatively recently, new medical procedures have been developed for the treatment of stroke. These endovascular procedures rely upon the use of microcatheters. These procedures could be facilitated with this sensor for D dimer integrated with a microcatheter for the diagnosis of clot type, and as an indicator of the effectiveness, or end-point of thrombolytic therapy.

Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA); Grant, Sheila A. (Pleasanton, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Coated Fiber Neutron Detector Test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. The currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) from Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large neutron detector. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world, and thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Reported here are the results of tests of the 6Li/ZnS(Ag)-coated non-scintillating plastic fibers option. This testing measured the required performance for neutron detection efficiency and gamma ray rejection capabilities of a system manufactured by Innovative American Technology (IAT).

Lintereur, Azaree T.; Ely, James H.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Stromswold, David C.

2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detergents synthetic fibers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Effects of hadron irradiation on scintillating fibers  

SciTech Connect

Trackers based on scintillating-fiber technology are being considered by the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration at SSC and the D[phi] collaboration at Fermilab. An important issue is the effect of the radiation existing in the detector cores on fiber properties. Most studies of radiation damage in scintillators have irradiated small bulk samples rather than fibers, and have used X-rays, [sup 60]Co gammas, or electron beams, often at accelerated rates. The authors have irradiated some 600 fibers in the Fermilab Tevatron C[phi] area, thereby obtaining a hadronic irradiation at realistic rates. Four-meter-long samples of ten Bicron polystyrene-based fiber types, maintained in air, dry nitrogen, argon, and vacuum atmospheres within stainless-steel tubes, were irradiated for seven weeks at various distances from the accelerator beam pipes. Maximum doses, measured by thermoluminescence detectors, were about 80 Krad. Fiber properties, particularly light yield and attenuation length, have been measured over a one-year period. A description of the work together with the results is presented. At the doses achieved, corresponding to a few years of actual fiber-tracking detector operation, little degradation is observed. In addition, recovery after several days' exposure to air has been noted. Properties of unirradiated samples kept in darkness show no changes after one year.

Atac, M. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States) Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)); Buchanan, C.; Chrisman, D.; Cline, D.; Kolonko, J.; Kubic, J.; Park, J. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Baumbaugh, A.; Binkley, M.; Bross, A.D.; Finley, D.; Elias, J.; Foster, G.W.; Kephart, R.; Kephart, R.; Kim, C.; Park, H.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Rivetta, C.; Tkaczyk, S.; Wagner, R. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)); Chung, M.; Goldberg, H.; Jeskik, R.; Margulies, S.; Mendez, H.; Solomon, J.; Vaca, F. (Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States)); Kelley, C. (Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Sciences, Boston, MA (United States)); Baumbaugh, B.; Bishop, J.; Biswas, N.; Cason, N.; Jacques, J.; Kehoe, R.; Kelly, M.; Kenney, V.; LoSecco, J.; Ruchti, R.; Shephard, W.; Warchol, J.; Wayne, M.; Marchant, J.; Mountain, R.J. (Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)); Davis, D.; Vandergriff, D. (O

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Safe, secure and ethical? : assessing and regulating risks associated with synthetic biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synthetic biology is an emerging field, with a rapidly developing academic-industrial base and the promise of extensive product launches over the next few years. An intense debate over the risks and benefits of synthetic ...

Regårdh, Pernilla C. (Pernilla Christina)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Nanofabricated collagen-inspired synthetic elastomers for primary rat hepatocyte culture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synthetic substrates that mimic the properties of extracellular matrix proteins hold significant promise for use in systems designed for tissue engineering applications. In this report, we designed a synthetic polymeric ...

Bettinger, Christopher J.

264

Microbend fiber-optic chemical sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microbend fiber-optic chemical sensor for detecting chemicals in a sample, and a method for its use, is disclosed. The sensor comprises at least one optical fiber having a microbend section (a section of small undulations in its axis), for transmitting and receiving light. In transmission, light guided through the microbend section scatters out of the fiber core and interacts, either directly or indirectly, with the chemical in the sample, inducing fluorescence radiation. Fluorescence radiation is scattered back into the microbend section and returned to an optical detector for determining characteristics of the fluorescence radiation quantifying the presence of a specific chemical.

Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Synthetic IR Scene Simulation of Air-borne Targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IR scenes of high fidelity are needed to support the development and testing of various target detection and tracking techniques. It is impractical to test detection and tracking algorithms under all conceivable conditions. Therefore, to test the effectiveness of detection and tracking algorithms under variety of scenarios, synthetic IR scenes are generated. For air-borne targets, the presence of clouds plays an important role, since they affect most IR sensors. We propose, a mod- ification of original Gardner's Method [3], in order to generate clouds of richer spectral content. We also ex- plore an algorithm based on self-similarity [5] for cloud texture generation. Synthetic IR cloud images generated by our scene simulation software are radiometrically accurate and have typical cloud texture variations. We use Modtran J.O for radiometric calculation and VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language) for scene rendering.

Shankar T. More; Avinash A. Pandit; Avinash A. P; S. N. Merchant; U. B. Desai

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Synthetic nanotubes lay foundation for new technology: Artificial pores  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Synthetic nanotubes lay foundation for new technology: Artificial pores Synthetic nanotubes lay foundation for new technology: Artificial pores mimic key features of natural pores By Tona Kunz * July 17, 2012 Tweet EmailPrint Scientists have overcome key design hurdles to expand the potential uses of nanopores and nanotubes. The creation of smart nanotubes with selective mass transport opens up a wider range of applications for water purification, chemical separation and fighting disease. Nanopores and their rolled up version, nanotubes, consist of atoms bonded to each other in a hexagonal pattern to create an array of nanometer-scale openings or channels. This structure creates a filter that can be sized to select which molecules and ions pass into drinking water or into a cell. The same filter technique can limit the release of chemical by-products

267

Pentavalent Uranium Chemistry - Synthetic Pursuit Of A Rare Oxidation State  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This feature article presents a comprehensive overview of pentavalent uranium systems in non-aqueous solution with a focus on the various synthetic avenues employed to access this unusual and very important oxidation state. Selected characterization data and theoretical aspects are also included. The purpose is to provide a perspective on this rapidly evolving field and identify new possibilities for future developments in pentavalent uranium chemistry.

Graves, Christopher R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Directed evolution as a powerful synthetic biology tool Ryan E. Cobb a,b,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Directed evolution as a powerful synthetic biology tool Ryan E. Cobb a,b,1 , Ning Sun c,1 , Huimin by Rihe Liu Keyword: Synthetic biology Directed evolution a b s t r a c t At the heart of synthetic of this approach. Directed evolution, a process which mimics Darwinian selection on a laboratory scale, has allowed

Zhao, Huimin

269

Synthetic Antimicrobial Oligomers Induce Composition-dependent Topological  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Synthetic Antimicrobial Oligomers Induce Synthetic Antimicrobial Oligomers Induce Composition-dependent Topological Transition in Membranes The development of bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics is a major public health concern. For example, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) and Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) have emerged as common nosocomial (hospital-originating) infections. Circumvention of such resistance may be possi ble by emulating host defense antimicrobial peptides (AMP's), which are found in a broad range of species and have broad-spectrum antimicrobial properties. These AMP's have two structural motifs in common: they are cationic and amphipathic. It is thought that electro static interactions facilitate association of the peptide with the anionic bacterial membrane and amphiphilic interactions act to form pores in the bacterial membrane, leading to cell death. Thus, AMP's target generic characteristics common to the mem branes of many pathogenic species, and resistance to such natural defences evolves much more slowly than for conventional antibiotics. The exact molecular mechanisms by which membrane pores are formed are still not fully understood, although three major models ('barrel-stave', 'toroidal pore', 'carpet') have been proposed. Moreover, these models do not ex haustively cover all possibilities, as AMP activity is not always correlated with the loss of a permeability barrier. Understanding the structural tenden cies generated in antimicrobial-membrane interactions is an essential step to elucidating such molecular mechanisms and therefore to the pre dictive design of synthetic AMP analogs.

270

A fiber damage model for early stage consolidation of metal-coated fibers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuous fiber reinforced titanium matrix composites (TMCs) possess combinations of specific modulus, strength, and creep resistance that are well suited for a variety of aerospace applications. Recent studies of the high temperature consolidation of titanium alloy coated {alpha}-alumina fiber tows and SiC monofilaments have both revealed the widespread occurrence of fiber bending and fracture during early stage consolidation. This damage was shown to arise from the bending of unaligned fibers during consolidation and was found to be affected by the mechanical behavior of the metal-metal contacts at fiber crossovers. To predict the incidence of fiber fracture during early stage high temperature consolidation, a time-temperature dependent micromechanical model incorporating the evolving contact geometry and mechanical behavior of both the metal matrix and the ceramic fibers has been combined with a statistical representation of crossovers in the pre-consolidated layup. The damage predictions are found to compare favorably with experimental results. The model has subsequently been used to explore the effects of fiber strength, matrix constitutive properties and the processing conditions upon the incidence of fiber fracture. It reveals the existence of a temperature dependent pressurization rate below which fracture is relatively unlikely. This critical pressure rate can be significantly increased by the enhanced superplasticity of the initially nanocrystalline coating.

Warren, J.; Elzey, D.M.; Wadley, H.N.G. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Polyacrylonitrile / carbon nanotube composite fibers: effect of various processing parameters on fiber structure and properties .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study elucidates the effect of various processing parameters on polyacrylonitrile (PAN) /carbon nanotube (CNT) composite fiber structure and properties. Interaction between PAN and MWNT… (more)

Choi, Young Ho

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Distributed Light Sensing with Convex Potential Fibers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on a photoconductive fiber that supports decaying and convex electrical potential profiles capable of localizing a point of illumination, and propose a scheme to perform distributed optical sensing.

Sorin, Fabien

273

Fiber to waveguide couplers for silicon photonics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As silicon photonics enters mainstream technology, we find ourselves in need of methods to seamlessly transfer light between the optical fibers of global scale telecommunications networks and the on-chip waveguides used ...

Montalbo, Trisha M., 1980-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Fiber-Optic Environmental Radiation Dosimeter - Energy ...  

Solar Thermal; Startup ... mm in diameter by 10 cm in length and is fiber-optic-coupled to a photodetec-tor that is remotely located away from the potential radiation ...

275

Fiber gasket and method of making same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gasket (1) is made by repetitively spirally winding a fiber (3) back on itself in a closed path. The gasket (1) so made has a multi-layer spiral winding (1) formed in a loop (5). The fiber (3) can be wound at a constant wrap rate to form a gasket with a uniform cross-section around the loop. Alternatively, the wrap rate can be varied, increased to increase cross-sectional bulk, and decreased to reduce cross-section bulk around the loop (5). Also, the spiral winding (7) can be applied over a core (13) of either strands of the fiber (3) or a dissimilar material providing a desired property such as resiliency, stiffness or others. For high temperature applications, a ceramic fiber (3) can be used. The gasket (1) can have any of various geometric configurations with or without a core (13).

Bruck, Gerald Joseph (Murrysville, PA); Alvin, Mary Anne (Pittsburgh, PA); Smeltzer, Eugene E. (Export, PA)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Investigation on digitized RF transport over fiber.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Finally, the thesis investigates the power consumptions and energy-saving potentials of the fiber-wireless integration techniques. A mathematical model for estimating the base station power consumption… (more)

Yang, Yizhuo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Optoelectronic fiber webs for imaging applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate the use of novel visible and infrared light-sensitive optoelectronic fiber in the development of large scale photodector arrays. Unlike conventional point photodetectors these one-dimensional linear photodectors ...

Arnold, Jerimy Reeves

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Cement Composites Reinforced by Short Curaua Fibers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Consolidation of Nanostructured Al-Powder Alloys by Hot Extrusion: Grain Size ... Shell Fiber and Electron-Beam Irradiation in Thermo-Mechanical Properties of HDPE ... with Malealated Polypropylene (MAPP) Produced by Reactive Extrusion

279

Structural retrofitting using fiber reinforced polymers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the past decades, fiber reinforced polymers (FRP) have been widely used in the aeronautical and naval industries. Being more costly than conventional Civil Engineering materials such as steel or concrete, they have ...

Dumas, Pierre, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Fabrication of microscale carbon nanotube fibers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have excellent mechanical, chemical, and electronic properties, but realizing these excellences in practical applications needs to assemble individual CNTs into larger-scale products. Recently, CNT fibers demonstrate the potential ...

Gengzhi Sun; Yani Zhang; Lianxi Zheng

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detergents synthetic fibers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Fiber coupled optical spark delivery system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A spark delivery system for generating a spark using a laser beam is provided, the spark delivery system including a laser light source and a laser delivery assembly. The laser delivery assembly includes a hollow fiber and a launch assembly comprising launch focusing optics to input the laser beam in the hollow fiber. In addition, the laser delivery assembly includes exit focusing optics that demagnify an exit beam of laser light from the hollow fiber, thereby increasing the intensity of the laser beam and creating a spark. In accordance with embodiments of the present invention, the assembly may be used to create a spark in a combustion engine. In accordance with other embodiments of the present invention, a method of using the spark delivery system is provided. In addition, a method of choosing an appropriate fiber for creating a spark using a laser beam is also presented.

Yalin, Azer (Fort Collins, CO); Willson, Bryan (Fort Collins, CO); Defoort, Morgan (Fort Collins, CO)

2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

282

Fiber laser coupled optical spark delivery system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A spark delivery system for generating a spark using a laser beam is provided, and includes a laser light source and a laser delivery assembly. The laser delivery assembly includes a hollow fiber and a launch assembly comprising launch focusing optics to input the laser beam in the hollow fiber. The laser delivery assembly further includes exit focusing optics that demagnify an exit beam of laser light from the hollow fiber, thereby increasing the intensity of the laser beam and creating a spark. Other embodiments use a fiber laser to generate a spark. Embodiments of the present invention may be used to create a spark in an engine. Yet other embodiments include collecting light from the spark or a flame resulting from the spark and conveying the light for diagnostics. Methods of using the spark delivery systems and diagnostic systems are provided.

Yalin, Azer (Fort Collins, CO); Willson, Bryan (Fort Collins, CO); Defoort, Morgan (Fort Collins, CO); Joshi, Sachin (Fort Collins, CO); Reynolds, Adam (Fort Collins, CO)

2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

283

Radio over fiber in multimedia access networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dominant broadband access technologies today are Digital Subscriber Line (DSL) and hybrid fiber coaxial (HFC) networks. DSL leads, with global subscribers exceeding 100 million, while cable-modem subscribers worldwide total 55 million in 2005 [1]. Recently, ...

Xavier Fernando

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Plastic matrix composites with continuous fiber reinforcement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most plastic resins are not suitable for structural applications. Although many resins are extremely tough, most lack strength, stiffness, and deform under load with time. By mixing strong, stiff, fibrous materials into the plastic matrix, a variety of structural composite materials can be formed. The properties of these composites can be tailored by fiber selection, orientation, and other factors to suit specific applications. The advantages and disadvantages of fiberglass, carbon-graphite, aramid (Kevlar 49), and boron fibers are summarized.

NONE

1991-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

285

Fiber optics welder having movable aligning mirror  

SciTech Connect

A system for welding fiber optic waveguides together. The ends of the two fibers to be joined together are accurately, collinearly aligned in a vertical orientation and subjected to a controlled, diffuse arc to effect welding and thermal conditioning. A front-surfaced mirror mounted at a 45.degree. angle to the optical axis of a stereomicroscope mounted for viewing the junction of the ends provides two orthogonal views of the interface during the alignment operation.

Higgins, Robert W. (Los Alamos, NM); Robichaud, Roger E. (Jemez Springs, NM)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Fiber optic probe for light scattering measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fiber optic probe and a method for using the probe for light scattering analyses of a sample. The probe includes a probe body with an inlet for admitting a sample into an interior sample chamber, a first optical fiber for transmitting light from a source into the chamber, and a second optical fiber for transmitting light to a detector such as a spectrophotometer. The interior surface of the probe carries a coating that substantially prevents non-scattered light from reaching the second fiber. The probe is placed in a region where the presence and concentration of an analyte of interest are to be detected, and a sample is admitted into the chamber. Exciting light is transmitted into the sample chamber by the first fiber, where the light interacts with the sample to produce Raman-scattered light. At least some of the Raman-scattered light is received by the second fiber and transmitted to the detector for analysis. Two Raman spectra are measured, at different pressures. The first spectrum is subtracted from the second to remove background effects, and the resulting sample Raman spectrum is compared to a set of stored library spectra to determine the presence and concentration of the analyte.

Nave, Stanley E. (Evans, GA); Livingston, Ronald R. (Aiken, SC); Prather, William S. (Augusta, GA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Fiber optic probe for light scattering measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a fiber optic probe and a method for using the probe for light scattering analyses of a sample. The probe includes a probe body with an inlet for admitting a sample into an interior sample chamber, a first optical fiber for transmitting light from a source into the chamber, and a second optical fiber for transmitting light to a detector such as a spectrophotometer. The interior surface of the probe carries a coating that substantially prevents non-scattered light from reaching the second fiber. The probe is placed in a region where the presence and concentration of an analyte of interest are to be detected, and a sample is admitted into the chamber. Exciting light is transmitted into the sample chamber by the first fiber, where the light interacts with the sample to produce Raman-scattered light. At least some of the Raman- scattered light is received by the second fiber and transmitted to the detector for analysis. Two Raman spectra are measured, at different pressures. The first spectrum is subtracted from the second to remove background effects, and the resulting sample Raman spectrum is compared to a set of stored library spectra to determine the presence and concentration of the analyte.

Nave, S.E.; Livingston, R.R.; Prather, W.S.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Adaptive elastic properties of chromatin fiber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chromatin is a complex of DNA and specific proteins forming an intermediary level of organization of eukaryotic genomes, between double-stranded DNA and chromosome. Within a generic modeling of the chromatin assembly, we investigate the interplay between the mechanical properties of the chromatin fiber and its biological functions. A quantitative step is to relate the mechanics at the DNA level and the mechanics described at the chromatin fiber level. It allows to calculate the complete set of chromatin elastic constants (twist and bend persistence lengths, stretch modulus and twist-stretch coupling constant), in terms of DNA elastic properties and geometric features of the fiber. These elastic constants are strongly sensitive to the local architecture of the fiber and we argue that this tunable elasticity might be a key feature in chromatin functions, for instance in the initiation and regulation of transcription. Moreover, this analysis provides a framework to interpret micromanipulations studies of chromatin fiber and suggests further experiments involving intercalators to scan the tunable elasticity of the fiber.

Eli Ben-Haïm; Annick Lesne; Jean-Marc Victor

2002-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

289

Orientation factor and number of fibers at failure plane in ring-type steel fiber reinforced concrete  

SciTech Connect

Considering the probabilistic distributions of fibers in ring-type steel fiber reinforced concrete, the orientation factor and the number of ring-type steel fibers crossing the failure plane were theoretically derived as a function of fiber geometry, specimen dimensions, and fiber volume fraction. A total number of 24 specimens were tested incorporating different fiber types, specimen geometry, and fiber volume fractions of 0.2% and 0.4%: 5 beams and 5 panels containing straight steel fibers; and 6 beams and 8 panels containing ring-type steel fibers. Measurements were made to assess the number of fibers at fractured surfaces of steel fiber reinforced concrete. The developed theoretical expressions reasonably predicted the orientation factor and the number of ring-type steel fibers at failure plane: the average and the standard deviation for the ratios of the test to theory were 1.03 and 0.26, respectively. Theoretical investigations and comparisons were made for the values of orientation factor and the number of fibers at failure plane for straight steel fibers and ring-type steel fibers.

