National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for detection limit mdl

  1. Quantum nonlocality with arbitrary limited detection efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilles Pütz; Nicolas Gisin

    2015-07-17

    The demonstration and use of nonlocality, as defined by Bell's theorem, rely strongly on dealing with non-detection events due to losses and detector inefficiencies. Otherwise, the so-called detection loophole could be exploited. The only way to avoid this is to have detection efficiencies that are above a certain threshold. We introduce the intermediate assumption of limited detection efficiency, e.g. in each run of the experiment the overall detection efficiency is lower bounded by $\\eta_{min} > 0$. Hence, in an adversarial scenario, the adversaries have arbitrary large but not full control over the inefficiencies. We analyze the set of possible correlations that fulfil Limited Detection Locality (LDL) and show that they necessarily satisfy some linear Bell-like inequalities. We prove that quantum theory predicts violation of one of these inequalities for all $\\eta_{min} > 0$. Hence, nonlocality can be demonstrated with arbitrarily small limited detection efficiencies. Finally we propose a generalized scheme that uses this characterization to deal with detection inefficiencies, which interpolates between the two usual schemes, postselection and outcome assignment.

  2. Generalizing Case Frames Using a Thesaurus and the MDL Principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Generalizing Case Frames Using a Thesaurus and the MDL Principle Hang Li* NEC Corporation Naoki Abe, the proposed method makes use of an existing thesaurus and restricts its attention to those partitions that are present as "cuts" in the thesaurus tree, thus reducing thegeneralization problem to that ofestimating

  3. Recovery Efficiency, False Negative Rate, and Limit of Detection...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Recovery Efficiency, False Negative Rate, and Limit of Detection Performance of a Validated Macrofoam-Swab Sampling Method with Low Surface Concentrations of Two Bacillus anthracis...

  4. Limits on the thermoacoustic detectability of electric and magnetic charges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akerlof, C.W.

    1982-09-01

    The energy loss is estimated for a slow magnetic monopole traveling through a conductor. The thermoacoustic signal derived from this process is compared to the acoustic phonon fluctuation pressure. The results show that single-monopole detectability is strongly limited by thermal noise. These calculations also imply severe limits for the detectability of charged-particle cascades.

  5. Detection limits in plasmonic whispering gallery mode biosensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swaim, Jon D; Bowen, Warwick P

    2011-01-01

    We analyze a whispering gallery mode biosensor with a metallic nanorod bound to its surface. It is found that a localized surface plasmon resonance in the nanorod can reduce the optical mode volume of the resonator by as much as four orders of magnitude via a local enhancement of the electric field, thus improving the detection sensitivity. Optical frequency shifts as large as 15 MHz are predicted for typical proteins and, for typical experimental parameters, the biosensor is predicted to be limited by laser frequency noise, leading to a minimum detectable polarizability on the order of 10 cubic angstroms.

  6. Field-based detection and monitoring of uranium in contaminated groundwater using two immunosensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melton, S.J.; Yu, H.; Williams, K.H.; Morris, S.A.; Long, P.E.; Blake, D.A.

    2009-05-01

    Field-based monitoring of environmental contaminants has long been a need for environmental scientists. Described herein are two kinetic exclusion-based immunosensors, a field portable sensor (FPS) and an inline senor, that were deployed at the Integrated Field Research Challenge Site of the U.S. Department of Energy in Rifle, CO. Both sensors utilized a monoclonal antibody that binds to a U(VI)-dicarboxyphenanthroline complex (DCP) in a kinetic exclusion immunoassay format. These sensors were able to monitor changes of uranium in groundwater samples from {approx} 1 {micro}M to below the regulated drinking water limit of 126 nM (30 ppb). The FPS is a battery-operated sensor platform that can determine the uranium level in a single sample in 5-10 min, if the instrument has been previously calibrated with standards. The average minimum detection level (MDL) in this assay was 0.33 nM (79 ppt), and the MDL in the sample (based on a 1:200?1:400 dilution) was 66?132 nM (15.7?31.4 ppb). The inline sensor, while requiring a grounded power source, has the ability to autonomously analyze multiple samples in a single experiment. The average MDL in this assay was 0.12 nM (29 ppt), and the MDL in the samples (based on 1:200 or 1:400 dilutions) was 24?48 nM (5.7?11.4 ppb). Both sensor platforms showed an acceptable level of agreement (r{sup 2} = 0.94 and 0.76, for the inline and FPS, respectively) with conventional methods for uranium quantification.

  7. Decentralized detection in resource-limited sensor network architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tay, Wee Peng

    2008-01-01

    We consider the problem of decentralized binary detection in a network consisting of a large number of nodes arranged as a tree of bounded height. We show that the error probability decays exponentially fast with the number ...

  8. High Yield Silicon Photonic Crystal Microcavity Biosensors with 100fM Detection Limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ray

    High Yield Silicon Photonic Crystal Microcavity Biosensors with 100fM Detection Limit Yi Zou a silicon photonic crystal (PC) microcavity biosensor with 50 femto-molar detection limit. Our devices have, photonic crystal microcavity, biosensor, sub-wavelength grating coupler. *yzou@utexas.edu, swapnajit

  9. Determination of Method Detection Limits for Trace 232-Thorium and 238-Uranium in Copper using Ion Exchange and ICPMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoppe, Eric W.; LaFerriere, Brian D.; Maiti, Tapas C.; Soin, Aleksandr

    2014-04-15

    Determination of Method Detection Limits for Trace 232-Thorium and 238-Uranium in Copper using Ion Exchange and ICPMS

  10. Method for improving the limit of detection in a data signal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Synovec, Robert E. (Ames, IA); Yueng, Edward S. (Ames, IA)

    1989-10-17

    A method for improving the limit of detection for a data set in which experimental noise is uncorrelated along a given abscissa and an analytical signal is correlated to the abscissa, the steps comprising collecting the data set, converting the data set into a data signal including an analytical portion and the experimental noise portion, designating and adjusting a baseline of the data signal to center the experimental noise numerically about a zero reference, and integrating the data signal preserving the corresponding information for each point of the data signal. The steps of the method produce an enhanced integrated data signal which improves the limit of detection of the data signal.

  11. Accepted Applied Optics, May 2001 Thermal Infrared Spectral Band Detection Limits for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirkland, Laurel

    for in the remotely sensed spectral data base. Second, since the spectral shape varies with particle size, weathering kirkland@lpi.usra.edu. K. Herr is with The Aerospace Corporation, Los Angeles, California, 90009. J; revised manuscript received 3 April 2001. examined detection limits based on spectral signature mapping

  12. Limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cohen, S.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1984-10-19

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face is provided. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution. This limiter shape accommodates the various power scrape-off distances lambda p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V/sub parallel/, of the impacting particles.

  13. Method for improving the limit of detection in a data signal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Synovec, R.E.; Yueng, E.S.

    1989-10-17

    Disclosed is a method for improving the limit of detection for a data set in which experimental noise is uncorrelated along a given abscissa and an analytical signal is correlated to the abscissa, the steps comprising collecting the data set, converting the data set into a data signal including an analytical portion and the experimental noise portion, designating and adjusting a baseline of the data signal to center the experimental noise numerically about a zero reference, and integrating the data signal preserving the corresponding information for each point of the data signal. The steps of the method produce an enhanced integrated data signal which improves the limit of detection of the data signal. 8 figs.

  14. Limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cohen, Samuel A. (Hopewell, NJ); Hosea, Joel C. (Princeton, NJ); Timberlake, John R. (Allentown, NJ)

    1986-01-01

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face accommodates the various power scrape-off distances .lambda..sub.p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V.sub..parallel., of the impacting particles. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution.

  15. Detection limits for real-time source water monitoring using indigenous freshwater microalgae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez Jr, Miguel; Greenbaum, Elias

    2009-01-01

    This research identified toxin detection limits using the variable fluorescence of naturally occurring microalgae in source drinking water for five chemical toxins with different molecular structures and modes of toxicity. The five chemicals investigated were atrazine, Diuron, paraquat, methyl parathion, and potassium cyanide. Absolute threshold sensitivities of the algae for detection of the toxins in unmodified source drinking water were measured. Differential kinetics between the rate of action of the toxins and natural changes in algal physiology, such as diurnal photoinhibition, are significant enough that effects of the toxin can be detected and distinguished from the natural variance. This is true even for physiologically impaired algae where diminished photosynthetic capacity may arise from uncontrollable external factors such as nutrient starvation. Photoinhibition induced by high levels of solar radiation is a predictable and reversible phenomenon that can be dealt with using a period of dark adaption of 30 minutes or more.

  16. System for detecting and limiting electrical ground faults within electrical devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gaubatz, Donald C. (Cupertino, CA)

    1990-01-01

    An electrical ground fault detection and limitation system for employment with a nuclear reactor utilizing a liquid metal coolant. Elongate electromagnetic pumps submerged within the liquid metal coolant and electrical support equipment experiencing an insulation breakdown occasion the development of electrical ground fault current. Without some form of detection and control, these currents may build to damaging power levels to expose the pump drive components to liquid metal coolant such as sodium with resultant undesirable secondary effects. Such electrical ground fault currents are detected and controlled through the employment of an isolated power input to the pumps and with the use of a ground fault control conductor providing a direct return path from the affected components to the power source. By incorporating a resistance arrangement with the ground fault control conductor, the amount of fault current permitted to flow may be regulated to the extent that the reactor may remain in operation until maintenance may be performed, notwithstanding the existence of the fault. Monitors such as synchronous demodulators may be employed to identify and evaluate fault currents for each phase of a polyphase power, and control input to the submerged pump and associated support equipment.

  17. Detection limits for actinides in a monochromatic, wavelength-dispersive x-ray fluorescence instrument

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, Michael L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Havrilla, George J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Recent developments in x-ray optics have made it possible to examine the L x-rays of actinides using doubly-curved crystals in a bench-top device. A doubly-curved crystal (DCC) acts as a focusing monochromatic filter for polychromatic x-rays. A Monochromatic, Wavelength-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (MWDXRF) instrument that uses DCCs to measure Cm and Pu in reprocessing plant liquors was proposed in 2007 by the authors at Los Alamos National Laboratory. A prototype design of this MWDXRF instrument was developed in collaboration with X-ray Optical Systems Inc. (XOS), of East Greenbush, New York. In the MWDXRF instrument, x-rays from a Rhodium-anode x-ray tube are passed through a primary DCC to produce a monochromatic beam of 20.2-keV photons. This beam is focused on a specimen that may contain actinides. The 20.2-keV interrogating beam is just above the L3 edge of Californium; each actinide (with Z = 90 to 98) present in the specimen emits characteristic L x-rays as the result of L3-shell vacancies. In the LANL-XOS prototype MWDXRf, these x-rays enter a secondary DCC optic that preferentially passes 14.961-keV photons, corresponding to the L-alpha-1 x-ray peak of Curium. In the present stage of experimentation, Curium-bearing specimens have not been analyzed with the prototype MWDXRF instrument. Surrogate materials for Curium include Rubidium, which has a K-beta-l x-ray at 14.961 keV, and Yttrium, which has a K-alpha-1 x-ray at 14.958 keV. In this paper, the lower limit of detection for Curium in the LANL-XOS prototype MWDXRF instrument is estimated. The basis for this estimate is described, including a description of computational models and benchmarking techniques used. Detection limits for other actinides are considered, as well as future safeguards applications for MWDXRF instrumentation.

  18. Calculating exclusion limits for Weakly Interacting Massive Particle direct detection experiments without background subtraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anne M Green

    2001-10-04

    Competitive limits on the weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) spin-independent scattering cross section are currently being produced by 76Ge detectors originally designed to search for neutrinoless double beta decay, such as the Heidelberg-Moscow and IGEX experiments. In the absence of background subtraction, limits on the WIMP interaction cross section are set by calculating the upper confidence limit on the theoretical event rate, given the observed event rate. The standard analysis technique involves calculating the 90% upper confidence limit on the number of events in each bin, and excluding any set of parameters (WIMP mass and cross-section) which produces a theoretical event rate for any bin which exceeds the 90% upper confidence limit on the event rate for that bin. We show that, if there is more than one energy bin, this produces exclusion limits that are actually at a lower degree of confidence than 90%, and are hence erroneously tight. We formulate criteria which produce true 90% confidence exclusion limits in these circumstances, including calculating the individual bin confidence limit for which the overall probability that no bins exceeds this confidence limit is 90% and calculating the 90% minimum confidence limit on the number of bins which exceed their individual bin 90% confidence limits. We then compare the limits on the WIMP cross-section produced by these criteria with those found using the standard technique, using data from the Heidelberg-Moscow and IGEX experiments.

  19. Portable TXRF Spectrometer with 10{sup -11}g Detection Limit and Portable XRF Spectromicroscope with Sub-mm Spatial Resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunimura, Shinsuke; Hatakeyama, So; Sasaki, Nobuharu; Yamamoto, Takashi; Kawai, Jun

    2010-04-06

    A portable total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometer that we have developed is applied to trace elemental analysis of water solutions. Although a 5 W X-ray tube is used in the portable TXRF spectrometer, detection limits of several ppb are achieved for 3d transition metal elements and trace elements in a leaching solution of soils, a leaching solution of solder, and alcoholic beverages are detected. Portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectromicroscopes with a 1 W X-ray tube and an 8 W X-ray tube are also presented. Using the portable XRF spectromicroscope with the 1 W X-ray tube, 93 ppm of Cr is detected with an about 700 {mu}m spatial resolution. Spatially resolved elemental analysis of a mug painted with blue, red, green, and white is performed using the two portable spectromicroscopes, and the difference in elemental composition at each paint is detected.

  20. SQUID-Detected MRI in the Limit of Zero Static Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelso, Nathan

    2009-01-01

    for MRI in zero static field. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .acquired in the zero-static-field limit . . . . . 6.3.2versus power dissipated in a static field . . . . . . 7.4

  1. Carbon nanotube synthesis and detection : limiting the environmental impact of novel technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plata, Desirée L

    2009-01-01

    Driven by commercial promise, the carbon nanotube (CNT) industry is growing rapidly, yet little is known about the potential environmental impacts of these novel materials. In particular, there are no methods to detect ...

  2. SQUID-Detected MRI in the Limit of Zero Static Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelso, Nathan Dean

    2010-01-01

    image acquired in the zero-static-?eld limit . . . . . 6.3.2Protocol for MRI in zero static ?power dissipated in a static ?eld . . . . . . 7.4 Comparison

  3. Limitations for detecting small-scale faults using the coherency analysis of seismic data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnett, David Benjamin

    2006-08-16

    be distinguished from noise. Results from application of the coherency analysis were applied to the characterization of a very deep fault and fracture system imaged by a field seismic data set. A series of reverse and strike-slip faults were detected and mapped...

  4. Upper limits on the solar-neutron flux at the Yangbajing neutron monitor from BATSE-detected solar flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Tsuchiya; H. Miyasaka; E. Takahashi; S. Shimoda; Y. Yamada; I. Kondo; K. Makishima; F. Zhu; Y. Tan; H. Hu; Y. Tang; J. Zhang; H. Lu; X. Meng

    2007-03-16

    The purpose of this work is to search the Yangbajing neutron monitor data obtained between 1998 October and 2000 June for solar neutrons associated with solar flares. Using the onset times of 166 BATSE-detected flares with the GOES peak flux (1 -- 8 \\AA) higher than $1.0 \\times 10^{-5}$ $\\mathrm{Wm^{-2}}$, we prepare for each flare a light curve of the Yangbajing neutron monitor, spanning $\\pm$ 1.5 hours from the BATSE onset time. Based on the light curves, a systematic search for solar neutrons in energies above 100 MeV from the 166 flares was performed. No statistically significant signals due to solar neutrons were found in the present work. Therefore, we put upper limits on the $>$ 100 MeV solar-neutron flux for 18 events consisting of 2 X and 16 M class flares. The calculation assumed a power-law shaped neutron energy spectrum and three types of neutron emission profiles at the Sun. Compared with the other positive neutron detections associated with X-class flares, typical 95% confidence level upper limits for the two X-class flares are found to be comparable to the lowest and second lowest neutron fluxes at the top of the atmosphere.In addition, the upper limits for M-class flares scatter in the range of $10^{-2}$ to 1 neutrons $\\mathrm{cm^{-2}s^{-1}}$. This provides the first upper limits on the solar-neutron flux from M-class solar flares, using space observatories as well as ground-based neutron monitors.

  5. Far-IR Detection Limits I: Sky Confusion Due to Galactic Cirrus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woong-Seob Jeong; Hyung Mok Lee; Soojong Pak; Takao Nakagawa; Suk Minn Kwon; Chris P. Pearson; Glenn J. White

    2004-11-16

    Fluctuations in the brightness of the background radiation can lead to confusion with real point sources. Such background emission confusion will be important for infrared observations with relatively large beam sizes since the amount of fluctuation tends to increase with angular scale. In order to quantitively assess the effect of the background emission on the detection of point sources for current and future far-infrared observations by space-borne missions such as Spitzer, ASTRO-F, Herschel and SPICA, we have extended the Galactic emission map to higher angular resolution than the currently available data. Using this high resolution map, we estimate the sky confusion noise due to the emission from interstellar dust clouds or cirrus, based on fluctuation analysis and detailed photometry over realistically simulated images. We find that the confusion noise derived by simple fluctuation analysis agrees well with the result from realistic simulations. Although the sky confusion noise becomes dominant in long wavelength bands (> 100 um) with 60 - 90cm aperture missions, it is expected to be two order of magnitude smaller for the next generation space missions with larger aperture sizes such as Herschel and SPICA.

  6. Swift detection of all previously undetected blazars in a micro-wave flux-limited sample of WMAP foreground sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Giommi; M. Capalbi; E. Cavazzuti; S. Colafrancesco; A. Cucchiara; A. Falcone; J. Kennea; R. Nesci; M. Perri; G. Tagliaferri; A. Tramacere; G. Tosti; A. J. Blustin; G. Branduardi-Raymont; D. N. Burrows; G. Chincarini; A. J. Dean; N. Gehrels; H. Krimm; F. Marshall; A. M. Parsons; B. Zhang

    2007-03-07

    Almost the totality of the bright foreground sources in the WMAP CMB maps are blazars, a class of sources that show usually also X-ray emission. However, 23 objects in a flux-limited sample of 140 blazars of the WMAP catalog (first year) were never reported before as X-ray sources. We present here the results of 41 Swift observations which led to the detection of all these 23 blazars in the 0.3-10 keV band. We conclude that all micro-wave selected blazars are X-ray emitters and that the distribution of the micro-wave to X-ray spectral slope $\\alpha_{mu x}$ of LBL blazars is very narrow, confirming that the X-ray flux of most blazars is a very good estimator of their micro-wave emission. The X-ray spectral shape of all the objects that were observed long enough to allow spectral analysis is flat and consistent with inverse Compton emission within the commonly accepted view where the radiation from blazars is emitted in a Sychrotron-Inverse-Compton scenario. We predict that all blazars and most radio galaxies above the sensitivity limit of the WMAP and of the Planck CMB missions are X-ray sources detectable by the present generation of X-ray satellites. An hypothetical all-sky soft X-ray survey with sensitivity of approximately $10^{-15}$ erg/s would be crucial to locate and remove over 100,000 blazars from CMB temperature and polarization maps and therefore accurately clean the primordial CMB signal from the largest population of extragalactic foreground contaminants.

  7. detection

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    of 25 Million Grant to Improve Technological Capabilities for Detecting Nuclear Proliferation http:www.nnsa.energy.govmediaroompressreleasesncstateconsortium

  8. Swift detection of all previously undetected blazars in a micro-wave flux-limited sample of WMAP foreground sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giommi, P; Cavazzuti, E; Colafrancesco, S; Cucchiara, A; Falcone, A; Kennea, J; Nesci, R; Perri, M; Tagliaferri, G; Tramacere, A; Tosti, G; Blustin, A J; Branduardi-Raymont, G; Burrows, D N; Chincarini, G; Dean, A J; Gehrels, N; Krimm, H; Marshall, F; Parsons, A M; Zhang, B

    2007-01-01

    Almost the totality of the bright foreground sources in the WMAP CMB maps are blazars, a class of sources that show usually also X-ray emission. However, 23 objects in a flux-limited sample of 140 blazars of the WMAP catalog (first year) were never reported before as X-ray sources. We present here the results of 41 Swift observations which led to the detection of all these 23 blazars in the 0.3-10 keV band. We conclude that all micro-wave selected blazars are X-ray emitters and that the distribution of the micro-wave to X-ray spectral slope $\\alpha_{mu x}$ of LBL blazars is very narrow, confirming that the X-ray flux of most blazars is a very good estimator of their micro-wave emission. The X-ray spectral shape of all the objects that were observed long enough to allow spectral analysis is flat and consistent with inverse Compton emission within the commonly accepted view where the radiation from blazars is emitted in a Sychrotron-Inverse-Compton scenario. We predict that all blazars and most radio galaxies a...

  9. 17 Koerselman, W. and Meuleman, A.F.M.The vegetation N:Pratio: a new tool to detect the nature of nutrient limitation, J.App!. Ecol.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohn, Joshua R.

    Koerselman, W. (1992)The nature of nutrient limitation in Dutch dune slacks, in Coastal Dunes: GeomorphologyR E VIE WS 17 Koerselman, W. and Meuleman, A.F.M.The vegetation N:Pratio: a new tool to detect.G.M.and De Swart, E.O.A.M. (1994)Nutrientconcentrations in mire vegetation as a measure of nutrient

  10. Sample-morphology effects on x-ray photoelectron peak intensities. II. Estimation of detection limits for thin-film materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, Cedric J.; Werner, Wolfgang S. M.; Smekal, Werner

    2014-09-01

    The authors show that the National Institute of Standards and Technology database for the simulation of electron spectra for surface analysis (SESSA) can be used to determine detection limits for thin-film materials such as a thin film on a substrate or buried at varying depths in another material for common x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurement conditions. Illustrative simulations were made for a W film on or in a Ru matrix and for a Ru film on or in a W matrix. In the former case, the thickness of a W film at a given depth in the Ru matrix was varied so that the intensity of the W 4d{sub 5/2} peak was essentially the same as that for a homogeneous RuW{sub 0.001} alloy. Similarly, the thickness of a Ru film at a selected depth in the W matrix was varied so that the intensity of the Ru 3p{sub 3/2} peak matched that from a homogeneous WRu{sub 0.01} alloy. These film thicknesses correspond to the detection limits of each minor component for measurement conditions where the detection limits for a homogeneous sample varied between 0.1 at.?% (for the RuW{sub 0.001} alloy) and 1 at.?% (for the WRu{sub 0.01} alloy). SESSA can be similarly used to convert estimates of XPS detection limits for a minor species in a homogeneous solid to the corresponding XPS detection limits for that species as a thin film on or buried in the chosen solid.

  11. No Slide Title

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of identifying tritium exposure * Frequency of bioassay is set to give near the minimum detection limit (MDL) of 3.15x10 -06 Cisample in urine (0.1 mrem). This is 1 Ci...

  12. WIMP Dark Matter Limit-Direct Detection Data and Sensitivity Plots from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search II and the University of California at Santa Barbara

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Expectations for non-baryonic dark matter are founded principally in Big Bang nucleosynthesis calculations, which indicate that the missing mass of the universe is not likely to be baryonic. The supersymmetric standard model (SUSY) offers a promising framework for expectations of particle species which could satisfy the observed properties of dark matter. WIMPs are the most likely SUSY candidate for a dark matter particle. The High Energy Physics Group at University of California, Santa Barbara, is part of the CDMSII Collaboration and have provided the Interactive Plotter for WIMP Dark Matter Limit-Direct Detection Data on their website. They invite other collaborations working on dark matter research to submit datasets and, as a result, have more than 150 data sets now available for use with the plotting tool. The published source of the data is provided with each data set.

