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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detector spot size" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Measurement and characterization of x-ray spot size  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In planning an x-ray imaging experiment one must have an accurate model of the imaging system to obtain optimum results. The blurring caused by the finite size of the x-ray source is often the least understood element in the system. We have developed experimental and analytical methods permitting accurate measurement and modeling of the x-ray source. The model offers a simple and accurate way to optimize the radiographic geometry for any given experimental requirement (i.e., resolution and dose at detector). Any text on radiography will mention the effects of the finite size of the x-ray source on image quality and how one can minimize this influence by the choice of a small radiographic magnification. The film blur (independent of the source blur) is often treated as a single number and combined with an effective blur dimension for the x-ray source to give a total blur on the film. In this paper, we will develop a treatment of x-ray sources based on the modulation transfer function (MTF). This approach allows us to infer the spatial distribution function of the electron beam that produces the bremsstrahlung x-rays and to predict the performance of an x-ray imaging system if we know the MTF of the detector. This treatment is much more accurate than a single number characterization. 4 refs., 7 figs.

Mueller, K.H.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Influence of spot size on propagation dynamics of laser-produced tin plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?Color online? Images of the tin plume recorded with 280 ? mdynamics of laser-produced tin plasma S. S. Harilal a?dynamics of an expanding tin plume for various spot sizes

Harilal, S S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

atf2 spot size: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

which is characterized by the surface brightness contrast, the size, the number, the umbrapenumbra structure, the shape, and the orientation with respect to the sweeping...

4

Real-time spot size camera for pulsed high-energy radiographic machines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focal spot size of an x-ray source is a critical parameter which degrades resolution in a flash radiograph. For best results, a small round focal spot is required. Therefore, a fast and accurate measurement of the spot size is highly desirable to facilitate machine tuning. This paper describes two systems developed for Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Pulsed High-Energy Radiographic Machine Emitting X-rays (PHERMEX) facility. The first uses a CCD camera combined with high-brightness floors, while the second utilizes phosphor storage screens. Other techniques typically record only the line spread function on radiographic film, while systems in this paper measure the more general two-dimensional point-spread function and associated modulation transfer function in real time for shot-to-shot comparison.

Watson, S.A.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Real-time spot size camera for pulsed high-energy radiographic machines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focal spot size of an x-ray source is a critical parameter which degrades resolution in a flash radiograph. For best results, a small round focal spot is required. Therefore, a fast and accurate measurement of the spot size is highly desirable to facilitate machine tuning. This paper describes two systems developed for Los Alamos National Laboratory's Pulsed High-Energy Radiographic Machine Emitting X-rays (PHERMEX) facility. The first uses a CCD camera combined with high-brightness floors, while the second utilizes phosphor storage screens. Other techniques typically record only the line spread function on radiographic film, while systems in this paper measure the more general two-dimensional point-spread function and associated modulation transfer function in real time for shot-to-shot comparison.

Watson, S.A.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

The Influence of spot size on the expansion dynamics of nanosecond-laser-produced copper plasmas in atmosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser produced copper plasmas of different spot sizes in air were investigated using fast photography and optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The laser energy was 33 mJ. There were dramatic changes in the plasma plume expansion into the ambient air when spot sizes changed from {approx}0.1 mm to {approx}0.6 mm. A stream-like structure and a hemispherical structure were, respectively, observed. It appeared that the same spot size resulted in similar expansion dynamics no matter whether the target was located in the front of or behind the focal point, although laser-induced air breakdown sometimes occurred in the latter case. Plasma plume front positions agree well with the classic blast wave model for the large spot-size cases, while an unexpected stagnation of {approx}80 ns occurred after the laser pulse ends for the small spot size cases. This stagnation can be understood in terms of the evolution of enhanced plasma shielding effects near the plasma front. Axial distributions of plasma components by OES revealed a good confinement effect. Electron number densities were estimated and interpreted using the recorded Intensified Charge Coupled Device (ICCD) images.

Li, Xingwen; Wei, Wenfu; Wu, Jian; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, No. 28 XianNing West Road, Xi'an, Shaanxi Province 710049 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, No. 28 XianNing West Road, Xi'an, Shaanxi Province 710049 (China)

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

7

Operational Experiences Tuning the ATF2 Final Focus Optics Towards Obtaining a 37nm Electron Beam IP Spot Size  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary aim of the ATF2 research accelerator is to test a scaled version of the final focus optics planned for use in next-generation linear lepton colliders. ATF2 consists of a 1.3 GeV linac, damping ring providing low-emittance electron beams (< 12pm in the vertical plane), extraction line and final focus optics. The design details of the final focus optics and implementation at ATF2 are presented elsewhere. The ATF2 accelerator is currently being commissioned, with a staged approach to achieving the design IP spot size. It is expected that as we implement more demanding optics and reduce the vertical beta function at the IP, the tuning becomes more difficult and takes longer. We present here a description of the implementation of the tuning procedures and describe operational experiences and performances.

White, Glen; /SLAC; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC; Woodley, Mark; /SLAC; Bai, Sha; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Bambade, Philip; /Orsay, LAL; Renier, Yves; /Orsay, LAL; Bolzon, Benoit; /Annecy, LAPP; Kamiya, Yoshio; /Tokyo U., ICEPP; Komamiya, Sachio; /Tokyo U.; Oroku, Masahiro; /Tokyo U.; Yamaguchi, Yohei; /Tokyo U.; Yamanaka, Takashi; /Tokyo U.; Kubo, Kiyoshi; /KEK, Tsukuba; Kuroda, Shigeru; /KEK, Tsukuba; Okugi, Toshiyuki; /KEK, Tsukuba; Tauchi, Toshiaki; /KEK, Tsukuba; Marin, Eduardo; /CERN

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

8

Effects of Fusion Zone Size and Failure Mode on Peak Load and Energy Absorption of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS). DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. The critical fusion zone sizes to ensure nugget pull-out failure mode are developed for both DP800 and TRIP800 using limit load based analytical model and micro-hardness measurements of the weld cross sections. Static weld strength tests using cross tension samples were performed on the joint populations with controlled fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied for all the weld populations using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that AHSS spot welds with fusion zone size of can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 materials examined. The critical fusion zone size for nugget pullout shall be derived for individual materials based on different base metal properties as well as different heat affected zone (HAZ) and weld properties resulted from different welding parameters.

Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

IEEE JOURNAL OF QUANTUM ELECTRONICS, VOL. 38, NO. 6, JUNE 2002 665 Facet Reflectivity of a Spot-Size-Converter Integrated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of 7 dBm are observed at the fabricated SOA, which consists of a window length of 20 m, facet angle reflectivity, semiconductor op- tical amplifier, spot-size-converter, window. I. INTRODUCTION SEMICONDUCTOR) coating requires a quarter-wave film with a refractive index equal to the square root of the refractive

10

Effects of Fusion Zone Size and Failure Mode on Peak Load and Energy Absorption of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds under Lap Shear Loading Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) under lap shear loading condition. DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. Static weld strength tests using lap shear samples were performed on the joint populations with various fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied for all the weld populations using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that AHSS spot welds with conventionally required fusion zone size of can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 welds under lap shear loading. Moreover, failure mode has strong influence on weld peak load and energy absorption for all the DP800 welds and the TRIP800 small welds: welds failed in pullout mode have statistically higher strength and energy absorption than those failed in interfacial fracture mode. For TRIP800 welds above the critical fusion zone level, the influence of weld failure modes on peak load and energy absorption diminishes. Scatter plots of peak load and energy absorption versus weld fusion zone size were then constructed, and the results indicate that fusion zone size is the most critical factor in weld quality in terms of peak load and energy absorption for both DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds.

Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The apparatus and method provide techniques through which both alpha and beta emission determinations can be made simultaneously using a simple detector structure. The technique uses a beta detector covered in an electrically conducting material, the electrically conducting material discharging ions generated by alpha emissions, and as a consequence providing a measure of those alpha emissions. The technique also offers improved mountings for alpha detectors and other forms of detectors against vibration and the consequential effects vibration has on measurement accuracy.

Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM); Bounds, John Alan (Los Alamos, NM); Allander, Krag (Los Alamos, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Size Effect on Nuclear Gamma-Ray Energy Spectra Acquired by Different Sized CeBr3, LaBr3:Ce, and NaI:Tl Gamma-Ray Detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gamma-ray energy spectra were acquired for different sizes of cerium tribromide (CeBr3), cerium-doped lanthanum tribromide (LaBr3:Ce), and thallium-doped sodium iodide (NaI:Tl) detectors. A comparison was conducted of the energy resolution and detection efficiency of these scintillator detectors for different sizes of detectors. The results of this study are consistent with the observation that for each size detector, LaBr3:Ce offers better resolution than either a CeBr3 or NaI:Tl detector of the same size. In addition, CeBr3 and LaBr3:Ce detectors could resolve some closely spaced peaks in the spectra of several radioisotopes that NaI:Tl could not. As the detector size increased, all three detector materials exhibited higher efficiency, albeit with slightly reduced resolution. Significantly, the very low intrinsic activity of CeBr3 is also demonstrated in this study, which, when combined with energy resolution characteristics for a range of detector sizes, could lead to an improved ability to detect special nuclear materials compared to the other detectors.

Guss, Paul [NSTec; Reed, Michael [NSTec; Yuan, Ding [NSTec; Beller, Denis [UNLV; Cutler, Matthew [UNLV; Contreras, Chris [UNLV; Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy [NSTec; Wilde, Scott UNLV

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

A FLUKA Study of $\\beta$-delayed Neutron Emission for the Ton-size DarkSide Dark Matter Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the published cosmogenic background study for a ton-sized DarkSide dark matter search, only prompt neutron backgrounds coincident with cosmogenic muons or muon induced showers were considered, although observation of the initiating particle(s) was not required. The present paper now reports an initial investigation of the magnitude of cosmogenic background from $\\beta$-delayed neutron emission produced by cosmogenic activity in DarkSide. The study finds a background rate for $\\beta$-delayed neutrons in the fiducial volume of the detector on the order of < 0.1 event/year. However, detailed studies are required to obtain more precise estimates. The result should be compared to a radiogenic background event rate from the PMTs inside the DarkSide liquid scintillator veto of 0.2 events/year.

Empl, Anton

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Canopy hot-spot as crop identifier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Illuminating any reflective rough or structured surface by a directional light source results in an angular reflectance distribution that shows a narrow peak in the direction of retro-reflection. This is called the Heiligenschein or hot-spot of vegetation canopies and is caused by mutual shading of leaves. The angular intensity distribution of the hot-spot, its brightness and slope, are therefore indicators of the plant's geometry. We propose the use of hot-spot characteristics as crop identifiers in satellite remote sensing because the canopy hot-spot carries information about plant stand architecture that is more distinctive for different plant species than, for instance, their spectral reflectance characteristics. A simple three-dimensional Monte Carlo/ray tracing model and an analytic two-dimensional model are developed to estimate the angular distribution of the hot-spot as a function of the size of the plant leaves. The results show that the brightness-distribution and slope of the hot-spot change distinctively for different leaf sizes indicating a much more peaked maximum for the smaller leaves.

Gerstl, S.A.W.; Simmer, C.; Powers, B.J.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Utility spot pricing, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of the present spot pricing study carried out for SCE and PG&E is to develop the concepts which wculd lead to an experimental design for spot pricing in the two utilities. The report suggests a set of experiments ...

Schweppe, Fred C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Reactor hot spot analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principle methods for performing reactor hot spot analysis are reviewed and examined for potential use in the Applied Physics Division. The semistatistical horizontal method is recommended for future work and is now available as an option in the SE2-ANL core thermal hydraulic code. The semistatistical horizontal method is applied to a small LMR to illustrate the calculation of cladding midwall and fuel centerline hot spot temperatures. The example includes a listing of uncertainties, estimates for their magnitudes, computation of hot spot subfactor values and calculation of two sigma temperatures. A review of the uncertainties that affect liquid metal fast reactors is also presented. It was found that hot spot subfactor magnitudes are strongly dependent on the reactor design and therefore reactor specific details must be carefully studied. 13 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

Vilim, R.B.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Spot-spraying Johnsongrass.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of naphtha and diesel fuel oil is the oil spray most generally used. Various other oil mixtures may be used for economy, for increased contact toxicity, or for a combination of contact toxicity and residual effectiveness. Oil sprays kill on contact... mixture of 40 pounds of sodium TCA and 20 pounds of sodium dalapon can be used for spot-treating sparsely infested cotton fields. It is a knock-out spray under some conditions. Maleic hydrazide (MH-30) is a translocated growth inhibitor with no residual...

Rea, H. E.

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Spot-Oiling Johnsongrass.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXTENSIO-N SERVICE G. G. Gibson, Director, College Station, Texas [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] I the bast I ir used the low I . .. 1 the fol or mort , needed SPOT-OILING JOHNSONGRASS H. E. Rea, M. J. Norris..., and Fred C. Elliott* Texas A. & M. College System ~HNSONGRASS CAN BE killed to the i ground by the application of 1 / 3 teaspoonful of a herbicidal oil to the crown of each stem. Eradication of established Johnsongrass can be obtained in a single...

Elliott, Fred C.; Norris, M. J.; Rea, H. E.

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Automated Spot Weld Inspection using Infrared Thermography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An automated non-contact and non-destructive resistance spot weld inspection system based on infrared (IR) thermography was developed for post-weld applications. During inspection, a weld coupon was heated up by an auxiliary induction heating device from one side of the weld, while the resulting thermal waves on the other side were observed by an IR camera. The IR images were analyzed to extract a thermal signature based on normalized heating time, which was then quantitatively correlated to the spot weld nugget size. The use of normalized instead of absolute IR intensity was found to be useful in minimizing the sensitivity to the unknown surface conditions and environment interference. Application of the IR-based inspection system to different advanced high strength steels, thickness gauges and coatings were discussed.

Chen, Jian [ORNL] [ORNL; Zhang, Wei [ORNL] [ORNL; Yu, Zhenzhen [ORNL] [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Hottest spot temperatures in ventilated dry type transformers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hottest spot temperature allowance to be used for the different insulation system temperature classes is a major unknown facing IEEE Working Groups developing standards and loading guides for ventilated dry type transformers. In 1944, the hottest spot temperature allowance for ventilated dry type transformers was established as 30 C for 80 C average winding temperature rise. Since 1944, insulation temperature classes have increased to 220 C but IEEE standards continue to use a constant 30 C hottest spot temperature allowance. IEC standards use a variable hottest spot temperature allowance from 5 to 30 C. Six full size test windings were manufactured with imbedded thermocouples and 133 test runs performed to obtain temperature rise data. The test data indicated that the hottest spot temperature allowance used in IEEE standards for ventilated dry type transformers above 500 kVA is too low. This is due to the large thermal gradient from the bottom to the top of the windings caused by natural convection air flow through the cooling ducts. A constant ratio of hottest spot winding temperature rise to average winding temperature rise should be used in product standards for all insulation temperature classes. A ratio of 1.5 is suggested for ventilated dry type transformers above 500 kVA. This would increase the hottest spot temperature allowance from 30 C to 60 C and decrease the permissible average winding temperature rise from 150 C to 120 C for the 220 C insulation temperature class.

Pierce, L.W. (General Electric Co., Rome, GA (United States))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detector spot size" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Direct and indirect effects of southern flounder predation on a spot population: Experimental and model analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have previously shown that southern flounder (Paralichthys lethostigma Jordan and Gilbert) influence the survival and size-distribution of spot (Leiostomus xanthurus Lafayette) and other small estuarine fishes in experimental ponds. In this paper, we seek to determine whether these of effects can be accounted for by direct size-dependent predation or if there is also evidence for indirect behavioral effects on spot foraging which might alter their survival or population size structure. In our experiment, spot were allowed to grow in the presence and absence of southern flounder in an experimental estuarine pond for 101 days. Each treatment was replicated three times. We also apply a recently published simulation model of the flounder-spot interaction to this experiment to independently test the model and to estimate the direct effects of flounder predation on spot survival and size structure.

Crowder, L.B.; Wright, R.A.; Martin, T.H.; Rice, J.A. (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Zoology); Rose, K.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Direct and indirect effects of southern flounder predation on a spot population: Experimental and model analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have previously shown that southern flounder (Paralichthys lethostigma Jordan and Gilbert) influence the survival and size-distribution of spot (Leiostomus xanthurus Lafayette) and other small estuarine fishes in experimental ponds. In this paper, we seek to determine whether these of effects can be accounted for by direct size-dependent predation or if there is also evidence for indirect behavioral effects on spot foraging which might alter their survival or population size structure. In our experiment, spot were allowed to grow in the presence and absence of southern flounder in an experimental estuarine pond for 101 days. Each treatment was replicated three times. We also apply a recently published simulation model of the flounder-spot interaction to this experiment to independently test the model and to estimate the direct effects of flounder predation on spot survival and size structure.

Crowder, L.B.; Wright, R.A.; Martin, T.H.; Rice, J.A. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Zoology; Rose, K.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

23

Utility spot pricing study : Wisconsin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spot pricing covers a range of electric utility pricing structures which relate the marginal costs of electric generation to the prices seen by utility customers. At the shortest time frames prices change every five ...

Caramanis, Michael C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Single-shot and single-spot measurement of laser ablation threshold for carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A simple and convenient procedure for single-shot, single-spot ablation threshold measurement has been developed. It is based on the employment of cylindrical lens to obtain elliptical Gaussian laser spot. The ablated spot chords which are parallel to the minor axis were measured across the spot major axis which is proportional to the fluence cross-section thus providing wide range dependence of damaged spot size versus fluence in one spot measurement. For both conventional and new-developed procedures the ablation threshold for typical Nd:YAG laser parameters (1064 nm, 10 ns) has been measured as 50 mJ/cm2 which is one order of magnitude lower than that for a bulk graphite.

Lednev, Vasily N; Obraztsova, Elena D; Kudryashov, Sergey I; Bunkin, Alexey F

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Predicting hottest spot temperatures in ventilated dry type transformer windings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Test data indicates that hottest spot allowances used in IEEE standards for ventilated dry type transformers above 500 kVA are too low. A mathematical model to predict hottest spot temperature rises in ventilated dry type transformers was developed. Data from six layer type test windings and a 2500 kva prototype was used to refine the model. A correlation for the local heat transfer coefficient in the cooling ducts was developed. The model was used to study the effect of various parameters on the ratio of hottest spot to average winding temperature rise. The number of conductor layers, insulation thickness, and conductor strand size were found to have only a minor effect on the ratio. Winding height was found to be the main parameter influencing the ratio of hottest spot to average winding temperature rise. The study based on the mathematical model confirmed previous conclusions based on test data that the hottest spot allowances used in IEEE standards for ventilated dry type transformers above 500 kVA should be revised.

Pierce, L.W. (General Electric Co., Rome, GA (United States))

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Systems and methods of varying charged particle beam spot size  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and devices enable shaping of a charged particle beam. A modified dielectric wall accelerator includes a high gradient lens section and a main section. The high gradient lens section can be dynamically adjusted to establish the desired electric fields to minimize undesirable transverse defocusing fields at the entrance to the dielectric wall accelerator. Once a baseline setting with desirable output beam characteristic is established, the output beam can be dynamically modified to vary the output beam characteristics. The output beam can be modified by slightly adjusting the electric fields established across different sections of the modified dielectric wall accelerator. Additional control over the shape of the output beam can be excreted by introducing intentional timing de-synchronization offsets and producing an injected beam that is not fully matched to the entrance of the modified dielectric accelerator.

Chen, Yu-Jiuan

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

27

Pendulum detector testing device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A detector testing device which provides consistent, cost-effective, repeatable results. The testing device is primarily constructed of PVC plastic and other non-metallic materials. Sensitivity of a walk-through detector system can be checked by: 1) providing a standard test object simulating the mass, size and material content of a weapon or other contraband, 2) suspending the test object in successive positions, such as head, waist and ankle levels, simulating where the contraband might be concealed on a person walking through the detector system; and 3) swinging the suspended object through each of the positions, while operating the detector system and observing its response. The test object is retained in a holder in which the orientation of the test device or target can be readily changed, to properly complete the testing requirements.

Gonsalves, John M. (Modesto, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Pendulum detector testing device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A detector testing device is described which provides consistent, cost-effective, repeatable results. The testing device is primarily constructed of PVC plastic and other non-metallic materials. Sensitivity of a walk-through detector system can be checked by: (1) providing a standard test object simulating the mass, size and material content of a weapon or other contraband, (2) suspending the test object in successive positions, such as head, waist and ankle levels, simulating where the contraband might be concealed on a person walking through the detector system; and (3) swinging the suspended object through each of the positions, while operating the detector system and observing its response. The test object is retained in a holder in which the orientation of the test device or target can be readily changed, to properly complete the testing requirements. 5 figs.

Gonsalves, J.M.

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

29

Blind spots between quantum states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The overlap of a large quantum state with its image, under tiny translations, oscillates swiftly. We here show that complete orthogonality occurs generically at isolated points. Decoherence, in the Markovian approximation, lifts the correlation minima from zero much more quickly than the Wigner function is smoothed into a positive phase space distribution. In the case of a superposition of coherent states, blind spots depend strongly on positions and amplitudes of the components, but they are only weakly affected by relative phases and the various degrees and directions of squeezing. The blind spots for coherent state triplets are special in that they lie close to an hexagonal lattice: Further superpositions of translated triplets, specified by nodes of one of the sublattices, are quasi-orthogonal to the original triplet and to any state, likewise constructed on the other sublattice.

Eduardo Zambrano; Alfredo M Ozorio de Almeida

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

30

Hot Spot | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:GreerHi GtelHomer, Alaska:Horace, NorthHorvatic JumpOpenHotPot,Spot

31

Resistance Spot Welding of Galvanized Steel: Part II. Mechanisms of Spot Weld Nugget Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

( l Resistance Spot Welding of Galvanized Steel: Part II. Mechanisms of Spot Weld Nugget Formation S. A. GEDEON and T. W. EAGAR Dynamic inspection monitoring of the weld current, voltage, resistance of material variations and weld process parameter modifications on resistance spot welding of coated

Eagar, Thomas W.

32

MS Detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Good eyesight is often taken for granted, a situation that everyone appreciates once vision begins to fade with age. New eyeglasses or contact lenses are traditional ways to improve vision, but recent new technology, i.e. LASIK laser eye surgery, provides a new and exciting means for marked vision restoration and improvement. In mass spectrometry, detectors are the 'eyes' of the MS instrument. These 'eyes' have also been taken for granted. New detectors and new technologies are likewise needed to correct, improve, and extend ion detection and hence, our 'chemical vision'. The purpose of this report is to review and assess current MS detector technology and to provide a glimpse towards future detector technologies. It is hoped that the report will also serve to motivate interest, prompt ideas, and inspire new visions for ion detection research.

Koppenaal, David W.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Denton, M Bonner B.; Sperline, Roger P.; Hieftje, Gary M.; Schilling, G. D.; Andrade, Francisco J.; Barnes IV., James H.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

BLIND SPOTS OF QUALITATIVE SIMULATORS Nuri Tasdemir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BLIND SPOTS OF QUALITATIVE SIMULATORS by Nuri Ta¸sdemir BS, in Electrical and Electronics in Computer Engineering Bogazi¸ci University 2007 #12;ii BLIND SPOTS OF QUALITATIVE SIMULATORS APPROVED BY: Prof. A.C. Cem Say . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (Thesis Supervisor) Prof. H. Levent Akin

34

Solid state neutron detector array  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A neutron detector array is capable of measuring a wide range of neutron fluxes. The array includes multiple semiconductor neutron detectors. Each detector has a semiconductor active region that is resistant to radiation damage. In one embodiment, the array preferably has a relatively small size, making it possible to place the array in confined locations. The ability of the array to detect a wide range of neutron fluxes is highly advantageous for many applications such as detecting neutron flux during start up, ramp up and full power of nuclear reactors. 7 figs.

Seidel, J.G.; Ruddy, F.H.; Brandt, C.D.; Dulloo, A.R.; Lott, R.G.; Sirianni, E.; Wilson, R.O.

1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

35

Solid state neutron detector array  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A neutron detector array is capable of measuring a wide range of neutron fluxes. The array includes multiple semiconductor neutron detectors. Each detector has a semiconductor active region that is resistant to radiation damage. In one embodiment, the array preferably has a relatively small size, making it possible to place the array in confined locations. The ability of the array to detect a wide range of neutron fluxes is highly advantageous for many applications such as detecting neutron flux during start up, ramp up and full power of nuclear reactors.

Seidel, John G. (Pittsburgh, PA); Ruddy, Frank H. (Monroeville, PA); Brandt, Charles D. (Mount Lebanon, PA); Dulloo, Abdul R. (Pittsburgh, PA); Lott, Randy G. (Pittsburgh, PA); Sirianni, Ernest (Monroeville, PA); Wilson, Randall O. (Greensburg, PA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Microwave detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microwave detector (10) is provided for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations. A biased ferrite (26, 28) produces a magnetization field flux that links a B-dot loop (16, 20). The magnetic field of the microwave pulse participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux. High-frequency insensitive means (18, 22) are provided for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop. The recorded output of the detector is proportional to the time derivative of the square of the envelope shape of the microwave pulse.

Meldner, Heiner W. (Moss Beach, CA); Cusson, Ronald Y. (Chapel Hill, NC); Johnson, Ray M. (San Ramon, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Microwave detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microwave detector is provided for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations. A biased ferrite produces a magnetization field flux that links a B-dot loop. The magnetic field of the microwave pulse participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux. High-frequency insensitive means are provided for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop. The recorded output of the detector is proportional to the time derivative of the square of the envelope shape of the microwave pulse.

Meldner, H.W.; Cusson, R.Y.; Johnson, R.M.

1985-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

38

Interactive display system having a matrix optical detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A display system includes a waveguide optical panel having an inlet face and an opposite outlet face. An image beam is projected across the inlet face laterally and transversely for display on the outlet face. An optical detector including a matrix of detector elements is optically aligned with the inlet face for detecting a corresponding lateral and transverse position of an inbound light spot on the outlet face.

Veligdan, James T.; DeSanto, Leonard

2007-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

39

POWER '99 Conference 1 Stochastic Models of Electricity Spot Price  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spread call options. power spot price delivery at PV gas spot price SoCal system 8000 heat rate When power. When the spot market implied heat rate is below the unit operating heat rate, generator should1 POWER '99 Conference 1 Stochastic Models of Electricity Spot Price and their Applications Shijie

California at Berkeley. University of

40

Neutron detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

Stephan, Andrew C. (Knoxville, TN); Jardret; Vincent D. (Powell, TN)

2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detector spot size" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Relationship between Hot Spot Residues and Ligand Binding Hot Spots in Protein-Protein Interfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, while identification of a hot spot by alanine scanning establishes the potential to generate substantial, termed "hot spots", that comprise the subset of residues that contribute the bulk of the binding free proposed as prime targets for drug binding.1,4 The established approach to the identification of such hot

Vajda, Sandor

42

Hot spot-derived shock initiation phenomena in heterogeneous nitromethane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The addition of solid silica particles to gelled nitromethane offers a tractable model system for interrogating the role of impedance mismatches as one type of hot spot 'seed' on the initiation behaviors of explosive formulations. Gas gun-driven plate impact experiments are used to produce well-defined shock inputs into nitromethane-silica mixtures containing size-selected silica beads at 6 wt%. The Pop-plots or relationships between shock input pressure and rundistance (or time)-to-detonation for mixtures containing small (1-4 {micro}m) and large (40 {micro}m) beads are presented. Overall, the addition of beads was found to influence the shock sensitivity of the mixtures, with the smaller beads being more sensitizing than the larger beads, lowering the shock initiation threshold for the same run distance to detonation compared with neat nitromethane. In addition, the use of embedded electromagnetic gauges provides detailed information pertaining to the mechanism of the build-up to detonation and associated reactive flow. Of note, an initiation mechanism characteristic of homogeneous liquid explosives, such as nitromethane, was observed in the nitromethane-40 {micro}m diameter silica samples at high shock input pressures, indicating that the influence of hot spots on the initiation process was minimal under these conditions.

Dattelbaum, Dana M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheffield, Stephen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stahl, David B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dattelbaum, Andrew M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Discriminative Keyword Spotting David Grangier1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratories America, Princeton, NJ, USA 2 IDIAP Research Institute, Martigny, Switzerland 3 Google Inc., Mountain View, CA, USA This chapter introduces a discriminative method for detecting and spotting keywords and transition models, or the Expectation-Maximization (EM) training procedure, which is prone to convergence

Tomkins, Andrew

44

Oscillator detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An alien liquid detector employs a monitoring element and an oscillatory electronic circuit for maintaining the temperature of the monitoring element substantially above ambient temperature. The output wave form, eg., frequency of oscillation or wave shape, of the oscillatory circuit depends upon the temperaturedependent electrical characteristic of the monitoring element. A predetermined change in the output waveform allows water to be discriminated from another liquid, eg., oil. Features of the invention employing two thermistors in two oscillatory circuits include positioning one thermistor for contact with water and the other thermistor above the oil-water interface to detect a layer of oil if present. Unique oscillatory circuit arrangements are shown that achieve effective thermistor action with an economy of parts and energizing power. These include an operational amplifier employed in an astable multivibrator circuit, a discrete transistor-powered tank circuit, and use of an integrated circuit chip.

Potter, B.M.

1980-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

45

Sourcing Flexibility, Spot Trading, and Procurement Contract Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the structure and pricing of option contracts for an industrial good in the presence of spot trading. We combine the analysis of spot trading and buyers' disparate private valuations for different suppliers' ...

Pei, Pamela Pen-Erh

46

Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels ...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle...

47

EECBG Success Story: Bright Green Spot: Fort Worth Library |...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Bright Green Spot: Fort Worth Library EECBG Success Story: Bright Green Spot: Fort Worth Library September 30, 2010 - 9:53am Addthis Fort Worth's Central Library is seeing...

48

Bright Green Spot: Fort Worth Library | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Bright Green Spot: Fort Worth Library Bright Green Spot: Fort Worth Library September 30, 2010 - 4:07pm Addthis Lindsay Gsell Fort Worth's Central Library is seeing tremendous...

49

A High-resolution TOF Detector _ A Possible Way to Compete with a RICH Detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using two identical 64-pixel Burle/Photonis MCP-PMTs to provide start and stop signals, they have achieved a timing resolution of {sigma}{sub Single{_}detector} {approx} 7.2 ps for N{sub pe} {approx} 50 photoelectrons (N{sub pe}) with a laser diode providing a 1 mm spot on the MCP window. The limiting resolution achieved was {sigma}{sub Single{_}detector} {approx} 5.0 ps for N{sub pe} {approx} 180, for which they estimate the MCP-PMT contribution of {sigma}{sub MCP-PMT} {approx} 4.5 ps. The electronics contribution is estimated as {sigma}{sub Electrons} = 3.42 ps. These results suggest that an ultra-high resolution TOF detector may become a reality at future experiments one day.

Va'vra, J; /SLAC; Ertley, C.; /Argonne; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Ratcliff, B.; Schwiening, J.; /SLAC

2008-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

50

A high resolution view of the jet termination shock in a hot spot of the nearby radio galaxy Pictor A: implications for X-ray models of radio galaxy hot spots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Images made with the VLBA have resolved the region in a nearby radio galaxy, Pictor A, where the relativistic jet that originates at the nucleus terminates in an interaction with the intergalactic medium, a so-called radio galaxy hot spot. This image provides the highest spatial resolution view of such an object to date (16 pc), more than three times better than previous VLBI observations of similar objects. The north-west Pictor A hot spot is resolved into a complex set of compact components, seen to coincide with the bright part of the hot spot imaged at arcsecond-scale resolution with the VLA. In addition to a comparison with VLA data, we compare our VLBA results with data from the HST and Chandra telescopes, as well as new Spitzer data. The presence of pc-scale components in the hot spot, identifying regions containing strong shocks in the fluid flow, leads us to explore the suggestion that they represent sites of synchrotron X-ray production, contributing to the integrated X-ray flux of the hot spot, along with X-rays from synchrotron self-Compton scattering. This scenario provides a natural explanation for the radio morphology of the hot spot and its integrated X-ray emission, leading to very different predictions for the higher energy X-ray spectrum compared to previous studies. From the sizes of the individual pc-scale components and their angular spread, we estimate that the jet width at the hot spot is in the range 70 - 700 pc, which is comparable to similar estimates in PKS 2153-69, 3C 205, and 4C 41.17. The lower limit in this range arises from the suggestion that the jet may dither in its direction as it passes through hot spot backflow material close to the jet termination point, creating a "dentist drill" effect on the inside of a cavity 700 pc in diameter.

S. J. Tingay; E. Lenc; G. Brunetti; M. Bondi

2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

51

Junction-side illuminated silicon detector arrays  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A junction-side illuminated detector array of pixelated detectors is constructed on a silicon wafer. A junction contact on the front-side may cover the whole detector array, and may be used as an entrance window for light, x-ray, gamma ray and/or other particles. The back-side has an array of individual ohmic contact pixels. Each of the ohmic contact pixels on the back-side may be surrounded by a grid or a ring of junction separation implants. Effective pixel size may be changed by separately biasing different sections of the grid. A scintillator may be coupled directly to the entrance window while readout electronics may be coupled directly to the ohmic contact pixels. The detector array may be used as a radiation hardened detector for high-energy physics research or as avalanche imaging arrays.

Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Patt, Bradley E.; Tull, Carolyn

2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

52

High speed two-dimensional optical beam position detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disclosed is the design of a high speed two-dimensional optical beam position detector which outputs the X and Y displacement and total intensity linearly. The experimental detector measures the displacement from DC to 123 MHz and the intensity of an optical spot in a similar way as a conventional quadrant photodiode detector. The design uses four discrete photodiodes and simple dedicated optics for the position decomposition which enables higher spatial accuracy and faster electronic processing than conventional detectors. Measurements of the frequency response and the spatial sensitivity demonstrate high suitability for atomic force microscopy, scanning probe data storage applications, and wideband wavefront sensing. The operation principle allows for position measurements up to 20 GHz and more in bandwidth.

Rutten, Paul Edmond [Maypa B.V., Bijsters 2, 5131 NW, Alphen (Netherlands)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

53

On the mechanism of operation of a cathode spot cell in a vacuum arc  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The erosive structures formed on a tungsten cathode as a result of the motion of the cathode spot of a vacuum arc over the cathode surface have been examined. It has been found that the average mass of a cathode microprotrusion having the shape of a solidified jet is approximately equal to the mass of ions removed from the cathode within the lifetime of a cathode spot cell carrying a current of several amperes. The time of formation of a new liquid-metal jet under the action of the reactive force of the plasma ejected by the cathode spot is about 10?ns, which is comparable to the lifetime of a cell. The growth rate of a liquid-metal jet is ?10{sup 4}?cm/s. The geometric shape and size of a solidified jet are such that a new explosive emission center (spot cell) can be initiated within several nanoseconds during the interaction of the jet with the dense cathode plasma. This is the underlying mechanism of the self-sustained operation of a vacuum arc.

Mesyats, G. A.; Petrov, A. A. [P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, 53 Leninsky Ave., Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Bochkarev, M. B. [Institute of Electrophysics, UB, RAS, 106 Amundsen St., Ekaterinburg 620016 (Russian Federation); Barengolts, S. A., E-mail: sb@nsc.gpi.ru [A. M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute, RAS, 38 Vavilov St., Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

54

The fractal nature of vacuum arc cathode spots  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cathode spot phenomena show many features of fractals, for example self-similar patterns in the emitted light and arc erosion traces. Although there have been hints on the fractal nature of cathode spots in the literature, the fractal approach to spot interpretation is underutilized. In this work, a brief review of spot properties is given, touching the differences between spot type 1 (on cathodes surfaces with dielectric layers) and spot type 2 (on metallic, clean surfaces) as well as the known spot fragment or cell structure. The basic properties of self-similarity, power laws, random colored noise, and fractals are introduced. Several points of evidence for the fractal nature of spots are provided. Specifically power laws are identified as signature of fractal properties, such as spectral power of noisy arc parameters (ion current, arc voltage, etc) obtained by fast Fourier transform. It is shown that fractal properties can be observed down to the cutoff by measurement resolution or occurrence of elementary steps in physical processes. Random walk models of cathode spot motion are well established: they go asymptotically to Brownian motion for infinitesimal step width. The power spectrum of the arc voltage noise falls as 1/f {sup 2}, where f is frequency, supporting a fractal spot model associated with Brownian motion.

Anders, Andre

2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

55

Berkeley Lab's SPOT Suite Transforms Beamline Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi,Benefits PlanabPerformanceSPOT Suite

56

HIgh Rate X-ray Fluorescence Detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to develop a compact, modular multi-channel x-ray detector with integrated electronics. This detector, based upon emerging silicon drift detector (SDD) technology, will be capable of high data rate operation superior to the current state of the art offered by high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors, without the need for liquid nitrogen. In addition, by integrating the processing electronics inside the detector housing, the detector performance will be much less affected by the typically noisy electrical environment of a synchrotron hutch, and will also be much more compact than current systems, which can include a detector involving a large LN2 dewar and multiple racks of electronics. The combined detector/processor system is designed to match or exceed the performance and features of currently available detector systems, at a lower cost and with more ease of use due to the small size of the detector. In addition, the detector system is designed to be modular, so a small system might just have one detector module, while a larger system can have many â?? you can start with one detector module, and add more as needs grow and budget allows. The modular nature also serves to simplify repair. In large part, we were successful in achieving our goals. We did develop a very high performance, large area multi-channel SDD detector, packaged with all associated electronics, which is easy to use and requires minimal external support (a simple power supply module and a closed-loop water cooling system). However, we did fall short of some of our stated goals. We had intended to base the detector on modular, large-area detectors from Ketek GmbH in Munich, Germany; however, these were not available in a suitable time frame for this project, so we worked instead with pnDetector GmbH (also located in Munich). They were able to provide a front-end detector module with six 100 m^2 SDD detectors (two monolithic arrays of three elements each) along with associated preamplifiers; these detectors surpassed the performance we expected to get from the Ketek detectors, however they are housed in a sealed module, which does not offer the ease of repair and expandability weâ??d hoped to achieve with the Ketek SDDâ??s. Our packaging efforts were quite successful, as we came up with a very compact way to mount the detector and to house the associated electronics, as well as a very effective way to reliably take out the heat (from the electronics as well as the detectorâ??s Peltier coolers) without risk of condensation and without external airflow or vibration, which could create problems for the target applications. While we were able to design compact processing electronics that fit into the detector assembly, they are still at the prototype stage, and would require a significant redesign to achieve product status. We have not yet tested this detector at a synchrotron facility; we do still plan on working with some close contacts at the nearby Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) to get some testing with the beam (using existing commercial electronics for readout, as the integrated processor is not ready for use).

Grudberg, Peter Matthew [XIA LLC

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

57

GADRAS Detector Response Function.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) applies a Detector Response Function (DRF) to compute the output of gamma-ray and neutron detectors when they are exposed to radiation sources. The DRF is fundamental to the ability to perform forward calculations (i.e., computation of the response of a detector to a known source), as well as the ability to analyze spectra to deduce the types and quantities of radioactive material to which the detectors are exposed. This document describes how gamma-ray spectra are computed and the significance of response function parameters that define characteristics of particular detectors.

Mitchell, Dean J.; Harding, Lee; Thoreson, Gregory G; Horne, Steven M.

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels II...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

II Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels II 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

59

Gamma ray detector shield  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gamma ray detector shield comprised of a rigid, lead, cylindrical-shaped vessel having upper and lower portions with an pneumatically driven, sliding top assembly. Disposed inside the lead shield is a gamma ray scintillation crystal detector. Access to the gamma detector is through the sliding top assembly.

Ohlinger, R.D.; Humphrey, H.W.

1985-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

60

Tevatron detector upgrades  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The D0 and CDF experiments are in the process of upgrading their detectors to cope with the high luminosities projected for the remainder of Tevatron Run II. They discuss the expected Tevatron environment through 2009, the detector challenges due to increasing luminosity in this period, and the solutions undertaken by the two experiments to mitigate detector problems and maximize physics results.

Lipton, R.; /Fermilab

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detector spot size" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Wafer-fused semiconductor radiation detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Wafer-fused semiconductor radiation detector useful for gamma-ray and x-ray spectrometers and imaging systems. The detector is fabricated using wafer fusion to insert an electrically conductive grid, typically comprising a metal, between two solid semiconductor pieces, one having a cathode (negative electrode) and the other having an anode (positive electrode). The wafer fused semiconductor radiation detector functions like the commonly used Frisch grid radiation detector, in which an electrically conductive grid is inserted in high vacuum between the cathode and the anode. The wafer-fused semiconductor radiation detector can be fabricated using the same or two different semiconductor materials of different sizes and of the same or different thicknesses; and it may utilize a wide range of metals, or other electrically conducting materials, to form the grid, to optimize the detector performance, without being constrained by structural dissimilarity of the individual parts. The wafer-fused detector is basically formed, for example, by etching spaced grooves across one end of one of two pieces of semiconductor materials, partially filling the grooves with a selected electrical conductor which forms a grid electrode, and then fusing the grooved end of the one semiconductor piece to an end of the other semiconductor piece with a cathode and an anode being formed on opposite ends of the semiconductor pieces.

Lee, Edwin Y. (Livermore, CA); James, Ralph B. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Gaseous Detectors: recent developments and applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since long time, the compelling scientific goals of future high energy physics experiments were a driving factor in the development of advanced detector technologies. A true innovation in detector instrumentation concepts came in 1968, with the development of a fully parallel readout for a large array of sensing elements - the Multiwire Proportional Chamber (MWPC), which earned Georges Charpak a Nobel prize in physics in 1992. Since that time radiation detection and imaging with fast gaseous detectors, capable of economically covering large detection volume with low mass budget, have been playing an important role in many fields of physics. Advances in photo-lithography and micro-processing techniques in the chip industry during the past decade triggered a major transition in the field of gas detectors from wire structures to Micro-Pattern Gas Detector (MPGD) concepts, revolutionizing cell size limitations for many gas detector applications. The high radiation resistance and excellent spatial and time resolution make them an invaluable tool to confront future detector challenges at the next generation of colliders. The design of the new micro-pattern devices appears suitable for industrial production. Novel structures where MPGDs are directly coupled to the CMOS pixel readout represent an exciting field allowing timing and charge measurements as well as precise spatial information in 3D. Originally developed for the high energy physics, MPGD applications has expanded to nuclear physics, UV and visible photon detection, astroparticle and neutrino physics, neutron detection and medical physics.

Maxim Titov

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

63

Cylindrical Detector and Preamplifier Design for Detecting Neutrons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

neutrons because the recoil protons do not cross the detectors. Proportional counters simulating different site-sizes can be used to get a better neutron dose equivalent measurement since the range and stopping power of protons generated by neutrons...