Lee, C., E-mail: cdlee@cau.ac.k [School of Architecture and Building Science, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, H. [School of Architecture and Building Science, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

290

Energy Efficient Indoor VOC Air Cleaning with Activated Carbon Fiber (ACF) Filters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

compound by activated carbon fiber. Carbon 2004, 42(14):of an activated carbon fiber cloth adsorber. Journal ofindoor VOCs – activated carbon fibers. Proceedings of IAQ’

Sidheswaran, Meera

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Five synthetic rubber pond liners protect against leakage and weather  

SciTech Connect

More than 137 million cu ft of pipeline quality gas is produced daily at the Great Plains Coal Gasification Project in Beulah, ND. The facility is the only commercial plant in the US which produces gaseous and liquid fuels from low-grade coal. The plant needs to recycle and reuse 100% of the organic process wastewater, requiring a complicated treatment system of cooling towers, evaporators, a liquid waste incinerator and other units, each of which has its own surge pond. In total, the plant has five surge ponds which hold near 80 million gallons. To prevent the seepage of wastewater from the surge ponds into the ground water, a liner material was needed that would fulfill several design criteria. The liner had to be resistant to degradation caused by a very wide range of temperatures and it had to have a low coefficient of expansion. Resistance to both organic and inorganic chemical substances was another key requirement. Finally, the liner material needed to be easy to seam during field installation. An elastomeric membrane liner using the synthetic rubber and reinforcing polyester scrim best met the plant's requirements. One of the primary reasons for selecting synthetic rubber was its low coefficient of expansion. Extreme seasonal weather conditions, with temperatures ranging from below zero in the winter to over 100/sup 0/F in the summer, are common in North Dakota. And because the level of wastewater in the ponds constantly varies, a liner is frequently exposed to the elements. Overall, the synthetic rubber pond liners have performed through extreme weather conditions and have proven to be a cost-effective solution to wastewater storage at the gasification project.

Weinreich, G.; Hofsess, R.; Toy, D.A.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Socioeconomic impact assessment: a methodology applied to synthetic fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Report is a supporting document for the Final Environmental Impact Statement, Alternative Fuels Demonstration Program, which was filed with the Council on Environmental Quality in November, 1977. It describes the methodology developed for the socioeconomic impact assessments contained in the Environmental Impact Statement, and highlights the findings. Part I of this Report explains clearly how the numbers are derived, and presents the salient planning issues. Starting with the labor force of a synthetic fuels facility, a public official, decision-maker, or student of socioeconomic impacts can use this Report to derive a reasonable set of estimates which reflect the resultant population, income, employment, land use, public facility costs, and local public revenues. Part II of this Report is the application of this methodology to synthetic fuels. Numerical estimates are given for the social and economic effects resulting from such energy technologies as coal gasification and liquefaction, oil shale, and the conversion of solid wastes and agricultural products to energy. Although the methodology is not site specific, illustrative sites, chosen from the major coal-bearing counties in the United States, have been included. This allows a user to compare the relative impacts of a given energy facility in various geographical locations and types of communities. The section on mitigating measures may be of special interest because of its treatment of problem areas and its broad range of suggested solutions. One advantage of the methodology is that it derives from a broad data base that is readily accessible: the United States Census. Another advantage is that impacts can be calculated by hand. Finally, it is applicable to a wide variety of energy technologies and not restricted to synthetic fuels.

Not Available

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Synthetic fossil fuel technologies: health problems and intersociety cooperation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential health impacts of synthetic fossil fuel products are considered mainly in terms of complex and potentially carcinogenic mixtures of polynuclear aromatic (PNA) compounds. These components of oils and tars present an especially perplexing range of problems to those concerned with health protection. The nature of these problems, such as multifactorial exposure, are discussed within a framework of current and future standards to regulate human exposure. Some activities of government agencies, national laboratories, and professional societies are described. A case can be made for pooling the resources of these groups to achieve better solutions for assessing the acceptability of the various technologies and safeguarding human health.

Gammage, R B; Turner, J E

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Fate of Mercury in Synthetic Gypsum Used for Wallboard Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents and discusses results from the project 'Fate of Mercury in Synthetic Gypsum Used for Wallboard Production', performed at five different full-scale commercial wallboard plants. Synthetic gypsum produced by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems on coal-fired power plants is commonly used in the manufacture of wallboard. This practice has long benefited the environment by recycling the FGD gypsum byproduct, which is becoming available in increasing quantities, decreasing the need to landfill this material, and increasing the sustainable design of the wallboard product. However, new concerns have arisen as recent mercury control strategies involve the capture of mercury in FGD systems. The objective of this study has been to determine whether any mercury is released into the atmosphere at wallboard manufacturing plants when the synthetic gypsum material is used as a feedstock for wallboard production. The project has been co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42080), USG Corporation, and EPRI. USG Corporation is the prime contractor, and URS Group is a subcontractor. The project scope included seven discrete tasks, each including a test conducted at various USG wallboard plants using synthetic gypsum from different wet FGD systems. The project was originally composed of five tasks, which were to include (1) a base-case test, then variations representing differing power plant: (2) emissions control configurations, (3) treatment of fine gypsum particles, (4) coal types, and (5) FGD reagent types. However, Task 5,could not be conducted as planned and instead was conducted at conditions similar to Task 3. Subsequently an opportunity arose to test gypsum produced from the Task 5 FGD system, but with an additive expected to impact the stability of mercury, so Task 6 was added to the project. Finally, Task 7 was added to evaluate synthetic gypsum produced at a power plant from an additional coal type. In the project, process stacks in the wallboard plant were sampled using the Ontario Hydro method. In every task, the stack locations sampled included a gypsum dryer and a gypsum calciner. In Tasks 1 and 4 through 7, the stack of the dryer for the wet wallboard product was also tested. Also at each site, in-stream process samples were collected and analyzed for mercury concentration before and after each significant step in wallboard production. These results and process data were used to construct mercury mass balances across the wallboard plants. The results from the project showed a wide range of percentage mercury losses from the synthetic gypsum feedstocks as measured by the Ontario Hydro method at the process stacks, ranging from 2% to 55% of the mercury in the gypsum feedstock. For the tasks exceeding 10% mercury loss across the wallboard plant, most of the loss occurred across the gypsum calciner. When total wallboard emissions remained below 10%, the primary emission location varied with a much less pronounced difference in emission between the gypsum dryer, calciner and board dryer. For all seven tasks, the majority of the mercury emissions were measured to be in the elemental form (Hg{sup 0}). Overall, the measured mercury loss mass rates ranged from 0.01 to 0.17 grams of mercury per dry ton of synthetic gypsum processed, or 0.01 to 0.4 pounds of mercury released per million square feet of wallboard produced from synthetic gypsum. The Coal Combustion Product Production and Use Survey from the American Coal Ash Association (ACAA) indicate that 7,579,187 short tons of synthetic gypsum were used for wallboard production in 2006. Extrapolating the results of this study to the ACAA industry usage rate, we estimate that mercury releases from wallboard production plants in 2006 ranged between 150 to 3000 pounds for the entire U.S. wallboard industry. With only seven sets of wallboard plant measurements, it is difficult to draw firm conclusions about what variables impact the mercury loss percentages across the wallboard plants. One significant o

Jessica Sanderson

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

295

Activated carbon fibers and engineered forms from renewable resources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of producing activated carbon fibers (ACFs) includes the steps of providing a natural carbonaceous precursor fiber material, blending the carbonaceous precursor material with a chemical activation agent to form chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers, spinning the chemical agent-impregnated precursor material into fibers, and thermally treating the chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers. The carbonaceous precursor material is both carbonized and activated to form ACFs in a single step. The method produces ACFs exclusive of a step to isolate an intermediate carbon fiber.

Baker, Frederick S

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

296

Concentric core optical fiber with multiple-mode signal transmission  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A concentric core optical fiber provides for the simultaneous but independent transmission of signals over a single optical fiber. The concentric optical fiber is constructed of a single-mode or multimode inner optical fiber defined by a core and a cladding of a lower index of refraction than the core and an outer optical fiber defined by additional cladding concentrically disposed around the cladding and of an index of refraction lower than the first mentioned cladding whereby the latter functions as the core of the outer optical fiber. By employing such an optical fiber construction with a single-mode inner core or optical fiber, highly sensitive interferometric and stable less sensitive amplitude based sensors can be placed along the same length of a concentric core optical fiber. Also, by employing the concentric core optical fiber secure telecommunications can be achieved via the inner optical fiber since an intrusion of the concentric optical fiber will first cause a variation in the light being transmitted through the outer optical fiber and this variation of light being used to trigger a suitable alarm indicative of the intrusion. 3 figs.

Muhs, J.D.

1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

297

Concentric core optical fiber with multiple-mode signal transmission  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A concentric core optical fiber provides for the simultaneous but independent transmission of signals over a single optical fiber. The concentric optical fiber is constructed of a single-mode or multimode inner optical fiber defined by a core and a cladding of a lower index of refraction than the core and an outer optical fiber defined by additional cladding concentrically disposed around the cladding and of an index of refraction lower than the first mentioned cladding whereby the latter functions as the core of the outer optical fiber. By employing such an optical fiber construction with a single-mode inner core or optical fiber, highly sensitive interferometric and stable less sensitive amplitude based sensors can be placed along the same length of a concentric core optical fiber. Also, by employing the concentric core optical fiber secure telecommunications can be achieved via the inner optical fiber since an intrusion of the concentric optical fiber will first cause a variation in the light being transmitted through the outer optical fiber and this variation of light being used to trigger a suitable alarm indicative of the intrusion.

Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Chlorine-36 abundance in natural and synthetic perchlorate  

SciTech Connect

Perchlorate (ClO{sub 4}{sup -}) is ubiquitous in the environment. It occurs naturally as a product of atmospheric photochemical reactions, and is synthesized for military, aerospace, and industrial applications. Nitrate-enriched soils of the Atacama Desert (Chile) contain high concentrations of natural ClO{sub 4}{sup -}; nitrate produced from these soils has been exported worldwide since the mid-1800's for use in agriculture. The widespread introduction of synthetic and agricultural ClO{sub 4}{sup -} into the environment has complicated attempts to understand the geochemical cycle of ClO{sub 4}{sup -}. Natural ClO{sub 4}{sup -} samples from the southwestern United States have relatively high {sup 36}Cl abundances ({sup 36}Cl/Cl = 3,100 x 10{sup -15} to 28,800 x 10{sup -15}), compared with samples of synthetic ({sup 36}Cl/Cl = 0.0 x 10{sup -15} to 40 x 10{sup -15}) and Atacama Desert ({sup 36}Cl/Cl = 0.9 x 10{sup -15} to 590 x 10{sup -15}) ClO{sub 4}{sup -}. These data give a lower limit for the initial {sup 36}Cl abundance of natural ClO{sub 4}{sup -} and provide temporal and other constraints on its geochemical cycle.

Heikoop, Jeffrey M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dale, M [NON LANL; Sturchio, Neil C [UNIV OF ILLIONOIS; Caffee, M [PURDUE UNIV; Belosa, A D [UNIV OF ILLINOIS; Heraty, Jr., L J [UNIV OF ILLINOIS; Bohike, J K [RESTON, VA; Hatzinger, P B [SHAW ENIVIORNMENTAL C0.; Jackson, W A [TEXAS TECH; Gu, B [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Photoinitiated electron transfer in multichromophoric species: Synthetic tetrads and pentads  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project involves the design, synthesis and study of molecules which mimic some of the important aspects of photosynthetic electron and energy transfer. This research project is leading to a better understanding of the energy conserving steps of photosynthesis via the study of synthetic model systems which abstract features of the natural photosynthetic apparatus. The knowledge gained from these studies will aid in the design of artificial photosynthetic reaction centers which employ the basic chemistry and physics of photosynthesis to help meet mankind`s energy needs. The approach to artificial photosynthesis employed in this project is to use synthetic pigments, electron donors, and electron acceptors similar to those found in biological reaction centers, but to replace the protein component with covalent bonds. These chemical linkages determine the electronic coupling between the various moieties by controlling separation, relative orientation, and overlap of electronic orbitals. The model systems are designed to mimic the following aspects of natural photosynthetic electron transfer: electron donation from a tetrapyrrole excited single state, electron transfer between tetrapyrroles, electron transfer from tetrapyrroles to quinones, and electron transfer between quinones with different redox properties. In addition, they mimic carotenoid antenna function in photosynthesis (singlet-singlet energy transfer from carotenoid polyenes to chlorophyll) and carotenoid photoprotection from singlet oxygen damage (triplet-triplet energy transfer from chlorophyll to carotenoids).

NONE

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Hot Springs-Garrison Fiber Optic Project  

SciTech Connect

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is proposing to upgrade its operational telecommunications system between the Hot Springs Substation and the Garrison Substation using a fiber optic system. The project would primarily involve installing 190 kilometers (120 miles) of fiber optic cable on existing transmission structures and installing new fiber optic equipment in BPA`s substation yards and control houses. BPA prepared an environmental assessment (EA) evaluating the proposed action. This EA was published in October 1994. The EA identifies a number of minor impacts that might occur as a result of the proposed action, as well as some recommended mitigation measures. This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) identifies specific measures to avoid, minimize, or compensate for impacts identified in the EA.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detergents synthetic fibers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Carbon Fiber Damage in Particle Beam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon fibers are commonly used as moving targets in beam wire scanners. The heating of the fiber due to energy loss of the particles travelling through is simulated with Geant4. The heating induced by the beam electromagnetic field is estimated with ANSYS. The heat transfer and sublimation processes are modelled. Due to the model nonlinearity, a numerical approach based on discretization of the wire movement is used to solve it for particular beams. Radiation damage to the fiber is estimated with SRIM. The model is tested with available SPS and LEP data and a dedicated damage test on the SPS beam is performed followed by a post-mortem analysis of the wire remnants. Predictions for the LHC beams are made.

Dehning, B; Kroyer, T; Meyer, M; Sapinski, M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Simulations of carbon fiber composite delamination tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulations of mode I interlaminar fracture toughness tests of a carbon-reinforced composite material (BMS 8-212) were conducted with LSDYNA. The fracture toughness tests were performed by U.C. Berkeley. The simulations were performed to investigate the validity and practicality of employing decohesive elements to represent interlaminar bond failures that are prevalent in carbon-fiber composite structure penetration events. The simulations employed a decohesive element formulation that was verified on a simple two element model before being employed to perform the full model simulations. Care was required during the simulations to ensure that the explicit time integration of LSDYNA duplicate the near steady-state testing conditions. In general, this study validated the use of employing decohesive elements to represent the interlaminar bond failures seen in carbon-fiber composite structures, but the practicality of employing the elements to represent the bond failures seen in carbon-fiber composite structures during penetration events was not established.

Kay, G

2007-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

303

Interlayer toughening of fiber composite flywheel rotors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An interlayer toughening mechanism is described to mitigate the growth of damage in fiber composite flywheel rotors for long application. The interlayer toughening mechanism may comprise one or more tough layers composed of high-elongation fibers, high-strength fibers arranged in a woven pattern at a range from 0{degree} to 90{degree} to the rotor axis and bound by a ductile matrix material which adheres to and is compatible with the materials used for the bulk of the rotor. The number and spacing of the tough interlayers is a function of the design requirements and expected lifetime of the rotor. The mechanism has particular application in uninterruptable power supplies, electrical power grid reservoirs, and compulsators for electric guns, as well as electromechanical batteries for vehicles. 2 figs.

Groves, S.E.; Deteresa, S.J.

1998-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

304

Interlayer toughening of fiber composite flywheel rotors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An interlayer toughening mechanism to mitigate the growth of damage in fiber composite flywheel rotors for long application. The interlayer toughening mechanism may comprise one or more tough layers composed of high-elongation fibers, high-strength fibers arranged in a woven pattern at a range from 0.degree. to 90.degree. to the rotor axis and bound by a ductile matrix material which adheres to and is compatible with the materials used for the bulk of the rotor. The number and spacing of the tough interlayers is a function of the design requirements and expected lifetime of the rotor. The mechanism has particular application in uninterruptable power supplies, electrical power grid reservoirs, and compulsators for electric guns, as well as electromechanical batteries for vehicles.

Groves, Scott E. (Brentwood, CA); Deteresa, Steven J. (Livermore, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Cellulosic Fiber Composites Using Protein Hydrolysates and Methods of Making Same  

This technology relates to cellulosic fiber composites using protein hydrolysates. Cellulosic fiber composites currently use petroleum-derived binders ...

306

Characterization by mercury porosimetry of nonwoven fiber media with deformation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The porosity and pore diameter distribution are important characteristics of nonwoven fiber media. With the advent of electrospinning, the production of mats of nonwoven fibrous materials with fiber diameters in the 0.1-10 ...

Rutledge, Gregory C.

307

Method of thermochemically treating silicon carbide fibers derived from polymers  

SciTech Connect

A method is described of thermochemically treating polymeric-derived silicon carbide fiber comprising the step of: annealing a silicon carbide fiber derived from organosilicon polymeric precursors said fiber further including at least: (1) excess carbon and oxygen, (2) excess silicon and oxygen, or (3) nitrogen, at a temperature between 800 C and 1,800 C, thus outgassing from said silicon carbide fiber at least one member selected from the group consisting of nitrogen, silicon monoxide and carbon monoxide, in intimate contact with carbon particles and in the presence of a gas capable of reacting in the presence of said carbon particles and said silicon carbide fiber, with products and byproducts formed as a result of said outgassing to form silicon carbide, so that said annealing step provides an annealed fiber wherein at least said silicon of the silicon carbide at said modified surface of said annealed fiber was originally present in said fiber prior to said annealing step.

Wallace, J.S.; Bender, B.A.; Schrodt, D.

1993-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

308

Fiber Supercapacitors DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006062  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fiber Supercapacitors DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006062 Fiber Supercapacitors Made of Nanowire storage devices such as batteries and supercapacitors need to be explored, but future develop- ment. In recent years, electrochemical supercapacitors have attracted much attention as novel energy

Wang, Zhong L.

309

Characterization of Thermal Properties of Curaua Fibers by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... among others, are required especially in the case of an insulating natural fiber. In the present work, thermal properties of the curaua fibers were investigated by ... Evolution of Crystallographic Texture of Cold Roll Bonding and Annealing ...

310

Intrinsic Fabry-Perot optical fiber sensors and their multiplexing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An intrinsic Fabry-Perot optical sensor includes a thin film sandwiched between two fiber ends. When light is launched into the fiber, two reflections are generated at the two fiber/thin film interfaces due to a difference in refractive indices between the fibers and the film, giving rise to the sensor output. In another embodiment, a portion of the cladding of a fiber is removed, creating two parallel surfaces. Part of the evanescent fields of light propagating in the fiber is reflected at each of the surfaces, giving rise to the sensor output. In a third embodiment, the refractive index of a small portion of a fiber is changed through exposure to a laser beam or other radiation. Interference between reflections at the ends of the small portion give rise to the sensor output. Multiple sensors along a single fiber are multiplexed using an optical time domain reflectometry method.

Wang, Anbo (Blacksburg, VA)

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

311

Journal of Biological Engineering BioMed Central Review Authentic teaching and learning through synthetic biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Synthetic biology is an emerging engineering discipline that, if successful, will allow wellcharacterized biological components to be predictably and reliably built into robust organisms that achieve specific functions. Fledgling efforts to design and implement a synthetic biology curriculum for undergraduate students have shown that the co-development of this emerging discipline and its future practitioners does not undermine learning. Rather it can serve as the lynchpin of a synthetic biology curriculum. Here I describe educational goals uniquely served by synthetic biology teaching, detail ongoing curricula development efforts at MIT, and specify particular aspects of the emerging field that must develop rapidly in order to best train the next generation of synthetic biologists. Review Teaching opportunities and challenges specific to synthetic biology "Plant a carrot get a carrot, not a Brussels sprout " sings a musical theater character in The Fantasticks [1], aptly contrasting

Natalie Kuldell

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Fiber optically isolated and remotely stabilized data transmission system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fiber optically isolated and remotely stabilized data transmission system s described wherein optical data may be transmitted over an optical data fiber from a remote source which includes a data transmitter and a power supply at the remote source. The transmitter may be remotely calibrated and stabilized via an optical control fiber, and the power source may be remotely cycled between duty and standby modes via an optical control fiber.

Nelson, Melvin A. (Santa Barbara, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Fiber-Optic Sensors to Monitor Deepwater Oil and Gas ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fiber-Optic Sensors to Monitor Deepwater Oil and Gas Pipelines. Partnering Organization: Luna Innovations, Incorporated, Blacksburg, VA. ...