  13. Tritium Detection Methods and Limitations

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    NY (1994). ION CHAMBER DETECTORS * PORTABLE ION CHAMBERS * AREA (ROOM) ION CHAMBERS * EFFLUENT (STACK) ION CHAMBERS PORTABLE ION CHAMBERS 200 to 400 cc active volume 5 to 10 uCim3...

  14. Tritium Detection Methods and Limitations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from the 33rd Tritium Focus Group Meeting held in Aiken, South Carolina on April 22-24, 2014.

  15. Recovery Efficiency, False Negative Rate, and Limit of Detection Performance of a Validated Macrofoam-Swab Sampling Method with Low Surface Concentrations of Two Bacillus anthracis Surrogates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Deatherage Kaiser, Brooke L; Amidan, Brett G.; Sydor, Michael A.; Barrett, Christopher A.

    2015-03-31

    The performance of a macrofoam-swab sampling method was evaluated using Bacillus anthracis Sterne (BAS) and Bacillus atrophaeus Nakamura (BG) spores applied at nine low target amounts (2-500 spores) to positive-control plates and test coupons (2 in. × 2 in.) of four surface materials (glass, stainless steel, vinyl tile, and plastic). Test results from cultured samples were used to evaluate the effects of surrogate, surface concentration, and surface material on recovery efficiency (RE), false negative rate (FNR), and limit of detection. For RE, surrogate and surface material had statistically significant effects, but concentration did not. Mean REs were the lowest for vinyl tile (50.8% with BAS, 40.2% with BG) and the highest for glass (92.8% with BAS, 71.4% with BG). FNR values ranged from 0 to 0.833 for BAS and 0 to 0.806 for BG, with values increasing as concentration decreased in the range tested (0.078 to 19.375 CFU/cm2, where CFU denotes ‘colony forming units’). Surface material also had a statistically significant effect. A FNR-concentration curve was fit for each combination of surrogate and surface material. For both surrogates, the FNR curves tended to be the lowest for glass and highest for vinyl title. The FNR curves for BG tended to be higher than for BAS at lower concentrations, especially for glass. Results using a modified Rapid Viability-Polymerase Chain Reaction (mRV-PCR) analysis method were also obtained. The mRV-PCR results and comparisons to the culture results will be discussed in a subsequent report.

  16. Limiting efficiencies of solar energy conversion and photo-detection via internal emission of hot electrons and hot holes in gold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boriskina, Svetlana V; Hsu, Wei-Chun; Liao, Bolin; Chen, Gang

    2015-01-01

    We evaluate the limiting efficiency of full and partial solar spectrum harvesting via the process of internal photoemission in Au-semiconductor Schottky junctions. Our results based on the ab initio calculations of the electron density of states (e-DOS) reveal that the limiting efficiency of the full-spectrum Au converter based on hot electron injection is below 4%. This value is even lower than previously established limit based on the parabolic approximation of the Au electron energy bands. However, we predict limiting efficiency exceeding 10% for the hot holes collection through the Schottky junction between Au and p-type semiconductor. Furthermore, we demonstrate that such converters have more potential if used as a part of the hybrid system for harvesting high- and low-energy photons of the solar spectrum.

  17. AN MDL FRAMEWORK FOR DATA CLUSTERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myllymäki, Petri

    for Information Technology HIIT Tammasaarenkatu 3, Helsinki, Finland PO BOX 9800 FI-02015 TKK, Finland http 9800, FIN-02015 HUT, Finland petri.kontkanen@hiit.fi, http://www.hiit.fi/petri.kontkanen/ Petri Myllym 9800, FIN-02015 HUT, Finland petri.myllymaki@hiit.fi, http://www.hiit.fi/petri.myllymaki/ Wray Buntine

  18. MDL Ambiente Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Lyon-Lincoln Electric CoopMAP JumpMBMCMDL

  19. The inventory, seasonality and stoichiometry of the major phosphorus pools in the Sargasso Sea 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Case, Darin A

    2001-01-01

    ). The optimization of a Technicon Auto-Analyzer II increased the sensitivity of SRP measurements and established a method detection limit (MDL) of 11 nmol kg?¹. The mean SRP concentration in the upper 120 m for all cruises was approximately 16 nmol kg...

  20. An Intrusion Detection Game with Limited Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpcan, Tansu

    is with the Deutsche Telekom Laboratories, Technische Universit¨at Berlin, Ernst-Reuter-Platz 7, 10587 Berlin, Germany¸ar is with the Coordinated Science Laboratory, University of Illinois, 1308 West Main Street, Urbana, IL 61801 USA. E

  1. Limits in Predicting and Detecting Benthic Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jumars, Pete

    impacted by mining-induced resuspension and redeposition, the extent of this effect depending of resolution at the level of effects leading to the appearance or disappearance of individuals, to actual changes in com- munity composition . Physiological changes that are not likely to lead to altered

  2. Polybrominated diphenyl ether flame retardants in the antarctic environment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yogui, Gilvan Takeshi

    2009-05-15

    of Quantification m/z mass-to-charge ratio MDL Method Detection Limit MS Mass Spectrometry (or Mass Spectrometer) MSA Methanesulfonic Acid n number of samples nd not detected NIST National Institute of Standards and Technology NOAA National Oceanic... 13 was associated with the particulate phase (Oros et al., 2005). Average concentrations in sediments were 9.63 ng g-1 dry weight (dw) (range: nd-212 ng g-1 dw). According to the authors, these concentrations are higher than concentrations observed...

  3. ON COMPUTING UPPER LIMITS TO SOURCE INTENSITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashyap, Vinay L.; Siemiginowska, Aneta [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Van Dyk, David A.; Xu Jin [Department of Statistics, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-1250 (United States); Connors, Alanna [Eureka Scientific, 2452 Delmer Street, Suite 100, Oakland, CA 94602-3017 (United States); Freeman, Peter E. [Department of Statistics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Zezas, Andreas, E-mail: vkashyap@cfa.harvard.ed, E-mail: asiemiginowska@cfa.harvard.ed, E-mail: dvd@ics.uci.ed, E-mail: jinx@ics.uci.ed, E-mail: aconnors@eurekabayes.co, E-mail: pfreeman@cmu.ed, E-mail: azezas@cfa.harvard.ed [Physics Department, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, GR-710 03, Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2010-08-10

    A common problem in astrophysics is determining how bright a source could be and still not be detected in an observation. Despite the simplicity with which the problem can be stated, the solution involves complicated statistical issues that require careful analysis. In contrast to the more familiar confidence bound, this concept has never been formally analyzed, leading to a great variety of often ad hoc solutions. Here we formulate and describe the problem in a self-consistent manner. Detection significance is usually defined by the acceptable proportion of false positives (background fluctuations that are claimed as detections, or Type I error), and we invoke the complementary concept of false negatives (real sources that go undetected, or Type II error), based on the statistical power of a test, to compute an upper limit to the detectable source intensity. To determine the minimum intensity that a source must have for it to be detected, we first define a detection threshold and then compute the probabilities of detecting sources of various intensities at the given threshold. The intensity that corresponds to the specified Type II error probability defines that minimum intensity and is identified as the upper limit. Thus, an upper limit is a characteristic of the detection procedure rather than the strength of any particular source. It should not be confused with confidence intervals or other estimates of source intensity. This is particularly important given the large number of catalogs that are being generated from increasingly sensitive surveys. We discuss, with examples, the differences between these upper limits and confidence bounds. Both measures are useful quantities that should be reported in order to extract the most science from catalogs, though they answer different statistical questions: an upper bound describes an inference range on the source intensity, while an upper limit calibrates the detection process. We provide a recipe for computing upper limits that applies to all detection algorithms.

  4. MDL4BMF:Minimum Description Length for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waldmann, Uwe

    Antwerpen Middelheimlaan 1 BE-2020 Antwerp Belgium #12;Abstract Matrix factorizations--where a given data matrix is approximated by a prod- uct of two or more factor matrices--are powerful data mining tools the data mining community in recent years. The technique has desirable properties, such as high

  5. detonation detection

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Satellite Carrying NNSA-provided Nuclear Detonation Detection Sensors http:www.nnsa.energy.govmediaroompressreleasesafsatellite

  6. Limited Test Ban Treaty

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Satellite Carrying NNSA-provided Nuclear Detonation Detection Sensors http:www.nnsa.energy.govmediaroompressreleasesafsatellite

  7. Fingerprint detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saunders, George C. (Rt. 1, Box 428B, Espanola, NM 87532)

    1992-01-01

    A method for detection and visualization of latent fingerprints is provided and includes contacting a substrate containing a latent print thereon with a colloidal metal composition for time sufficient to allow reaction of said colloidal metal composition with said latent print, and preserving or recording the observable print. Further, the method for detection and visualization of latent fingerprints can include contacting the metal composition-latent print reaction product with a secondary metal-containing solution for time sufficient to allow precipitation of said secondary metal thereby enhancing the visibility of the latent print, and preserving or recording the observable print.

  8. Detection device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jay E. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a detection device comprising: (1) an entrance chamber, (2) a central chamber, and (3) an exit chamber. The central chamber includes an ionizing gas, anode, and means for connecting the anode with an external power supply and pulse counter.

  9. Exoplanet Detection Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Debra A; Laughlin, Greg P; Macintosh, Bruce; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Sahlmann, Johannes; Yee, Jennifer C

    2015-01-01

    We are still in the early days of exoplanet discovery. Astronomers are beginning to model the atmospheres and interiors of exoplanets and have developed a deeper understanding of processes of planet formation and evolution. However, we have yet to map out the full complexity of multi-planet architectures or to detect Earth analogues around nearby stars. Reaching these ambitious goals will require further improvements in instrumentation and new analysis tools. In this chapter, we provide an overview of five observational techniques that are currently employed in the detection of exoplanets: optical and IR Doppler measurements, transit photometry, direct imaging, microlensing, and astrometry. We provide a basic description of how each of these techniques works and discuss forefront developments that will result in new discoveries. We also highlight the observational limitations and synergies of each method and their connections to future space missions.

  10. Cell Phone Detection Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, Richard M.; Bunch, Kyle J.; Puzycki, David J.; Slaugh, Ryan W.; Good, Morris S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2007-10-01

    A team composed of Rick Pratt, Dave Puczyki, Kyle Bunch, Ryan Slaugh, Morris Good, and Doug McMakin teamed together to attempt to exploit cellular telephone features and detect if a person was carrying a cellular telephone into a Limited Area. The cell phone’s electromagnetic properties were measured, analyzed, and tested in over 10 different ways to determine if an exploitable signature exists. The method that appears to have the most potential for success without adding an external tag is to measure the RF spectrum, not in the cell phone band, but between 240 and 400MHz. Figures 1- 7 show the detected signal levels from cell phones from three different manufacturers.

  11. Quantum Limits of Thermometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas M. Stace

    2010-06-08

    The precision of typical thermometers consisting of $N$ particles is shot noise limited, improving as $\\sim1/\\sqrt{N}$. For high precision thermometry and thermometric standards this presents an important theoretical noise floor. Here it is demonstrated that thermometry may be mapped onto the problem of phase estimation, and using techniques from optimal phase estimation, it follows that the scaling of the precision of a thermometer may in principle be improved to $\\sim1/N$, representing a Heisenberg limit to thermometry.

  12. FIELD DESCRIPTION Water Oil/Tar Sediment Tissue STUDYNAME Study Name X X X X

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FIELD DESCRIPTION Water Oil/Tar Sediment Tissue STUDYNAME Study Name X X X X QCBATCH Laboratory than the MDL, however, peak height is greater than 3 times the noise level and ID criteria are met. FJ Alpha Analytical Found. Analyte detected at less than the MDL, however, peak height is greater than 3

  13. Detecting cosmic rays of the highest energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Vannucci

    2001-06-06

    Charged cosmic rays have been measured up to macroscopic energies. Concerning neutrinos, the detection is still limited to terrestrial ones (apart from supernova production). A new way to search for extragalactic neutrinos is discussed.

  14. Detection Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeeting |Design CompetitionsFuelof 12Detecting

  15. Spectroscopic detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woskov, Paul P. (Bedford, MA); Hadidi, Kamal (Cambridge, MA)

    2003-01-01

    In embodiments, spectroscopic monitor monitors modulated light signals to detect low levels of contaminants and other compounds in the presence of background interference. The monitor uses a spectrometer that includes a transmissive modulator capable of causing different frequency ranges to move onto and off of the detector. The different ranges can include those with the desired signal and those selected to subtract background contributions from those with the desired signal. Embodiments of the system are particularly useful for monitoring metal concentrations in combustion effluent.

  16. Optical limiting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McBranch, D.W.; Mattes, B.R.; Koskelo, A.C.; Heeger, A.J.; Robinson, J.M.; Smilowitz, L.B.; Klimov, V.I.; Cha, M.; Sariciftci, N.S.; Hummelen, J.C.

    1998-04-21

    Methanofullerenes, fulleroids and/or other fullerenes chemically altered for enhanced solubility, in liquid solution, and in solid blends with transparent glass (SiO{sub 2}) gels or polymers, or semiconducting (conjugated) polymers, are shown to be useful as optical limiters (optical surge protectors). The nonlinear absorption is tunable such that the energy transmitted through such blends saturates at high input energy per pulse over a wide range of wavelengths from 400--1,100 nm by selecting the host material for its absorption wavelength and ability to transfer the absorbed energy into the optical limiting composition dissolved therein. This phenomenon should be generalizable to other compositions than substituted fullerenes. 5 figs.

  17. Detection Efficiency of Asteroid Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tricarico, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive characterization of the detection efficiency of nine of the major asteroid surveys which have been active over the past two decades is presented. The detection efficiency is estimated on a nightly basis by comparing the detected asteroids with the complete catalog of known asteroids propagated to the same observing epoch. Results include a nightly estimate of the detection efficiency curves as a function of apparent magnitude and apparent velocity of the asteroids, as well as a cumulative analysis to estimate the overall performance of each survey. The limiting magnitude distribution is estimated for each survey, and it is then modeled as a function of telescope aperture to obtain an estimate over a wide range of apertures.

  18. Smoke detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warmack, Robert J. Bruce; Wolf, Dennis A.; Frank, Steven Shane

    2015-10-27

    Various apparatus and methods for smoke detection are disclosed. In one embodiment, a method of training a classifier for a smoke detector comprises inputting sensor data from a plurality of tests into a processor. The sensor data is processed to generate derived signal data corresponding to the test data for respective tests. The derived signal data is assigned into categories comprising at least one fire group and at least one non-fire group. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) training is performed by the processor. The derived signal data and the assigned categories for the derived signal data are inputs to the LDA training. The output of the LDA training is stored in a computer readable medium, such as in a smoke detector that uses LDA to determine, based on the training, whether present conditions indicate the existence of a fire.

  19. Smoke detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warmack, Robert J Bruce; Wolf, Dennis A.; Frank, Steven Shane

    2015-11-05

    Various apparatus and methods for smoke detection are disclosed. In one embodiment, a method of training a classifier for a smoke detector comprises inputting sensor data from a plurality of tests into a processor. The sensor data is processed to generate derived signal data corresponding to the test data for respective tests. The derived signal data is assigned into categories comprising at least one fire group and at least one non-fire group. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) training is performed by the processor. The derived signal data and the assigned categories for the derived signal data are inputs to the LDA training. The output of the LDA training is stored in a computer readable medium, such as in a smoke detector that uses LDA to determine, based on the training, whether present conditions indicate the existence of a fire.

  20. Radon detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacArthur, D.W.; Allander, K.S.; Bounds, J.A.

    1994-01-25

    A detector for atmospheric radon using a long range alpha detector as its sensing element is described. An electrostatic filter removes ions from ambient air, while allowing radon atoms to pass into a decay cavity. Here, radon atoms are allowed to decay, creating air ions. These air ions are drawn by a fan through a second electrostatic filter which can be activated or deactivated, and into the long range alpha detector. With the second electrostatic filter activated, no air ions are allowed to pass, and the signal output from the long range alpha detector consists of only the electronic background. With the second electrostatic filter deactivated, air ions and cosmic rays will be detected. The cosmic ray contribution can be minimized by shielding. 3 figures.

  1. Radon detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacArthur, Duncan W. (Los Alamos, NM); Allander, Krag S. (Ojo Caliente, NM); Bounds, John A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1994-01-01

    A detector for atmospheric radon using a long range alpha detector as its sensing element. An electrostatic filter removes ions from ambient air, while allowing radon atoms to pass into a decay cavity. Here, radon atoms are allowed to decay, creating air ions. These air ions are drawn by a fan through a second electrostatic filter which can be activated or deactivated, and into the long range alpha detector. With the second electrostatic filter activated, no air ions are allowed to pass, and the signal output from the long range alpha detector consists of only the electronic background. With the second electrostatic filter deactivated, air ions and cosmic rays will be detected. The cosmic ray contribution can be minimized by shielding.

  2. Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carla Aramo

    2005-09-06

    The paper describes methods used for the detection of cosmic rays with energies above 10^18 eV (UHECR, UltraHigh Energy Cosmic Rays). It had been anticipated there would be a cutoff in the energy spectrum of primary cosmic rays around 3 10^19 eV induced by their interaction with the 2.7 K primordial photons. This has become known as the GZK cutoff. However, several showers have been detected with estimated primary energy exceeding this limit.

  3. The Limit of Mental Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandler, George

    2013-01-01

    of constructing such structures. References A cautionaryTHE LIMIT OF MENTAL STRUCTURES Asch, S. E. , & Ebenholtz, S.100. THE LIMIT OF MENTAL STRUCTURES Halford, G. S. , Cowan,

  4. Fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Darmann, Francis Anthony

    2013-10-08

    A fault current limiter (FCL) includes a series of high permeability posts for collectively define a core for the FCL. A DC coil, for the purposes of saturating a portion of the high permeability posts, surrounds the complete structure outside of an enclosure in the form of a vessel. The vessel contains a dielectric insulation medium. AC coils, for transporting AC current, are wound on insulating formers and electrically interconnected to each other in a manner such that the senses of the magnetic field produced by each AC coil in the corresponding high permeability core are opposing. There are insulation barriers between phases to improve dielectric withstand properties of the dielectric medium.

  5. (Limiting the greenhouse effect)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, S.

    1991-01-07

    Traveler attended the Dahlem Research Conference organized by the Freien Universitat, Berlin. The subject of the conference was Limiting the Greenhouse Effect: Options for Controlling Atmospheric CO{sub 2} Accumulation. Like all Dahlem workshops, this was a meeting of scientific experts, although the disciplines represented were broader than usual, ranging across anthropology, economics, international relations, forestry, engineering, and atmospheric chemistry. Participation by scientists from developing countries was limited. The conference was divided into four multidisciplinary working groups. Traveler acted as moderator for Group 3 which examined the question What knowledge is required to tackle the principal social and institutional barriers to reducing CO{sub 2} emissions'' The working rapporteur was Jesse Ausubel of Rockefeller University. Other working groups examined the economic costs, benefits, and technical feasibility of options to reduce emissions per unit of energy service; the options for reducing energy use per unit of GNP; and the significant of linkage between strategies to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions and other goals. Draft reports of the working groups are appended. Overall, the conference identified a number of important research needs in all four areas. It may prove particularly important in bringing the social and institutional research needs relevant to climate change closer to the forefront of the scientific and policy communities than hitherto.

  6. Arc fault detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jha, Kamal N. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1999-01-01

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard.

  7. Arc fault detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jha, K.N.

    1999-05-18

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard. 1 fig.

  8. SHORT COMMUNICATION Wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) detectability from helicopters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Mark C.

    SHORT COMMUNICATION Wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) detectability from helicopters for wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) populations has been limited. We surveyed Rio Grande wild turkey (M and examine power to detect trends in population change. We observed that wild turkey flock detectability

  9. Initiative for Explosives Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of electromagnetic radiation, or to detect with currently fielded technologies. Approaches to improving detectionInitiative for Explosives Detection Highly Concealed Bulk Explosives Detection This focus area emphasizes the detection of explosives or IEDs hidden in vehicles, buildings or various types of containers

  10. COMMENTARY:Limits to adaptation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preston, Benjamin L

    2013-01-01

    An actor-centered, risk-based approach to defining limits to social adaptation provides a useful analytic framing for identifying and anticipating these limits and informing debates over society s responses to climate change.

  11. Portable modular detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brennan, James S. (Rodeo, CA); Singh, Anup (Danville, CA); Throckmorton, Daniel J. (Tracy, CA); Stamps, James F. (Livermore, CA)

    2009-10-13

    Disclosed herein are portable and modular detection devices and systems for detecting electromagnetic radiation, such as fluorescence, from an analyte which comprises at least one optical element removably attached to at least one alignment rail. Also disclosed are modular detection devices and systems having an integrated lock-in amplifier and spatial filter and assay methods using the portable and modular detection devices.

  12. Spectroscopic Detection of Pathogens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALAM,M. KATHLEEN; TIMLIN,JERILYN A.; MARTIN,LAURA E.; HJELLE,DRIAN; LYONS,RICK; GARRISON,KRISTIN

    2000-11-01

    The goal of this LDRD Research project was to provide a preliminary examination of the use of infrared spectroscopy as a tool to detect the changes in cell cultures upon activation by an infectious agent. Due to a late arrival of funding, only 5 months were available to transfer and setup equipment at UTTM,develop cell culture lines, test methods of in-situ activation and collect kinetic data from activated cells. Using attenuated total reflectance (ATR) as a sampling method, live cell cultures were examined prior to and after activation. Spectroscopic data were collected from cells immediately after activation in situ and, in many cases for five successive hours. Additional data were collected from cells activated within a test tube (pre-activated), in both transmission mode as well as in ATR mode. Changes in the infrared data were apparent in the transmission data collected from the pre-activated cells as well in some of the pre-activated ATR data. Changes in the in-situ activated spectral data were only occasionally present due to (1) the limited time cells were studied and (2) incomplete activation. Comparison of preliminary data to infrared bands reported in the literature suggests the primary changes seen are due an increase in ribonucleic acid (RNA) production. This work will be continued as part of a 3 year DARPA grant.

  13. Advancing Explosives Detection Capabilities: Vapor Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkinson, David

    2012-10-15

    A new, PNNL-developed method provides direct, real-time detection of trace amounts of explosives such as RDX, PETN and C-4. The method selectively ionizes a sample before passing the sample through a mass spectrometer to detect explosive vapors. The method could be used at airports to improve aviation security.

  14. Advancing Explosives Detection Capabilities: Vapor Detection

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Atkinson, David

    2014-07-24

    A new, PNNL-developed method provides direct, real-time detection of trace amounts of explosives such as RDX, PETN and C-4. The method selectively ionizes a sample before passing the sample through a mass spectrometer to detect explosive vapors. The method could be used at airports to improve aviation security.

  15. Bridge Detection By Road Detection Jeff Kaufman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danner, Andrew

    Bridge Detection By Road Detection Jeff Kaufman cbr@sccs.swarthmore.edu 1 Introduction It is useful, with local min- ima: cells from which there is no direction of descent. A common cause of this is bridges. The area over which a bridge passes shows up in the digital elevation as being of a height greater than

  16. FUEL CASK IMPACT LIMITER VULNERABILITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leduc, D; Jeffery England, J; Roy Rothermel, R

    2009-02-09

    Cylindrical fuel casks often have impact limiters surrounding just the ends of the cask shaft in a typical 'dumbbell' arrangement. The primary purpose of these impact limiters is to absorb energy to reduce loads on the cask structure during impacts associated with a severe accident. Impact limiters are also credited in many packages with protecting closure seals and maintaining lower peak temperatures during fire events. For this credit to be taken in safety analyses, the impact limiter attachment system must be shown to retain the impact limiter following Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT) and Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) impacts. Large casks are often certified by analysis only because of the costs associated with testing. Therefore, some cask impact limiter attachment systems have not been tested in real impacts. A recent structural analysis of the T-3 Spent Fuel Containment Cask found problems with the design of the impact limiter attachment system. Assumptions in the original Safety Analysis for Packaging (SARP) concerning the loading in the attachment bolts were found to be inaccurate in certain drop orientations. This paper documents the lessons learned and their applicability to impact limiter attachment system designs.