Xia, Zhenghua

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

64

High-energy detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The preferred embodiments are directed to a high-energy detector that is electrically shielded using an anode, a cathode, and a conducting shield to substantially reduce or eliminate electrically unshielded area. The anode and the cathode are disposed at opposite ends of the detector and the conducting shield substantially surrounds at least a portion of the longitudinal surface of the detector. The conducting shield extends longitudinally to the anode end of the detector and substantially surrounds at least a portion of the detector. Signals read from one or more of the anode, cathode, and conducting shield can be used to determine the number of electrons that are liberated as a result of high-energy particles impinge on the detector. A correction technique can be implemented to correct for liberated electron that become trapped to improve the energy resolution of the high-energy detectors disclosed herein.

Bolotnikov, Aleksey E. (South Setauket, NY); Camarda, Giuseppe (Farmingville, NY); Cui, Yonggang (Upton, NY); James, Ralph B. (Ridge, NY)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

65

Modelling spot and forward prices for energy companies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modelling spot and forward prices for energy companies Dafydd Steele MSc Stochastics and Financial forward and spot prices for energy com- panies. The two main ways of modelling power prices are stochastic Mathematics dafydd.steele@edf-energy.com August 5, 2010 #12;Abstract The focus of this thesis is on modelling

Bhulai, Sandjai

66

A NONGAUSSIAN ORNSTEINUHLENBECK PROCESS FOR ELECTRICITY SPOT PRICE MODELING AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A NON­GAUSSIAN ORNSTEIN­UHLENBECK PROCESS FOR ELECTRICITY SPOT PRICE MODELING AND DERIVATIVES for analytical pricing of electricity forward and futures contracts. Electricity forward and futures contracts to capture the observed dynamics of electricity spot prices. We also discuss the pricing of European call

Kallsen, Jan

67

Cinematography of Resistance Spot Welding of Galvanized Steel Sheet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cinematography of Resistance Spot Welding of Galvanized Steel Sheet Preweld and postweld current modifications on the resistance spot welding of galvanized steel sheet ·are analyzed using high phenomena through· out the weld process are discussed. In addition. the duration of current modifi· cation

Eagar, Thomas W.

68

Hot Spot Conditions during Cavitation in Water Yuri T. Didenko,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hot Spot Conditions during Cavitation in Water Yuri T. Didenko, William B. McNamara III-13 the effective hot spot temperature during aqueous cavitation remains unresolved. Given the importance of aqueous cavitation (sonography and bioeffects of ultrasound, sonochemical remediation of aqueous pollutants

Suslick, Kenneth S.

69

Detectors (5/5)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

This lecture will serve as an introduction to particle detectors and detection techniques. In the first lecture, a historic overview of particle detector development will be given. In the second lecture, some basic techniques and concepts for particle detection will be discussed. In the third lecture, the interaction of particles with matter, the basis of particle detection, will be presented. The fourth and fifth lectures will discuss different detector types used for particle tracking, energy measurement and particle identification.

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

70

Detectors (4/5)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

This lecture will serve as an introduction to particle detectors and detection techniques. In the first lecture, a historic overview of particle detector development will be given. In the second lecture, some basic techniques and concepts for particle detection will be discussed. In the third lecture, the interaction of particles with matter, the basis of particle detection, will be presented. The fourth and fifth lectures will discuss different detector types used for particle tracking, energy measurement and particle identification.

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

71

ALFA Detector Control System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ALFA (Absolute Luminosity For ATLAS) is one of the sub-detectors of ATLAS/LHC. The ALFA system is composed by two stations installed in the LHC tunnel 240 m away from each side of the ATLAS interaction point. Each station has a vacuum and ventilation system, movement control and all the required electronic for signal processing. The Detector Control System (DCS) provides control and monitoring of several components and ensures the safe operation of the detector contributing to good Data Quality. This paper describes the ALFA DCS system including a detector overview, operation aspects and hardware control through a SCADA system, WinCC OA.

Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; The ATLAS collaboration

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Adaptors for radiation detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

Livesay, Ronald Jason

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

73

Detector Systems at CLIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Compact Linear Collider CLIC is designed to deliver e+e- collisions at a center of mass energy of up to 3 TeV. The detector systems at this collider have to provide highly efficient tracking and excellent jet energy resolution and hermeticity for multi-TeV final states with multiple jets and leptons. In addition, the detector systems have to be capable of distinguishing physics events from large beam-induced background at a crossing frequency of 2 GHz. Like for the detector concepts at the ILC, CLIC detectors are based on event reconstruction using particle flow algorithms. The two detector concepts for the ILC, ILD and SID, were adapted for CLIC using calorimeters with dense absorbers limiting leakage through increased compactness, as well as modified forward and vertex detector geometries and precise time stamping to cope with increased background levels. The overall detector concepts for CLIC are presented, with particular emphasis on the main detector and engineering challenges, such as: the ultra-thin vertex detector with high resolution and fast time-stamping, hadronic calorimetry using tungsten absorbers, and event reconstruction techniques related to particle flow algorithms and beam background suppression.

Frank Simon

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Wall and laser spot motion in cylindrical hohlraums  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wall and laser spot motion measurements in empty, propane-filled and plastic (CH)-lined gold coated cylindrical hohlraums were performed on the Omega laser facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Wall motion was measured using axial two-dimensional (2D) x-ray imaging and laser spot motion was perpendicularly observed through a thinned wall using streaked hard x-ray imaging. Experimental results and 2D hydrodynamic simulations show that while empty targets exhibit on-axis plasma collision, CH-lined and propane-filled targets inhibit wall expansion, corroborated with perpendicular streaked imaging showing a slower motion of laser spots.

Huser, G.; Courtois, C.; Monteil, M.-C. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

Large area liquid argon detectors for interrogation systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of the efficiency, pulse shape, and energy and time resolution of liquid argon (LAr) detectors are presented. Liquefied noble gas-based (LNbG) detectors have been developed for the detection of dark matter and neutrinoless double-beta decay. However, the same qualities that make LNbG detectors ideal for these applications, namely their size, cost, efficiency, pulse shape discrimination and resolution, make them promising for portal screening and the detection of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM). Two 18-liter prototype detectors were designed, fabricated, and tested, one with pure LAr and the other doped with liquid Xe (LArXe). The LArXe detector presented the better time and energy resolution of 3.3 ns and 20% at 662 KeV, respectively. The total efficiency of the detector was measured to be 35% with 4.5% of the total photons detected in the photopeak.

Gary, Charles; Kane, Steve; Firestone, Murray I.; Smith, Gregory [Adelphi Technology LLC, Purdue Technology Center, 5225 Exploration Drive, Indianapolis, IN 46241 (United States); Gozani, Tsahi; Brown, Craig; Kwong, John; King, Michael J. [Rapiscan Laboratories, 520 Almanor Avenue, Sunnyvale, CA 94085 (United States); Nikkel, James A.; McKinsey, Dan [Physics Department, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

76

The TESLA Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For the superconducting linear collider TESLA a multi purpose detector has been designed. This detector is optimised for the important physics processes expected at a next generation linear collider up to around 1 TeV and is designed for the specific environment of a superconducting collider.

Klaus Moenig

2001-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

77

Statistical analysis of the sizes and velocities of laser hot spots of smoothed beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the speckle patterns generated by optical smoothing techniques for uniform irradiation in plasma physics for uniform irradiation in plasma physics.1 This paper is a contribution to the study of optical smoothing for application to inertial confinement fusion ICF , which requires a high level of irradiation uniformity

Garnier, Josselin

78

Statistical analysis of the sizes and velocities of laser hot spots of smoothed beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the speckle patterns generated by optical smoothing techniques for uniform irradiation in plasma physics for uniform irradiation in plasma physics. 1 This paper is a contribution to the study of optical smoothing for application to inertial confinement fusion ~ICF!, which requires a high level of irradiation uniformity

Garnier, Josselin

79

X-ray imaging with monochromatic and small focal spot size sources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout SRNL Home SRNL main campusMore thanX-RayX-ray ImagePhase

80

Nanomechanical resonance detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An embodiment of a nanomechanical frequency detector includes a support structure and a plurality of elongated nanostructures coupled to the support structure. Each of the elongated nanostructures has a particular resonant frequency. The plurality of elongated nanostructures has a range of resonant frequencies. An embodiment of a method of identifying an object includes introducing the object to the nanomechanical resonance detector. A resonant response by at least one of the elongated nanostructures of the nanomechanical resonance detector indicates a vibrational mode of the object. An embodiment of a method of identifying a molecular species of the present invention includes introducing the molecular species to the nanomechanical resonance detector. A resonant response by at least one of the elongated nanostructures of the nanomechanical resonance detector indicates a vibrational mode of the molecular species.

Grossman, Jeffrey C; Zettl, Alexander K

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detector spot size" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

On the burn topology of hot-spot-initiated reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We determine the reaction progress function for an ideal hot spot model problem. The considered problem has an exact analytic solution that can derived from a reduction of Nichols statistical hot spot model. We perform numerical calculations to verify the analytic solution and to illustrate the error realized in real, finite systems. We show how the baseline problem, which does not distinguish between the reactant and product densities, can be scaled to handle general cases for which the two densities differ.

Hill, Larry G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zimmermann, Bjorn [WOLFRAM RESEARCH INC.; Nichols, Albert L [LLNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Simulation studies and spectroscopic measurements of a position sensitive detector based on pixelated CdTe crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulation studies and spectroscopic measurements are presented regarding the development of a pixel multilayer CdTe detector under development in the context of the COCAE project. The instrument will be used for the localization and identification of radioactive sources and radioactively contaminated spots. For the localization task the Compton effect is exploited. The detector response under different radiation fields as well as the overall efficiency of the detector has been evaluated. Spectroscopic measurements have been performed to evaluate the energy resolution of the detector. The efficiency of the event reconstruction has been studied in a wide range of initial photon energies by exploiting the detector's angular resolution measure distribution. Furthermore, the ability of the COCAE detector to localize radioactive sources has been investigated.

Karafasoulis, K; Seferlis, S; Kaissas, I; Lambropoulos, C; Loukas, D; Potiriadis, C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Simulation studies and spectroscopic measurements of a position sensitive detector based on pixelated CdTe crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulation studies and spectroscopic measurements are presented regarding the development of a pixel multilayer CdTe detector under development in the context of the COCAE project. The instrument will be used for the localization and identification of radioactive sources and radioactively contaminated spots. For the localization task the Compton effect is exploited. The detector response under different radiation fields as well as the overall efficiency of the detector has been evaluated. Spectroscopic measurements have been performed to evaluate the energy resolution of the detector. The efficiency of the event reconstruction has been studied in a wide range of initial photon energies by exploiting the detector's angular resolution measure distribution. Furthermore, the ability of the COCAE detector to localize radioactive sources has been investigated.

K. Karafasoulis; K. Zachariadou; S. Seferlis; I. Kaissas; C. Lambropoulos; D. Loukas; C. Potiriadis

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

84

Layered semiconductor neutron detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Room temperature operating solid state hand held neutron detectors integrate one or more relatively thin layers of a high neutron interaction cross-section element or materials with semiconductor detectors. The high neutron interaction cross-section element (e.g., Gd, B or Li) or materials comprising at least one high neutron interaction cross-section element can be in the form of unstructured layers or micro- or nano-structured arrays. Such architecture provides high efficiency neutron detector devices by capturing substantially more carriers produced from high energy .alpha.-particles or .gamma.-photons generated by neutron interaction.

Mao, Samuel S; Perry, Dale L

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

85

Pocked surface neutron detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The detection efficiency, or sensitivity, of a neutron detector material such as of Si, SiC, amorphous Si, GaAs, or diamond is substantially increased by forming one or more cavities, or holes, in its surface. A neutron reactive material such as of elemental, or any compound of, .sup.10 B, .sup.6 Li, .sup.6 LiF, U, or Gd is deposited on the surface of the detector material so as to be disposed within the cavities therein. The portions of the neutron reactive material extending into the detector material substantially increase the probability of an energetic neutron reaction product in the form of a charged particle being directed into and detected by the neutron detector material.

McGregor, Douglas (Whitmore Lake, MI); Klann, Raymond (Bolingbrook, IL)

2003-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

86

Ultrafast neutron detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A neutron detector of very high temporal resolution is described. It may be used to measure distributions of neutrons produced by fusion reactions that persist for times as short as about 50 picoseconds.

Wang, C.L.

1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

87

Modular optical detector system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A modular optical detector system. The detector system is designed to detect the presence of molecules or molecular species by inducing fluorescence with exciting radiation and detecting the emitted fluorescence. Because the system is capable of accurately detecting and measuring picomolar concentrations it is ideally suited for use with microchemical analysis systems generally and capillary chromatographic systems in particular. By employing a modular design, the detector system provides both the ability to replace various elements of the detector system without requiring extensive realignment or recalibration of the components as well as minimal user interaction with the system. In addition, the modular concept provides for the use and addition of a wide variety of components, including optical elements (lenses and filters), light sources, and detection means, to fit particular needs.

Horn, Brent A. (Livermore, CA); Renzi, Ronald F. (Tracy, CA)

2006-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

88

Improved gaseous leak detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a short path length mass-spectrometer type of helium leak detector wherein the helium trace gas is ionized, accelerated and deflected onto a particle counter, an arrangement is provided for converting the detector to neon leak detection. The magnetic field of the deflection system is lowered so as to bring the nonlinear fringe area of the magnetic field across the ion path, thereby increasing the amount of deflection of the heavier neon ions.

Juravic, F.E. Jr.

1983-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

89

Gaseous leak detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a short path length mass-spectrometer type of helium leak detector wherein the helium trace gas is ionized, accelerated and deflected onto a particle counter, an arrangement is provided for converting the detector to neon leak detection. The magnetic field of the deflection system is lowered so as to bring the non linear fringe area of the magnetic field across the ion path, thereby increasing the amount of deflection of the heavier neon ions.

Juravic, Jr., Frank E. (Aurora, IL)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Modular multi-element high energy particle detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Multi-element high energy particle detector modules comprise a planar heavy metal carrier of tungsten alloy with planar detector units uniformly distributed over one planar surface. The detector units are secured to the heavy metal carrier by electrically conductive adhesive so that the carrier serves as a common ground. The other surface of each planar detector unit is electrically connected to a feedthrough electrical terminal extending through the carrier for front or rear readout. The feedthrough electrical terminals comprise sockets at one face of the carrier and mating pins projecting from the other face, so that any number of modules may be plugged together to create a stack of modules of any desired number of radiation lengths. The detector units each comprise four, preferably rectangular, p-i-n diode chips arranged around the associated feedthrough terminal to form a square detector unit providing at least 90% detector element coverage of the carrier. Integral spacers projecting from the carriers extend at least partially along the boundaries between detector units to space the p-i-n diode chips from adjacent carriers in a stack. The spacers along the perimeters of the modules are one-half the width of the interior spacers so that when stacks of modules are arranged side by side to form a large array of any size or shape, distribution of the detector units is uniform over the entire array. 5 figs.

Coon, D.D.; Elliott, J.P.

1990-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

91

Wide size range fast integrated mobility spectrometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mobility spectrometer to measure a nanometer particle size distribution is disclosed. The mobility spectrometer includes a conduit and a detector. The conduit is configured to receive and provide fluid communication of a fluid stream having a charged nanometer particle mixture. The conduit includes a separator section configured to generate an electrical field of two dimensions transverse to a dimension associated with the flow of the charged nanometer particle mixture through the separator section to spatially separate charged nanometer particles of the charged nanometer particle mixture in said two dimensions. The detector is disposed downstream of the conduit to detect concentration and position of the spatially-separated nanometer particles.

Wang, Jian

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

92

Friction Stir Spot Welding of DP780 Carbon Steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Friction stir spot welds were made in uncoated and galvannealed DP780 sheets using polycrystalline boron nitride stir tools. The tools were plunged at either a single continuous rate or in two segments consisting of a relatively high rate followed by a slower rate of shorter depth. Welding times ranged from 1 to 10 s. Increasing tool rotation speed from 800 to 1600 rev min{sup -1} increased strength values. The 2-segment welding procedures also produced higher strength joints. Average lap shear strengths exceeding 10 {center_dot} 3 kN were consistently obtained in 4 s on both the uncoated and the galvannealed DP780. The likelihood of diffusion and mechanical interlocking contributing to bond formation was supported by metallographic examinations. A cost analysis based on spot welding in automobile assembly showed that for friction stir spot welding to be economically competitive with resistance spot welding the cost of stir tools must approach that of resistance spot welding electrode tips.

Santella, Michael L [ORNL; Hovanski, Yuri [ORNL; Frederick, David Alan [ORNL; Grant, Glenn J [ORNL; Dahl, Michael E [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Longevity effects on the performance of fire detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detector Sensitivity 6. Light Obscuration Type Photoelectric Smoke Detector 10 7. Angular Patterns of Scattered Intensity from Particles of Three Sizes 8. Detection Systems Present in the State of Texas for 1991 13 9. Ionization Flow Chart 19 10.... Photoelectric Flow Chart 11. Smoke Chamber: Orientation Drawing 20 25 12. Smoke Chamber: Plan View 13. Smoke Chamber: Cross Section 14. Smoke Chamber: Elevation Side 1 15. Smoke Chamber: Elevation Side 2 16. Smoke Chamber: Elevation Side 3 17. Smoke...

Dedear, Timothy Keith

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Aspects of the life history and population dynamics of the spot, Leiostomus xanthurus, in the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Spot are distributed from &5 to 73 m but are most abundant at 5-9 m. Spot of one cohort recruit to the Gulf primarily in two periods, May- July (Spring), at 3-7 mo, and January-March (winter), at 13-18 mo of age. Recruitment occurs in waters &5-16 m.... Collection Observed Size Ran e 955 Confidence Limits about h N 99% Conf idence Limits of bs rvations Spring Recruitment Group 1 Oct 77 D 4 Rov 77 D 137-207 166, 1 148-201 173. 1 69 331. 2 9 373. 6 161. 7-170. 5 158. 2-188. 0 117. 7-214. 5...

Hata, David Noboru

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Spatially extended Unruh-DeWitt detectors for relativistic quantum information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unruh-DeWitt detectors interacting locally with a quantum field are systems under consideration for relativistic quantum information processing. In most works, the detectors are assumed to be point-like and, therefore, couple with the same strength to all modes of the field spectrum. We propose the use of a more realistic detector model where the detector has a finite size conveniently tailored by a spatial profile. We design a spatial profile such that the detector, when inertial, naturally couples to a peaked distribution of Minkowski modes. In the uniformly accelerated case, the detector couples to a peaked distribution of Rindler modes. Such distributions are of special interest in the analysis of entanglement in non-inetial frames. We use our detector model to show the noise detected in the Minkowski vacuum and in single particle states is a function of the detector's acceleration.

Antony R. Lee; Ivette Fuentes

2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

96

Io hot spots - infrared photometry of satellite occultations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Io's active hot spots, which are presently mapped on the basis of IR photometry of this moon's occultation by other Gallilean satellites, are obtained with greatest spatial resolution near the sub-earth point. A model is developed for the occultation lightcurves, and its fitting to the data defines the apparent path of the occulting satellite relative to Io; the mean error in apparent relative position of occulting satellites is of the order of 178 km. A heretofore unknown, 20-km diameter hot spot is noted on Io's leading hemisphere. 31 references.

Goguen, J.D.; Matson, D.L.; Sinton, W.M.; Howell, R.R.; Dyck, H.M.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

A field-shaping multi-well avalanche detector for direct conversion amorphous selenium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: A practical detector structure is proposed to achieve stable avalanche multiplication gain in direct-conversion amorphous selenium radiation detectors. Methods: The detector structure is referred to as a field-shaping multi-well avalanche detector. Stable avalanche multiplication gain is achieved by eliminating field hot spots using high-density avalanche wells with insulated walls and field-shaping inside each well. Results: The authors demonstrate the impact of high-density insulated wells and field-shaping to eliminate the formation of both field hot spots in the avalanche region and high fields at the metal-semiconductor interface. Results show a semi-Gaussian field distribution inside each well using the field-shaping electrodes, and the electric field at the metal-semiconductor interface can be one order-of-magnitude lower than the peak value where avalanche occurs. Conclusions: This is the first attempt to design a practical direct-conversion amorphous selenium detector with avalanche gain.

Goldan, A. H.; Zhao, W. [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, SUNY at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

Handheld CZT radiation detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A handheld CZT radiation detector having a CZT gamma-ray sensor, a multichannel analyzer, a fuzzy-logic component, and a display component is disclosed. The CZT gamma-ray sensor may be a coplanar grid CZT gamma-ray sensor, which provides high-quality gamma-ray analysis at a wide range of operating temperatures. The multichannel analyzer categorizes pulses produce by the CZT gamma-ray sensor into channels (discrete energy levels), resulting in pulse height data. The fuzzy-logic component analyzes the pulse height data and produces a ranked listing of radioisotopes. The fuzzy-logic component is flexible and well-suited to in-field analysis of radioisotopes. The display component may be a personal data assistant, which provides a user-friendly method of interacting with the detector. In addition, the radiation detector may be equipped with a neutron sensor to provide an enhanced mechanism of sensing radioactive materials.

Murray, William S.; Butterfield, Kenneth B.; Baird, William

2004-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

99

Semiconductor radiation detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A semiconductor radiation detector is provided to detect x-ray and light photons. The entrance electrode is segmented by using variable doping concentrations. Further, the entrance electrode is physically segmented by inserting n+ regions between p+ regions. The p+ regions and the n+ regions are individually biased. The detector elements can be used in an array, and the p+ regions and the n+ regions can be biased by applying potential at a single point. The back side of the semiconductor radiation detector has an n+ anode for collecting created charges and a number of p+ cathodes. Biased n+ inserts can be placed between the p+ cathodes, and an internal resistor divider can be used to bias the n+ inserts as well as the p+ cathodes. A polysilicon spiral guard can be implemented surrounding the active area of the entrance electrode or surrounding an array of entrance electrodes.

Patt, Bradley E. (Sherman Oaks, CA); Iwanczyk, Jan S. (Los Angeles, CA); Tull, Carolyn R. (Orinda, CA); Vilkelis, Gintas (Westlake Village, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Semiconductor neutron detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A neutron detector has a compound of lithium in a single crystal form as a neutron sensor element. The lithium compound, containing improved charge transport properties, is either lithium niobate or lithium tantalate. The sensor element is in direct contact with a monitor that detects an electric current. A signal proportional to the electric current is produced and is calibrated to indicate the neutrons sensed. The neutron detector is particularly useful for detecting neutrons in a radiation environment. Such radiation environment may, e.g. include gamma radiation and noise.

Ianakiev, Kiril D. (Los Alamos, NM); Littlewood, Peter B. (Cambridge, GB); Blagoev, Krastan B. (Arlington, VA); Swinhoe, Martyn T. (Los Alamos, NM); Smith, James L. (Los Alamos, NM); Sullivan, Clair J. (Los Alamos, NM); Alexandrov, Boian S. (Los Alamos, NM); Lashley, Jason Charles (Santa Fe, NM)

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detector spot size" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Ultrasonic liquid level detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ultrasonic liquid level detector for use within a shielded container, the detector being tubular in shape with a chamber at its lower end into which liquid from in the container may enter and exit, the chamber having an ultrasonic transmitter and receiver in its top wall and a reflector plate or target as its bottom wall whereby when liquid fills the chamber a complete medium is then present through which an ultrasonic wave may be transmitted and reflected from the target thus signaling that the liquid is at chamber level.

Kotz, Dennis M. (North Augusta, SC); Hinz, William R. (Augusta, GA)

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

102

Fissile material detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A detector for fissile materials which provides for integrity monitoring of fissile materials and can be used for nondestructive assay to confirm the presence of a stable content of fissile material in items. The detector has a sample cavity large enough to enable assay of large items of arbitrary configuration, utilizes neutron sources fabricated in spatially extended shapes mounted on the endcaps of the sample cavity, incorporates a thermal neutron filter insert with reflector properties, and the electronics module includes a neutron multiplicity coincidence counter.

Ivanov, Alexander I. (Dubna, RU); Lushchikov, Vladislav I. (Dubna, RU); Shabalin, Eugeny P. (Dubna, RU); Maznyy, Nikita G. (Dubna, RU); Khvastunov, Michael M. (Dubna, RU); Rowland, Mark (Alamo, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Glow discharge detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A highly sensitive electronic ion cell for the measurement of trace elements in He carrier gas which involves glow discharge. A constant wave (CW) glow discharge detector which is controlled through a biased resistor, can detect the change of electron density caused by impurities in the He carrier gas by many orders of magnitude larger than that caused by direct ionization or electron capture. The glow discharge detector utilizes a floating pseudo-electrode to form a probe in or near the plasma. By using this probe, the large variation of electron density due to trace amounts of impurities can be directly measured.

Koo, Jackson C. (San Ramon, CA); Yu, Conrad M. (Antioch, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

The Upgraded D0 detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The D0 experiment enjoyed a very successful data-collection run at the Fermilab Tevatron collider between 1992 and 1996. Since then, the detector has been upgraded to take advantage of improvements to the Tevatron and to enhance its physics capabilities. We describe the new elements of the detector, including the silicon microstrip tracker, central fiber tracker, solenoidal magnet, preshower detectors, forward muon detector, and forward proton detector. The uranium/liquid-argon calorimeters and central muon detector, remaining from Run I, are discussed briefly. We also present the associated electronics, triggering, and data acquisition systems, along with the design and implementation of software specific to D0.

Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, D.L.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahmed, S.N.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G.A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, J.T.; Anderson, S.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U./Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota /Charles U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Prague, Inst. Phys. /San Francisco deQuito U. /Clermont-Ferrand U. /LPSC, Grenoble /Marseille, CPPM /Orsay, LAL /Paris U., VI-VII /DAPNIA, Saclay /Strasbourg, IReS; ,

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Minimum-Hot-Spot Query Trees for Wireless Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an energy- efficient query routing tree. (a) Energy harvesting for battery- less nodes for the (b) Voltree to the querying node. Energy-efficient query routing trees are needed in a plethora of systems such as PeopleMinimum-Hot-Spot Query Trees for Wireless Sensor Networks Georgios Chatzimilioudis Dept

Zeinalipour, Demetris

106

REAL TIME ULTRASONIC ALUMINUM SPOT WELD MONITORING SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aluminum alloys pose several properties that make them one of the most popular engineering materials: they have excellent corrosion resistance, and high weight-to-strength ratio. Resistance spot welding of aluminum alloys is widely used today but oxide film and aluminum thermal and electrical properties make spot welding a difficult task. Electrode degradation due to pitting, alloying and mushrooming decreases the weld quality and adjustment of parameters like current and force is required. To realize these adjustments and ensure weld quality, a tool to measure weld quality in real time is required. In this paper, a real time ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation system for aluminum spot welds is presented. The system is able to monitor nugget growth while the spot weld is being made. This is achieved by interpreting the echoes of an ultrasound transducer located in one of the welding electrodes. The transducer receives and transmits an ultrasound signal at different times during the welding cycle. Valuable information of the weld quality is embedded in this signal. The system is able to determine the weld nugget diameter by measuring the delays of the ultrasound signals received during the complete welding cycle. The article presents the system performance on aluminum alloy AA6022.

Regalado, W. Perez; Chertov, A. M.; Maev, R. Gr. [Institute for Diagnostic Imaging Research, Physics Department, University of Windsor, 292 Essex Hall, 401 Sunset Ave. N9B 3P4 Windsor, Ontario (Canada)

2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

107

Spot Convenience Yield Models for Energy Michael Ludkovski  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This is not true for some commodities, such as electricity. Even for mature markets like crude oil where spot of fu- ture asset and current consumption values. However, unlike financial deriva- tives, storage, the agent has the option of flexibility with regards to consumption (no risk of commodity shortage

Ludkovski, Mike

108

Front Vehicle Blind Spot Translucentization Based on Augmented Reality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Front Vehicle Blind Spot Translucentization Based on Augmented Reality Che-Tsung Lin, Yu-Chen Lin--Recently, WAVE/DSRC has become an attrac- tive technology for vehicular safety applications. Vehicles with WAVE/DSRC devices can communicate with their neighboring vehicles to exchange information to achieve collaborative

Wang, Yuan-Fang

109

Bright Spots in the South Carolina the Economy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bright Spots in the South Carolina the Economy 2012 African American Economic Summit Doug Woodward Professor of Economics #12;Overview · Why we should worry. ­ Global economy and financial contagion. ­ U.S. economy and political uncertainty. · Why we should be happy. ­ South Carolina economy healing. · Robust

Almor, Amit

110

Fast Detector Simulation Using Lelaps, Detector Descriptions in GODL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lelaps is a fast detector simulation program which reads StdHep generator files and produces SIO or LCIO output files. It swims particles through detectors taking into account magnetic fields, multiple scattering and dE/dx energy loss. It simulates parameterized showers in EM and hadronic calorimeters and supports gamma conversions and decays. In addition to three built-in detector configurations, detector descriptions can also be read from files in the new GODL file format.

Langeveld, Willy; /SLAC

2005-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

111

Spot welding of steel and aluminum using insert sheet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Automobile industries have been increasingly interested in the use of aluminum and thus joining of steel and aluminum becomes of importance. The joining of the two types of metal raises a problem of brittle welds caused by the formation of intermetallic compounds. The authors solved the problem by using an insert sheet. This paper deals with the resistance spot welding of steel and aluminum sheets using insert sheets. The insert sheet used in the present development was a steel/aluminum clad sheet of the 0.8 mm thickness with 50% steel and 50% aluminum. The clad sheet was produced by warm rolling of steel and aluminum with a direct resistance heating process. Steel to be warm rolled was of EDDQ of the 0.4 mm thickness and aluminum was of JIS A1050 of 0.6 mm thickness. The mechanical properties of the insert clad sheets were in between those of the steel sheets and the aluminum sheets, while the clad sheets showed much better formability than the aluminum sheets. Resistance spot welding was conducted for 0.8 mm thick EDDQ steel sheets and 1.0 mm thick aluminum alloy (AL-5.5%Mg) sheets under the welding force of 1.96 kN, welding current ranging between 4.2 and 20.1 kA, and welding time from 0.5 to 10 cycles. The steel was spot welded to the steel side of the insert sheet while the aluminum was welded to the aluminum side. What the authors investigated were the applicable welding current range, nugget diameter, tensile shear strength, U-tension strength, and macro- and microstructures. In conclusion, steel sheets can be spot welded to aluminum sheets without difficulty by using clad sheets as insert materials while the strength level of the dissimilar metal spot welds is close to that of aluminum joints.

Oikawa, H.; Saito, T.; Yoshimura, T. [and others

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

112

Photovoltaic radiation detector element  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation detector element is formed of a body of semiconductor material, a coating on the body which forms a photovoltaic junction therewith, and a current collector consisting of narrow metallic strips, the aforesaid coating having an opening therein in the edge of which closely approaches but is spaced from the current collector strips.

Agouridis, D.C.

1980-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

113

The BABAR Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BABAR, the detector for the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric e+e- B Factory operating at the upsilon 4S resonance, was designed to allow comprehensive studies of CP-violation in B-meson decays. Charged particle tracks are measured in a multi-layer silicon vertex tracker surrounded by a cylindrical wire drift chamber. Electromagentic showers from electrons and photons are detected in an array of CsI crystals located just inside the solenoidal coil of a superconducting magnet. Muons and neutral hadrons are identified by arrays of resistive plate chambers inserted into gaps in the steel flux return of the magnet. Charged hadrons are identified by dE/dx measurements in the tracking detectors and in a ring-imaging Cherenkov detector surrounding the drift chamber. The trigger, data acquisition and data-monitoring systems, VME- and network-based, are controlled by custom-designed online software. Details of the layout and performance of the detector components and their associated electronics and software are presented.

The BABAR Collaboration

2001-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

114

The CLIC Vertex Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The precision physics needs at TeV-scale linear electron-positron colliders (ILC and CLIC) require a vertex-detector system with excellent flavour-tagging capabilities through a meas- urement of displaced vertices. This is essential, for example, for an explicit measurement of the Higgs decays to pairs of b-quarks, c-quarks and gluons. Efficient identification of top quarks in the decay t ? W b will give access to the ttH-coupling measurement. In addition to those requirements driven by physics arguments, the CLIC bunch structure calls for hit tim- ing at the few-ns level. As a result, the CLIC vertex-detector system needs to have excellent spatial resolution, full geometrical coverage extending to low polar angles, extremely low material budget, low occupancy facilitated by time-tagging, and sufficient heat removal from sensors and readout. These considerations challenge current technological limits. A detector concept based on hybrid pixel-detector technology is under development for the CLIC ver- tex det...

Dannheim, D.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Sensitive hydrogen leak detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A sensitive hydrogen leak detector system using passivation of a stainless steel vacuum chamber for low hydrogen outgassing, a high compression ratio vacuum system, a getter operating at 77.5 K and a residual gas analyzer as a quantitative hydrogen sensor.

Myneni, Ganapati Rao (Yorktown, VA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Directional gamma detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved directional gamma radiation detector has a collector sandwiched etween two layers of insulation of varying thicknesses. The collector and insulation layers are contained within an evacuated casing, or emitter, which releases electrons upon exposure to gamma radiation. Delayed electrons and electrons entering the collector at oblique angles are attenuated as they pass through the insulation layers on route to the collector.

LeVert, Francis E. (Downers Grove, Knoxville, TN); Cox, Samson A. (Downers Grove, IL)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

High-resolution ionization detector and array of such detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high-resolution ionization detector and an array of such detectors are described which utilize a reference pattern of conductive or semiconductive material to form interaction, pervious and measurement regions in an ionization substrate of, for example, CdZnTe material. The ionization detector is a room temperature semiconductor radiation detector. Various geometries of such a detector and an array of such detectors produce room temperature operated gamma ray spectrometers with relatively high resolution. For example, a 1 cm.sup.3 detector is capable of measuring .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays with room temperature energy resolution approaching 2% at FWHM. Two major types of such detectors include a parallel strip semiconductor Frisch grid detector and the geometrically weighted trapezoid prism semiconductor Frisch grid detector. The geometrically weighted detector records room temperature (24.degree. C.) energy resolutions of 2.68% FWHM for .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays and 2.45% FWHM for .sup.60 Co 1.332 MeV gamma rays. The detectors perform well without any electronic pulse rejection, correction or compensation techniques. The devices operate at room temperature with simple commercially available NIM bin electronics and do not require special preamplifiers or cooling stages for good spectroscopic results.

McGregor, Douglas S. (Ypsilanti, MI); Rojeski, Ronald A. (Pleasanton, CA)

2001-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

118

E-Print Network 3.0 - anti-white spot syndrome Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

white spot syndrome Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: anti-white spot syndrome Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 JOURNAL OF VIROLOGY, June...

119

Near infrared detectors for SNAP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Near Infrared Detectors for SNAP M. Schubnell a , N. Barron1k × 1k and 2k × 2k) near infrared detectors manufactured byas part of the near infrared R&D e?ort for SNAP (the Super-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

EGG AND LARVAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE SPOT, LEIOSTOMUS XANTHURUS (SCIAENIDAE)l  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atlantic and GulfofMexico coasts from Massachusetts Bay to the Bay of Campeche (Johnson 1978). Spot spawns

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detector spot size" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Time series analysis and long range correlations of Nordic spot electricity market  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 21020 Ispra(VA), Italy Abstract The electricity system price of the Nord Pool spot market is analysed. Weron and Przybylowicz [19] studied the electricity prices using Hurst R/S analysis and showed anti energy spot price time series. The question of modelling electricity spot prices has also been addressed

Wright, Francis

122

A k-factor GIGARCH process: Estimation and Application on electricity market spot prices.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A k-factor GIGARCH process: Estimation and Application on electricity market spot prices. Abdou Kâ time series of market data, such as electricity spot price, exhibit long-memory, in the sense of slowly this approach to electricity prices (spot prices) from the German energy market (European Energy e

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

123

IMPROVING MULTI-LATTICE ALIGNMENT BASED SPOKEN KEYWORD SPOTTING Hui Lin, Alex Stupakov and Jeff Bilmes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as when- ever it is inconvenient, unsafe, or impossible for the user to enter a search query using and the utterance being searched is beneficial for spoken keyword spotting. In this paper, we introduce several im- prove the performance of spoken keyword spotting. Index Terms-- Spoken keyword spotting, lattice

Noble, William Stafford

124

Delivery and Hedging Delivery ties the futures price to the spot price.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Delivery and Hedging · Delivery ties the futures price to the spot price. · On the delivery date, the settlement price of the futures contract is determined by the spot price. · Hence, when the delivery period is reached, the futures price should be very close to the spot price. · Changes in futures prices usually

Lyuu, Yuh-Dauh

125

The NordPool Market The spot and electricity forward relation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The NordPool Market The spot and electricity forward relation Spot price modelling HJM approach to forwards Conclusions Modelling and pricing in electricity markets Fred Espen Benth Work in collaboration and electricity forward relation Spot price modelling HJM approach to forwards Conclusions Overview

Pfeifer, Holger

126

Small-Scale Readout Systems Prototype for the STAR PIXEL Detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A prototype readout system for the STAR PIXEL detector in the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) vertex detector upgrade is presented. The PIXEL detector is a Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) based silicon pixel vertex detector fabricated in a commercial CMOS process that integrates the detector and front-end electronics layers in one silicon die. Two generations ofMAPS prototypes designed specifically for the PIXEL are discussed. We have constructed a prototype telescope system consisting of three small MAPS sensors arranged in three parallel and coaxial planes with a readout system based on the readout architecture for PIXEL. This proposed readout architecture is simple and scales to the size required to readout the final detector. The real-time hit finding algorithm necessary for data rate reduction in the 400 million pixel detector is described, and aspects of the PIXEL system integration into the existing STAR framework are addressed. The complete system has been recently tested and shown to be fully functional.

Szelezniak, Michal A.; Besson, Auguste; Colledani, Claude; Dorokhov, Andrei; Dulinski, Wojciech; Greiner, Leo C.; Himmi, Abdelkader; Hu, Christine; Matis, Howard S.; Ritter, Hans Georg; Rose, Andrew; Shabetai, Alexandre; Stezelberger, Thorsten; Sun, Xiangming; Thomas, Jim H.; Valin, Isabelle; Vu, Chinh Q.; Wieman, Howard H.; Winter, Marc

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector includes a low power pulsed microwave transmitter with a broad-band antenna for producing a directional beam of microwaves, an index of refraction matching cap placed over the patients head, and an array of broad-band microwave receivers with collection antennae. The system of microwave transmitter and receivers are scanned around, and can also be positioned up and down the axis of the patients head. The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector is a completely non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots or to measure blood flow within the head or body. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with specialized antennas and tomographic methods. The system can be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of blood pooling such as occurs with hemorrhagic stroke in human or animal patients as well as for the detection of hemorrhage within a patient's body.

Haddad, Waleed S. (Dublin, CA); Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector includes a low power pulsed microwave transmitter with a broad-band antenna for producing a directional beam of microwaves, an index of refraction matching cap placed over the patients head, and an array of broad-band microwave receivers with collection antennae. The system of microwave transmitter and receivers are scanned around, and can also be positioned up and down the axis of the patients head. The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector is a completely non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots or to measure blood flow within the head or body. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with specialized antennas and tomographic methods. The system can be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of blood pooling such as occurs with hemorrhagic stoke in human or animal patients as well as for the detection of hemorrhage within a patient's body.

Haddad, Waleed S. (Dublin, CA); Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA)

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

129

Semiconductor radiation detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A semiconductor detector for ionizing electromagnetic radiation, neutrons, and energetic charged particles. The detecting element is comprised of a compound having the composition I-III-VI.sub.2 or II-IV-V.sub.2 where the "I" component is from column 1A or 1B of the periodic table, the "II" component is from column 2B, the "III" component is from column 3A, the "IV" component is from column 4A, the "V" component is from column 5A, and the "VI" component is from column 6A. The detecting element detects ionizing radiation by generating a signal proportional to the energy deposited in the element, and detects neutrons by virtue of the ionizing radiation emitted by one or more of the constituent materials subsequent to capture. The detector may contain more than one neutron-sensitive component.

Bell, Zane W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Burger, Arnold (Knoxville, TN)

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

130

Amorphous silicon radiation detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

Street, Robert A. (Palo Alto, CA); Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA); Kaplan, Selig N. (El Cerrito, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Amorphous silicon radiation detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

1992-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

132

Ionizing radiation detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ionizing radiation detector is provided which is based on the principle of analog electronic integration of radiation sensor currents in the sub-pico to nano ampere range between fixed voltage switching thresholds with automatic voltage reversal each time the appropriate threshold is reached. The thresholds are provided by a first NAND gate Schmitt trigger which is coupled with a second NAND gate Schmitt trigger operating in an alternate switching state from the first gate to turn either a visible or audible indicating device on and off in response to the gate switching rate which is indicative of the level of radiation being sensed. The detector can be configured as a small, personal radiation dosimeter which is simple to operate and responsive over a dynamic range of at least 0.01 to 1000 R/hr.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Pulsed neutron detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pulsed neutron detector and system for detecting low intensity fast neutron pulses has a body of beryllium adjacent a body of hydrogenous material the latter of which acts as a beta particle detector, scintillator, and moderator. The fast neutrons (defined as having En>1.5 MeV) react in the beryllium and the hydrogenous material to produce larger numbers of slow neutrons than would be generated in the beryllium itself and which in the beryllium generate hellium-6 which decays and yields beta particles. The beta particles reach the hydrogenous material which scintillates to yield light of intensity related to the number of fast neutrons. A photomultiplier adjacent the hydrogenous material (scintillator) senses the light emission from the scintillator. Utilization means, such as a summing device, sums the pulses from the photo-multiplier for monitoring or other purposes.

Robertson, deceased, J. Craig (late of Albuquerque, NM); Rowland, Mark S. (Livermore, CA)

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

134

Extruded plastic scintillation detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a way to lower the cost of plastic scintillation detectors, commercially available polystyrene pellets have been used in the production of scintillating materials that can be extruded into different profiles. The selection of the raw materials is discussed. Two techniques to add wavelength shifting dopants to polystyrene pellets and to extrude plastic scintillating strips are described. Data on light yield and transmittance measurements are presented.