314

Nanomaterials on Fiber Optic Sensors in Healthcare and Industry ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fiber optic sensors have several advantages over conventional electrical counterparts: 1) immunity to electromagnetic interference; 2)Lightweight; 3) Small

315

System to Continuously Produce Carbon Fiber via Microwave-Assisted ...  

Biomass and Biofuels; Building ... Carbon and graphite fibers are conventionally produced through the controlled pyrolysis of fibrous organic carbon precursors ...

316

Fiber optically isolated and remotely stabilized data transmission system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fiber optically isolated and remotely stabilized data transmission systems described wherein optical data may be transmitted over an optical data fiber from a remote source which includes a data transmitter and a power supply at the remote source. The transmitter may be remotely calibrated and stabilized via an optical control fiber, and the power source may be remotely cycled between duty and standby modes via an optical control fiber. 3 figs.

Nelson, M.A.

1992-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

317

Mechanical Properties of Tensile Tested Coir Fiber Reinforced ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lignocellulosic-Based Carbon Fibers from Biofuel Production Wastes · Magnesium Sheets Produced by Extrusion · Magnetite Formation Observed with TEM on ...

318

A fiber optically isolated and remotely stabilized data transmission system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It is, an object of this invention to provide a fiber optically isolated and remotely stabilized data transmission system wherein optical data may be transmitted over an optical data fiber from a remote source which includes a data transmitter and a power supply at the remote source, the transmitter may be remotely calibrated and stabilized via an optical control fiber, and the power source may be remotely cycled between duty and standby modes via an optical control fiber.

Nelson, M.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

A fiber optically isolated and remotely stabilized data transmission system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It is, an object of this invention to provide a fiber optically isolated and remotely stabilized data transmission system wherein optical data may be transmitted over an optical data fiber from a remote source which includes a data transmitter and a power supply at the remote source, the transmitter may be remotely calibrated and stabilized via an optical control fiber, and the power source may be remotely cycled between duty and standby modes via an optical control fiber.

Nelson, M.A.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

320

Carbon Fibers and Carbon Nanotubes - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 17, 2010 ... Polymer Nanocomposites: Carbon Fibers and Carbon Nanotubes Sponsored by: The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society Program ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detergents synthetic fibers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Charpy Impact Resistance of Alkali Treated Curaua Fiber ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lignocellulosic-Based Carbon Fibers from Biofuel Production Wastes · Magnesium Sheets Produced by Extrusion · Magnetite Formation Observed with TEM on ...

322

Tensile Strength of Bamboo Fibers: Weibull Analysis to Characterize ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lignocellulosic-Based Carbon Fibers from Biofuel Production Wastes · Magnesium Sheets Produced by Extrusion · Magnetite Formation Observed with TEM on ...

323

Fiber Laser Cladding of Spherotene Spherical Fused WC/Inconel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conditioning of Composite Lubricant Powder for Cold Spray · Confirmation ... Fabrication of Surface Composite via Additive Friction Stir Technology · Fiber Laser ...

324

BIMA Memoranda Series Report from First Hat Creek Fiber-Optic Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-mode fibers.* * On Sept. 20, the fiber-optic link was disassembled and the normal system restored. 2 system. 2.2 Fiber-Optic Cable Two 100-m lengths of fiber-optic cable were used in the experiments. 5 #12; A Fiber-Optic Upgrade of the BIMA Array In light of the success of the fiber-optic link

325

Fate of Mercury in Synthetic Gypsum Used for Wallboard Production  

SciTech Connect

This report presents and discusses results from Task 6 of the study 'Fate of Mercury in Synthetic Gypsum Used for Wallboard Production,' performed at a full-scale commercial wallboard plant. Synthetic gypsum produced by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems on coal-fired power plants is commonly used in the manufacture of wallboard. This practice has long benefited the environment by recycling the FGD gypsum byproduct, which is becoming available in increasing quantities, decreasing the need to landfill this material, and increasing the sustainable design of the wallboard product. However, new concerns have arisen as recent mercury control strategies involve the capture of mercury in FGD systems. The objective of this study is to determine whether any mercury is released into the atmosphere when the synthetic gypsum material is used as a feedstock for wallboard production. The project is being co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42080), USG Corporation, and EPRI. USG Corporation is the prime contractor, and URS Group is a subcontractor. The project scope now includes six discrete tasks, each conducted at various USG wallboard plants using synthetic gypsum from different FGD systems. The project was originally composed of five tasks, which were to include (1) a baseline test, then variations representing differing power plant: (2) emissions control configurations, (3) treatment of fine gypsum particles, (4) coal types, and (5) FGD reagent types. However, Task 5, which was to include testing with an alternate FGD reagent, could not be conducted as planned. Instead, Task 5 was conducted at conditions similar to Task 3, although with gypsum from an alternate FGD system. Subsequent to conducting Task 5 under these revised conditions, an opportunity arose to test gypsum produced at the same FGD system, but with an additive (Degussa Corporation's TMT-15) being used in the FGD system. TMT-15 was expected to impact the stability of mercury in synthetic gypsum used to produce wallboard, so Task 6 was added to the project to test this theory. In this project, process stacks in the wallboard plant have been sampled using the Ontario Hydro method. For every task, the stack locations sampled have included a dryer for the wet gypsum as it enters the plant and a gypsum calciner. For Tasks 1, 4, 5 and 6, the stack of the dryer for the wet wallboard product was also tested. Also at each site, in-stream process samples were collected and analyzed for mercury concentration before and after each significant step in wallboard production. The Ontario Hydro results, process sample mercury concentration data, and process data were used to construct mercury mass balances across the wallboard plants. Task 6 was conducted at a wallboard plant processing synthetic gypsum from a power plant that fires Eastern bituminous coal. The power plant has a single-loop, open spray tower limestone forced oxidation FGD system, with the forced oxidation conducted in the reaction tank integral with the FGD absorber. The FGD system has gypsum fines blow down as part of the dewatering step. The power plant is equipped with a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system for NOX emissions control, and the SCR was in service during the time period the gypsum tested was produced. Also, as mentioned above, Degussa additive TMT-15 was being added to the FGD system when this gypsum was produced. The results of the Task 6 stack testing, as measured by the Ontario Hydro method, detected that an average of 55% of the incoming mercury was emitted during wallboard production. These losses were distributed as about 4% across the dryer mill, 6% across the board dryer kiln, and 45% across the kettle calciner. Emissions were similar to what Task 5 results showed on a percentage basis, but about 30% lower on a mass basis. The same power plant FGD system produced the synthetic gypsum used in Task 5 (with no use of TMT-15) and in Task 6 (with TMT-15 added to the FGD system). The lower emissions on a mass basis appeared

Jessica Sanderson; Gary M. Blythe; Mandi Richardson

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Fate of Mercury in Synthetic Gypsum Used for Wallboard Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents and discusses results from Task 6 of the study 'Fate of Mercury in Synthetic Gypsum Used for Wallboard Production,' performed at a full-scale commercial wallboard plant. Synthetic gypsum produced by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems on coal-fired power plants is commonly used in the manufacture of wallboard. This practice has long benefited the environment by recycling the FGD gypsum byproduct, which is becoming available in increasing quantities, decreasing the need to landfill this material, and increasing the sustainable design of the wallboard product. However, new concerns have arisen as recent mercury control strategies involve the capture of mercury in FGD systems. The objective of this study is to determine whether any mercury is released into the atmosphere when the synthetic gypsum material is used as a feedstock for wallboard production. The project is being co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42080), USG Corporation, and EPRI. USG Corporation is the prime contractor, and URS Group is a subcontractor. The project scope now includes six discrete tasks, each conducted at various USG wallboard plants using synthetic gypsum from different FGD systems. The project was originally composed of five tasks, which were to include (1) a baseline test, then variations representing differing power plant: (2) emissions control configurations, (3) treatment of fine gypsum particles, (4) coal types, and (5) FGD reagent types. However, Task 5, which was to include testing with an alternate FGD reagent, could not be conducted as planned. Instead, Task 5 was conducted at conditions similar to Task 3, although with gypsum from an alternate FGD system. Subsequent to conducting Task 5 under these revised conditions, an opportunity arose to test gypsum produced at the same FGD system, but with an additive (Degussa Corporation's TMT-15) being used in the FGD system. TMT-15 was expected to impact the stability of mercury in synthetic gypsum used to produce wallboard, so Task 6 was added to the project to test this theory. In this project, process stacks in the wallboard plant have been sampled using the Ontario Hydro method. For every task, the stack locations sampled have included a dryer for the wet gypsum as it enters the plant and a gypsum calciner. For Tasks 1, 4, 5 and 6, the stack of the dryer for the wet wallboard product was also tested. Also at each site, in-stream process samples were collected and analyzed for mercury concentration before and after each significant step in wallboard production. The Ontario Hydro results, process sample mercury concentration data, and process data were used to construct mercury mass balances across the wallboard plants. Task 6 was conducted at a wallboard plant processing synthetic gypsum from a power plant that fires Eastern bituminous coal. The power plant has a single-loop, open spray tower limestone forced oxidation FGD system, with the forced oxidation conducted in the reaction tank integral with the FGD absorber. The FGD system has gypsum fines blow down as part of the dewatering step. The power plant is equipped with a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system for NOX emissions control, and the SCR was in service during the time period the gypsum tested was produced. Also, as mentioned above, Degussa additive TMT-15 was being added to the FGD system when this gypsum was produced. The results of the Task 6 stack testing, as measured by the Ontario Hydro method, detected that an average of 55% of the incoming mercury was emitted during wallboard production. These losses were distributed as about 4% across the dryer mill, 6% across the board dryer kiln, and 45% across the kettle calciner. Emissions were similar to what Task 5 results showed on a percentage basis, but about 30% lower on a mass basis. The same power plant FGD system produced the synthetic gypsum used in Task 5 (with no use of TMT-15) and in Task 6 (with TMT-15 added to the FGD system). The lower emissions on a mass basis appeared

Jessica Sanderson; Gary M. Blythe; Mandi Richardson

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Low Cost Fiber-Optic Links for Digital Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will allow longer fiber-optic links to operate at fre- quencies beyond the flat portion of the system side of the board. Production fiber-optic systems can Equation 4. OPM (dB) = Optical power margin. PR shielding should be applied to the receiver if the system using the fiber-optic link is extremely noisy

Berns, Hans-Gerd

328

Test of Conductive Carbon Fiber Enhancing the Structural Bearing Capacity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research mechanism of conductive carbon fiber concrete, including mechanical intelligent properties, electrical properties, thermo-sensitive properties and mechanical properties. Put forward intelligent programs of carbon fiber concrete bridge, and do ... Keywords: conductive carbon fiber, CFRP concrete, intelligent programs, properties test, structural bearing capacity

Xiao-ming He; Jie Liang; Peng Guan

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

EFFECTS OF FIBER WAVINESS ON COMPOSITES FOR WIND TURBINE BLADES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EFFECTS OF FIBER WAVINESS ON COMPOSITES FOR WIND TURBINE BLADES J.F. Mandell D.D. Samborsky and L Composite materials of interest for wind turbine blades use relatively low cost fibers, resins and processes WORDS: Composite Materials, Fiber Waviness, Compressive Strength #12;1. INTRODUCTION Wind turbine blades

330

Stability of Mullite and V2O3 in Synthetic Slags Based on Molten ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials in Clean Power Systems VI: Clean Coal-, Hydrogen ... In this study, synthetic slags simulating coal-petcoke ash mixtures were evaluated ...

331

Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with Synthetic Manganese-Substituted Goethite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E. , Thesis, Reactions of Plutonium(VI) with the Iron Oxideof Uranium, Neptunium, Plutonium, Americium and Technetium;Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with Synthetic

Hu, Yung-Jin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Numerical Simulation of Flame-Vortex Interactions in Natural and Synthetic Gas Mixtures .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The interactions between laminar premixed flames and counter-rotating vortex pairs in natural and synthetic gas mixtures have been computationally investigated through the use of Direct… (more)

Weiler, Justin D.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Specific Effects of Fiber Size and Fiber Swelling on Biomass Substrate Surface Area and Enzymatic Digestibility  

SciTech Connect

To clarify the specific effect of biomass substrate surface area on its enzymatic digestibility, factors of fiber size reduction and swelling changes were investigated by using poplar substrates with controlled morphological and chemical properties after modified chemical pulping. Results showed that fiber size changes had insignificant influence on enzymatic hydrolysis, although the external surface area increased up to 41% with the reduction of fiber size. Swelling changes caused by increased biomass fiber porosities after PFI refining showed a significant influence on the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis. It is also found that chemical properties such as xylan and lignin content can influence the swelling effect. Xylan is confirmed to facilitate substrate hydrolysability by swelling, while lignin restricts swelling effect and thus minimizes the enzyme accessibility to substrates.

Ju, Xiaohui; Grego, Courtnee; Zhang, Xiao

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Economic regulation and the commercialization of synthetic gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The history of the Great Plains coal-gasification plant (proposed for Mercer Co., N.D.) illuminates the role of economic regulation in commercializing new energy technologies. Even though sponsors of such projects seek to ensure cost recovery and profit in advance via the regulatory process, the regulators are reluctant to provide more than partial assurance. Future economic-regulatory entities will have to develop better criteria for deciding which synthetic-gas projects will have access to rolled-in pricing. At least in the near term, most high-Btu manufactured gas will require cross-subsidization by other lower priced gas sources in order to be competitive economically; this makes advance approval of rolled-in pricing crucial to the pace and extent of syngas's market penetration. Regulatory agencies must also address the structure of escalation clauses and price ceilings.

Hall, G.R.

1981-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

335

Dual-transponder Precision Navigation System for Synthetic Aperture Sonar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The technical details of a dual-transponder, long-baseline positioning system to measure the sway of a free towed Synthetic Aperture Sonar (SAS) are presented. The sway is measured with respect to freely deployed, battery powered, transponders which sit stationary on the seabed connected via cables to floating buoys housing high-accuracy GPS timing receivers. A T/R switch allows a single hydrophone on each transponder to alternately receive and transmit linear FM chirp signals. The time of flight of the signals is determined by matched-filtering using a DSP and transmitted to the towboat for storage in real time using RF modems. The sway information is completely independent for each sonar ping and allows the deblurring of the SAS images by post processing. A Matlab simulation predicts a worst case sway accuracy of cm.

E N Pilbrow; M P Hayes; P T Gough

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Composite synthetic roofing structure with integral solar collector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A form-molded synthetic foam roofing section or structure is described, having a solar-collecting insert or panel incorporated therein with a relatively broad undersurface and an exposed surface configured to resemble interlocked and overlapping roofing shingles which are united to support a surface such as wood, metal, etc. During the molding process. The roofing structure may be affixed by any conventional means, such as nails or adhesives, to roof boards, rafters or over old existing roof structures with adjacent roofing sections interconnected by appropriate inlets and outlets for the solar panel insert. Solar heat-collecting fluid may be circulated through the solar panel inserts in a conventional manner. Connecting tubes are provided for connecting the solar panel inserts in adjacent roofing sections and terminal connectors are compatible with all circulating systems.

Gould, W.M.

1981-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

337

Fluoride-containing wastewater converted to synthetic fluorspar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the manufacture of uranium hexafluoride, sulfur hexafluoride, iodine pentafluoride, and antimony pentafluoride, the Allied Corporation's Metropolis Works (Metropolis, IL) generates approximately 250,000 gpd of process wastewater which contains substantial amounts of soluble fluoride. Most of the wastewater is also acidic. Alkaline waste and hydrated lime (calcium hydroxide) in a pair of neutralizers are used to precipitate the soluble fluoride as calcium fluoride. Due to the alkalinity, the material is considered a hazardous waste. The limited availability of land suitable for the construction of impoundment basins and the potential for eventual seepage from the basins presented a challenge to the management and technical staff at the Metropolis Works situation on-site. Efforts were directed toward developing a process to convert the calcium fluoride waste into a useful product. Excess lime waste could be converted to 90% CaF/sub 2/ by neutralizing the lime with hydrofluoric acid. The 90% CaF/sub 2/, closely resembling fluorspar, would be able to be used directly at other Allied plants as a substitute for natural fluorspar in the production of anhydrous hydrofluoric (AHF) acid. Engineering efforts to design a full-scale plant for the recovery of CaF/sub 2/ began in mid-1980. Construction of the plant begin in July, 1981. Since startup in mid-1982, the full scale recovery plant has been in continuous operation. Design capacity is 8000 tons/yr of synthetic fluorspar. The synthetic fluorspar is directly replacing an equivalent amount of imported natural fluorspar in the production of anhydrous hydrofluoric acid. Total cost to construct the CaF/sub 2/ recovery plant was $4.3 million. Currently realized cost savings of about $1 million/yr give the project an expected payback period of under five years.

Cipolla, A.J.; Shields, E.J.; Wickersham, C.P.; Toy, D.A.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Cation Adsorption on Manganese Dioxide Impregnated Fibers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The complete removal of radioactive cations by standard mixed-bed ion-exchange resins is sometimes not achieved in liquid radwaste systems. This report documents an alternative ion adsorption process for the purification of liquid wastes, specifically, the use of manganese dioxide (MnO2) impregnated fibers to remove selected cations from PWR liquid waste streams.

1993-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

339

Single-fiber multi-color pyrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is a fiber-based multi-color pyrometry set-up for real-time non-contact temperature and emissivity measurement. The system includes a single optical fiber to collect radiation emitted by a target, a reflective rotating chopper to split the collected radiation into two or more paths while modulating the radiation for lock-in amplification (i.e., phase-sensitive detection), at least two detectors possibly of different spectral bandwidths with or without filters to limit the wavelength regions detected and optics to direct and focus the radiation onto the sensitive areas of the detectors. A computer algorithm is used to calculate the true temperature and emissivity of a target based on blackbody calibrations. The system components are enclosed in a light-tight housing, with provision for the fiber to extend outside to collect the radiation. Radiation emitted by the target is transmitted through the fiber to the reflective chopper, which either allows the radiation to pass straight through or reflects the radiation into one or more separate paths. Each path includes a detector with or without filters and corresponding optics to direct and focus the radiation onto the active area of the detector. The signals are recovered using lock-in amplification. Calibration formulas for the signals obtained using a blackbody of known temperature are used to compute the true temperature and emissivity of the target. The temperature range of the pyrometer system is determined by the spectral characteristics of the optical components.

Small, IV, Ward (Livermore, CA); Celliers, Peter (Berkeley, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Single-fiber multi-color pyrometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This invention is a fiber-based multi-color pyrometry set-up for real-time non-contact temperature and emissivity measurement. The system includes a single optical fiber to collect radiation emitted by a target, a reflective rotating chopper to split the collected radiation into two or more paths while modulating the radiation for lock-in amplification (i.e., phase-sensitive detection), at least two detectors possibly of different spectral bandwidths with or without filters to limit the wavelength regions detected and optics to direct and focus the radiation onto the sensitive areas of the detectors. A computer algorithm is used to calculate the true temperature and emissivity of a target based on blackbody calibrations. The system components are enclosed in a light-tight housing, with provision for the fiber to extend outside to collect the radiation. Radiation emitted by the target is transmitted through the fiber to the reflective chopper, which either allows the radiation to pass straight through or reflects the radiation into one or more separate paths. Each path includes a detector with or without filters and corresponding optics to direct and focus the radiation onto the active area of the detector. The signals are recovered using lock-in amplification. Calibration formulas for the signals obtained using a blackbody of known temperature are used to compute the true temperature and emissivity of the target. The temperature range of the pyrometer system is determined by the spectral characteristics of the optical components.

Small, W. IV; Celliers, P.