  17. Revolution in Detection Affairs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern W.

    2013-11-02

    The detection of nuclear or radioactive materials for homeland or national security purposes is inherently difficult. This is one reason detection efforts must be seen as just one part of an overall nuclear defense strategy which includes, inter alia, material security, detection, interdiction, consequence management and recovery. Nevertheless, one could argue that there has been a revolution in detection affairs in the past several decades as the innovative application of new technology has changed the character and conduct of detection operations. This revolution will likely be most effectively reinforced in the coming decades with the networking of detectors and innovative application of anomaly detection algorithms.

  18. Challenges and Solutions for Intrusion Detection in Wireless Mesh Networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassanzadeh, Amin

    2014-05-03

    The problem of intrusion detection in wireless mesh networks (WMN) is challenging, primarily because of lack of single vantage points where traffic can be analyzed and the limited resources available to participating nodes. Although the problem has...

  19. Lesson 8 Infinite Limits and One-sided Limits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-09-06

    Sep 6, 2013 ... long-term behavior. A common model for the population of a species in an area is the logistic model: Lesson 8 Infinite Limits and One-sided ...

  20. Maximum patch method for directional dark matter detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, Shawn; Monroe, Jocelyn; Fisher, Peter [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Laboratory for Nuclear Science, MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Present and planned dark matter detection experiments search for WIMP-induced nuclear recoils in poorly known background conditions. In this environment, the maximum gap statistical method provides a way of setting more sensitive cross section upper limits by incorporating known signal information. We give a recipe for the numerical calculation of upper limits for planned directional dark matter detection experiments, that will measure both recoil energy and angle, based on the gaps between events in two-dimensional phase space.

  1. Interior intrusion detection systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, J.R.; Matter, J.C. ); Dry, B. )

    1991-10-01

    The purpose of this NUREG is to present technical information that should be useful to NRC licensees in designing interior intrusion detection systems. Interior intrusion sensors are discussed according to their primary application: boundary-penetration detection, volumetric detection, and point protection. Information necessary for implementation of an effective interior intrusion detection system is presented, including principles of operation, performance characteristics and guidelines for design, procurement, installation, testing, and maintenance. A glossary of sensor data terms is included. 36 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Nuclear Structure at the Limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nazarewicz, W.

    1998-01-12

    One of the frontiers of today?s nuclear science is the ?journey to the limits? of atomic charge and nuclear mass, of neutron-to-proton ratio, and of angular momentum. The tour to the limits is not only a quest for new, exciting phenomena, but the new data are expected, as well, to bring qualitatively new information about the fundamental properties of the nucleonic many-body system, the nature of the nuclear interaction, and nucleonic correlations at various energy-distance scales. In this series of lectures, current developments in nuclear structure at the limits are discussed from a theoretical perspective, mainly concentrating on medium-mass and heavy nuclei.

  3. Nuclear Structure at the Limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nazarewicz, Witold

    1997-12-31

    One of the frontiers of today`s nuclear science is the ``journey to the limits``: of atomic charge and nuclear mass, of neutron-to-proton ratio, and of angular momentum. The tour to the limits is not only a quest for new, exciting phenomena but the new data are expected, as well, to bring qualitatively new information about the fundamental properties of the nucleonic many-body system, the nature of the nuclear interaction, and nucleonic correlations at various energy-distance scales. In this talk, current developments in nuclear structure at the limits are discussed from a theoretical perspective.

  4. Limits on Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the Milagro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Limits on Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the Milagro Observatory Miguel F of Milagro allow it to detect very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray burst emission with much higher sensitivity gamma-ray burst satellites at keV to MeV energies. Even in the absence of a positive detection, VHE

  5. Generalized Geometric Quantum Speed Limits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diego Paiva Pires; Marco Cianciaruso; Lucas C. Céleri; Gerardo Adesso; Diogo O. Soares-Pinto

    2015-09-30

    The attempt to gain a theoretical understanding of the concept of time in quantum mechanics has triggered significant progress towards the search for faster and more efficient quantum technologies. One of such advances consists in the interpretation of the time-energy uncertainty relations as lower bounds for the minimal evolution time between two distinguishable states of a quantum system, also known as quantum speed limits. We investigate how the non uniqueness of a bona fide measure of distinguishability defined on the quantum state space affects the quantum speed limits and can be exploited in order to derive improved bounds. Specifically, we establish an infinite family of quantum speed limits valid for unitary and nonunitary evolutions, based on an elegant information geometric formalism. Our work unifies and generalizes existing results on quantum speed limits, and provides instances of novel bounds which are tighter than any established one based on the conventional quantum Fisher information. We illustrate our findings with relevant examples, clarifying the role of classical populations versus quantum coherences in the determination and saturation of the speed limits. Our results can find applications in the optimization and control of quantum technologies such as quantum computation and metrology, and might provide new insights in fundamental investigations of quantum thermodynamics.

  6. Fast Neutron Detection Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKigney, Edward A.; Stange, Sy

    2014-03-17

    These slides present a summary of previous work, conclusions, and anticipated schedule for the conclusion of our fast neutron detection evaluation.

  7. Factory capacity limits Machine dependencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foley, Simon

    Factory capacity limits Machine dependencies Employee scheduling Raw material availability Other internal operations (and also possibly the actions of other suppliers that supply raw materials) and at an international workshop at the multi-agent conference (AAMAS'06). Manufacturer Customer demand Penalties for non

  8. Lean blowoff detection sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thornton, Jimmy (Morgantown, WV); Straub, Douglas L. (Morgantown, WV); Chorpening, Benjamin T. (Morgantown, WV); Huckaby, David (Morgantown, WV)

    2007-04-03

    Apparatus and method for detecting incipient lean blowoff conditions in a lean premixed combustion nozzle of a gas turbine. A sensor near the flame detects the concentration of hydrocarbon ions and/or electrons produced by combustion and the concentration monitored as a function of time are used to indicate incipient lean blowoff conditions.

  9. Array for detecting microbes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andersen, Gary L.; DeSantis, Todd D.

    2014-07-08

    The present embodiments relate to an array system for detecting and identifying biomolecules and organisms. More specifically, the present embodiments relate to an array system comprising a microarray configured to simultaneously detect a plurality of organisms in a sample at a high confidence level.

  10. Image Change Detection via Ensemble Learning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Benjamin W [ORNL] [ORNL; Vatsavai, Raju [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The concept of geographic change detection is relevant in many areas. Changes in geography can reveal much information about a particular location. For example, analysis of changes in geography can identify regions of population growth, change in land use, and potential environmental disturbance. A common way to perform change detection is to use a simple method such as differencing to detect regions of change. Though these techniques are simple, often the application of these techniques is very limited. Recently, use of machine learning methods such as neural networks for change detection has been explored with great success. In this work, we explore the use of ensemble learning methodologies for detecting changes in bitemporal synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. Ensemble learning uses a collection of weak machine learning classifiers to create a stronger classifier which has higher accuracy than the individual classifiers in the ensemble. The strength of the ensemble lies in the fact that the individual classifiers in the ensemble create a mixture of experts in which the final classification made by the ensemble classifier is calculated from the outputs of the individual classifiers. Our methodology leverages this aspect of ensemble learning by training collections of weak decision tree based classifiers to identify regions of change in SAR images collected of a region in the Staten Island, New York area during Hurricane Sandy. Preliminary studies show that the ensemble method has approximately 11.5% higher change detection accuracy than an individual classifier.

  11. Upper Limits from Counting Experiments with Multiple Pipelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick J. Sutton

    2010-04-07

    In counting experiments, one can set an upper limit on the rate of a Poisson process based on a count of the number of events observed due to the process. In some experiments, one makes several counts of the number of events, using different instruments, different event detection algorithms, or observations over multiple time intervals. We demonstrate how to generalize the classical frequentist upper limit calculation to the case where multiple counts of events are made over one or more time intervals using several (not necessarily independent) procedures. We show how different choices of the rank ordering of possible outcomes in the space of counts correspond to applying different levels of significance to the various measurements. We propose an ordering that is matched to the sensitivity of the different measurement procedures and show that in typical cases it gives stronger upper limits than other choices. As an example, we show how this method can be applied to searches for gravitational-wave bursts, where multiple burst-detection algorithms analyse the same data set, and demonstrate how a single combined upper limit can be set on the gravitational-wave burst rate.

  12. NEW LIMITS ON GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, Rhiannon D.; Dai, Xinyu; Kochanek, Christopher S. E-mail: xdai@ou.edu

    2014-11-01

    Galaxy clusters are predicted to produce ?-rays through cosmic ray interactions and/or dark matter annihilation, potentially detectable by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT). We present a new, independent stacking analysis of Fermi-LAT photon count maps using the 78 richest nearby clusters (z < 0.12) from the Two Micron All Sky Survey cluster catalog. We obtain the lowest limit on the photon flux to date, 2.3 × 10{sup –11} photons cm{sup –2} s{sup –1} (95% confidence) per cluster in the 0.8-100 GeV band, which corresponds to a luminosity limit of 3.5 × 10{sup 44} photons s{sup –1}. We also constrain the emission limits in a range of narrower energy bands. Scaling to recent cosmic ray acceleration and ?-ray emission models, we find that cosmic rays represent a negligible contribution to the intra-cluster energy density and gas pressure.

  13. Axions - Motivation, limits and searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georg G. Raffelt

    2006-11-09

    The axion solution of the strong CP problem provides a number of possible windows to physics beyond the standard model, notably in the form of searches for solar axions and for galactic axion dark matter, but in a broader context also inspires searches for axion-like particles in pure laboratory experiments. We briefly review the motivation for axions, astrophysical limits, their possible cosmological role, and current searches for axions and axion-like particles.

  14. Fundamental Limits to Cellular Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pieter Rein ten Wolde; Nils B. Becker; Thomas E. Ouldridge; A. Mugler

    2015-05-25

    In recent years experiments have demonstrated that living cells can measure low chemical concentrations with high precision, and much progress has been made in understanding what sets the fundamental limit to the precision of chemical sensing. Chemical concentration measurements start with the binding of ligand molecules to receptor proteins, which is an inherently noisy process, especially at low concentrations. The signaling networks that transmit the information on the ligand concentration from the receptors into the cell have to filter this noise extrinsic to the cell as much as possible. These networks, however, are also stochastic in nature, which means that they will also add noise to the transmitted signal. In this review, we will first discuss how the diffusive transport and binding of ligand to the receptor sets the receptor correlation time, and then how downstream signaling pathways integrate the noise in the receptor state; we will discuss how the number of receptors, the receptor correlation time, and the effective integration time together set a fundamental limit on the precision of sensing. We then discuss how cells can remove the receptor noise while simultaneously suppressing the intrinsic noise in the signaling network. We describe why this mechanism of time integration requires three classes of resources---receptors and their integration time, readout molecules, energy---and how each resource class sets a fundamental sensing limit. We also briefly discuss the scheme of maximum-likelihood estimation, the role of receptor cooperativity, and how cellular copy protocols differ from canonical copy protocols typically considered in the computational literature, explaining why cellular sensing systems can never reach the Landauer limit on the optimal trade-off between accuracy and energetic cost.

  15. Second-order properties of lossy likelihoods and the MLE/MDL dichotomy in lossy compression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Formulation Information theory, classically, has had two primary goals: source coding (efficient data com"). In particular, the fundamental theory Madiman and Ioannis Kontoyiannis Division of Applied Mathematics Brown University. May 2004 Revised

  16. Clustering Words with the MDL Principle Hang Li and Naoki Abe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .cl.nee.co.jp Abstract We address the probhml of automaticMly constructing a thesaurus by clustering words based pp-attachment disambiguation ex- periments using an automaticMly con- structed thesaurus. Our experimental results indicate that such a thesaurus can be used to improve accuracy in disam- biguation. 1

  17. Renewable Surface Biosensors With Optical Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J.; Ackerman, Eric J.; Dockendorff, Brian P.; Holman, David A.; Grate, Jay W.

    2001-12-01

    One major challenge in the development of biosensors is the limited lifetime of a chemically selective surface that includes biomolecules. Renewable surface biosensors address this issue by using fresh aliquots of derivatized microbeads for each analysis. The analyte detection can then occur on the microbeads, or downstream from the microbeads. In this paper, we will describe two types of renewable surface biosensors. The first renewable biosensor system includes on-column optical detection for monitoring the binding of biomolecules onto protein or DNA-derivatized Sepharose beads. The second renewable biosensor system includes detection downstream from the microparticles and is based on the use of derivatized magnetic particles for selective binding. The magnetic particles are fluidically captured and released in a sequential injection system to allow the automation of an Enzyme Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay.

  18. Renewable Surface Biosensors with Optical Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Ackerman, Eric J.; Dockendorff, Brian P.; Holman, David A.; Grate, Jay W.

    2001-04-30

    One major challenge in the development of biosensors is the limited lifetime of a chemically selective surface that includes biomolecules. Renewable surface biosensors address this issue by using fresh aliquots of derivatized microbeads for each analysis. The analyte detection can then occur on the microbeads, or downstream from the microbeads. In this paper, we will describe two types of renewable surface biosensors. The first renewable biosensor system includes on-column optical detection for monitoring the binding of biomolecules onto protein or DNA-derivatized Sepharose beads. The second renewable biosensor system includes detection downstream from the microparticles and is based on the use of derivatized magnetic particles for selective binding. The magnetic particles are fluidically captured and released in a sequential injection system to allow the automation of an Enzyme Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay.

  19. Composition for detecting uranyl

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baylor, Lewis C. (North Augusta, SC); Stephens, Susan M. (Athens, GA)

    1995-01-01

    A composition for detecting the presence and concentration of a substance such as uranyl, comprising an organohalide covalently bonded to an indicator for said substance. The composition has at least one active OH site for forming a complex with the substance to be detected. The composition is made by reacting equimolar amounts of the indicator and the organohalide in a polar organic solvent. The absorbance spectrum of the composition-uranyl complex is shifted with respect to the absorbance spectrum of the indicator-uranyl complex, to provide better spectral resolution for detecting uranyl.

  20. Leak detection aid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steeper, T.J.

    1989-12-26

    A leak detection apparatus and method for detecting leaks across an O-ring sealing a flanged surface to a mating surface is an improvement in a flanged surface comprising a shallow groove following O-ring in communication with an entrance and exit port intersecting the shallow groove for injecting and withdrawing, respectively, a leak detection fluid, such as helium. A small quantity of helium injected into the entrance port will flow to the shallow groove, past the O-ring and to the exit port. 2 figs.

  1. Leak detection aid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steeper, Timothy J. (Graniteville, SC)

    1989-01-01

    A leak detection apparatus and method for detecting leaks across an O-ring sealing a flanged surface to a mating surface is an improvement in a flanged surface comprising a shallow groove following O-ring in communication with an entrance and exit port intersecting the shallow groove for injecting and withdrawing, respectively, a leak detection fluid, such as helium. A small quantity of helium injected into the entrance port will flow to the shallow groove, past the O-ring and to the exit port.

  2. United Biofuels Private Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United Biofuels Private Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name: United Biofuels Private Limited Place: Tamil Nadu, India Sector: Biomass Product: India-based owner and operator...

  3. Idaho Explosive Detection System

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Klinger, Jeff

    2013-05-28

    Learn how INL researchers are making the world safer by developing an explosives detection system that can inspect cargo. For more information about INL security research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

  4. Explosive Detection Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-10-26

    To standardize and accelerate implementation of the Department of Energy (DOE) explosive detection program. DOE N 251.40, dated 5/3/01, extends this directive until 12/31/01.

  5. Energy Detectives (3 Activities)

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    Students explore the classroom as they look and feel for signs of energy. They record the ways they use energy throughout a typical day in an energy detective journal.

  6. Hudol Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNewTexas: Energy Resources Jump to:Huber Heights,Hudol Limited

  7. Novacem Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg, Oregon: EnergyNongqishiCleanAlinca AgricolaNovacem Limited

  8. Hestiun Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA JumpDuimen River PowerHeckert BXTHengyuanUmweltHestiun Limited Jump

  9. Plaxica Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2, Blue MountainSchool DistrictPlaxica Limited Jump to:

  10. Dose Limits | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8,Department of2 Federal Register / Vol.DollarDorm RoomLimits

  11. Energy-limited escape revised

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salz, M; Czesla, S; Schmitt, J H M M

    2015-01-01

    Gas planets in close proximity to their host stars experience photoevaporative mass loss. The energy-limited escape concept is generally used to derive estimates for the planetary mass-loss rates. Our photoionization hydrodynamics simulations of the thermospheres of hot gas planets show that the energy-limited escape concept is valid only for planets with a gravitational potential lower than $\\log_\\mathrm{10}\\left( -\\Phi_{\\mathrm{G}}\\right) < 13.11~$erg$\\,$g$^{-1}$ because in these planets the radiative energy input is efficiently used to drive the planetary wind. Massive and compact planets with $\\log_\\mathrm{10}\\left( -\\Phi_{\\mathrm{G}}\\right) \\gtrsim 13.6~$erg$\\,$g$^{-1}$ exhibit more tightly bound atmospheres in which the complete radiative energy input is re-emitted through hydrogen Ly$\\alpha$ and free-free emission. These planets therefore host hydrodynamically stable thermospheres. Between these two extremes the strength of the planetary winds rapidly declines as a result of a decreasing heating eff...

  12. Temperature differential detection device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Girling, Peter M. (Allentown, PA)

    1986-01-01

    A temperature differential detection device for detecting the temperature differential between predetermined portions of a container wall is disclosed as comprising a Wheatstone bridge circuit for detecting resistance imbalance with a first circuit branch having a first elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a predetermined portion of the container wall, a second circuit branch having a second elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a second predetermined portion of a container wall with the wire elements having a predetermined temperature-resistant coefficient, an indicator interconnected between the first and second branches remote from the container wall for detecting and indicating resistance imbalance between the first and second wire elements, and connector leads for electrically connecting the wire elements to the remote indicator in order to maintain the respective resistance value relationship between the first and second wire elements. The indicator is calibrated to indicate the detected resistance imbalance in terms of a temperature differential between the first and second wall portions.

  13. Tau-neutrino mass limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.

    1987-05-01

    was supported in part by the U.S. Depart- ment of Energy under Contracts Nos. W-31-109-Eng-38, DE-AC02-76ER011 12, DE-AC03-76S F000998, DE- AC02-76ER01428, and DE-AC02-84ER40125. This ex- periment was made possible by the support provided by the SLAC PEP staff... articles is followed, and page proofs are sent to authors. Tau-neutrino mass limit S. Abachi, P. Baringer, B. G. Bylsma, R. De Bonte, D. Koltick, F. J. Loeffler, E. H. Low, R. L. McIlwain, D. H. Miller, C. R. Ng, L. K. Rangan, and E. I. Shibata Purdue...

  14. Physics of the Shannon Limits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merhav, Neri

    2009-01-01

    We provide a simple physical interpretation, in the context of the second law of thermodynamics, to the information inequality (a.k.a. the Gibbs' inequality, which is also equivalent to the log-sum inequality), asserting that the relative entropy between two probability distributions cannot be negative. Since this inequality stands at the basis of the data processing theorem (DPT), and the DPT in turn is at the heart of most, if not all, proofs of converse theorems in Shannon theory, it is observed that conceptually, the roots of fundamental limits of Information Theory can actually be attributed to the laws of physics, in particular, to the second law of thermodynamics, and at least indirectly, also to the law of energy conservation. By the same token, in the other direction: one can view the second law as stemming from information-theoretic principles.

  15. The limits of filopodium stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sander Pronk; Phillip L. Geissler; Daniel A. Fletcher

    2008-03-03

    Filopodia are long, finger-like membrane tubes supported by cytoskeletal filaments. Their shape is determined by the stiffness of the actin filament bundles found inside them and by the interplay between the surface tension and bending rigidity of the membrane. Although one might expect the Euler buckling instability to limit the length of filopodia, we show through simple energetic considerations that this is in general not the case. By further analyzing the statics of filaments inside membrane tubes, and through computer simulations that capture membrane and filament fluctuations, we show under which conditions filopodia of arbitrary lengths are stable. We discuss several in vitro experiments where this kind of stability has already been observed. Furthermore, we predict that the filaments in long, stable filopodia adopt a helical shape.

  16. Limited-life cartridge primers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Rosen, Robert S.

    2005-04-19

    A cartridge primer which utilizes an explosive that can be designed to become inactive in a predetermined period of time: a limited-life primer. The explosive or combustible material of the primer is an inorganic reactive multilayer (RML). The reaction products of the RML are sub-micron grains of non-corrosive inorganic compounds that would have no harmful effects on firearms or cartridge cases. Unlike use of primers containing lead components, primers utilizing RML's would not present a hazard to the environment. The sensitivity of an RML is determined by the physical structure and the stored interfacial energy. The sensitivity lowers with time due to a decrease in interfacial energy resulting from interdiffusion of the elemental layers. Time-dependent interdiffusion is predictable, thereby enabling the functional lifetime of an RML primer to be predetermined by the initial thickness and materials selection of the reacting layers.

  17. Limited-life cartridge primers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Rosen, R.S.

    1998-06-30

    A cartridge primer is described which utilizes an explosive that can be designed to become inactive in a predetermined period of time: a limited-life primer. The explosive or combustible material of the primer is an inorganic reactive multilayer (RML). The reaction products of the RML are sub-micron grains of non-corrosive inorganic compounds that would have no harmful effects on firearms or cartridge cases. Unlike use of primers containing lead components, primers utilizing RML`s would not present a hazard to the environment. The sensitivity of an RML is determined by the physical structure and the stored interfacial energy. The sensitivity lowers with time due to a decrease in interfacial energy resulting from interdiffusion of the elemental layers. Time-dependent interdiffusion is predictable, thereby enabling the functional lifetime of an RML primer to be predetermined by the initial thickness and materials selection of the reacting layers. 10 figs.

  18. Limited-life cartridge primers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Rosen, Robert S. (San Ramon, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A cartridge primer which utilizes an explosive that can be designed to become inactive in a predetermined period of time: a limited-life primer. The explosive or combustible material of the primer is an inorganic reactive multilayer (RML). The reaction products of the RML are sub-micron grains of non-corrosive inorganic compounds that would have no harmful effects on firearms or cartridge cases. Unlike use of primers containing lead components, primers utilizing RML's would not present a hazard to the environment. The sensitivity of an RML is determined by the physical structure and the stored interfacial energy. The sensitivity lowers with time due to a decrease in interfacial energy resulting from interdiffusion of the elemental layers. Time-dependent interdiffusion is predictable, thereby enabling the functional lifetime of an RML primer to be predetermined by the initial thickness and materials selection of the reacting layers.

  19. Limited View Angle Iterative CT Reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Connelly, "CT Technologies," in Aspects of Explosives Detection, Elsevier 2009. Dual energy CT Z. Ying, R. Nam and C. R. Crawford, "Dual energy computed tomography for explosive detection," Journal of X

  20. Negative Backaction Noise in Interferometric Detection of a Microlever

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Laurent; A. Mosset; O. Arcizet; J. Chevrier; S. Huant; H. Sellier

    2011-07-22

    Interferometric detection of mirror displacements is intrinsically limited by laser shot noise. In practice, however, it is often limited by thermal noise. Here we report on an experiment performed at the liquid helium temperature to overcome the thermal noise limitation and investigate the effect of classical laser noise on a microlever that forms a Fabry-Perot cavity with an optical fiber. The spectral noise densities show a region of negative contribution of the backaction noise close to the resonance frequency. We interpret this noise reduction as a coherent coupling of the microlever to the laser intensity noise. This optomechanical effect could be used to improve the detection sensitivity as discussed in proposals going beyond the Standard Quantum Limit.

  1. Nucleic acid detection kits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Mast, Andrea L.; Brow, Mary Ann; Kwiatkowski, Robert W.; Vavra, Stephanie H.

    2005-03-29

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of nucleic acid from various viruses in a sample.