Anna Pla-Dalmau, Alan D. Bross and Kerry L. Mellott

1999-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

135

Biological detector and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M; McDowell, Andrew F

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

136

Nuclear Reactor Safeguards and Monitoring with Antineutrino Detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cubic-meter-sized antineutrino detectors can be used to non-intrusively, robustly and automatically monitor and safeguard a wide variety of nuclear reactor types, including power reactors, research reactors, and plutonium production reactors. Since the antineutrino spectra and relative yields of fissioning isotopes depend on the isotopic composition of the core, changes in composition can be observed without ever directly accessing the core itself. Information from a modest-sized antineutrino detector, coupled with the well-understood principles that govern the core's evolution in time, can be used to determine whether the reactor is being operated in an illegitimate way. A group at Sandia is currently constructing a one cubic meter antineutrino detector at the San Onofre reactor site in California to demonstrate these principles.

Adam Bernstein; Yifang Wang; Giorgio Gratta; Todd West

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Recent Results and Fabrication of Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (MPFD)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environments found in a reactor core. Self-powered neutron detectors (SPND) have the advantages of no voltage to noise ratio of the fission and ionization chambers, the low voltage requirements and small size of SPND

Shultis, J. Kenneth

138

Sensor readout detector circuit  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A sensor readout detector circuit is disclosed that is capable of detecting sensor signals down to a few nanoamperes or less in a high (microampere) background noise level. The circuit operates at a very low standby power level and is triggerable by a sensor event signal that is above a predetermined threshold level. A plurality of sensor readout detector circuits can be formed on a substrate as an integrated circuit (IC). These circuits can operate to process data from an array of sensors in parallel, with only data from active sensors being processed for digitization and analysis. This allows the IC to operate at a low power level with a high data throughput for the active sensors. The circuit may be used with many different types of sensors, including photodetectors, capacitance sensors, chemically-sensitive sensors or combinations thereof to provide a capability for recording transient events or for recording data for a predetermined period of time following an event trigger. The sensor readout detector circuit has applications for portable or satellite-based sensor systems. 6 figs.

Chu, D.D.; Thelen, D.C. Jr.

1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

139

Sensor readout detector circuit  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A sensor readout detector circuit is disclosed that is capable of detecting sensor signals down to a few nanoamperes or less in a high (microampere) background noise level. The circuit operates at a very low standby power level and is triggerable by a sensor event signal that is above a predetermined threshold level. A plurality of sensor readout detector circuits can be formed on a substrate as an integrated circuit (IC). These circuits can operate to process data from an array of sensors in parallel, with only data from active sensors being processed for digitization and analysis. This allows the IC to operate at a low power level with a high data throughput for the active sensors. The circuit may be used with many different types of sensors, including photodetectors, capacitance sensors, chemically-sensitive sensors or combinations thereof to provide a capability for recording transient events or for recording data for a predetermined period of time following an event trigger. The sensor readout detector circuit has applications for portable or satellite-based sensor systems.

Chu, Dahlon D. (Albuquerque, NM); Thelen, Jr., Donald C. (Bozeman, MT)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Nanowire-based detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems, articles, and methods are provided related to nanowire-based detectors, which can be used for light detection in, for example, single-photon detectors. In one aspect, a variety of detectors are provided, for example one including an electrically superconductive nanowire or nanowires constructed and arranged to interact with photons to produce a detectable signal. In another aspect, fabrication methods are provided, including techniques to precisely reproduce patterns in subsequently formed layers of material using a relatively small number of fabrication steps. By precisely reproducing patterns in multiple material layers, one can form electrically insulating materials and electrically conductive materials in shapes such that incoming photons are redirected toward a nearby electrically superconductive materials (e.g., electrically superconductive nanowire(s)). For example, one or more resonance structures (e.g., comprising an electrically insulating material), which can trap electromagnetic radiation within its boundaries, can be positioned proximate the nanowire(s). The resonance structure can include, at its boundaries, electrically conductive material positioned proximate the electrically superconductive nanowire such that light that would otherwise be transmitted through the sensor is redirected toward the nanowire(s) and detected. In addition, electrically conductive material can be positioned proximate the electrically superconductive nanowire (e.g. at the aperture of the resonant structure), such that light is directed by scattering from this structure into the nanowire.

Berggren, Karl K; Hu, Xiaolong; Masciarelli, Daniele

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detector spot size" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Optical ionization detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical ionization detector wherein a beam of light is split so that one arm passes through a fiber optics and the other arm passes through a gas-filled region, and uses interferometry to detect density changes in a gas when charged particles pass through it. The gas-filled region of the detector is subjected to a high electric field and as a charged particle traverses this gas region electrons are freed from the cathode and accelerated so as to generate an electron avalanche which is collected on the anode. The gas density is effected by the electron avalanche formation and if the index or refraction is proportional to the gas density the index will change accordingly. The detector uses this index change by modulating the one arm of the split light beam passing through the gas, with respect to the other arm that is passed through the fiber optic. Upon recombining of the beams, interference fringe changes as a function of the index change indicates the passage of charged particles through the gaseous medium. 3 figures.

Wuest, C.R.; Lowry, M.E.

1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

142

Optical ionization detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical ionization detector wherein a beam of light is split so that one arm passes through a fiber optics and the other arm passes through a gas-filled region, and uses interferometry to detect density changes in a gas when charged particles pass through it. The gas-filled region of the detector is subjected to a high electric field and as a charged particle traverses this gas region electrons are freed from the cathode and accelerated so as to generate an electron avalanche which is collected on the anode. The gas density is effected by the electron avalanche formation and if the index or refraction is proportional to the gas density the index will change accordingly. The detector uses this index change by modulating the one arm of the split light beam passing through the gas, with respect to the other arm that is passed through the fiber optic. Upon recombining of the beams, interference fringe changes as a function of the index change indicates the passage of charged particles through the gaseous medium.

Wuest, Craig R. (Danville, CA); Lowry, Mark E. (Castro Valley, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Impulsive Spot Heating and Thermal Explosion of Interstellar Grains Revisited  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The problem of impulsive heating of dust grains in cold, dense interstellar clouds is revisited theoretically, with the aim to better understand leading mechanisms of the explosive desorption of icy mantles. It is rigorously shown that if the heating of a reactive medium occurs within a sufficiently localized spot (e.g., heating of mantles by cosmic rays), then the subsequent thermal evolution is characterized by a single dimensionless number $\\lambda$. This number identifies a bifurcation between two distinct regimes: When $\\lambda$ exceeds a critical value (threshold), the heat equation exhibits the explosive solution, i.e., the thermal (chemical) explosion is triggered. Otherwise, thermal diffusion causes the deposited heat to spread over the entire grain -- this regime is commonly known as the whole-grain heating. The theory allows us to find a critical combination of the physical parameters that govern the explosion of icy mantles due to impulsive spot heating. In particular, the calculations suggest tha...

Ivlev, A V; Vasyunin, A; Caselli, P

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

The STAR Vertex Position Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 2x3 channel pseudo Vertex Position Detector (pVPD) in the STAR experiment at RHIC has been upgraded to a 2x19 channel detector in the same acceptance, called the Vertex Position Detector (VPD). This detector is fully integrated into the STAR trigger system and provides the primary input to the minimum-bias trigger in Au+Au collisions. The information from the detector is used both in the STAR Level-0 trigger and offline to measure the location of the primary collision vertex along the beam pipe and the event "start time" needed by other fast-timing detectors in STAR. The offline timing resolution of single detector channels in full-energy Au+Au collisions is ~100 ps, resulting in a start time resolution of a few tens of picoseconds and a resolution on the primary vertex location of ~1 cm.

W. J. Llope; J. Zhou; T. Nussbaum; G. W. Hoffmann; K. Asselta; J. D. Brandenburg; J. Butterworth; T. Camarda; W. Christie; H. J. Crawford; X. Dong; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; F. Geurts; J. Hammond; E. Judd; D. L. McDonald; C. Perkins; L. Ruan; J. Scheblein; J. J. Schambach; R. Soja; K. Xin; C. Yang

2014-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

145

X-ray focal spot locating apparatus and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An X-ray beam finder for locating a focal spot of an X-ray tube includes a mass of X-ray opaque material having first and second axially-aligned, parallel-opposed faces connected by a plurality of substantially identical parallel holes perpendicular to the faces and a film holder for holding X-ray sensitive film tightly against one face while the other face is placed in contact with the window of an X-ray head.

Gilbert, Hubert W. (Cedar Crest, NM)

1985-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

146

A statistical study of bright spot reflection parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cal Study of Bright Spot Reflection Parameters. (December 1981) David Lee Godwin, B. S. , Pepperdine University Chairman of Adv1sory Committee: Dr. T. W. Spencer A data set consisting of two seismic lines served as the basis of study... obtained from each of the seismic lines were compared to deter- mine if the presence of commercial quantities of gas could be identified. The measurement process revealed that the interval travel time measurements between the marker horizons...

Godwin, David Lee

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Evidence of randomness in United States spot oil prices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study investigates U.S. crude oil spot-market prices to determine if they were cyclical, autoregressive, or random in nature. The fact that oil-price volatility emerged only with the rise of spot markets meant that data for this type of an analysis were not previously available. The hypothesis tested was that U.S. crude oil price changes are neither cyclical nor autocorrelated, and are, therefore, random. Daily data on U.S. crude oil spot market prices (for the period of December 3, 1984 to November 4, 1988) were analyzed using spectral analysis; this converts time-series data into a frequency series, where it can be analyzed using more-powerful statistical methods. The spectral results of the price series gave a maximum power spectrum of 0.026, which is considerably smaller than the significance level of 0.052, considered acceptable using a 99% confidence level. The conclusion reached was that there was no significant cyclicality or autocorrelation in the data. This indicated that the U.S. crude oil prices are efficient, and that it would not be possible to predict crude oil price changes by using historical price data, seasonality, or business cycles.

Howard, B.W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Understanding plastic deformation in thermal glasses from single-soft-spot dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By considering the low-frequency vibrational modes of amorphous solids, Manning and Liu [Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 108302 (2011)] showed that a population of "soft spots" can be identified that are intimately related to plasticity at zero temperature under quasistatic shear. In this work we track individual soft spots with time in a two-dimensional sheared thermal Lennard Jones glass at temperatures ranging from deep in the glassy regime to above the glass transition temperature. We show that the lifetimes of individual soft spots are correlated with the timescale for structural relaxation. We additionally calculate the number of rearrangements required to destroy soft spots, and show that most soft spots can survive many rearrangements. Finally, we show that soft spots are robust predictors of rearrangements at temperatures well into the super-cooled regime. Altogether, these results pave the way for mesoscopic theories of plasticity of amorphous solids based on dynamical behavior of individual soft spots.

Samuel S. Schoenholz; Andrea J. Liu; Robert A. Riggleman; Joerg Rottler

2014-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

149

PDID: Pulsed-Discharge Ionization Detector A new detector for...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ppb sensitivity (1 gkg) * Near universal detector * Hand-portable * Push button automation MicroChemlab VOC Biomarker Diagnosis Advantages Radical shift in diagnosis...

150

Wire-inhomogeneity detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device for uncovering imperfections in electrical conducting wire, particularly superconducting wire, by detecting variations in eddy currents. Eddy currents effect the magnetic field in a gap of an inductor, contained in a modified commercial ferrite core, through which the wire being tested is passed. A small increase or decrease in the amount of conductive material, such as copper, in a fixed cross section of wire will unbalance a bridge used to measure the impedance of the inductor, tripping a detector and sounding an alarm.

Gibson, G.H.; Smits, R.G.; Eberhard, P.H.

1982-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

151

Liquid level detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A liquid level detector for low pressure boilers. A boiler tank, from which apor, such as steam, normally exits via a main vent, is provided with a vertical side tube connected to the tank at the desired low liquid level. When the liquid level falls to the level of the side tube vapor escapes therethrough causing heating of a temperature sensitive device located in the side tube, which, for example, may activate a liquid supply means for adding liquid to the boiler tank. High liquid level in the boiler tank blocks entry of vapor into the side tube, allowing the temperature sensitive device to cool, for example, to ambient temperature.

Grasso, Albert P. (Vernon, CT)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Flexible composite radiation detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A flexible composite scintillator was prepared by mixing fast, bright, dense rare-earth doped powdered oxyorthosilicate (such as LSO:Ce, LSO:Sm, and GSO:Ce) scintillator with a polymer binder. The binder is transparent to the scintillator emission. The composite is seamless and can be made large and in a wide variety of shapes. Importantly, the composite can be tailored to emit light in a spectral region that matches the optimum response of photomultipliers (about 400 nanometers) or photodiodes (about 600 nanometers), which maximizes the overall detector efficiency.

Cooke, D. Wayne (Santa Fe, NM); Bennett, Bryan L. (Los Alamos, NM); Muenchausen, Ross E. (Los Alamos, NM); Wrobleski, Debra A. (Los Alamos, NM); Orler, Edward B. (Los Alamos, NM)

2006-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

153

Ionizing Radiation Detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A CdZnTe (CZT) crystal provided with a native CdO dielectric coating to reduce surface leakage currents and thereby, improve the resolution of instruments incorporating detectors using CZT crystals is disclosed. A two step process is provided for forming the dielectric coating which includes etching the surface of a CZT crystal with a solution of the conventional bromine/methanol etch treatment, and passivating the CZT crystal surface with a solution of 10 w/o NH.sub.4 F and 10 w/o H.sub.2 O.sub.2 in water after attaching electrical contacts to the crystal surface.

Wright, Gomez W. (Nashville, TN); James, Ralph B. (Livermore, CA); Burger, Arnold (Nashville, TN); Chinn, Douglas A. (Livermore, CA)

2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

154

Avalanche semiconductor radiation detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operation of novel avalanche semiconductor detector, produced on the basis of heterojunctions Si-SiC and Si-Si{sub x}O{sub y} is described. A uniform avalanche process with gain from 10{sup 3} to 10{sup 5} can be reached depending on the conductivity of SiC and Si{sub x}O{sub y} layers. Two types of avalanche photodetectors designed for applications in wavelength range 500--10,00 nm with quantum efficiency 60 {+-} 10% (650 nm) and 200--700 nm with quantum efficiency 60 {+-} 15% (450 nm) are presented.

Sadygov, Z.Y. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)] [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); [Azerbaijan Academy of Sciences, Baku (Azerbaijan). Physics Inst.; Zheleznykh, I.M.; Kirillova, T.A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. for Nuclear Research] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. for Nuclear Research; Malakhov, N.A.; Jejer, V.N. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)] [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Liquid level detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A liquid level detector for low pressure boilers. A boiler tank, from which vapor, such as steam, normally exits via a main vent, is provided with a vertical side tube connected to the tank at the desired low liquid level. When the liquid level falls to the level of the side tube vapor escapes therethrough causing heating of a temperature sensitive device located in the side tube, which, for example, may activate a liquid supply means for adding liquid to the boiler tank. High liquid level in the boiler tank blocks entry of vapor into the side tube, allowing the temperature sensitive device to cool, for example, to ambient temperature.

Grasso, A.P.

1984-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

156

Pyroelectric demodulating detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pyroelectric demodulating detector (also termed a pyroelectric demodulator) is disclosed which utilizes an electrical resistor stacked upon a pyroelectric element to demodulate an rf or microwave electrical input signal which is amplitude-modulated (AM). The pyroelectric demodulator, which can be formed as a hybrid or a monolithic device, has applications for use in AM radio receivers. Demodulation is performed by feeding the AM input signal into the resistor and converting the AM input signal into an AM heat signal which is conducted through the pyroelectric element and used to generate an electrical output signal containing AM information from the AM input signal.

Brocato, Robert W. (Sandia Park, NM)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

157

A Centrality Detector Concept  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The nucleus-nucleus impact parameter and collision geometry of a heavy ion collision are typically characterized by assigning a collision "centrality". In all present heavy ion experiments centrality is measured indirectly, by detecting the number of particles or the energy of the particles produced in the interactions, typically at high rapidity. Centrality parameters are associated to the measured detector response using the Glauber model. This approach suffers from systematic uncertainties related to the assumptions about the particle production mechanism and limitations of the Glauber model. In the collider based experiments there is a unique possibility to measure centrality parameters by registering spectator fragments remaining from the collision. This approach does not require model assumptions and relies on the fact that spectators and participants are related via the total number of nucleons in the colliding species. This article describes the concept of the centrality detector for heavy ion experiment, which measures the total mass number of all fragments by measuring their deflection in the magnetic field of the collider elements.

Sourav Tarafdar; Zvi Citron; Alexander Milov

2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

158

Efficiencies of Quantum Optical Detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a definition for the efficiency that can be universally applied to all classes of quantum optical detectors. This definition is based on the maximum amount of optical loss that a physically plausible device can experience while still replicating the properties of a given detector. We prove that detector efficiency cannot be increased using linear optical processing. That is, given a set of detectors, as well as arbitrary linear optical elements and ancillary light sources, it is impossible to construct detection devices that would exhibit higher efficiencies than the initial set.

Daniel Hogg; Dominic W. Berry; A. I. Lvovsky

2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

Avalanche photodiode based detector for beam emission spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An avalanche photodiode based (APD) detector for the visible wavelength range was developed for low light level, high frequency beam emission spectroscopy (BES) experiments in fusion plasmas. This solid state detector has higher quantum efficiency than photomultiplier tubes, and unlike normal photodiodes, it has internal gain. This paper describes the developed detector as well as the noise model of the electronic circuit. By understanding the noise sources and the amplification process, the optimal amplifier and APD reverse voltage setting can be determined, where the signal-to-noise ratio is the highest for a given photon flux. The calculations are compared to the absolute calibration results of the implemented circuit. It was found that for a certain photon flux range, relevant for BES measurements ({approx_equal}10{sup 8}-10{sup 10} photons/s), the new detector is superior to both photomultipliers and photodiodes, although it does not require cryogenic cooling of any component. The position of this photon flux window sensitively depends on the parameters of the actual experimental implementation (desired bandwidth, detector size, etc.) Several detector units based on these developments have been built and installed in various tokamaks. Some illustrative results are presented from the 8-channel trial BES system installed at Mega-Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) and the 16-channel BES system installed at the Torus Experiment for Technology Oriented Research (TEXTOR).

Dunai, D.; Zoletnik, S.; Sarkoezi, J. [KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, EURATOM Association, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Field, A. R. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

Radiation and Background Levels in a CLIC Detector due to Beam-Beam Effects Optimisation of Detector Geometries and Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The high charge density---due to small beam sizes---and the high energy of the proposed CLIC concept for a linear electron--positron collider with a centre-of-mass energy of up to 3~TeV lead to the production of a large number of particles through beam-beam interactions at the interaction point during every bunch crossing (BX). A large fraction of these particles safely leaves the detector. A still significant amount of energy will be deposited in the forward region nonetheless, which will produce secondary particles able to cause background in the detector. Furthermore, some particles will be created with large polar angles and directly cause background in the tracking detectors and calorimeters. The main sources of background in the detector, either directly or indirectly, are the incoherent $mathrm{e}^{+}mathrm{e}^{-}$ pairs and the particles from $gammagamma ightarrow$ hadron events. The background and radiation levels in the detector have to be estimated, to study if a detector is feasible, that can han...

Sailer, André; Lohse, Thomas

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detector spot size" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Development of A Self Biased High Efficiency Solid-State Neutron Detector for MPACT Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutron detection is an important aspect of materials protection, accounting, and control for transmutation (MPACT). Currently He-3 filled thermal neutron detectors are utilized in many applications; these detectors require high-voltage bias for operation, which complicates the system when multiple detectors are used. In addition, due to recent increase in homeland security activity and the nuclear renaissance, there is a shortage of He-3, and these detectors become more expensive. Instead, cheap solid-state detectors that can be mass produced like any other computer chips will be developed. The new detector does not require a bias for operation, has low gamma sensitivity, and a fast response. The detection system is based on a honeycomb-like silicon device, which is filled with B-10 as the neutron converter; while a silicon p-n diode (i.e., solar cell type device) formed on the thin silicon wall of the honeycomb structure detects the energetic charged particles emitted from the B-10 conversion layer. Such a detector has ~40% calculated thermal neutron detection efficiency with an overall detector thickness of about 200 ?m. Stacking of these devices allows over 90% thermal neutron detection efficiency. The goal of the proposed research is to develop a high-efficiency, low-noise, self-powered solid-state neutron detector system based on the promising results of the existing research program. A prototype of this solid-state neutron detector system with sufficient detector size (up to 8-inch diam., but still portable and inexpensive) and integrated with interface electronics (e.g., preamplifier) will be designed, fabricated, and tested as a coincidence counter for MPACT applications. All fabrications proposed are based on silicon-compatible processing; thus, an extremely cheap detector system could be massively produced like any other silicon chips. Such detectors will revolutionize current neutron detection systems by providing a solid-state alternative to traditional gas-based neutron detectors.

Danon, Yaron; Bhat, Ishwara; Jian-Qiang Lu, James

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

162

Porous material neutron detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A neutron detector employs a porous material layer including pores between nanoparticles. The composition of the nanoparticles is selected to cause emission of electrons upon detection of a neutron. The nanoparticles have a maximum dimension that is in the range from 0.1 micron to 1 millimeter, and can be sintered with pores thereamongst. A passing radiation generates electrons at one or more nanoparticles, some of which are scattered into a pore and directed toward a direction opposite to the applied electrical field. These electrons travel through the pore and collide with additional nanoparticles, which generate more electrons. The electrons are amplified in a cascade reaction that occurs along the pores behind the initial detection point. An electron amplification device may be placed behind the porous material layer to further amplify the electrons exiting the porous material layer.

Diawara, Yacouba (Oak Ridge, TN); Kocsis, Menyhert (Venon, FR)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

163

Event counting alpha detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrostatic detector is disclosed for atmospheric radon or other weak sources of alpha radiation. In one embodiment, nested enclosures are insulated from one another, open at the top, and have a high voltage pin inside and insulated from the inside enclosure. An electric field is produced between the pin and the inside enclosure. Air ions produced by collision with alpha particles inside the decay volume defined by the inside enclosure are attracted to the pin and the inner enclosure. With low alpha concentrations, individual alpha events can be measured to indicate the presence of radon or other alpha radiation. In another embodiment, an electrical field is produced between parallel plates which are insulated from a single decay cavity enclosure. 6 figs.

Bolton, R.D.; MacArthur, D.W.

1996-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

164

Particle detector spatial resolution  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method and apparatus for producing separated columns of scintillation layer material, for use in detection of X-rays and high energy charged particles with improved spatial resolution is disclosed. A pattern of ridges or projections is formed on one surface of a substrate layer or in a thin polyimide layer, and the scintillation layer is grown at controlled temperature and growth rate on the ridge-containing material. The scintillation material preferentially forms cylinders or columns, separated by gaps conforming to the pattern of ridges, and these columns direct most of the light produced in the scintillation layer along individual columns for subsequent detection in a photodiode layer. The gaps may be filled with a light-absorbing material to further enhance the spatial resolution of the particle detector. 12 figs.

Perez-Mendez, V.

1992-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

165

Particle detector spatial resolution  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method and apparatus for producing separated columns of scintillation layer material, for use in detection of X-rays and high energy charged particles with improved spatial resolution. A pattern of ridges or projections is formed on one surface of a substrate layer or in a thin polyimide layer, and the scintillation layer is grown at controlled temperature and growth rate on the ridge-containing material. The scintillation material preferentially forms cylinders or columns, separated by gaps conforming to the pattern of ridges, and these columns direct most of the light produced in the scintillation layer along individual columns for subsequent detection in a photodiode layer. The gaps may be filled with a light-absorbing material to further enhance the spatial resolution of the particle detector.

Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Imaging alpha particle detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A dielectric coated high voltage electrode and a tungsten wire grid constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

Anderson, D.F.

1980-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

167

Imaging alpha particle detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A conducting coated high voltage electrode (1) and a tungsten wire grid (2) constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source (3) to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window (4) allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

Anderson, David F. (Los Alamos, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Event counting alpha detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrostatic detector for atmospheric radon or other weak sources of alpha radiation. In one embodiment, nested enclosures are insulated from one another, open at the top, and have a high voltage pin inside and insulated from the inside enclosure. An electric field is produced between the pin and the inside enclosure. Air ions produced by collision with alpha particles inside the decay volume defined by the inside enclosure are attracted to the pin and the inner enclosure. With low alpha concentrations, individual alpha events can be measured to indicate the presence of radon or other alpha radiation. In another embodiment, an electrical field is produced between parallel plates which are insulated from a single decay cavity enclosure.

Bolton, Richard D. (Los Alamos, NM); MacArthur, Duncan W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Fiber optic fluid detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element having a cladding or coating of a material which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses. 10 figs.

Angel, S.M.

1987-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

170

The magnetic configuration of a delta-spot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sunspots, which harbor both magnetic polarities within one penumbra, are called delta-spots. They are often associated with flares. Nevertheless, there are only very few detailed observations of the spatially resolved magnetic field configuration. We present an investigation performed with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter at the Vacuum Tower Telescope in Tenerife. We observed a sunspot with a main umbra and several additional umbral cores, one of them with opposite magnetic polarity (the delta-umbra). The delta-spot is divided into two parts by a line along which central emissions of the spectral line Ca II 854.2 nm appear. The Evershed flow comming from the main umbra ends at this line. In deep photospheric layers, we find an almost vertical magnetic field for the delta-umbra, and the magnetic field decreases rapidly with height, faster than in the main umbra. The horizontal magnetic field in the direction connecting main and delta-umbra is rather smooth, but in one location next to a bright penumbral featu...

Balthasar, Horst; Louis, Rohan E; Verma, Meetu; Denker, Carsten

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

March market review. [Spot market prices for uranium (1993)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The spot market price for uranium in unrestricted markets weakened further during March, and at month end, the NUEXCO Exchange Value had fallen $0.15, to $7.45 per pound U3O8. The Restricted American Market Penalty (RAMP) for concentrates increased $0.15, to $2.55 per pound U3O8. Ample UF6 supplies and limited demand led to a $0.50 decrease in the UF6 Value, to $25.00 per kgU as UF6, while the RAMP for UF6 increased $0.75, to $5.25 per kgU. Nine near-term uranium transactions were reported, totalling almost 3.3 million pounds equivalent U3O8. This is the largest monthly spot market volume since October 1992, and is double the volume reported in January and February. The March 31 Conversion Value was $4.25 per kgU as UF6. Beginning with the March 31 Value, NUEXCO now reports its Conversion Value in US dollars per kilogram of uranium (US$/kgU), reflecting current industry practice. The March loan market was inactive with no transactions reported. The Loan Rate remained unchanged at 3.0 percent per annum. Low demand and increased competition among sellers led to a one-dollar decrease in the SWU Value, to $65 per SWU, and the RAMP for SWU declined one dollar, to $9 per SWU.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Air cooling for Vertex Detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The vertex detectors are crucial detectors for future linear e+e- colliders since they must give the most accurate location of any outgoing charged particles originating from the interaction point. The DEPFET collaboration is developing a new type of pixel sensors which provide very low noise and high spatial resolution. In order to precisely determine the track and vertex positions, multiple scattering in the detector has to be reduced by minimizing the material in the sensors, cooling, and support structures. A new method of cooling by blowing air over the sensors has been developed and tested. It is applied in the design and construction of the Belle-II detector and may be used in the new generation of vertex detectors for linear colliders.

Arantza Oyanguren

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

173

Host-specific strain of Stemphylium causes leaf spot disease of California spinach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spinach culti- vars developed leaf spots within 2 weeks, while the wateras onto spinach lines used in downy mildew research. A water

Koike, Steven T.; Henderson, Diana M.; Butler, Edward E.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Optimal spot market inventory strategies in the presence of cost and price risk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimal spot market inventory strategies in the presence ofeither increase or decrease inventory by buying or sellingof actively managing inventory during the period rather than

Guo, X.; Kaminsky, P.; Tomecek, P.; Yuen, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Transformation from spots to waves in a model of actin pattern formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Actin networks in certain single-celled organisms exhibit a complex pattern-forming dynamics that starts with the appearance of static spots of actin on the cell cortex. Spots soon become mobile, executing persistent random walks, and eventually give rise to traveling waves of actin. Here we describe a possible physical mechanism for this distinctive set of dynamic transformations, by equipping an excitable reaction-diffusion model with a field describing the spatial orientation of its chief constituent (which we consider to be actin). The interplay of anisotropic actin growth and spatial inhibition drives a transformation at fixed parameter values from static spots to moving spots to waves.

Stephen Whitelam; Till Bretschneider; Nigel J. Burroughs

2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

176

ATLAS Inner Detector Event Data Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

offline/? cvsroot=atlas : InnerDetector/InDetRawEvent/ATLAS Inner Detector Event Data Model F. Akesson 1 , M.J.the Inner Detector of the ATLAS experiment is presented. Di?

Costa, M.J.; ATLAS

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Acquisition System and Detector Interface for Power Pulsed Detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A common DAQ system is being developed within the CALICE collaboration. It provides a flexible and scalable architecture based on giga-ethernet and 8b/10b serial links in order to transmit either slow control data, fast signals or read out data. A detector interface (DIF) is used to connect detectors to the DAQ system based on a single firmware shared among the collaboration but targeted on various physical implementations. The DIF allows to build, store and queue packets of data as well as to control the detectors providing USB and serial link connectivity. The overall architecture is foreseen to manage several hundreds of thousands channels.

Cornat, R

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

High-efficiency neutron detectors and methods of making same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Neutron detectors, advanced detector process techniques and advanced compound film designs have greatly increased neutron-detection efficiency. One embodiment of the detectors utilizes a semiconductor wafer with a matrix of spaced cavities filled with one or more types of neutron reactive material such as 10B or 6LiF. The cavities are etched into both the front and back surfaces of the device such that the cavities from one side surround the cavities from the other side. The cavities may be etched via holes or etched slots or trenches. In another embodiment, the cavities are different-sized and the smaller cavities extend into the wafer from the lower surfaces of the larger cavities. In a third embodiment, multiple layers of different neutron-responsive material are formed on one or more sides of the wafer. The new devices operate at room temperature, are compact, rugged, and reliable in design.

McGregor, Douglas S.; Klann, Raymond

2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

179

Detectors and Sensors | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Detectors and Sensors SHARE Detectors and Sensors 201303163 Extreme Filter for Low-Output Thermocouples in High EMI Environments 201303179 Internal Tube Inspection System...

180

The IPNS resonance detector spectrometer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the resonance detector method of neutron spectroscopy, a foil is placed in the scattered neutron beam and scattered neutrons having the resonance energy are detected by detecting the capture gammas resulting from the resonance absorption of the neutrons. A prototype resonance detector spectrometer called the Electron Volt Spectrometer (EVS) has been built and operated. The instrument is described, the current understanding of the background of the instrument is discussed, software developed to simulate the detector efficiency is described and compared with experimental results, and a test of the use of foil-thickness difference techniques to improve resolution is presented. (LEW)

Crawford, R.K.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detector spot size" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

ATLAS Forward Detectors and Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this communication I describe the ATLAS forward physics program and the detectors, LUCID, ZDC and ALFA that have been designed to meet this experimental challenge. In addition to their primary role in the determination of ATLAS luminosity these detectors - in conjunction with the main ATLAS detector - will be used to study soft QCD and diffractive physics in the initial low luminosity phase of ATLAS running. Finally, I will briefly describe the ATLAS Forward Proton (AFP) project that currently represents the future of the ATLAS forward physics program.

N. Soni

2010-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

182

Neutrino Physics with Thermal Detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The investigation of fundamental neutrino properties like its mass and its nature calls for the design of a new generation of experiments. High sensitivity, high energy resolution, and versatility together with the possibility of a simple multiplexing scheme are the key features of future detectors for these experiments. Thermal detectors can combine all these features. This paper reviews the status and the perspectives for what concerns the application of this type of detectors to neutrino physics, focusing on direct neutrino mass measurements and neutrinoless double beta decay searches.

Nucciotti, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano Bicocca and INFN Sezione di Milano-Bicocca Piazza della Scienza, 3, 20126 Milano (Italy)

2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

183

Seal system with integral detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A seal system is disclosed for materials where security is of the essence, such as nuclear materials. The seal is tamper-indicating, indicates changes in environmental conditions that evidence attempts to bypass the seal, is unique and cost effective. The seal system is comprised of a seal where an optical signal is transmitted through a loop, with a detector to read said signal, and one or more additional detectors designed to detect environmental changes, these detectors being operatively associated with the seal so that detection of a break in the optical signal or detection of environmental changes will cause an observable change in the seal.

Fiarman, S.

1982-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

184

Seal system with integral detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

There is disclosed a seal system for materials where security is of the essence, such as nuclear materials, which is tamper-indicating, which indicates changes in environmental conditions that evidence attempts to by-pass the seal, which is unique and cost effective, said seal system comprised of a seal where an optical signal is transmitted through a loop, with a detector to read said signal, and one or more additional detectors designed to detect environmental changes, these detectors being operatively associated with the seal so that detection of a break in the optical signal or detection of environmental changes will cause an observable change in the seal.

Fiarman, Sidney (Port Jefferson, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Optical transcutaneous bilirubin detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention consists of a transcutaneous bilirubin detector comprising a source of light having spectral components absorbable and not absorbable by bilirubin, a handle assembly, electronic circuitry and a fiber optic bundle connecting the assembly to the light source and circuitry. Inside the assembly is a prism that receives the light from one end of the fiber optic bundle and directs it onto the skin and directs the reflected light back into the bundle. The other end of the bundle is trifucated, with one end going to the light source and the other two ends going to circuitry that determines how much light of each kind has been reflected. A relatively greater amount absorbed by the skin from the portion of the spectrum absorbable by bilirubin may indicate the presence of the illness. Preferably, two measurements are made, one on the kneecap and one on the forehead, and compared to determine the presence of bilirubin. To reduce the impact of light absorption by hemoglobin in the blood carried by the skin, pressure is applied with a plunger and spring in the handle assembly, the pressure limited by points of a button slidably carried in the assembly that are perceived by touch when the pressure applied is sufficient.

Kronberg, J.W.

1991-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

186

Microwave hematoma detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The Microwave Hematoma Detector is a non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots near the outer surface of the body. While being geared towards finding sub-dural and epi-dural hematomas, the device can be used to detect blood pooling anywhere near the surface of the body. Modified versions of the device can also detect pneumothorax, organ hemorrhage, atherosclerotic plaque in the carotid arteries, evaluate perfusion (blood flow) at or near the body surface, body tissue damage at or near the surface (especially for burn assessment) and be used in a number of NDE applications. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with a specialized antenna, signal processing/recognition algorithms and a disposable cap worn by the patient which will facilitate accurate mapping of the brain and proper function of the instrument. The invention may be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of sub-dural or epi-dural hematoma in human or animal patients, detection of hemorrhage within approximately 5 cm of the outer surface anywhere on a patient's body.

Haddad, Waleed S. (Dublin, CA); Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA); Matthews, Dennis L. (Moss Beach, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Energy resolution of the CdTe-XPAD detector:calibration and potential for Laue diffractionmeasurements on protein crystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The XPAD3S-CdTe, a CdTe photon-counting pixel array detector, has been used to measure the energy and the intensity of the white-beam diffraction from a lysozyme crystal. A method was developed to calibrate the detector in terms of energy, allowing incident photon energy measurement to high resolution (approximately 140 eV), opening up new possibilities in energy-resolved X-ray diffraction. In order to demonstrate this, Laue diffraction experiments were performed on the bending-magnet beamline METROLOGIE at Synchrotron SOLEIL. The X-ray energy spectra of diffracted spots were deduced from the indexed Laue patterns collected with an imaging-plate detector and then measured with both the XPAD3S-CdTe and the XPAD3S-Si, a silicon photon-counting pixel array detector. The predicted and measured energy of selected diffraction spots are in good agreement, demonstrating the reliability of the calibration method. These results open up the way to direct unit-cell parameter determination and the measurement of high-quality Laue data even at low resolution. Based on the success of these measurements, potential applications in X-ray diffraction opened up by this type of technology are discussed.

Medjoubi K.; Idir M.; Thompson, A.; Berar, J-F.; Clemens, J-C.; Delpierre, P.; Da Silva, P.; Dinkespiler, B.; Itie, J-P.; Legrand, P.; Menneglier, C.; Mercere, P.; Picca, F.; Samama J-P.

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

188

Light stops, blind spots, and isospin violation in the MSSM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the framework of the MSSM, we examine several simplified models where only a few superpartners are light. This allows us to study WIMP-nucleus scattering in terms of a handful of MSSM parameters and thereby scrutinize their impact on dark matter direct-detection experiments. Focusing on spin-independent WIMP-nucleon scattering, we derive simplified, analytic expressions for the Wilson coefficients associated with Higgs and squark exchange. We utilize these results to study the complementarity of constraints due to direct-detection, flavor, and collider experiments. We also identify parameter configurations that produce (almost) vanishing cross sections. In the proximity of these so-called blind spots, the amount of isospin violation is found to be much larger than typically expected in the MSSM. This feature is a generic property of parameter regions where cross sections are suppressed, and highlights the importance of a careful analysis of the nucleon couplings and the associated hadronic uncertainties. T...

Crivellin, Andreas; Procura, Massimiliano; Tunstall, Lewis C

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

A NON-GAUSSIAN ORNSTEIN-UHLENBECK PROCESS FOR ELECTRICITY SPOT PRICE MODELING AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A NON-GAUSSIAN ORNSTEIN-UHLENBECK PROCESS FOR ELECTRICITY SPOT PRICE MODELING AND DERIVATIVES for analytical pricing of electricity forward and futures contracts. Electricity forward and futures contracts to capture the observed dynamics of electricity spot prices. We also discuss the pricing of European call

Kallsen, Jan

190

Resistance Spot Welding of Galvanized Steel: Part I. Material Variations and Process Modifications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

( l Resistance Spot Welding of Galvanized Steel: Part I. Material Variations and Process to determine their effects on the acceptable range of resistance spot welding conditions for galvanized steel upsloping and downsloping of the weld current, preheat current, postheat current, electrode tip geometry

Eagar, Thomas W.

191

The Effects of the Dysfunctional Spot Market for Electricity in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Effects of the Dysfunctional Spot Market for Electricity in California on the Cost of Forward), the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) program on Reliability and Markets at the U Cruz, California. #12;ABSTRACT The unexpectedly high spot prices for electricity in the summer of 2000

192

AUTOMATIC HOT SPOT DETECTION AND SEGMENTATION IN WHOLE BODY FDG-PET IMAGES Haiying Guan1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AUTOMATIC HOT SPOT DETECTION AND SEGMENTATION IN WHOLE BODY FDG-PET IMAGES Haiying Guan1 , Toshiro a system for automatic hot spots detection and segmentation in whole body FDG-PET images. The main in clinical PET images. 1.INTRODUCTION Positron emission tomography (PET) using fluorine-18 de- oxyglucose

California at Santa Barbara, University of

193

Physics with the MAC detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New results, obtained during the previous year at the PEP colliding beam rings with the MAC detector at a center of mass energy of 29 GeV, are presented.

Ford, W.T.; Read, A.L. Jr., Smith, J. G.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Neutron detectors comprising boron powder  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-efficiency neutron detector substrate assemblies comprising a first conductive substrate, wherein a first side of the substrate is in direct contact with a first layer of a powder material comprising .sup.10boron, .sup.10boron carbide or combinations thereof, and wherein a conductive material is in proximity to the first layer of powder material; and processes of making said neutron detector substrate assemblies.

Wang, Zhehui; Morris, Christopher; Bacon, Jeffrey Darnell; Makela, Mark F; Spaulding, Randy Jay

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

195

STAR Vertex Detector Upgrade Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the development and prototyping efforts undertaken with the goal of producing a micro-vertex detector for the STAR experiment at the RHIC accelerator at BNL. We present the basic detector requirements and show a sensor development path, conceptual mechanical design candidates and readout architecture. Prototyping and beam test results with current generation MimoSTAR-2 sensors and a readout system featuring FPGA based on-the-fly hit finding and data sparsification are also presented.

Greiner, Leo C.; Matis, Howard S.; Stezelberger, Thorsten; Vu,Chinh Q.; Wieman, Howard; Szelezniak, Michal; Sun, Xiangming

2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

196

Software digitizer for high granular gaseous detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A sampling calorimeter using gaseous sensor layers with digital readout [1] is near perfect for ``Particle Flow Algorithm'' [2,3] approach, since it is homogeneous over large surfaces, robust, cost efficient, easily segmentable to any readout pad dimension and size and almost insensitive to neutrons. Monte-Carlo (MC) programs such as GEANT4 [4] simulate with high precision the energy deposited by particles. The sensor and electronic response associated to a pad are calculated in a separate ``digitization'' process. We develop a general method for simulating the pad response using the spatial information from a simulation done at high granularity. The digitization method proposed here has been applied to gaseous detectors including Glass Resistive Plate Chambers (GRPC) and MicroMegas, and validated on test beam data. Experimental observable such as pad multiplicity and mean number of hits at different thresholds have been reproduced with high precision.

Haddad, Y; Boudry, V

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

A Genetic Algorithm Method for Multi-spot Diffuse Infrared Wireless Communications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

optoelectronic devices, such as light emitting diodes (LEDs) and silicon detectors [2]. However there are two

Haddadi, Hamed

198

Measurement of the inelastic proton-proton cross section with the ATLAS detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A measurement of the inelastic proton-proton cross-section at centre-of-mass energy of Central diffraction in proton-proton collisions at {radical}(s) = 7TeV using the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider is presented. Events are selected by requiring hits in scintillator counters mounted in the forward region of the ATLAS detector and the dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20{mu}b{sup -1}. In addition, the total cross-section is studied as a function of the rapidity gap size measured with the inner detector and calorimetry.

Zenis, Tibor [Comenius University Bratislava (Slovakia); Collaboration: ATLAS Collaboration

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

199

Potential of Thin Films for use in Charged Particle Tracking Detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thin Film technology has widespread applications in everyday electronics, notably Liquid Crystal Display screens, solar cells, and organic light emitting diodes. We explore the potential of this technology as charged particle radiation tracking detectors for use in High Energy Physics experiments such as those at the Large Hadron Collider or the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Through modern fabrication techniques, a host of semiconductor materials are available to construct thin, flexible detectors with integrated electronics with pixel sizes on the order of a few microns. We review the material properties of promising candidates, discuss the potential benefits and challenges associated with this technology, and review previously demonstrated applicability as a neutron detector.

J. Metcalfe; I. Mejia; J. Murphy; M. Quevedo; L. Smith; J. Alvarado; B. Gnade; H. Takai

2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

200

Potential of Thin Films for use in Charged Particle Tracking Detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thin Film technology has widespread applications in everyday electronics, notably Liquid Crystal Display screens, solar cells, and organic light emitting diodes. We explore the potential of this technology as charged particle radiation tracking detectors for use in High Energy Physics experiments such as those at the Large Hadron Collider or the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Through modern fabrication techniques, a host of semiconductor materials are available to construct thin, flexible detectors with integrated electronics with pixel sizes on the order of a few microns. We review the material properties of promising candidates, discuss the potential benefits and challenges associated with this technology, and review previously demonstrated applicability as a neutron detector.