2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detergents synthetic fibers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Nonlinear texture modeling of mesophase carbon fibers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a theoretical and computational nonlinear study of structure selection in carbon fibers obtained by spinning binary blends of carbonaceous mesophases precursors. Although models for single component mesophase precursors seem to capture ... Keywords: carbonaceous mesophase, multiple solution, nematic liquid crystals, texture

M. Golmohammadi; A. D. Rey

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Remote Synchrotron Light Instrumentation Using Optical Fibers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By coupling the emitted synchrotron light into an optical fiber, it is possible to transmit the signal at substantial distances from the light port, without the need to use expensive beamlines. This would be especially beneficial in all those cases when the synchrotron is situated in areas not easily access because of their location, or due to high radiation levels. Furthermore, the fiber output can be easily switched, or even shared, between different diagnostic instruments. We present the latest results on the coupling and dispersion measurements performed at the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley. In several cases, coupling synchrotron light into optical fibers can substantially facilitate the use of beam diagnostic instrumentation that measures longitudinal beam properties by detecting synchrotron radiation. It has been discussed in with some detail, how fiberoptics can bring the light at relatively large distances from the accelerator, where a variety of devices can be used to measure beam properties and parameters. Light carried on a fiber can be easily switched between instruments so that each one of them has 100% of the photons available, rather than just a fraction, when simultaneous measurements are not indispensable. From a more general point of view, once synchrotron light is coupled into the fiber, the vast array of techniques and optoelectronic devices, developed by the telecommunication industry becomes available. In this paper we present the results of our experiments at the Advanced Light Source, where we tried to assess the challenges and limitations of the coupling process and determine what level of efficiency one can typically expect to achieve.

De Santis, S.; Yin, Y.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

343

Method for enhancing signals transmitted over optical fibers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for spectral equalization of high frequency spectrally broadband signals transmitted through an optical fiber is disclosed. The broadband signal input is first dispersed by a grating. Narrow spectral components are collected into an array of equalizing fibers. The fibers serve as optical delay lines compensating for material dispersion of each spectral component during transmission. The relative lengths of the individual equalizing fibers are selected to compensate for such prior dispersion. The output of the equalizing fibers couple the spectrally equalized light onto a suitable detector for subsequent electronic processing of the enhanced broadband signal.

Ogle, J.W.; Lyons, P.B.

1981-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

344

Method for enhancing signals transmitted over optical fibers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for spectral equalization of high frequency spectrally broadband signals transmitted through an optical fiber. The broadband signal input is first dispersed by a grating. Narrow spectral components are collected into an array of equalizing fibers. The fibers serve as optical delay lines compensating for material dispersion of each spectral component during transmission. The relative lengths of the individual equalizing fibers are selected to compensate for such prior dispersion. The output of the equalizing fibers couple the spectrally equalized light onto a suitable detector for subsequent electronic processing of the enhanced broadband signal.

Ogle, James W. (Goleta, CA); Lyons, Peter B. (Whiterock, NM)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Fiber-bragg grating-loop ringdown method and apparatus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A device comprising a fiber grating loop ringdown (FGLRD) system of analysis is disclosed. A fiber Bragg grating (FBG) or Long-Period grating (LPG) written in a section of single mode fused silica fiber is incorporated into a fiber loop. By utilizing the wing areas of the gratings' bandwidth as a wavelength dependent attenuator of the light transmission, a fiber grating loop ringdown concept is formed. One aspect of the present invention is temperature sensing, which has been demonstrated using the disclosed device. Temperature measurements in the areas of accuracy, stability, high temperature, and dynamic range are also described.

Wang, Chuji (Starkville, MS)

2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

346

Fiber-bragg grating-loop ringdown method and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device comprising a fiber grating loop ringdown (FGLRD) system of analysis is disclosed. A fiber Bragg grating (FBG) or Long-Period grating (LPG) written in a section of single mode fused silica fiber is incorporated into a fiber loop. By utilizing the wing areas of the gratings' bandwidth as a wavelength dependent attenuator of the light transmission, a fiber grating loop ringdown concept is formed. One aspect of the present invention is temperature sensing, which has been demonstrated using the disclosed device. Temperature measurements in the areas of accuracy, stability, high temperature, and dynamic range are also described.

Wang, Chuji (Starkville, MS)

2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

347

Carbon Fiber Production from a Kraft Hardwood Lignin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lignin is a renewable resource material that is being evaluated for the low cost production of carbon fiber for automotive and other applications. Solvent extraction of a commercial hardwood lignin product yielded a purified lignin free of the contaminants typical of lignins derived from the Kraft chemical pulping of wood. The purified lignin was highly melt-spinnable into fibers, from which carbon fiber was subsequently produced. The lignin has been evaluated in terms of its rheological properties, fiber melt spinning ability, and potential for manufacture of low cost carbon fiber without the need for plasticizing agents or chemical modifications.

Baker, Darren A [ORNL; Gallego, Nidia C [ORNL; Baker, Frederick S [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Method of producing a hybrid matrix fiber composite  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hybrid matrix fiber composites having enhanced compressive performance as well as enhanced stiffness, toughness and durability suitable for compression-critical applications. The methods for producing the fiber composites using matrix hybridization. The hybrid matrix fiber composites comprised of two chemically or physically bonded matrix materials, whereas the first matrix materials are used to impregnate multi-filament fibers formed into ribbons and the second matrix material is placed around and between the fiber ribbons that are impregnated with the first matrix material and both matrix materials are cured and solidified.

Deteresa, Steven J. (Livermore, CA); Lyon, Richard E. (Absecon, NJ); Groves, Scott E. (Brentwood, CA)

2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

349

Metal matrix coated fiber composites and the methods of manufacturing such composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fiber coating which allows ceramic or metal fibers to be wetted by molten metals is disclosed. The coating inhibits degradation of the physical properties caused by chemical reaction between the fiber and the coating itself or between the fiber and the metal matrix. The fiber coating preferably includes at least a wetting layer, and in some applications, a wetting layer and a barrier layer between the fiber and the wetting layer. The wetting layer promotes fiber wetting by the metal matrix. The barrier layer inhibits fiber degradation. The fiber coating permits the fibers to be infiltrated with the metal matrix resulting in composites having unique properties not obtainable in pure materials.

Weeks, Jr., Joseph K. (Salt Lake City, UT); Gensse, Chantal (Salt Lake City, UT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

A compensated vibrating optical fiber pressure measuring device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microbending optical fiber is attached under tension to a diaphragm to sense a differential pressure applied across the diaphragm which causes it to deflect. The fiber is attached to the diaphragm so that one portion of the fiber, attached to a central portion of the diaphragm, undergoes a change in tension; proportional to the differential pressure applied to the diaphragm while a second portion attached at the periphery of the diaphragm remains at a reference tension. Both portions of the fiber are caused to vibrate at their natural frequencies. Light transmitted through the fiber is attenuated by both portions of the tensioned sections of the fiber by an amount which increases with the curvature of fiber bending so that the light signal is modulated by both portions of the fiber at separate frequencies. The modulated light signal is transduced into an electrical signal. The separate modulation signals are detected to generate separate signals having frequencies corresponding to the reference and measuring vibrating sections of the continuous fiber, respectively. A signal proportional to the difference between these signals is generated which is indicative of the measured pressure differential across the diaphragm. The reference portion of the fiber is used to compensate the pressure signal for zero and span changes resulting from ambient temperature and humidity effects upon the fiber and the transducer fixture.

Fasching, G.E.; Goff, D.R.

1985-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

351

Fiber optic moisture sensor with moisture-absorbing reflective target  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for sensing moisture changes by utilizing optical fiber technology. One embodiment uses a reflective target at the end of an optical fiber. The reflectance of the target varies with its moisture content and can be detected by a remote unit at the opposite end of the fiber. A second embodiment utilizes changes in light loss along the fiber length. This can be attributed to changes in reflectance of cladding material as a function of its moisture content. It can also be affected by holes or inserts interposed in the cladding material and/or fiber. Changing light levels can also be coupled from one fiber to another in an assembly of fibers as a function of varying moisture content in their overlapping lengths of cladding material.

Kirkham, Randy R. (Richland, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Lab Breakthrough: Better Fiber for Better Products | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Better Fiber for Better Products Better Fiber for Better Products Lab Breakthrough: Better Fiber for Better Products May 2, 2012 - 9:47am Addthis Researchers at Idaho National Laboratory have developed a cost-effective method for the continuous production of alpha silicon carbide fiber. The exceptionally strong, lightweight fiber could enable significant performance improvements in many everyday products. Michael Hess Michael Hess Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What could Alpha Silicon Carbide Fibers produce? Lighter and longer-lasting vehicle body structures that are 3 to 6 times stronger than those using steel. Utilities could deploy lighter, stronger power lines. Idaho National Laboratory researcher John Garnier recently took some time to explain how the carbon fibers he and George Griffith invented could

353

Fate of Mercury in Synthetic Gypsum Used for Wallboard Production  

SciTech Connect

This report presents and discusses results from Task 5 of the study ''Fate of Mercury in Synthetic Gypsum Used for Wallboard Production,'' performed at a full-scale commercial wallboard plant. Synthetic gypsum produced by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems on coal-fired power plants is commonly used in the manufacture of wallboard. The FGD process is used to control the sulfur dioxide emissions which would result in acid rain if not controlled. This practice has long benefited the environment by recycling the FGD gypsum byproduct, which is becoming available in increasing quantities, decreasing the need to landfill this material, and increasing the sustainable design of the wallboard product. However, new concerns have arisen as recent mercury control strategies developed for power plants involve the capture of mercury in FGD systems. The objective of this study is to determine whether any mercury is released into the atmosphere when the synthetic gypsum material is used as a feedstock for wallboard production. The project is being co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42080), USG Corporation, and EPRI. USG Corporation is the prime contractor, and URS Group is a subcontractor. The project scope includes five discrete tasks, each conducted at various USG wallboard plants using synthetic gypsum from different FGD systems. The five tasks were to include (1) a baseline test, then variations representing differing power plant (2) emissions control configurations, (3) treatment of fine gypsum particles, (4) coal types, and (5) FGD reagent types. However, Task 5, which was to evaluate gypsum produced from an alternate FGD reagent, could not be conducted as planned. Instead, Task 5 was conducted at conditions similar to a previous task, Task 3, although with gypsum from an alternate FGD system. In this project, process stacks in the wallboard plant have been sampled using the Ontario Hydro method. The stack locations sampled for each task include a dryer for the wet gypsum as it enters the plant and a gypsum calciner. The stack of the dryer for the wet wallboard product was also tested as part of this task, and was tested as part of Tasks 1 and 4. Also at each site, in-stream process samples were collected and analyzed for mercury concentration before and after each significant step in wallboard production. The Ontario Hydro results, process sample mercury concentration data, and process data were used to construct mercury mass balances across the wallboard plants. Task 5 was conducted at a wallboard plant processing synthetic gypsum from a power plant that fires Eastern bituminous coal. The power plant is equipped with a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system for NOX emissions control, but the SCR was bypassed during the time period the gypsum tested was produced. The power plant has a single-loop, open spray tower, limestone reagent FGD system, with forced oxidation conducted in a reaction tank integral with the FGD absorber. The FGD system has gypsum fines blow down as part of the dewatering step. Gypsum fines blow down is believed to be an important variable that impacts the amount of mercury in the gypsum byproduct and possibly its stability during the wallboard process. The results of the Task 5 stack testing, as measured by the Ontario Hydro method, detected that an average of 51% of the incoming mercury in the FGD gypsum was emitted during wallboard production. These losses were distributed as 2% or less each across the wet gypsum dryer and product wallboard dryer, and about 50% across the gypsum calciner. Emissions were similar to what Task 3 results showed, on both a percentage and a mass basis, for gypsum produced by a power plant firing bituminous coal and also having gypsum fines blow down as part of the FGD dewatering scheme. As was seen in the Task 1 through 4 results, most of the mercury detected in the stack testing on the wet gypsum dryer and kettle calciner was in the form of elemental mercury. In the wallboard dryer kiln, a more signific

Jessica Marshall Sanderson

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

ForPeerReview From vegetable oils to polyurethanes: synthetic routes to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From vegetable oils to polyurethanes: synthetic routes to polyols and main industrial products Myriam and main industrial products Most of biobased polyols for polyurethanes are synthesized from vegetable oils literature; focus on the industrial synthetic routes. Keywords: vegetable oils; biobased polyols

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

355

Ris-PhD-27(EN) Wind Energy Applications of Synthetic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risø-PhD-27(EN) Wind Energy Applications of Synthetic Aperture Radar Merete Bruun Christiansen Risø National Laboratory Roskilde Denmark November 2006 #12;Author: Merete Bruun Christiansen Title: Wind Energy Applications of Synthetic Aperture Radar Department: Wind Energy Department Risø-PhD-27(EN) November 2006

356

A NEW SYNTHETIC LIBRARY OF THE NEAR-INFRARED Ca II TRIPLET INDICES. I. INDEX DEFINITION, CALIBRATION, AND RELATIONS WITH STELLAR ATMOSPHERIC PARAMETERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adopting the SPECTRUM package, which is a stellar spectral synthesis program, we have synthesized a comprehensive set of 2890 near-infrared (NIR) synthetic spectra with a resolution and wavelength sampling similar to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the forthcoming Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) spectra. During the synthesis, we applied the 'New grids of ATLAS9 Model Atmosphere' to develop a grid of local thermodynamic equilibrium model atmospheres for effective temperatures (T{sub eff}) ranging from 3500 to 7500 K, for surface gravities (log g) from 0.5 to 5.0 dex, for metallicities ([Fe/H]) from -4.0 to 0.5 dex, and for solar ([{alpha}/Fe] = 0.0 dex) and non-solar ([{alpha}/Fe] = +0.4 dex) abundances. This synthetic stellar library is composed of 1350 solar scaled abundance (SSA) and 1530 non-solar scaled abundance (NSSA) spectra, grounding on which we have defined a new set of NIR Ca II triplet indices and an index CaT as the sum of the three. These defined indices were automatically measured on every spectrum of the synthetic stellar library and calibrated with the indices computed on the observational spectra from the INDO-U.S. stellar library. In order to check the effect of {alpha}-element enhancement on the so-defined Ca II indices, we compared indices measured on the SSA spectra with those on the NSSA ones at the same trine of stellar parameters (T{sub eff}, log g, [Fe/H]); luckily, little influences of {alpha}-element enhancement were found. Furthermore, comparisons of our synthetic indices with the observational ones from measurements on the INDO-U.S. stellar library, the SDSS-DR7 and SDSS-DR8 spectroscopic survey are presented, respectively, for dwarfs and giants in specific. For dwarfs, our synthetic indices could well reproduce the behaviors of the observational indices versus stellar parameters, which verifies the validity of our index definitions for dwarfs. For giants, the consistency between our synthetic indices and the observational ones does not appear to be as good. However, a new synthetic library of NIR Ca II indices has been founded for deeper studies on the NIR wave band of stellar spectra, and this library is particularly appropriate for the SDSS and the forthcoming LAMOST stellar spectra. We have regressed the strength of the CaT index as a function of stellar parameters for both dwarfs and giants after a series of experimental investigations into relations of the indices with stellar parameters. For dwarfs, log g has little effect on the indices, while [Fe/H] and T{sub eff} play a role together. The leading factor is probably [Fe/H], which changes the strength of the indices by a positive trend. For giants, log g starts to influence the strength of the indices by a negative trend for the metal-poor, and even impact deeply for the metal-rich; besides, [Fe/H] and T{sub eff} still matter. In addition, we briefly discussed the major differences between our Ca II triplet indices and the CaHK doublet indices. Ultimately, a supplemental experiment was carried out to show that spectral noises do have effects on our set of NIR Ca II indices. However, the influence is not weak enough to be ignored if the signal-to-noise ratio falls below 20.

Du, W.; Luo, A. L.; Zhao, Y. H., E-mail: wdu@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: lal@nao.cas.cn [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

357

Ceramic fiber ceramic matrix filter development  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project were to develop a novel type of candle filter based on a ceramic fiber-ceramic matrix composite material, and to extend the development to full-size, 60-mm OD by 1-meter-long candle filters. The goal is to develop a ceramic filter suitable for use in a variety of fossil energy system environments such as integrated coal gasification combined cycles (IGCC), pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC), and other advanced coal combustion environments. Further, the ceramic fiber ceramic matrix composite filter, hereinafter referred to as the ceramic composite filter, was to be inherently crack resistant, a property not found in conventional monolithic ceramic candle filters, such as those fabricated from clay-bonded silicon carbide. Finally, the adequacy of the filters in the fossil energy system environments is to be proven through simulated and in-plant tests.

Judkins, R.R.; Stinton, D.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Smith, R.G.; Fischer, E.M. [3M Company, St. Paul, MN (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Mechanized selection of fiber optic arrays for spectroscopy measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 400-fiber optic bundle has been installed as part of the beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic for measuring density fluctuations in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. One hundred bundles, each composed of four 1-mm-diam fibers, transmit {ital H}{sub {alpha}} light 50 m away to 20 detectors located outside the radiation area. To shorten the time spent manually switching the bundles among the 20 detectors, a mechanized fiber selector was installed. The fiber bundles were separated into radial and poloidal groups of 220 and 180 fibers and coupled by a computer-controlled, motorized precision translation stage. The fibers were fastened to a plate and placed less than 0.003 in. from an identical plate that holds a similar array of fibers which transmits the light to the detectors. Holding the fiber spacing tolerance to 0.001 in., and using refractive index matching fluid, the highest measured loss was less than 0.5 dB, and generally was very small compared to the fiber's insertion loss. The stages are actuated with precision encoded micrometers and controlled by the beam emission spectroscopy VAX-resident software via a RS-232/CAMAC interface allowing arbitrary selections of fibers between plasma discharges with a 5 min repetition rate.

Paul, S.F.; Cylinder, D.; Durst, R.D.; Fonck, R.J. (Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Fatigue Enhancement of a Carbon Fiber Reinforced Nanocomposite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary objective of the present investigation is to study the fatigue characteristics of a woven carbon fiber reinforced polymer which has been modified with either amine or fluorine functionalized carbon nanotubes on the fiber-matrix interface. Multi-wall functionalized carbon nanotubes are sprayed onto both sides of each fiber at 0.2-wt % with respect to the fibers. The composites are fabricated using high temperature vacuum assisted resin transfer molding with four-harness satin weave fabric and EPON 862/Epi-Kure W epoxy. Due to the heterogeneous nature of carbon fiber composites, under dynamic loading the composites undergoes a series of complex failure mechanisms: matrix cracking, fiber-matrix debonding, fiber fracture, and buckling. It is believed that debonding of the fiber-matrix interface is the most crucial of these failure mechanisms. Debonding of the fiber-matrix interface critically hinders the matrix’s ability to transfer loads to the fibers, leading to a poor distribution of load. Due to this distribution, one of three failures occurs: individual yarns of fibers are overloaded and fracture, the matrix losses strength and buckles, or a mixture of the two occurs. It will be shown that functionalized multi-wall carbon nanotubes can strengthen the fiber-matrix interface, resulting in fatigue life improvement. The research investigates this behavior for both tension-tension and tension-compression fatiguing. It is believed that improvements will be best at negative R-ratios and high cycle regimes, because the damage is almost entirely matrix dominated occurs under these conditions. Results have shown improvements in static tensile properties of about twenty percent and an order of magnitude improvement in the fatigue life. Fractographic analysis reveals that the nanocomposites can withstand far greater matrix damage prior to final failure. In addition, both optical and scanning electron microscopy indicates that the nanocomposite exhibits reduced fiber-matrix debonding.

Wilkerson, Justin W.

2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

360

Synthetic aperture radar and interferometry development at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Environmental monitoring, earth-resource mapping, and military systems require broad-area imaging at high resolutions. Many times the imagery must be acquired in inclement weather or during night as well as day. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) provides such a capability. SAR systems take advantage of the long-range propagation characteristics of radar signals and the complex information processing capability of modern digital electronics to provide high resolution imagery. SAR complements photographic and other optical imaging capabilities because of the minimum constrains on time-of-day and atmospheric conditions and because of the unique responses of terrain and cultural targets to radar frequencies. Interferometry is a method for generating a three-dimensional image of terrain. The height projection is obtained by acquiring two SAR images from two slightly differing locations. It is different from the common method of stereoscopic imaging for topography. The latter relies on differing geometric projections for triangulation to define the surface geometry whereas interferometry relies on differences in radar propagation times between the two SAR locations. This paper presents the capabilities of SAR, explains how SAR works, describes a few SAR applications, provides an overview of SAR development at Sandia, and briefly describes the motion compensation subsystem.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detergents synthetic fibers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Skin carcinogenicity of synthetic and natural petroleums. [Mice  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In a series of three separate experiments mice were exposed to various concentrations of fossil liquids obtained from coal, oil shale or natural petroleum. All materials were capable of inducing squamous cell carcinoma, but potency differed substantially. Skin carcinogenicity was markedly greater for both coal or oil shale liquids than for natural petroleums. None of the syncrudes approached the skin carcinogenicity of a pure reference carcinogen, benzo(a)pyrene (BP). It is unlikely that determination of the concentration of an active compound in material applied to the test animal will allow meaningful comparison among the diverse agents of interest to the synthetic fuels industry. To better establish the relationship between actual tissue dose and surface concentration the authors are investigating various in vitro and biochemical measures of hydrocarbon-skin interaction to determine which, if any, could serve as a more definitive measure of surface dose. Results, using BP as a marker carcinogenic hydrocarbon, suggest that carcinogenic crudes inhibit both BP metabolism in skin organ culture and the interaction of BP adducts with epidermal DNA, in vivo.