  2. Solar system fault detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farrington, R.B.; Pruett, J.C. Jr.

    1984-05-14

    A fault detecting apparatus and method are provided for use with an active solar system. The apparatus provides an indication as to whether one or more predetermined faults have occurred in the solar system. The apparatus includes a plurality of sensors, each sensor being used in determining whether a predetermined condition is present. The outputs of the sensors are combined in a pre-established manner in accordance with the kind of predetermined faults to be detected. Indicators communicate with the outputs generated by combining the sensor outputs to give the user of the solar system and the apparatus an indication as to whether a predetermined fault has occurred. Upon detection and indication of any predetermined fault, the user can take appropriate corrective action so that the overall reliability and efficiency of the active solar system are increased.

  3. Solar system fault detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farrington, Robert B. (Wheatridge, CO); Pruett, Jr., James C. (Lakewood, CO)

    1986-01-01

    A fault detecting apparatus and method are provided for use with an active solar system. The apparatus provides an indication as to whether one or more predetermined faults have occurred in the solar system. The apparatus includes a plurality of sensors, each sensor being used in determining whether a predetermined condition is present. The outputs of the sensors are combined in a pre-established manner in accordance with the kind of predetermined faults to be detected. Indicators communicate with the outputs generated by combining the sensor outputs to give the user of the solar system and the apparatus an indication as to whether a predetermined fault has occurred. Upon detection and indication of any predetermined fault, the user can take appropriate corrective action so that the overall reliability and efficiency of the active solar system are increased.

  4. Error detection method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, Eric J.

    2013-06-11

    An apparatus, program product, and method that run an algorithm on a hardware based processor, generate a hardware error as a result of running the algorithm, generate an algorithm output for the algorithm, compare the algorithm output to another output for the algorithm, and detect the hardware error from the comparison. The algorithm is designed to cause the hardware based processor to heat to a degree that increases the likelihood of hardware errors to manifest, and the hardware error is observable in the algorithm output. As such, electronic components may be sufficiently heated and/or sufficiently stressed to create better conditions for generating hardware errors, and the output of the algorithm may be compared at the end of the run to detect a hardware error that occurred anywhere during the run that may otherwise not be detected by traditional methodologies (e.g., due to cooling, insufficient heat and/or stress, etc.).

  5. Composition for detecting uranyl

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baylor, L.C.; Stephens, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention relates to an indicator composition for use in spectrophotometric detection of a substance in a solution, and a method for making the composition. Useful indicators are sensitive to the particular substance being measured, but are unaffected by the fluid and other chemical species that may be present in the fluid. Optical indicators are used to measure the uranium concentration of process solutions in facilities for extracting uranium from ores, production of nuclear fuels, and reprocessing of irradiated fuels. The composition comprises an organohalide covalently bonded to an indicator for the substance, in such a manner that the product is itself an indicator that provides increased spectral resolution for detecting the substance. The indicator is preferably arsenazo III and the organohalide is preferably cyanuric chloride. These form a composition that is ideally suited for detecting uranyl.

  6. Relating to ion detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

    2001-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide a technique for improving detection of alpha and/or beta emitting sources on items or in locations using indirect means. The emission forms generate ions in a medium surrounding the item or location and the medium is then moved to a detecting location where the ions are discharged to give a measure of the emission levels. To increase the level of ions generated and render the system particularly applicable for narrow pipes and other forms of conduits, the medium pressure is increased above atmospheric pressure. STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

  7. Detection of solar events

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischbach, Ephraim; Jenkins, Jere

    2013-08-27

    A flux detection apparatus can include a radioactive sample having a decay rate capable of changing in response to interaction with a first particle or a field, and a detector associated with the radioactive sample. The detector is responsive to a second particle or radiation formed by decay of the radioactive sample. The rate of decay of the radioactive sample can be correlated to flux of the first particle or the field. Detection of the first particle or the field can provide an early warning for an impending solar event.

  8. Detection of neutrinos

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischbach, Ephraim; Jenkins, Jere

    2014-02-04

    A flux detection apparatus can include a radioactive sample having a decay rate capable of changing in response to interaction with a first particle or a field, and a detector associated with the radioactive sample. The detector is responsive to a second particle or radiation formed by decay of the radioactive sample. The rate of decay of the radioactive sample can be correlated to flux of the first particle or the field. Detection of the first particle or the field can provide an early warning for an impending solar event.

  9. Reaching the quantum limit of sensitivity in electron spin resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bienfait; J. J. Pla; Y. Kubo; M. Stern; X. Zhou; C. C. Lo; C. D. Weis; T. Schenkel; M. L. W. Thewalt; D. Vion; D. Esteve; B. Julsgaard; K. Moelmer; J. J. L. Morton; P. Bertet

    2015-07-24

    We report pulsed electron-spin resonance (ESR) measurements on an ensemble of Bismuth donors in Silicon cooled at 10mK in a dilution refrigerator. Using a Josephson parametric microwave amplifier combined with high-quality factor superconducting micro-resonators cooled at millikelvin temperatures, we improve the state-of-the-art sensitivity of inductive ESR detection by nearly 4 orders of magnitude. We demonstrate the detection of 1700 bismuth donor spins in silicon within a single Hahn echo with unit signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio, reduced to just 150 spins by averaging a single Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill sequence. This unprecedented sensitivity reaches the limit set by quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field instead of thermal or technical noise, which constitutes a novel regime for magnetic resonance.

  10. Shear wall ultimate drift limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffey, T.A.; Goldman, A.; Farrar, C.R.

    1994-04-01

    Drift limits for reinforced-concrete shear walls are investigated by reviewing the open literature for appropriate experimental data. Drift values at ultimate are determined for walls with aspect ratios ranging up to a maximum of 3.53 and undergoing different types of lateral loading (cyclic static, monotonic static, and dynamic). Based on the geometry of actual nuclear power plant structures exclusive of containments and concerns regarding their response during seismic (i.e.,cyclic) loading, data are obtained from pertinent references for which the wall aspect ratio is less than or equal to approximately 1, and for which testing is cyclic in nature (typically displacement controlled). In particular, lateral deflections at ultimate load, and at points in the softening region beyond ultimate for which the load has dropped to 90, 80, 70, 60, and 50 percent of its ultimate value, are obtained and converted to drift information. The statistical nature of the data is also investigated. These data are shown to be lognormally distributed, and an analysis of variance is performed. The use of statistics to estimate Probability of Failure for a shear wall structure is illustrated.

  11. Detection of counterfeit currency

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burns, D.A.

    1998-05-26

    A method is disclosed of detecting counterfeit currency by contacting the currency to be tested with near infrared beams in the spectrum below 1,250 nanometers, measuring reflectance of the near infrared beams and comparing the reflectance values with those from genuine currency. 18 figs.

  12. Correlation and image compression for limited-bandwidth CCD.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Douglas G.

    2005-07-01

    As radars move to Unmanned Aerial Vehicles with limited-bandwidth data downlinks, the amount of data stored and transmitted with each image becomes more significant. This document gives the results of a study to determine the effect of lossy compression in the image magnitude and phase on Coherent Change Detection (CCD). We examine 44 lossy compression types, plus lossless zlib compression, and test each compression method with over 600 CCD image pairs. We also derive theoretical predictions for the correlation for most of these compression schemes, which compare favorably with the experimental results. We recommend image transmission formats for limited-bandwidth programs having various requirements for CCD, including programs which cannot allow performance degradation and those which have stricter bandwidth requirements at the expense of CCD performance.

  13. Dark matter limits froma 15 kg windowless bubble chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szydagis, Matthew Mark; /Chicago U.

    2010-12-01

    The COUPP collaboration has successfully used bubble chambers, a technology previously applied only to high-energy physics experiments, as direct dark matter detectors. It has produced the world's most stringent spin-dependent WIMP limits, and increasingly competitive spin-independent limits. These limits were achieved by capitalizing on an intrinsic rejection of the gamma background that all other direct detection experiments must address through high-density shielding and empirically-determined data cuts. The history of COUPP, including its earliest prototypes and latest results, is briefly discussed in this thesis. The feasibility of a new, windowless bubble chamber concept simpler and more inexpensive in design is discussed here as well. The dark matter limits achieved with a 15 kg windowless chamber, larger than any previous COUPP chamber (2 kg, 4 kg), are presented. Evidence of the greater radiopurity of synthetic quartz compared to natural is presented using the data from this 15 kg device, the first chamber to be made from synthetic quartz. The effective reconstruction of the three-dimensional positions of bubbles in a highly distorted optical field, with ninety-degree bottom lighting similar to cloud chamber lighting, is demonstrated. Another innovation described in this thesis is the use of the sound produced by bubbles recorded by an array of piezoelectric sensors as the primary means of bubble detection. In other COUPP chambers, cameras have been used as the primary trigger. Previous work on bubble acoustic signature differentiation using piezos is built upon in order to further demonstrate the ability to discriminate between alpha- and neutron-induced events.

  14. Rapid detection of Ebola virus with a reagent-free, point-of-care biosensor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Baca, Justin T.; Severns, Virginia; Lovato, Debbie; Branch, Darren W.; Larson, Richard S.

    2015-04-14

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors can rapidly detect Ebola antigens at the point-of-care without the need for added reagents, sample processing, or specialized personnel. This preliminary study demonstrates SAW biosensor detection of the Ebola virus in a concentration-dependent manner. The detection limit with this methodology is below the average level of viremia detected on the first day of symptoms by PCR. We observe a log-linear sensor response for highly fragmented Ebola viral particles, with a detection limit corresponding to 1.9 × 10? PFU/mL prior to virus inactivation. We predict greatly improved sensitivity for intact, infectious Ebola virus. This point-of-care methodologymore »has the potential to detect Ebola viremia prior to symptom onset, greatly enabling infection control and rapid treatment. This biosensor platform is powered by disposable AA batteries and can be rapidly adapted to detect other emerging diseases in austere conditions.« less

  15. Neural substrates of cognitive capacity limitations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buschman, Tim

    Cognition has a severely limited capacity: Adult humans can retain only about four items “in mind”. This limitation is fundamental to human brain function: Individual capacity is highly correlated with intelligence measures ...

  16. Graduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Time Limits and Work Schedules Graduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules Point your career towards Los Alamos Lab: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive...

  17. FUNDAMENTAL PERFORMANCE LIMITS OF WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baochun

    FUNDAMENTAL PERFORMANCE LIMITS OF WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS ZHIHUA HU, BAOCHUN LI Abstract. Understanding the fundamental performance limits of wireless sensor networks is critical towards. In addition to presenting the general results with respect to the maximum sustainable throughput of wireless

  18. Trace Explosive Detection using Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krause, Adam R; Van Neste, Charles W; Senesac, Larry R; Thundat, Thomas George; Finot, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Satisfying the conditions of high sensitivity and high selectivity using portable sensors that are also reversible is a challenge. Miniature sensors such as microcantilevers offer high sensitivity but suffer from poor selectivity due to the lack of sufficiently selective receptors. Although many of the mass deployable spectroscopic techniques provide high selectivity, they do not have high sensitivity. Here, we show that this challenge can be overcome by combining photothermal spectroscopy on a bimaterial microcantilever with the mass induced change in the cantilever's resonance frequency. Detection using adsorption-induced resonant frequency shift together with photothermal deflection spectroscopy shows extremely high selectivity with a subnanogram limit of detection for vapor phase adsorbed explosives, such as pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX), and trinitrotoluene (TNT).

  19. Primordial magnetic field limits from cosmological data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahniashvili, Tina [McWilliams Center for Cosmology and Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Department of Physics, Laurentian University, Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C (Canada); Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, Ilia State University, 2A Kazbegi Ave, Tbilisi, GE-0160 (Georgia); Tevzadze, Alexander G. [Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, Ilia State University, 2A Kazbegi Ave, Tbilisi, GE-0160 (Georgia); Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences, Tbilisi State University, 1 Chavchavadze Avenue, Tbilisi, GE-0128 (Georgia); Sethi, Shiv K. [McWilliams Center for Cosmology and Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Raman Research Institute, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560080 (India); Pandey, Kanhaiya [Raman Research Institute, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560080 (India); Ratra, Bharat [Department of Physics, Kansas State University, 116 Cardwell Hall, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    We study limits on a primordial magnetic field arising from cosmological data, including that from big bang nucleosynthesis, cosmic microwave background polarization plane Faraday rotation limits, and large-scale structure formation. We show that the physically relevant quantity is the value of the effective magnetic field, and limits on it are independent of how the magnetic field was generated.

  20. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.

    1997-02-04

    A fault current limiter for an electrical circuit is disclosed. The fault current limiter includes a high temperature superconductor in the electrical circuit. The high temperature superconductor is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter. 15 figs.

  1. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL)

    1997-01-01

    A fault current limiter (10) for an electrical circuit (14). The fault current limiter (10) includes a high temperature superconductor (12) in the electrical circuit (14). The high temperature superconductor (12) is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter (10).

  2. Economic Growth, Physical Limits and Liveability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economic Growth, Physical Limits and Liveability: Can Metro Vancouver Achieve all Three? by Jeremy of Thesis: Economic Growth, Physical Limits and Liveability: Can Metro Vancouver Achieve all Three. The Local Energy scenario adds a local energy limit. For each scenario I assume continuous economic

  3. Method for early detection of cooling-loss events

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bermudez, Sergio A.; Hamann, Hendrik F.; Marianno, Fernando J.

    2015-12-22

    A method of detecting cooling-loss event early is provided. The method includes defining a relative humidity limit and change threshold for a given space, measuring relative humidity in the given space, determining, with a processing unit, whether the measured relative humidity is within the defined relative humidity limit, generating a warning in an event the measured relative humidity is outside the defined relative humidity limit and determining whether a change in the measured relative humidity is less than the defined change threshold for the given space and generating an alarm in an event the change is greater than the defined change threshold.

  4. Parallel Heuristics for Scalable Community Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Howard; Kalyanaraman, Anantharaman; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Choudhury, Sutanay

    2014-05-17

    Community detection has become a fundamental operation in numerous graph-theoretic applications. It is used to reveal natural divisions that exist within real world networks without imposing prior size or cardinality constraints on the set of communities. Despite its potential for application, there is only limited support for community detection on large-scale parallel computers, largely owing to the irregular and inherently sequential nature of the underlying heuristics. In this paper, we present parallelization heuristics for fast community detection using the Louvain method as the serial template. The Louvain method is an iterative heuristic for modularity optimization. Originally developed by Blondel et al. in 2008, the method has become increasingly popular owing to its ability to detect high modularity community partitions in a fast and memory-efficient manner. However, the method is also inherently sequential, thereby limiting its scalability to problems that can be solved on desktops. Here, we observe certain key properties of this method that present challenges for its parallelization, and consequently propose multiple heuristics that are designed to break the sequential barrier. Our heuristics are agnostic to the underlying parallel architecture. For evaluation purposes, we implemented our heuristics on shared memory (OpenMP) and distributed memory (MapReduce-MPI) machines, and tested them over real world graphs derived from multiple application domains (internet, biological, natural language processing). Experimental results demonstrate the ability of our heuristics to converge to high modularity solutions comparable to those output by the serial algorithm in nearly the same number of iterations, while also drastically reducing time to solution.

  5. Protein detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fruetel, Julie A. (Livermore, CA); Fiechtner, Gregory J. (Bethesda, MD); Kliner, Dahv A. V. (San Ramon, CA); McIlroy, Andrew (Livermore, CA)

    2009-05-05

    The present embodiment describes a miniature, microfluidic, absorption-based sensor to detect proteins at sensitivities comparable to LIF but without the need for tagging. This instrument utilizes fiber-based evanescent-field cavity-ringdown spectroscopy, in combination with faceted prism microchannels. The combination of these techniques will increase the effective absorption path length by a factor of 10.sup.3 to 10.sup.4 (to .about.1-m), thereby providing unprecedented sensitivity using direct absorption. The coupling of high-sensitivity absorption with high-performance microfluidic separation will enable real-time sensing of biological agents in aqueous samples (including aerosol collector fluids) and will provide a general method with spectral fingerprint capability for detecting specific bio-agents.

  6. Chlorofluorocarbon leak detection technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munday, E.B.

    1990-12-01

    There are about 590 large coolant systems located at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) leaking nearly 800,000 lb of R-114 refrigerant annually (1989 estimate). A program is now under way to reduce the leakage to 325,000 lb/year -- an average loss of 551 lb/year (0.063 lb/h) per coolant system, some of which are as large as 800 ft. This report investigates leak detection technologies that can be used to locate leaks in the coolant systems. Included are descriptions, minimum leak detection rate levels, advantages, disadvantages, and vendor information on the following technologies: bubbling solutions; colorimetric leak testing; dyes; halogen leak detectors (coronea discharge detectors; halide torch detectors, and heated anode detectors); laser imaging; mass spectroscopy; organic vapor analyzers; odorants; pressure decay methods; solid-state electrolytic-cell gas sensors; thermal conductivity leak detectors; and ultrasonic leak detectors.

  7. May Gravity detect Tsunami ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fargion, D

    2004-01-01

    The present gravitational wave detectors are reaching lowest metric deviation fields able to detect galactic and extra-galactic gravitational waves, related to Supernova explosions up to Virgo cluster. The same gravitational wave detector are nevertheless almost able to reveal near field gravitational perturbations due to fast huge mass displacements as the ones occurring during largest Earth-Quake or Tsunami as the last on 26th December 2004 in Asiatic area. The prompt gravitational near field deformation by the Tsunami may reach the LIGO threshold sensitivity within 3000-10000 km distances. Their eventual discover (in LIGO data or in future on-line detector arrays) may offer the most rapid warning alarm system on earth. Nevertheless the later continental mass rearrangement and their gravitational field assessment on Earth must induce, for Richter Magnitude 9 Tsunami, a different terrestrial inertia momentum and a different rotation axis, as well as a detectable shrinking of the Earth radius of nearly R =1.7...

  8. Solar neutrino detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lino Miramonti

    2009-01-22

    More than 40 years ago, neutrinos where conceived as a way to test the validity of the solar models which tell us that stars are powered by nuclear fusion reactions. The first measurement of the neutrino flux, in 1968 in the Homestake mine in South Dakota, detected only one third of the expected value, originating what has been known as the Solar Neutrino Problem. Different experiments were built in order to understand the origin of this discrepancy. Now we know that neutrinos undergo oscillation phenomenon changing their nature traveling from the core of the Sun to our detectors. In the work the 40 year long saga of the neutrino detection is presented; from the first proposals to test the solar models to last real time measurements of the low energy part of the neutrino spectrum.

  9. Termination Detection of Local Computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godard, Emmanuel; Tel, Gerard

    2010-01-01

    Contrary to the sequential world, the processes involved in a distributed system do not necessarily know when a computation is globally finished. This paper investigates the problem of the detection of the termination of local computations. We define four types of termination detection: no detection, detection of the local termination, detection by a distributed observer, detection of the global termination. We give a complete characterisation (except in the local termination detection case where a partial one is given) for each of this termination detection and show that they define a strict hierarchy. These results emphasise the difference between computability of a distributed task and termination detection. Furthermore, these characterisations encompass all standard criteria that are usually formulated : topological restriction (tree, rings, or triangu- lated networks ...), topological knowledge (size, diameter ...), and local knowledge to distinguish nodes (identities, sense of direction). These re- sult...

  10. 2009 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved. An optoelectronic nose for the detection of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    ). Specific examples of such sensors include conductive polymers and polymer composites, multiple polymers­8 , it is the composite response of the chemical reactivity of such an array that identifies an odorant or mixture or conductivity) or occur after physisorption on surfaces (for example, analyte oxidation on heated metal oxides

  11. Fundamental Limits on Secure Clock Synchronization and Man-In-The-Middle Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be built, including routing protocols and more sophisticated heavyweight protocols. I. INTRODUCTION to conserve power. If synchronization is lost or tampered with in such systems, nodes may waste power waking up and transmitting at times when other nodes are asleep. Thus, secure clock synchronization

  12. Computational modeling techniques for biological network productivity increases : optimization and rate-limiting reaction detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yuanyuan, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    The rapid development and applications of high throughput measurement techniques bring the biological sciences into a 'big data' era. The vast available data for enzyme and metabolite concentrations, fluxes, and kinetics ...

  13. Detection Limit of H and D for Tritium Process R&D

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation from the 35th Tritium Focus Group Meeting held in Princeton, New Jersey on May 05-07, 2015.

  14. Method for detecting biomolecules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huo, Qisheng (Albuquerque, NM); Liu, Jun (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-08-12

    A method for detecting and measuring the concentration of biomolecules in solution, utilizing a conducting electrode in contact with a solution containing target biomolecules, with a film with controllable pore size distribution characteristics applied to at least one surface of the conducting electrode. The film is functionalized with probe molecules that chemically interact with the target biomolecules at the film surface, blocking indicator molecules present in solution from diffusing from the solution to the electrode, thereby changing the electrochemical response of the electrode

  15. Fraud Detection in Healthcare

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandola, Varun; Schryver, Jack C; Sukumar, Sreenivas R

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the problem of fraud detection in healthcare in this chapter. Given the recent scrutiny of the ineciencies in the US healthcare system, identifying fraud has been on the forefront of the eorts towards reducing the healthcare costs. In this chapter we will focus on understanding the issue of healthcare fraud in detail, and review methods that have been proposed in the literature to combat this issue using data driven approach.

  16. Nucleic acid detection methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, C.L.; Yaar, R.; Szafranski, P.; Cantor, C.R.

    1998-05-19

    The invention relates to methods for rapidly determining the sequence and/or length a target sequence. The target sequence may be a series of known or unknown repeat sequences which are hybridized to an array of probes. The hybridized array is digested with a single-strand nuclease and free 3{prime}-hydroxyl groups extended with a nucleic acid polymerase. Nuclease cleaved heteroduplexes can be easily distinguish from nuclease uncleaved heteroduplexes by differential labeling. Probes and target can be differentially labeled with detectable labels. Matched target can be detected by cleaving resulting loops from the hybridized target and creating free 3-hydroxyl groups. These groups are recognized and extended by polymerases added into the reaction system which also adds or releases one label into solution. Analysis of the resulting products using either solid phase or solution. These methods can be used to detect characteristic nucleic acid sequences, to determine target sequence and to screen for genetic defects and disorders. Assays can be conducted on solid surfaces allowing for multiple reactions to be conducted in parallel and, if desired, automated. 18 figs.

  17. Nucleic Acid Detection Methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Cassandra L. (Boston, MA); Yaar, Ron (Brookline, MA); Szafranski, Przemyslaw (Boston, MA); Cantor, Charles R. (Boston, MA)

    1998-05-19

    The invention relates to methods for rapidly determining the sequence and/or length a target sequence. The target sequence may be a series of known or unknown repeat sequences which are hybridized to an array of probes. The hybridized array is digested with a single-strand nuclease and free 3'-hydroxyl groups extended with a nucleic acid polymerase. Nuclease cleaved heteroduplexes can be easily distinguish from nuclease uncleaved heteroduplexes by differential labeling. Probes and target can be differentially labeled with detectable labels. Matched target can be detected by cleaving resulting loops from the hybridized target and creating free 3-hydroxyl groups. These groups are recognized and extended by polymerases added into the reaction system which also adds or releases one label into solution. Analysis of the resulting products using either solid phase or solution. These methods can be used to detect characteristic nucleic acid sequences, to determine target sequence and to screen for genetic defects and disorders. Assays can be conducted on solid surfaces allowing for multiple reactions to be conducted in parallel and, if desired, automated.

  18. Remote detection of fissile material : Cherenkov counters for gamma detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, Anna S

    2011-01-01

    The need for large-size detectors for long-range active interrogation (Al) detection has generated interest in water-based detector technologies. AI is done using external radiation sources to induce fission and to detect, ...

  19. Revolution in nuclear detection affairs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, Warren M.

    2014-05-09

    The detection of nuclear or radioactive materials for homeland or national security purposes is inherently difficult. This is one reason detection efforts must be seen as just one part of an overall nuclear defense strategy which includes, inter alia, material security, detection, interdiction, consequence management and recovery. Nevertheless, one could argue that there has been a revolution in detection affairs in the past several decades as the innovative application of new technology has changed the character and conduct of detection operations. This revolution will likely be most effectively reinforced in the coming decades with the networking of detectors and innovative application of anomaly detection algorithms.