Metcalfe, J; Murphy, J; Quevedo, M; Smith, L; Alvarado, J; Gnade, B; Takai, H

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detector spot size" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

An Analysis of Price Volatility in Different Spot Markets for Electricity in the U.S.A.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Analysis of Price Volatility in Different Spot Markets for Electricity in the U.S.A. by Tim important feature. Spot prices for electricity have been very volatile with dramatic price spikes occurring insight into the behavior of spot prices for electricity, and in particular, to model the type

202

Report on Advanced Detector Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutron, gamma and charged particle detection improvements are key to supporting many of the foreseen measurements and systems envisioned in the R&D programs and the future fuel cycle requirements, such as basic nuclear physics and data, modeling and simulation, reactor instrumentation, criticality safety, materials management and safeguards. This task will focus on the developmental needs of the FCR&D experimental programs, such as elastic/inelastic scattering, total cross sections and fission neutron spectra measurements, and will leverage a number of existing neutron detector development efforts and programs, such as those at LANL, PNNL, INL, and IAC as well as those at many universities, some of whom are funded under NE grants and contracts. Novel materials and fabrication processes combined with state-of-the-art electronics and computing provide new opportunities for revolutionary detector systems that will be able to meet the high precision needs of the program. This work will be closely coordinated with the Nuclear Data Crosscut. The Advanced Detector Development effort is a broadly-focused activity that supports the development of improved nuclear data measurements and improved detection of nuclear reactions and reactor conditions. This work supports the design and construction of large-scale, multiple component detectors to provide nuclear reaction data of unprecedented quality and precision. Examples include the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) and the DANCE detector at LANL. This work also supports the fabrication and end-user application of novel scintillator materials detection and monitoring.

James K. Jewell

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Passive environmental radon detector study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are three stages at which the ambient air concentrations of radon-222 are monitored around the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites: before, during, and after construction. Pre-remedial-action measurements are taken for approximately 1 year. Monitoring is conducted during the entire duration of construction, and post-remedial-action monitoring is performed for approximately 1 year. Currently, the UMTRA Project uses Radtrak{reg_sign} brand alpha-track radon detectors for these environmental measurements. The purposes of radon monitoring around the UMTRA sites are (1) to determine background values around the site and pre-remedial-action conditions, (2) to control construction activities and monitor off-site releases, and (3) to compare post-remedial-action concentrations with pre-remedial-action values to demonstrate that radon concentrations have been reduced to approximately background levels. The Technical Assistance Contractor to the DOE for the UMTRA Project evaluated the performance of four different types of passive environmental radon detectors under both controlled laboratory conditions and field conditions at an unremediated UMTRA site. This study was undertaken to evaluate the accuracy and precision of four different passive, timeintegrating, environmental radon detectors in an effort to determine which brand of detector is best suited to measure environmental outdoor radon concentrations for the UMTRA Project. Voluntary manufacturer participation in the study was solicited by placing an advertisement in the Commerce Business Daily. All manufacturers participating in the study supplied the detectors and analysis free of charge.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Passive environmental radon detector study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are three stages at which the ambient air concentrations of radon-222 are monitored around the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites: before, during, and after construction. Pre-remedial-action measurements are taken for approximately 1 year. Monitoring is conducted during the entire duration of construction, and post-remedial-action monitoring is performed for approximately 1 year. Currently, the UMTRA Project uses Radtrak[reg sign] brand alpha-track radon detectors for these environmental measurements. The purposes of radon monitoring around the UMTRA sites are (1) to determine background values around the site and pre-remedial-action conditions, (2) to control construction activities and monitor off-site releases, and (3) to compare post-remedial-action concentrations with pre-remedial-action values to demonstrate that radon concentrations have been reduced to approximately background levels. The Technical Assistance Contractor to the DOE for the UMTRA Project evaluated the performance of four different types of passive environmental radon detectors under both controlled laboratory conditions and field conditions at an unremediated UMTRA site. This study was undertaken to evaluate the accuracy and precision of four different passive, timeintegrating, environmental radon detectors in an effort to determine which brand of detector is best suited to measure environmental outdoor radon concentrations for the UMTRA Project. Voluntary manufacturer participation in the study was solicited by placing an advertisement in the Commerce Business Daily. All manufacturers participating in the study supplied the detectors and analysis free of charge.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Modulated voltage metastable ionization detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metastable ionization detectors used for chromatographic analysis usually employa fixed high voltage for the ionization potential. For this reason, the operating range is limited to about three orders of magnitude. By use of the technique disclosed in the instant invention, operating ranges of about nine orders of magnitude are obtained. The output current from a metastable ionization detector (MID) is applied to a modulation voltage circuit. An adjustment is made to balance out the background current, and an output current, above background, is applied to an input of a strip chart recorder. For low level concentrations, i.e., low detected output current, the ionization potential will be at a maximum and the metastable ionization detector will operate at its most sensitive level. When the detected current from the metastable ionization detector increases above a predetermined threshold level, a voltage control circuit is activated which turns on a high voltage transistor which acts to reduce the ionization potential. The ionization potential applied to the metastable ionization detector is then varied so as to maintain the detected signal level constant. The variation in ionization potential is now related to the concentration fo the constituent and a representative amplitude is applied to another input of said strip chart recorder.

Carle, G. C.; Humphry, D. E.; Kojiro, D. R.

1985-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

206

Near infrared detectors for SNAP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large format (1k x 1k and 2k x 2k) near infrared detectors manufactured by Rockwell Scientific Center and Raytheon Vision Systems are characterized as part of the near infrared R&D effort for SNAP (the Super-Nova/Acceleration Probe). These are hybridized HgCdTe focal plane arrays with a sharp high wavelength cut-off at 1.7 um. This cut-off provides a sufficiently deep reach in redshift while it allows at the same time low dark current operation of the passively cooled detectors at 140 K. Here the baseline SNAP near infrared system is briefly described and the science driven requirements for the near infrared detectors are summarized. A few results obtained during the testing of engineering grade near infrared devices procured for the SNAP project are highlighted. In particular some recent measurements that target correlated noise between adjacent detector pixels due to capacitive coupling and the response uniformity within individual detector pixels are discussed.

Schubnell, M.; Barron, N.; Bebek, C.; Brown, M.G.; Borysow, M.; Cole, D.; Figer, D.; Lorenzon, W.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Seshadri, S.; Smith, R.; Tarle, G.

2006-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

207

The EXO-200 detector, part I: Detector design and construction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXO-200 is an experiment designed to search for double beta decay of $^{136}$Xe with a single-phase, liquid xenon detector. It uses an active mass of 110 kg of xenon enriched to 80.6% in the isotope 136 in an ultra-low background time projection chamber capable of simultaneous detection of ionization and scintillation. This paper describes the EXO-200 detector with particular attention to the most innovative aspects of the design that revolve around the reduction of backgrounds, the efficient use of the expensive isotopically enriched xenon, and the optimization of the energy resolution in a relatively large volume.

M. Auger; D. J. Auty; P. S. Barbeau; L. Bartoszek; E. Baussan; E. Beauchamp; C. Benitez-Medina; M. Breidenbach; D. Chauhan; B. Cleveland; R. Conley; J. Cook; S. Cook; A. Coppens; W. Craddock; T. Daniels; C. G. Davis; J. Davis; R. deVoe; A. Dobi; M. J. Dolinski; M. Dunford; W. Fairbank Jr; J. Farine; P. Fierlinger; D. Franco; G. Giroux; R. Gornea; K. Graham; G. Gratta; C. Hagemann; C. Hall; K. Hall; C. Hargrove; S. Herrin; J. Hodgson; M. Hughes; A. Karelin; L. J. Kaufman; J. Kirk; A. Kuchenkov; K. S. Kumar; D. S. Leonard; F. Leonard; F. LePort; D. Mackay; R. MacLellan; M. Marino; K. Merkle; B. Mong; M. Montero Díez; A. R. Müller; R. Neilson; A. Odian; K. O'Sullivan; C. Ouellet; A. Piepke; A. Pocar; C. Y. Prescott; K. Pushkin; A. Rivas; E. Rollin; P. C. Rowson; A. Sabourov; D. Sinclair; K. Skarpaas; S. Slutsky; V. Stekhanov; V. Strickland; M. Swift; D. Tosi; K. Twelker; J. -L. Vuilleumier; J. -M. Vuilleumier; T. Walton; M. Weber; U. Wichoski; J. Wodin; J. D. Wright; L. Yang; Y. -R. Yen

2012-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

208

Hot spot generation in energetic materials created by long-wavelength infrared radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hot spots produced by long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) radiation in an energetic material, crystalline RDX (1,3,5-trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine), were studied by thermal-imaging microscopy. The LWIR source was a CO{sub 2} laser operating in the 28-30?THz range. Hot spot generation was studied using relatively low intensity (?100?W cm{sup ?2}), long-duration (450 ms) LWIR pulses. The hot spots could be produced repeatedly in individual RDX crystals, to investigate the fundamental mechanisms of hot spot generation by LWIR, since the peak hot-spot temperatures were kept to ?30?K above ambient. Hot spots were generated preferentially beneath RDX crystal planes making oblique angles with the LWIR beam. Surprisingly, hot spots were more prominent when the LWIR wavelength was tuned to be weakly absorbed (absorption depth ?30??m) than when the LWIR wavelength was strongly absorbed (absorption depth ?5??m). This unexpected effect was explained using a model that accounts for LWIR refraction and RDX thermal conduction. The weakly absorbed LWIR is slightly focused underneath the oblique crystal planes, and it penetrates the RDX crystals more deeply, increasing the likelihood of irradiating RDX defect inclusions that are able to strongly absorb or internally focus the LWIR beam.

Chen, Ming-Wei; You, Sizhu; Suslick, Kenneth S.; Dlott, Dana D., E-mail: dlott@illinois.edu [School of Chemical Sciences and Fredrick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

209

May market review. [Spot market prices for uranium (1993)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seven uranium transactions totalling nearly three million pounds equivalent U3O8 were reported during May, but only two, totalling less than 200 thousand pounds equivalent U3O8, involved concentrates. As no discretionary buying occurred during the month, and as near-term supply and demand were in relative balance, prices were steady, while both buyers and sellers appeared to be awaiting some new market development to signal the direction of future spot-market prices. The May 31, 1993, Exchange Value and the Restricted American market Penalty (RAMP) for concentrates were both unchanged at $7.10, and $2.95 per pound U3O8, respectively. NUEXCO's judgement was that transactions for significant quantities of uranium concentrates that were both deliverable in and intended for consumption in the USA could have been concluded on May 31 at $10.05 per pound U3O8. Two near-term concentrate transactions were reported in which one US utility purchased less than 200 thousand pounds equivalent U3O8 from two separate sellers. These sales occurred at price levels at or near the May 31 Exchange Value plus RAMP. No long-term uranium transactions were reported during May. Consequently, the UF6 Value decreased $0.20 to $24.30 per kgU as UF6, reflecting some weakening of the UF6 market outside the USA.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Light stops, blind spots, and isospin violation in the MSSM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the framework of the MSSM, we examine several simplified models where only a few superpartners are light. This allows us to study WIMP-nucleus scattering in terms of a handful of MSSM parameters and thereby scrutinize their impact on dark matter direct-detection experiments. Focusing on spin-independent WIMP-nucleon scattering, we derive simplified, analytic expressions for the Wilson coefficients associated with Higgs and squark exchange. We utilize these results to study the complementarity of constraints due to direct-detection, flavor, and collider experiments. We also identify parameter configurations that produce (almost) vanishing cross sections. In the proximity of these so-called blind spots, the amount of isospin violation is found to be much larger than typically expected in the MSSM. This feature is a generic property of parameter regions where cross sections are suppressed, and highlights the importance of a careful analysis of the nucleon couplings and the associated hadronic uncertainties. This becomes especially relevant once the increased sensitivity of future direct-detection experiments corners the MSSM into these regions of parameter space.

Andreas Crivellin; Martin Hoferichter; Massimiliano Procura; Lewis C. Tunstall

2015-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

211

Silicon Detector Letter of Intent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the current status of SiD's effort to develop an optimized design for an experiment at the International Linear Collider. It presents detailed discussions of each of SiD's various subsystems, an overview of the full GEANT4 description of SiD, the status of newly developed tracking and calorimeter reconstruction algorithms, studies of subsystem performance based on these tools, results of physics benchmarking analyses, an estimate of the cost of the detector, and an assessment of the detector R&D needed to provide the technical basis for an optimised SiD.

Aihara, H.; Burrows, P.; Oreglia, M.

2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

212

Niobium superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the performance of superconducting nanowire photon detectors fabricated from ultra-thin Nb. A direct comparison is made between these detectors and similar nanowire detectors fabricated from NbN. We find that Nb detectors are significantly more susceptible than NbN to thermal instability (latching) at high bias. We show that the devices can be stabilized by reducing the input resistance of the readout. Nb detectors optimized in this way are shown to have approximately 2/3 the reset time of similar large-active-area NbN detectors of the same geometry, with approximately 6% detection efficiency for single photons at 470 nm.

Annunziata, Anthony J; Chudow, Joel D; Frunzio, Luigi; Rooks, Michael J; Frydman, Aviad; Prober, Daniel E

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

High Resolution PET with 250 micrometer LSO Detectors and Adaptive Zoom  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There have been impressive improvements in the performance of small-animal positron emission tomography (PET) systems since their first development in the mid 1990s, both in terms of spatial resolution and sensitivity, which have directly contributed to the increasing adoption of this technology for a wide range of biomedical applications. Nonetheless, current systems still are largely dominated by the size of the scintillator elements used in the detector. Our research predicts that developing scintillator arrays with an element size of 250 {micro}m or smaller will lead to an image resolution of 500 {micro}m when using 18F- or 64Cu-labeled radiotracers, giving a factor of 4-8 improvement in volumetric resolution over the highest resolution research systems currently in existence. This proposal had two main objectives: (i) To develop and evaluate much higher resolution and efficiency scintillator arrays that can be used in the future as the basis for detectors in a small-animal PET scanner where the spatial resolution is dominated by decay and interaction physics rather than detector size. (ii) To optimize one such high resolution, high sensitivity detector and adaptively integrate it into the existing microPET II small animal PET scanner as a 'zoom-in' detector that provides higher spatial resolution and sensitivity in a limited region close to the detector face. The knowledge gained from this project will provide valuable information for building future PET systems with a complete ring of very high-resolution detector arrays and also lay the foundations for utilizing high-resolution detectors in combination with existing PET systems for localized high-resolution imaging.

Cherry, Simon R.; Qi, Jinyi

2012-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

214

Sensitivity of DANSS detector to short range neutrino oscillations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DANSS is a highly segmented $1m^3$ plastic scintillator detector. Its 2500 scintillator strips have a Gd loaded reflective cover. Light is collected with 3 wave length shifting fibers per strip and read out with 50 PMTs and 2500 SiPMs. The DANSS will be installed under the industrial 3GW$_{th}$ reactor of the Kalinin Nuclear Power Plant at distances varying from 9.7m to 12.2m from the reactor core. PMTs and SiPMs collect about 30 photo electrons per MeV distributed approximately equally between two types of the readout. Light collection non-uniformity across and along the strip is about $\\pm13\\%$ from maximum to minimum. The resulting energy resolution is modest, $\\sigma/E=15\\%$ at 5MeV. This leads to a smearing of the oscillation pattern comparable with the smearing due to the large size of the reactor core. Nevertheless because of the large counting rate ($\\sim 10000$ / day), small background ($Tests of the detector prototype DANSSino demonstrated that in spite of a small size ($4\\%$ of DANSS), it is quite sensitive to reactor antineutrinos, detecting about 70 Inverse Beta Decay events per day with the signal-to-background ratio of about unity. The prototype tests have demonstrated feasibility to reach the design performance of the DANSS detector.

Mikhail Danilov

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

215

Down-sizing Forever  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evidence for cosmic down-sizing has been growing over the last decade. It is now clear that the major star-forming epoch for the largest galaxies occurred earlier than for smaller galaxies. This not only runs counter to the popular hierarchical clustering picture, but points to an even more radical revision of our ideas of the evolution of cosmological structure. Galaxies do not form at all.

Douglas Scott; Ali Frolop

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

Display Size Wireless LAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.) - Security sofware ­ESET Smart Security. No Reuse PC with English OS for this time. PC PC Code Image Brand PC PC Code Image Brand Model F008 Panasonic CF-W2 Pentium733 M 1.10GHz 256MB 40GB 12.1 inch 1.0kg System Memory HDD Display Size Weight OS Accessory LAN Wireless LAN Remarks PC PC Code Image Brand

Katsumoto, Shingo

217

ARM - Measurement - Cloud size  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Related InformationAciddroplet size ARM Dataicesizesize ARM Data

218

ARM - Measurement - Hydrometeor size  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Related InformationAciddroplet sizeGeometry ARMphase ARM

219

Hawaiian hot-spot swell structure from seafloor MT sounding Steven Constablea,*, Graham Heinsonb,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hawaiian hot-spot swell structure from seafloor MT sounding Steven Constablea,*, Graham Heinsonb,1 5348090. E-mail addresses: sconstable@ucsd.edu (S. Constable)8 Graham.Heinson@adelaide.edu.au (G. Heinson

Constable, Steve

220

E-Print Network 3.0 - automatic robotic spotting Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: P2 position on the pig and the spot produced by the laser on the end of the robot arm. This was less... Computers and Electronics in Agriculture 44 (2004) 93-106 A...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detector spot size" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Calculation of the fast ion tail distribution for a spherically symmetric hot spot  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fast ion tail for a spherically symmetric hot spot is computed via the solution of a simplified Fokker-Planck collision operator. Emphasis is placed on describing the energy scaling of the fast ion distribution function in the hot spot as well as the surrounding cold plasma throughout a broad range of collisionalities and temperatures. It is found that while the fast ion tail inside the hot spot is significantly depleted, leading to a reduction of the fusion yield in this region, a surplus of fast ions is observed in the neighboring cold plasma region. The presence of this surplus of fast ions in the neighboring cold region is shown to result in a partial recovery of the fusion yield lost in the hot spot.

McDevitt, C. J.; Tang, X.-Z.; Guo, Z. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Berk, H. L. [Department of Physics, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

E-Print Network 3.0 - availability hot spot Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

20.00 2006 IEEE 22nd IEEE SEMI-THERM Symposium Hot Spot Cooling using Embedded Thermoelectric Coolers Summary: 0-7803-XXXX-X0620.00 2006 IEEE 22nd IEEE SEMI-THERM...

223

Wetland monitoring using classification trees and SPOT-5 seasonal time series. Aurlie Davranche1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to estimate the area of4 marshes covered with common reeds (Phragmites australis) and submerged macrophytes5 Phragmites australis, remote sensing, SPOT-5, submerged macrophytes, wetland monitoring.29 30 1. Introduction

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

224

Reedbed monitoring using classification trees and SPOT-5 seasonal time series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Phragmites australis, Remote sensing, SPOT-5. Abstract The Camargue, the RhĂ´ne river delta in south of France to model the presence of common reed (Phragmite australis) stands in Camargue. The development

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

225

April market review. [Spot market prices for uranium (1993)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The spot market price for uranium outside the USA weakened further during April, and at month end, the NUEXCO Exchange Value had fallen $0.35, to $7.10 per pound U3O8. This is the lowest Exchange Value observed in nearly twenty years, comparable to Values recorded during the low price levels of the early 1970s. The Restricted American Market Penalty (RAMP) for concentrates increased $0.40, to $2.95 per pound U3O8. Transactions for significant quantities of uranium concentrates that are both deliverable in and intended for consumption in the USA could have been concluded on April 30 at $10.05 per pound U3O8, up $0.05 from the sum of corresponding March Values. Four near-term concentrates transactions were reported, totalling nearly 1.5 million pounds equivalent U3O8. One long-term sale was reported. The UF6 Value also declined, as increased competition among sellers led to a $0.50 decrease, to $24.50 per kgU as UF6. However, the RAMP for UF6 increased $0.65, to $5.90 per kgU as UF6, reflecting an effective US market level of $30.40 per kgU. Two near term transactions were reported totalling approximately 1.1 million pounds equivalent U3O8. In total, eight uranium transactions totalling 28 million pounds equivalent U3O8 were reported, which is about average for April market activity.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Direct detector for terahertz radiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A direct detector for terahertz radiation comprises a grating-gated field-effect transistor with one or more quantum wells that provide a two-dimensional electron gas in the channel region. The grating gate can be a split-grating gate having at least one finger that can be individually biased. Biasing an individual finger of the split-grating gate to near pinch-off greatly increases the detector's resonant response magnitude over prior QW FET detectors while maintaining frequency selectivity. The split-grating-gated QW FET shows a tunable resonant plasmon response to FIR radiation that makes possible an electrically sweepable spectrometer-on-a-chip with no moving mechanical optical parts. Further, the narrow spectral response and signal-to-noise are adequate for use of the split-grating-gated QW FET in a passive, multispectral terahertz imaging system. The detector can be operated in a photoconductive or a photovoltaic mode. Other embodiments include uniform front and back gates to independently vary the carrier densities in the channel region, a thinned substrate to increase bolometric responsivity, and a resistive shunt to connect the fingers of the grating gate in parallel and provide a uniform gate-channel voltage along the length of the channel to increase the responsivity and improve the spectral resolution.

Wanke, Michael C. (Albuquerque, NM); Lee, Mark (Albuquerque, NM); Shaner, Eric A. (Albuquerque, NM); Allen, S. James (Santa Barbara, CA)

2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

227

Avoiding Carbon Bed Hot Spots in Thermal Process Off-Gas Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mercury has had various uses in nuclear fuel reprocessing and other nuclear processes, and so is often present in radioactive and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes. Test programs performed in recent years have shown that mercury in off-gas streams from processes that treat radioactive wastes can be controlled using fixed beds of activated sulfur-impregnated carbon, to levels low enough to comply with air emission regulations such as the Hazardous Waste Combustor (HWC) Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards. Carbon bed hot spots or fires have occurred several times during these tests, and also during a remediation of tanks that contained mixed waste. Hot spots occur when localized areas in a carbon bed become heated to temperatures where oxidation occurs. This heating typically occurs due to heat of absoption of gas species onto the carbon, but it can also be caused through external means such as external heaters used to heat the carbon bed vessel. Hot spots, if not promptly mitigated, can grow into bed fires. Carbon bed hot spots and fires must be avoided in processes that treat radioactive and mixed waste. Hot spots are detected by (a) monitoring in-bed and bed outlet gas temperatures, and (b) more important, monitoring of bed outlet gas CO concentrations. Hot spots are mitigated by (a) designing for appropriate in-bed gas velocity, for avoiding gas flow maldistribution, and for sufficient but not excessive bed depth, (b) appropriate monitoring and control of gas and bed temperatures and compositions, and (c) prompt implementation of corrective actions if bed hot spots are detected. Corrective actions must be implemented quickly if bed hot spots are detected, using a graded approach and sequence starting with corrective actions that are simple, quick, cause the least impact to the process, and are easiest to recover from.

Nick Soelberg; Joe Enneking

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Pressure fluctuations beneath turbulent spots and instability wave packets in a hypersonic boundary layer.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of turbulent spots in a hypersonic boundary layer was studied on the nozzle wall of the Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel. Under quiet flow conditions, the nozzle wall boundary layer remains laminar and grows very thick over the long nozzle length. This allows the development of large turbulent spots that can be readily measured with pressure transducers. Measurements of naturally occurring wave packets and developing turbulent spots were made. The peak frequencies of these natural wave packets were in agreement with second-mode computations. For a controlled study, the breakdown of disturbances created by spark and glow perturbations were studied at similar freestream conditions. The spark perturbations were the most effective at creating large wave packets that broke down into turbulent spots. The flow disturbances created by the controlled perturbations were analyzed to obtain amplitude criteria for nonlinearity and breakdown as well as the convection velocities of the turbulent spots. Disturbances first grew into linear instability waves and then quickly became nonlinear. Throughout the nonlinear growth of the wave packets, large harmonics are visible in the power spectra. As breakdown begins, the peak amplitudes of the instability waves and harmonics decrease into the rising broad-band frequencies. Instability waves are still visible on either side of the growing turbulent spots during this breakdown process.

Beresh, Steven Jay; Casper, Katya M.; Schneider, Steven P. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Neutron coincidence detectors employing heterogeneous materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A neutron detector relies upon optical separation of different scintillators to measure the total energy and/or number of neutrons from a neutron source. In pulse mode embodiments of the invention, neutrons are detected in a first detector which surrounds the neutron source and in a second detector surrounding the first detector. An electronic circuit insures that only events are measured which correspond to neutrons first detected in the first detector followed by subsequent detection in the second detector. In spectrometer embodiments of the invention, neutrons are thermalized in the second detector which is formed by a scintillator-moderator and neutron energy is measured from the summed signals from the first and second detectors.

Czirr, J. Bartley (Mapleton, UT); Jensen, Gary L. (Orem, UT)

1993-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

230

Gamma-ray imaging with coaxial HPGe detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the first experimental demonstration of Compton imaging of gamma rays with a single coaxial high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. This imaging capability is realized by two-dimensional segmentation of the outside contact in combination with digital pulse-shape analysis, which enables to image gamma rays in 4{pi} without employing a collimator. We are able to demonstrate the ability to image the 662keV gamma ray from a {sup 137}Cs source with preliminary event selection with an angular accuracy of 5 degree with an relative efficiency of 0.2%. In addition to the 4{pi} imaging capability, such a system is characterized by its excellent energy resolution and can be implemented in any size possible for Ge detectors to achieve high efficiency.

Niedermayr, T; Vetter, K; Mihailescu, L; Schmid, G J; Beckedahl, D; Kammeraad, J; Blair, J

2005-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

231

Hybrid anode for semiconductor radiation detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a novel hybrid anode configuration for a radiation detector that effectively reduces the edge effect of surface defects on the internal electric field in compound semiconductor detectors by focusing the internal electric field of the detector and redirecting drifting carriers away from the side surfaces of the semiconductor toward the collection electrode(s).

Yang, Ge; Bolotnikov, Aleksey E; Camarda, Guiseppe; Cui, Yonggang; Hossain, Anwar; Kim, Ki Hyun; James, Ralph B

2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

232

The Harris Corner Detector Konstantinos G. Derpanis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will result in a significant increase; this indicates a corner. References [1] C. Harris and M.J. StephensThe Harris Corner Detector Konstantinos G. Derpanis kosta@cs.yorku.ca October 27, 2004 In this report the derivation of the Harris corner detector [1] is presented. The Harris corner detector

Salvaggio, Carl

233

A mobile antineutrino detector with plastic scintillators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a new type segmented antineutrino detector made of plastic scintillators for the nuclear safeguard application. A small prototype was built and tested to measure background events. A satisfactory unmanned field operation of the detector system was demonstrated. Besides, a detailed Monte Carlo simulation code was developed to estimate the antineutrino detection efficiency of the detector.

Yasuhiro Kuroda; Shugo Oguri; Yo Kato; Ryoko Nakata; Yoshizumi Inoue; Chikara Ito; Makoto Minowa

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

234

Usage by Job Size  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sectorlongUpdates by DianeDemographics UsageUsage by Job Size

235

Subatomic Physics Detector Lab Design, construction and testing of particle detectors for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for position sensitivity. polycrystalline diamond after surface prep at NSFL ebeam in to expt.Diamond detector imaging at HSC #12; Diamond Detectors for Particle Physics J.W. Martin et al, U. Winnipeg Detectors. Synthetic diamond used as a semiconductor detector (eh pair creation) ­ fast response, low noise ­ very

Martin, Jeff

236

Development of Yangbajing Air shower Core detector array for a new EAS hybrid Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aiming at the observation of cosmic-ray chemical composition at the "knee" energy region, we have been developinga new type air-shower core detector (YAC, Yangbajing Air shower Core detector array) to be set up at Yangbajing (90.522$^\\circ$ E, 30.102$^\\circ$ N, 4300 m above sea level, atmospheric depth: 606 g/m$^2$) in Tibet, China. YAC works together with the Tibet air-shower array (Tibet-III) and an underground water cherenkov muon detector array (MD) as a hybrid experiment. Each YAC detector unit consists of lead plates of 3.5 cm thick and a scintillation counter which detects the burst size induced by high energy particles in the air-shower cores. The burst size can be measured from 1 MIP (Minimum Ionization Particle) to $10^{6}$ MIPs. The first phase of this experiment, named "YAC-I", consists of 16 YAC detectors each having the size 40 cm $\\times$ 50 cm and distributing in a grid with an effective area of 10 m$^{2}$. YAC-I is used to check hadronic interaction models. The second phase of the experiment,...

Liu, Jinsheng; Chen, Ding; Zhang, Ying; Zhai, Liuming; Chen, Xu; Hu, Xiaobin; Lin, Yuhui; Zhang, Xueyao; Feng, Cunfeng; Jia, Huanyu; Zhou, Xunxiu; DanZengLuoBu,; Chen, Tianlu; Li, Haijin; Liu, Maoyuan; Yuan, Aifang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Use of treatment log files in spot scanning proton therapy as part of patient-specific quality assurance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The purpose of this work was to assess the monitor unit (MU) values and position accuracy of spot scanning proton beams as recorded by the daily treatment logs of the treatment control system, and furthermore establish the feasibility of using the delivered spot positions and MU values to calculate and evaluate delivered doses to patients. Methods: To validate the accuracy of the recorded spot positions, the authors generated and executed a test treatment plan containing nine spot positions, to which the authors delivered ten MU each. The spot positions were measured with radiographic films and Matrixx 2D ion-chambers array placed at the isocenter plane and compared for displacements from the planned and recorded positions. Treatment logs for 14 patients were then used to determine the spot MU values and position accuracy of the scanning proton beam delivery system. Univariate analysis was used to detect any systematic error or large variation between patients, treatment dates, proton energies, gantry angles, and planned spot positions. The recorded patient spot positions and MU values were then used to replace the spot positions and MU values in the plan, and the treatment planning system was used to calculate the delivered doses to patients. The results were compared with the treatment plan. Results: Within a treatment session, spot positions were reproducible within {+-}0.2 mm. The spot positions measured by film agreed with the planned positions within {+-}1 mm and with the recorded positions within {+-}0.5 mm. The maximum day-to-day variation for any given spot position was within {+-}1 mm. For all 14 patients, with {approx}1 500 000 spots recorded, the total MU accuracy was within 0.1% of the planned MU values, the mean (x, y) spot displacement from the planned value was (-0.03 mm, -0.01 mm), the maximum (x, y) displacement was (1.68 mm, 2.27 mm), and the (x, y) standard deviation was (0.26 mm, 0.42 mm). The maximum dose difference between calculated dose to the patient based on the plan and recorded data was within 2%. Conclusions: The authors have shown that the treatment log file in a spot scanning proton beam delivery system is precise enough to serve as a quality assurance tool to monitor variation in spot position and MU value, as well as the delivered dose uncertainty from the treatment delivery system. The analysis tool developed here could be useful for assessing spot position uncertainty and thus dose uncertainty for any patient receiving spot scanning proton beam therapy.

Li Heng; Sahoo, Narayan; Poenisch, Falk; Suzuki, Kazumichi; Li Yupeng; Li Xiaoqiang; Zhang Xiaodong; Gillin, Michael T.; Zhu, X. Ronald [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Lee, Andrew K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

239

Plasma Panel Based Radiation Detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The plasma panel sensor (PPS) is a gaseous micropattern radiation detector under current development. It has many operational and fabrication principles common to plasma display panels (PDPs). It comprises a dense matrix of small, gas plasma discharge cells within a hermetically sealed panel. As in PDPs, it uses non-reactive, intrinsically radiation-hard materials such as glass substrates, refractory metal electrodes, and mostly inert gas mixtures. We are developing these devices primarily as thin, low-mass detectors with gas gaps from a few hundred microns to a few millimeters. The PPS is a high gain, inherently digital device with the potential for fast response times, fine position resolution (< 50 m RMS) and low cost. In this paper we report here on prototype PPS experimental results in detecting betas, protons and cosmic muons, and we extrapolate on the PPS potential for applications including detection of alphas, heavy-ions at low to medium energy, thermal neutrons and X-rays.

Friedman, Dr. Peter S. [Integrated Sensors, LLC; Varner Jr, Robert L [ORNL; Ball, Robert [University of Michigan; Beene, James R [ORNL; Ben Moshe, M. [Tel Aviv University; Benhammou, Yan [Tel Aviv University; Chapman, J. Wehrley [University of Michigan; Etzion, E [Tel Aviv University; Ferretti, Claudio [University of Michigan; Bentefour, E [Ion Beam Applications; Levin, Daniel S. [University of Michigan; Moshe, M. [Tel Aviv University; Silver, Yiftah [Tel Aviv University; Weaverdyck, Curtis [University of Michigan; Zhou, Bing [University of Michigan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Background canceling surface alpha detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A background canceling long range alpha detector which is capable of providing output proportional to both the alpha radiation emitted from a surface and to radioactive gas emanating from the surface. The detector operates by using an electrical field between first and second signal planes, an enclosure and the surface or substance to be monitored for alpha radiation. The first and second signal planes are maintained at the same voltage with respect to the electrically conductive enclosure, reducing leakage currents. In the presence of alpha radiation and radioactive gas decay, the signal from the first signal plane is proportional to both the surface alpha radiation and to the airborne radioactive gas, while the signal from the second signal plane is proportional only to the airborne radioactive gas. The difference between these two signals is proportional to the surface alpha radiation alone. 5 figs.

MacArthur, D.W.; Allander, K.S.; Bounds, J.A.

1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detector spot size" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Microgap x-ray detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An x-ray detector is disclosed which provides for the conversion of x-ray photons into photoelectrons and subsequent amplification of these photoelectrons through the generation of electron avalanches in a thin gas-filled region subject to a high electric potential. The detector comprises a cathode (photocathode) and an anode separated by the thin, gas-filled region. The cathode may comprise a substrate, such a beryllium, coated with a layer of high atomic number material, such as gold, while the anode can be a single conducting plane of material, such as gold, or a plane of resistive material, such as chromium/silicon monoxide, or multiple areas of conductive or resistive material, mounted on a substrate composed of glass, plastic or ceramic. The charge collected from each electron avalanche by the anode is passed through processing electronics to a point of use, such as an oscilloscope. 3 figures.

Wuest, C.R.; Bionta, R.M.; Ables, E.

1994-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

242

Superconducting transmission line particle detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microvertex particle detector for use in a high energy physic collider including a plurality of parallel superconducting thin film strips separated from a superconducting ground plane by an insulating layer to form a plurality of superconducting waveguides. The microvertex particle detector indicates passage of a charged subatomic particle by measuring a voltage pulse measured across a superconducting waveguide caused by the transition of the superconducting thin film strip from a superconducting to a non- superconducting state in response to the passage of a charged particle. A plurality of superconducting thin film strips in two orthogonal planes plus the slow electromagnetic wave propagating in a superconducting transmission line are used to resolve N/sup 2/ ambiguity of charged particle events. 6 figs.

Gray, K.E.

1988-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

243

Superconducting transmission line particle detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microvertex particle detector for use in a high energy physic collider including a plurality of parallel superconducting thin film strips separated from a superconducting ground plane by an insulating layer to form a plurality of superconducting waveguides. The microvertex particle detector indicates passage of a charged subatomic particle by measuring a voltage pulse measured across a superconducting waveguide caused by the transition of the superconducting thin film strip from a superconducting to a non-superconducting state in response to the passage of a charged particle. A plurality of superconducting thin film strips in two orthogonal planes plus the slow electromagnetic wave propogating in a superconducting transmission line are used to resolve N.sup.2 ambiguity of charged particle events.

Gray, Kenneth E. (Naperville, IL)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Microgap x-ray detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An x-ray detector which provides for the conversion of x-ray photons into photoelectrons and subsequent amplification of these photoelectrons through the generation of electron avalanches in a thin gas-filled region subject to a high electric potential. The detector comprises a cathode (photocathode) and an anode separated by the thin, gas-filled region. The cathode may comprise a substrate, such a beryllium, coated with a layer of high atomic number material, such as gold, while the anode can be a single conducting plane of material, such as gold, or a plane of resistive material, such as chromium/silicon monoxide, or multiple areas of conductive or resistive material, mounted on a substrate composed of glass, plastic or ceramic. The charge collected from each electron avalanche by the anode is passed through processing electronics to a point of use, such as an oscilloscope.

Wuest, Craig R. (Danville, CA); Bionta, Richard M. (Livermore, CA); Ables, Elden (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Particle Detector / Beam Current Transformer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Particle Detector / Beam Current Transformer Analysis December 8, 2009 Harold G. Kirk #12;ShotSignal,A.U. Proton Bunch Number Beam Current Transformer - 17011 0 2 4 6 8 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 Integrated Transformer Pump 187829 (au) Probe 196504 (au) Ratios: Beam Current 1.046 SF 1.019 2.9% difference #12;Shot

McDonald, Kirk

246

Electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector system having enhanced radio frequency interference immunity includes a detector housing with a detector entrance opening for receiving the charged particles. A charged particle detector having an active surface is disposed within the housing. The active surface faces toward the detector entrance opening for providing electrical signals representative of the received charged particles when the received charged particles are applied to the active surface. A conductive layer is disposed upon the active surface. In a preferred embodiment, a nonconductive layer is disposed between the conductive layer and the active surface. The conductive layer is electrically coupled to the detector housing to provide a substantially continuous conductive electrical shield surrounding the active surface. The inner surface of the detector housing is supplemented with a radio frequency absorbing material such as ferrite. 1 fig.

Balmer, D.K.; Haverty, T.W.; Nordin, C.W.; Tyree, W.H.

1996-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

247

Electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector system having enhanced radio frequency interference immunity includes a detector housing with a detector entrance opening for receiving the charged particles. A charged particle detector having an active surface is disposed within the housing. The active surface faces toward the detector entrance opening for providing electrical signals representative of the received charged particles when the received charged particles are applied to the active surface. A conductive layer is disposed upon the active surface. In a preferred embodiment, a nonconductive layer is disposed between the conductive layer and the active surface. The conductive layer is electrically coupled to the detector housing to provide a substantially continuous conductive electrical shield surrounding the active surface. The inner surface of the detector housing is supplemented with a radio frequency absorbing material such as ferrite.

Balmer, David K. (155 Coral Way, Broomfield, CO 80020); Haverty, Thomas W. (1173 Logan, Northglenn, CO 80233); Nordin, Carl W. (7203 W. 32nd Ave., Wheatridge, CO 80033); Tyree, William H. (1977 Senda Rocosa, Boulder, CO 80303)

1996-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

248

PIXSCAN: Pixel Detector CT-Scanner for Small Animal Imaging P. Delpierrea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

very large dynamic range of photons counting at very low detector noise. They also provide high-scanner, especially for soft tissues, and to reduce both the scan duration and the absorbed dose. A proof of principle initially built for detection of X-ray synchrotron radiations. Despite the relatively large pixel size

Boyer, Edmond

249

Three-dimensional boron particle loaded thermal neutron detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Three-dimensional boron particle loaded thermal neutron detectors utilize neutron sensitive conversion materials in the form of nano-powders and micro-sized particles, as opposed to thin films, suspensions, paraffin, etc. More specifically, methods to infiltrate, intersperse and embed the neutron nano-powders to form two-dimensional and/or three-dimensional charge sensitive platforms are specified. The use of nano-powders enables conformal contact with the entire charge-collecting structure regardless of its shape or configuration.

Nikolic, Rebecca J.; Conway, Adam M.; Graff, Robert T.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Reinhardt, Catherine; Voss, Lars F.; Cheung, Chin Li; Heineck, Daniel

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

250

XAMPS Detectors Readout ASIC for LCLS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An ASIC for the readout of signals from X-ray Active Matrix Pixel Sensor (XAMPS) detectors to be used at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is presented. The X-ray Pump Probe (XPP) instrument, for which the ASIC has been designed, requires a large input dynamic range on the order of 104 photons at 8 keV with a resolution of half a photon FWHM. Due to the size of the pixel and the length of the readout line, large input capacitance is expected, leading to stringent requirement on the noise optimization. Furthermore, the large number of pixels needed for a good position resolution and the fixed LCLS beam period impose limitations on the time available for the single pixel readout. Considering the periodic nature of the LCLS beam, the ASIC developed for this application is a time-variant system providing low-noise charge integration, filtering and correlated double sampling. In order to cope with the large input dynamic range a charge pump scheme implementing a zero-balance measurement method has been introduced. It provides an on chip 3-bit coarse digital conversion of the integrated charge. The residual charge is sampled using correlated double sampling into analog memory and measured with the required resolution. The first 64 channel prototype of the ASIC has been fabricated in TSMC CMOS 0.25 {micro}m technology. In this paper, the ASIC architecture and performances are presented.

Dragone, A; /SLAC; Pratte, J.F.; Rehak, P.; /Brookhaven; Carini, G.A.; /BNL, NSLS; Herbst, R.; /SLAC; O'Connor, P.; /Brookhaven; Siddons, D.P.; /BNL, NSLS

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

251

Software digitizer for high granular gaseous detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A sampling calorimeter equipped with gaseous sensor layers with digital readout is near perfect for "Particle Flow Algorithm" approach, since it is homogeneous over large surfaces, robust, cost efficient, easily segmentable to any readout pad dimension and size and almost insensitive to neutrons. The response of a finely segmented digital calorimeter is characterized by track efficiency and multiplicity. Monte Carlo (MC) programs such as GEANT4 simulate with high precision the energy deposited by particles. The sensor and electronic response associated to a pad are calculated in a separate "digitization" process. We developed a general method for simulating the pad response, a digitization, reproducing efficiency and multiplicity, using the spatial information from a simulation done at higher granularity. The digitization method proposed here has been applied to gaseous detectors including Glass Resistive Plate Chambers (GRPC) and MicroMegas. Validating the method on test beam data, experimental observables such as efficiency, multiplicity and mean number of hits at different thresholds have been reproduced with high precision.

Y. Haddad; M. Ruan; V. Boudry

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

252

Hybrid photon detectors for the LHCb RICH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The LHCb Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) counters use the pixel Hybrid Photon Detector (HPD) as a photo-sensitive device. Photo-electrons are produced in semi-transparent multi-alkali photo-cathode (S20) and are accelerated by a voltage of 20 kV onto a pixelated silicon anode. The anode is bump-bonded to the LHCBPIX1 pixel readout chip which amplifies and digitises the anode signals at the LHC speed of 40 MHz. Using a demagnification of five, the effective pixel size at the HPD window is 2.5 x 2.5 mm$^2$. Over the course of 18 months, 550 HPSs will undergo a quality-assurance programme to verify the specifications and to characterise the tubes. The tested parameters include the threshold and noise behaviour of the chip, the response to light emitting diode (LED) light, the demagnification of the electron optics, the leakage current and the depletion of the silicon sensor, the quality of the vacuum, the signal efficiency and the dark count rate. Results of tests of the first nine HPDs of the final design are pr...