Holland, J.M.; Rahn, R.O.; Smith, L.H.; Clark, B.R.; Chang, S.S.; Stephens, T.J.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Low-Cost Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The size and cost of fabricating fiber optic pressure sensors is reduced by fabricating the membrane of the sensor in a non-planar shape. The design of the sensors may be made in such a way that the non-planar membrane becomes a part of an air-tight cavity, so as to make the membrane resilient due to the air-cushion effect of the air-tight cavity. Such non-planar membranes are easier to make and attach.

Sheem, Sang K. (Pleasanton, CA)

2004-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

363

Low-Cost Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The size and cost of fabricating fiber optic pressure sensors is reduced by fabricating the membrane of the sensor in a non-planar shape. The design of the sensors may be made in such a way that the non-planar membrane becomes a part of an air-tight cavity, so as to make the membrane resilient due to the air-cushion effect of the air-tight cavity. Such non-planar membranes are easier to make and attach.

Sheem, Sang K. (Pleasanton, CA)

2003-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

364

Multi-Scale Reinforced Carbon Fiber Nanocomposites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon fiber polymer composites are utilized in many industries including in commercial and military aircraft and space vehicles because of their lighter weight and superior strength compared to aluminum and steel. Due to the insulating nature of epoxy-based polymer composites and the dielectric breakdown of the epoxy, catastrophic failure may occur when subjected to high voltages (as in a lightning strike). The addition of carbon nanofibers and carbon nanotubes to the epoxy resin has the potential to improve electrical deficiencies and enhance mechanical characteristics, as well as add self-sensing and actuation capabilities to the original composite. The focus of the present research is to modify the epoxy in traditional carbon fiber composites through addition of carbon nanofibers. As a first step, this study aims to develop an effective technique to disperse carbon nanofibers in the epoxy using mechanical stirring along with sonication, and characterize cured composite samples of various nanomaterial concentrations by optical microscopy, and mechanical and electrical characterization. Once the dispersion procedure is finalized, the nanofibers must be aligned in a desired direction to maximize the extent to which they enhance the original composite. This is achieved by placing electrodes on opposite sides of the material to apply an electric field while the epoxy cures, as secondary bonding joins the aligned nanofibers together. The Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) process is currently used in industry and serves as a basis to add the modified epoxy resin to the carbon fiber fabric. Results will be tested and compared to a standard carbon fiber composite to optimize the overall procedure. With greater understanding and control of nanoparticles, it will be possible to design composites for specific applications in the not-so-distant future.

VanRooyen, Ainsley

2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

365

Adaptive nonparametric regression on spin fiber bundles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The construction of adaptive nonparametric procedures by means of wavelet thresholding techniques is now a classical topic in modern mathematical statistics. In this paper, we extend this framework to the analysis of nonparametric regression on sections ... Keywords: 42B35, 42C10, 42C40, 46E35, 62G08, 62G20, Adaptive nonparametric regression, Mixed spin needlets, Spin Besov spaces, Spin fiber bundles, Thresholding

Claudio Durastanti; Daryl Geller; Domenico Marinucci

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Fiber Optic Cables in High Voltage Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, it has become common for electric utilities to place fiber optic cables within their transmission rights-of-way. Overhead transmission power line corridors can provide the telecommunications industry with cost-effective alternative routes, and at the same time benefit the electric utilities by generating additional revenues using existing facilities. Also, within the power utility industry, reliable internal communications are vital to ensure ptotection and control of the power system. S...

2000-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

367

Development of a rapid design procedure for emergency repair of bridge columns using fiber-reinforced polymers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

strengthening effects with carbon fiber sheet for concreteD. and Ho, F. (1995). “Carbon fiber jacket retrofit test ofcolumns with continuous carbon fiber jackets, volume II,

Slater, Susan E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Solar power system utilizing optical fibers each fiber fed by a respective lens  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mosaic of lenses is oriented to face the sun. Each lens focuses a solar image upon the open end of a respective optical fiber. The several fibers converge to form a bundle. The bundle passes to a receiver generally inside a building. The radiation delivered by the bundle may be used for cooking, lighting, operation of a thermodynamic engine, or other similar application. In the preferred system the lens mosaic is a plastic sheet into which lenses have been molded. In a first auxiliary system the lens mosaic is formed on the front surface of a transparent plate. Solar images are formed on the rear surface. Optical fibers are attached where these solar images are formed. This eliminates two reflecting surfaces, thereby increasing efficiency by 19%. In a second auxiliary system mass of the plate is reduced by using truncated cones to transmit the radiation to the solar image positions.

Whitaker, R.O.

1984-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

369

Microsoft Word - Bell-BoundaryFiber_CX_2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Amanda Williams Amanda Williams Project Manager - TEP-TPP-3 Proposed Action: Bell-Boundary Fiber Project Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.7 - Fiber optic cable Location: Spokane and Pend Orielle counties, WA Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA is proposing to install new fiber optic line along 90 miles of existing BPA transmission lines in Spokane and Pend Orielle counties in Washington (see Figure 1). It would extend from Bell Substation in Spokane, WA to Boundary Substation 8 miles north of Metaline Falls, WA. The fiber would be strung on the Bell-Boundary No. 1 transmission line and run through Sacheen and Cusick substations along the route. BPA would install overhead fiber optic cable on existing towers or on fiber optic wood poles where

370

Spectrometer employing optical fiber time delays for frequency resolution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides different length glass fibers for providing a broad range of optical time delays for short incident chromatic light pulses for the selective spatial and frequency analysis of the light with a single light detector. To this end, the frequencies of the incident light are orientated and matched with the different length fibers by dispersing the separate frequencies in space according to the respective fiber locations and lengths at the input terminal of the glass fibers. This makes the different length fibers useful in the field of plasma physics. To this end the short light pulses can be scattered by a plasma and then passed through the fibers for analyzing and diagnosing the plasma while it varies rapidly with time.

Schuss, Jack J. (Providence, RI); Johnson, Larry C. (Princeton, NJ)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Progress in the development of scintillating optical fibers  

SciTech Connect

Starting with 1 inch diameter PVT scintillator as a preform, the authors have drawn fibers of several diameters ranging from 1 to 4 mm. These fibers have been coated in line with the draw to form optical fibers. Several cladding materials whose index of refraction ranges from 1.35 to 1.55 have been used. The most successful fiber has been obtained with an extra thick (200 micron) cladding of silicone in combination with a linear draw, as opposed to a spool draw. This fiber is acceptable, but it is extremely fragile and its quality is difficult to control. The authors are currently constructing a 12 channel hodoscope with 1 mm spatial resolution using 4 mm diameter fibers. An account is also given of the progress made in using the Avalanche Photo Diode (APD) operated in the Geiger mode as the photo detector.

Borenstein, S.R.; Strand, R.C.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Optical Fiber Sensor Instrumentation for Slagging Coal Gasifiers  

SciTech Connect

Coal gasifier is one of the most promising solutions for clean fossil energy. Refractory thickness monitoring and online real-time temperature measurement is needed for improved reliability and advanced process control for current and future generation power plants. The objective of this program is to design and implement an optical fiber based sensing system that could potentially be used to monitor refractory wall thickness and temperature inside a coal gasifier. For the thickness monitoring, the system should be able to operate at temperatures up to 1000 C. For this temperature range, silica fiber can still work so it is chosen for the sensor design. The measurement is based on a photon counting optical time domain reflectometer. A narrow light pulse is launched into a silica fiber which could be embedded into the gasifier refractory wall, and is partially reflected by the far end of the fiber. The time of flight of the light pulse in the fiber then gives an indication of the position of the fiber end, which is a function of the wall thickness when the fiber is embedded. Results obtained show a measurement accuracy of {+-}2cm in environment of 1000 C with a saw cut fiber end. When the fiber end is corroded by sodium carbide at 900 C, the accuracy is {+-}3cm. For the temperature measurement, a single crystal sapphire fiber sensor is designed. The sapphire fiber guides the broadband light from a light emitting diode to a sapphire wafer functioning as a Fabry-Perot interferometer and the wafer optical thickness is a function of temperature. The returned optical signal is then demodulated by multimode fiber based whitelight interferometry. The system was tested up to 1500 C with a measurement accuracy of {+-}10 C for the entire measurement range.

Anbo Wang; Kristie Cooper

2008-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

373

Modeling Time-dependent Responses of Piezoelectric Fiber Composite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The existence of polymer constituent in piezoelectric fiber composites (PFCs) could lead to significant viscoelastic behaviors, affecting overall performance of PFCs. High mechanical and electrical stimuli often generate significant amount of heat, increasing temperatures of the PFCs. At elevated temperatures, most materials, especially polymers show pronounced time-dependent behaviors. Predicting time-dependent responses of the PFCs becomes important to improve reliability in using PFCs. We study overall performance of PFCs having unidirectional piezoceramic fibers, such as PZT fibers, dispersed in viscoelastic polymer matrix. Two types of PFCs are studied, which are active fiber composites (AFCs) and macro fiber composites (MFCs). AFCs and MFCs consist of unidirectional PZT fibers dispersed in epoxy placed between two interdigitated electrode and kapton layers. The AFCs have a circular fiber cross-section while the MFCs have a square fiber cross-section. Finite element (FE) models of representative volume elements (RVEs) of active PFCs, having square and circular fiber cross-sections, are generated for composites with 20, 40, and 60 percent fiber contents. Two FE micromechanical models having one fiber embedded in epoxy matrix and five fibers placed in epoxy matrix are considered. A continuum 3D piezoelectric element in ABAQUS FE is used. A general time-integral function is applied for the mechanical, electrical, and piezoelectric properties in order to incorporate the time-dependent effect and histories of loadings. The effective properties of PZT-5A/epoxy and PZT-7A/LaRC-SI piezocomposites determined from the FE micromechanical models are compared to available experimental data and analytical solutions in the literature. Furthermore, the effect of viscoelastic behaviors of the LaRC-SI matrix at an elevated temperature on the overall electro-mechanical and piezoelectric constants are examined.

Li, Kuo-An

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Faceted ceramic fibers, tapes or ribbons and epitaxial devices therefrom  

SciTech Connect

A crystalline article includes a single-crystal ceramic fiber, tape or ribbon. The fiber, tape or ribbon has at least one crystallographic facet along its length, which is generally at least one meter long. In the case of sapphire, the facets are R-plane, M-plane, C-plane or A-plane facets. Epitaxial articles, including superconducting articles, can be formed on the fiber, tape or ribbon.

Goyal, Amit (Knoxville, TN)

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

375

Synthetic Nano-Low Density Lipoprotein as Targeted Drug DeliveryVehicle for Glioblastoma Multiforme  

SciTech Connect

This paper discribes a synthetic low density lipoprotein(LDL) made by complexing a 29 amino acid that consists of a lipid bindingdomain and the LDL receptor binding domain with a lipid microemulsion.The nano-LDL particles were intermdiate in size between LDL and HDL andbound to LDL receptors on GBM brain tumor cells. Synthetic nano-LDLuptake by GBM cells was LDL receptor specific and dependent on cellreceptor number. It is suggested that these synthetic particles can serveas a delivery vehicle for hydophobic anti-tumor drugs by targeting theLDL receptor.

Nikanjam, Mina; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Bjornstad, Kathleen A.; Shu,Xiao; Budinger, Thomas F.; Forte, Trudy M.

2006-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

376

Test Methods for the Tensile Evaluation of Ceramic Fibers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Test methods for the determination of tensile strength of ceramic fibers will be reviewed. The withdrawal of ASTM D3379 and the requirements in ...

377

Fiber optics interface for a dye laser oscillator and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dye laser oscillator in which one light beam is used to pump a continuous stream of dye within a cooperating dye chamber for producing a second, different beam is generally disclosed herein along with a specific arrangement including an optical fiber and a fiber optics interface for directing the pumping beam into the dye chamber. The specific fiber optics interface illustrated includes three cooperating lenses which together image one particular dimension of the pumping beam into the dye chamber from the output end of the optical fiber in order to insure that the dye chamber is properly illuminated by the pumping beam.

Johnson, S.A.; Seppala, L.G.

1984-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

378

Nanocoating Enhanced Optical Fiber Sensors - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Nanotechnology for Energy ... In that time, considerable progress has been made in conception and development of novel fiber-optic configurations ...

379

Production of Activated Carbon Fibers and Engineered Forms ...  

Carbon fibers are currently produced from non-renewable fossil sources, namely coal, oil, and natural gas, through energy-intensive processes.

380

Nano/Micro Vacuum Triodes Using Glass Fiber Drawing Methods  

Nano/Micro Vacuum Triodes Using Glass Fiber Drawing Methods Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing rights to this intellectual ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detergents synthetic fibers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Mechanical Performance of Discontinuous Carbon Fiber-SiC Matrix ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Mechanical Performance of Discontinuous Carbon Fiber-SiC Matrix Composites for Wear Components of High-Speed Train Applications.

382

Composite Silicon Carbon Nano-fiber Anode for High Energy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Composite Silicon Carbon Nano-fiber Anode for High .... of Super P Carbon Black and Silicon Carbide in Si-based Lithium Ion Batteries.

383

Carbon Fiber Reinforced Ultra-High-Temperature Ceramic Matrix ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To improve the thermal shock resistance of UHTC, carbon fiber was selected as the ... Nanoscale Characterization of Polymer Precursor Derived Silicon Carbide

384

A TESTING FRAMEWORK FOR FIBER TRACTOGRAPHY Langping (Kevin) Wei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that particular situation. Developed in C/C++ in conjunction with Tcl/Tk, FiberTK is a toolkit developed

Sun, Jing

385

Contact Lee McGetrick Director, Carbon Fiber Technology Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Director, Carbon Fiber Technology Facility (865) 574-6549 mcgetricklb@ornl.gov Craig Blue, Ph.D. Director, Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (865) 574-4351...

386

Michael Heine, SGL Group - The Carbon Company, Carbon Fibers...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Fibers in Lightweight Systems for Wind Energy and Automotive Applications: Availability and Challenges for the Future Michael Heine, SGL Group - The Carbon Company, Carbon...

387

Modular Off-Axis Fiber Optic Solar Concentrator  

interior lighting: Sunlight Direct, ... a Modular Off-Axis Fiber Optic Solar Concentrator, uses novel embodiments of an off-axis aspheric focusing system to achieve ...

388

Fiber Reinforced Composite Pipeline - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

End Date: October 1, 2016 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Fiber Reinforced Composite Pipeline (FRP) Successfully adapt spoolable FRP currently used in * the oil and natural gas...

389

Carbon Fiber with Ni-Coated Reinforced Aluminum Alloy Matrix ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 1, 2007 ... Carbon Fiber with Ni-Coated Reinforced Aluminum Alloy Matrix Composites by Bianhua Han, Tianjiao Luo, Chunlin Liang,Guangchun Yao, ...

390

Assessment of Various Manufacturing Methods for Natural Fiber ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterizing the Variation of Surface Charge Density of Natural Fibers by High- Resolution Force Spectroscopy · Creep Behavior of Chitin-carbon Nanotube ...

391

System to Continuously Produce Carbon Fiber via Microwave-Assisted ...  

ORNL 2011-G00246/jcn UT-B ID 200501518 09.2011 System to Continuously Produce Carbon Fiber via Microwave-Assisted Plasma Processing Technology Summary

392

Distributed Fiber Optic Gas Sensing for Harsh Environments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

primary technology products include: * High-quality sapphire long period grating (LPG) or fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors - both single and multiple grating devices, *...

393

The Influence of Polypropylene Fibers on the Punching Resistance ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effect of Accelerated Carbonation on Kraft Pulp Fiber Reinforced ... Effects of Temperature and Strain Rate on the Tensile Properties of TWIP steels · Evaluation ...

394

Resolving optical illumination distributions along an axially symmetric photodetecting fiber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photodetecting fibers of arbitrary length with internal metal, semiconductor and insulator domains have recently been demonstrated. These semiconductor devices exhibit a continuous translational symmetry which presents ...

Sorin, Fabien

395

Resolving optical illumination distributions along an axially symmetric photodetecting fiber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photodetecting fibers of arbitrary length with internal metal, semiconductor and insulator domains have recently been demonstrated. These semiconductor devices display a continuous translational symmetry which presents ...

Lestoquoy, Guillaume

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Corn fiber hulls as a food additive or animal feed  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a novel animal feed or food additive that may be made from thermochemically hydrolyzed, solvent-extracted corn fiber hulls. The animal feed or food additive may be made, for instance, by thermochemically treating corn fiber hulls to hydrolyze and solubilize the hemicellulose and starch present in the corn fiber hulls to oligosaccharides. The residue may be extracted with a solvent to separate the oil from the corn fiber, leaving a solid residue that may be prepared, for instance by aggolmerating, and sold as a food additive or an animal feed.

Abbas, Charles (Champaign, IL); Beery, Kyle E. (Decatur, IN); Cecava, Michael J. (Decatur, IN); Doane, Perry H. (Decatur, IN)

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

397

New Measurement Technique to Fill Critical Need for Fiber ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... In consumer-driven industries, it is critically important to provide customers what they ... Some 19 million miles of optical fiber were installed in the US ...

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

398

Trillium FiberFuels Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inc Place Corvallis, Oregon Zip 97333 Product Oregon-based biochemical cellulosic ethanol technology developer. References Trillium FiberFuels Inc1 LinkedIn Connections...

399

Stable polarization-encoded quantum key distribution in fiber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polarizations of single-photon pulses have been controlled with long-term stability of more than 10 hours by using an active feedback technique for auto-compensation of unpredictable polarization scrambling in long-distance fiber. Experimental tests of long-term operations in 50, 75 and 100 km fibers demonstrated that such a single-photon polarization control supported stable polarization encoding in long-distance fibers to facilitate stable one-way fiber system for polarization-encoded quantum key distribution, providing quantum bit error rates below the absolute security threshold.

Wu, G; Li, Y; Zeng, H; Wu, Guang; Chen, Jie; Li, Yao; Zeng, Heping

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Stabilization and carbonization studies of polyacrylonitrile /carbon nanotube composite fibers .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Carbon fibers contain more than 90 wt. % carbon. They have low density, high specific strength and modulus, and good temperature and chemical resistance. Therefore,… (more)

Liu, Yaodong

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detergents synthetic fibers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Single Wall Carbon Nanotube/Polyacrylonitrile Composite Fiber .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs), discovered in 1993, have good mechanical, electrical and thermal properties. Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) is an important fiber for textiles as well… (more)

Liang, Jianghong

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Characterizing Blast and Impact of Long Carbon Fiber Reinforced Concrete.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The primary objective of the study was to investigate the blast and impact resistance of carbon fiber reinforced concrete. The impact resistance was assessed through… (more)

Musselman, Eric

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Manufacturing Demonstration Facility Low-Cost Carbon Fiber Available...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low-Cost Carbon Fiber Available to US Manufacturers for Market Development and Demonstration Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is making available market development quantities...

404

Carbon nanotube reinforced polyacrylonitrile and poly(etherketone) fibers .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The graphitic nature, continuous structure, and high mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) make them good candidate for reinforcing polymer fiber. The different types of… (more)

Jain, Rahul

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

System to continuously produce carbon fiber via microwave ...  

A system to continuously produce fully carbonized or graphitized carbon fibers using microwave-assisted plasma (MAP) processing comprises an elongated chamber in ...