  20. Statistical detection and imaging of objects hidden in turbid media using ballistic photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Statistical detection and imaging of objects hidden in turbid media using ballistic photons Sina-resolution imaging through scattering media with ballistic photons. We derive the fundamental limits on the accuracy

  1. Limits on iron-dominated fallback disk in SN 1987A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Werner; T. Nagel; T. Rauch

    2007-03-20

    The non-detection of a point source in SN1987A imposes an upper limit for the optical luminosity of L=2L_sun. This limits the size of a possible fallback disk around the stellar remnant. Assuming a steady-state thin disk with blackbody emission requires a disk smaller than 100,000 km if the accretion rate is at 30% of the Eddington rate (Graves et al. 2005). We have performed detailed non-LTE radiation transfer calculations to model the disk spectrum more realistically. It turns out that the observational limit on the disk extension becomes even tighter, namely 70,000 km.

  2. Time_Limit_Extension_Form.docx | Revised: 10/13/2014 Time Limit Extension Request Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Time_Limit_Extension_Form.docx | Revised: 10/13/2014 Time Limit Extension Request Form OFFICE on your request. PURPOSE The Time Limit Extension may be filed when a student nears the end of the time limitation for completion of the requirements for their degree but needs more time to complete the degree

  3. Nucleic acid detection assays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann; Dahlberg, James E.

    2005-04-05

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  4. Nucleic acid detection compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prudent, James R. (Madison, WI); Hall, Jeff G. (Madison, WI); Lyamichev, Victor I. (Madison, WI); Brow, Mary Ann (Madison, WI); Dahlberg, James L. (Madison, WI)

    2008-08-05

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  5. Flaw detection and evaluation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilks, Robert S. (Plum, PA); Sturges, Jr., Robert H. (Plum, PA)

    1983-01-01

    The invention provides a method of and apparatus for optically inspecting nuclear fuel pellets for surface flaws. The inspection system includes a prism and lens arrangement for scanning the surface of each pellet as the same is rotated. The resulting scan produces data indicative of the extent and shape of each flaw which is employed to generate a flaw quality index for each detected flaw. The flaw quality indexes from all flaws are summed and compared with an acceptable surface quality index. The result of the comparison is utilized to control the acceptance or rejection of the pellet.

  6. Opaque cloud detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roskovensky, John K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-01-20

    A method of detecting clouds in a digital image comprising, for an area of the digital image, determining a reflectance value in at least three discrete electromagnetic spectrum bands, computing a first ratio of one reflectance value minus another reflectance value and the same two values added together, computing a second ratio of one reflectance value and another reflectance value, choosing one of the reflectance values, and concluding that an opaque cloud exists in the area if the results of each of the two computing steps and the choosing step fall within three corresponding predetermined ranges.

  7. PETER GRINDROD Numbercraft Limited Version 1.0 March 2001 Bioinformatics for Functional Genomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheichl, Robert

    PETER GRINDROD Numbercraft Limited Version 1.0 March 2001 Bioinformatics for Functional Genomics 1 UK Bioinformatics for Functional Genomics: Watching the Detectives Executive Summary The ability research spending aimed at underpinning the UK's position within the post genome economy. An informal

  8. Design of proximity detecting codes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perisetty, Srinivas

    1997-01-01

    class of codes called Proximity Detecting Codes can be used to overcome this problem associated with asynchronous channels. A t-proximity detecting (t-PD) code can detect when a received word is within distance t from the transmitted codeword, when using...

  9. Basic category theory -Limits Gouter des doctorants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doyen, Laurent

    Basic category theory - Limits Gouter des doctorants Jérémy Dubut LSV, ENS Cachan Friday, 3rd April, 2015 Jérémy Dubut (LSV, ENS Cachan) Basic category theory - Limits Friday, 3rd April, 2015 1 / 8 #12 not necessarily exist Jérémy Dubut (LSV, ENS Cachan) Basic category theory - Limits Friday, 3rd April, 2015 2 / 8

  10. Hydrogenation of Dislocation-Limited Heteroepitaxial Silicon...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hydrogenation of Dislocation-Limited Heteroepitaxial Silicon Solar Cells: Preprint Bolen, M. L.; Grover, S.; Teplin, C. W.; Bobela, D.; Branz, H. M.; Stradins, P. 08 HYDROGEN; 14...

  11. Distributed Detection and Localization of Events in Large Ad Hoc Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Anurag

    are application­specific networks that com- prise a large number of tiny, energy­limited, smart sensor devices by . This formulation is motivated by the change detection/isolation framework introduced by Nikiforov [6]. We extend decisions of ALL toggle rapidly. Motivated by this fact, we propose a distributed change detection

  12. An Improved Labelling for the INRIA Person Data Set for Pedestrian Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    An Improved Labelling for the INRIA Person Data Set for Pedestrian Detection Matteo Taiana, Jacinto is very popular in the Pedestrian Detection community, both for training detectors and reporting results. Yet, the labelling of its test set has some limitations: some of the pedestrians are not labelled

  13. Eddy Current Testing for Detecting Small Defects in Thin Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obeid, Simon; Tranjan, Farid M. [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, UNCC (United States); Dogaru, Teodor [Albany Instruments, 426-O Barton Creek, Charlotte, NC 28262 (United States)

    2007-03-21

    Presented here is a technique of using Eddy Current based Giant Magneto-Resistance sensor (GMR) to detect surface and sub-layered minute defects in thin films. For surface crack detection, a measurement was performed on a copper metallization of 5-10 microns thick. It was done by scanning the GMR sensor on the surface of the wafer that had two scratches of 0.2 mm, and 2.5 mm in length respectively. In another experiment, metal coatings were deposited over the layers containing five defects with known lengths such that the defects were invisible from the surface. The limit of detection (resolution), in terms of defect size, of the GMR high-resolution Eddy Current probe was studied using this sample. Applications of Eddy Current testing include detecting defects in thin film metallic layers, and quality control of metallization layers on silicon wafers for integrated circuits manufacturing.

  14. Ultrasensitive measurement of MEMS cantilever displacement sensitivity below the shot noise limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pooser, R C

    2014-01-01

    The displacement of micro-electro-mechanical-systems(MEMs) cantilevers is used to measure a variety of phenomena in devices ranging from force microscopes for single spin detection[1] to biochemical sensors[2] to uncooled thermal imaging systems[3]. The displacement readout is often performed optically with segmented detectors or interference measurements. Until recently, various noise sources have limited the minimum detectable displacement in MEMs systems, but it is now possible to minimize all other sources[4] so that the noise level of the coherent light field, called the shot noise limit(SNL), becomes the dominant source. Light sources dis- playing quantum-enhanced statistics below this limit are available[5, 6], with applications in gravitational wave astronomy[7] and bioimaging[8], but direct displacement measurements of MEMS cantilevers below the SNL have been impossible until now. Here, we demonstrate the first direct measurement of a MEMs cantilever displacement with sub-SNL sensitivity, thus enabli...

  15. HIERARCHICAL CENSORING FOR DISTRIBUTED DETECTION IN WIRELESS SENSOR Neal Patwari and Alfred O. Hero III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patwari, Neal

    maximizes system lifetime. If energy consumption can be sufficiently reduced, solar power or energy will require aggressive energy limitation. Equivalently, given a battery size, minimizing energy consumption]@eecs.umich.edu. ABSTRACT In energy-limited wireless sensor networks, detection using `cen- soring sensors' reduces

  16. Limiting Emission Angle for Improved Solar Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limiting Emission Angle for Improved Solar Cell Performance While direct light enters a solar cell will explore the potential benefits to limiting the emission angles of realistic solar cells, with efficiencies cooling, waste heat recovery and solar electricity generation, low values of the thermoelectric figure

  17. Detection of gas leakage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thornberg, Steven (Peralta, NM); Brown, Jason (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-06-19

    A method of detecting leaks and measuring volumes as well as an apparatus, the Power-free Pump Module (PPM), that is a self-contained leak test and volume measurement apparatus that requires no external sources of electrical power during leak testing or volume measurement, where the invention is a portable, pneumatically-controlled instrument capable of generating a vacuum, calibrating volumes, and performing quantitative leak tests on a closed test system or device, all without the use of alternating current (AC) power. Capabilities include the ability is to provide a modest vacuum (less than 10 Torr), perform a pressure rise leak test, measure the gas's absolute pressure, and perform volume measurements. All operations are performed through a simple rotary control valve which controls pneumatically-operated manifold valves.

  18. Digital quadrature phase detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, James A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, John A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1992-01-01

    A system for detecting the phase of a frequency of phase modulated signal that includes digital quadrature sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal at two times that are one quarter of a cycle of a reference signal apart, determination of the arctangent of the ratio of a first sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal to the second sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal, and a determination of quadrant in which the phase determination is increased by 2.pi. when the quadrant changes from the first quadrant to the fourth quadrant and decreased by 2.pi. when the quadrant changes from the fourth quadrant to the first quadrant whereby the absolute phase of the frequency or phase modulated signal can be determined using an arbitrary reference convention.

  19. Digital quadrature phase detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, J.A.; Johnson, J.A.

    1992-05-26

    A system for detecting the phase of a frequency or phase modulated signal that includes digital quadrature sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal at two times that are one quarter of a cycle of a reference signal apart, determination of the arctangent of the ratio of a first sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal to the second sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal, and a determination of quadrant in which the phase determination is increased by 2[pi] when the quadrant changes from the first quadrant to the fourth quadrant and decreased by 2[pi] when the quadrant changes from the fourth quadrant to the first quadrant whereby the absolute phase of the frequency or phase modulated signal can be determined using an arbitrary reference convention. 6 figs.

  20. Target detection portal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Linker, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM); Brusseau, Charles A. (Tijeras, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A portal apparatus for screening persons or objects for the presence of trace amounts of target substances such as explosives, narcotics, radioactive materials, and certain chemical materials. The portal apparatus can have a one-sided exhaust for an exhaust stream, an interior wall configuration with a concave-shape across a horizontal cross-section for each of two facing sides to result in improved airflow and reduced washout relative to a configuration with substantially flat parallel sides; air curtains to reduce washout; ionizing sprays to collect particles bound by static forces, as well as gas jet nozzles to dislodge particles bound by adhesion to the screened person or object. The portal apparatus can be included in a detection system with a preconcentrator and a detector.

  1. Weld failure detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pennell, William E. (Unity Township, Westmoreland County, PA); Sutton, Jr., Harry G. (Mt. Lebanon, PA)

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for detecting failure in a welded connection, particrly applicable to not readily accessible welds such as those joining components within the reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor system. A preselected tag gas is sealed within a chamber which extends through selected portions of the base metal and weld deposit. In the event of a failure, such as development of a crack extending from the chamber to an outer surface, the tag gas is released. The environment about the welded area is directed to an analyzer which, in the event of presence of the tag gas, evidences the failure. A trigger gas can be included with the tag gas to actuate the analyzer.

  2. Waveguide disturbance detection method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korneev, Valeri A. (Albany, CA); Nihei, Kurt T. (Oakland, CA); Myer, Larry R. (Benicia, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A method for detection of a disturbance in a waveguide comprising transmitting a wavefield having symmetric and antisymmetric components from a horizontally and/or vertically polarized source and/or pressure source disposed symmetrically with respect to the longitudinal central axis of the waveguide at one end of the waveguide, recording the horizontal and/or vertical component or a pressure of the wavefield with a vertical array of receivers disposed at the opposite end of the waveguide, separating the wavenumber transform of the wavefield into the symmetric and antisymmetric components, integrating the symmetric and antisymmetric components over a broad frequency range, and comparing the magnitude of the symmetric components and the antisymmetric components to an expected magnitude for the symmetric components and the antisymmetric components for a waveguide of uniform thickness and properties thereby determining whether or not a disturbance is present inside the waveguide.

  3. Self-triggering superconducting fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yuan, Xing (Albany, NY); Tekletsadik, Kasegn (Rexford, NY)

    2008-10-21

    A modular and scaleable Matrix Fault Current Limiter (MFCL) that functions as a "variable impedance" device in an electric power network, using components made of superconducting and non-superconducting electrically conductive materials. The matrix fault current limiter comprises a fault current limiter module that includes a superconductor which is electrically coupled in parallel with a trigger coil, wherein the trigger coil is magnetically coupled to the superconductor. The current surge doing a fault within the electrical power network will cause the superconductor to transition to its resistive state and also generate a uniform magnetic field in the trigger coil and simultaneously limit the voltage developed across the superconductor. This results in fast and uniform quenching of the superconductors, significantly reduces the burnout risk associated with non-uniformity often existing within the volume of superconductor materials. The fault current limiter modules may be electrically coupled together to form various "n" (rows).times."m" (columns) matrix configurations.

  4. Complementarity of direct dark matter detection and indirect detection through gamma-rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lars Bergstrom; Torsten Bringmann; Joakim Edsjo

    2011-02-23

    We show, by using an extensive sample of viable supersymmetric models as templates, that indirect detection of dark matter through gamma rays may have a large potential for identifying the nature of dark matter. This is in particular true also for models that give too weak dark matter-nucleon scattering cross sections to be probed by present and planned direct detection experiments. Also models with a mass scale too high to be accessible at CERN's LHC accelerator may show up in next-generation imaging Cherenkov telescope arrays. Based on our our findings, we therefore suggest to view indirect searches as genuine particle physics experiments, complementing other strategies to probe so far unknown regions in the parameter space of e.g. supersymmetric models, and propose a new approach that would make use of telescopes dedicated for dark matter searches. As a concrete example for the potential of such an approach, we consider an array of imaging air Cherenkov telescopes, the Dark Matter Array (DMA), and show that such an experiment could extend present-day limits by several orders of magnitude, reaching a large class of models that would remain undetected in both direct detection experiments and searches at the LHC. In addition, in a sizable part of the parameter space, signals from more than one type of dark matter detection experiment would be possible, something that may eventually be necessary in order to identify the dark matter candidate.

  5. Complementarity of direct dark matter detection and indirect detection through gamma rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergstroem, Lars; Bringmann, Torsten; Edsjoe, Joakim

    2011-02-15

    We show, by using an extensive sample of viable supersymmetric models as templates, that indirect detection of dark matter through gamma rays may have a large potential for identifying the nature of dark matter. This is, in particular, true also for models that give too weak dark matter-nucleon scattering cross sections to be probed by present and planned direct detection experiments. Also models with a mass scale too high to be accessible at CERN's LHC accelerator may show up in next-generation imaging Cherenkov telescope arrays. Based on our findings, we therefore suggest to view indirect searches as genuine particle physics experiments, complementing other strategies to probe so far unknown regions in the parameter space of e.g. supersymmetric models, and propose a new approach that would make use of telescopes dedicated for dark matter searches. As a concrete example for the potential of such an approach, we consider an array of imaging air Cherenkov telescopes, the Dark Matter Array (DMA), and show that such an experiment could extend present-day limits by several orders of magnitude, reaching a large class of models that would remain undetected in both direct detection experiments and searches at the LHC. In addition, in a sizable part of the parameter space, signals from more than one type of dark matter detection experiment would be possible, something that may eventually be necessary in order to identify the dark matter candidate.

  6. Predetermining acceptable noise limits in EXAFS spectra in the limit of stochastic noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Yung-Jin

    2010-01-01

    Predetermining acceptable noise limits of EXAFS spectrain the limit of stochastic noise Yung-Jin Hu 1 and Corwin H.The e?ect of stochastic noise on Extended X-ray Absorption

  7. Limit of light coupling into solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naqavi, A; Ballif, C; Scharf, T; Herzig, H P

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a limit for the strength of coupling light into the modes of solar cells. This limit depends on both a cell's thickness and its modal properties. For a cell with refractive index n and thickness d, we obtain a maximal coupling rate of 2c*sqrt(n^2-1)/d where c is speed of light. Our method can be used in the design of solar cells and in calculating their efficiency limits; besides, it can be applied to a broad variety of resonant phenomena and devices.

  8. Decoupling limits in multi-sector supergravities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Achúcarro, Ana; Hardeman, Sjoerd; Schalm, Koenraad; Aalst, Ted van der [Instituut-Lorentz for Theoretical Physics, Universiteit Leiden, Niels Bohrweg 2, Leiden (Netherlands); Oberreuter, Johannes M., E-mail: achucar@lorentz.leidenuniv.nl, E-mail: j.m.oberreuter@uva.nl, E-mail: kschalm@lorentz.leidenuniv.nl, E-mail: vdaalst@lorentz.leidenuniv.nl [Instituut voor Theoretische Fysica, Universiteit van Amsterdam, Science Park 904, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-03-01

    Conventional approaches to cosmology in supergravity assume the existence of multiple sectors that only communicate gravitationally. In principle these sectors decouple in the limit M{sub pl}??. In practice such a limit is delicate: for generic supergravities, where sectors are combined by adding their Kähler functions, the separate superpotentials must contain non-vanishing vacuum expectation values supplementing the naïve global superpotential. We show that this requires non-canonical scaling in the naïve supergravity superpotential couplings to recover independent sectors of globally supersymmetric field theory in the decoupling limit M{sub pl} ? ?.

  9. PP-206 Frontera Generation Limited Partnership | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PP-206 Frontera Generation Limited Partnership PP-206 Frontera Generation Limited Partnership Presidential permit authorizing Frontera Generation Limited Partnership to construct,...

  10. Representation of Limited Rights Data and Restricted Computer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Representation of Limited Rights Data and Restricted Computer Software Representation of Limited Rights Data and Restricted Computer Software Representation of Limited Rights Data...

  11. Method for detecting an element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blackwood, Larry G.; Reber, Edward L.; Rohde, Kenneth W.

    2007-02-06

    A method for detecting an element is disclosed and which includes the steps of providing a gamma-ray spectrum which depicts, at least in part, a test region having boundaries, and which has a small amount of the element to be detected; providing a calculation which detects the small amount of the element to be detected; and providing a moving window and performing the calculation within the moving window, and over a range of possible window boundaries within the test region to determine the location of the optimal test region within the gamma-ray spectrum.

  12. Incipient fire detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brooks, Jr., William K. (Newport News, VA)

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for an incipient fire detection system that receives gaseous samples and measures the light absorption spectrum of the mixture of gases evolving from heated combustibles includes a detector for receiving gaseous samples and subjecting the samples to spectroscopy and determining wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples. The wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples are compared to predetermined absorption wavelengths. A warning signal is generated whenever the wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples correspond to the predetermined absorption wavelengths. The method includes receiving gaseous samples, subjecting the samples to light spectroscopy, determining wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples, comparing the wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples to predetermined absorption wavelengths and generating a warning signal whenever the wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples correspond to the predetermined absorption wavelengths. In an alternate embodiment, the apparatus includes a series of channels fluidically connected to a plurality of remote locations. A pump is connected to the channels for drawing gaseous samples into the channels. A detector is connected to the channels for receiving the drawn gaseous samples and subjecting the samples to spectroscopy. The wavelengths of absorption are determined and compared to predetermined absorption wavelengths is provided. A warning signal is generated whenever the wavelengths correspond.

  13. May Gravity detect Tsunami ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Fargion

    2005-11-23

    The present gravitational wave detectors are reaching lowest metric deviation fields able to detect galactic and extra-galactic gravitational waves, related to Supernova explosions up to Virgo cluster. The same gravitational wave detector are nevertheless almost able to reveal, in principle, near field Newtonian gravitational perturbations due to fast huge mass displacements as the ones occurring during largest Earth-Quake or Tsunami as the last on 26nd December 2004 in Asiatic area. Virgo and Ligo detector are unfortunately recording on high frequencies (above tens Hz) while the signal of the Tsunami lay at much lower range (below 0.1 Hz). Nevertheless prompt gravitational near field deformation by the Tsunami might reach the future LISA threshold sensitivity and frequency windows if such an array is located nearby (3000-10000) km distances. Unfortunately the present LISA system should be located at Lagrange point too far (1.5 million km. far away). We note however that the later continental mass rearrangement and their gravitational field assessment on Earth must induce, for Richter Magnitude 9-like Tsunami, a different terrestrial inertia momentum and a different principal rotation axis. In conclusion we remind that gravitational geodetic deviation on new precise satellites (GOCE 2006), assisted by GPS network, might nevertheless reach in the near future the needed threshold and accuracy to reveal Tsunami by their prompt tidal gravity field deviations . An array of such geoid detector maybe correlated with LISA-like satellite on Earth orbits may offer the fastest alarm system.

  14. Outlier Detection Rules for Fault Detection in Solar Photovoltaic Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehman, Brad

    . The models must be modified due to different PV capacity, solar cell technology, or installation locationOutlier Detection Rules for Fault Detection in Solar Photovoltaic Arrays Ye Zhao, Brad Lehman Abstract-- Solar photovoltaic (PV) arrays are unique power sources that may have uncleared fault current

  15. Analysis of radium-226 concentrations in environmental samples using a Ge(Li) detector 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, Roger L

    1977-01-01

    described in the HASL manual ( 20). Because the samples were often moist and the moisture interfered with the ashing process, all vegeta- tion samples were placed in a 3, 000 milliliter beaker and dried for 24 hours in an oven. The dried samples were... the Minimum Detectable Levels were taken from the HASL manual (22). 34 TABLE 3 Minimum Detectable Levels (MDL) of Radium-Z26 in Environmental Samples ~Sam le Containment Vessel MDL Soil Glass Beaker 0. 07 pCi/g Vegetation Glass Beaker 0. 01 p...

  16. Climate Prediction: The Limits of Ocean Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, Peter H.

    We identify three major areas of ignorance which limit predictability in current ocean GCMs. One is the very crude representation of subgrid-scale mixing processes. These processes are parameterized with coefficients whose ...

  17. Performance limits of axial turbomachine stages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, David Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    This thesis assesses the limits of stage efficiency for axial compressor and turbine stages. A stage model is developed, consisting of a specified geometry and a surface velocity distribution with turbulent boundary layers. ...

  18. Infinite volume limit for the dipole gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Dimock

    2009-04-28

    We consider a classical dipole gas in with low activity and show that the pressure has a limit as the volume goes to infinity. The result is obtained by a renormalization group analysis of the model.

  19. Quantum Cryptography Approaching the Classical Limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weedbrook, Christian

    We consider the security of continuous-variable quantum cryptography as we approach the classical limit, i.e., when the unknown preparation noise at the sender’s station becomes significantly noisy or thermal (even by as ...

  20. Some Fundamental Limitations for Cognitive Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahai, Anant

    ' & $ % Some Fundamental Limitations for Cognitive Radio Anant Sahai Wireless Foundations, UCB EECS program November 1 at BWRC Cognitive Radio Workshop #12;' & $ % Outline 1. Why cognitive radios? 2 November 1 at BWRC Cognitive Radio Workshop #12;' & $ % Apparent spectrum allocations · Traditional

  1. Physical limits on cellular directional mechanosensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouffanais, Roland

    Many eukaryotic cells are able to perform directional mechanosensing by directly measuring minute spatial differences in the mechanical stress on their membranes. Here, we explore the limits of a single mechanosensitive ...

  2. Cosmological neutrino mass detection: The Best probe of neutrino lifetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serpico, Pasquale D.; /Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    Future cosmological data may be sensitive to the effects of a finite sum of neutrino masses even as small as {approx}0.06 eV, the lower limit guaranteed by neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that a cosmological detection of neutrino mass at that level would improve by many orders of magnitude the existing limits on neutrino lifetime, and as a consequence on neutrino secret interactions with (quasi-)massless particles as in majoron models. On the other hand, neutrino decay may provide a way-out to explain a discrepancy {approx}< 0.1 eV between cosmic neutrino bounds and Lab data.

  3. MPI Runtime Error Detection with MUST: Advances in Deadlock Detection

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hilbrich, Tobias; Protze, Joachim; Schulz, Martin; de Supinski, Bronis R.; Müller, Matthias S.