Eisenhardt, Stephan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Magnetic dipole discharges. II. Cathode and anode spot discharges and probe diagnostics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high current regime of a magnetron-type discharge has been investigated. The discharge uses a permanent magnet as a cold cathode which emits secondary electrons while the chamber wall or a grounded electrode serves as the anode. As the discharge voltage is increased, the magnet develops cathode spots, which are short duration arcs that provide copious electrons to increase the discharge current dramatically. Short (1 ?s), high current (200 A) and high voltage (750 V) discharge pulses are produced in a relaxation instability between the plasma and a charging capacitor. Spots are also observed on a negatively biased plane Langmuir probe. The probe current pulses are as large as those on the magnet, implying that the high discharge current does not depend on the cathode surface area but on the properties of the spots. The fast current pulses produce large inductive voltages, which can reverse the electrical polarity of the magnet and temporarily operate it as an anode. The discharge current may also oscillate at the frequency determined by the charging capacitor and the discharge circuit inductance. Each half cycle of high-current current pulses exhibits a fast (?10 ns) current rise when a spot is formed. It induces high frequency (10–100 MHz) transients and ringing oscillations in probes and current circuits. Most probes behave like unmatched antennas for the electromagnetic pulses of spot discharges. Examples are shown to distinguish the source of oscillations and some rf characteristics of Langmuir probes.

Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095-1547 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095-1547 (United States); Ionita, C.; Schrittwieser, R. [Institute for Ion Physics and Applied Physics, University of Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)] [Institute for Ion Physics and Applied Physics, University of Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

The Observer March 2003 page 3 CSU Fresno 16" SCT at f/38 & Jupiter's Great Red Spot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Observer March 2003 page 3 CSU Fresno 16" SCT at f/38 & Jupiter's Great Red Spot By Greg Morgan in March that the Great Red Spot will be making a central meridian crossing along with the shadow of one in the region of the Great Red Spot. Similarly, on Tuesday evening April 1st , from 10:24 PM to 1:48 AM PDT, Io

Ringwald, Frederick A.

255

Superlinear threshold detectors in quantum cryptography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We introduce the concept of a superlinear threshold detector, a detector that has a higher probability to detect multiple photons if it receives them simultaneously rather than at separate times. Highly superlinear threshold detectors in quantum key distribution systems allow eavesdropping the full secret key without being revealed. Here, we generalize the detector control attack, and analyze how it performs against quantum key distribution systems with moderately superlinear detectors. We quantify the superlinearity in superconducting single-photon detectors based on earlier published data, and gated avalanche photodiode detectors based on our own measurements. The analysis shows that quantum key distribution systems using detector(s) of either type can be vulnerable to eavesdropping. The avalanche photodiode detector becomes superlinear toward the end of the gate. For systems expecting substantial loss, or for systems not monitoring loss, this would allow eavesdropping using trigger pulses containing less than 120 photons per pulse. Such an attack would be virtually impossible to catch with an optical power meter at the receiver entrance.

Lydersen, Lars; Maroey, Oystein; Skaar, Johannes; Makarov, Vadim [Department of Electronics and Telecommunications, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NO-7491 Trondheim (Norway); University Graduate Center, NO-2027 Kjeller (Norway); Jain, Nitin; Wittmann, Christoffer; Marquardt, Christoph; Leuchs, Gerd [Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Guenther-Scharowsky-Strasse 1/Bau 24, DE-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Institut fuer Optik, Information und Photonik, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Staudtstrasse 7/B2, DE-91058 Erlangen (Germany)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

TIME INTEGRATED MEASUREMENTS OF THE ACTIVITY-WEIGHTED SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF RADON PROGENY by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dose to the lung is dependent on the size distribution as well as the concentration of radon progeny. The principal indicator of particle size is the diffusion coefficient. The diffusion coefficient of radon progeny is the most important parameter in determining whether the particle will deposit its alpha energy in the tracheobronchial region of the respiratory tract. Due to the importance of the size distribution of progeny when characterizing health effects, a detector was developed that exploits the difference in diffusion coefficients to provide integrated measurements of the activity-weighted size distribution. Several radon chamber tests were performed in which the diffusion coefficient and unattached fraction of radon progeny were varied by the use of trace gasses and aerosol particles. The technical feasibility of this new detector design was demonstrated in all cases.

William C. Tetley P. E; Daniel R. Westcott; Bruce A. Cununings

257

Detectors for Linear Colliders: Detector design for a Future Electron-Positron Collider (4/4)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

In this lecture I will discuss the issues related to the overall design and optimization of a detector for ILC and CLIC energies. I will concentrate on the two main detector concepts which are being developed in the context of the ILC. Here there has been much recent progress in developing realistic detector models and in understanding the physics performance of the overall detector concept. In addition, I will discuss the how the differences in the detector requirements for the ILC and CLIC impact the overall detector design.

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

258

Nanocomposite scintillator, detector, and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compact includes a mixture of a solid binder and at least one nanopowder phosphor chosen from yttrium oxide, yttrium tantalate, barium fluoride, cesium fluoride, bismuth germanate, zinc gallate, calcium magnesium pyrosilicate, calcium molybdate, calcium chlorovanadate, barium titanium pyrophosphate, a metal tungstate, a cerium doped nanophosphor, a bismuth doped nanophosphor, a lead doped nanophosphor, a thallium doped sodium iodide, a doped cesium iodide, a rare earth doped pyrosilicate, or a lanthanide halide. The compact can be used in a radiation detector for detecting ionizing radiation.

Cooke, D. Wayne (Santa Fe, NM); McKigney, Edward A. (Los Alamos, NM); Muenchausen, Ross E. (Los Alamos, NM); Bennett, Bryan L. (Los Alamos, NM)

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

259

Microgap ultra-violet detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microgap ultra-violet detector of photons with wavelengths less than 400 run (4,000 Angstroms) which comprises an anode and a cathode separated by a gas-filled gap and having an electric field placed across the gap is disclosed. Either the anode or the cathode is semi-transparent to UV light. Upon a UV photon striking the cathode an electron is expelled and accelerated across the gap by the electric field causing interactions with other electrons to create an electron avalanche which contacts the anode. The electron avalanche is detected and converted to an output pulse. 2 figs.

Wuest, C.R.; Bionta, R.M.

1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

260

Carbon nanotube IR detectors (SV)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC) collaborated to (1) evaluate the potential of carbon nanotubes as channels in infrared (IR) photodetectors; (2) assemble and characterize carbon nanotube electronic devices and measure the photocurrent generated when exposed to infrared light;(3) compare the performance of the carbon nanotube devices with that of traditional devices; and (4) develop and numerically implement models of electronic transport and opto-electronic behavior of carbon nanotube infrared detectors. This work established a new paradigm for photodetectors.

Leonard, F. L.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detector spot size" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Microgap ultra-violet detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microgap ultra-violet detector of photons with wavelengths less than 400 run (4000 Angstroms) which comprises an anode and a cathode separated by a gas-filled gap and having an electric field placed across the gap. Either the anode or the cathode is semi-transparent to UV light. Upon a UV photon striking the cathode an electron is expelled and accelerated across the gap by the electric field causing interactions with other electrons to create an electron avalanche which contacts the anode. The electron avalanche is detected and converted to an output pulse.

Wuest, Craig R. (Danville, CA); Bionta, Richard M. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

High gas flow alpha detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An alpha detector for application in areas of high velocity gas flows, such as smokestacks and air vents. A plurality of spaced apart signal collectors are placed inside an enclosure, which would include smokestacks and air vents, in sufficient numbers to substantially span said enclosure so that gas ions generated within the gas flow are electrostatically captured by the signal collector means. Electrometer means and a voltage source are connected to the signal collectors to generate an electrical field between adjacent signal collectors, and to indicate a current produced through collection of the gas ions by the signal collectors. 4 figs.

Bolton, R.D.; Bounds, J.A.; Rawool-Sullivan, M.W.

1996-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

263

High gas flow alpha detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An alpha detector for application in areas of high velocity gas flows, such as smokestacks and air vents. A plurality of spaced apart signal collectors are placed inside an enclosure, which would include smokestacks and air vents, in sufficient numbers to substantially span said enclosure so that gas ions generated within the gas flow are electrostatically captured by the signal collector means. Electrometer means and a voltage source are connected to the signal collectors to generate an electrical field between adjacent signal collectors, and to indicate a current produced through collection of the gas ions by the signal collectors.

Bolton, Richard D. (Los Alamos, NM); Bounds, John A. (Los Alamos, NM); Rawool-Sullivan, Mohini W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Scintillation detectors of Alborz-I experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new air shower experiment of the Alborz Observatory, Alborz-I, located at the Sharif University of Technology, Iran, will be constructed in near future. An area of about 30$\\times$40 m$^{2}$ will be covered by 20 plastic scintillation detectors (each with an area of 50$\\times$50 cm$^{2}$). A series of experiments have been performed to optimize the height of light enclosures of the detectors for this array and the results have been compared to an extended code simulation of these detectors. Operational parameters of the detector obtained by this code are cross checked by Geant4 simulation. There is a good agreement between extended-code and Geant4 simulations. We also present further discussions on the detector characteristics, which can be applicable for all scintillation detectors with a similar configuration.

Pezeshkian, Yousef; Motlagh, Mehdi Abbasian; Rezaie, Masoume

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Control of Black Spot of Roses with Sulphur-Copper Dust.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, Director College Station, Texas BULLETIN NO. 648 APRIL, 1944 CONTROL OF BLACK SPOT OF ROSES WITH SULPHUR-COPPER DUST E. W. LYLE Division of Plant Pathology and Physiology l ,i- ' 7, r... ......................................................................................................... - . CONTROLOFBLACKSPOTOFROSES WITH SULPHUR-COPPER DUST' E. W. Lyle,' Plant Pathologist Black spot is a fungous disease of the rose plant that attacks ' leaves during rainy, humid weather (5). It is caused by the fung Diplocarpon rosae. As the name of the disease implies...

Lyle, E. W. (Eldon W.)

1944-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

CDF central preshower and crack detector upgrade  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CDF Central Preshower and Crack Detector Upgrade consist of scintillator tiles with embedded wavelength-shifting fibers, clear-fiber optical cables, and multi-anode photomultiplier readout. A description of the detector design, test results from R&D studies, and construction phase are reported. The upgrade was installed late in 2004, and a large amount of proton-antiproton collider data has been collected since then. Detector studies using those data are also discussed.

Artikov, A.; Boudagov, J.; Chokheli, D.; Drake, G.; Gallinaro, M.; Giunta, M.; Grudzinski, J.; Huston, J.; Iori, M.; Kim, D.; Kim, M.; /Dubna, JINR /Argonne /Rockefeller

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Recirculating cross-correlation detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A digital cross-correlation detector is provided in which two time-varying signals are correlated by repetitively comparing data samples stored in digital form to detect correlation between the two signals. The signals are sampled at a selected rate converted to digital form, and stored in separate locations in separate memories. When the memories are filled, the data samples from each memory are first fed word-by-word through a multiplier and summing circuit and each result is compared to the last in a peak memory circuit and if larger than the last is retained in the peak memory. Then the address line to leading signal memory is offset by one byte to affect one sample period delay of a known amount in that memory and the data in the two memories are then multiplied word-by-word once again and summed. If a new result is larger than a former sum, it is saved in the peak memory together with the time delay. The recirculating process continues with the address of the one memory being offset one additional byte each cycle until the address is shifted through the length of the memory. The correlation between the two signals is indicated by the peak signal stored in the peak memory together with the delay time at which the peak occurred. The circuit is faster and considerably less expensive than comparable accuracy correlation detectors.

Andrews, W.H. Jr.; Roberts, M.J.

1985-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

268

Liquid-phase chromatography detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A liquid-phase chromatography detector comprises a flow cell having an inlet tubular conduit for receiving a liquid chromatographic effluent and discharging it as a flowing columnar stream onto a vertically adjustable receiving surface spaced apart from and located vertically below and in close proximity to the discharge end of the tubular conduit; a receiver adapted to receive liquid overflowing from the receiving surface; an exit conduit for continuously removing liquid from the receiver; a light source for focusing fluorescence-producing light pulses on the flowing columnar stream as it passes from the outlet of the conduit to the receiving surface and a fluorescence detector to detect the produced fluorescence; a source of light pulse for producing acoustic waves in the columnar stream as it passes from the conduit outlet to the receiving surface; and a piezoelectric transducer adapted to detect those waves; and a source of bias voltage applied to the inlet tubular conduit and adapted to produce ionization of the liquid flowing through the flow cell so as to produce photocurrents therein and an electrical system to detect and record the photocurrents. This system is useful in separating and detecting individual chemical compounds from mixtures thereof. 5 figs.

Voigtman, E.G.; Winefordner, J.D.; Jurgensen, A.R.

1983-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

269

RESPONSE FUNCTION OF THE BGO AND NAI(T1) DETECTORS USING MONTE CARLO SIMULATIONS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high efficiency of the BGO detectors makes them very attractive candidates to replace NaI(T1) detectors, which are widely used in studies of body composition. In this work, the response functions of the BGO and NaI(T1) detectors were determined at 0.662,4.4, and 10.0 MeV using three different Monte Carlo codes: EGS4, MCNP, and PHOTON. These codes differ in their input files and transport calculations, and were used to verify the internal consistency of the setup and of the input data. The energy range of 0.662 to 10 MeV was chosen to cover energies of interest in body composition-studies. The superior efficiency of the BGO-detectors has to be weighed-against their inferior resolution, and their higher price than that of the NaI detectors. Because the price of the BGO detectors strongly depends on the size of the crystal, its optimization is an important component in the design of the entire system.

Orion, I.; Wielopolski, L.

2001-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

270

Experimental results obtained during fatigue testing of a spot-welded lap-shear structural-joint specimen are  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a number of industries. Spot welding is the traditional method of assembly for steel-based automotive and construction of vehicular structures indicate a strong diversification of material usage, with aluminum and polymeric composites projected to play a major role. While aluminum is amenable to both spot welding

Giurgiutiu, Victor

271

Price-based Congestion-Control in Wi-Fi Hot Spots Roberto Battiti(*), Marco Conti(**), Enrico Gregori(**), Mikalai Sabel(*)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

if they are in the transmission range of an access point. A new business model, named Wi-Fi Hot Spots, is now emerging to exploit offer with Wi-Fi. To reach an efficient use of the scarce bandwidth resources, market mechanisms the potentialities of this technology. A hot spot is a "critical" business area, e.g., airports, stations, hotels

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

272

Forecasting the conditional volatility of oil spot and futures prices with structural breaks and long memory models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forecasting the conditional volatility of oil spot and futures prices with structural breaks of oil spot and futures prices using three GARCH-type models, i.e., linear GARCH, GARCH with structural that oil price fluctuations influence economic activity and financial sector (e.g., Jones and Kaul, 1996

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

273

A Scalable Soft Spot Analysis Methodology for Compound Noise Effects in Nano-meter Circuits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Scalable Soft Spot Analysis Methodology for Compound Noise Effects in Nano-meter Circuits Chong@ece.ucsd.edu ABSTRACT Circuits using nano-meter technologies are becoming increasingly vulnerable to signal interference methodology to study the vulnerability of digital ICs exposed to nano-meter noise and transient soft errors

California at San Diego, University of

274

Energy Spot Price Models and Spread Options Pricing Samuel Hikspoors and Sebastian Jaimungal a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Spot Price Models and Spread Options Pricing Samuel Hikspoors and Sebastian Jaimungal In this article, we construct forward price curves and value a class of two asset exchange options for energy the implied market prices of risk for this commodity. 1. Introduction The energy commodity markets

Jaimungal, Sebastian

275

ESTIMATING THE VOLATILITY OF SPOT PRICES IN RESTRUCTURED ELECTRICITY MARKETS AND THE IMPLICATIONS FOR OPTION VALUES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Draft 1e ESTIMATING THE VOLATILITY OF SPOT PRICES IN RESTRUCTURED ELECTRICITY MARKETS path. Accurate valuation of claims based on competitive electricity prices has proved problematic, as electricity price data are not well represented by traditional commodity price models of Brownian motion

276

Forecasting electricity spot market prices with a k-factor GIGARCH process.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forecasting electricity spot market prices with a k-factor GIGARCH process. Abdou Kâ Diongue this method to the German electricity price market for the period August 15, 2000 - De- cember 31, 2002 and we; Electricity prices; Forecast; GIGARCH process. Corresponding author: Universite Gaston Berger de Saint

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

277

Joint Modelling of Gas and Electricity spot prices N. Frikha1 , V. Lemaire2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Joint Modelling of Gas and Electricity spot prices N. Frikha1 , V. Lemaire2 October 9, 2009 for developing a risk management framework as well as pricing of options. Many derivatives on both electricity and electricity prices is a relevant issue. Numerous diffusion-type and econometric models have been proposed

278

Fracture toughness of the molten zone of resistance spot welds Florent Krajcarz1,2*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). In these tests, the load vs. load line displacement curve is recorded to derive the weld strength (i.e. maximal of the base metal still significantly influences the load vs. displacement curve, yet to a lesser extent than and the crack extension resistance of the molten zone of resistance spot welds under Mode I loading has been

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

279

THE FROBENIUS INTEGRABILITY THEOREM AND THE BLIND-SPOT PROBLEM FOR MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-side automotive mirror that has no blind-spot or distortion. While reasonably good solutions have been found driver-side mirror compared with a aluminum prototype designed using the method described in [7, the issue of the driver's field of view is a crucial one for automotive safety. According to a U

Moskow, Shari

280

SPIRIT-IPY: List of Publications SPOT 5 stereoscopic survey of Polar Ice: Reference Images &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, A. and Gallee, H.: Modeling the mass and surface heat budgets in a coastal blue ice area of AdelieSPIRIT-IPY: List of Publications SPOT 5 stereoscopic survey of Polar Ice: Reference Images stereoscopic survey of Polar Ice: Reference Images and Topographies during the fourth International Polar Year

Berthier, Etienne

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detector spot size" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Essays on price dynamics, discovery, and dynamic threshold effects among energy spot markets in North America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pool (SPP), Entergy (ENT), and Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT). Approximate locations of the spot markets are shown in Figure 2.1. Plots of the price series for each market are provided in Figure 2.2. One day lagged U.S. aggregate...

Park, Haesun

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Integrated thermal-microstructure model to predict the property gradients in resistance spot steel welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An integrated model approach was proposed for relating resistance welding parameters to weldment properties. An existing microstructure model was used to determine the microstructural and property gradients in resistance spot welds of plain carbon steel. The effect of these gradients on the weld integrity was evaluated with finite element analysis. Further modifications to this integrated thermal-microstructure model are discussed.

Babu, S.S.; Riemer, B.W.; Santella, M.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Feng, Z. [Edison Welding Inst., Columbus, OH (United States)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Detection, tracking and analysis of turbulent spots and other coherent structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transition. 1 Jacques Lewalle2 and David E. Ashpis3 Abstract Transition on turbine blades is an important of this preliminary study was to evaluate which spot properties can be quanti ed based on hot lm data, and which seem station, which provides smooth data to measure the phase relative to the rst stage blade passing

Lewalle, Jacques

284

Short-lived spots in solar-like stars as observed by CoRoT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Context. CoRoT light curves have an unprecedented photometric quality, having simultaneously a high signal-to-noise ratio, a long time span and a nearly continuous duty-cycle. Aims. We analyse the light-curves of four bright targets observed in the seismology field and study short-lived small spots in solar-like stars. Methods. We present a simple spot modeling by iterative analysis. Its ability to extract relevant parameters is ensured by implementing relaxation steps to avoid convergence to local minima of the sum of the residuals between observations and modeling. The use of Monte-Carlo simulations allows us to estimate the performance of the fits. Results. Our starspot modeling gives a representation of the spots on these stars in agreement with other well tested methods. Within this framework, parameters such as rigid-body rotation and spot lifetimes seem to be precisely determined. Then, the lifetime/rotation period ratios are in the range 0.5 - 2, and there is clear evidence for differential rotation.

Mosser, B; Lanza, A F; Hulot, J C; Catala, C; Baglin, A; Auvergne, M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Reduced form electricity spot price modeling with a view towards spike risk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reduced form electricity spot price modeling with a view towards spike risk Prof. Dr. Meyer. Februar 2010, 16:15 Uhr Seminarraum, LudwigstraĂ?e 33 I The recent deregulation of electricity markets has led to the creation of energy exchanges, where the electricity is freely traded. We study the most

Gerkmann, Ralf

286

Futures pricing in electricity markets based on stable CARMA spot models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Futures pricing in electricity markets based on stable CARMA spot models Gernot M¨uller Vortrag im years, electricity markets throughout the world have undergone massive changes due to deregulations risk but also against price movements. Consequently, statistical modeling and estimation of electricity

Gerkmann, Ralf

287

DROPLET-BASED HOT SPOT COOLING USING TOPLESS DIGITAL MICROFLUIDICS ON A PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DROPLET-BASED HOT SPOT COOLING USING TOPLESS DIGITAL MICROFLUIDICS ON A PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARD Phil demonstrated a cooling method on a "digital microfluidics" platform whereby discrete droplets are manipulated and the effective flow rate of the droplets. The results presented here suggest that digital microfluidics

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

288

Mapping the Energy Distribution of SERRS Hot Spots from Anti-Stokes to Stokes Intensity Ratios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mapping the Energy Distribution of SERRS Hot Spots from Anti- Stokes to Stokes Intensity Ratios in the anti-Stokes to Stokes intensity ratios in single-molecule surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering-enhanced Raman scattering. Moreover, a methodology to estimate the distribution of resonance energies

Brolo, Alexandre G.

289

21 Apr 2006 IPSN / SPOTS `06 Trio: Enabling Sustainable and Scalable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management. Use energy harvesting. Improve energy mgmt. Reduce power draw. #12;21 Apr 2006 IPSN / SPOTS `06 harvesting · Improve energy "transfer" ­ Lower operating voltage ­ Adapt load (e.g. MPP) · Decrease power ­ Increasing Lifetime through Solar Energy Solar Cell Short Circuit Current Richmond Field Station, August 24

California at Berkeley, University of

290

Resistance of Kentucky Bluegrass Cultivars to Necrotic Ring Spot by Tom Hsiang and Gary A Chastagner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resistance of Kentucky Bluegrass Cultivars to Necrotic Ring Spot by Tom Hsiang and Gary, but is especially destructive on Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) (Smiley et al., 1992; Worf et al., 1986 stands of Kentucky bluegrass. Symptoms are small, pale, straw-coloured patches of turf a few cm

Hsiang, Tom

291

Verification of the Accuracy of Sample-Size Equation Calculations for Visual Sample Plan Version 0.9C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Visual Sample Plan (VSP) is a software tool being developed to facilitate the design of environmental sampling plans using a site-map visual interface, standard sample-size equations, a variety of sampling grids and random sampling plans, and graphs to visually depict the results to the user. This document provides comparisons between sample sizes calculated by VSP Version 0.9C, and sample sizes calculated by test code written in the S-Plus language. All sample sizes calculated by VSP matched the independently calculated sample sizes. Also the VSP implementation of the ELIGPRID-PC algorithm for hot spot probabilities is shown to match previous results for 100 standard test cases. The Conclusions and Limitations section of this document lists some aspects of VSP that were not tested by this suite of tests and recommends simulation-based enhancements for future versions of VSP.

Davidson, James R.

2001-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

292

Hot-spot mix in ignition-scale implosions on the NIF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ignition of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target depends on the formation of a central hot spot with sufficient temperature and areal density. Radiative and conductive losses from the hot spot can be enhanced by hydrodynamic instabilities. The concentric spherical layers of current National Ignition Facility (NIF) ignition targets consist of a plastic ablator surrounding a thin shell of cryogenic thermonuclear fuel (i.e., hydrogen isotopes), with fuel vapor filling the interior volume [S. W. Haan et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051001 (2011)]. The Rev. 5 ablator is doped with Ge to minimize preheat of the ablator closest to the DT ice caused by Au M-band emission from the hohlraum x-ray drive [D. S. Clark et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 052703 (2010)]. Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor hydrodynamic instabilities seeded by high-mode () ablator-surface perturbations can cause Ge-doped ablator to mix into the interior of the shell at the end of the acceleration phase [B. A. Hammel et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 056310 (2011)]. As the shell decelerates, it compresses the fuel vapor, forming a hot spot. K-shell line emission from the ionized Ge that has penetrated into the hot spot provides an experimental signature of hot-spot mix. The Ge emission from tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) and deuterium-tritium (DT) cryogenic targets and gas-filled plastic-shell capsules, which replace the THD layer with a mass-equivalent CH layer, was examined. The inferred amount of hot-spot-mix mass, estimated from the Ge K-shell line brightness using a detailed atomic physics code [J. J. MacFarlane et al., High Energy Density Phys. 3, 181 (2006)], is typically below the 75-ng allowance for hot-spot mix [S. W. Haan et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051001 (2011)]. Predictions of a simple mix model, based on linear growth of the measured surface-mass modulations, are consistent with the experimental results.

Regan, S. P.; Epstein, R.; McCrory, R. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Hammel, B. A.; Suter, L. J.; Ralph, J.; Scott, H.; Barrios, M. A.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Cerjan, C.; Collins, G. W.; Dixit, S. N.; Doeppner, T.; Edwards, M. J.; Farley, D. R.; Glenn, S.; Glenzer, S. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

293

Role of hydrodynamic instability growth in hot-spot mass gain and fusion performance of inertial confinement fusion implosions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an inertial confinement fusion target, energy loss due to thermal conduction from the hot-spot will inevitably ablate fuel ice into the hot-spot, resulting in a more massive but cooler hot-spot, which negatively impacts fusion yield. Hydrodynamic mix due to Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the gas-ice interface can aggravate the problem via an increased gas-ice interfacial area across which energy transfer from the hot-spot and ice can be enhanced. Here, this mix-enhanced transport effect on hot-spot fusion-performance degradation is quantified using contrasting 1D and 2D hydrodynamic simulations, and its dependence on effective acceleration, Atwood number, and ablation speed is identified.

Srinivasan, Bhuvana, E-mail: srinbhu@vt.edu [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Department of Aerospace and Ocean Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Tang, Xian-Zhu, E-mail: xtang@lanl.gov [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

Experimental investigation of bright spots in broadband, gated x-ray images of ignition-scale implosions on the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bright spots in the hot spot intensity profile of gated x-ray images of ignition-scale implosions at the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller et al., Opt. Eng. 443, (2004)] are observed. X-ray images of cryogenically layered deuterium-tritium (DT) and tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) ice capsules, and gas filled plastic shell capsules (Symcap) were recorded along the hohlraum symmetry axis. Heterogeneous mixing of ablator material and fuel into the hot spot (i.e., hot-spot mix) by hydrodynamic instabilities causes the bright spots. Hot-spot mix increases the radiative cooling of the hot spot. Fourier analysis of the x-ray images is used to quantify the evolution of bright spots in both x- and k-space. Bright spot images were azimuthally binned to characterize bright spot location relative to known isolated defects on the capsule surface. A strong correlation is observed between bright spot location and the fill tube for both Symcap and cryogenically layered DT and THD ice targets, indicating the fill tube is a significant seed for the ablation front instability causing hot-spot mix. The fill tube is the predominant seed for Symcaps, while other capsule non-uniformities are dominant seeds for the cryogenically layered DT and THD ice targets. A comparison of the bright spot power observed for Si- and Ge-doped ablator targets shows heterogeneous mix in Symcap targets is mostly material from the doped ablator layer.

Barrios, M. A.; Suter, L. J.; Glenn, S.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Collins, G. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Izumi, N.; Ma, T.; Scott, H.; Smalyuk, V. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Regan, S. P.; Epstein, R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-199 (United States)] [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-199 (United States); Kyrala, G. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

Alien liquid detector and control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An alien liquid detector employs a monitoring element and an energizing circuit for maintaining the temperature of the monitoring element substantially above ambient temperature. For this purpose an electronic circit controls a flow of heating current to the monitoring element. The presence of an alien liquid is detected by sensing a predetermined change in heating current flow to the monitoring element, e.g., to distinguish between water and oil. In preferred embodiments the monitoring element is a thermistor whose resistance is compared with a reference resistance and heating current through the thermistor is controlled in accordance with the difference. In one embodiment a bridge circuit senses the resistance difference; the difference may be sensed by an operational amplifier arrangement. Features of the invention include positioning the monitoring element at the surface of water, slightly immersed, so that the power required to maintain the thermistor temperature substantially above ambient temperature serves to detect presence of oil pollution at the surface.

Potter, B.M.

1980-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

296

Two-color infrared detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A two-color detector includes a first absorber layer. The first absorber layer exhibits a first valence band energy characterized by a first valence band energy function. A barrier layer adjoins the first absorber layer at a first interface. The barrier layer exhibits a second valence band energy characterized by a second valence band energy function. The barrier layer also adjoins a second absorber layer at a second interface. The second absorber layer exhibits a third valence band energy characterized by a third valence band energy function. The first and second valence band energy functions are substantially functionally or physically continuous at the first interface and the second and third valence band energy functions are substantially functionally or physically continuous at the second interface.

Klem, John F; Kim, Jin K

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

297

Unitary scintillation detector and system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a unitary alpha, beta, and gamma scintillation detector and system for sensing the presence of alpha, beta, and gamma radiations selectively or simultaneously. The scintillators are mounted in a light-tight housing provided with an entrance window for admitting alpha, beta, and gamma radiation and excluding ambient light from the housing. Light pulses from each scintillator have different decay constants that are converted by a photosensitive device into corresponding differently shaped electrical pulses. A pulse discrimination system identifies the electrical pulses by their respective pulse shapes which are determined by decay time. The identified electrical pulses are counted in separate channel analyzers to indicate the respective levels of sensed alpha, beta, and gamma radiations.

McElhaney, Stephanie A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Chiles, Marion M. (Knoxville, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Ion chamber based neutron detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A neutron detector with monolithically integrated readout circuitry, including: a bonded semiconductor die; an ion chamber formed in the bonded semiconductor die; a first electrode and a second electrode formed in the ion chamber; a neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber; and the readout circuitry which is electrically coupled to the first and second electrodes. The bonded semiconductor die includes an etched semiconductor substrate bonded to an active semiconductor substrate. The readout circuitry is formed in a portion of the active semiconductor substrate. The ion chamber has a substantially planar first surface on which the first electrode is formed and a substantially planar second surface, parallel to the first surface, on which the second electrode is formed. The distance between the first electrode and the second electrode may be equal to or less than the 50% attenuation length for neutrons in the neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber.

Derzon, Mark S; Galambos, Paul C; Renzi, Ronald F

2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

299

High spatial resolution particle detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed below are representative embodiments of methods, apparatus, and systems for detecting particles, such as radiation or charged particles. One exemplary embodiment disclosed herein is particle detector comprising an optical fiber with a first end and second end opposite the first end. The optical fiber of this embodiment further comprises a doped region at the first end and a non-doped region adjacent to the doped region. The doped region of the optical fiber is configured to scintillate upon interaction with a target particle, thereby generating one or more photons that propagate through the optical fiber and to the second end. Embodiments of the disclosed technology can be used in a variety of applications, including associated particle imaging and cold neutron scattering.

Boatner, Lynn A.; Mihalczo, John T.

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

300

Controlling atomistic processes on Pb films via quantum size effects and lattice rotation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The two main techniques used to record the data in this dissertation were Spot Profile Analysis - Low Energy Electron Diffraction (SPA-LEED) and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM). A specific data analysis technique for LEED data called G(S) curves is described in depth. G(S) curves can provide a great deal of structural information about the surface; including step heights, island size, and island separation. The effects of quantum size effects (QSE) on the diffusion and critical island sizes of Pb and In on Pb #12;films are reported. Pb depositions on the 2D In phases {radical}3 and {radical}31 to see how the phases affect the Pb growth and its strong QSE are reported.

Binz, Steven

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detector spot size" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Semiconductor detectors with proximity signal readout  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Semiconductor-based radiation detectors are routinely used for the detection, imaging, and spectroscopy of x-rays, gamma rays, and charged particles for applications in the areas of nuclear and medical physics, astrophysics, environmental remediation, nuclear nonproliferation, and homeland security. Detectors used for imaging and particle tracking are more complex in that they typically must also measure the location of the radiation interaction in addition to the deposited energy. In such detectors, the position measurement is often achieved by dividing or segmenting the electrodes into many strips or pixels and then reading out the signals from all of the electrode segments. Fine electrode segmentation is problematic for many of the standard semiconductor detector technologies. Clearly there is a need for a semiconductor-based radiation detector technology that can achieve fine position resolution while maintaining the excellent energy resolution intrinsic to semiconductor detectors, can be fabricated through simple processes, does not require complex electrical interconnections to the detector, and can reduce the number of required channels of readout electronics. Proximity electrode signal readout (PESR), in which the electrodes are not in physical contact with the detector surface, satisfies this need.

Asztalos, Stephen J. [XIA, LLC, Hayward, CA (United States)

2014-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

302

Performance of An Axial Gas Ionization Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An axial gas ionization chamber has been fabricated for use as a $\\Delta E$ detector in heavy ion induced nuclear reactions. Different operating parameters such as gas type, pressure, anode voltage and anode structures have been optimized. The transparency of the anode structure is observed to play an important role in improving the energy resolution of the detector.

S. Adhikari; C. Basu; C. Samanta; S. S. Brahmachari; B. P. Das; P. Basu

2006-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

303

Gas Filled Detectors counting & tracking of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas Filled Detectors counting & tracking of particles energy loss generation of electron-ion+ pairs #12;Gas Filled Detectors Primary and Total Ionization fast charged particles ionize the atoms of a gas fraction of resulting primary electrons have enough kinetic energy to ionize other atoms #12;Gas Filled

Peletier, Reynier

304

Neutron Position Sensitive Detectors for the ESS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The European Spallation Source (ESS) in Lund, Sweden will become the world's leading neutron source for the study of materials. The instruments are being selected from conceptual proposals submitted by groups from around Europe. These instruments present numerous challenges for detector technology in the absence of the availability of Helium-3, which is the default choice for detectors for instruments built until today and due to the extreme rates expected across the ESS instrument suite. Additionally a new generation of source requires a new generation of detector technologies to fully exploit the opportunities that this source provides. The detectors will be sourced from partners across Europe through numerous in-kind arrangements; a process that is somewhat novel for the neutron scattering community. This contribution presents briefly the current status of detectors for the ESS, and outlines the timeline to completion. For a conjectured instrument suite based upon instruments recommended for construction, ...

Kirstein, Oliver; Stefanescu, Irina; Etxegarai, Maddi; Anastasopoulos, Michail; Fissum, Kevin; Gulyachkina, Anna; Höglund, Carina; Imam, Mewlude; Kanaki, Kalliopi; Khaplanov, Anton; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kolya, Scott; Nilsson, Björn; Ortega, Luis; Pfeiffer, Dorothea; Piscitelli, Francesco; Ramos, Judith Freita; Robinson, Linda; Scherzinger, Julius

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Detector Ensemble Shengyang Dai Ming Yang Ying Wu Aggelos Katsaggelos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to han- dle the imperfectness of part-detectors in the integration step, is not well addressed-detectors. These situations have chal- lenged many existing component-based detectors. To han- dle the false positives

Bustamante, Fabián E.

306

Understanding sensitization behavior of lead selenide photoconductive detectors by charge separation model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We introduce a charge separation model in this work to explain the mechanism of enhanced photoconductivity of polycrystalline lead salt photoconductors. Our results show that this model could clarify the heuristic fabrication processes of such lead salt detectors that were not well understood and often considered mysterious for nearly a century. The improved lifetime and performance of the device, e.g., responsivity, are attributed to the spatial separation of holes and electrons, hence less possibility of carrier recombination. This model shows that in addition to crystal quality the size of crystallites, the depth of outer conversion layer, and doping concentration could all affect detector performance. The simulation results agree well with experimental results and thus offer a very useful tool for further improvement of lead salt detectors. The model was developed with lead salt family of photoconductors in mind, but may well be applicable to a wider class of semiconducting films.

Zhao, Lihua, E-mail: lihua.zhao@ou.edu, E-mail: shi@ou.edu; Qiu, Jijun; Weng, Binbin; Chang, Caleb; Yuan, Zijian; Shi, Zhisheng, E-mail: lihua.zhao@ou.edu, E-mail: shi@ou.edu [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States)

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

307

Development of Yangbajing Air shower Core detector array for a new EAS hybrid Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aiming at the observation of cosmic-ray chemical composition at the "knee" energy region, we have been developinga new type air-shower core detector (YAC, Yangbajing Air shower Core detector array) to be set up at Yangbajing (90.522$^\\circ$ E, 30.102$^\\circ$ N, 4300 m above sea level, atmospheric depth: 606 g/m$^2$) in Tibet, China. YAC works together with the Tibet air-shower array (Tibet-III) and an underground water cherenkov muon detector array (MD) as a hybrid experiment. Each YAC detector unit consists of lead plates of 3.5 cm thick and a scintillation counter which detects the burst size induced by high energy particles in the air-shower cores. The burst size can be measured from 1 MIP (Minimum Ionization Particle) to $10^{6}$ MIPs. The first phase of this experiment, named "YAC-I", consists of 16 YAC detectors each having the size 40 cm $\\times$ 50 cm and distributing in a grid with an effective area of 10 m$^{2}$. YAC-I is used to check hadronic interaction models. The second phase of the experiment, called "YAC-II", consists of 124 YAC detectors with coverage about 500 m$^2$. The inner 100 detectors of 80 cm $\\times $ 50 cm each are deployed in a 10 $\\times$ 10 matrix from with a 1.9 m separation and the outer 24 detectors of 100 cm $\\times$ 50 cm each are distributed around them to reject non-core events whose shower cores are far from the YAC-II array. YAC-II is used to study the primary cosmic-ray composition, in particular, to obtain the energy spectra of proton, helium and iron nuclei between 5$\\times$$10^{13}$ eV and $10^{16}$ eV covering the "knee" and also being connected with direct observations at energies around 100 TeV. We present the design and performance of YAC-II in this paper.

Jinsheng Liu; Jing Huang; Ding Chen; Ying Zhang; Liuming Zhai; Xu Chen; Xiaobin Hu; Yuhui Lin; Xueyao Zhang; Cunfeng Feng; Huanyu Jia; Xunxiu Zhou; DanZengLuoBu; Tianlu Chen; Haijin Li; Maoyuan Liu; Aifang Yuan

2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

308

activation detectors application: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

scattering science is still growing its instruments' power and the neutron flux a detector must tolerate is increasing. For small area detectors the main effort is to expand...

309

A Segmented, Enriched N-type Germanium Detector for Neutrinoless...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Segmented, Enriched N-type Germanium Detector for Neutrinoless Double Beta-Decay Experiments. A Segmented, Enriched N-type Germanium Detector for Neutrinoless Double Beta-Decay...

310

Jefferson Lab's Detector Group builds small-animal imaging device...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

March Smith Mark Smith, Detector Group Biomedical Imaging Physicist and project manager for this effort, holds the tungsten box encasing the detector head for the mini gamma camera...

311

Finite element simulation of laser spot welding A. De, S. K. Maiti, C. A. Walsh and H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Finite element simulation of laser spot welding A. De, S. K. Maiti, C. A. Walsh and H. K. D. H laser spot welding, taking into account the temperature dependence of the physical properties and latent formation during laser spot welding, although the `double ellipsoidal' representation requires an a priori

Cambridge, University of

312

Electron gas grid semiconductor radiation detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electron gas grid semiconductor radiation detector (EGGSRAD) useful for gamma-ray and x-ray spectrometers and imaging systems is described. The radiation detector employs doping of the semiconductor and variation of the semiconductor detector material to form a two-dimensional electron gas, and to allow transistor action within the detector. This radiation detector provides superior energy resolution and radiation detection sensitivity over the conventional semiconductor radiation detector and the "electron-only" semiconductor radiation detectors which utilize a grid electrode near the anode. In a first embodiment, the EGGSRAD incorporates delta-doped layers adjacent the anode which produce an internal free electron grid well to which an external grid electrode can be attached. In a second embodiment, a quantum well is formed between two of the delta-doped layers, and the quantum well forms the internal free electron gas grid to which an external grid electrode can be attached. Two other embodiments which are similar to the first and second embodiment involve a graded bandgap formed by changing the composition of the semiconductor material near the first and last of the delta-doped layers to increase or decrease the conduction band energy adjacent to the delta-doped layers.

Lee, Edwin Y. (Livermore, CA); James, Ralph B. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Operating conditions for the generation of stable anode spot plasma in front of a positively biased electrode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stability of an anode spot plasma, which is an additional high density plasma generated in front of a positively biased electrode immersed in ambient plasma, is a critical issue for its utilization to various types of ion sources. In this study, operating conditions for the generation of stable anode spot plasmas are experimentally investigated. Diagnostics of the bias current flowing into the positively biased electrode and the properties of ambient plasma reveal that unstable nature of the anode spot is deeply associated with the reduction of double layer potential between the anode spot plasma and the ambient plasma. It is found that stability of the anode spot plasma can be improved with increasing the ionization rate in ambient plasma so as to compensate the loss of electrons across the double layer or with enlarging the area of the biased electrode to prevent electron accumulation inside the anode spot. The results obtained from the present study give the guideline for operating conditions of anode spot plasmas as an ion source with high brightness.

Park, Yeong-Shin; Lee, Yuna; Dang, Jeong-Jeung [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Kyoung-Jae, E-mail: jkjlsh1@snu.ac.kr [Center for Advance Research in Fusion Reactor Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)] [Center for Advance Research in Fusion Reactor Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Y. S. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of) [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Advance Research in Fusion Reactor Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

314

Comparison of CeBr3 with LaBr3:Ce, LaCl3:Ce, and NaI:Tl Detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy resolution and detection efficiency were compared between two sizes of cerium bromide (CeBr3) scintillators, three sizes of lanthanum bromide (LaBr3:Ce) scintillators, three sizes of sodium iodide (NaI:Tl) scintillators, and a lanthanum chloride (LaCl3:Ce) scintillator. Comparisons are made of key parameters such as energy resolution, detection efficiency, linearity, and self-activity of CeBr3, LaBr3:Ce, LaCl3:Ce, and NaI:Tl scintillator detectors. The scintillator detectors are tested by comparing the peak separation and identification in the energy range up to 3.0 MeV using 133Ba, 152Eu, and naturally occurring radioactive materials [1]. The study has shown that CeBr3 scintillator detectors provided by Saint-Gobain offer better resolution than NaI:Tl scintillator detectors. CeBr3 detectors could resolve some closely spaced peaks from 133Ba and 152Eu, which NaI:Tl could not. LaBr3:Ce has slightly better resolution, and a slightly higher efficiency than CeBr3. In this work, “self-activity” of each of these four detector types was measured by operating the detectors themselves. A comparison of the intrinsic activity for all of the detectors in this study is demonstrated. For CeBr3, the self-activity present may be reduced, or even eliminated in the future, through improved processes for growing the material. It will be discussed if, and under what conditions, CeBr3 may be better than LaBr3:Ce and LaCl3:Ce for detection of certain special nuclear material ?-rays [2]. An overall advantage of CeBr3 detectors over lanthanum halide and NaI:Tl detectors will be discussed.