406

Transverse Mechanical Properties of Unidirectionally Reinforced Hybrid Fiber Composites.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Fiber reinforced polymer composites have much versatility in structural design on account of their wide range of elastic and strength properties as functions of direction.… (more)

Ripepi, Maximilian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Reaction Kinetics Between Fiber and Matrix Components in Metal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

parabolic rate constants for the total growth of the reaction zone and the component of the reaction zone which displaces the fiber (12). (a). (b). Figure 4 - Cross- ...

408

Microsoft Word - CX_SouthTacoma_FredericksonFiber.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and redundancy of the fiber optic communications between the BPA's South Tacoma Substation and Frederickson Power. The proposed project would begin at the existing South...

409

Method and apparatus for assaying wood pulp fibers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Paper pulp is added to a stain solution. The stain solution and pulp fibers are mixed to form a slurry. Samples are removed from the slurry and are admixed with dilution water and a bleach. Then, the fibers are moved into a flow cell where they are subjected to a light source adapted to stimulate fluorescence from the stained pulp fiber. Before the fiber slurry enters the flow cell it is mixed with a dilution water of bleach to reduce background fluorescence. The fluorescent light is collimated and directed through a dichroic filter onto a fluorescence splitting dichroic filter.

Gustafson, Richard (Bellevue, WA); Callis, James B. (Seattle, WA); Mathews, Jeffrey D. (Neenah, WI); Robinson, John (Issaquah, WA); Bruckner, Carsten A. (San Mateo, CA); Suvamakich, Kuntinee (Seattle, WA)

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

410

Surface modification of aramid fibers with novel chemical approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

propane was chosen as the treatment reagent to modify aramid fibers surface via. Graft reaction. After the modification, the interfacial properties of aramid/epoxy.

411

Glass fiber composition. [for use as thermal insulation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a glass fiber composition useful for thermal insulation having a low melting temperature and high chemical durability.

Wolf, G.A.; Kupfer, M.J.

1980-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

412

Characterization of Thermal Properties of Curauá Fibers by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results revealed that these fibers have superior thermal insulating ability. Proceedings Inclusion? ... Forging Hot and Cold: Development through the Ages.

413

Fiber-optic-coupled, laser heated thermoluminescence dosimeter ...  

Fiber-optic-coupled, laser heated thermoluminescence dosimeter for remote radiation sensing Alan L. Hustona) and Brian L. Justus Optical Sciences ...

414

Top 9 Things You Didn't Know about Carbon Fiber | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

about Carbon Fiber Top 9 Things You Didn't Know about Carbon Fiber March 29, 2013 - 12:30pm Addthis The Energy Departments Carbon Fiber Technology Facility at Oak Ridge...

415

Fiber Optical Micro-detectors for Oxygen Sensing in Power Plants  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

coating fiber bundles 13 Figure 5. Photograph of Fiber 121 as fabricated and after all thermal testing 14 Figure 6. Oxygen sensitivity of Fiber 121 at 42 C over several cycles of...

416

Mesophase Pitch-based Carbon Fiber and Its Composites: Preparation and Characterization.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this study is to investigate the relationship among process, structure, and property of the UTSI pitch-based carbon fibers and optimize carbon fiber’s… (more)

Liu, Chang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

BioJADE: A Design and Simulation Tool for Synthetic Biological Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The next generations of both biological engineering and computer engineering demand that control be exerted at the molecular level. Creating, characterizing and controlling synthetic biological systems may provide us ...

Goler, Jonathan A.

2004-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

418

The Use of Synthetic Hurricane Tracks in Risk Analysis and Climate Change Damage Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of the lack of data on past hurricanes, empirical evaluations of the statistics needed for risk management are very uncertain. An alternative strategy is to use a hurricane model to produce large sets of synthetic hurricane tracks. This ...

Stéphane Hallegatte

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Synthetic Subsurface Pressure Derived from Bottom Pressure and Tide Gauge Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthetic subsurface pressure (SSP) can be formed from tide gauge records and from bottom pressure measurements to provide a consistent and convenient basis for comparison of these two different types of observations. Common methods for this ...

Sabine Harms; Clinton D. Winant

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Interbilayer-crosslinked multilamellar vesicles as synthetic vaccines for potent humoral and cellular immune responses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vaccines based on recombinant proteins avoid the toxicity and antivector immunity associated with live vaccine (for example, viral) vectors, but their immunogenicity is poor, particularly for CD8+ T-cell responses. Synthetic ...

Moon, James J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detergents synthetic fibers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Assimilation of Synthetic Tropical Cyclone Observations into the Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In June 1990, the assimilation of synthetic tropical cyclone observations into the Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System (NOGAPS) was initiated at Fleet Numerical Oceanography Center (FNOC). These observations are derived directly ...

James S. Goerss; Richard A. Jeffries

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Multifrequency and multistatic inverse synthetic aperture radar, with application to FM passive radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with the imaging of a moving target using a multifrequency and multistatic radar consisting in one receiver and several narrowband transmitters. Considering two hypotheses about the studied target, we derive two multistatic inverse synthetic ...

Guillaume Ginolhac; Françoise Schmitt; Franck Daout; Philippe Forster

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Strategies for designing, testing and demonstrating safety : what synthetic biology can learn from retrospective cases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synthetic biology is an emerging technology field within the realm of genetic engineering, differing from traditional genetic engineering in that it focuses on the modularization of genetic parts and the creation of de ...

Yeddanapudi, Neelima, 1976-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Use of Synthetic Aperture Radar in Finescale Surface Analysis of Synoptic-Scale Fronts at Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The viability of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) as a tool for finescale marine meteorological surface analyses of synoptic-scale fronts is demonstrated. In particular, it is shown that SAR can reveal the presence of, and the mesoscale and ...

G. S. Young; T. N. Sikora; N. S. Winstead

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

The Rhine Outflow Plume Studied by the Analysis of Synthetic Aperture Radar Data and Numerical Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamics of the Rhine outflow plume in the proximity of the river mouth is investigated by using remote sensing data and numerical simulations. The remote sensing data consist of 41 synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images acquired by the First ...

Katrin Hessner; Angelo Rubino; Peter Brandt; Werner Alpers

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Realistic assessment of direct radiolysis for synthetic fuels production using fusion radiation sources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

These studies indicate that synthetic fuel production by direct radiolysis cannot compete economically with other production methods. Low G-values and radiation contamination of products are given as reasons. (MOW)

Pendergrass, J.H.; Booth, L.A.; Finch, F.T.; Frank, T.G.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

The Generation of Synthetic Sea Surface Temperature Data for the Equatorial Pacific Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthetic monthly SST anomaly data are constructed using frequency domain analyses of significant principle components derived from reconstructed SST data in the equatorial Pacific Ocean. The model provides insight into the dominant physical ...

J. M. Caron; J. J. O’Brien

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Synthetic Aperture Radar as a Tool for Investigating Polar Mesoscale Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polar mesoscale cyclones are intense vortices that form in cold, marine air masses poleward of major jet streams and frontal zones. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) should be considered as a potential tool for the study of polar mesoscale cyclones ...

Todd D. Sikora; Karen S. Friedman; William G. Pichel; Pablo Clemente-Colón

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Use of Synthetic Data to Test Flight Patterns for a Boundary Layer Field Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A virtual research aircraft was flown through a synthetic atmospheric boundary layer to help design a real flight plan that would allow robust turbulence statistics to be obtained in a heterogeneous, evolving, convective boundary layer. The ...

Edi Santoso; Roland Stull

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Observations of Bora Events over the Adriatic Sea and Black Sea by Spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bora events over the Adriatic Sea and Black Sea are investigated by using synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images acquired by the advanced SAR (ASAR) on board the European satellite Envisat. It is shown that the sea surface roughness patterns ...

Werner Alpers; Andrei Ivanov; Jochen Horstmann

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

The synthetic multivulva genes and their suppressors regulate opposing cell fates through chromatin remodeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The synthetic multivulva (synMuv) genes act redundantly to inhibit vulval fates in Caenorhabditis elegans. These genes are grouped into three classes called A, B and C. The class A genes encode putative transcription ...

Andersen, Erik C

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Characterization of carbon fibers: coefficient of thermal expansion and microstructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The focus of the research is to develop a consistent and repeatable method to evaluate the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of carbon fibers at high temperatures. Accurate measurement of the CTE of carbon fibers is essential to understand and develop optimal processing procedures as well as computational simulations to predict properties and allowables for fiber-reinforced composites. The mismatch between the coefficient of thermal expansion of the fiber and the matrix has a profound impact on the development of residual stresses and the subsequent damage initiation and progression, potentially diminishing the performance of composite structures. In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is selected to perform the experimental work on account of the high resolution and the capability of evaluating both the longitudinal and transverse CTE. The orthotropy in the CTE is tested by rotating the fibers through 45° about their axis. The method is validated by testing standard tungsten filaments of known CTE. Additionally, the microstructure of the fibers is studied in a field emission scanning electron microscope as well as through selected area diffraction patterns in a TEM to observe presence of any potential orthotropy. The pitch based P55 fiber revealed a cylindrically orthotropic microstructure, but the PAN based IM7 and T1000 fibers did not reveal any orthotropy. Finite element models of hexagonally arranged IM7 fibers in a 977 epoxy matrix are developed using PATRAN and analyzed using the commercial FEA code ABAQUS 6.4. The fiber properties were considered temperature independent where as the matrix properties were varied linearly with temperature. The lamina properties evaluated from the finite element modeling are in agreement with the experimental results in literature within 10% in the temperature range of room temperature to the stress free temperature of the epoxy, however at cryogenic temperatures the difference is greater. The residual stresses developed during processing of the composite indicated a potential location for fiber matrix debonding to be in the matrix dominant regions.

Kulkarni, Raghav Shrikant

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Design Methodology for Development of Behavioral Synthesis Generic and Synthetic Benchmarks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The importance of benchmarking as an essential methodology in evaluating and comparing digital systems synthesis tools is well established. Equally well are the limitations of the majority of current benchmarks recognized. Our primary goal is to lay out the theoretically and statistically sound foundations for addressing the key issues related to the selection of generic benchmarks and the synthesis and analysis of statistical synthetic benchmarks. The methodology for the synthetic benchmark generation uses as an intermediate step the methodology for the generic benchmark selection. The benefits of our methodology for the generic benchmark selection are: (1) it provides the sound statistical foundations for the generic benchmark selection, (2) it establishes the fact that the development of a generic benchmark is a well-defined optimization problem. The advantages of the statistical synthetic benchmarks over the generic benchmarks include: (1) having an unlimited supply of synthetic design examples, (2) obtaining the real-life like design examples which suit a particular design or analysis need, (3) having a test set which better fits all available real-life design examples. Due to the fact that the synthetic benchmark generation is based on the generic benchmark selection, the entire process of the generic and synthetic benchmark development is in sequence. It consists of the following five-stages: (1) collecting and analyzing real life design examples, (2) extracting and selecting the relevant properties that are used to specify designs, (3) deriving a generic benchmark set from the real life design examples, (4) developing the synthetic benchmark generator, and (5) constructing a synthetic benchmark set for the current applications or the future applications based ...

Hm Ar Ks

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

System and method for forming synthetic protein crystals to determine the conformational structure by crystallography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for forming synthetic crystals of proteins in a carrier fluid by use of the dipole moments of protein macromolecules that self-align in the Helmholtz layer adjacent to an electrode. The voltage gradients of such layers easily exceed 10.sup.6 V/m. The synthetic protein crystals are subjected to x-ray crystallography to determine the conformational structure of the protein involved.

Craig, George D. (Lafayette, CA); Glass, Robert (Livermore, CA); Rupp, Bernhard (Dublin, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Process for gasification using a synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gasification process is disclosed using a synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor consisting essentially of at least one compound selected from the group consisting of calcium oxide and calcium carbonate supported in a refractory carrier matrix, the carrier having the general formula Ca.sub.5 (SiO.sub.4).sub.2 CO.sub.3. A method for producing the synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor is also disclosed.

Lancet, Michael S. (Pittsburgh, PA); Curran, George P. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

System and method for forming synthetic protein crystals to determine the conformational structure by crystallography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for forming synthetic crystals of proteins in a carrier fluid by use of the dipole moments of protein macromolecules that self-align in the Helmholtz layer adjacent to an electrode. The voltage gradients of such layers easily exceed 10{sup 6}V/m. The synthetic protein crystals are subjected to x-ray crystallography to determine the conformational structure of the protein involved. 2 figs.

Craig, G.D.; Glass, R.; Rupp, B.

1997-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

437

Systems studies of dual purpose electric/synthetic fuels fusion plants  

SciTech Connect

A reactor power plant is proposed that can meet base load electrical demand, while the remainder can generate synthetic fuels and meet intermittent electrical demands. Two principal objectives of this study are: (1) to examine how strongly various economic demand and resource factors affect the amount of installed CTR capacity, and (2) to examine what increase in CTR capacity can be expected with dual purpose electric/synthetic fuel fusion plants, and also the relative importance of the different production modes. (MOW)

Beardsworth, E.; Powell, J.

1975-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

New synthetic derivatives of triterpenoids in the treatment of cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methyl 2-cyano-3,11-dioxo-18?-olean-1,12-dien-30-oate (?-CDODA-Me) and methyl 2-cyano-3,11-dioxo-18?-olean-1,12-dien-30-oate (?-CDODA-Me ) isomers are synthetic analogs of the naturally occurring triterpenoid glycyrrhetinic acid. The activity of these compounds as selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? (PPAR?) agonists and as cytotoxic anticancer agents has been investigated in colon, prostate and pancreatic cancer cells. In colon cancer cells ?-CDODA-Me arrested the growth at G2/M and this was accompanied by decreased expression of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 protein and mRNA and several Sp-dependent genes including survivin, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and VEGF receptor 1 (VEGFR1 or Flt-1). ?-CDODA-Me also inhibited tumor growth in athymic nude mice bearing RKO cells as xenografts. ?- CDODA-Me decreased expression of microRNA-27a (miR-27a), and this was accompanied by increased expression of two miR-27a-regulated mRNAs, namely ZBTB10 (an Sp repressor) and Myt-1 which catalyzes phosphorylation of cdc2 to inhibit progression of cells through G2/M. In LNCaP prostate cancer cells induction of two proapoptotic proteins namely nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug- activated gene-1 (NAG-1) and activating transcription factor-3 (ATF-3) was PPAR? independent and required activation of kinases. ?-CDODA-Me also decreased the levels of androgen receptor (AR) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) mRNA and protein levels. Thus the cytotoxicity of ?- CDODA-Me involved multiple pathways that selectively activate growth inhibitory and proapoptotic responses. Betulinic acid (BA), an inhibitor of melanoma is a pentacyclic triterpenoid natural product that induces apoptosis and antiangiogenic responses in tumors derived from multiple tissues. However, the underlying mechanism of action of BA is unknown. In LNCaP prostate cancer cells, BA acts as a novel anticancer agent by inducing proteasome-dependent repression of Sp proteins and Sp- dependent genes. The anticancer activity of the 2-cyano substituted analogs of BA, CN-BA and its methyl ester, CN-BA-Me was also investigated in colon and pancreatic cancer cells. Both CNBA and CN-BA-Me were highly cytotoxic and activated PPAR? and induced several receptor-mediated responses. The results clearly demonstrated that both the PPAR? agonist activities of CN-BA and CN-BA-Me were structure-, response-/gene- and cell context-dependent suggesting that these compounds are a novel class of selective PPAR? modulators with potential for clinical treatment of prostate, colon and pancreatic cancer.

Papineni, Sabitha

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

AOCS Official Method D 1-99  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comparison of AOCS and ASTM Methods for Soaps and Synthetic Detergent Analysis AOCS Official Method D 1-99 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads Surfactants and Detergents DEFIN

440

Interactions of Jet Fuels with Nitrile O-Rings: Petroleum-Derived versus Synthetic Fuels  

SciTech Connect

A transition from petroleum~derived jet fuels to blends with Fischer-Tropsch (F~T) fuels, and ultimately fully synthetic hydro-isomerized F-T fuels has raised concern about the fate of plasticizers in nitrile-butadiene rubber a-rings that are contacted by the fuels as this transition occurs. The partitioning of plasticizers and fuel molecules between nitrile a-rings and petroleum-derived, synthetic, and additized-synthetic jet fuels has been measured. Thermal desorption of o-rings soaked in the various jet fuels followed by gas chromatographic analysis with a mass spectrometric detector showed many of the plasticizer and stabilizer compounds were removed from the o-rings regardless of the contact fuel. Fuel molecules were observed to migrate into the o-rings for the petroleum-derived fuel as did both the fuel and additive for a synthetic F-T jet fuel additized with benzyl alcohol, but less for the unadditized synthetic fuel. The specific compounds or classes of compounds involved in the partitioning were identified and a semiquantitative comparison of relative partitioning of the compounds of interest was made. The results provide another step forward in improving the confidence level of using additized, fully synthetic jet fuel in the place of petroleum-derived fuel.

Gormley, R.J.; Link, D.D.; Baltrus, J.P.; Zandhuis, P.H.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detergents synthetic fibers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Interactions of Jet Fuels with Nitrile O-Rings: Petroleum-Derived versus Synthetic Fuels  

SciTech Connect

A transition from petroleum-derived jet fuels to blends with Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) fuels, and ultimately fully synthetic hydro-isomerized F-T fuels has raised concern about the fate of plasticizers in nitrile-butadiene rubber o-rings that are contacted by the fuels as this transition occurs. The partitioning of plasticizers and fuel molecules between nitrile o-rings and petroleum-derived, synthetic, and additized-synthetic jet fuels has been measured. Thermal desorption of o-rings soaked in the various jet fuels followed by gas chromatographic analysis with a mass spectrometric detector showed many of the plasticizer and stabilizer compounds were removed from the o-rings regardless of the contact fuel. Fuel molecules were observed to migrate into the o-rings for the petroleum-derived fuel as did both the fuel and additive for a synthetic F-T jet fuel additized with benzyl alcohol, but less for the unadditized synthetic fuel. The specific compounds or classes of compounds involved in the partitioning were identified and a semiquantitative comparison of relative partitioning of the compounds of interest was made. The results provide another step forward in improving the confidence level of using additized, fuIly synthetic jet fuel in the place of petroleum-derived fueL

Gormley, R.J.; Link, D.D.; Baltrus, J.P.; Zandhuis, P.H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Procedure for matching synfuel users with potential suppliers. Appendix B. Proposed and ongoing synthetic fuel production projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To assist the Department of Energy, Office of Fuels Conversion (OFC), in implementing the synthetic fuel exemption under the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act (FUA) of 1978, Resource Consulting Group, Inc. (RCG), has developed a procedure for matching prospective users and producers of synthetic fuel. The matching procedure, which involves a hierarchical screening process, is designed to assist OFC in: locating a supplier for a firm that wishes to obtain a synthetic fuel exemption; determining whether the fuel supplier proposed by a petitioner is technically and economically capable of meeting the petitioner's needs; and assisting the Synthetic Fuels Corporation or a synthetic fuel supplier in evaluating potential markets for synthetic fuel production. A data base is provided in this appendix on proposed and ongoing synthetic fuel production projects to be used in applying the screening procedure. The data base encompasses a total of 212 projects in the seven production technologies.