    2013-01-01

    The widely used Message Passing Interface (MPI) is complex and rich. As a result, application developers require automated tools to avoid and to detect MPI programming errors. We present the Marmot Umpire Scalable Tool (MUST) that detects such errors with significantly increased scalability. We present improvements to our graph-based deadlock detection approach for MPI, which cover future MPI extensions. Our enhancements also check complex MPI constructs that no previous graph-based detection approach handled correctly. Finally, we present optimizations for the processing of MPI operations that reduce runtime deadlock detection overheads. Existing approaches often require (p) analysis time per MPI operation,more »forpprocesses. We empirically observe that our improvements lead to sub-linear or better analysis time per operation for a wide range of real world applications.« less

  4. Window in the dark matter exclusion limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaharijas, Gabrijela; Farrar, Glennys R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, New York, New York 10003 (United States)

    2005-10-15

    We consider the cross section limits for light dark matter cadnidates (m=0.4 to 10 GeV). We calculate the interaction of dark matter in the crust above underground dark matter detectors and find that in the intermediate cross section range, the energy loss of dark matter is sufficient to fall below the energy threshold of current underground experiments. This implies the existence of a window in the dark matter exclusion limits in the micro-barn range.

  5. Inequality design limits in optimal aerodynamic shapes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seaman, Charles Knight

    1968-01-01

    INEQUALITY DESIGN LIMITS IN OPTIMAL AERODYNAMIC SHAPES A Thesis By CHARLES KNIGHT SEAMAN Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1968... Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering INEQUALITY DESIGN LIMITS IN OPTIMAL AERODYNAMIC SHAPES A Thesis By CHARLES KNIGHT SEAMAN Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department) (Member) (Member) May 1968...

  6. Limits on Enhanced Radio Wave Scattering by Supernova Remnants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura G. Spitler; Steven R. Spangler

    2005-06-28

    We report multifrequency observations with the NRAO Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) of the compact radio sources J0128+6306 and J0547+2721, which are viewed through the supernova remnants G127.1+0.5 and S147, respectively. Observations were made at frequencies of 1.427, 1.667, 2.271, and 4.987 GHz. The lines of sight to these sources pass through the shock wave and upstream and downstream turbulent layers of their respective supernova remnants, and thus might detect cosmic-ray generated turbulence produced during the Fermi acceleration process. For both sources, we detect interstellar scattering, characterized by a component of the angular size which scales as the square of the observing wavelength. The magnitude of the scattering is characterized by an effective scattering angular size theta_S0 at a frequency of 1 GHz of 13.2 +/- 2.6 milliarcseconds (mas) for J0128+6306 and 6.7 +/- 2.2 mas for J0547+2721. These angular sizes are consistent with the ``incidental'' scattering for any line of sight out of the galaxy at similar galactic latitudes and longitudes. There is therefore no evidence for enhanced turbulence at these supernova remnants. We establish upper limits to the supernova remnant-associated scattering measures of 8.1-14.8 m^-20/3-pc for J0128+6306 and 3.0 m^-20/3-pc for J0547+2721.

  7. Supernova Neutrinos Detection On Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xin-Heng Guo; Ming-Yang Huang; Bing-Lin Young

    2009-05-12

    In this paper, we first discuss the detection of supernova neutrino on Earth. Then we propose a possible method to acquire information about $\\theta_{13}$ smaller than $1.5^\\circ$ by detecting the ratio of the event numbers of different flavor supernova neutrinos. Such an sensitivity cannot yet be achieved by the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment.

  8. Neutron Detection Efficiency of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilfoyle, Jerry

    Neutron Detection Efficiency of the CLAS12 Detector M. Moog and G. Gilfoyle University Of Richmond - Department of Physics Software We simulated the neutron detection efficiency of the forward time of flight scintillators for quasielastic electron-neutron scattering using a series of software packages. Elastic

  9. Purchasing Department PCard Update Form Change Cardholder Limits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clayton, Dale H.

    : _____________________________ Current Monthly (Cycle) Limit:______________________________ Requested PCard Limits Requested Single Purchase Limit: ___________________________ Requested Monthly (Cycle) Limit) __________________________________________________________________________________________________ University of Utah Purchasing Department | 1901 E South Campus Drive, Room 151 | SLC UT 84112 Phone: 801

  10. Pushing the precision limit of ground-based eclipse photometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Gillon; D. R. Anderson; B. -O. Demory; D. M. Wilson; C. Hellier; D. Queloz; C. Waelkens

    2008-06-30

    Until recently, it was considered by many that ground-based photometry could not reach the high cadence sub-mmag regime because of the presence of the atmosphere. Indeed, high frequency atmospheric noises (mainly scintillation) limit the precision that high SNR photometry can reach within small time bins. If one is ready to damage the sampling of his photometric time-series, binning the data (or using longer exposures) allows to get better errors, but the obtained precision will be finally limited by low frequency noises. To observe several times the same planetary eclipse and to fold the photometry with the orbital period is thus generally considered as the only option to get very well sampled and precise eclipse light curve from the ground. Nevertheless, we show here that reaching the sub-mmag sub-min regime for one eclipse is possible with a ground-based instrument. This has important implications for transiting planets characterization, secondary eclipses measurement and small planets detection from the ground.

  11. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Schneck; B. Cabrera; D. G. Cerdeno; V. Mandic; H. E. Rogers; R. Agnese; A. J. Anderson; M. Asai; D. Balakishiyeva; D. Barker; R. Basu Thakur; D. A. Bauer; J. Billard; A. Borgland; D. Brandt; P. L. Brink; R. Bunker; D. O. Caldwell; R. Calkins; H. Chagani; Y. Chen; J. Cooley; B. Cornell; C. H. Crewdson; P. Cushman; M. Daal; P. C. F. Di Stefano; T. Doughty; L. Esteban; S. Fallows; E. Figueroa-Feliciano; G. L. Godfrey; S. R. Golwala; J. Hall; H. R. Harris; T. Hofer; D. Holmgren; L. Hsu; M. E. Huber; D. M. Jardin; A. Jastram; O. Kamaev; B. Kara; M. H. Kelsey; A. Kennedy; A. Leder; B. Loer; E. Lopez Asamar; P. Lukens; R. Mahapatra; K. A. McCarthy; N. Mirabolfathi; R. A. Moffatt; J. D. Morales Mendoza; S. M. Oser; K. Page; W. A. Page; R. Partridge; M. Pepin; A. Phipps; K. Prasad; M. Pyle; H. Qiu; W. Rau; P. Redl; A. Reisetter; Y. Ricci; A. Roberts; T. Saab; B. Sadoulet; J. Sander; R. W. Schnee; S. Scorza; B. Serfass; B. Shank; D. Speller; D. Toback; S. Upadhyayula; A. N. Villano; B. Welliver; J. S. Wilson; D. H. Wright; X. Yang; S. Yellin; J. J. Yen; B. A. Young; J. Zhang

    2015-06-22

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter-nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  12. Directional detection of dark matter streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciaran A. J. O'Hare; Anne M. Green

    2014-11-11

    Directional detection of WIMPs, in which the energies and directions of the recoiling nuclei are measured, currently presents the only prospect for probing the local velocity distribution of Galactic dark matter. We investigate the extent to which future directional detectors would be capable of probing dark matter substructure in the form of streams. We analyse the signal expected from a Sagittarius-like stream and also explore the full parameter space of stream speed, direction, dispersion and density. Using a combination of non-parametric directional statistics, a profile likelihood ratio test and Bayesian parameter inference we find that within acceptable exposure times (O(10) kg yr for cross sections just below the current exclusion limits) future directional detectors will be sensitive to a wide range of stream velocities and densities. We also examine and discuss the importance of the energy window of the detector.

  13. Neutron detection with single crystal organic scintillators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaitseva, N; Newby, J; Hamel, S; Carman, L; Faust, M; Lordi, V; Cherepy, N; Stoeffl, W; Payne, S

    2009-07-15

    Detection of high-energy neutrons in the presence of gamma radiation background utilizes pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) phenomena in organics studied previously only with limited number of materials, mostly liquid scintillators and single crystal stilbene. The current paper presents the results obtained with broader varieties of luminescent organic single crystals. The studies involve experimental tools of crystal growth and material characterization in combination with the advanced computer modeling, with the final goal of better understanding the relevance between the nature of the organic materials and their PSD properties. Special consideration is given to the factors that may diminish or even completely obscure the PSD properties in scintillating crystals. Among such factors are molecular and crystallographic structures that determine exchange coupling and exciton mobility in organic materials and the impurity effect discussed on the examples of trans-stilbene, bibenzyl, 9,10-diphenylanthracene and diphenylacetylene.

  14. Limits on anomalous WW? and WWZ couplings from WW/WZ? e?jj production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Coppage, Don; Hebert, C.

    2000-08-09

    IV, V and VI describe our particle identification methods, the data sample, and event selection criteria. Sec- tions VII and VIII are devoted to detection efficiency and background estimates. Results and conclusions are presented in Secs. IX and X. II... containing a radiator ~393 foils of 18 mm thick polypropylene in a volume filled with nitrogen gas!, and an x-ray detection chamber filled with Xe gas. The TRD information is not used in this analysis.5-4 LIMITS ON ANOMALOUS WWg AND WWZ COUPLINGS...

  15. Particle detection systems and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morris, Christopher L.; Makela, Mark F.

    2010-05-11

    Techniques, apparatus and systems for detecting particles such as muons and neutrons. In one implementation, a particle detection system employs a plurality of drift cells, which can be for example sealed gas-filled drift tubes, arranged on sides of a volume to be scanned to track incoming and outgoing charged particles, such as cosmic ray-produced muons. The drift cells can include a neutron sensitive medium to enable concurrent counting of neutrons. The system can selectively detect devices or materials, such as iron, lead, gold, uranium, plutonium, and/or tungsten, occupying the volume from multiple scattering of the charged particles passing through the volume and can concurrently detect any unshielded neutron sources occupying the volume from neutrons emitted therefrom. If necessary, the drift cells can be used to also detect gamma rays. The system can be employed to inspect occupied vehicles at border crossings for nuclear threat objects.

  16. A brightness exceeding simulated Langmuir limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakasuji, Mamoru

    2013-08-15

    When an excitation of the first lens determines a beam is parallel beam, a brightness that is 100 times higher than Langmuir limit is measured experimentally, where Langmuir limits are estimated using a simulated axial cathode current density which is simulated based on a measured emission current. The measured brightness is comparable to Langmuir limit, when the lens excitation is such that an image position is slightly shorter than a lens position. Previously measured values of brightness for cathode apical radii of curvature 20, 60, 120, 240, and 480 ?m were 8.7, 5.3, 3.3, 2.4, and 3.9 times higher than their corresponding Langmuir limits, respectively, in this experiment, the lens excitation was such that the lens and the image positions were 180 mm and 400 mm, respectively. From these measured brightness for three different lens excitation conditions, it is concluded that the brightness depends on the first lens excitation. For the electron gun operated in a space charge limited condition, some of the electrons emitted from the cathode are returned to the cathode without having crossed a virtual cathode. Therefore, method that assumes a Langmuir limit defining method using a Maxwellian distribution of electron velocities may need to be revised. For the condition in which the values of the exceeding the Langmuir limit are measured, the simulated trajectories of electrons that are emitted from the cathode do not cross the optical axis at the crossover, thus the law of sines may not be valid for high brightness electron beam systems.

  17. Compiler-Assisted Detection of Transient Memory Errors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tavarageri, Sanket; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Sadayappan, Ponnuswamy

    2014-06-09

    The probability of bit flips in hardware memory systems is projected to increase significantly as memory systems continue to scale in size and complexity. Effective hardware-based error detection and correction requires that the complete data path, involving all parts of the memory system, be protected with sufficient redundancy. First, this may be costly to employ on commodity computing platforms and second, even on high-end systems, protection against multi-bit errors may be lacking. Therefore, augmenting hardware error detection schemes with software techniques is of consider- able interest. In this paper, we consider software-level mechanisms to comprehensively detect transient memory faults. We develop novel compile-time algorithms to instrument application programs with checksum computation codes so as to detect memory errors. Unlike prior approaches that employ checksums on computational and architectural state, our scheme verifies every data access and works by tracking variables as they are produced and consumed. Experimental evaluation demonstrates that the proposed comprehensive error detection solution is viable as a completely software-only scheme. We also demonstrate that with limited hardware support, overheads of error detection can be further reduced.

  18. Gaia transient detection efficiency: hunting for nuclear transients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blagorodnova, Nadejda; Harrison, Diana L; Koposov, Sergey; Mattila, Seppo; Campbell, Heather; Walton, Nicholas A; Wyrzykowski, Lukasz

    2015-01-01

    We present a study of the detectability of transient events associated with galaxies for the Gaia European Space Agency astrometric mission. We simulated the on-board detections, and on-ground processing for a mock galaxy catalogue to establish the properties required for the discovery of transient events by Gaia, specifically tidal disruption events (TDEs) and supernovae (SNe). Transients may either be discovered by the on-board detection of a new source or by the brightening of a previously known source. We show that Gaia transients can be identified as new detections on-board for offsets from the host galaxy nucleus of 0.1--0.5,arcsec, depending on magnitude and scanning angle. The Gaia detection system shows no significant loss of SNe at close radial distances to the nucleus. We used the detection efficiencies to predict the number of transients events discovered by Gaia. For a limiting magnitude of 19, we expect around 1300 SNe per year: 65% SN Ia, 28% SN II and 7% SN Ibc, and ~20 TDEs per year.

  19. The detection of high impedance faults using random fault behavior 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carswell, Patrick Wayne

    1988-01-01

    and cleared by conventional overcurrent devices. Examples of high impedance fault scenarios include broken conductors and grounded conductors as is the case with tree faults. Most high impedance fault situations occur on the power distribution system due... of the most promising proposals are presented and commented upon as to their weaknesses and limitations if implemented on an actual power distribution system. A new algorithm is developed which attempts to detect the presence of a high impedance fault...

  20. DETECTING MASSIVE GRAVITONS USING PULSAR TIMING ARRAYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Kejia; Kramer, Michael [University of Manchester, School of Physics and Astronomy, Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Jenet, Fredrick A.; Price, Richard H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at Brownsville, Brownsville, TX 78520 (United States); Wex, Norbert, E-mail: kjlee@mpifr-bonn.mpg.d [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Bonn 53121 (Germany)

    2010-10-20

    At the limit of weak static fields, general relativity becomes Newtonian gravity with a potential field that falls off as inverse distance rather than a theory of Yukawa-type fields with a finite range. General relativity also predicts that the speed of disturbances of its waves is c, the vacuum light speed, and is non-dispersive. For these reasons, the graviton, the boson for general relativity, can be considered to be massless. Massive gravitons, however, are features of some alternatives to general relativity. This has motivated experiments and observations that, so far, have been consistent with the zero-mass graviton of general relativity, but further tests will be valuable. A basis for new tests may be the high sensitivity gravitational wave (GW) experiments that are now being performed and the higher sensitivity experiments that are being planned. In these experiments, it should be feasible to detect low levels of dispersion due to non-zero graviton mass. One of the most promising techniques for such a detection may be the pulsar timing program that is sensitive to nano-Hertz GWs. Here, we present some details of such a detection scheme. The pulsar timing response to a GW background with the massive graviton is calculated, and the algorithm to detect the massive graviton is presented. We conclude that, with 90% probability, massless gravitons can be distinguished from gravitons heavier than 3 x 10{sup -22} eV (Compton wavelength {lambda}{sub g} = 4.1 x 10{sup 12} km), if bi-weekly observation of 60 pulsars is performed for 5 years with a pulsar rms timing accuracy of 100 ns. If 60 pulsars are observed for 10 years with the same accuracy, the detectable graviton mass is reduced to 5 x 10{sup -23} eV ({lambda}{sub g} = 2.5 x 10{sup 13} km); for 5 year observations of 100 or 300 pulsars, the sensitivity is respectively 2.5 x 10{sup -22} ({lambda}{sub g} = 5.0 x 10{sup 12} km) and 10{sup -22} eV ({lambda}{sub g} = 1.2 x 10{sup 13} km). Finally, a 10 year observation of 300 pulsars with 100 ns timing accuracy would probe graviton masses down to 3 x 10{sup -23} eV ({lambda}{sub g} = 4.1 x 10{sup 13} km).

  1. Defining coiled tubing limits -- A new approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newman, K.R.; Sathuvalli, U.B.; Stone, L.R.; Wolhart, S.

    1996-12-31

    The burst, collapse and axial load operating limits for Coiled Tubing (CT) are currently established using the Von Mises incipient yield criterion. This criterion has historically been used to calculate the limits for oil country tubular goods (OCTG). The limits according to this criterion are based on the point at which the pipe material reaches a load state in which it begins to yield. Because of the bending that occurs when the CT is spooled on and off the reel, and when it is bent over the guide arch, the CT is already far beyond the yield point before it enters a well. Thus, this criterion does not really apply to CT. This paper describes a research project currently in progress. The purpose of this project is to define a new set of CT limits based on criteria other than incipient yield. This new approach to setting CT operating limits takes into account the internal residual stresses in the CT which are a consequence of repeated bending cycles and the accompanying change in material properties.

  2. Detection of damage in axial (membrane) systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffey, T.A. [Duffey (T.A.), Tijeras, NM (United States); Baker, W.E. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Farrar, C.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Rhee, W.H. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1998-12-31

    In a recent paper, two methods of damage identification (Modified Damage Index and Change-in-Flexibility) were applied to detection of damage in an 8-DOF vibrating system. The goal of the work was to detect damage (reduction in stiffness of one or more of the elements) as well as to locate the particular damaged elements (S). However, the investigation was limited to numerical simulations only. In this paper, a physical, spring-mass model of a similar, degenerate 8-DOF system (7 normal modes plus a rigid-body mode) was constructed. Experiments were then performed and the modal properties of the system were determined in undamaged and damaged states. Excitation was provided either by an impact hammer or by an electromechanical shaker. Damage was induced by replacing one of the springs with a spring of lower stiffness. The Modified Damage Index method clearly isolated the location of damage for a variety of damage locations and levels of damage. The Change-in-Flexibility method, however, was found to be less reliable. The ability of the method to locate damage depended strongly on location and the level of damage as well as the number of modes included.

  3. Detection of phenols using engineered bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wise, Arlene A. (Philadelphia, PA); Kuske, Cheryl R. (Los Alamos, NM); Terwilliger, Thomas C. (Santa Fe, NM)

    2007-12-04

    Detection of phenols using engineered bacteria. A biosensor can be created by placing a reporter gene under control of an inducible promoter. The reporter gene produces a signal when a cognate transcriptional activator senses the inducing chemical. Creation of bacterial biosensors is currently restricted by limited knowledge of the genetic systems of bacteria that catabolize xenobiotics. By using mutagenic PCR to change the chemical specificity of the Pseudomonas species CF600 DmpR protein, the potential for engineering novel biosensors for detection of phenols has been demonstrated. DmpR, a well-characterized transcriptional activator of the P. CF600's dmp operon mediates growth on simple phenols. Transcription from Po, the promoter heading the dmp operon, is activated when the sensor domain of DmpR interacts with phenol and mono-substituted phenols. By altering the sensor domain of the DmpR, a group of DmpR derivatives that activate transcription of a Po-lacZ fusion in response to eight of the EPA's eleven priority pollutant phenols has been created. The assays and the sensor domain mutations that alter the chemical specificity of DmpR is described.

  4. Detection of phenols using engineered bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wise, Arlene A.; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.

    2004-08-10

    Detection of phenols using engineered bacteria. A biosensor can be created by placing a reporter gene under control of an inducible promoter. The reporter gene produces a signal when a cognate transcriptional activator senses the inducing chemical. Creation of bacterial biosensors is currently restricted by limited knowledge of the genetic systems of bacteria that catabolize xenobiotics. By using mutagenic PCR to change the chemical specificity of the Pseudomonas species CF600 DmpR protein, the potential for engineering novel biosensors for detection of phenols has been demonstrated. DmpR, a well-characterized transcriptional activator of the P. CF600's dmp operon mediates growth on simple phenols. Transcription from Po, the promoter heading the dmp operon, is activated when the sensor domain of DmpR interacts with phenol and mono-substituted phenols. By altering the sensor domain of the DmpR, a group of DmpR derivatives that activate transcription of a Po-lacZ fusion in response to eight of the EPA's eleven priority pollutant phenols has been created. The assays and the sensor domain mutations that alter the chemical specificity of DmpR is described.

  5. LIMITS ON THE NUMBER OF GALACTIC YOUNG SUPERNOVA REMNANTS EMITTING IN THE DECAY LINES OF {sup 44}Ti

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dufour, François; Kaspi, Victoria M., E-mail: dufourf@physics.mcgill.ca [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 rue University, Montréal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada)

    2013-09-20

    We revise the assumptions of the parameters involved in predicting the number of supernova remnants detectable in the nuclear lines of the decay chain of {sup 44}Ti. Specifically, we consider the distribution of the supernova progenitors, the supernova rate in the Galaxy, the ratios of supernova types, the Galactic production of {sup 44}Ti, and the {sup 44}Ti yield from supernovae of different types to derive credible bounds on the expected number of detectable remnants. We find that, within 1? uncertainty, the Galaxy should contain an average of 5.1{sup +2.4}{sub -2.0} remnants detectable to a survey with a {sup 44}Ti decay line flux limit of 10{sup –5} photons cm{sup –2} s{sup –1}, with a probability of detecting a single remnant of 2.7{sup +10.0}{sub -2.4}%, and an expected number of detections between two and nine remnants, making the single detection of Cas A unlikely but consistent with our models. Our results show that the probability of detecting the brightest {sup 44}Ti flux source at the high absolute Galactic longitude of Cas A or above is ?10%. Using the detected flux of Cas A, we attempt to constrain the Galactic supernova rate and Galactic production of {sup 44}Ti, but find the detection to be only weakly informative. We conclude that even future surveys having 200 times more sensitivity than state-of-the-art surveys can be guaranteed to detect only a few new remnants, with an expected number of detections between 8 and 21 at a limiting {sup 44}Ti decay flux of 10{sup –7} photons cm{sup –2} s{sup –1}.

  6. Discrimination of the binary coherent signal: Gaussian-operation limit and simple non-Gaussian near-optimal receivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masahiro Takeoka; Masahide Sasaki

    2008-08-14

    We address the limit of the Gaussian operations and classical communication in the problem of quantum state discrimination. We show that the optimal Gaussian strategy for the discrimination of the binary phase shift keyed (BPSK) coherent signal is a simple homodyne detection. We also propose practical near-optimal quantum receivers that beat the BPSK homodyne limit in all areas of the signal power. Our scheme is simple and does not require realtime electrical feedback.

  7. Fundamental limitations for quantum and nano thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Micha? Horodecki; Jonathan Oppenheim

    2014-10-25

    The relationship between thermodynamics and statistical physics is valid in the thermodynamic limit - when the number of particles becomes very large. Here, we study thermodynamics in the opposite regime - at both the nano scale, and when quantum effects become important. Applying results from quantum information theory we construct a theory of thermodynamics in these limits. We derive general criteria for thermodynamical state transformations, and as special cases, find two free energies: one that quantifies the deterministically extractable work from a small system in contact with a heat bath, and the other that quantifies the reverse process. We find that there are fundamental limitations on work extraction from nonequilibrium states, owing to finite size effects and quantum coherences. This implies that thermodynamical transitions are generically irreversible at this scale. As one application of these methods, we analyse the efficiency of small heat engines and find that they are irreversible during the adiabatic stages of the cycle.

  8. Multiple soft limits of cosmological correlation functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joyce, Austin; Khoury, Justin; Simonovi?, Marko E-mail: jkhoury@sas.upenn.edu

    2015-01-01

    We derive novel identities satisfied by inflationary correlation functions in the limit where two external momenta are taken to be small. We derive these statements in two ways: using background-wave arguments and as Ward identities following from the fixed-time path integral. Interestingly, these identities allow us to constrain some of the O(q{sup 2}) components of the soft limit, in contrast to their single-soft analogues. We provide several nontrivial checks of our identities both in the context of resonant non-Gaussianities and in small sound speed models. Additionally, we extend the relation at lowest order in external momenta to arbitrarily many soft legs, and comment on the many-soft extension at higher orders in the soft momentum. Finally, we consider how higher soft limits lead to identities satisfied by correlation functions in large-scale structure.