,

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Neutron detector using sol-gel absorber  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An neutron detector composed of fissionable material having ions of lithium, uranium, thorium, plutonium, or neptunium, contained within a glass film fabricated using a sol-gel method combined with a particle detector is disclosed. When the glass film is bombarded with neutrons, the fissionable material emits fission particles and electrons. Prompt emitting activated elements yielding a high energy electron contained within a sol-gel glass film in combination with a particle detector is also disclosed. The emissions resulting from neutron bombardment can then be detected using standard UV and particle detection methods well known in the art, such as microchannel plates, channeltrons, and silicon avalanche photodiodes.

Hiller, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Wallace, Steven A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Minefield reconnaissance and detector system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multi-sensor system (10) for detecting the presence of objects on the surface of the ground or buried just under the surface, such as anti-personnel or anti-tank mines or the like. A remote sensor platform (12) has a plurality of metal detector sensors (22) and a plurality of short pulse radar sensors (24). The remote sensor platform (12) is remotely controlled from a processing and control unit (14) and signals from the remote sensor platform (12) are sent to the processing and control unit (14) where they are individually evaluated in separate data analysis subprocess steps (34, 36) to obtain a probability "score" for each of the pluralities of sensors (22, 24). These probability scores are combined in a fusion subprocess step (38) by comparing score sets to a probability table (130) which is derived based upon the historical incidence of object present conditions given that score set. A decision making rule is applied to provide an output which is optionally provided to a marker subprocess (40) for controlling a marker device (76) to mark the location of found objects.

Butler, Millard T. (Albuquerque, NM); Cave, Steven P. (Albuquerque, NM); Creager, James D. (Albuquerque, NM); Johnson, Charles M. (Albuquerque, NM); Mathes, John B. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, Kirk J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Magnet Coil Shorted Turn Detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Magnet Coil Shorted Turn Detector has been developed to facilitate the location of shorted turns in magnet coils. Finding these shorted turns is necessary to determine failure modes that are a necessary step in developing future production techniques. Up to this point, coils with shorted turns had the insulation burned off without the fault having been located. This disassembly process destroyed any chance of being able to find the fault. In order to maintain a flux balance in a coupled system such as a magnet coil, the current in a shorted turn must be opposed to the incident current. If the direction of the current in each conductor can be measured relative to the incident current, then the exact location of the short can be determined. In this device, an AC voltage is applied to the magnet under test. A small hand held B-dot pickup coil monitors the magnetic field produced by current in the individual magnet conductors. The relative phase of this pickup coil voltage is compared to a reference signal derived from the input current to detect a current reversal as the B-dot pickup coil is swept over the conductors of the coil under test. This technique however, is limited to only those conductors that are accessible to the hand held probe.

Dinkel, J.A.; Biggs, J.E.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Children's Clothes - Size and Selection.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tooe ZTA245.7 8-1303 B873 no ? \\'3J~3L-~=============i1 ? ? ? CHILDREN'S CLOTHES, SIZE AND SELECTION ? ~========================~ Texas Agricultural Extension Service. The Texas A&M University System. Daniel C. pfannstiel, Director.... College Station, Texas ," ? (BIaBk Pa,ge in O'rigjaal Bulletinl ' / I' j '. ":SIZE AND SELECTION Ann Vanderpoorten and Claudia Kerbel* Preschool and school-age children have special...

Vanderpoorten, Ann; Kerbel, Claudia

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Projectile containing metastable intermolecular composites and spot fire method of use  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for altering the course of a conflagration involving firing a projectile comprising a powder mixture of oxidant powder and nanosized reductant powder at velocity sufficient for a violent reaction between the oxidant powder and the nanosized reductant powder upon impact of the projectile, and causing impact of the projectile at a location chosen to draw a main fire to a spot fire at such location and thereby change the course of the conflagration, whereby the air near the chosen location is heated to a temperature sufficient to cause a spot fire at such location. The invention also includes a projectile useful for such method and said mixture preferably comprises a metastable intermolecular composite.

Asay, Blaine W.; Son, Steven F.; Sanders, V. Eric; Foley, Timothy; Novak, Alan M.; Busse, James R.

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

320

SOI detector with drift field due to majority carrier flow - an alternative to biasing in depletion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on a SOI detector with drift field induced by the flow of majority carriers. It is proposed as an alternative method of detector biasing compared to standard depletion. N-drift rings in n-substrate are used at the front side of the detector to provide charge collecting field in depth as well as to improve the lateral charge collection. The concept was verified on a 2.5 x 2.5 mm{sup 2} large detector array with 20 {micro}m and 40 {micro}m pixel pitch fabricated in August 2009 using the OKI semiconductor process. First results, obtained with a radioactive source to demonstrate spatial resolution and spectroscopic performance of the detector for the two different pixel sizes will be shown and compared to results obtained with a standard depletion scheme. Two different diode designs, one using a standard p-implantation and one surrounded by an additional BPW implant will be compared as well.

Trimpl, M.; Deptuch, G.; Yarema, R.; /Fermilab

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detector spot size" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

The Pixel Detector of the ATLAS Experiment for LHC Run-2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment has shown excellent performance during the whole Run-1 of LHC. Taking advantage of the long shutdown, the detector was extracted from the experiment and brought to surface, to equip it with new service quarter panels, to repair modules and to ease installation of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL). IBL is a fourth layer of pixel detectors, and has been installed in May 2014 between the existing Pixel Detector and a new smaller radius beam-pipe at a radius of 3.3 cm. To cope with the high radiation and hit occupancy due to the proximity to the interaction point, a new read-out chip and two different silicon sensor technologies (planar and 3D) have been developed. Furthermore, the physics performance will be improved through the reduction of pixel size while, targeting for a low material budget, a new mechanical support using lightweight staves and a CO2 based cooling system have been adopted. An overview of the refurbishing of the Pixel Detector and of the IBL project as we...

Pernegger, Heinz; The ATLAS collaboration

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Position detectors, methods of detecting position, and methods of providing positional detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Position detectors, welding system position detectors, methods of detecting various positions, and methods of providing position detectors are described. In one embodiment, a welding system positional detector includes a base that is configured to engage and be moved along a curved surface of a welding work piece. At least one position detection apparatus is provided and is connected with the base and configured to measure angular position of the detector relative to a reference vector. In another embodiment, a welding system positional detector includes a weld head and at least one inclinometer mounted on the weld head. The one inclinometer is configured to develop positional data relative to a reference vector and the position of the weld head on a non-planar weldable work piece.

Weinberg, David M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Harding, L. Dean (Chubbuck, ID); Larsen, Eric D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Spot test for 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene, TATB  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A simple, sensitive and specific spot test for 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene, TATB, is described. Upon the application of the composition of matter of the present invention to samples containing in excess of 0.1 mg of this explosive, a bright orange color results. Interfering species such as TNT and Tetryl can be removed by first treating the sample with a solvent which does not dissolve much of the TATB, but readily dissolves these explosives.

Harris, Betty W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Spot test for 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene, TATB  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A simple, sensitive and specific spot test for 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene, TATB, is described. Upon the application of the composition of matter of the subject invention to samples containing in excess of 0.1 mg of this explosive, a bright orange color results. Interfering species such as TNT and Tetryl can be removed by first treating the sample with a solvent which does not dissolve the TATB, but readily dissolves these interfering explosives.

Harris, B.W.

1984-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

325

Eutectic structures in friction spot welding joint of aluminum alloy to copper  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A dissimilar joint of AA5083 Al alloy and copper was produced by friction spot welding. The Al-MgCuAl{sub 2} eutectic in both coupled and divorced manners were found in the weld. At a relatively high temperature, mass transport of Cu due to plastic deformation, material flow, and atomic diffusion, combined with the alloy system of AA5083 are responsible for the ternary eutectic melting.

Shen, Junjun, E-mail: junjun.shen@hzg.de; Suhuddin, Uceu F. H.; Cardillo, Maria E. B.; Santos, Jorge F. dos [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute of Materials Research, Materials Mechanics, Solid-State Joining Processes, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

326

Proximity charge sensing for semiconductor detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A non-contact charge sensor includes a semiconductor detector having a first surface and an opposing second surface. The detector includes a high resistivity electrode layer on the first surface and a low resistivity electrode on the high resistivity electrode layer. A portion of the low resistivity first surface electrode is deleted to expose the high resistivity electrode layer in a portion of the area. A low resistivity electrode layer is disposed on the second surface of the semiconductor detector. A voltage applied between the first surface low resistivity electrode and the second surface low resistivity electrode causes a free charge to drift toward the first or second surface according to a polarity of the free charge and the voltage. A charge sensitive preamplifier coupled to a non-contact electrode disposed at a distance from the exposed high resistivity electrode layer outputs a signal in response to movement of free charge within the detector.

Luke, Paul N; Tindall, Craig S; Amman, Mark

2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

327

Effective placement of detectors at diamond interchanges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Most signalized interchanges in Texas are tight urban diamond interchanges of freeways having one-way frontage roads. At these interchanges, traffic actuated control with improper location of detectors may result in inefficient traffic operations...

Prabhakar, Dayakar

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Coherent neutrino scattering in dark matter detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus and weakly interacting massive particle-nucleus interaction signatures are expected to be quite similar. This paper discusses how a next-generation ton-scale dark matter detector could ...

Anderson, Alexander John

329

First results from the HERMES Recoil Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

proton undetected large background contamination (15%) A. Mussgiller, Vertex 2008, 28 for the last two years of data taking DVCS: recoiling proton detected background contamination Detector 16 sensors Inside HERA vacuum 5 cm close to beam #12; Momentum Reconstruction Lowenergy

330

Capacitance measurements on silicon microstrip detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Load capacitance is the most significant parameter determining the noise level of charge-sensitive readout electronics. This is the capacitance between the detecting electrode and all other conductors in the system. For the case of silicon microstrip detectors, the significant contributions are those from the other strips on the detector surface and also from the backplane. This article presents the results of capacitance measurements on both the junction and ohmic sides of detectors, and with various geometries. Double-sided detectors with a second metal layer and different readout patterns were also studied. In addition, the authors present measurements of microstrip capacitance after irradiation with both neutrons and photons made as part of the research by the RD20 collaboration into all aspects of the use of silicon microstrips at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN.

Masciocchi, S. (INFN, Milano (Italy) CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)); Peisert, A. (INFN, Padova (Italy)); Roenqvist, C. (SEFT, Helsinki (Finland)); Vite, D.; Wheadon, R. (Imperial Coll., London (United Kingdom))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

He Puff System For Dust Detector Upgrade  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Local detection of surface dust is needed for the safe operation of next-step magnetic fusion devices such as ITER. An electrostatic dust detector, based on a 5 cm x 5 cm grid of interlocking circuit traces biased to 50 V, has been developed to detect dust on remote surfaces and was successfully tested for the first time on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). We report on a helium puff system that clears residual dust from this detector and any incident debris or fibers that might cause a permanent short circuit. The entire surface of the detector was cleared of carbon particles by two consecutive helium puffs delivered by three nozzles of 0.45 mm inside diameter. The optimal configuration was found to be with the nozzles at an angle of 30o with respect to the surface of the detector and a helium backing pressure of 6 bar. __________________________________________________

B. Rais, C.H. Skinner A.L. Roquemore

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Sky coverage of orbital detectors. Analytical approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Orbital detectors without pointing capability have to keep their field of view axis laying on their orbital plane, to observe the largest sky fraction. A general approach to estimate the exposure of each sky element for such detectors is a valuable tool in the R&D phase of a project, when the detector characteristics are still to be fixed. An analytical method to estimate the sky exposure is developed, which makes only few very reasonable approximations. The formulae obtained with this method are used to compute the histogram of the sky exposure of a hypothetical gamma-ray detector installed on the ISS. The C++ code used in this example is freely available on the http://cern.ch/casadei/software.html web page.

Diego Casadei

2005-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

333

The International Large Detector: Letter of Intent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The International Large Detector (ILD) is a concept for a detector at the International Linear Collider, ILC. The ILC will collide electrons and positrons at energies of initially 500 GeV, upgradeable to 1 TeV. The ILC has an ambitious physics program, which will extend and complement that of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). A hallmark of physics at the ILC is precision. The clean initial state and the comparatively benign environment of a lepton collider are ideally suited to high precision measurements. To take full advantage of the physics potential of ILC places great demands on the detector performance. The design of ILD is driven by these requirements. Excellent calorimetry and tracking are combined to obtain the best possible overall event reconstruction, including the capability to reconstruct individual particles within jets for particle ow calorimetry. This requires excellent spatial resolution for all detector systems. A highly granular calorimeter system is combined with a central tracker which st...

Abe, Toshinori; Abramowicz, Halina; Adamus, Marek; Adeva, Bernardo; Afanaciev, Konstantin; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Alabau Pons, Carmen; Albrecht, Hartwig; Andricek, Ladislav; Anduze, Marc; Aplin, Steve J.; Arai, Yasuo; Asano, Masaki; Attie, David; Attree, Derek J.; Burger, Jochen; Bailey, David; Balbuena, Juan Pablo; Ball, Markus; Ballin, James; Barbi, Mauricio; Barlow, Roger; Bartels, Christoph; Bartsch, Valeria; Bassignana, Daniela; Bates, Richard; Baudot, Jerome; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Jeannine; Beckmann, Moritz; Bedjidian, Marc; Behnke, Ties; Belkadhi, Khaled; Bellerive, Alain; Bentvelsen, Stan; Bergauer, Thomas; Berggren, C.Mikael U.; Bergholz, Matthias; Bernreuther, Werner; Besancon, Marc; Besson, Auguste; Bhattacharya, Sudeb; Bhuyan, Bipul; Biebel, Otmar; Bilki, Burak; Blair, Grahame; Blumlein, Johannes; Bo, Li; Boisvert, Veronique; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, Giovanni; Boos, Eduard; Boudry, Vincent; Bouquet, Bernard; Bouvier, Joel; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Brient, Jean-Claude; Brock, Ian; Brogna, Andrea; Buchholz, Peter; Buesser, Karsten; Bulgheroni, Antonio; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Buzulutskov, A.F.; Caccia, Massimo; Caiazza, Stefano; Calcaterra, Alessandro; Caldwell, Allen; Callier, Stephane L.C.; Calvo Alamillo, Enrique; Campbell, Michael; Campbell, Alan J.; Cappellini, Chiara; Carloganu, Cristina; Castro, Nuno; Castro Carballo, Maria Elena; Chadeeva, Marina; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chang, Paoti; Charpy, Alexandre; Chen, Xun; Chen, Shaomin; Chen, Hongfang; Cheon, Byunggu; Choi, Suyong; Choudhary, B.C.; Christen, Sandra; Ciborowski, Jacek; Ciobanu, Catalin; Claus, Gilles; Clerc, Catherine; Coca, Cornelia; Colas, Paul; Colijn, Auke; Colledani, Claude; Combaret, Christophe; Cornat, Remi; Cornebise, Patrick; Corriveau, Francois; Cvach, Jaroslav; Czakon, Michal; D'Ascenzo, Nicola; Da Silva, Wilfrid; Dadoun, Olivier; Dam, Mogens; Damerell, Chris; Danilov, Mikhail; Daniluk, Witold; Daubard, Guillaume; David, Dorte; David, Jacques; De Boer, Wim; De Groot, Nicolo; De Jong, Sijbrand; De Jong, Paul; De La Taille, Christophe; De Masi, Rita; De Roeck, Albert; Decotigny, David; Dehmelt, Klaus; Delagnes, Eric; Deng, Zhi; Desch, Klaus; Dieguez, Angel; Diener, Ralf; Dima, Mihai-Octavian; Dissertori, Gunther; Dixit, Madhu S.; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris A.; Dollan, Ralph; Dorokhov, Andrei; Doublet, Philippe; Doyle, Tony; Doziere, Guy; Dragicevic, Marko; Drasal, Zbynek; Drugakov, Vladimir; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Dulucq, Frederic; Dumitru, Laurentiu Alexandru; Dzahini, Daniel; Eberl, Helmut; Eckerlin, Guenter; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eigen, Gerald; Eklund, Lars; Elsen, Eckhard; Elsener, Konrad; Emeliantchik, Igor; Engels, Jan; Evrard, Christophe; Fabbri, Riccardo; Faber, Gerard; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Faus-Golfe, Angeles; Feege, Nils; Feng, Cunfeng; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernandez Garcia, Marcos; Filthaut, Frank; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischer, Manfred; Fleta, Celeste; Fleury, Julien L.; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Foster, Brian; Fourches, Nicolas; Fouz, Mary-Cruz; Frank, Sebastian; Frey, Ariane; Frotin, Mickael; Fujii, Hirofumi; Fujii, Keisuke; Fujimoto, Junpei; Fujita, Yowichi; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gaddi, Andrea; Gaede, Frank; Galkin, Alexei; Galkin, Valery; Gallas, Abraham; Gallin-Martel, Laurent; Gamba, Diego; Gao, Yuanning; Garrido Beltran, Lluis; Garutti, Erika; Gastaldi, Franck; Gaur, Bakul; Gay, Pascal; Gellrich, Andreas; Genat, Jean-Francois; Gentile, Simonetta; Gerwig, Hubert; Gibbons, Lawrence; Ginina, Elena; Giraud, Julien; Giraudo, Giuseppe; Gladilin, Leonid; Goldstein, Joel; Gonzalez Sanchez, Francisco Javier; Gournaris, Filimon; Greenshaw, Tim; Greenwood, Z.D.; Grefe, Christian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Gris, Philippe; Grondin, Denis; Grunewald, Martin; Grzelak, Grzegorz; Gurtu, Atul; Haas, Tobias; Haensel, Stephan; Hajdu, Csaba; Hallermann, Lea; Han, Liang; Hansen, Peter H.; Hara, Takanori; Harder, Kristian; Hartin, Anthony; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Harz, Martin; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hauschild, Michael; He, Qing; Hedberg, Vincent; Hedin, David; Heinze, Isa; Helebrant, Christian; Henschel, Hans; Hensel, Carsten; Hertenberger, Ralf; Herve, Alain; Higuchi, Takeo; Himmi, Abdelkader; Hironori, Kazurayama; Hlucha, Hana; Hommels, Bart; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horvath, Dezso; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Wei-Shu; Hu-Guo, Christine; Huang, Xingtao; Huppert, Jean Francois; Ide, Yasuhiro; Idzik, Marek; Iglesias Escudero, Carmen; Ignatenko, Alexandr; Igonkina, Olga; Ikeda, Hirokazu; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikemoto, Yukiko; Ikuno, Toshinori; Imbault, Didier; Imhof, Andreas; Imhoff, Marc; Ingbir, Ronen; Inoue, Eiji

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Quantum enhanced estimation of optical detector efficiencies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum mechanics establishes the ultimate limit to the scaling of the precision on any parameter, by iden- tifying optimal probe states and measurements. While this paradigm is, at least in principle, adequate for the metrology of quantum channels involving the estimation of phase and loss parameters, we show that estimat- ing the loss parameters associated with a quantum channel and a realistic quantum detector are fundamentally different. While Fock states are provably optimal for the former, we identify a crossover in the nature of the optimal probe state for estimating detector imperfections as a function of the loss parameter. We provide explicit results for on-off and homodyne detectors, the most widely used detectors in quantum photonics technologies.

Barbieri, Marco; Bartley, Tim J; Jin, Xian-Min; Kolthammer, W Steven; Walmsley, Ian A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Friction Stir Spot Welding (FSSW) of Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) is applied to join advanced high strength steels (AHSS): galvannealed dual phase 780 MPa steel (DP780GA), transformation induced plasticity 780 MPa steel (TRIP780), and hot-stamped boron steel (HSBS). A low-cost Si3N4 ceramic tool was developed and used for making welds in this study instead of polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN) material used in earlier studies. FSSW has the advantages of solid-state, low-temperature process, and the ability of joining dissimilar grade of steels and thicknesses. Two different tool shoulder geometries, concave with smooth surface and convex with spiral pattern, were used in the study. Welds were made by a 2-step displacement control process with weld time of 4, 6, and 10 seconds. Static tensile lap-shear strength achieved 16.4 kN for DP780GA-HSBS and 13.2kN for TRIP780-HSBS, above the spot weld strength requirements by AWS. Nugget pull-out was the failure mode of the joint. The joining mechanism was illustrated from the cross-section micrographs. Microhardness measurement showed hardening in the upper sheet steel (DP780GA or TRIP780) in the weld, but softening of HSBS in the heat-affect zone (HAZ). The study demonstrated the feasibility of making high-strength AHSS spot welds with low-cost tools.

Santella, M. L.; Hovanski, Yuri; Pan, Tsung-Yu

2012-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

336

Blind Spots for neutralino Dark Matter in the MSSM with an intermediate m_A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the spin-independent neutralino Dark Matter scattering off heavy nuclei in the MSSM. We identify analytically the blind spots in direct detection for intermediate values of $m_A$. In the region where $\\mu$ and $M_{1,2}$ have opposite signs, there is not only a reduction of the lightest CP-even Higgs coupling to neutralinos, but also a destructive interference between the neutralino scattering through the exchange of the lightest CP-even Higgs and that through the exchange of the heaviest CP-even Higgs. At critical values of $m_A$, the tree-level contribution from the light Higgs exchange cancels the contribution from the heavy Higgs, so the scattering cross section vanishes. We denote these configurations as blind spots, since they provide a generalization of the ones previously discussed in the literature, which occur at very large values of $m_A$. We show that the generalized blind spots may occur in regions of parameter space that are consistent with the obtention of the proper neutralino relic density, and can be tested by non-standard Higgs boson searches and EWino searches at the LHC and future linear colliders.

Peisi Huang; Carlos E. M. Wagner

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Radiation Therapy: Does Breast Size Matter?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the effects of breast size on dose-volume histogram parameters and clinical toxicity in whole-breast hypofractionated radiation therapy using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, all patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy between 2005 and 2009 were screened, and qualifying consecutive patients were included in 1 of 2 cohorts: large-breasted patients (chest wall separation >25 cm or planning target volume [PTV] >1500 cm{sub 3}) (n=97) and small-breasted patients (chest wall separation <25 cm and PTV <1500 cm{sub 3}) (n=32). All patients were treated prone or supine with hypofractionated IMRT to the whole breast (42.4 Gy in 16 fractions) followed by a boost dose (9.6 Gy in 4 fractions). Dosimetric and clinical toxicity data were collected and analyzed using the R statistical package (version 2.12). Results: The mean PTV V95 (percentage of volume receiving >= 95% of prescribed dose) was 90.18% and the mean V105 percentage of volume receiving >= 105% of prescribed dose was 3.55% with no dose greater than 107%. PTV dose was independent of breast size, whereas heart dose and maximum point dose to skin correlated with increasing breast size. Lung dose was markedly decreased in prone compared with supine treatments. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 0, 1, and 2 skin toxicities were noted acutely in 6%, 69%, and 25% of patients, respectively, and at later follow-up (>3 months) in 43%, 57%, and 0% of patients, respectively. Large breast size contributed to increased acute grade 2 toxicity (28% vs 12%, P=.008). Conclusions: Adequate PTV coverage with acceptable hot spots and excellent sparing of organs at risk was achieved by use of IMRT regardless of treatment position and breast size. Although increasing breast size leads to increased heart dose and maximum skin dose, heart dose remained within our institutional constraints and the incidence of overall skin toxicity was comparable to that reported in the literature. Taken together, these data suggest that hypofractionated radiation therapy using IMRT is a viable and appropriate therapeutic modality in large-breasted patients.

Hannan, Raquibul, E-mail: Raquibul.Hannan@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Thompson, Reid F.; Chen Yu; Bernstein, Karen; Kabarriti, Rafi; Skinner, William [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States); Chen, Chin C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Landau, Evan; Miller, Ekeni; Spierer, Marnee; Hong, Linda; Kalnicki, Shalom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

338

Optical Link of the Atlas Pixel Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The on-detector optical link of the ATLAS pixel detector contains radiation-hard receiver chips to decode bi-phase marked signals received on PIN arrays and data transmitter chips to drive VCSEL arrays. The components are mounted on hybrid boards (opto-boards). We present results from the irradiation studies with 24 GeV protons up to 32 Mrad (1.2 x 10^15 p/cm^2) and the experience from the production.

K. K. Gan

2007-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

339

Fiber optic detector for immuno-testing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A portable fiber optic detector that senses the presence of specific target chemicals in air or a gas by exchanging the target chemical for a fluoroescently-tagged antigen that is bound to an antibody which is in turn attached to an optical fiber. Replacing the fluorescently-tagged antigen reduces the fluorescence so that a photon sensing detector records the reduced light level and activates an appropriate alarm or indicator.

Partin, Judy K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ward, Thomas E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Grey, Alan E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Shielding and grounding in large detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prevention of electromagnetic interference (EMI), or ``noise pickup,`` is an important design aspect in large detectors in accelerator environments. Shielding effectiveness as a function of shield thickness and conductivity vs the type and frequency of the interference field is described. Noise induced in transmission lines by ground loop driven currents in the shield is evaluated and the importance of low shield resistance is emphasized. Some measures for prevention of ground loops and isolation of detector-readout systems are discussed.

Radeka, V.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detector spot size" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Megaton Water Cerenkov Detectors and Astrophysical Neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although formal proposals have not yet been made, the UNO and Hyper-Kamiokande projects are being developed to follow-up the tremendously successful program at Super-Kamiokande using a detector that is 20-50 times larger. The potential of such a detector to continue the study of astrophysical neutrinos is considered and contrasted with the program for cubic kilometer neutrino observatories.

Maury Goodman

2005-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

342

Status of the CDF silicon detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CDF Run II silicon micro-strip detector is an essential part of the heavy flavor tagging and forward tracking capabilities of the experiment. Since the commissioning period ended in 2002, about 85% of the 730 k readout channels have been consistently provided good data. A summary of the recent improvements in the DAQ system as well as experience of maintaining and operating such a large, complex detector are presented.

Grinstein, Sebastian; /Harvard U.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

MicroBooNE Detector Move  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

On Monday, June 23, 2014 the MicroBooNE detector -- a 30-ton vessel that will be used to study ghostly particles called neutrinos -- was transported three miles across the Fermilab site and gently lowered into the laboratory's Liquid-Argon Test Facility. This video documents that move, some taken with time-lapse camerad, and shows the process of getting the MicroBooNE detector to its new home.

Flemming, Bonnie; Rameika, Gina

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

Graphene vertical hot-electron terahertz detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose and analyze the concept of the vertical hot-electron terahertz (THz) graphene-layer detectors (GLDs) based on the double-GL and multiple-GL structures with the barrier layers made of materials with a moderate conduction band off-set (such as tungsten disulfide and related materials). The operation of these detectors is enabled by the thermionic emissions from the GLs enhanced by the electrons heated by incoming THz radiation. Hence, these detectors are the hot-electron bolometric detectors. The electron heating is primarily associated with the intraband absorption (the Drude absorption). In the frame of the developed model, we calculate the responsivity and detectivity as functions of the photon energy, GL doping, and the applied voltage for the GLDs with different number of GLs. The detectors based on the cascade multiple-GL structures can exhibit a substantial photoelectric gain resulting in the elevated responsivity and detectivity. The advantages of the THz detectors under consideration are associated with their high sensitivity to the normal incident radiation and efficient operation at room temperature at the low end of the THz frequency range. Such GLDs with a metal grating, supporting the excitation of plasma oscillations in the GL-structures by the incident THz radiation, can exhibit a strong resonant response at the frequencies of several THz (in the range, where the operation of the conventional detectors based on A{sub 3}B{sub 5} materials, in particular, THz quantum-well detectors, is hindered due to a strong optical phonon radiation absorption in such materials). We also evaluate the characteristics of GLDs in the mid- and far-infrared ranges where the electron heating is due to the interband absorption in GLs.

Ryzhii, V., E-mail: v-ryzhii@riec.tohoku.ac.jp [Research Institute for Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Center for Photonics and Infrared Engineering, Bauman Moscow State Technical University and Institute of Ultra High Frequency Semiconductor Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 111005 (Russian Federation); Satou, A.; Otsuji, T. [Research Institute for Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Ryzhii, M. [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Aizu, Aizu-Wakamatsu 965-8580 (Japan); Mitin, V. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 1460-1920 (United States); Shur, M. S. [Departments of Electrical, Electronics, and Systems Engineering and Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

345

COMPENSATION OF DETECTOR SOLENOID IN SUPER-B  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SUPER-B detector solenoid has a strong 1.5 T field in the Interaction Region (IR) area, and its tails extend over the range of several meters. The main effect of the solenoid field is coupling of the horizontal and vertical betatron motion which must be corrected in order to preserve the small design beam size at the Interaction Point. The additional effects are orbit and dispersion caused by the angle between the solenoid and beam trajectories. The proposed correction system provides local compensation of the solenoid effects independently for each side of the IR. It includes 'bucking' solenoids to remove the solenoid field tails and a set of skew quadrupoles, dipole correctors and anti-solenoids to cancel linear perturbations to the optics. Details of the correction system are presented.

Nosochkov, Yuri; Bertsche, Kirk; Sullivan, Michael; /SLAC

2011-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

346

The International Large Detector: Letter of Intent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The International Large Detector (ILD) is a concept for a detector at the International Linear Collider, ILC. The ILC will collide electrons and positrons at energies of initially 500 GeV, upgradeable to 1 TeV. The ILC has an ambitious physics program, which will extend and complement that of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). A hallmark of physics at the ILC is precision. The clean initial state and the comparatively benign environment of a lepton collider are ideally suited to high precision measurements. To take full advantage of the physics potential of ILC places great demands on the detector performance. The design of ILD is driven by these requirements. Excellent calorimetry and tracking are combined to obtain the best possible overall event reconstruction, including the capability to reconstruct individual particles within jets for particle ow calorimetry. This requires excellent spatial resolution for all detector systems. A highly granular calorimeter system is combined with a central tracker which stresses redundancy and efficiency. In addition, efficient reconstruction of secondary vertices and excellent momentum resolution for charged particles are essential for an ILC detector. The interaction region of the ILC is designed to host two detectors, which can be moved into the beam position with a push-pull scheme. The mechanical design of ILD and the overall integration of subdetectors takes these operational conditions into account.

The ILD Concept Group

2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

347

High-Resolution PET Detector. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop an understanding of the limits of performance for a high resolution PET detector using an approach based on continuous scintillation crystals rather than pixelated crystals. The overall goal was to design a high-resolution detector, which requires both high spatial resolution and high sensitivity for 511 keV gammas. Continuous scintillation detectors (Anger cameras) have been used extensively for both single-photon and PET scanners, however, these instruments were based on NaI(Tl) scintillators using relatively large, individual photo-multipliers. In this project we investigated the potential of this type of detector technology to achieve higher spatial resolution through the use of improved scintillator materials and photo-sensors, and modification of the detector surface to optimize the light response function.We achieved an average spatial resolution of 3-mm for a 25-mm thick, LYSO continuous detector using a maximum likelihood position algorithm and shallow slots cut into the entrance surface.

Karp, Joel

2014-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

348

Articles Intercomparison of Retrospective Radon Detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We performed both a laboratory and a field intercompanison of two novel glass-based retrospective radon detectors previously used in major radon case-control studies performed in Missouri and Iowa. The new detectors estimate retrospective residential radon exposure from the accumulation of a long-lived radon decay product, 210Pb, in glass. The detectors use track registration material in direct contact with glass surfaces to measure the a-emission of a 210Pb-decay product, 210Po. The detector's track density generation rate (tracks per square centimeter per hour) is proportional to the sur6ce a-activity. In the absence of other strong sources of a-emission in the glass, the implanted surface a-activity should be proportional to the accumulated 210Po, and hence to the cumulative radon gas exposure. The goals of the intercomparison were to a) perform collocated measurements using two different glass-based retrospective radon detectors in a controlled laboratory environment to compare their relative response to implanted polonium in the absence of environmental variation, b) perform collocated measurements using two different retrospective radon progeny detectors in a variety of residential settings to compare their detection of glass-implanted polonium activities, and c) examne the correlation between track density rates and contemporary radon gas concentrations. The laboratory results suggested that the materials

R. William Field; Daniel J. Steck; Mary Ann Parkhurst; Judy A. Mahaffey; Michael C. R. Alavanja

349

Effect of Acidulated Phosphate Fluoride Gel on the Prevention of White Spot Lesions in Patients Undergoing Active Orthodontic Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of 1.23% acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) gel on white spot lesion (WSL) formation utilizing a typical orthodontic treatment interval for the applications. Methods...

Hutto Fretty, Corneil Kimberly

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

350

Managing Two-Spotted Spider Mites on Soybeans Ken Ostlie, Extension Entomologist, and Bruce Potter, IPM Specialist  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Managing Two-Spotted Spider Mites on Soybeans Ken Ostlie, Extension Entomologist, and Bruce Potter? Spider mite populations are held in balance by natural enemies, weather and host quality. Drought

Minnesota, University of

351

Development of elastography as a non-invasive method for hard spots detection of packaged beef rations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generated under the selected conditions. The elastograms were segmented using an automatic thresholding algorithm and the results were used to analyze the detection of hard spots. The optimal conditions determined for elastography were an applied strain of 1...

Wang, Wei-wei

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Post-Harvest Control of Two-Spotted Spider Mites in Nikki Rothwell, District Fruit IPM Educator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with two distinct black spots; irregular dark splotches may appear after feeding. Male TSSM are more as both species can have greenish colored stages. TSSM infestations are often accompanied by silk webbing

353

Particle pulses from superconducting aluminum tunnel junction detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Superconducting aluminum tunnel junctions have been developed for use as particle detectors. This paper presents results on static characteristics of these devices. We also present results from tests of these detectors with 6-keV X-rays. An extrapolation of the properties of these detectors to one suitable for dark-matter detectors is discussed.

Stricker, D.A.; Bing, D.D.; Bland, R.W.; Dickson, S.C.; Dignan, T.; Johnson, R.T.; Lockhart, J.M.; Laws, K.; Simon, M.W.; Watson, R. (San Francisco State Univ., Physics and Astronomy Dept. San Francisco, CA (US))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Decision making in coastal fisheries conflict: the case of red drum and spotted seatrout legislation in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stricter Measures Called For The TPWD Increases Regulations on Red and Spotted Seatrout Illegal Netting 61 65 66 Drum TABLE OF CONTENTS (continued) IV CASE FINDINGS (continued) The Opposition Increases The Legislative Process Economic Impact... of the controversial House B i 1 1 1000 in the Texas Legislature. H B. 1000 was signed into law in May, 1981 and prohibits the possession or transportation for the purpose of sale red drum or spotted seatrout taken from waters under the jurisdiction of the state...

Christian, Richard Travis

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

System for inspecting large size structural components  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a system for inspecting large scale structural components such as concrete walls or the like. The system includes a mobile gamma radiation source and a mobile gamma radiation detector. The source and detector are constructed and arranged for simultaneous movement along parallel paths in alignment with one another on opposite sides of a structural component being inspected. A control system provides signals which coordinate the movements of the source and detector and receives and records the radiation level data developed by the detector as a function of source and detector positions. The radiation level data is then analyzed to identify areas containing defects corresponding to unexpected variations in the radiation levels detected.

Birks, Albert S. (Columbus, OH); Skorpik, James R. (Kennewick, WA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Nuclear radiation detectors based on a matrix of ion-implanted p-i-n diodes on undoped GaAs epilayers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Samples of nuclear detectors which represent matrices of p-i-n diodes were fabricated based on undoped gallium arsenide epitaxial layers by ion implantation technology. The detectors have a size of the active area of 0.4 Multiplication-Sign 0.4 and 0.9 Multiplication-Sign 0.9 cm{sup 2}. Electrical characteristics of fabricated detectors and results of measurements of fast neutrons spectra of {sup 241}Am-Be source by the recoil protons method are discussed.

Baryshnikov, F. M.; Britvich, G. I.; Chernykh, A. V.; Chernykh, S. V.; Chubenko, A. P.; Didenko, S. I.; Koltsov, G. I. [National University of Science and Technology 'MISIS', Leninskiy prospect 4, 119049 Moscow (Russian Federation); Institute for High Energy Physics, Polshhad nauki 1, 142281 Protvino (Russian Federation); National University of Science and Technology 'MISIS', Leninskiy prospect 4, 119049 Moscow (Russian Federation); P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute of the RAS, Leninskiy prospect 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); National University of Science and Technology 'MISIS', Leninskiy prospect 4, 119049 Moscow (Russian Federation)

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

357

Charged particle detectors with active detector surface for partial energy deposition of the charged particles and related methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation detector is disclosed. The radiation detector comprises an active detector surface configured to generate charge carriers in response to charged particles associated with incident radiation. The active detector surface is further configured with a sufficient thickness for a partial energy deposition of the charged particles to occur and permit the charged particles to pass through the active detector surface. The radiation detector further comprises a plurality of voltage leads coupled to the active detector surface. The plurality of voltage leads is configured to couple to a voltage source to generate a voltage drop across the active detector surface and to separate the charge carriers into a plurality of electrons and holes for detection. The active detector surface may comprise one or more graphene layers. Timing data between active detector surfaces may be used to determine energy of the incident radiation. Other apparatuses and methods are disclosed herein.

Gerts, David W; Bean, Robert S; Metcalf, Richard R

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

358

Novel Large Area High Resolution Neutron Detector for the Spallation Neutron Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutron scattering is a powerful technique that is critically important for materials science and structural biology applications. The knowledge gained from past developments has resulted in far-reaching advances in engineering, pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, to name a few. New facilities for neutron generation at much higher flux, such as the SNS at Oak Ridge, TN, will greatly enhance the capabilities of neutron scattering, with benefits that extend to many fields and include, for example, development of improved drug therapies and materials that are stronger, longer-lasting, and more impact-resistant. In order to fully realize this enhanced potential, however, higher neutron rates must be met with improved detection capabilities, particularly higher count rate capability in large size detectors, while maintaining practicality. We have developed a neutron detector with the technical and economic advantages to accomplish this goal. This new detector has a large sensitive area, offers 3D spatial resolution, high sensitivity and high count rate capability, and it is economical and practical to produce. The proposed detector technology is based on B-10 thin film conversion of neutrons in long straw-like gas detectors. A stack of many such detectors, each 1 meter in length, and 4 mm in diameter, has a stopping power that exceeds that of He-3 gas, contained at practical pressures within an area detector. With simple electronic readout methods, straw detector arrays can provide spatial resolution of 4 mm FWHM or better, and since an array detector of such form consists of several thousand individual elements per square meter, count rates in a 1 m^2 detector can reach 2?10^7 cps. Moreover, each individual event can be timetagged with a time resolution of less than 0.1 ?sec, allowing accurate identification of neutron energy by time of flight. Considering basic elemental cost, this novel neutron imaging detector can be commercially produced economically, probably at a small fraction of the cost of He-3 detectors. In addition to neutron scattering science, the fully developed base technology can be used as a rugged, low-cost neutron detector in area monitoring and surveying. Radiation monitors are used in a number of other settings for occupational and environmental radiation safety. Such a detector can also be used in environmental monitoring and remote nuclear power plant monitoring. For example, the Department of Energy could use it to characterize nuclear waste dumps, coordinate clean-up efforts, and assess the radioactive contaminants in the air and water. Radiation monitors can be used to monitor the age and component breakdown of nuclear warheads and to distinguish between weapons and reactor grade plutonium. The UN's International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) uses radiation monitors for treaty verification, remote monitoring, and enforcing the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons. As part of treaty verification, monitors can be used to certify the contents of containers during inspections. They could be used for portal monitoring to secure border checkpoints, sea ports, air cargo centers, public parks, sporting venues, and key government buildings. Currently, only 2% of all sea cargo shipped is inspected for radiation sources. In addition, merely the presence of radiation is detected and nothing is known about the radioactive source until further testing. The utilization of radiation monitors with neutron sensitivity and capability of operation in hostile port environments would increase the capacity and effectiveness of the radioactive scanning processes.

Lacy, Jeffrey L

2009-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

359

8, 78477881, 2008 Size distributions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 8, 7847­7881, 2008 Size distributions and sources of WSOC in urban background area H. Timonen, sources and source areas of water-soluble organic carbon in urban background air H. Timonen 1 , S Chemistry Division National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80305-3000, USA

Boyer, Edmond

360

Calibration of the GLAST Burst Monitor Detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will augment the capabilities of GLAST for the detection of cosmic gamma-ray bursts by extending the energy range (20 MeV to > 300 GeV) of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) towards lower energies by 2 BGO-detectors (150 keV to 30 MeV) and 12 NaI(Tl) detectors (10 keV to 1 MeV). The physical detector response of the GBM instrument for GRBs is determined with the help of Monte Carlo simulations, which are supported and verified by on-ground calibration measurements, performed extensively with the individual detectors at the MPE in 2005. All flight and spare detectors were irradiated with calibrated radioactive sources in the laboratory (from 14 keV to 4.43 MeV). The energy/channel-relations, the dependences of energy resolution and effective areas on the energy and the angular responses were measured. Due to the low number of emission lines of radioactive sources below 100 keV, calibration measurements in the energy range from 10 keV to 60 keV were performed with the X-ray radiometry working group of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) at the BESSY synchrotron radiation facility, Berlin.

von Kienlin, Andreas; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Lichti, Giselher G.; Steinle, Helmut; Krumrey, Michael; Gerlach, Martin; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegan, Charles; Bhat, Narayana; Briggs, Michael S.; Diehl, Roland; Connaughton, Valerie; Greiner, Jochen; Kippen, R.Marc; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Paciesas, William; Preece, Robert; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detector spot size" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Device for calibrating a radiation detector system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device is disclosed for testing a radiation detector system that includes at least two arrays of radiation detectors that are movable with respect to each other. The device includes a ''shield plate'' or shell, and an opposing ''source plate'' containing a source of ionizing radiation. Guides are attached to the outer surface of the shell for engaging the forward ends of the detectors, thereby reproducibly positioning the detectors with respect to the source and with respect to each other, thereby ensuring that a predetermined portion of the radiation emitted by the source passes through the shell and reaches the detectors. The shell is made of an hydrogenous material having approximately the same radiological attenuation characteristics as composite human tissue. The source represents a human organ such as the lungs, heart, kidneys, liver, spleen, pancreas, thyroid, testes, prostate, or ovaries. The source includes a source of ionizing radiation having a long half-life and an activity that is within the range typically searched for in human subjects. 3 figures.