None

1981-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

443

Lorentz force actuator and carbon fiber co-winding design, construction and characterization.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Carbon fiber composites are materials that present many benefits to engineering applications, ranging from aerospace to medicine. This thesis provides background on carbon fiber properties… (more)

Chen, Yi, S. B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Influence of Lignin modification on PAN-Lignin copolymers as potential carbon fiber precursors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Carbon fiber based polymer composites have been recognized as advanced materials for structural applications. The unique reinforcing abilities of carbon fibers with their combination of… (more)

Ramasubramanian, Gauri

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Fabrication of Aluminium Matrix Composites (AMCs) by Squeeze Casting Technique Using Carbon Fiber as Reinforcement .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Composites have been developed with great success by the use of fiber reinforcements in metallic materials. Fiber reinforced metal matrices possess great potential to be… (more)

Alhashmy, Hasan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Tensile testing and stabilization/carbonization studies of polyacrylonitrile/carbon nanotube composite fibers .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study focuses on the processing, structure and properties of polyacrylonitrile (PAN)/ carbon nanotube (CNT) composite carbon fibers. Small diameter PAN/CNT based carbon fibers have… (more)

Lyons, Kevin Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

The effect of second phase particles in the fiber/matrix interfacial strength of carbon fiber reinforced thermoset composites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fiber/matrix interfacial strength of graphite fiber reinforced epoxy (DGEBF cured with diprimary amine (9,9-bis[3-methyl-4-aminophenyl]fluorene) has been studied to determine the effect of second phase additions of rubber and glass on the interfacial strength. Single fiber fragmentation tests, microindentation tests, single fiber push-out tests, and in-situ observations of fracture of specimens loaded in a SEM have been utilized. The single fiber fragmentation tests were not successful due to the failure of the single fiber test specimen prior to saturation in the fiber fragmentation process. The microindentation tests were also unsuccessful due to fracture in the carbon fiber prior to interfacial debond. The fiber push-out test results were twice as high as the shear strength of the resin, raising questions about what was really being measured and whether the 30% difference was significant on a relative scale. On the other hand, in-situ fracture observation in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) indicated that the initiation of damage, which occurred due to fiber/matrix debonding, occurred at similar ply stress levels in each of the four specimens. Furthermore, the propagation of such damage in all four systems studied seemed to pass along fiber/matrix interfaces only when it was convenient to the fracture path and not preferentially, again suggesting equally good interfaces in each of the four tests. In conclusion, it does not appear that the addition of rubber or glass second phase particles to this composite material has any significant effect on the interfacial strength of the composite system.

Lu, Chung-Yuan

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Thermal Analysis of Curaua Fiber Reinforced Polyester Matrix ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Among the drawbacks associated with the application of natural fibers, ... the effect of the curaua fiber on the thermal resistance of the composites. ... Characterization of High Carbon Equivalent Cast Iron Using Thermal Analysis Curves ... Nanosecond Electrical Discharges between Semiconducting Sulfide Mineral Particles ...

449

Extrinsic fiber optic displacement sensors and displacement sensing systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor comprises a single-mode fiber, used as an input/output fiber, and a multimode fiber, used purely as a reflector, to form an air gap within a silica tube that acts as a Fizeau cavity. The Fresnel reflection from the glass/air interface at the front of the air gap (reference reflection) and the reflection from the air/glass interface at the far end of the air gap (sensing reflection) interfere in the input/output fiber. The two fibers are allowed to move in the silica tube, and changes in the air gap length cause changes in the phase difference between the reference reflection and the sensing reflection. This phase difference is observed as changes in intensity of the light monitored at the output arm of a fused biconical tapered coupler. The extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor behaves identically whether it is surface mounted or embedded, which is unique to the extrinsic sensor in contrast to intrinsic Fabry-Perot sensors. The sensor may be modified to provide a quadrature phase shift extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor for the detection of both the amplitude and the relative polarity of dynamically varying strain. The quadrature light signals may be generated by either mechanical or optical means. A plurality of the extrinsic sensors may connected in cascade and multiplexed to allow monitoring by a single analyzer.

Murphy, Kent A. (Roanoke, VA); Gunther, Michael F. (Blacksburg, VA); Vengsarkar, Ashish M. (Scotch Plains, NJ); Claus, Richard O. (Christiansburg, VA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Kinetics of Diuron Adsorption onto Activated Carbon Fiber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was conducted on the adsorption kinetics of diuron from aqueous solutions onto activated carbon fiber. The results showed that the formation of hydrogen bonds between diuron and water, and temperature variations may possibly affect the adsorption ... Keywords: activated carbon fiber, diuron adsorption, kinetic models, hydrogen bonds

Jianhua Xu; Yabing Sun; Zhenyu Li; Jingwei Feng

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Fiber Laser Front Ends for High Energy, Short Pulse Lasers  

SciTech Connect

We are developing a fiber laser system for short pulse (1-10ps), high energy ({approx}1kJ) glass laser systems. Fiber lasers are ideal for these systems as they are highly reliable and enable long term stable operation.

Dawson, J; Messerly, M; Phan, H; Siders, C; Beach, R; Barty, C

2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

452

Surface Treatment of Carbon Fibers by Continuous Gaseous System  

SciTech Connect

The mechanical performance of carbon fiber-polymer composites strongly depends on interfacial adhesion, which is function of types of carbon fiber, surface chemistry, physical and chemical interactions, and mechanical interlocking. Untreated and unsized high strength carbon fibers were oxidized by continuous thermochemical and atmospheric plasma treatment. Surface properties were investigated before and after treatment (chemistry, topography), as well as their mechanical properties. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed a significant increase of the oxygen atomic content from 3% to around 20% and the analysis of the carbon peak showed that carboxylic acid functionalities and hydroxyl groups were generated. An observation of the fiber surface by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy did not show any dramatic change of the fiber morphology and surface topography. A Raman spectroscopy analysis exhibited that the weak boundary layers and debris remaining at the surface of untreated fibers were removed. No significant damage of the mechanical properties (tensile strength) was noticed. The influence of the changes of the surface properties on interfacial adhesion of carbon fiber-epoxy and -vinyl ester matrix was evaluated using 90 flexural and short beam shear tests with unidirectional coupons. A significant increase of the 90 flexural and short beam shear strength showed that the interfacial adhesion between carbon fibers and epoxy resins was improved. The observation of the fracture profile by scanning electron microcopy confirmed those results, as the rupture of the coupons after surface treatment was more cohesive.

Vautard, Frederic [ORNL; Paulauskas, Felix L [ORNL; Naskar, Amit K [ORNL; Warren, Charles David [ORNL; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL; Ozcan, Soydan [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Method for forming hermetic coatings for optical fibers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for forming hermetic coatings on optical fibers by hot filament assisted chemical vapor deposition advantageously produces a desirable coating while maintaining the pristine strength of the pristine fiber. The hermetic coatings may be formed from a variety of substances, such as, for example, boron nitride and carbon.

Michalske, Terry A. (P.O. Box 1042, Cedar Crest, NM 87008); Rye, Robert R. (1304 Espanola NE., Albuquerque, NM 87110); Smith, William L. (9916 Fostoria Rd., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Properties of fiber composites for advanced flywheel energy storage devices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of commercial high-performance fibers is examined for application to flywheel power supplies. It is shown that actual delivered performance depends on multiple factors such as inherent fiber strength, strength translation and stress-rupture lifetime. Experimental results for recent stress-rupture studies of carbon fibers will be presented and compared with other candidate reinforcement materials. Based on an evaluation of all of the performance factors, it is concluded that carbon fibers are preferred for highest performance and E-glass fibers for lowest cost. The inferior performance of the low-cost E-glass fibers can be improved to some extent by retarding the stress-corrosion of the material due to moisture and practical approaches to mitigating this corrosion are discussed. Many flywheel designs are limited not by fiber failure, but by matrix-dominated failure modes. Unfortunately, very few experimental results for stress-rupture under transverse tensile loading are available. As a consequence, significant efforts are made in flywheel design to avoid generating any transverse tensile stresses. Recent results for stress-rupture of a carbon fiber/epoxy composite under transverse tensile load reveal that these materials are surprisingly durable under the transverse loading condition and that some radial tensile stress could be tolerated in flywheel applications.

DeTeresa, S J; Groves, S E

2001-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

455

Grizzly Substation Fiber Optics : Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect

This notice announces BPA`s decision to construct, operate, and maintain the Grizzly Substation Fiber Optic Project (Project). This Project is part of a continuing effort by BPA to complete a regionwide upgrade of its existing telecommunications system. The US Forest Service and BPA jointly prepared the Grizzly Substation Fiber Optic Project Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1241) evaluating the potential environmental impacts of the Proposed Action, the Underground Installation Alternative, and the No Action Alternative. Based on the analysis in the EA, the US Forest Service and BPA have determined that the Proposed Action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI. The US Forest Service has separately issued a FONSI and Decision Notice authorizing BPA to construct, operate, and maintain the Project within the Crooked River National Grassland (Grassland).

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Microsoft Word - SilverCreek-Fiber-CX.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

John Brank John Brank Customer Service Engineer - TPC-OLYMPIA Proposed Action: Silver Creek Substation fiber project Budget Information: Work Order 253198, Task 03 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.7 Adding fiber optic cable to transmission structures or burying fiber optic cable in existing transmission line rights of way. Locations: Silver Creek Substation, Lewis County, Washington (T12N R2E SEC17) Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Lewis County Public Utility District (PUD) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to connect a fiber optic cable from an existing Lewis County PUD transmission line into the BPA Silver Creek Substation in Lewis County, Washington. The fiber project is needed to increase transmission system

457

A Fiber Interferometer for the Magnetized Shock Experiment  

SciTech Connect

The Magnetized Shock Experiment (MSX) at Los Alamos National Laboratory requires remote diagnostics of plasma density. Laser interferometry can be used to determine the line-integrated density of the plasma. A multi-chord heterodyne fiber optic Mach-Zehnder interferometer is being assembled and integrated into the experiment. The advantage of the fiber coupling is that many different view chords can be easily obtained by simply moving transmit and receive fiber couplers. Several such fiber sets will be implemented to provide a time history of line-averaged density for several chords at once. The multiple chord data can then be Abel inverted to provide radially resolved spatial profiles of density. We describe the design and execution of this multiple fiber interferometer.

Yoo, Christian [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

458

Microsoft Word - CX- Eugene Substation Fiber_130520.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Jonathan Toobian Project Manager - TPC-TPP-4 Proposed Action: Eugene Substation Fiber Interconnection Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B 4.7 Fiber Optic Cable Location: Eugene, Lane County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes allowing Light Speed Networks (LSN) to interconnect with its existing fiber optic network at BPA's Eugene substation in Lane County, Oregon. To interconnect to BPA's fiber network, LSN would install two new below ground fiber optic vaults within BPA's existing right-of-way. The first vault would be installed on BPA fee-owned land immediately south of the existing substation entrance, while the second vault

459

Microsoft Word - CX-Midway-Vantage-Fiber.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, 2011 2, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Chad Hamel Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Midway Area Fiber Project Budget Information: Work Order 00224734, Task 3 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.7 Adding fiber optic cable to transmission structures or burying fiber optic cable in existing transmission line rights-of-way. Location: Grant and Benton Counties, Washington Township 13 North, Range 24 East, Sections 2, 11, and 14 Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to install about 1.5 miles of aerial fiber optic cable on the existing Midway-Rocky Ford No.1 230-kilovolt (kV) transmission line. The new fiber

460

Apparatus and method for carbon fiber surface treatment  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus and method for enhancing the surface energy and/or surface chemistry of carbon fibers involves exposing the fibers to direct or indirect contact with atmospheric pressure plasma generated using a background gas containing at least some oxygen or other reactive species. The fiber may be exposed directly to the plasma, provided that the plasma is nonfilamentary, or the fiber may be exposed indirectly through contact with gases exhausting from a plasma discharge maintained in a separate volume. In either case, the process is carried out at or near atmospheric pressure, thereby eliminating the need for vacuum equipment. The process may be further modified by moistening the fibers with selected oxygen-containing liquids before exposure to the plasma.

Paulauskas, Felix L. (Knoxville, TN); Sherman, Daniel M. (Knoxville, TN)

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detergents synthetic fibers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Radiation-induced transient absorption in optical fibers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transient absorption in optical fibers has been studied with emphasis on fast absorption components. Radiation damage was induced with a Febetron 706 electron accelerator, modified to deliver an electron pulse width of 1.1 ns. Dye lasers were synchronized to the accelerator to provide a light pulse through the fiber during the radiation pulse. The output light pulse was detected with a biplanar vacuum photodiode. Four scope traces were used on each electron pulse to monitor the Febetron output, the input drive pulse, and two records of the output pulse on two sweep speeds. Detailed data were acquired for times less than 100 ns after irradiation. An insulated enslosure was used to vary fiber temperature from -30/sup 0/C to + 250/sup 0/C. Several fibers were studied with emphasis on ITT T303 PCS fiber. Data were acquired at 600 and 850 nm. Theoretical modeling of the data is presented.

Looner, L.D.; Turquet de Beauregard, G.; Lyons, P.B.; Kelly, R.E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Low-temperature hermetic sealing of optical fiber components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for manufacturing low-temperature hermetically sealed optical fiber components is provided. The method comprises the steps of: inserting an optical fiber into a housing, the optical fiber having a glass core, a glass cladding and a protective buffer layer disposed around the core and cladding; heating the housing to a predetermined temperature, the predetermined temperature being below a melting point for the protective buffer layer and above a melting point of a solder; placing the solder in communication with the heated housing to allow the solder to form an eutectic and thereby fill a gap between the interior of the housing and the optical fiber; and cooling the housing to allow the solder to form a hermetic compression seal between the housing and the optical fiber.

Kramer, D.P.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

463

Rotating fiber array molecular driver and molecular momentum transfer device constructed therewith  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rotating fiber array molecular driver is disclosed which includes a magnetically suspended and rotated central hub to which is attached a plurality of elongated fibers extending radially therefrom. The hub is rotated so as to straighten and axially extend the fibers and to provide the fibers with a tip speed which exceeds the average molecular velocity of fluid molecules entering between the fibers. Molecules colliding with the sides of the rotating fibers are accelerated to the tip speed of the fiber and given a momentum having a directional orientation within a relatively narrow distribution angle at a point radially outward of the hub, which is centered and peaks at the normal to the fiber sides in the direction of fiber rotation. The rotating fiber array may be used with other like fiber arrays or with other stationary structures to form molecular momentum transfer devices such as vacuum pumps, molecular separators, molecular coaters, or molecular reactors.

Milleron, Norman (1854 San Juan, Berkeley, CA 94707)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Chromatin fibers observed in situ in frozen hydrated sections. Native fiber diameter is not correlated with nucleosome repeat length  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Chromatin fibers have been observed and measured in frozen hydrated sections of three types of cell (chicken erythrocytes and sperm of Patiria miniata and Thyone briareus) representing an •20-bp range of nucleosomal repeat lengths. For sperm of the starfish P. miniata, it was possible to obtain images of chromatin fibers from cells that were swimming in seawater up to the moment of cryo-immobilization, thus providing a record of the native morphology of the chromatin of these cells. Glutaraldehyde fixation produced no significant changes in the ultrastructure or diameter of chromatin fibers, and fiber diameters observed in cryosections were similar to those recorded after low temperature embedding in Lowicryl KllM. Chromatin fiber diameters measured from

C. L. Woodcock

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Development of a Seed Cotton Fiber Quality Sensing System For Cotton Fiber Quality Mapping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For precision agriculture to work, an automated process to collect spatial-variability data within a field is necessary. Otherwise, data collection is prohibitively expensive and time consuming. Furthermore, to minimize measurement error due to harvesting method, data-collection processes involving normal cotton harvesting and ginning operations must be used. For the case of cotton, an automated prototype system using image processing to measure the micronaire value of cotton fiber during harvest was designed and built in the laboratory. This system was tested with two image-processing algorithms to identify and remove the effects of objects present in the images that were not cotton fiber, and then measure the reflectivity in three Near-Infrared (NIR) wavebands. Both algorithms yielded similar results when used on seed cotton samples. The reflectivity measurement after removing the effects of foreign matter had a strong relationship to standard micronaire measurements (R^2= 0.73 and 0.74 for the ratio-image and single-image algorithms, respectively) with a root mean squared error (RMSE) of 0.28 and 0.27, respectively. The ratio-image pixel classification method classified an average of 58% of the pixels in an image as "cotton", while the single-image method classified an average of 81% of the pixels in each image as cotton. These results do not show as strong a relationship between micronaire and NIR reflectivity of cotton samples as previous research done with very uniform lint cotton calibration samples. This is attributed to the higher content of foreign matter in seed cotton samples. With higher trash cotton and fiber that has not yet been cleaned, results obviously are not as good as when using calibration cotton samples. These results indicate the system can be adapted to perform in-situ measurement of cotton fiber quality, specifically micronaire, and enable harvesters to create quality maps of a field automatically to allow better crop management.

Schielack, Vincent Paul

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Stable nonlinear Mach-Zehnder fiber switch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An all-optical fiber switch is implemented within a short Mach-Zehnder interferometer configuration. The Mach-Zehnder switch is constructed to have a high temperature stability so as to minimize temperature gradients and other thermal effects which result in undesirable instability at the output of the switch. The Mach-Zehnder switch of the preferred embodiment is advantageously less than 2 cm in length between couplers to be sufficiently short to be thermally stable, and full switching is accomplished by heavily doping one or both of the arms between the couplers so as to provide a highly nonlinear region within one or both of the arms. A pump input source is used to affect the propagation characteristics of one of the arms to control the output coupling ratio of the switch. Because of the high nonlinearity of the pump input arm, low pump powers can be used, thereby alleviating difficulties and high cost associated with high pump input powers.

Digonnet, Michel J. F. (Palo Alto, CA); Shaw, H. John (Palo Alto, CA); Pantell, Richard H. (Menlo Park, CA); Sadowski, Robert W. (Camp Doha, KW)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Reflectance based optical fiber chemical sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thin film chemical sensor undergoes changes in reflective optical properties when exposed to a chemical species. A thin metal film is deposited at the end of an optical fiber, and exposure of the thin film to the chemical species causes changes in the effective thickness of the thin film, thereby changing its reflective properties. A chemical detection system based on the thin film sensor includes a light source and an optical divider for dividing light from the light source into a first and second light path. The first light path leads to circuitry for providing a reference signal. The thin film chemical sensor receives light from the second light path, and a photoelectric detector detects light reflected from the chemical sensor and provides an electrical signal representative of the reflected light. Circuitry is provided for comparing the reference signal with the reflected light signal, thereby providing a measurement signal indicative of the presence of the chemical species. 5 figs.

Butler, M.A.; Pfeifer, K.B.; Ricco, A.J.

1988-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

468

RADIATION EFFECTS ON EPOXY CARBON FIBER COMPOSITE  

SciTech Connect

Carbon fiber-reinforced bisphenol-A epoxy matrix composite was evaluated for gamma radiation resistance. The composite was exposed to total gamma doses of 50, 100, and 200 Mrad. Irradiated and baseline samples were tested for tensile strength, hardness and evaluated using FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy and DSC (differential scanning calorimetry) for structural changes. Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate microstructural behavior. Mechanical testing of the composite bars revealed no apparent change in modulus, strain to failure, or fracture strength after exposures. However, testing of only the epoxy matrix revealed changes in hardness, thermal properties, and FTIR results with increasing gamma irradiation. The results suggest the epoxy within the composite can be affected by exposure to gamma irradiation.

Hoffman, E

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

469

Fiber optical assembly for fluorescence spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for analyzing a sample for the presence of an analyte in a sample. The system includes a sample holder for containing the sample; an excitation source, such as a laser, and at least one linear array radially disposed about the sample holder. Radiation from the excitation source is directed to the sample, and the radiation induces fluorescent light in the sample. Each linear array includes a plurality of fused silica optical fibers that receive the fluorescent light and transmits a fluorescent light signal from the first end to an optical end port of the linear array. An end port assembly having a photo-detector is optically coupled to the optical end port. The photo-detector detects the fluorescent light signal and converts the fluorescent light signal into an electrical signal.

Carpenter, II, Robert W. (Pagosa Springs, CO); Rubenstein, Richard (Staten Island, NY); Piltch, Martin (Los Alamos, NM); Gray, Perry (Los Alamos, NM)

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

470

Development of the Nested Fiber Filter  

SciTech Connect

Battelle, has tested the Nested Fiber Filter (NFF) as a particulate control device for high temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) applications. Battelle funded initial bench-scale tests which were the basis for patents and a concept applying the NFF. Subsequent parametric tests in a 6-inch diameter reactor established excellent particulate capture performance, > 99 percent, for conditions up to 1600 F and 6 atmospheres. Effective cleaning/regeneration of the NFF was achieved in the 6-inch scale with acoustic and mechanical vibration. A pulse combustor was tested in an integrated NFF arrangement because of compatibility with the HTBP conditions. This arrangement provided the basis for larger scale tests under the subject contract. A 6-ft[sup 2] test module was designed and installed with an existing fluidized bed combustor for additional development and testing.