  9. Review of Current Neutron Detection Systems for Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukhopadhyay, S.; Maurer, R.; Guss, P.; Kruschwitz, C.

    2014-09-01

    Neutron detectors are used in a myriad of applications—from safeguarding special nuclear materials (SNM) to determining lattice spacing in soft materials. The transformational changes taking place in neutron detection and imaging techniques in the last few years are largely being driven by the global shortage of helium-3 (3He). This article reviews the status of neutron sensors used specifically for SNM detection in radiological emergency response. These neutron detectors must be highly efficient, be rugged, have fast electronics to measure neutron multiplicity, and be capable of measuring direction of the neutron sources and possibly image them with high spatial resolution. Neutron detection is an indirect physical process: neutrons react with nuclei in materials to initiate the release of one or more charged particles that produce electric signals that can be processed by the detection system. Therefore, neutron detection requires conversion materials as active elements of the detection system; these materials may include boron-10 (10B), lithium-6 (6Li), and gadollinium-157 (157Gd), to name a few, but the number of materials available for neutron detection is limited. However, in recent years, pulse-shape-discriminating plastic scintillators, scintillators made of helium-4 (4He) under high pressure, pillar and trench semiconductor diodes, and exotic semiconductor neutron detectors made from uranium oxide and other materials have widely expanded the parameter space in neutron detection methodology. In this article we will pay special attention to semiconductor-based neutron sensors. Modern micro-fabricated nanotubes covered inside with neutron converter materials and with very high aspect ratios for better charge transport will be discussed.

  10. New Limits on the Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Neutrino Flux from the ANITA Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorham, P.W.; Allison, P.; Barwick, S.W.; Beatty, J.J.; Besson, D.Z.; Binns, W.R.; Chen, C.; Chen, P.; Clem, J.M.; Connolly, A.; Dowkontt, P.F.; DuVernois, M.A.; Field, R.C.; Goldstein, D.; Goodhue, A.; Hast, C.; Hebert, C.L.; Hoover, S.; Israel, M.H.; Kowalski, J.; Learned, J.G.; /Hawaii U. /Caltech, JPL /Hawaii U. /Minnesota U. /Hawaii U. /Ohio State U. /Hawaii U. /UC, Irvine /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Caltech, JPL /SLAC /University Coll. London /Ohio State U. /SLAC /Hawaii U. /UCLA /Delaware U. /Hawaii U. /SLAC /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.

    2011-12-01

    We report initial results of the first flight of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA-1) 2006-2007 Long Duration Balloon flight, which searched for evidence of a diffuse flux of cosmic neutrinos above energies of E{sub v} = 3 x 10{sup 18} eV. ANITA-1 flew for 35 days looking for radio impulses due to the Askaryan effect in neutrino-induced electromagnetic showers within the Antarctic ice sheets. We report here on our initial analysis, which was performed as a blind search of the data. No neutrino candidates are seen, with no detected physics background. We set model-independent limits based on this result. Upper limits derived from our analysis rule out the highest cosmogenic neutrino models. In a background horizontal-polarization channel, we also detect six events consistent with radio impulses from ultrahigh energy extensive air showers.

  11. Experimental measurements and modeling prediction of flammability limits of binary hydrocarbon mixtures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Fuman

    2009-05-15

    ?..?????...?????????..29 3.3 Detection Criterion for Flammability Limit Measurement??...36 IV EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS AND DATA ANALYSIS??????.40 4.1 Overview?...?????????....???????....???40 4.2 Combustion Types in Reaction Vessel???..????..???.40 4...) profiles for non-propagation combustion. ???????????????????..42 4.2 Temperature (top) and pressure (bottom) profiles for flash combustion?.??.43 4.3 Temperature (top) and pressure (bottom) profiles for discontinuous flame...

  12. Trace Explosive Detection Using Nanosensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senesac, Larry R [ORNL; Thundat, Thomas George [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    Selective and sensitive detection of explosives is very important in countering terrorist threats. Detecting trace explosives has become a very complex and expensive endeavor because of a number of factors, such as the wide variety of materials that can be used as explosives, the lack of easily detectable signatures, the vast number of avenues by which these weapons can be deployed, and the lack of inexpensive sensors with high sensitivity and selectivity. High sensitivity and selectivity, combined with the ability to lower the deployment cost of sensors using mass production, is essential in winning the war on explosives-based terrorism. Nanosensors have the potential to satisfy all the requirements for an effective platform for the trace detection of explosives.

  13. Track detection: an MCM approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kotha, Kedarnath S.

    1993-01-01

    132ns. A new integrated circuit packaging structure coupled with a purely hardware system was needed to meet the high speed and best performance requirements for track detection of subatomic particles. Microprocessors cannot be used for this kind...

  14. Parametric Feature Detection CUCS02895

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , efficient search, feature detection, parameter estimation, step edges, roof edges, corners, lines, discs. The concepts of parameter reduction by normalization, dimension reduction, pattern rejection, and efficient search are employed to achieve high efficiency. Detectors have been implemented for five specific

  15. Redshift-space limits of bound structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rolando Dünner; Andreas Reisenegger; Andrés Meza; Pablo A. Araya; Hernán Quintana

    2007-02-26

    An exponentially expanding Universe, possibly governed by a cosmological constant, forces gravitationally bound structures to become more and more isolated, eventually becoming causally disconnected from each other and forming so-called "island universes". This new scenario reformulates the question about which will be the largest structures that will remain gravitationally bound, together with requiring a systematic tool that can be used to recognize the limits and mass of these structures from observational data, namely redshift surveys of galaxies. Here we present a method, based on the spherical collapse model and N-body simulations, by which we can estimate the limits of bound structures as observed in redshift space. The method is based on a theoretical criterion presented in a previous paper that determines the mean density contrast that a spherical shell must have in order to be marginally bound to the massive structure within it. Understanding the kinematics of the system, we translated the real-space limiting conditions of this "critical" shell to redshift space, producing a projected velocity envelope that only depends on the density profile of the structure. From it we created a redshift-space version of the density contrast that we called "density estimator", which can be calibrated from N-body simulations for a reasonable projected velocity envelope template, and used to estimate the limits and mass of a structure only from its redshift-space coordinates.

  16. DISSOLVED CONCENTRATION LIMITS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NA

    2004-11-22

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of elements with radioactive isotopes under probable repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, field measurements, and laboratory experiments. The scope of this modeling activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for 14 elements with radioactive isotopes (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium) important to calculated dose. Model outputs for uranium, plutonium, neptunium, thorium, americium, and protactinium are in the form of tabulated functions with pH and log (line integral) CO{sub 2} as independent variables, plus one or more uncertainty terms. The solubility limits for the remaining elements are either in the form of distributions or single values. The output data from this report are fundamental inputs for Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) to determine the estimated release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Consistent modeling approaches and environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models for all of the actinides. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so that they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, and activity coefficients have been quantified or otherwise addressed.

  17. Limiting Abnormal Mold Growth in Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, C. W.

    2002-01-01

    in wood, or rusting and corrosion of metals. Abnormal mold or fungal growth, then, can create major problems for building owners. Moisture is the key factor that building designers and owners can manage in order to limit mold growth. This paper introduces...

  18. Flexible moldable conductive current-limiting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shea, John Joseph (Pittsburgh, PA); Djordjevic, Miomir B. (Milwaukee, WI); Hanna, William Kingston (Pittsburgh, PA)

    2002-01-01

    A current limiting PTC device (10) has two electrodes (14) with a thin film of electric conducting polymer material (20) disposed between the electrodes, the polymer material (20) having superior flexibility and short circuit performance, where the polymer material contains short chain aliphatic diepoxide, conductive filler particles, curing agent, and, preferably, a minor amount of bisphenol A epoxy resin.

  19. THE LANDAUER LIMIT AND THERMODYNAMICS OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baez, John

    THE LANDAUER LIMIT AND THERMODYNAMICS OF BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS David H. Wolpert Santa Fe Institute1 v2 b) h 2R vv1 v2 c) h vv1 v2 R Thermodynamic cost to erase a bit - the minimal amount of entropy be thermodynamically reversible ... but if it is applied to known data, it is thermodynamically irreversible." #12;HEAT

  20. Efficiency Limitations for -Protocols for Group Homomorphisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Efficiency Limitations for -Protocols for Group Homomorphisms (Full Version) Endre Bangerter1 , Jan stephan.krenn@bfh.ch Abstract. Efficient zero-knowledge proofs of knowledge for group ho- momorphisms be performed very efficiently within groups of known order, for hidden order groups the respective proofs

  1. LIMITED SUBMISSION Obama-Singh 21st

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    -secondary educational institutions, in the thematic areas of energy; sustainable development; climate changeLIMITED SUBMISSION Obama-Singh 21st Century Knowledge Initiative (OSI) US-India Institutional for the support of projects through the Obama-Singh 21st Century Knowledge Initiative (OSI). Announced by the U.S

  2. More "Circle Limit III" Patterns Douglas Dunham

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunham, Doug

    of the four. In Circle Limit III, four fish meet at right fin tips, three fish meet at left fin tips, and three fish meet at their noses. In this paper, we show patterns with other numbers of fish that meet none but "through traffic" #12;series, and all the fish belonging to one series have the same colour

  3. Extending the Upper Temperature Limit for Life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    ) un- der N2-CO2 (80:20) in sealed culture tubes that con- tained formate (10 mM) as the electron donor that permit strain 121 to grow at such high temperatures are unknown. It is gen- erally assumed that the upperExtending the Upper Temperature Limit for Life Kazem Kashefi and Derek R. Lovley* The upper

  4. Jerk Limited Input Shapers Tarunraj Singh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Tarunraj

    ACC04 Jerk Limited Input Shapers Tarunraj Singh tsingh@eng.buffalo.edu State University of New York with the impulse sequence. Singh and Vadali [8] proposed a technique to design time-delay filters whose performance and Watanabe [11], multi-hump input shapers by Singhose et al., minimax filters by Singh [12], user specified

  5. Jerk Limited Input Shapers Tarunraj Singh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Tarunraj

    Jerk Limited Input Shapers Tarunraj Singh Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering SUNY. Singh and Vadali 5 pro- posed a technique to design time-delay filters whose performance was identical and Watanabe 6 , multi-hump input shapers by Singhose et al., minimax filters by Singh 7 , user specified time

  6. Antenna factorization in strongly ordered limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosower, David A.

    2005-02-15

    When energies or angles of gluons emitted in a gauge-theory process are small and strongly ordered, the emission factorizes in a simple way to all orders in perturbation theory. I show how to unify the various strongly ordered soft, mixed soft-collinear, and collinear limits using antenna factorization amplitudes, which are generalizations of the Catani-Seymour dipole factorization function.

  7. Dose Limit Philosophies Implemented at the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Motor Target in Center-cut Position Figure Credit: Adam Carroll EDM Machining Map Specimen Map #12 is an administrative tool used to limit the risk of component failure originating from radiation-induced changes of gadolinium coating on the moderator poison plates ­ Concern: Loss of resolution and performance

  8. Extremal Limits of Rotating Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Andrianopoli; Riccardo D'Auria; Antonio Gallerati; Mario Trigiante

    2013-05-30

    We consider non-extremal, stationary, axion-dilaton solutions to ungauged symmetric supergravity models, obtained by Harrison transformations of the non-extremal Kerr solution. We define a general algebraic procedure, which can be viewed as an Inonu-Wigner contraction of the Noether charge matrix associated with the effective D=3 sigma-model description of the solution, yielding, through different singular limits, the known BPS and non-BPS extremal black holes (which include the under-rotating non-BPS one). The non-extremal black hole can thus be thought of as "interpolating" among these limit-solutions. The algebraic procedure that we define generalizes the known Rasheed-Larsen limit which yielded, in the Kaluza-Klein theory, the first instance of under-rotating extremal solution. As an example of our general result, we discuss in detail the non-extremal solution in the T^3-model, with either (q_0, p^1) or (p^0, q_1) charges switched on, and its singular limits. Such solutions, computed in D=3 through the solution-generating technique, is completely described in terms of D=4 fields, which include the fully integrated vector fields.

  9. Detection device for hazardous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Partin, Judy K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Grey, Alan E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01

    A detection device that is activated by the interaction of a hazardous chcal with a coating interactive with said chemical on an optical fiber thereby reducing the amount of light passing through the fiber to a light detector. A combination of optical filters separates the light into a signal beam and a reference beam which after detection, appropriate amplification, and comparison with preset internal signals, activates an alarm means if a predetermined level of contaminant is observed.

  10. Detection device for hazardous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Partin, Judy K.; Grey, Alan E.

    1994-04-05

    A detection device that is activated by the interaction of a hazardous chcal with a coating interactive with said chemical on an optical fiber thereby reducing the amount of light passing through the fiber to a light detector. A combination of optical filters separates the light into a signal beam and a reference beam which after detection, appropriate amplification, and comparison with preset internal signals, activates an alarm means if a predetermined level of contaminant is observed.

  11. Limits on the Short Term Variability of Sagittarius A* in the Near-Infrared

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hornstein, S D; Tanner, A; Morris, M; Becklin, E E; Wizinowich, P

    2002-01-01

    The recent detection of a 3-hr X-ray flare by the Chandra Observatory has raised the possibility of enhanced emission over a broad range of wavelengths from Sgr A*, the suspected 2.6 x 10^6 solar mass black hole at the Galactic Center, during a flaring event. We have, therefore, reconstructed 3-hr data sets from 2 micron speckle and adaptive optics images (theta_core = 50 - 100 mas) obtained with the W. M. Keck 10-m telescopes between 1995 and 2001. In 25 separate observations, no evidence of any significant excess emission associated with Sgr A* was detected. The lowest of our detection limits gives an observed limit for the quiescent state of Sgr A* of 0.09+/-0.005 mJy, or, equivalently, a dereddened value of 2.0+/-0.1 mJy, which is a factor of 2 lower than the best previously published quiescent value. Under the assumption that there are random 3-hr flares producing both enhanced X-ray and near-infrared emission, our highest limit constrains the variable state of Sgr A* to <0.8 mJy (observed) or 19 mJy ...

  12. Limit-Induced Stable Limit Cycles in Power Patel Bhageerath Reddy Ian A. Hiskens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    place bounds on the divergent behaviour of states. This paper explores the situation where generator a high value. However it is well known that as KA increases, a Hopf bifurcation may occur at a critical/PSS/exciter model of Figure 1. The PSS output VP SS is limited by clipping limits, whilst the field voltage Efd

  13. Direct Real-Time Detection of Vapors from Explosive Compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ewing, Robert G.; Clowers, Brian H.; Atkinson, David A.

    2013-10-03

    The real-time detection of vapors from low volatility explosives including PETN, tetryl, RDX and nitroglycerine along with various compositions containing these substances is demonstrated. This was accomplished with an atmospheric flow tube (AFT) using a non-radioactive ionization source and coupled to a mass spectrometer. Direct vapor detection was demonstrated in less than 5 seconds at ambient temperature without sample pre-concentration. The several seconds of residence time of analytes in the AFT provides a significant opportunity for reactant ions to interact with analyte vapors to achieve ionization. This extended reaction time, combined with the selective ionization using the nitrate reactant ions (NO3- and NO3-•HNO3), enables highly sensitive explosives detection. Observed signals from diluted explosive vapors indicate detection limits below 10 ppqv using selected ion monitoring (SIM) of the explosive-nitrate adduct at m/z 349, 378, 284 and 289 for tetryl, PETN, RDX and NG respectively. Also provided is a demonstration of the vapor detection from 10 different energetic formulations, including double base propellants, plastic explosives and commercial blasting explosives using SIM for the NG, PETN and RDX product ions.

  14. Simultaneous Detection and Registration for Ileo-Cecal Valve Detection in 3D CT Colonography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbu, Adrian

    Simultaneous Detection and Registration for Ileo-Cecal Valve Detection in 3D CT Colonography Le Lu1-Cecal Valve (ICV) detection in both clean and tagged 3D CT colonography scans. Our final ICV detection system

  15. Scalable Techniques for Anomaly Detection 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yadav, Sandeep 1985-

    2012-08-20

    Computer networks are constantly being attacked by malicious entities for various reasons. Network based attacks include but are not limited to, Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS), DNS based attacks, Cross-site Scripting ...

  16. Quantum Limits of Measurements and Uncertainty Principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanao Ozawa

    2015-05-19

    In this paper, we show how the Robertson uncertainty relation gives certain intrinsic quantum limits of measurements in the most general and rigorous mathematical treatment. A general lower bound for the product of the root-mean-square measurement errors arising in joint measurements of noncommuting observables is established. We give a rigorous condition for holding of the standard quantum limit (SQL) for repeated measurements, and prove that if a measuring instrument has no larger root-mean-square preparational error than the root-mean-square measurement errors then it obeys the SQL. As shown previously, we can even construct many linear models of position measurement which circumvent this condition for the SQL.

  17. Polymer Quantum Mechanics and its Continuum Limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alejandro Corichi; Tatjana Vukasinac; Jose A. Zapata

    2007-08-22

    A rather non-standard quantum representation of the canonical commutation relations of quantum mechanics systems, known as the polymer representation has gained some attention in recent years, due to its possible relation with Planck scale physics. In particular, this approach has been followed in a symmetric sector of loop quantum gravity known as loop quantum cosmology. Here we explore different aspects of the relation between the ordinary Schroedinger theory and the polymer description. The paper has two parts. In the first one, we derive the polymer quantum mechanics starting from the ordinary Schroedinger theory and show that the polymer description arises as an appropriate limit. In the second part we consider the continuum limit of this theory, namely, the reverse process in which one starts from the discrete theory and tries to recover back the ordinary Schroedinger quantum mechanics. We consider several examples of interest, including the harmonic oscillator, the free particle and a simple cosmological model.

  18. Radio frequency detection assembly and method for detecting radio frequencies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cown, Steven H. (Rigby, ID); Derr, Kurt Warren (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2010-03-16

    A radio frequency detection assembly is described and which includes a radio frequency detector which detects a radio frequency emission produced by a radio frequency emitter from a given location which is remote relative to the radio frequency detector; a location assembly electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and which is operable to estimate the location of the radio frequency emitter from the radio frequency emission which has been received; and a radio frequency transmitter electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and the location assembly, and which transmits a radio frequency signal which reports the presence of the radio frequency emitter.

  19. Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance Studies on ?-conjugated...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ThesisDissertation: Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance Studies on -conjugated semiconductor systems Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Optically Detected Magnetic...

  20. Representing the Gaichi in Japanese Detective Fiction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cruz, Aileen Marie

    2014-01-01

    Shinchosa, 1990. Kawana, Sari. Murder Most Modern: DetectiveDetective Fiction Writer?s Murder” Conclusion Bibliography itheir illicit attachment. The murder-suicide via bomb in “A

  1. Advancing the art of tuberculosis detection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advancing art of tuberculosis detection Advancing the art of tuberculosis detection New approach to finding a TB biomarker could provide earlier diagnosis. April 19, 2013 Los...

  2. Toxicity Data to Determine Refrigerant Concentration Limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calm, James M.

    2000-09-30

    This report reviews toxicity data, identifies sources for them, and presents resulting exposure limits for refrigerants for consideration by qualified parties in developing safety guides, standards, codes, and regulations. It outlines a method to calculate an acute toxicity exposure limit (ATEL) and from it a recommended refrigerant concentration limit (RCL) for emergency exposures. The report focuses on acute toxicity with particular attention to lethality, cardiac sensitization, anesthetic and central nervous system effects, and other escape-impairing effects. It addresses R-11, R-12, R-22, R-23, R-113, R-114, R-116, R-123, R-124, R-125, R-134, R-134a, R-E134, R-141b, R-142b, R-143a, R-152a, R-218, R-227ea, R-236fa, R-245ca, R-245fa, R-290, R-500, R-502, R-600a, R-717, and R-744. It summarizes additional data for R-14, R-115, R-170 (ethane), R-C318, R-600 (n-butane), and R-1270 (propylene) to enable calculation of limits for blends incorporating them. The report summarizes the data a nd related safety information, including classifications and flammability data. It also presents a series of tables with proposed ATEL and RCL concentrations-in dimensionless form and the latter also in both metric (SI) and inch-pound (IP) units of measure-for both the cited refrigerants and 66 zerotropic and azeotropic blends. They include common refrigerants, such as R-404A, R-407C, R-410A, and R-507A, as well as others in commercial or developmental status. Appendices provide profiles for the cited single-compound refrigerants and for R-500 and R-502 as well as narrative toxicity summaries for common refrigerants. The report includes an extensive set of references.

  3. Limited English Proficiency | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFinancialInvesting in Minority Banks InvestingLabLighting andLimited

  4. Means for limiting and ameliorating electrode shorting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van Konynenburg, Richard A. (Livermore, CA); Farmer, Joseph C. (Tracy, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A fuse and filter arrangement for limiting and ameliorating electrode shorting in capacitive deionization water purification systems utilizing carbon aerogel, for example. This arrangement limits and ameliorates the effects of conducting particles or debonded carbon aerogel in shorting the electrodes of a system such as a capacitive deionization water purification system. This is important because of the small interelectrode spacing and the finite possibility of debonding or fragmentation of carbon aerogel in a large system. The fuse and filter arrangement electrically protect the entire system from shutting down if a single pair of electrodes is shorted and mechanically prevents a conducting particle from migrating through the electrode stack, shorting a series of electrode pairs in sequence. It also limits the amount of energy released in a shorting event. The arrangement consists of a set of circuit breakers or fuses with one fuse or breaker in the power line connected to one electrode of each electrode pair and a set of screens of filters in the water flow channels between each set of electrode pairs.

  5. Means for limiting and ameliorating electrode shorting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konynenburg, R.A. van; Farmer, J.C.

    1999-11-09

    A fuse and filter arrangement is described for limiting and ameliorating electrode shorting in capacitive deionization water purification systems utilizing carbon aerogel, for example. This arrangement limits and ameliorates the effects of conducting particles or debonded carbon aerogel in shorting the electrodes of a system such as a capacitive deionization water purification system. This is important because of the small interelectrode spacing and the finite possibility of debonding or fragmentation of carbon aerogel in a large system. The fuse and filter arrangement electrically protect the entire system from shutting down if a single pair of electrodes is shorted and mechanically prevents a conducting particle from migrating through the electrode stack, shorting a series of electrode pairs in sequence. It also limits the amount of energy released in a shorting event. The arrangement consists of a set of circuit breakers or fuses with one fuse or breaker in the power line connected to one electrode of each electrode pair and a set of screens of filters in the water flow channels between each set of electrode pairs.

  6. Multivariate Central Limit Theorem in Quantum Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon Buchholz; Chiara Saffirio; Benjamin Schlein

    2013-09-06

    We consider the time evolution of $N$ bosons in the mean field regime for factorized initial data. In the limit of large $N$, the many body evolution can be approximated by the non-linear Hartree equation. In this paper we are interested in the fluctuations around the Hartree dynamics. We choose $k$ self-adjoint one-particle operators $O_1, \\dots, O_k$ on $L^2 (\\R^3)$, and we average their action over the $N$-particles. We show that, for every fixed $t \\in \\R$, expectations of products of functions of the averaged observables approach, as $N \\to \\infty$, expectations with respect to a complex Gaussian measure, whose covariance matrix can be expressed in terms of a Bogoliubov transformation describing the dynamics of quantum fluctuations around the mean field Hartree evolution. If the operators $O_1, \\dots, O_k$ commute, the Gaussian measure is real and positive, and we recover a "classical" multivariate central limit theorem. All our results give explicit bounds on the rate of the convergence (we obtain therefore Berry-Ess{\\'e}en type central limit theorems).