McFee, M.C.; Kirkham, T.J.; Johnson, T.H.

1994-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

362

Device for calibrating a radiation detector system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device for testing a radiation detector system that includes at least two arrays of radiation detectors that are movable with respect to each other. The device includes a "shield plate" or shell, and an opposing "source plate" containing a source of ionizing radiation. Guides are attached to the outer surface of the shell for engaging the forward ends of the detectors, thereby reproducibly positioning the detectors with respect to the source and with respect to each other, thereby ensuring that a predetermined portion of the radiation emitted by the source passes through the shell and reaches the detectors. The shell is made of an hydrogenous material having approximately the same radiological attenuation characteristics as composite human tissue. The source represents a human organ such as the lungs, heart, kidneys, heart, liver, spleen, pancreas, thyroid, testes, prostate, or ovaries. The source includes a source of ionizing radiation having a long half-life and an activity that is within the range typically searched for in human subjects.

Mc Fee, Matthew C. (New Ellenton, SC); Kirkham, Tim J. (Beech Island, SC); Johnson, Tippi H. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Neutrino induced events in the MINOS detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MINOS experiment is designed to study neutrino oscillations. It uses an accelerator generated beam of neutrinos and two detectors, the smaller at a distance of 1km and the larger at 735 km. By comparing the spectrum and flavour composition of the beam at the two detectors precise determinations of the oscillation parameters are possible. This thesis concentrates on the analysis of data from the larger Far Detector. By studying the spectrum of neutral current events it is possible to look for evidence of non-interacting 'sterile' neutrinos. The thesis describes how events are selected for this analysis, and a method for discriminating between charged current and neutral current events. The systematic uncertainties resulting from these cuts are evaluated. Several techniques for using Near Detector data to eliminate systematic uncertainties in the predicted Far Detector spectrum are compared. An oscillation analysis, based on the first year of MINOS data, uses the selected events to make a measurement of f{sub s}, the fraction of unseen neutrinos that are sterile. The measured value is f{sub s} = 0.07{sup +0.32} at 68%C.L., and is consistent with the standard three-neutrino picture, which has no sterile neutrino.

Litchfield, Reuben Phillip; /Oxford U.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Control of Transcription by Cell Size  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cell size increases significantly with increasing ploidy. Differences in cell size and ploidy are associated with alterations in gene expression, although no direct connection has been made between cell size and transcription. ...

Wu, Chia-Yung

365

5, 52235252, 2005 Size-resolved source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, gasoline vehicle, diesel vehicle, copper smelter, and volcano emission. PMF analysis of size% in the fine size range (0.56­2.5 µm). The diesel vehicle source contributed the most in the ultra-fine size

Boyer, Edmond

366

Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A detector for time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering includes a nearly constant diameter, evacuated linear tube having an end plate detector with a first fluorescent screen and concentric rings of first fiber optic bundles for low angle scattering detection and an annular detector having a second fluorescent screen and second fiber optic bundles concentrically disposed about the tube for higher angle scattering detection. With the scattering source, i.e., the specimen under investigation, located outside of the evacuated tube on the tube's longitudinal axis, scattered x-rays are detected by the fiber optic bundles, to each of which is coupled a respective photodetector, to provide a measurement resolution, i.e., dq/q, where q is the momentum transferred from an incident x-ray to an x-ray scattering specimen, of 2% over two (2) orders of magnitude in reciprocal space, i.e., qmax/qmin approx=lO0.

Hessler, Jan P.

2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

Interferometric direction finding with a metamaterial detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present measurements and analysis demonstrating useful direction finding of sources in the S band (2–4?GHz) using a metamaterial detector. An augmented metamaterial absorber that supports magnitude and phase measurement of the incident electric field, within each unit cell, is described. The metamaterial is implemented in a commercial printed circuit board process with off-board back-end electronics. We also discuss on-board back-end implementation strategies. Direction finding performance is analyzed for the fabricated metamaterial detector using simulated data and the standard algorithm, MUtiple SIgnal Classification. The performance of this complete system is characterized by its angular resolution as a function of radiation density at the detector. Sources with power outputs typical of mobile communication devices can be resolved at kilometer distances with sub-degree resolution and high frame rates.

Venkatesh, Suresh; Schurig, David, E-mail: david.schurig@utah.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Shrekenhamer, David; Padilla, Willie [Department of Physics, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 02467 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 02467 (United States); Xu, Wangren; Sonkusale, Sameer [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts 02155 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts 02155 (United States)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

368

A Very High Momentum Particle Identification Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The construction of a new detector is proposed to extend the capabilities of ALICE in the high transverse momentum (pT) region. This Very High Momentum Particle Identification Detector (VHMPID) performs charged hadron identification on a track-by-track basis in the 5 GeV/c < p < 25 GeV/c momentum range and provides ALICE with new opportunities to study parton-medium interactions at LHC energies. The VHMPID covers up to 30% of the ALICE central barrel and presents sufficient acceptance for triggered- and tagged-jet studies, allowing for the first time identified charged hadron measurements in jets. This Letter of Intent summarizes the physics motivations for such a detector as well as its layout and integration into ALICE.

T. V. Acconcia; A. G. Agocs; F. Barile; G. G. Barnafoldi; R. Bellwied; G. Bencedi; G. Bencze; D. Berenyi; L. Boldizsar; S. Chattopadhyay; F. Cindolo; D. D. Chinellato; S. D'Ambrosio; D. Das; K. Das; L. Das-Bose; A. K. Dash; G. De Cataldo; S. De Pasquale; D. Di Bari; A. Di Mauro; E. Futo; E. Garcia; G. Hamar; A. Harton; G. Iannone; R. T. Jimenez; D. W. Kim; J. S. Kim; A. Knospe; L. Kovacs; P. Levai; E. Nappi; C. Markert; P. Martinengo; D. Mayani; L. Molnar; L. Olah; G. Paic; C. Pastore; G. Patimo; M. E. Patino; V. Peskov; L. Pinsky; F. Piuz; S. Pochybova; I. Sgura; T. Sinha; J. Song; J. Takahashi; A. Timmins; J. B. Van Beelen; D. Varga; G. Volpe; M. Weber; L. Xaplanteris; J. Yi; I. K. Yoo

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

369

The CLAS12 large area RICH detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A large area RICH detector is being designed for the CLAS12 spectrometer as part of the 12 GeV upgrade program of the Jefferson Lab Experimental Hall-B. This detector is intended to provide excellent hadron identification from 3 GeV/c up to momenta exceeding 8 GeV/c and to be able to work at the very high design luminosity-up to 1035 cm2 s?1. Detailed feasibility studies are presented for two types of radiators, aerogel and liquid C6F14 freon, in conjunction with a highly segmented light detector in the visible wavelength range. The basic parameters of the RICH are outlined and the resulting performances, as defined by preliminary simulation studies, are reported.

M. Contalbrigo, E. Cisbani, P. Rossi

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Resistance spot welding of ultra-fine grained steel sheets produced by constrained groove pressing: Optimization and characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Constrained groove pressing as a severe plastic deformation method is utilized to produce ultra-fine grained low carbon steel sheets. The ultra-fine grained sheets are joined via resistance spot welding process and the characteristics of spot welds are investigated. Resistance spot welding process is optimized for welding of the sheets with different severe deformations and their results are compared with those of as-received samples. The effects of failure mode and expulsion on the performance of ultra-fine grained sheet spot welds have been investigated in the present paper and the welding current and time of resistance spot welding process according to these subjects are optimized. Failure mode and failure load obtained in tensile-shear test, microhardness, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope and scanning electron microscope images have been used to describe the performance of spot welds. The region between interfacial to pullout mode transition and expulsion limit is defined as the optimum welding condition. The results show that optimum welding parameters (welding current and welding time) for ultra-fine grained sheets are shifted to lower values with respect to those for as-received specimens. In ultra-fine grained sheets, one new region is formed named recrystallized zone in addition to fusion zone, heat affected zone and base metal. It is shown that microstructures of different zones in ultra-fine grained sheets are finer than those of as-received sheets. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Resistance spot welding process is optimized for joining of UFG steel sheets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optimum welding current and time are decreased with increasing the CGP pass number. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microhardness at BM, HAZ, FZ and recrystallized zone is enhanced due to CGP.

Khodabakhshi, F.; Kazeminezhad, M., E-mail: mkazemi@sharif.edu; Kokabi, A.H.

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

Resistance Spot Welding of Aluminum Alloy to Steel with Transition Material - From Process to Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes work to date on resistance spot welding (RSW) of aluminum alloy to mild steel from process development to performance evaluation. A cold-rolled strip material is introduced as a transition material to aid the resistance welding process. The optimal welding parameters and electrode selections were established using a combination of experimental and analytical approaches. The mechanical behaviors of welded samples was evaluated using static and dynamic strength tests and cyclic fatigue tests. A statistical analysis was also performed to analyze the effect of different failure modes on the sample's peak load and energy absorption.

Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Shao, H; Kimchi, Menachem; Menachem Kimchi and Wanda Newman

2004-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

372

Numerical studies of third-harmonic generation in laser filament in air perturbed by plasma spot  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Third-harmonic emission from laser filament intercepted by plasma spot is studied by numerical simulations. Significant enhancement of the third-harmonic generation is obtained due to the disturbance of the additional plasma. The contribution of the pure plasma effect and the possible plasma-enhanced third-order susceptibility on the third-harmonic generation enhancement are compared. It is shown that the plasma induced cancellation of destructive interference [Y. Liu et al., Opt. Commun. 284, 4706 (2011)] of two-colored filament is the dominant mechanism of the enhancement of third-harmonic generation.

Feng Liubin [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100190 (China); Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics and Department of Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Lu Xin; Liu Xiaolong; Li Yutong; Chen Liming; Ma Jinglong; Dong Quanli; Wang Weimin [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100190 (China); Xi Tingting [College of Physical Sciences, Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Sheng Zhengming; Zhang Jie [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100190 (China); Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas of the Ministry of Education of China and Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); He Duanwei [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics and Department of Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

373

High spring temperatures decrease peach fruit size  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

useful in dif?cult fruit- and crop level interactions inin light of the increasing fruit size distribution and waterpressure for large-size fruits. CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE •

Lopez, Geraldo; Johnson, R. Scott; DeJong, Theodore M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Neighbouring male spotted bowerbirds are not related, but do maraud each other  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Lanctot et al. 1998), or by determining the size and structure of aggregations that males form (Westcott

Dasmahapatra, Kanchon

375

Alpha track density using a semiconductor detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

F) to minimize voltage ripple. One channel of the filtered voltage is routed to a state-of-the-an LM7824 voltage regulator integrated-circuit (IC). This IC provides a constant 24VDC output regardless of loading (Traister and Mayo 1987). The decision to use... the LM7824 was based on the practicality of making full use of the available voltage of the transformer secondary for the detector circuit. The higher the voltage applied to the detector, within its rated limit, the greater the effective resolution...

Hamilton, Ian Scott

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

376

Development of a plasma panel radiation detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article reports on the development and experimental results of commercial plasma display panels adapted for their potential use as micropattern gas radiation detectors. The plasma panel sensor (PPS) design and materials include glass substrates, metal electrodes and inert gas mixtures which provide a physically robust, hermetically sealed device. Plasma display panels used as detectors were tested with cosmic ray muons, beta rays and gamma rays, protons, and thermal neutrons. The results demonstrated rise times and time resolution of a few nanoseconds, as well as sub-millimeter spatial resolution compatible with the pixel pitch.

Ball, Robert [University of Michigan; Beene, James R [ORNL; Ben Moshe, M. [Tel Aviv University; Benhammou, Yan [Tel Aviv University; Bensimon, B [Tel Aviv University; Chapman, J. Wehrley [University of Michigan; Etzion, E [Tel Aviv University; Ferretti, Claudio [University of Michigan; Friedman, Dr. Peter S. [Integrated Sensors, LLC; Levin, Daniel S. [University of Michigan; Silver, Yiftah [Tel Aviv University; Weaverdyck, Curtis [University of Michigan; Wetzel, R. [University of Michigan; Zhou, Bing [University of Michigan; Anderson, T [GE Measurement and Control Solutions; McKinny, K [GE Measurement and Control Solutions; Bentefour, E [Ion Beam Applications

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Commissioning of the ATLAS pixel detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ATLAS pixel detector is a high precision silicon tracking device located closest to the LHC interaction point. It belongs to the first generation of its kind in a hadron collider experiment. It will provide crucial pattern recognition information and will largely determine the ability of ATLAS to precisely track particle trajectories and find secondary vertices. It was the last detector to be installed in ATLAS in June 2007, has been fully connected and tested in-situ during spring and summer 2008, and is ready for the imminent LHC turn-on. The highlights of the past and future commissioning activities of the ATLAS pixel system are presented.

ATLAS Collaboration; Golling, Tobias

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Development of a plasma panel radiation detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article reports on the development and experimental results of commercial plasma display panels adapted for their potential use as micropattern gas radiation detectors. The plasma panel sensors (PPS) design an materials include glass substrates, metal electrodes and inert gas mixtures which provide a physically robust, hermetically-sealed device. Plasma display panels used as detectors were tested with cosmic ray muons, beta rays and gamma rays, protons and thermal neutrons. The results demonstrated rise times and time resolution of a few nanoseconds, as well as sub-millimeter spatial resolution compatible with the pixel pitch.

R. Ball; J. R. Beene; M. Ben-Moshe; Y. Benhammou; R. Bensimon; J. W. Chapman; E. Etzion; C. Ferretti; P. S. Friedman; D. S. Levin; Y. Silver; R. L. Varner; C. Weaverdyck; R. Wetzel; B. Zhou; T. Anderson; K. McKinny; E. H. Bentefour

2014-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

379

ARM - Measurement - Cloud droplet size  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Related InformationAciddroplet size ARM Data Discovery Browse

380

ARM - Measurement - Hydrometeor Size Distribution  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Related InformationAciddroplet sizeGeometry ARM Data

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detector spot size" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Strategy Guideline: HVAC Equipment Sizing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system is arguably the most complex system installed in a house and is a substantial component of the total house energy use. A right-sized HVAC system will provide the desired occupant comfort and will run efficiently. This Strategy Guideline discusses the information needed to initially select the equipment for a properly designed HVAC system. Right-sizing of an HVAC system involves the selection of equipment and the design of the air distribution system to meet the accurate predicted heating and cooling loads of the house. Right-sizing the HVAC system begins with an accurate understanding of the heating and cooling loads on a space; however, a full HVAC design involves more than just the load estimate calculation - the load calculation is the first step of the iterative HVAC design procedure. This guide describes the equipment selection of a split system air conditioner and furnace for an example house in Chicago, IL as well as a heat pump system for an example house in Orlando, Florida. The required heating and cooling load information for the two example houses was developed in the Department of Energy Building America Strategy Guideline: Accurate Heating and Cooling Load Calculations.

Burdick, A.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Printing out Particle Detectors with 3D-Printers, a Potentially Transformational Advance for HEP Instrumentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This white paper suggests posing a "grand challenge" to the HEP instrumentation community, i.e. the aggressive development of additive manufacturing, also known as 3D-printing, for the production of particle detectors in collaboration with industry. This notion is an outcome of discussions within the instrumentation frontier group during the 2013 APS-DPF Snowmass summer study conducted by the U.S. HEP community. Improvements of current industrial 3D-printing capabilities by one to two orders of magnitude in terms of printing resolution, speed, and object size together with developing the ability to print composite materials could enable the production of any desired 3D detector structure directly from a digital model. Current industrial 3D-printing capabilities are briefly reviewed and contrasted with capabilities desired for printing detectors for particle physics, with micro-pattern gaseous detectors used as a first example. A significant impact on industrial technology could be expected if HEP were to partner with industry in taking on such a challenge.

M. Hohlmann

2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

383

Printing out Particle Detectors with 3D-Printers, a Potentially Transformational Advance for HEP Instrumentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This white paper suggests posing a "grand challenge" to the HEP instrumentation community, i.e. the aggressive development of additive manufacturing, also known as 3D-printing, for the production of particle detectors in collaboration with industry. This notion is an outcome of discussions within the instrumentation frontier group during the 2013 APS-DPF Snowmass summer study conducted by the U.S. HEP community. Improvements of current industrial 3D-printing capabilities by one to two orders of magnitude in terms of printing resolution, speed, and object size together with developing the ability to print composite materials could enable the production of any desired 3D detector structure directly from a digital model. Current industrial 3D-printing capabilities are briefly reviewed and contrasted with capabilities desired for printing detectors for particle physics, with micro-pattern gaseous detectors used as a first example. A significant impact on industrial technology could be expected if HEP were to part...

Hohlmann, M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Next Generation Semiconductor-Based Radiation Detectors Using Cadmium Magnesium Telluride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of Phase I was to perform extensive studies on the purification, crystal growth and annealing procedures of CdMgTe to gain a clear understanding of the basic material properties to enable production of detector material with performance comparable to that of CdZnTe. Brimrose utilized prior experience in the growth and processing of II-VI crystals and produced high purity material and good quality single crystals of CdMgTe. Processing techniques for these crystals including annealing, mechanical and chemical polishing, surface passivation and electrode fabrication were developed. Techniques to characterize pertinent electronic characteristics were developed and gamma ray detectors were fabricated. Feasibility of the development of comprehensive defect modeling in this new class of material was demonstrated by our partner research institute SRI International, to compliment the experimental work. We successfully produced a CdMgTe detector that showed 662 keV gamma response with energy resolution of 3.4% (FWHM) at room temperature, without any additional signal correction. These results are comparable to existing CdZnTe (CZT) technology using the same detector size and testing conditions. We have successfully demonstrated detection of gamma-radiation from various isotopes/sources, using CdMgTe thus clearly proving the feasibility that CdMgTe is an excellent, low-cost alternative to CdZnTe.

Trivedi, Sudhir B [Brimrose Technology Corporation; Kutcher, Susan W [Brimrose Technology Corporation; Berding, Martha . [SRI International; Burger, Arnold . [Independent Consultant; Palosz, Witold . [Brimrose Technology Corporation

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

385

Wear testing of friction stir spot welding tools for joining of DP 980 Steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Friction stir spot welding has been shown to be a viable method of joining ultra high strength steel (UHSS), both in terms of joint strength and process cycle time. However, the cost of tooling must be reasonable in order for this method to be adopted as an industrial process. Several tooling materials have been evaluated in prior studies, including silicon nitride and polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN). Recently a new tool alloy has been developed, where a blend of PCBN and tungsten rhenium (W-Re) was used in order to improve the toughness of the tool. Wear testing results are presented for two of these alloys: one with a composition of 60% PCBN and 40% W-Re (designated as Q60), and one with 70% PCBN and 30% W-Re (designated at Q70). The sheet material used for all wear testing was DP 980. Tool profiles were measured periodically during the testing process in order to show the progression of wear as a function of the number of spots produced. Lap shear testing was done each time a tool profile was taken in order to show the relationship between tool wear and joint strength. For the welding parameters chosen for this study the Q70 tool provided the best combination of wear resistance and joint strength.

Ridges, Chris; Miles, Michael; Hovanski, Yuri; Peterson, Jeremy; Steel, Russell

2011-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

386

Joint strength in high speed friction stir spot welded DP 980 steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High speed friction stir spot welding was applied to 1.2 mm thick DP 980 steel sheets under different welding conditions, using PCBN tools. The range of vertical feed rates used during welding was 2.5 mm – 102 mm per minute, while the range of spindle speeds was 2500 – 6000 rpm. Extended testing was carried out for five different sets of welding conditions, until tool failure. These welding conditions resulted in vertical welding loads of 3.6 – 8.2 kN and lap shear tension failure loads of 8.9 – 11.1 kN. PCBN tools were shown, in the best case, to provide lap shear tension fracture loads at or above 9 kN for 900 spot welds, after which tool failure caused a rapid drop in joint strength. Joint strength was shown to be strongly correlated to bond area, which was measured from weld cross sections. Failure modes of the tested joints were a function of bond area and softening that occurred in the heat-affected zone.

Saunders, Nathan; Miles, Michael; Hartman, Trent; Hovanski, Yuri; Hong, Sung Tae; Steel, Russell

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Monitoring seasonal and annual wetland changes in a freshwater marsh with SPOT HRV data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Eleven dates of SPOT HRV data along with near-concurrent vertical aerial photographic and phenological data for 1987, 1988, and 1989 were evaluated to determine seasonal and annual changes in a 400-hectare, southeastern freshwater marsh. Early April through mid-May was the best time to discriminate among the cypress (Taxodium distichum)/water tupelo (Nyssa acquatica) swamp forest and the non-persistent (Ludwigia spp.) and persistent (Typha spp.) stands in this wetlands. Furthermore, a ten-fold decrease in flow rate from 11 cubic meters per sec (cms) in 1987 to one cms in 1988 was recorded in the marsh followed by a shift to drier wetland communities. The Savannah River Site (SRS), maintained by the US Department of Energy, is a 777 km{sup 2} area located in south central South Carolina. Five tributaries of the Savannah River run southwest through the SRS and into the floodplain swamp of the Savannah River. This paper describes the use of SPOT HRV data to monitor seasonal and annual trends in one of these swamp deltas, Pen Branch Delta, during a three-year period, 1987--1989.

Mackey, H.E. Jr.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Monitoring seasonal and annual wetland changes in a freshwater marsh with SPOT HRV data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Eleven dates of SPOT HRV data along with near-concurrent vertical aerial photographic and phenological data for 1987, 1988, and 1989 were evaluated to determine seasonal and annual changes in a 400-hectare, southeastern freshwater marsh. Early April through mid-May was the best time to discriminate among the cypress (Taxodium distichum)/water tupelo (Nyssa acquatica) swamp forest and the non-persistent (Ludwigia spp.) and persistent (Typha spp.) stands in this wetlands. Furthermore, a ten-fold decrease in flow rate from 11 cubic meters per sec (cms) in 1987 to one cms in 1988 was recorded in the marsh followed by a shift to drier wetland communities. The Savannah River Site (SRS), maintained by the US Department of Energy, is a 777 km{sup 2} area located in south central South Carolina. Five tributaries of the Savannah River run southwest through the SRS and into the floodplain swamp of the Savannah River. This paper describes the use of SPOT HRV data to monitor seasonal and annual trends in one of these swamp deltas, Pen Branch Delta, during a three-year period, 1987--1989.

Mackey, H.E. Jr.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

389

DEFINING THE 'BLIND SPOT' OF HINODE EIS AND XRT TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Observing high-temperature, low emission measure plasma is key to unlocking the coronal heating problem. With current instrumentation, a combination of EUV spectral data from Hinode Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS; sensitive to temperatures up to 4 MK) and broadband filter data from Hinode X-ray Telescope (XRT; sensitive to higher temperatures) is typically used to diagnose the temperature structure of the observed plasma. In this Letter, we demonstrate that a 'blind spot' exists in temperature-emission measure space for combined Hinode EIS and XRT observations. For a typical active region core with significant emission at 3-4 MK, Hinode EIS and XRT are insensitive to plasma with temperatures greater than {approx}6 MK and emission measures less than {approx}10{sup 27} cm{sup -5}. We then demonstrate that the temperature and emission measure limits of this blind spot depend upon the temperature distribution of the plasma along the line of sight by considering a hypothetical emission measure distribution sharply peaked at 1 MK. For this emission measure distribution, we find that EIS and XRT are insensitive to plasma with emission measures less than {approx}10{sup 26} cm{sup -5}. We suggest that a spatially and spectrally resolved 6-24 Angstrom-Sign spectrum would improve the sensitivity to these high-temperature, low emission measure plasma.

Winebarger, Amy R.; Cirtain, Jonathan; Mulu-Moore, Fana [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, VP 62, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Schmelz, Joan T. [Physics Department, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States); Golub, Leon [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kobayashi, Ken, E-mail: amy.r.winebarger@nasa.gov [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, 320 Sparkman Dr, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)

2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

390

Beamline 9.3.1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Characteristics 3 modes: transmission, sample current, or fluorescence Detectors Si photodiode, Single element Si drift Spot size at sample 1.0 mm x 0.7 mm Samples Solids, holder...

391

SuperB Progress Report: Detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the present status of the detector design for SuperB. It is one of four separate progress reports that, taken collectively, describe progress made on the SuperB Project since the publication of the SuperB Conceptual Design Report in 2007 and the Proceedings of SuperB Workshop VI in Valencia in 2008.

Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Donvito, G.; Spinoso, V.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Manghisoni, M.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; /INFN, Pavia /Bergamo U., Ingengneria Dept.; Eigen, G.; Fehlker, D.; Helleve, L.; /Bergen U.; Carbone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Gabrielli, A.; Galli, D.; Giorgi, F.; Marconi, U.; Perazzini, S.; Sbarra, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valentinetti, S.; Villa, M.; Zoccoli, A.; /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Caltech /Carleton U. /Cincinnati U. /INFN, CNAF /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /UC, Irvine /Taras Shevchenko U. /Orsay, LAL /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Frascati /INFN, Legnaro /Orsay, IPN /Maryland U. /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Pavia /Pavia U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Caltech /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /PNL, Richland /Queen Mary, U. of London /Rutherford /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome2 /Rome U.,Tor Vergata /INFN, Rome3 /Rome III U. /SLAC /Tel Aviv U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Padua /Trento U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /TRIUMF /British Columbia U. /Montreal U. /Victoria U.

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

392

Mathematically Modeling a Fresh Fish Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"One fish, Two fish, Red fish, Blue fish" Mathematically Modeling a Fresh Fish Detector Ibrahim using a device designed to determine the freshness of fish. Through an electric current applied fresh fish from those which are not. Key words. Mathematical modelling, differential equations, noise re

Macdonald, Colin B.

393

Multichannel photodiode detector for ultrafast optical spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Construction and characterization of a multichannel photodiode detector based on commercially available components with high signal to noise of $\\sim10^{6}$ and a rapid frame rate, suitable for time resolved femtosecond spectroscopy with high repetition femtosecond sources, is presented.

Mertelj, T; Borzda, T; Vaskivskyi, I; Pogrebna, A; Mihailovic, D

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Speed estimation using single loop detector outputs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...................................................................................10 2.1 Introduction ........................................................................................10 2.2 Vehicle Detectors ...............................................................................10 2.3 Description of the Speed....4 Hourly traffic volumes from the IH-35 test bed in Austin on Oct. 27, 2004 38 Fig 3.5 Layout of the simulated freeway section ...................................................... 41 Fig. 4.1 Average vehicle lengths over time...

Ye, Zhirui

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

395

Speed estimation using single loop detector outputs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...................................................................................10 2.1 Introduction ........................................................................................10 2.2 Vehicle Detectors ...............................................................................10 2.3 Description of the Speed....4 Hourly traffic volumes from the IH-35 test bed in Austin on Oct. 27, 2004 38 Fig 3.5 Layout of the simulated freeway section ...................................................... 41 Fig. 4.1 Average vehicle lengths over time...

Ye, Zhirui

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

396

Detector signal correction method and system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Corrective factors are applied so as to remove anomalous features from the signal generated by a photoconductive detector, and to thereby render the output signal highly linear with respect to the energy of incident, time-varying radiation. The corrective factors may be applied through the use of either digital electronic data processing means or analog circuitry, or through a combination of those effects.

Carangelo, Robert M. (Glastonbury, CT); Duran, Andrew J. (Oviedo, FL); Kudman, Irwin (Boca Raton, FL)

1995-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

397

High resolution scintillation detector with semiconductor readout  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A novel high resolution scintillation detector array for use in radiation imaging such as high resolution Positron Emission Tomography (PET) which comprises one or more parallelepiped crystals with at least one long surface of each crystal being in intimate contact with a semiconductor photodetector such that photons generated within each crystal by gamma radiation passing therethrough is detected by the photodetector paired therewith.

Levin, Craig S. (Santa Monica, CA); Hoffman, Edward J. (Los Angeles, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

MCNP Analysis of a Phoswich Detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of triple crystal phosphor sandwich detectors have been developed and constructed for testing at the University of Missouri-Columbia [1-7]. These detectors can simultaneously measure alpha, beta, and gamma radiation and utilize digital pulse shape discrimination to identify and separate radiation events coming from each of the separate phosphors. The research reported here uses Monte Carlo [8] software analysis to determine operating parameters for this detector system and optimizes its design for measuring trace amounts of alpha, beta and gamma-ray activity in effluent streams from nuclear waste cleanup processes. The previously designed, fabricated and tested phoswich detector [5] consisted of three scintillators placed on top of each other with a common diameter of 5.08 cm and viewed with a single photomultiplier tube. The scintillators (ZnS-0.00376 cm, CaF{sub 2}-0.254 cm and NaI-2.54 cm) interact preferentially with alpha, beta and gamma-ray radiation, respectively. This design allows preferential, but not exclusive, interaction of various radiations with specific layers. Taking into account and correcting for events that can occur in the ''wrong'' phosphor, this system was experimentally shown to have a 99% accuracy for properly identifying radiation coming from a mixed alpha/beta/gamma-ray source. In an attempt to better understand this system and provide design guidance for a detector system to be used in monitoring effluents from nuclear waste treatment facilities, this detector was modeled using MCNP [8]. This analysis [9] indicated that the thin ZnS layer adequately stops alpha particle energy, but greatly reduces beta detection efficiency to essentially zero at beta E{sub max} energies below 300 keV. The CaF{sub 2} layer, designed to keep any beta particle energy from entering the NaI detector results in an incorrect gamma-ray response that is approximately 23% of the NaI's response and is variable with energy. High energy beta events in the CaF{sub 2} can lead to Bremsstrahlung radiation being detected in the NaI. These errors must be corrected by system software.

Nathan Childress; William H. Miller

2002-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

399

Studies on discharges in Micro Pattern Gaseous Detectors, towards a spark resistant THGEM detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The problem afflicting any of MPGDs is the phenomenon of discharging which might be destructive in some highly energetic cases, at least being responsible of a slow aging of the detector. So far one solution has been cascading several gain elements (GEM, THGEM detectors) reducing the gain of each one; this method, spreading the charges along their path, reduce effectively the likelihood of a discharge but introduce more material due to the multiple stages of amplification. Our goal is developing a single stage THGEM detector which could withstand discharges, not reducing the gain, hence being still able to amplify low level ionizing particles while implementing some methodologies to reduce the damages due to discharge induced by high rate of particles’ flux and/or highly ionizing particles. This report describes the test bench set up to study discharges between simple structures, which are actually models of the bigger detector. The idea behind this approach is to reduce the complexity of the whole phenomen...

Cantini, Cosimo; De Oliveira, Rui

400

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol particle size  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Related InformationAcid RainTheimage ARM Dataparticle size ARM

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detector spot size" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Quasiparticle and Phonon Transport in Superconducting Particle Detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For over a decade now there has been much research into the use of superconductors in X-ray, gamma ray and other particle detectors. Detectors based on superconductor-insulator-superconductor(SIS) and superconductor-insulator-normal metal...

Burnell, Gavin

402

Radiation hardness of si strip detectors with integrated coupling capacitors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Si strip detectors with integrated coupling capacitors between diode and metallization and with separate bias resistors for each strip have been exposed to ionising radiation. Results from measurements of detector response before and after irradiation are presented.

Dijkstra, H.; Horisberger, R.; Hubbeling, L.; Maehlum, G.; Peisert, A.; Weilhammer, P.; Tuuva, T.; Evensen, L.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

ydrocarbon detector for the remote sensing of vehicle exhaust emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-nitrogen-cooled indium antimonide detectors, a rotating gas filter correlation cell which pre- cluded the simultaneous, and associated electronics. The new instrument uses four Peltier cooled lead selenide (PbSe) detectors, one each

Denver, University of

404

Test and characterization of a new triple-GEM detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In my thesis project, I provide a description of the entire process of materials preparation, assembly, testing, and characterization of several triple-GEM (Gas-Electron Multiplier) prototype detectors. GEM detectors ...

Burns, Laurie Davenport

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Fermilab | Web Cams | NOvA Far Detector  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Follow us on: Facebook Twitter NOvA Far Detector Live Webcam Detector Hall Looking Downstream This text will be replaced View this full feed on Twitter @NOvANuz Twitter Feed...

406

Superconducting Tunnel Junctions as Direct Detectors for Submillimeter Astronomy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Superconducting Tunnel Junctions as Direct Detectors for Submillimeter Astronomy A Dissertation 2008 by John Daniel Teufel. All rights reserved. #12;Abstract Superconducting Tunnel Junctions on the of performance of superconducting tunnel junctions (STJ) as direct detectors for submillimeter radiation. Over

407

Multi-user CDMA detectors for its applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

multistage detector. Also, less degradation of the performance can be achieved for multipath and fading channels with these new detectors. The choice of spreading sequences, inherent to the spread spectrum CDMA technique, is directly linked to the performance...

Louichon, Franck

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

NEET Micro-Pocket Fission Detector -- FY 2012 Status Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A research program has been initiated by the NEET program for developing and testing compact miniature fission chambers capable of simultaneously measuring thermal neutron flux, fast neutron flux and temperature within a single package. When implemented, these sensors will significantly advance flux detection capabilities for irradiation tests in US Materials Test Reactors (MTRs).Ultimately, evaluations may lead to a more compact, more accurate, and longer lifetime flux sensor for critical mock-ups, high performance reactors and commercial nuclear power plants. Deployment of Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (MPFDs) in US DOE-NE program irradiation tests will address several challenges: Current fission chamber technologies do not offer the ability to measure fast flux, thermal flux and temperature within a single compact probe, MPFDs offer this option. MPFD construction is very different then current fission chamber construction; the use of high temperature materials allow MPFDs to be specifically tailored to survive harsh conditions in typical high performance MTR irradiation tests. New high-fidelity reactor physics codes will need a small, accurate, multipurpose in-core sensor to validate the codes without perturbing the validation experiment; MPFDs fill this requirement. MPFDs can be built with variable sensitivities to survive the lifetime of an experiment or fuel assembly in some MTRs; allowing for more efficient and cost effective power monitoring. The small size of the MPFDs allows multiple sensors to be simultaneously deployed; obtaining data required to visualize the reactor flux and temperature profiles. This report summarizes the research progress for year 1 of this 3 year project. An updated design of the MPFD has been developed, materials and tools to support the new design have been procured, construction methods to support the new design have been initiated at INL’s HTTL and KSU’s SMART Laboratory, plating methods are being updated at KSU, new detector electronics have been designed, built and tested at KSU. In addition, a project meeting was held at KSU and a detector evaluation plan has been initiated between INL and KSU. Once NEET program evaluations are completed, the final MPFD will be deployed in MTR irradiations, enabling DOE-NE programs evaluating the performance of candidate new fuels and materials to better characterize irradiation test conditions.

Troy Unruh; Joy Rempe; Douglas McGregor; Philip Ugorowski; Michael Reichenberger

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

The Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay: The Case for Germanium Detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An overview of the current status of Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay is presented, emphasizing on the case of Germanium Detectors.

A. Morales; J. Morales

2002-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

410

Status and performance of the CDF Run II silicon detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CDF silicon detector is one of the largest silicon detectors in operation. It has a total of 722,432 electronic channels, and it covers a sensor surface area of 6 m{sup 2}. The detector has been operating reliably for five years, and it has recorded 1.5 fb{sup -1} of data. This article discusses experiences of operating such a large, complex system as well as the longevity of the detector.

Maki, Tuula; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Development of a Focusing DIRC Detector for Particle Identification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have constructed a prototype Direct Ring Imaging ? Cerenkov (DIRC) detector in our optics lab to study its performance for identifying pions and kaons. This type of detector will be used for the Belle II experiment now under construction at the KEK laboratory in Japan. To test our prototype, we have constructed a cosmic ray telescope (CRT) that is able to trigger on and reconstruct cosmic ray tracks. We require that the tracks traverse the DIRC detector and study the resulting detector response.

Schwartz, Alan J. [University of Cincinnati] [University of Cincinnati

2014-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

412

MONTE CARLO CALCULATIONS OF LR115 DETECTOR RESPONSE TO 222  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(4):414­419; 2000 Key words: Monte Carlo; radon progeny; detector, alpha- track; thoron INTRODUCTION THE LR115

Yu, K.N.

413

Advances in InGaAs/InP single-photon detector systems for quantum communication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Single-photon detectors (SPDs) are the most sensitive instruments for light detection. In the near-infrared range, SPDs based on III-V compound semiconductor avalanche photodiodes have been extensively used during the past two decades for diverse applications due to their advantages in practicality including small size, low cost and easy operation. In the past decade, the rapid developments and increasing demands in quantum information science have served as key drivers to improve the device performance of single-photon avalanche diodes and to invent new avalanche quenching techniques. This Review aims to introduce the technology advances of InGaAs/InP single-photon detector systems in the telecom wavelengths and the relevant quantum communication applications, and particularly to highlight recent emerging techniques such as high-frequency gating at GHz rates and free-running operation using negative-feedback avalanche diodes. Future perspectives of both the devices and quenching techniques are summarized.

Zhang, Jun; Zbinden, Hugo; Pan, Jian-Wei

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Advances in InGaAs/InP single-photon detector systems for quantum communication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Single-photon detectors (SPDs) are the most sensitive instruments for light detection. In the near-infrared range, SPDs based on III-V compound semiconductor avalanche photodiodes have been extensively used during the past two decades for diverse applications due to their advantages in practicality including small size, low cost and easy operation. In the past decade, the rapid developments and increasing demands in quantum information science have served as key drivers to improve the device performance of single-photon avalanche diodes and to invent new avalanche quenching techniques. This Review aims to introduce the technology advances of InGaAs/InP single-photon detector systems in the telecom wavelengths and the relevant quantum communication applications, and particularly to highlight recent emerging techniques such as high-frequency gating at GHz rates and free-running operation using negative-feedback avalanche diodes. Future perspectives of both the devices and quenching techniques are summarized.

Jun Zhang; Mark A. Itzler; Hugo Zbinden; Jian-Wei Pan

2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

415

Static detectors and circular-geodesic detectors on the Schwarzschild black hole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the response of an Unruh-DeWitt particle detector coupled to a massless scalar field on the (3+1)-dimensional Schwarzschild spacetime, in the Boulware, Hartle-Hawking and Unruh states, for static detectors and detectors on circular geodesics, by primarily numerical methods. For the static detector, the response in the Hartle-Hawking state exhibits the known thermality at the local Hawking temperature, and the response in the Unruh state is thermal at the local Hawking temperature in the limit of a large detector energy gap. For the circular-geodesic detector, we find evidence of thermality in the limit of a large energy gap for the Hartle-Hawking and Unruh states, at a temperature that exceeds the Doppler-shifted local Hawing temperature. Detailed quantitative comparisons between the three states are given. The response in the Hartle-Hawking state is compared with the response in the Minkowski vacuum and in the Minkowski thermal state for the corresponding Rindler, drifted Rindler, and circularly accelerated trajectories. The analysis takes place within first-order perturbation theory and relies in an essential way on stationarity.

Lee Hodgkinson; Jorma Louko; Adrian C. Ottewill

2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

416

Effect of Te Inclusions on Internal Electric Field of CdMnTe Gamma-Ray Detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We studied two separate as-grown CdMnTe crystals by Infrared (IR) microscopy and Pockels effect imaging, and then developed an algorithm to analyze and visualize the electric field within the crystals’ bulk. In one of the two crystals the size and distribution of inclusions within the bulk promised to be more favorable in terms of efficiency as a detector crystal. However, the Te inclusions were arranged in characteristic ‘planes’. Pockels imaging revealed an accumulation of charges in the region of these planes. We demonstrated that the planes induced stress within the bulk of the crystal that accumulated charges, thereby causing non-uniformity of the internal electric field and degrading the detector’s performance.

Babalola, O.S.; Bolotnikov, A.; Egarievwe, S.; Hossain, A.; Burger, A.; James, R.

2009-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

417

Neutral Current Detectors for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3 Neutral Current Detectors for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory Peter Michael Thornewell Lincoln), a 1,000 tonne heavy water Cerenkov detector presently under construction. This detector will measure the 8B e flux and energy spectrum via a pure charge current reaction, and independently the 8B total

Waltham, Chris

418

Avoiding the Detector Blinding Attack on Quantum Cryptography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show the detector blinding attack by Lydersen et al [1] will be ineffective on most single photon avalanche photodiodes (APDs) and certainly ineffective on any detectors that are operated correctly. The attack is only successful if a redundant resistor is included in series with the APD, or if the detector discrimination levels are set inappropriately.

Z L Yuan; J F Dynes; A J Shields

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

419

ASTRO-F/FIS Observing Simulation Including Detector Characteristics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASTRO-F/FIS Observing Simulation Including Detector Characteristics Woong-Seob Jeong1, Soojong Pak1 simulations to examined the detector characteristics on the FIS instrument (Far- Infrared Surveyor) images narrow and wide bands using a short wavelength (SW) and long wavelength (LW) detector array. The FIS (Far

Lee, Hyung Mok

420

The evaluation of resistance of seedling alfalfa varieties and strains to the spotted alfalfa aphid, Therioaphis maculata (Buckton)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Evaluation of Resistance oi Seedling Alfalfa Varieties and Strains to the Spotted Alfalfa Aphid, ~ggj, ~a~ Eggg~g (Buck- ton) EILFRED J. KLEi~KlT A Thesis Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural aud Mechanical College of Texas... in partial 1'ulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER UF SCIEECE January 1960 Major Subject: Entomology The Evaluation of Raeietance of SeecG. Lag Alfalfa Varietiee and ~trains to the Spotted Alfalfa Aphid& (3~ton) A Thesis By 4'iifred...

Klement, Wilfred John

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detector spot size" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

03.03.2008 DPG-Frhjahrstagung Freiburg 1 The HERMES Recoil DetectorThe HERMES Recoil Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PID detectors Track detectors #12;03.03.2008 DPG-FrĂĽhjahrstagung Freiburg 5 ~15% overall background-FrĂĽhjahrstagung Freiburg 9 Silicon Strip Detector (SSD) 16 double sided sensors inside beam vacuum around the beam 2 layers of sensors, each sensor has the area of 97mmx97mm, thickness =300um #12;03.03.2008 DPG

422

Impact of tool wear on joint strength in friction stir spot welding of DP 980 steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Friction stir spot welding has been shown to be a viable method of joining ultra high strength steel (UHSS), both in terms of joint strength and process cycle time. However, the cost of tooling must be reasonable in order for this method to be adopted as an industrial process. Recently a new tool alloy has been developed, using a blend of PCBN and tungsten rhenium (W-Re) in order to improve the toughness of the tool. Wear testing results are presented for two of these alloys: one with a composition of 60% PCBN and 40% W-Re, and one with 70% PCBN and 30% W-Re. The sheet material used for all wear testing was 1.4 mm DP 980. Lap shear testing was used to show the relationship between tool wear and joint strength. The Q70 tool provided the best combination of wear resistance and joint strength.