Litt, R.D.; Conkle, H.N.; Raghavan, J.K.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Mechanical properties of fiber reinforced lightweight concrete composites  

SciTech Connect

Hybrid composites with variable strength/toughness properties can be manufactured using combinations of brittle or ductile mesh in addition to brittle and ductile matrix reinforcements. The bending and tensile properties of thin sheet fiber cement composites made from these mixtures were investigated. Composites consisted of a woven mesh of either polyvinyl chloride (PVC) coated E-glass or polypropylene (PP) fibers for the surface reinforcement. In addition, chopped polypropylene, acrylic, nylon, and alkali-resistant (AR) glass fibers were used for the core reinforcement. It is shown that by controlling fiber contents, types, and combinations, design objectives such as strength, stiffness and toughness, can be achieved. Superior post-cracking behavior was measured for composites reinforced both with glass mesh and PP mesh. Load carrying capacity of PP mesh composites can be increased with the use of 1% or higher chopped PP fibers. Glass mesh composites with short AR glass fibers as matrix reinforcement indicate an increased matrix cracking strength and modulus of rupture. Combinations of PP mesh/short AR glass did not show a substantial improvement in the matrix ultimate strength. An increased nylon fiber surface area resulted in improved post peak response.

Perez-Pena, M. (USG Corp., Libertyville, IL (United States)); Mobasher, B. (Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Raman fiber optic probe assembly for use in hostile environments  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a device for Raman spectroscopic measurement of composition and concentrations in a hostile environment by the use of a first fiber optic as a means of directing high intensity monochromatic light from a laser to the hostile environment and a second fiber optic to receive the lower intensity scattered light for transmittal to a monochromator for analysis. To avoid damage to the fiber optics, they are protected from the hostile environment. A preferred embodiment of the Raman fiber optic probe is able to obtain Raman spectra of corrosive gases and solutions at temperatures up to 600.degree. F. and pressures up to 2000 psi. The incident exciting fiber optic cable makes an angle of substantially 90.degree. with the collecting fiber optic cable. This 90.degree. geometry minimizes the Rayleigh scattering signal picked up by the collecting fiber, because the intensity of Rayleigh scattering is lowest in the direction perpendicular to the beam path of the exciting light and therefore a 90.degree. scattering geometry optimizes the signal to noise ratio.

Schmucker, John E. (Hurt, VA); Falk, Jon C. (Pittsburgh, PA); Archer, William B. (Bethel Park, PA); Blasi, Raymond J. (Harrison City, PA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Carbon fiber composite characterization in adverse thermal environments.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The behavior of carbon fiber aircraft composites was studied in adverse thermal environments. The effects of resin composition and fiber orientation were measured in two test configurations: 102 by 127 millimeter (mm) test coupons were irradiated at approximately 22.5 kW/m{sup 2} to measure thermal response, and 102 by 254 mm test coupons were irradiated at approximately 30.7 kW/m{sup 2} to characterize piloted flame spread in the vertically upward direction. Carbon-fiber composite materials with epoxy and bismaleimide resins, and uni-directional and woven fiber orientations, were tested. Bismaleimide samples produced less smoke, and were more resistant to flame spread, as expected for high temperature thermoset resins with characteristically lower heat release rates. All materials lost approximately 20-25% of their mass regardless of resin type, fiber orientation, or test configuration. Woven fiber composites displayed localized smoke jetting whereas uni-directional composites developed cracks parallel to the fibers from which smoke and flames emanated. Swelling and delamination were observed with volumetric expansion on the order of 100% to 200%. The purpose of this work was to provide validation data for SNL's foundational thermal and combustion modeling capabilities.

Gomez-Vasquez, Sylvia; Brown, Alexander L.; Hubbard, Joshua A.; Ramirez, Ciro J.; Dodd, Amanda B.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

BMC Systems Biology BioMed Central Commentary Models for synthetic biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Synthetic biological engineering is emerging from biology as a distinct discipline based on quantification. The technologies propelling synthetic biology are not new, nor is the concept of designing novel biological molecules. What is new is the emphasis on system behavior. The objective is the design and construction of new biological devices and systems to deliver useful applications. Numerous synthetic gene circuits have been created in the past decade, including bistable switches, oscillators, and logic gates, and possible applications abound, including biofuels, detectors for biochemical and chemical weapons, disease diagnosis, and gene therapies. More than fifty years after the discovery of the molecular structure of DNA, molecular biology is mature enough for real quantification that is useful for biological engineering applications, similar to the revolution in modeling in chemistry in the 1950s. With the excitement that synthetic biology is generating, the engineering and biological science communities appear remarkably willing to cross disciplinary boundaries toward a common goal. Synthetic biological engineering is emerging from biology

Yiannis N Kaznessis

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

An optimum approach for fabrication of tapered hemispherical-end fiber for laser module packaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: coupling efficientcy, laser module packaging, semiempirical model, tapered hemispherical-end fiber

H. M. Yang; D. C. Jou; M. H. Chen; S. H. Wu; W. H. Cheng

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

THE BASICS OF FIBER OPTIC CABLE (Single-mode multi-mode)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

campuses, office buildings, industrial plants, and electric utility companies. A fiber-optic system is similar to the copper wire system that fiber-optics is replacing. The difference is that fiber-optics use into the fiber-optic medium where they travel down the cable. The light (near infrared) is most often 850nm

Wang, Deli

477

Density effect on relativistic electron beams in a plasma fiber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intense short-petawatt-laser driven relativistic electron beams in a hollow high-Z plasma fiber embedded in low-Z plasmas of different densities are studied. When the plasma is of lower density than the hollow fiber, resistive filamentation of the electron beam is observed. It is found that the electron motion and the magnetic field are highly correlated with tens of terahertz oscillation frequency. Depending on the material property around the hollow fiber and the plasma density, the beam electrons can be focused or defocused as it propagates in the plasma. Relativistic electron transport and target heating are also investigated.

Zhou, C. T.; He, X. T. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Wang, X. G. [Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Wu, S. Z. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Cai, H. B. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang, F. [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

478

Titanium diboride ceramic fiber composites for Hall-Heroult cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved cathode structure is described for Hall-Heroult cells for the electrolytic production of aluminum metal. This cathode structure is a preform fiber base material that is infiltrated with electrically conductive titanium diboride using chemical vapor infiltration techniques. The structure exhibits good fracture toughness, and is sufficiently resistant to attack by molten aluminum. Typically, the base can be made from a mat of high purity silicon carbide fibers. Other ceramic or carbon fibers that do not degrade at temperatures below about 1000 C can be used.

Besmann, T.M.; Lowden, R.A.

1990-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

479

Distributed Fiber Optic Gas Sensing for Harsh Environment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes work to develop a novel distributed fiber-optic micro-sensor that is capable of detecting common fossil fuel gases in harsh environments. During the 32-month research and development (R&D) program, GE Global Research successfully synthesized sensing materials using two techniques: sol-gel based fiber surface coating and magnetron sputtering based fiber micro-sensor integration. Palladium nanocrystalline embedded silica matrix material (nc-Pd/Silica), nanocrystalline palladium oxides (nc-PdO{sub x}) and palladium alloy (nc-PdAuN{sub 1}), and nanocrystalline tungsten (nc-WO{sub x}) sensing materials were identified to have high sensitivity and selectivity to hydrogen; while the palladium doped and un-doped nanocrystalline tin oxide (nc-PdSnO{sub 2} and nc-SnO{sub 2}) materials were verified to have high sensitivity and selectivity to carbon monoxide. The fiber micro-sensor comprises an apodized long-period grating in a single-mode fiber, and the fiber grating cladding surface was functionalized by above sensing materials with a typical thickness ranging from a few tens of nanometers to a few hundred nanometers. GE found that the morphologies of such sensing nanomaterials are either nanoparticle film or nanoporous film with a typical size distribution from 5-10 nanometers. nc-PdO{sub x} and alloy sensing materials were found to be highly sensitive to hydrogen gas within the temperature range from ambient to 150 C, while nc-Pd/Silica and nc-WO{sub x} sensing materials were found to be suitable to be operated from 150 C to 500 C for hydrogen gas detection. The palladium doped and un-doped nc-SnO{sub 2} materials also demonstrated sensitivity to carbon monoxide gas at approximately 500 C. The prototyped fiber gas sensing system developed in this R&D program is based on wavelength-division-multiplexing technology in which each fiber sensor is identified according to its transmission spectra features within the guiding mode and cladding modes. The interaction between the sensing material and fossil fuel gas results in a refractive index change and optical absorption in the sensing layer. This induces mode coupling strength and boundary conditions changes and thereby shifts the central wavelengths of the guiding mode and cladding modes propagation. GE's experiments demonstrated that such an interaction between the fossil fuel gas and sensing material not only shifts the central wavelengths of the guide mode and cladding modes propagation, but also alters their power loss characteristics. The integrated fiber gas sensing system includes multiple fiber gas sensors, fiber Bragg grating-based temperature sensors, fiber optical interrogator, and signal processing software.

Juntao Wu

2008-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

480

Nonlinear transmission through a tapered fiber in rubidium vapor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sub-wavelength diameter tapered optical fibers surrounded by rubidium vapor can undergo a substantial decrease in transmission at high atomic densities due to the accumulation of rubidium atoms on the surface of the fiber. Here we demonstrate the ability to control these changes in transmission using light guided within the taper. We observe transmission through a tapered fiber that is a nonlinear function of the incident power. This effect can also allow a strong control beam to change the transmission of a weak probe beam.

S. M. Hendrickson; T. B. Pittman; J. D. Franson

2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Development of Commodity Grade, Lower Cost Carbon Fiber - Commercial Applications  

SciTech Connect

In pursuit of the goal to produce ultra-lightweight fuel efficient vehicles, there has been great excitement during the last few years about the potential for using carbon fiber reinforced composites in high volume applications. Currently, the greatest hurdle that inhibits wider implementation of carbon fiber composites in transportation is the high cost of the fiber when compared to other candidate materials. As part of the United States Department of Energy s FreedomCAR initiative, significant research is being conducted to develop lower cost, high volume technologies for producing carbon fiber. This paper will highlight the on-going research in this area. Through Department of Energy (DOE) sponsorship, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and its partners have been working with the US Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC) to develop technologies that would enable the production of carbon fiber at 5-7 dollars per pound. Achievement of this cost goal would allow the introduction of carbon fiber based composites into a greater number of applications for future vehicles. The approach has necessitated the development of both alternative precursors and more efficient production methods. Alternative precursors under investigation include textile grade polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fibers and fibers from lignin-based feedstocks. Previously, as part of the research program, Hexcel Corporation developed the science necessary to allow textile grade PAN to be used as a precursor rather than typical carbon fiber grade precursors. Efforts are also underway to develop carbon fiber precursors from lignin-based feedstocks. ORNL and its partners are working on this effort with domestic pulp and paper producers. In terms of alternative production methods, ORNL has developed a microwave-based carbonization unit that can process pre-oxidized fiber at over 200 inches per minute. ORNL has also developed a new method of high speed oxidation and a new method for precursor stabilization. Additionally, novel methods of activating carbon fiber surfaces have been developed which allow atomic oxygen concentrations as high as 25-30% to be achieved rather than the more typical 4-8% achieved by the standard industrial ozone treatment.

Warren, Charles David [ORNL; Paulauskas, Felix L [ORNL; Baker, Frederick S [ORNL; Eberle, Cliff [ORNL; Naskar, Amit K [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Weaver, Charles E. (Knoxville, TN); Chilcoat, Bill R. (Knoxville, TN); Derbyshire, Frank (Lexington, KY); Jagtoyen, Marit (Lexington, KY)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Weaver, Charles E. (Knoxville, TN); Chilcoat, Bill R. (Knoxville, TN); Derbyshire, Frank (Lexington, KY); Jagtoyen, Marit (Lexington, KY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Titanium diboride ceramic fiber composites for Hall-Heroult cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved cathode structure for Hall-Heroult cells for the electrolytic production of aluminum metal. This cathode structure is a preform fiber base material that is infiltrated with electrically conductive titanium diboride using chemical vapor infiltration techniques. The structure exhibits good fracture toughness, and is sufficiently resistant to attack by molten aluminum. Typically, the base can be made from a mat of high purity silicon carbide fibers. Other ceramic or carbon fibers that do not degrade at temperatures below about 1000 deg. C can be used.

Besmann, Theodore M. (Knoxville, TN); Lowden, Richard A. (Knoxville, TN)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Real-time resilient focusing through a bending multimode fiber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a system capable of focusing light through a multimode fiber in 37ms, one order of magnitude faster than demonstrated in previous reports. As a result, the focus spot can be maintained during significant bending of the fiber, opening numerous opportunities for endoscopic imaging and energy delivery applications. We measure the transmission matrix of the fiber by projecting binary-amplitude computer generated holograms using a digital micromirror device and a field programmable gate array controller. The system shows two orders of magnitude enhancements of the focus spot relative to the background.

Caravaca-Aguirre, Antonio M; Conkey, Donald B; Piestun, Rafael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Using fiber optics to tap the sun`s power  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses a solar energy collection system in which optical fibers are used to transport energy from a single-stage and a double-stage, three-dimensional Compound Parabolic Concentrator (CPC). After developing a thermo-mathematical model for the assembly of CPC and fibers, numerical simulations are used to optimize the system design. The modules filled with plastic and glass are shown to perform considerably better than those filled with air. A two-stage system performs better than a single-stage module. CPC surface reflectance improves the yield but an increase in fiber length decreases the performance.

Khatri, N.; Brown, M.; Gerner, F. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States). Dept. of Mechanical, Industrial and Nuclear Engineering

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Method for separating the non-inked cellulose fibers from the inked cellulose fibers in cellulosic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for enzymatically separating the non-inked cellulose fibers from the inked cellulose fibers in cellulosic materials. The cellulosic material, such as newsprint, is introduced into a first chamber containing a plastic canvas basket. This first chamber is in fluid communication, via plastic tubing, with a second chamber containing cellobiase beads in a plastic canvas basket. Cellulase is then introduced into the first chamber. A programmable pump then controls the flow rate between the two chambers. The action of cellulase and stirring in the first chamber results in the production of a slurry of newsprint pulp in the first chamber. This slurry contains non-inked fibers, inked fibers, and some cellobiose. The inked fibers and cellobiose flow from the first chamber to the second chamber, whereas the non-inked fibers remain in the first chamber because they are too large to pass through the pores of the plastic canvas basket. The resulting non-inked and inked fibers are then recovered. 6 figs.

Woodward, J.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Comparison of Nonlinear Model Results Using Modified Recorded and Synthetic Ground Motions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study has been performed that compares results of nonlinear model runs using two sets of earthquake ground motion time histories that have been modified to fit the same design response spectra. The time histories include applicable modified recorded earthquake ground motion time histories and synthetic ground motion time histories. The modified recorded earthquake ground motion time histories are modified from time history records that are selected based on consistent magnitude and distance. The synthetic ground motion time histories are generated using appropriate Fourier amplitude spectrums, Arias intensity, and drift correction. All of the time history modification is performed using the same algorithm to fit the design response spectra. The study provides data to demonstrate that properly managed synthetic ground motion time histories are reasonable for use in nonlinear seismic analysis.

Robert E. Spears; J. Kevin Wilkins

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Synthetic and alternate fuels characterization. Final report, 31 August 1981-31 January 1988  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Diesel fuels derived from petroleum and synthetic sources were compared chemically and toxicologically to address the issue of whether a changeover of mobility fuels from natural to synthetic sources might be accompanied by greater or different toxicological hazards to military personnel. Diesel fuels derived from petroleum, shale oil, tar sands, and tar sands/petroleum coprocessing were compared for major organic composition, 4-6 ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon dermal tumorigens, major organic compounds in their inhalable volatiles, mouse dermal tumorigenicity and promoting activity. The data base was expanded by a similar comparison of petroleum- and coal-derived fuels for the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE). The results suggest that highly refined and finished mobility fuels from synthetic or alternate sources will not pose a significantly greater toxicological hazard than current petroleum-based fuels. Toxicological differences are likely to be subtle.

Griest, W.H.; Guerin, M.R.; Smith, L.H.; Witschi, H.P.; Higgins, C.E.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Metal matrix coated fiber composites and the methods of manufacturing such composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fiber coating which allows ceramic or metal fibers to be wetted by molten metals is disclosed. The coating inhibits degradation of the physical properties caused by chemical reaction between the fiber and the coating itself or between the fiber and the metal matrix. The fiber coating preferably includes at least a wetting layer, and in some applications, a wetting layer and a barrier layer between the fiber and the wetting layer. The wetting layer promotes fiber wetting by the metal matrix. The barrier layer inhibits fiber degradation. The fiber coating permits the fibers to be infiltrated with the metal matrix resulting in composites having unique properties not obtainable in pure materials. 8 figures.

Weeks, J.K. Jr.; Gensse, C.

1993-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

491

Emissions from Buses with DDC 6V92 Engines Using Synthetic Diesel Fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Synthetic diesel fuel can be made from a variety of feedstocks, including coal, natural gas and biomass. Synthetic diesel fuels can have very low sulfur and aromatic content, and excellent autoignition characteristics. Moreover, synthetic diesel fuels may also economically competitive with California diesel fuel if .roduced in large volumes. Previous engine laboratory and field tests using a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer indicate that synthetic diesel fuel made using the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalytic conversion process is a promising alternative fuel, because it can be used in unmodified diesel engines, and can reduce exhaust emissions substantially. The objective of this study was a preliminary assessment of the emissions from older model transit operated on Mossgas synthetic diesel fuel. The study compared emissions from transit buses operating on Federal no. 2 Diesel fuel, Mossgas synthetic diesel (MGSD), and a 50/50 blend of the two fuels. The buses were equipped with unmodified Detroit Diesel 6V92 2-stroke diesel engines. Six 40-foot buses were tested. Three of the buses had recently rebuilt engines and were equipped with an oxidation catalytic converter. Vehicle emissions measurements were performed using West Virginia University's unique transportable chassis dynamometer. The emissions were measured over the Central Business District (CBD) driving cycle. The buses performed well on both neat and blended MGSD fuel. Three buses without catalytic converters were tested. Compared to their emissions when operating on Federal no. 2 diesel fuel, these buses emitted an average of 5% lower oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and 20% lower particulate matter (PM) when operating on neat MGSD fuel. Catalyst equipped buses emitted an average of 8% lower NOx and 31% lower PM when operating on MGSD than when operating on Federal no. 2 diesel fuel.

Paul Norton; Keith Vertin; Nigel N. Clark; Donald W. Lyons; Mridul Gautam; Stephen Goguen; James Eberhardt

1999-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

492

Thermo-economic assessment of CO2 separation technologies in the framework of synthetic natural gas (SNG) production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Synthetic Natural Gas (SNG) is one of the alternative fuels that can be produced from biomass. Its potential advantages are the possibility of mixing with… (more)

Alamia, Alberto

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health IssuesChapter 14 Mitochondria as Novel Targets for Proapoptotic Synthetic Retinoids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health Issues Chapter 14 Mitochondria as Novel Targets for Proapoptotic Synthetic Retinoids Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press  ...

494

Study of comfort properties of natural and synthetic knitted fabrics in different blend ratios for winter active sportswear.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of the present study is to produce base layer winter active sportswear fabrics using natural and synthetic fibres and their blends which will… (more)

Wardiningsih, W

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

BIMA Memoranda Series Report from First Hat Creek FiberOptic Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cable system. Appendix A presents and costs a plan for upgrading the entire array to fiber­optic LO­stable single­mode fibers. On Sept. 20, the fiber­optic link was disassembled and the normal system restored. 2­meter lengths. 5 #12; A Fiber­Optic Upgrade of the BIMA Array In light of the success of the fiber­optic

496

High Strength Carbon Fibers - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

System and yielding 15 Msi modulus and 150 ksi. Technical Barriers High-strength carbon fibers account for approximately 65% of the cost of the high-pressure storage tanks....

497

Fiber optic signal amplifier using thermoelectric power generation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A remote fiber optic signal amplifier for use as a repeater/amplifier, such as in transoceanic communications, powered by a Pu.sub.238 or Sr.sub.90 thermoele