Miles, Michael; Ridges, Chris; Hovanski, Yuri; Peterson, Jeremy; Santella, M. L.; Steel, Russel

2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

423

On the development of nugget growth model for resistance spot welding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we developed a general mathematical model to estimate the nugget growth process based on the heat energy delivered into the welds by the resistance spot welding. According to the principles of thermodynamics and heat transfer, and the effect of electrode force during the welding process, the shape of the nugget can be estimated. Then, a mathematical model between heat energy absorbed and nugget diameter can be obtained theoretically. It is shown in this paper that the nugget diameter can be precisely described by piecewise fractal polynomial functions. Experiments were conducted with different welding operation conditions, such as welding currents, workpiece thickness, and widths, to validate the model and the theoretical analysis. All the experiments confirmed that the proposed model can predict the nugget diameters with high accuracy based on the input heat energy to the welds.

Zhou, Kang, E-mail: zhoukang326@126.com, E-mail: melcai@ust.hk; Cai, Lilong, E-mail: zhoukang326@126.com, E-mail: melcai@ust.hk [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

424

Germanium blocked impurity band far infrared detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum has been of interest to scientist since the eighteenth century when Sir William Herschel discovered the infrared as he measured temperatures in the sun's spectrum and found that there was energy beyond the red. In the late nineteenth century, Thomas Edison established himself as the first infrared astronomer to look beyond the solar system when he observed the star Arcturus in the infrared. Significant advances in infrared technology and physics, long since Edison's time, have resulted in many scientific developments, such as the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) which was launched in 1983, semiconductor infrared detectors for materials characterization, military equipment such as night-vision goggles and infrared surveillance equipment. It is now planned that cooled semiconductor infrared detectors will play a major role in the ''Star Wars'' nuclear defense scheme proposed by the Reagan administration.

Rossington, C.S.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Empirical analysis of the spot market implications ofprice-elastic demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regardless of the form of restructuring, deregulated electricity industries share one common feature: the absence of any significant, rapid demand-side response to the wholesale (or, spotmarket) price. For a variety of reasons, electricity industries continue to charge most consumers an average cost based on regulated retail tariff from the era of vertical integration, even as the retailers themselves are forced to purchase electricity at volatile wholesale prices set in open markets. This results in considerable price risk for retailers, who are sometimes forbidden by regulators from signing hedging contracts. More importantly, because end-users do not perceive real-time (or even hourly or daily) fluctuations in the wholesale price of electricity, they have no incentive to adjust their consumption in response to price signals. Consequently, demand for electricity is highly inelastic, and electricity generation resources can be stretched to the point where system stability is threatened. This, then, facilitates many other problems associated with electricity markets, such as market power and price volatility. Indeed, economic theory suggests that even modestly price-responsive demand can remove the stress on generation resources and decrease spot prices. To test this theory, we use actual generator bid data from the New York control area to construct supply stacks, and intersect them with demand curves of various slopes to approximate different levels of demand elasticity. We then estimate the potential impact of real-time pricing on the equilibrium spot price and quantity. These results indicate the immediate benefits that could be derived from a more price-elastic demand. Such analysis can provide policymakers with a measure of how effective price-elastic demand can potentially reduce prices and maintain consumption within the capability of generation resources.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Bartholomew, Emily S.; Marnay, Chris

2004-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

426

Empirical Analysis of the Spot Market Implications ofPrice-Responsive Demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regardless of the form of restructuring, deregulatedelectricity industries share one common feature: the absence of anysignificant, rapid demand-side response to the wholesale (or, spotmarket) price. For a variety of reasons, most electricity consumers stillpay an average cost based regulated retail tariff held over from the eraof vertical integration, even as the retailers themselves are oftenforced to purchase electricity at volatile wholesale prices set in openmarkets. This results in considerable price risk for retailers, who aresometimes additionally forbidden by regulators from signing hedgingcontracts. More importantly, because end-users do not perceive real-time(or even hourly or daily) fluctuations in the wholesale price ofelectricity, they have no incentive to adjust their consumptionaccordingly. Consequently, demand for electricity is highly inelastic,which together with the non storability of electricity that requiresmarket clearing over very short time steps spawn many other problemsassociated with electricity markets, such as exercise of market power andprice volatility. Indeed, electricity generation resources can bestretched to the point where system adequacy is threatened. Economictheory suggests that even modest price responsiveness can relieve thestress on generation resources and decrease spot prices. To quantify thiseffect, actual generator bid data from the New York control area is usedto construct supply stacks and intersect them with demand curves ofvarious slopes to approximate the effect of different levels of demandresponse. The potential impact of real-time pricing (RTP) on theequilibrium spot price and quantity is then estimated. These resultsindicate the immediate benefits that could be derived from a moreprice-responsive demand providing policymakers with a measure of howprices can be potentially reduced and consumption maintained within thecapability of generation assets.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Bartholomew, Emily S.; Marnay, Chris

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

High resolution collimator system for X-ray detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

High resolution in an X-ray computerized tomography (CT) inspection system is achieved by using a collimator/detector combination to limit the beam width of the X-ray beam incident on a detector element to the desired resolution width. In a detector such as a high pressure Xenon detector array, a narrow tapered collimator is provided above a wide detector element. The collimator slits have any desired width, as small as a few mils at the top, the slit width is easily controlled, and they are fabricated on standard machines. The slit length determines the slice thickness of the CT image.

Eberhard, Jeffrey W. (Schenectady, NY); Cain, Dallas E. (Scotia, NY)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Polyaniline-based optical ammonia detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Electronic absorption spectroscopy of a polyaniline film deposited on a polyethylene surface by chemical oxidation of aniline monomer at room temperature was used to quantitatively detect ammonia gas. The present optical ammonia gas detector was found to have a response time of less than 15 s, a regeneration time of less than 2 min. at room temperature, and a detection limit of 1 ppm (v/v) for ammonia, with a linear dynamic range from 180 ppm to 18,000 ppm.

Duan, Yixiang (Los Alamos, NM); Jin, Zhe (Los Alamos, NM); Su, Yongxuan (Los Alamos, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Noble Travails: Noble Liquid Dark Matter Detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, or water, 0.1x flux per 10 cm Cosmic Ray Muons generate high energy neutrons 50 MeV - 3 GeV which are toughGaitskell Noble Travails: Noble Liquid Dark Matter Detectors Rick Gaitskell Particle Astrophysics://particleastro.brown.edu/ http://gaitskell.brown.edu v1 #12;LUX Dark Matter Collaboration 2007 v01_7mm Dark Matter Theory

Golwala, Sunil

430

Recent results from the KEDR Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report results of experiments performed with the KEDR detector at the VEPP-4M e+e- collider. They include precise measurement of the D0 and D+- meson masses, determination of the psi(3770) resonance parameters, and a search for narrow resonances in e+e- annihilation at center-of-mass energies between 1.85 and 3.1 GeV.

Anashin, V V; Baldin, E M; Barladyan, A K; Barnyakov, A Yu; Barnyakov, M Yu; Baru, S E; Bedny, I V; Beloborodova, O L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bobrov, A V; Bobrovnikov, V S; Bogomyagkov, A V; Bondar, A E; Buzykaev, A R; Eidelman, S I; Glukhovchenko, Yu M; Gulevich, V V; Gusev, D V; Karnaev, S E; Karpov, S V; Kharlamova, T A; Kiselev, V A; Kononov, S A; Kotov, K Yu; Kravchenko, E A; Kulikov, V F; Kurkin, G Ya; Kuper, E A; Levichev, E B; Maksimov, D A; Malyshev, V M; Maslennikov, A L; Medvedko, A S; Meshkov, O I; Mishnev, S I; Morozov, I I; Muchnoi, N Yu; Neufeld, V V; Nikitin, S A; Nikolaev, I B; Okunev, I N; Onuchin, A P; Oreshkin, S B; Orlov, I O; Osipov, A A; Peleganchuk, S V; Pivovarov, S G; Piminov, P A; Petrov, V V; Poluektov, A O; Popkov, I N; Prisekin, V G; Ruban, A A; Sandyrev, V K; Savinov, G A; Shamov, A G; Shatilov, D N; Shwartz, B A; Simonov, E A; Sinyatkin, S V; Skovpen, Yu I; Skrinsky, A N; Smaluk, V V; Sokolov, A V; Sukharev, A M; Starostina, E V; Talyshev, A A; Tayursky, V A; Telnov, V I; Tikhonov, Yu A; Todyshev, K Yu; Tumaikin, G M; Usov, Yu V; Vorobiov, A I; Yushkov, A N; Zhilich, V N; Zhulanov, V V; Zhuravlev, A N

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Detector signal correction method and system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Corrective factors are applied so as to remove anomalous features from the signal generated by a photoconductive detector, and to thereby render the output signal highly linear with respect to the energy of incident, time-varying radiation. The corrective factors may be applied through the use of either digital electronic data processing means or analog circuitry, or through a combination of those effects. 5 figs.

Carangelo, R.M.; Duran, A.J.; Kudman, I.

1995-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

432

Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A detector for time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering includes a nearly constant diameter, evacuated linear tube having an end plate detector with a first fluorescent screen and concentric rings of first fiber optic bundles for low angle scattering detection and an annular detector having a second fluorescent screen and second fiber optic bundles concentrically disposed about the tube for higher angle scattering detection. With the scattering source, i.e., the specimen under investigation, located outside of the evacuated tube on the tube's longitudinal axis, scattered x-rays are detected by the fiber optic bundles, to each of which is coupled a respective photodetector, to provide a measurement resolution, i.e., dq/q, where q is the momentum transferred from an incident x-ray to an x-ray scattering specimen, of 2% over two (2) orders of magnitude in reciprocal space, i.e., q.sub.max /q.sub.min.congruent.100.

Hessler, Jan P. (Downers Grove, IL)

2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

433

MINOS near-detector coil design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 980-ton MINOS near detector will be installed in the new NuMI near hall at 100m below grade at Fermilab. It will be assembled from 282 1-inch thick steel plates. The planes are made from low carbon (1006), hot rolled steel and are toroidally magnetized. Each plane will be hung by two 'ears', which are extensions of the octagonal plane structure, similar to the hanging files in a file drawer. The plates have a center-to-center spacing of 5.94 cm. This document has been prepared for the 8/99 Conceptual Design Review of the MINOS near detector coil. It's main goal is to provide a set of references to previous documents and to assemble various design drawings and engineering calculations that have not been included in previous technical memos. It also provides some background material relevant for the coil implementation. Much of the text for this document is edited from the MINOS Detectors Technical Design Report.

Nelson, J.K.; /William-Mary Coll.; Kilmer, J.; /Fermilab

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Constraining solar hidden photons using HPGe detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this Letter we report on the results of our search for photons from a U(1) gauge factor in the hidden sector of the full theory. With our experimental setup we observe the single spectrum in a HPGe detector arising as a result of the photoelectric-like absorption of hidden photons emitted from the Sun on germanium atoms inside the detector. The main ingredient of the theory used in our analysis, a severely constrained kinetic mixing from the two U(1) gauge factors and massive hidden photons, entails both photon into hidden state oscillations and a minuscule coupling of hidden photons to visible matter, of which the latter our experimental setup has been designed to observe. On a theoretical side, full account was taken of the effects of refraction and damping of photons while propagating in Sun's interior as well as in the detector. We exclude hidden photons with kinetic couplings chi > (2.2 x 10^{-13}- 3 x 10^{-7}) in the mass region 0.2 eV < m_gamma' < 30 keV. Our constraints on the mixing parameter chi in the mass region from 20 eV up to 15 keV prove even slightly better then those obtained recently by using data from the CAST experiment, albeit still somewhat weaker than those obtained from solar and HB stars lifetime arguments.

R. Horvat; D. Kekez; M. Krcmar; Z. Krecak; A. Ljubicic

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

435

High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n-type, intrinsic, p-type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography. 18 figs.

Street, R.A.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.

1992-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

436

High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n type, intrinsic, p type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography.

Street, Robert A. (Palo Alto, CA); Kaplan, Selig N. (El Cerrito, CA); Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Lithium Loaded Glass Fiber Neutron Detector Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. The currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) from Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large neutron detector. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world and, thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Four technologies have been identified as being currently commercially available, potential alternative neutron detectors to replace the use of 3He in RPMs. Reported here are the results of tests of the lithium-loaded glass fibers option. This testing measured the neutron detection efficiency and gamma ray rejection capabilities of a small system manufactured by Nucsafe (Oak Ridge, TN).

Ely, James H.; Erikson, Luke E.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Stromswold, David C.

2009-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

438

Cryogenic Silicon Microstrip Detector Modules for LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CERN is presently constructing the LHC, which will produce collisions of 7 TeV protons in 4 interaction points at a design luminosity of 1034 cm-2 s-1. The radiation dose resulting from the operation at high luminosity will cause a serious deterioration of the silicon tracker performance. The state-of-art silicon microstrip detectors can tolerate a fluence of about 3 1014 cm-2 of hadrons or charged leptons. This is insufficient, however, for long-term operation in the central parts of the LHC trackers, in particular after the possible luminosity upgrade of the LHC. By operating the detectors at cryogenic temperatures the radiation hardness can be improved by a factor 10. This work proposes a cryogenic microstrip detector module concept which has the features required for the microstrip trackers of the upgraded LHC experiments at CERN. The module can hold an edgeless sensor, being a good candidate for improved luminosity and total cross-section measurements in the ATLAS, CMS and TOTEM experiments. The design o...

Perea-Solano, B

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Docket No. PA02-2-000 Price Manipulation in Western MarketsV-1 V. The Influence of Electricity Spot Prices on Electricity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Electricity Spot Prices on Electricity Forward Prices Summary of Results The vital link between the spot price electric prices today and the forward price of electricity. Instead, forward prices should mostly reflect electricity in the West, forward gas prices should, in large part, explain forward electricity prices. Our

Laughlin, Robert B.

440

Genome Size Varaiation in D. melanogaster  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in genome size may account for some of the missing heritability. We measured female genome sizes for 34 Drosophila melanogaster inbred strains that derived from isofemale lines established from a natural population in Raleigh, NC, in addition to a group...

Alfrejd, Benjamin

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detector spot size" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Strategic Behavior in Spot Markets for Electricity when Load is Stochastic Department of Agricultural, Resource, and Managerial Economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strategic Behavior in Spot Markets for Electricity when Load is Stochastic T.D. Mount Department of market power to raise prices above competitive levels in the UK market for electricity has been discussed in an electricity market. In spite of this abundant evidence, regulators in the USA have been relatively unconcerned

442

Assessing the Degree of Spot Market Integration For U.S. Natural Gas: Evidence from Daily Price Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

following the FERC's `open access' reforms of the late 1980s. Daily spot prices at 76 market locations from segmented from the more loosely integrated Western market. Thus, although the FERC reforms have contributed Commission (FERC) implemented a series of far-reaching regulatory reforms. These reforms were designed

443

P~!ETRIC STUDY OF HEAT FLOW DURING RESISTANCE SPOT WELDING Euiwhan Kim and Thomas W. Eagar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i ...) P~!ETRIC STUDY OF HEAT FLOW DURING RESISTANCE SPOT WELDING Euiwhan Kim and Thomas W. Eagar case of resistance welding to see the effects of each parameter on the lobe shape. The parameters include material proper- ties, geometry of electrodes and work piece, weld time and current

Eagar, Thomas W.

444

23. Gray{Scott equations Patterns are everywhere in nature. Examples include spots on butter ies, stripes on zebras, tri-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

23. Gray{Scott equations Patterns are everywhere in nature. Examples include spots on butter ies variety. The Gray{Scott equations were formulated originally by Gray and Scott in 1983; we shall advantage of this principle. References P. Gray and S. K. Scott, papers in Chem. Eng. Sci. 38 (1983), 29

Trefethen, Nick

445

The sweet spot of forward osmosis: Treatment of produced water, drilling wastewater, and other complex and difficult liquid streams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and especially oil and gas (O&G) exploration and production wastewaters. High salt concentrations, decentralized generated during exploration and production (E&P) (e.g., drilling muds, hydraulic fracturing flowback water processes, have identified its sweet spot: treatment and desalination of complex industrial streams

446

Instabilities of a three-dimensional localized spot Marcin Leda, Vladimir K. Vanag, and Irving R. Epstein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Zhabotinsky reaction in water-in-oil microemulsion. We find three types of instabili- ties: splitting of a single spot be classified as either supercritical or subcritical. In reaction-diffusion systems, supercritical instabilities of a ho- mogeneous steady state SS can give rise to small-amplitude patterns, while subcritical

Epstein, Irving R.

447

Introduction The composition and size of atmospheric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of nearly an order of magnitude in all size bins, with pronounced increases in larger size bins. · The Raman&M University Chart 1: The 0.3 m size bin exceeds 1x10 particles per 0.5000ft³ and particle count overlaps. Chart 2: The 0.3m bin count predominates and there are significant differences between size bin counts

448

Comparative study of ionization chamber detectors vis-a-vis a CCD detector for dispersive XAS measurement in transmission geometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have designed and fabricated parallel plate ionization chamber detectors and voltage vs. current characteristics (V-I curve) of the detectors were recorded with synchrotron radiation to qualify for use in X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) measurements. After qualifying the ionization chambers, the detectors were used in the dispersive EXAFS beamline (BL-08) at INDUS-2 SRS in Turbo-XAS geometry. Using the same setup and under the same setting, XAS spectra were also recorded with a CCD detector and the observation on relative performance of the ionization chamber vis-a-vis the CCD detector is presented in this paper.

Poswal, A. K.; Agrawal, A.; Bhattachryya, D.; Jha, S. N.; Sahoo, N. K. [Applied Spectroscopy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai -400 085 (India)

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

449

Improved generator and detector of millimeter waves for use in microwave spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the corrosion problem were necessary. Tungsten wire was nickel plated and soldered in place. A pair of probes having solidered connections between tungsten and brass was made and tested. Not only were they appreciably more efficient in energy output.... It was necessary to solder small pieces of the slabs to the crystal mounting block and to grind them to the proper size for use as detector and generator crystals. Silicon semiconductor must first be nickel plated before it can be soldered. The nickel plating...

Tolberg, Wesley Edward

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

On the possibility to use ATLAS and CMS detectors for neutrino physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energetic primary cosmic rays entering the Earth's atmosphere generate flux of secondary particles including neutrinos. Muon neutrinos passed through the Earth and produced muons via the charged current reaction can be registered by experimental setups intended for the measurements with colliding beams. Due to large geometrical size and advanced muon detecting system such detectors as ATLAS and CMS on LHC have chance to contribute also into the neutrino physics. The estimation of possible rates of up-going muons produced by neutrinos is given.

A. Guskov

2009-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

451

Alignment of the Near Detector scintillator modules using cosmic ray muons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors describe the procedures and the results of the first alignment of the Near Detector. Using 15.5 million cosmic ray muon tracks, collected from October, 2004 through early january, 2005, they derive the effective transverse positions of the calorimeter scintillator modules. The residuals from straight line fits indicate that the current alignment has achieved better than 1 mm precision. They estimate the size of the remaining misalignment and using tracks recorded with a magnetic field test the effect of the magnetic field on the alignment.

Ospanov, Rustem; Lang, Karol; /Texas U.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

7, 1074310766, 2007 EC size distributions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 7, 10743­10766, 2007 EC size distributions in an urban atmosphere in China Xiao-Feng Huang a Creative Commons License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Size distributions of elemental Correspondence to: Jian Zhen Yu (chjianyu@ust.hk) 10743 #12;ACPD 7, 10743­10766, 2007 EC size distributions

Boyer, Edmond

453

6, 1184511875, 2006 A new SIze REsolved  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the aerosol size distribution into sections and solves the GDE by splitting coagulation and condensation Interactive Discussion EGU that affect the aerosol size/composition distribution are therefore crucial. ThreeACPD 6, 11845­11875, 2006 A new SIze REsolved Aerosol Model E. Debry et al. Title Page Abstract

Boyer, Edmond

454

ATRC Neutron Detector Testing Quick Look Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) program, a joint Idaho State University (ISU) / French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) / Idaho National Laboratory (INL) project was initiated in FY-10 to investigate the feasibility of using neutron sensors to provide online measurements of the neutron flux and fission reaction rate in the ATR Critical Facility (ATRC). A second objective was to provide initial neutron spectrum and flux distribution information for physics modeling and code validation using neutron activation based techniques in ATRC as well as ATR during depressurized operations. Detailed activation spectrometry measurements were made in the flux traps and in selected fuel elements, along with standard fission rate distribution measurements at selected core locations. These measurements provide additional calibration data for the real-time sensors of interest as well as provide benchmark neutronics data that will be useful for the ATR Life Extension Program (LEP) Computational Methods and V&V Upgrade project. As part of this effort, techniques developed by Prof. George Imel will be applied by Idaho State University (ISU) for assessing the performance of various flux detectors to develop detailed procedures for initial and follow-on calibrations of these sensors. In addition to comparing data obtained from each type of detector, calculations will be performed to assess the performance of and reduce uncertainties in flux detection sensors and compare data obtained from these sensors with existing integral methods employed at the ATRC. The neutron detectors required for this project were provided to team participants at no cost. Activation detectors (foils and wires) from an existing, well-characterized INL inventory were employed. Furthermore, as part of an on-going ATR NSUF international cooperation, the CEA sent INL three miniature fission chambers (one for detecting fast flux and two for detecting thermal flux) with associated electronics for assessment. In addition, Prof. Imel, ISU, has access to an inventory of Self-Powered Neutron Detectors (SPNDs) with a range of response times as well as Back-to-Back (BTB) fission chambers from prior research he conducted at the Transient REActor Test Facility (TREAT) facility and Neutron RADiography (NRAD) reactors. Finally, SPNDs from the National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina (CNEA) were provided in connection with the INL effort to upgrade ATR computational methods and V&V protocols that are underway as part of the ATR LEP. Work during fiscal year 2010 (FY10) focussed on design and construction of Experiment Guide Tubes (EGTs) for positioning the flux detectors in the ATRC N-16 locations as well as obtaining ATRC staff concurrence for the detector evaluations. Initial evaluations with CEA researchers were also started in FY10 but were cut short due to reactor reliability issues. Reactor availability issues caused experimental work to be delayed during FY11/12. In FY13, work resumed; and evaluations were completed. The objective of this "Quick Look" report is to summarize experimental activities performed from April 4, 2013 through May 16, 2013.

Troy C. Unruh; Benjamin M. Chase; Joy L. Rempe

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Sensitivity of DANSS detector to short range neutrino oscillations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DANSS is a highly segmented $1m^3$ plastic scintillator detector. Its 2500 scintillator strips have a Gd loaded reflective cover. Light is collected with 3 wave length shifting fibers per strip and read out with 50 PMTs and 2500 SiPMs. The DANSS will be installed under the industrial 3GW$_{th}$ reactor of the Kalinin Nuclear Power Plant at distances varying from 9.7m to 12.2m from the reactor core. PMTs and SiPMs collect about 30 photo electrons per MeV distributed approximately equally between two types of the readout. Light collection non-uniformity across and along the strip is about $\\pm13\\%$ from maximum to minimum. The resulting energy resolution is modest, $\\sigma/E=15\\%$ at 5MeV. This leads to a smearing of the oscillation pattern comparable with the smearing due to the large size of the reactor core. Nevertheless because of the large counting rate ($\\sim 10000$ / day), small background ($<1\\%$) and good control of systematic uncertainties due to frequent changes of positions, the DANSS is quite se...

Danilov, Mikhail

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Nuclear structure through moment measurements: Exploiting ?-ray detector arrays with ancillary detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental methods to measure the magnetic moments of short-lived excited states in beams of rare isotopes are outlined. The emphasis is on the so-called High-Velocity Transient-Field (HVTF) and the Recoil in Vacuum (RIV) methods, and the role of ?-ray detector arrays with ancillary detectors. Insights into the structure of neutron-rich nuclei through such measurements on radioactive beams are discussed. Opportunities for the future development of these techniques, for applications to both stable and radioactive beams, are explored.

Stuchbery, Andrew E. [Department of Nuclear Physics, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

457

Three-component borehole wall-locking seismic detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A seismic detector for boreholes is described that has an accelerometer sensor block for sensing vibrations in geologic formations of the earth. The density of the seismic detector is approximately matched to the density of the formations in which the detector is utilized. A simple compass is used to orient the seismic detector. A large surface area shoe having a radius approximately equal to the radius of the borehole in which the seismic detector is located may be pushed against the side of the borehole by actuating cylinders contained in the seismic detector. Hydraulic drive of the cylinders is provided external to the detector. By using the large surface area wall-locking shoe, force holding the seismic detector in place is distributed over a larger area of the borehole wall thereby eliminating concentrated stresses. Borehole wall-locking forces up to ten times the weight of the seismic detector can be applied thereby ensuring maximum detection frequency response up to 2,000 hertz using accelerometer sensors in a triaxial array within the seismic detector.

Owen, Thomas E. (Helotes, TX)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

PIN detector arrays and integrated readout circuitry on high-resistivity float-zone silicon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new silicon PIN-diode-based pixel detector for ionizing particles integrating a two-dimensional array of detecting elements with readout circuitry has been developed and extensively tested. The signal charge is collected on a low-capacitance electrode avoiding loss of charge into the local readout circuitry within each pixel. The spatial resolution for a given circuitry size is optimized. The approach required back side patterning of the wafer, the only nonconventional part in the Stanford BiCMOS based manufacturing process. Thirteen masks on the front side of the wafer and three on the back yielded both CMOS readout circuitry and detecting elements. A gettering step helped obtain a high minority carrier lifetime (500 [mu]s). Test results obtained by infrared illumination, gamma rays, and high-energy particles, which have been described in detail elsewhere, will be summarized. They include a signal to single-channel-noise performance of about 150 to 1 for a minimum ionizing particle, which is an order of magnitude better than silicon strip detectors currently used, and a record-breaking spatial resolution in the direction of smallest pixel pitch (standard deviation of about 1.8 [mu]m). The authors describe the device and chip operation of the new detector in detail.

Snoeys, W.; Plummer, J. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Center for Integrated Systems); Parker, S.; Kenney, C. (Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States). Dept. of Physics)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

3D Particle Track Reconstrution in a Single Layer Cadmium-Telluride Hybrid Active Pixel Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the past 20 years the search for neutrinoless double beta decay has driven many developements in all kind of detector technology. A new branch in this field are highly-pixelated semiconductor detectors - such as the CdTe-Timepix detectors. It compromises a cadmium-telluride sensor of 14 mm x 14 mm x 1 mm size with an ASIC which has 256 x 256 pixel of 55 \\textmu m pixel pitch and can be used to obtain either spectroscopic or timing information in every pixel. In regular operation it can provide a 2D projection of particle trajectories; however, three dimensional trajectories are desirable for neutrinoless double beta decay and other applications. In this paper we present a method to obtain such trajectories. The method was developed and tested with simulations that assume some minor modifications to the Timepix ASIC. Also, we were able to test the method experimentally and in the best case achieved a position resolution of about 90 \\textmu m with electrons of 4.4 GeV.

Filipenko, Mykhaylo; Anton, Gisela; Michel, Thilo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Characterization studies of Silicon Photomultipliers and crystals matrices for a novel time of flight PET detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes the characterization of crystal matrices and silicon photomultiplier arrays for a novel Positron Emission Tomography (PET) detector, namely the external plate of the EndoTOFPET-US system. The EndoTOFPET-US collaboration aims to integrate Time-Of-Flight PET with ultrasound endoscopy in a novel multimodal device, capable to support the development of new biomarkers for prostate and pancreatic tumors. The detector consists in two parts: a PET head mounted on an ultrasound probe and an external PET plate. The challenging goal of 1 mm spatial resolution for the PET image requires a detector with small crystal size, and therefore high channel density: 4096 LYSO crystals individually readout by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) make up the external plate. The quality and properties of these components must be assessed before the assembly. The dark count rate, gain, breakdown voltage and correlated noise of the SiPMs are measured, while the LYSO crystals are evaluated in terms of light yield and en...

Auffray, Etiennette; Cortinovis, Daniele; Doroud, Katayoun; Garutti, Erika; Lecoq, Paul; Liu, Zheng; Martinez, Rosana; Paganoni, Marco; Pizzichemi, Marco; Silenzi, Alessandro; Xu, Chen; Zvolský, Milan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detector spot size" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

A threshold type Cerenkov radiation detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 3 The Cerenkov cone, and the field vectors. I , "9 / / L 5! D. The General Plan c the Present Work. The intensities of high-energy cosmic ray muons are being studied at Texas Assai University. A detector that would detect only the hign... study of the effect. One of his important accomplishments was distinguishing it from fluorescence and phosphorescence. 5 In 1934 P. A. Cerenkov started an exhaustive four~ear study of the phenomenon which is now named after him. His experiments were...

Winningham, John David

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Coherent Transition Radiation in Askaryan radio detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the coherent transition radiation emitted by a macroscopic bunch of particles with a net charge traversing the boundary of two different media. The obtained expression is compared to the emission from a relativistically moving steady charge, as well the emission from a time-varying charge or current. As a first application, we discuss the transition radiation from high-energy cosmic-ray induced air showers hitting Earth's surface before the cascade has died out in the atmosphere. The induced emission gives rise to a radio signal which should be detectable in the currently operating Askaryan radio detectors built to search for the GZK neutrino flux.

de Vries, Krijn D; van Eijndhoven, Nick; Meures, Thomas; O'Murchadha, Aongus; Scholten, Olaf

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Large volume flow-through scintillating detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A large volume flow through radiation detector for use in large air flow situations such as incinerator stacks or building air systems comprises a plurality of flat plates made of a scintillating material arranged parallel to the air flow. Each scintillating plate has a light guide attached which transfers light generated inside the scintillating plate to an associated photomultiplier tube. The output of the photomultiplier tubes are connected to electronics which can record any radiation and provide an alarm if appropriate for the application.

Gritzo, Russ E. (Los Alamos, NM); Fowler, Malcolm M. (Los Alamos, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Detectors and Sensors | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape, Density, andagingaboutDrizzlethiolOfficerDetectors

465

Hydrogen Contamination Detector Workshop | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy Health and ProductivityEnergyEnergyHybridAnalysisContamination Detector

466

Sandia National Laboratories: terahertz sources and detectors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmitted for USMaterialstheterahertz sources and detectors Jerry Simmons

467

Investigation of a direction sensitive sapphire detector stack at the 5 GeV electron beam at DESY-II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extremely radiation hard sensors are needed in particle physics experiments to instrument the region near the beam pipe. Examples are beam halo and beam loss monitoring systems at the Large Hadron Collider, FLASH or XFEL. Artificial diamond sensors are currently widely used as sensors in these systems. In this paper single crystal sapphire sensors are considered as a promising alternative. Industrially grown sapphire wafers are available in large sizes, are of low cost and, like diamond sensors, can be operated without cooling. Here we present results of an irradiation study done with sapphire sensors in a high intensity low energy electron beam. Then, a multichannel direction-sensitive sapphire detector stack is described. It comprises 8 sapphire plates of 1 cm^2 size and 525 micrometer thickness, metallized on both sides, and apposed to form a stack. Each second metal layer is supplied with a bias voltage, and the layers in between are connected to charge-sensitive preamplifiers. The performance of the detector was studied in a 5 GeV electron beam. The charge collection efficiency of the sensors was measured as a function of the bias voltage. It rises with the voltage, reaching about 10 % at 950 V. The signal size obtained from an electron crossing the stack at this voltage is about 22000 e, where e is the unit charge. Using the EUDET beam telescope, beam electrons trajectories where reconstructed, allowing to determine the position of the hits on the detector. The signal size is measured as a function of the hit position, showing variations of up to 20 % in the direction perpendicular to the beam and to the electric field. The measurement of the signal size as a function of the coordinate parallel to the electric field confirms the prediction that mainly electrons contribute to the signal. Also evidence for the presence of a polarization field was observed.

O. Karacheban; K. Afanaciev; M. Hempel; H. Henschel; W. Lange; J. L. Leonard; I. Levy; W. Lohmann; S. Schuwalow

2015-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

468

Can selection on nest size from nest predation explain the latitudinal gradient in clutch size?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Can selection on nest size from nest predation explain the latitudinal gradient in clutch size. 2. The nest size hypothesis posits that higher nest predation in the tropics favours selection for smaller nests and thereby constrains clutch size by shrinking available space for eggs and/or nestlings

Martin, Thomas E.

469

Instrumented Water Tanks can Improve Air Shower Detector Sensitivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Previous works have shown that water Cherenkov detectors have superior sensitivity to those of scintillation counters as applied to detecting extensive air showers (EAS). This is in large part due to their much higher sensitivity to EAS photons which are more than five times more numerous than EAS electrons. Large area water Cherenkov detectors can be constructed relatively cheaply and operated reliably. A sparse detector array has been designed which uses these types of detectors to substantially increase the area over which the Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory collects EAS information. Improvements to the Milagro detector's performance characteristics and sensitivity derived from this array and preliminary results from a prototype array currently installed near the Milagro detector will be presented.

Atkins, R; Berley, D; Chen, M L; Coyne, D G; Delay, R S; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Evans, D; Falcone, A D; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gisler, G; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hoffman, C M; Hugenberger, S; Kelley, L A; Leonor, I; Macri, J R; McConnell, M; McCullough, J F; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Ryan, J M; Schneider, M; Shen, B; Shoup, A L; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Thompson, T N; Tümer, T O; Wang, K; Wascko, M O; Westerhoff, S; Williams, D A; Yang, T; Yodh, G B

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Localization of gravitational wave sources with networks of advanced detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coincident observations with gravitational wave (GW) detectors and other astronomical instruments are among the main objectives of the experiments with the network of LIGO, Virgo, and GEO detectors. They will become a necessary part of the future GW astronomy as the next generation of advanced detectors comes online. The success of such joint observations directly depends on the source localization capabilities of the GW detectors. In this paper we present studies of the sky localization of transient GW sources with the future advanced detector networks and describe their fundamental properties. By reconstructing sky coordinates of ad hoc signals injected into simulated detector noise, we study the accuracy of the source localization and its dependence on the strength of injected signals, waveforms, and network configurations.

Klimenko, S.; Mitselmakher, G.; Pankow, C. [University of Florida, P.O. Box 118440, Gainesville, Florida, 32611 (United States); Vedovato, G. [INFN, Sezione di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Drago, M.; Prodi, G. [University of Trento, Physics Department and INFN, Gruppo Collegato di Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Mazzolo, G.; Salemi, F. [Max Planck Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Callinstrasse 38, 30167 Hannover and Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Hannover (Germany); Re, V. [INFN, Sezione di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Yakushin, I. [LIGO Livingston Observatory, Louisiana (United States)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

471

Instrumented Water Tanks can Improve Air Shower Detector Sensitivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Previous works have shown that water Cherenkov detectors have superior sensitivity to those of scintillation counters as applied to detecting extensive air showers (EAS). This is in large part due to their much higher sensitivity to EAS photons which are more than five times more numerous than EAS electrons. Large area water Cherenkov detectors can be constructed relatively cheaply and operated reliably. A sparse detector array has been designed which uses these types of detectors to substantially increase the area over which the Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory collects EAS information. Improvements to the Milagro detector's performance characteristics and sensitivity derived from this array and preliminary results from a prototype array currently installed near the Milagro detector will be presented.

R. Atkins; W. Benbow; D. Berley; M. -L. Chen; D. G. Coyne; R. S. Delay; B. L. Dingus; D. E. Dorfan; R. W. Ellsworth; D. Evans; A. Falcone; L. Fleysher; R. Fleysher; G. Gisler; J. A. Goodman; T. J. Haines; C. M. Hoffman; S. Hugenberger; L. A. Kelley; I. Leonor; J. Macri; M. McConnell; J. F. McCullough; J. E. McEnery; R. S. Miller; A. I. Mincer; M. F. Morales; P. Nemethy; J. M. Ryan; M. Schneider; B. Shen; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; T. N. Thompson; O. T. Tumer; K. Wang; M. O. Wascko; S. Westerhoff; D. A. Williams; T. Yang; G. B. Yodh

1999-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

472

The Independent Detector Testing Laboratory and the NGST Detector Characterization Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

galaxies formed in the web of dark matter that existed when the Universe was in its infancy (z ~10 formed in the web of dark matter that existed when the Universe was in its infancy (z ~10-20). To achieve will measure first-order detector parameters, i.e. dark current, read noise, QE, intra-pixel sensitivity

Figer, Donald F.

473

Diamonds as timing detectors for MIP: The HADES proton-beam monitor and start detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper gives an overview of a recent development of measuring time of flight of minimum-ionizing particles (MIP) with mono-crystalline diamond detectors. The application in the HADES spectrometer as well as test results obtained with proton beams are discussed.

J. Pietraszko; L. Fabbietti; W. Koenig

2009-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

474

Diamonds as timing detectors for MIP: The HADES proton-beam monitor and start detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper gives an overview of a recent development of measuring time of flight of minimum-ionizing particles (MIP) with mono-crystalline diamond detectors. The application in the HADES spectrometer as well as test results obtained with proton beams are discussed.

,

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Application of Pd silicide in the process of silicon detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new technology called a self-aligned metal-silicide process is described in the fabrication of silicon detectors. It has been found that this technology improves both detector yield and leakage current. The use of a metal silicide also gives a lower contact resistance and, depending on the thermal process, a controllable junction depth, which may be essential in the integration of detectors and their electronics. 15 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

Li, Zheng; Chen, Wei; Kraner, H.W.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Application of Pd silicide in the process of silicon detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new technology called a self-aligned metal-silicide process is described in the fabrication of silicon detectors. It has been found that this technology improves both detector yield and leakage current. The use of a metal silicide also gives a lower contact resistance and, depending on the thermal process, a controllable junction depth, which may be essential in the integration of detectors and their electronics.

Li, Z.; Chen, W.; Kraner, H.W. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Analysis of alpha backgrounds in the DEAP-1 detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEAP-1 is a 7 kg liquid argon dark matter detector used to prototype the tonne scale DEAP-3600 detector at SNOLAB.We present an analysis of the alpha particle backgrounds in DEAP-1 and isolate the radiations from various 222Rn daughters at various locations within the detector. The backgrounds will be removed by event position reconstruction and strict controls of material purity.

Kevin S. Olsen

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Stabilization of scintillation detector by reference signal from radioactive source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines the possibility of stabilization of a scintillation detector using an additional detector whose scintillator with respect to the former performs the function of a target, which generates secondary radiation. It is experimentally established that a regulation time constant of 10 sec ensures constancy of the transfer characteristic of the detector with an error of about 1.5% for disturbing effects that correspond to 20% of this characteristic.

Nedavnii, O.I.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Development of a fast position-sensitive laser beam detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the development of a fast position-sensitive laser beam detector. The detector uses a fiber-optic bundle that spatially splits the incident beam, followed by a fast balanced photodetector. The detector is applied to the study of Brownian motion of particles on fast time scales with 1 A spatial resolution. Future applications include the study of molecule motors, protein folding, as well as cellular processes.

Chavez, Isaac; Huang Rongxin; Henderson, Kevin; Florin, Ernst-Ludwig; Raizen, Mark G. [Center for Nonlinear Dynamics and Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

480

Effectiveness of slit collimation of radiometric detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The article investigates theoretically and experimentally the effectiveness of slit collimation of detectors. Formulas are obtained approximating the dependence of the instrument build-up factor on the parameters of the slit collimator for different radiative energies and materials of the product. The experiment was carried out on a laboratory installation with radiation source type /sup 137/Cs with an activity of 1.5 g-eq of radium. Conversion of the radiation to an electric signal was effected by a scintillation detector consisting of a single crystal of cesium iodide and a photomultiplier operating in the regime of stable anodic current. For recording the defectorgrams a rapid automatic recorder was used. The obtained dependences of the instrument build-up factor for unidirectional and isotropic radiation sources make it possible to evaluate fairly simply the expected contribution of scattered radiation to the total signal at the output of the slit collimator or to choose the parameters of the collimator by proceeding from the maximally permissible ratio of the contributions of scattered and unscattered radiation to the total signal.

Zav'yalkin, F.M.; Zubkov, Yu.G.; Osipov, S.P.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detector spot size" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

High speed point derivative microseismic detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high speed microseismic event detector constructed in accordance with the present invention uses a point derivative comb to quickly and accurately detect microseismic events. Compressional and shear waves impinging upon microseismic receiver stations disposed to collect waves are converted into digital data and analyzed using a point derivative comb including assurance of quiet periods prior to declaration of microseismic events. If a sufficient number of quiet periods have passed, the square of a two point derivative of the incoming digital signal is compared to a trip level threshold exceeding the determined noise level to declare a valid trial event. The squaring of the derivative emphasizes the differences between noise and signal, and the valid event is preferably declared when the trip threshold has been exceeded over a temporal comb width to realize a comb over a given time period. Once a trial event has been declared, the event is verified through a spatial comb, which applies the temporal event comb to additional stations. The detector according to the present invention quickly and accurately detects initial compressional waves indicative of a microseismic event which typically exceed the ambient cultural noise level by a small amount, and distinguishes the waves from subsequent larger amplitude shear waves. 9 figs.

Uhl, J.E.; Warpinski, N.R.; Whetten, E.B.

1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

482

High speed point derivative microseismic detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high speed microseismic event detector constructed in accordance with the present invention uses a point derivative comb to quickly and accurately detect microseismic events. Compressional and shear waves impinging upon microseismic receiver stations disposed to collect waves are converted into digital data and analyzed using a point derivative comb including assurance of quiet periods prior to declaration of microseismic events. If a sufficient number of quiet periods have passed, the square of a two point derivative of the incoming digital signal is compared to a trip level threshold exceeding the determined noise level to declare a valid trial event. The squaring of the derivative emphasizes the differences between noise and signal, and the valid event is preferably declared when the trip threshold has been exceeded over a temporal comb width to realize a comb over a given time period. Once a trial event has been declared, the event is verified through a spatial comb, which applies the temporal event comb to additional stations. The detector according to the present invention quickly and accurately detects initial compressional waves indicative of a microseismic event which typically exceed the ambient cultural noise level by a small amount, and distinguishes the waves from subsequent larger amplitude shear waves.

Uhl, James Eugene (Albuquerque, NM); Warpinski, Norman Raymond (Albuquerque, NM); Whetten, Ernest Blayne (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z