  7. A BAYESIAN HIERARCHICAL DETECTION FRAMEWORK FOR PARKING SPACE DETECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    University, Hsinchu, Taiwan. 2 Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University problem come from luminance variations, inter- occlusions among cars, and occlusions caused to the parking space detection problem, the available parking spaces and the labeling of parked cars can

  8. Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation JV Jump to: navigation, search Name: Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power...

  9. (Expired) Nationwide Limited Public Interest Waiver for LED Lighting...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (Expired) Nationwide Limited Public Interest Waiver for LED Lighting and HVAC Units: February 11, 2010 (Expired) Nationwide Limited Public Interest Waiver for LED Lighting and HVAC...

  10. Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Lifetime Limitations: The Role...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrolyte Fuel Cell Lifetime Limitations: The Role of Electrocatalyst Degradation Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Lifetime Limitations: The Role of Electrocatalyst Degradation...

  11. Assessing Galaxy Limiting Magnitudes in Large Optical Surveys...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Assessing Galaxy Limiting Magnitudes in Large Optical Surveys Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Assessing Galaxy Limiting Magnitudes in Large Optical Surveys Authors:...

  12. Detecting bioterrorism: Is chemistry enough?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeeting |Design CompetitionsFuelof 12Detecting andDetecting

  13. 16 unit limit All undergraduates are limited to 16 unit enrollment 6/4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    16 unit limit All undergraduates are limited to 16 unit enrollment 6/4 7/31. Graduating seniors may enroll in up to 18 units 8/1 8/11Graduating seniors may enroll in up to 18 units 8/18/11. Graduating Undergraduates = Excess Unit petitions for graduating seniors will be available 8/19/6. d d d d d

  14. Ultrasensitive measurement of MEMS cantilever displacement sensitivity below the shot noise limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pooser, Raphael C; Lawrie, Benjamin J

    2015-01-01

    The displacement of micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMs) cantilevers is used to measure a variety of phe- nomena in devices ranging from force microscopes for single spin detection[1] to biochemical sensors[2] to un- cooled thermal imaging systems[3]. The displacement readout is often performed optically with segmented de- tectors or interference measurements. Until recently, var- ious noise sources have limited the minimum detectable displacement in MEMs systems, but it is now possible to minimize all other sources[4] so that the noise level of the coherent light eld, called the shot noise limit (SNL), becomes the dominant source. Light sources dis- playing quantum-enhanced statistics below this limit are available[5, 6], with applications in gravitational wave astronomy[7] and bioimaging[8], but direct displacement measurements of MEMS cantilevers below the SNL have been impossible until now. Here, we demonstrate the rst direct measurement of a MEMs cantilever displace- ment with sub-SNL sensitivity, thus enabling ultratrace sensing, imaging, and microscopy applications. By com- bining multi-spatial-mode quantum light sources with a simple dierential measurement, we show that sub-SNL MEMs displacement sensitivity is highly accessible com- pared to previous eorts that measured the displacement of macroscopic mirrors with very distinct spatial struc- tures crafted with multiple optical parametric ampliers and locking loops[9]. We apply this technique to a com- mercially available microcantilever in order to detect dis- placements 60% below the SNL at frequencies where the microcantilever is shot-noise-limited. These results sup- port a new class of quantum MEMS sensor whose ulti- mate signal to noise ratio is determined by the correla- tions possible in quantum optics systems.

  15. Low velocity limits of cold atom clocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Muñoz; I. Lizuain; J. G. Muga

    2009-09-08

    Fundamental low-energy limits to the accuracy of quantum clock and stopwatch models in which the clock hand motion is activated by the presence of a particle in a region of space have been studied in the past, but their relevance for actual atomic clocks had not been assessed. In this work we address the effect of slow atomic quantum motion on Rabi and Ramsey resonance fringe patterns, as a perturbation of the results based on classical atomic motion. We find the dependence of the fractional error of the corresponding atomic clocks on the atomic velocity and interaction parameters.

  16. Heavy baryons in the large Nc limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albertus, C; Fernando, I P; Goity, J L

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that in the large Nc limit heavy baryon masses can be estimated quantitatively in a 1/Nc expansion using the Hartree approximation. The results are compared with available lattice calculations for different values of the ratio between the square root of the string tension and the heavy quark mass tension independent of Nc. Using a potential adjusted to agree with the one obtained in lattice QCD, a variational analysis of the ground state spin averaged baryon mass is performed using Gaussian Hartree wave functions. Relativistic corrections through the quark kinetic energy are included. The results provide good estimates for the first sub-leading in 1/Nc corrections.

  17. Heavy baryons in the large Nc limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Albertus; E. Ruiz Arriola; I. P. Fernando; J. L. Goity

    2015-07-16

    It is shown that in the large Nc limit heavy baryon masses can be estimated quantitatively in a 1/Nc expansion using the Hartree approximation. The results are compared with available lattice calculations for different values of the ratio between the square root of the string tension and the heavy quark mass tension independent of Nc. Using a potential adjusted to agree with the one obtained in lattice QCD, a variational analysis of the ground state spin averaged baryon mass is performed using Gaussian Hartree wave functions. Relativistic corrections through the quark kinetic energy are included. The results provide good estimates for the first sub-leading in 1/Nc corrections.

  18. Limits in high efficiency quantum frequency conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolás Quesada; J. E. Sipe

    2015-08-13

    Frequency conversion is an enabling process in many quantum information protocols. In this letter we study fundamental limits to high efficiency frequency conversion imposed by time ordering corrections. Using the Magnus expansion, we argue that these corrections, which are usually considered detrimental, can be used to increase the efficiency of conversion under certain circumstances. The corrections induce a nonlinear behaviour in the probability of upconversion as a function of the pump intensity, significantly modifying the sinusoidal Rabi oscillations that are otherwise expected. Finally, by using a simple scaling argument, we explain why cascaded frequency conversion devices attenuate time ordering corrections, allowing the construction of near ideal quantum pulse gates.

  19. Energy Systems Limited ESL | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbH JumpEllenville, NewLtd EILEnergy DatadataCentreCo LtdEnergyLimited ESL

  20. Renewable Fuels Limited RFL | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, New York: Energy ResourcesProducts LLC JumpTechSupply LtdLimited

  1. Bharat Renewable Energy Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC Jump to:Greece:BajoBelpower Srl JumpOpenRenewable Energy Limited

  2. Castle European Estates Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLCLtd Jump to: navigation, search Name:InformationEstates Limited

  3. QuantaSol Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,Energy LLCALLETE IncScience and Technology CoQuantaSol Limited

  4. Lead Hero Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EAInvervar HydroElectricColorado:EnergyLaorLaunchLea CountyHero Limited

  5. United Group Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company) JumpGTZ Climate OrientedUnionUnited ElectricLimited Jump

  6. Urenco Limited UK | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company) JumpGTZ ClimateFeedUrat Rear Banner JiheUrenco Limited

  7. Carbon Limiting Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,Cammack Village, Arkansas:Fund for Spanish Firms FC2E JumpLimiting

  8. Carnegie Wave Energy Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,Cammack Village, Arkansas:Fund forCarnegie Wave Energy Limited Jump to:

  9. Biodiesel Energy Trading Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYorkColoradoBelcherCarbonAlgeneBioLogical CapitalLimited

  10. Zebec Biogas Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan) JumpZhuyuan Electric Development CoZebec Biogas Limited

  11. Catamount Energy Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavy Electricals Ltd BHEL JumpCMNA Power JumpWindSLCastellwindLimited

  12. Clipper Windpower Europe Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavy Electricals Ltd BHELEurope Limited Jump to: navigation, search

  13. Crionaig Power Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavy Electricals Ltd BHELEurope Limited JumpAGGraefe KGCrionaig Power

  14. GenDrive Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavy ElectricalsFTL SolarGate Solar Jump to:GenDrive Limited Jump to:

  15. Graduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Low LETUsefulJorgeAtl anta,GraduateTime Limits and Work

  16. Noise canceling in-situ detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, David O.

    2014-08-26

    Technologies applicable to noise canceling in-situ NMR detection and imaging are disclosed. An example noise canceling in-situ NMR detection apparatus may comprise one or more of a static magnetic field generator, an alternating magnetic field generator, an in-situ NMR detection device, an auxiliary noise detection device, and a computer.

  17. Distributed Termination Detection for Dynamic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhamdhere, Dhananjay Madhav

    systems, Termination detection. \\Lambda Address all correspondence to this author. 1 #12; Distributed

  18. An experiment to detect gravity at sub-mm scale with high-Q mechanical oscillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Haiberger; M. Weingran; H. Wenz; S. Schiller

    2005-10-20

    Silicon double paddle oscillators are well suited for the detection of weak forces because of their high Q factor (about 10^5 at room temperature). We describe an experiment aimed at the detection of gravitational forces between masses at sub-mm distance using such an oscillator. Gravitational excitation is produced by a rotating aluminium disk with platinum segments. The force sensitivity of this apparatus is about 10 fN at room temperature for 1000 s averaging time at room temperature. The current limitations to detection of the gravitational force are mentioned.

  19. Anomalous change detection in imagery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Theiler, James P. (Los Alamos, NM); Perkins, Simon J. (Santa Fe, NM)

    2011-05-31

    A distribution-based anomaly detection platform is described that identifies a non-flat background that is specified in terms of the distribution of the data. A resampling approach is also disclosed employing scrambled resampling of the original data with one class specified by the data and the other by the explicit distribution, and solving using binary classification.

  20. Electromagnetic Interrogation Techniques Damage Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electromagnetic Interrogation Techniques for Damage Detection H. T. Banks and M. L. Joyner Center.P. Winfree Nasa Langley Research Center Hampton, VA Plenary Lecture, Electromagnetic Nondestructive Evaluation 2001 (ENDE 2001), Kobe, Japan, May 18-19, 20001 #12;Electromagnetic Interrogation Techniques

  1. Electromagnetic Interrogation Techniques Damage Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electromagnetic Interrogation Techniques for Damage Detection H. T. Banks #3; and M. L. Joyner Wincheski and W.P. Winfree Nasa Langley Research Center Hampton, VA #3; Plenary Lecture, Electromagnetic Nondestructive Evaluation 2001 (ENDE 2001), Kobe, Japan, May 18­19, 20001 #12; Electromagnetic Interrogation

  2. Detection of explosives in soils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chambers, William B. (Edgewood, NM); Rodacy, Philip J. (Albuquerque, NM); Phelan, James M. (Bosque Farms, NM); Woodfin, Ronald L. (Sandia Park, NM)

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for detecting explosive-indicating compounds in subsurface soil. The apparatus has a probe with an adsorbent material on some portion of its surface that can be placed into soil beneath the ground surface, where the adsorbent material can adsorb at least one explosive-indicating compound. The apparatus additional has the capability to desorb the explosive-indicating compound through heating or solvent extraction. A diagnostic instrument attached to the probe detects the desorbed explosive-indicating compound. In the method for detecting explosive-indicating compounds in soil, the sampling probe with an adsorbent material on at least some portion of a surface of the sampling probe is inserted into the soil to contact the adsorbent material with the soil. The explosive-indicating compounds are then desorbed and transferred as either a liquid or gas sample to a diagnostic tool for analysis. The resulting gas or liquid sample is analyzed using at least one diagnostic tool selected from the group consisting of an ion-mobility spectrometer, a gas chromatograph, a high performance liquid chromatograph, a capillary electrophoresis chromatograph, a mass spectrometer, a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer and a Raman spectrometer to detect the presence of explosive-indicating compounds.

  3. AT NORTHWESTERN EARLY CANCER DETECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chisholm, Rex L.

    --including lung cancer, pancreatic cancer, and ovarian cancer-- there is simply no screening option available, such as pancreatic, ovarian, and lung cancer. · Improve existing screening techniques, such as those for colon cancer, with the THE CANCER INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE EARLY CANCER DETECTION TECHNOLOGIES INSTITUTE

  4. Detect

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB Packet HanfordDOEDanielDeSmall Business ForumDesignerFile

  5. detection

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 Federal RegisterStorm1 3446 YEAR/%2A en Defense9/%2A

  6. Nucleic acid sequence detection using multiplexed oligonucleotide PCR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nolan, John P. (Santa Fe, NM); White, P. Scott (Los Alamos, NM)

    2006-12-26

    Methods for rapidly detecting single or multiple sequence alleles in a sample nucleic acid are described. Provided are all of the oligonucleotide pairs capable of annealing specifically to a target allele and discriminating among possible sequences thereof, and ligating to each other to form an oligonucleotide complex when a particular sequence feature is present (or, alternatively, absent) in the sample nucleic acid. The design of each oligonucleotide pair permits the subsequent high-level PCR amplification of a specific amplicon when the oligonucleotide complex is formed, but not when the oligonucleotide complex is not formed. The presence or absence of the specific amplicon is used to detect the allele. Detection of the specific amplicon may be achieved using a variety of methods well known in the art, including without limitation, oligonucleotide capture onto DNA chips or microarrays, oligonucleotide capture onto beads or microspheres, electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry. Various labels and address-capture tags may be employed in the amplicon detection step of multiplexed assays, as further described herein.

  7. Real time detection and correction of distribution feeder operational problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subramanian, A.K.; Huang, J.C.

    1995-12-31

    The paper presents a new technique that detects and corrects distribution operational problems using closed loop control of substation transformers, capacitors and reactors by an online computer. This allows the distribution system to be operated close to its capacity without sacrificing the quality of power supply. Such operations help defer the additional cost of installing new substations. The technique integrates the Distribution Feeder Analysis (DFA) and the Distribution Substation Control (DSC) functions to achieve this. The DFA function provides the topology and power flow results for the feeders using the substation real time measurements. It does not require feeder section measurements. The realtime feeder results are used in detecting any currently existing feeder operational problems such as feeder section voltages and currents outside their limits. The detected feeder problems are transformed into substation distribution bus objectives and then corrected by the DSC function using controls available at the substation. The DSC function has been performing successfully for several years at Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO) in Washington, D.C. It uses a closed loop control scheme that controls the substation transformer taps and shunt capacitor and reactor breakers and optimizes the substation operation. By combining the DFA and DSC functions into a single function and with proper transformation of feeder problems into substation objectives, a new closed loop control scheme for the substation controls is achieved. This scheme corrects the detected feeder problems and optimizes the substation operation. This technique is implemented and tested using the actual substation and feeder models of PEPCO.

  8. Detection of Small Kuiper Belt Objects by Stellar Occultations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Stevenson

    2007-12-10

    Knowledge of the Kuiper Belt is currently limited to those objects that can be detected directly. Objects with diameters less than $\\sim$10km reflect too little light to be detected. These smaller bodies could contain most of the mass in the Kuiper Belt while the abundance of these bodies may constrain the distribution of mass. The overall size distribution of bodies within the Kuiper Belt can also be inferred from the relative abundances of sub-km and larger bodies. Stellar occultations are already used to study dark objects in the Solar System, such as asteroids or planetary rings. Occultation by a KBO of a size comparable to, or larger than, that of the Fresnel Scale will result in Fresnel diffraction. Detection of diffraction effects requires fast multiple-star photometry, which will be conducted in July 2007 using the Orthogonal Parallel Transfer Imaging Camera (OPTIC) mounted on the University of Hawaii 2.2m telescope on Mauna Kea. This paper details how knowledge of the mass and structure of the outer Solar System may be obtained through the detection of serendipitous stellar occultations.

  9. Gravitational Wave Detection with High Frequency Phonon Trapping Acoustic Cavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxim Goryachev; Michael E. Tobar

    2014-10-31

    There are a number of theoretical predictions for astrophysical and cosmological objects, which emit high frequency ($10^6-10^9$~Hz) Gravitation Waves (GW) or contribute somehow to the stochastic high frequency GW background. Here we propose a new sensitive detector in this frequency band, which is based on existing cryogenic ultra-high quality factor quartz Bulk Acoustic Wave cavity technology, coupled to near-quantum-limited SQUID amplifiers at $20$~mK. We show that spectral strain sensitivities reaching $10^{-22}$ per $\\sqrt{\\text{Hz}}$ per mode is possible, which in principle can cover the frequency range with multiple ($>100$) modes with quality factors varying between $10^6-10^{10}$ allowing wide bandwidth detection. Due to its compactness and well established manufacturing process, the system is easily scalable into arrays and distributed networks that can also impact the overall sensitivity and introduce coincidence analysis to ensure no false detections.

  10. Damage detection for applications undergoing axial (membrane) response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffey, T.A. [Duffey (T.A.), Tijeras, NM (United States); Farrar, C.R.; Doebling, S.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-12-01

    This paper extends and applies recently reported damage identification methods, previously utilized for flexural vibrations only, to axial-type vibrations. The methods are applied to an 8-DOF linear spring-mass system, which models a multi-degree-of-freedom axial or membrane system. The goal of the work is to detect damage (as indicated by reduction in stiffness of one or more of the elements) as well as to locate the damage elements. Two damage detection methods were investigated--the change-in-flexibility method and the damage-index method. Both were found to successfully locate the damaged element(s) for 10% reduction in element stiffness. The change-in-flexibility method indicated damage location even when only a limited number of lower modes were included.

  11. Developments in Nanosecond Pulse Detection Methods and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. A. McFadden; N. D. R. Bhat; R. D. Ekers; C. W. James; D. Jones; S. J. Tingay; P. P. Roberts; C. J. Phillips; R. J. Protheroe

    2008-01-22

    A promising method for the detection of UHE neutrinos is the Lunar Cherenkov technique, which utilises Earth-based radio telescopes to detect the coherent Cherenkov radiation emitted when a UHE neutrino interacts in the outer layers of the Moon. The LUNASKA project aims to overcome the technological limitations of past experiments to utilise the next generation of radio telescopes in the search for these elusive particles. To take advantage of broad-bandwidth data from potentially thousands of antennas requires advances in signal processing technology. Here we describe recent developments in this field and their application in the search for UHE neutrinos, from a preliminary experiment using the first stage of an upgrade to the Australia Telescope Compact Array, to possibilities for fully utilising the completed Square Kilometre Array. We also explore a new real time technique for characterising ionospheric pulse dispersion which specifically measures ionospheric electron content that is line of sight to the moon.

  12. Discovery Radiomics for Multi-Parametric MRI Prostate Cancer Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Audrey G; Kumar, Devinder; Khalvati, Farzad; Haider, Masoom A; Wong, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most diagnosed form of cancer in Canadian men, and is the third leading cause of cancer death. Despite these statistics, prognosis is relatively good with a sufficiently early diagnosis, making fast and reliable prostate cancer detection crucial. As imaging-based prostate cancer screening, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), requires an experienced medical professional to extensively review the data and perform a diagnosis, radiomics-driven methods help streamline the process and has the potential to significantly improve diagnostic accuracy and efficiency, and thus improving patient survival rates. These radiomics-driven methods currently rely on hand-crafted sets of quantitative imaging-based features, which are selected manually and can limit their ability to fully characterize unique prostate cancer tumour phenotype. In this study, we propose a novel \\textit{discovery radiomics} framework for generating custom radiomic sequences tailored for prostate cancer detection. Discover...

  13. LIMITS TO THE FRACTION OF HIGH-ENERGY PHOTON EMITTING GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akerlof, Carl W.; Zheng, WeiKang, E-mail: akerlof@umich.edu [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, 450 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1040 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, 450 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1040 (United States)

    2013-02-20

    After almost four years of operation, the two instruments on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have shown that the number of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with high-energy photon emission above 100 MeV cannot exceed roughly 9% of the total number of all such events, at least at the present detection limits. In a recent paper, we found that GRBs with photons detected in the Large Area Telescope have a surprisingly broad distribution with respect to the observed event photon number. Extrapolation of our empirical fit to numbers of photons below our previous detection limit suggests that the overall rate of such low flux events could be estimated by standard image co-adding techniques. In this case, we have taken advantage of the excellent angular resolution of the Swift mission to provide accurate reference points for 79 GRB events which have eluded any previous correlations with high-energy photons. We find a small but significant signal in the co-added field. Guided by the extrapolated power-law fit previously obtained for the number distribution of GRBs with higher fluxes, the data suggest that only a small fraction of GRBs are sources of high-energy photons.

  14. Remotely replaceable tokamak plasma limiter tiles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsuo, Simon (Lakewood, CO), Langford, Alison A. (Boulder, CO)

    1989-01-01

    U-shaped limiter tiles placed end-to-end over a pair of parallel runners secured to a wall have two rods which engage L-shaped slots in the runners. The short receiving legs of the L-shaped slots are perpendicular to the wall and open away from the wall, while long retaining legs are parallel to and adjacent the wall. A sliding bar between the runners has grooves with clips to retain the rods pressed into receiving legs of the L-shaped slots in the runners. Sliding the bar in the direction of retaining legs of the L-shaped slots latches the tiles in place over the runners. Resilient contact strips between the parallel arms of the U-shaped tiles and the wall assure thermal and electrical contact with the wall.

  15. Thermal-noise-limited underground interferometer CLIO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazuhiro Agatsuma; Koji Arai; Masa-Katsu Fujimoto; Seiji Kawamura; Kazuaki Kuroda; Osamu Miyakawa; Shinji Miyoki; Masatake Ohashi; Toshikazu Suzuki; Ryutaro Takahashi; Daisuke Tatsumi; Souichi Telada; Takashi Uchiyama; Kazuhiro Yamamoto; CLIO collaborators

    2010-01-29

    We report on the current status of CLIO (Cryogenic Laser Interferometer Observatory), which is a prototype interferometer for LCGT (Large Scale Cryogenic Gravitational-Wave Telescope). LCGT is a Japanese next-generation interferometric gravitational wave detector featuring the use of cryogenic mirrors and a quiet underground site. The main purpose of CLIO is to demonstrate a reduction of the mirror thermal noise by cooling the sapphire mirrors. CLIO is located in an underground site of the Kamioka mine, 1000 m deep from the mountain top, to verify its advantages. After a few years of commissioning work, we have achieved a thermal-noise-limited sensitivity at room temperature. One of the main results of noise hunting was the elimination of thermal noise caused by a conductive coil-holder coupled with a pendulum through magnets.

  16. Unitary limit in crossed Andreev transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. A. Sadovskyy; G. B. Lesovik; V. M. Vinokur

    2015-04-10

    Crossed Andreev reflection splitting a Cooper pair into the metal through spatially separated terminals as two spin and energy entangled electrons is one of the most promising approaches to generation of entangled electron pairs. However, while the conventional (local) Andreev reflection occurs with the probability of unity, the probability of crossed Andreev reflection is significantly suppressed. We propose a one-dimensional model capturing main features of the hybrid normal metal-superconductor setups used in experiments, which allows to achieve a unitary limit of crossed Andreev transport, i.e. splitting of Cooper pairs with the 100% efficiency. We calculate and analyze electron-to-hole transmission probability, differential conductance, and cross-correlations of currents passing through different terminals thus putting the ideas of maximum possible outcome on a firm analytical basis.

  17. Self field triggered superconducting fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tekletsadik, Kasegn D. (Rexford, NY)

    2008-02-19

    A superconducting fault current limiter array with a plurality of superconductor elements arranged in a meanding array having an even number of supconductors parallel to each other and arranged in a plane that is parallel to an odd number of the plurality of superconductors, where the odd number of supconductors are parallel to each other and arranged in a plane that is parallel to the even number of the plurality of superconductors, when viewed from a top view. The even number of superconductors are coupled at the upper end to the upper end of the odd number of superconductors. A plurality of lower shunt coils each coupled to the lower end of each of the even number of superconductors and a plurality of upper shunt coils each coupled to the upper end of each of the odd number of superconductors so as to generate a generally orthoganal uniform magnetic field during quenching using only the magenetic field generated by the superconductors.

  18. Various factors affect coiled tubing limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Y.S.

    1996-01-15

    Safety and reliability remain the primary concerns in coiled tubing operations. Factors affecting safety and reliability include corrosion, flexural bending, internal (or external) pressure and tension (or compression), and mechanical damage due to improper use. Such limits as coiled tubing fatigue, collapse, and buckling need to be understood to avoid disaster. With increased use of coiled tubing, operators will gain more experience. But at the same time, with further research and development of coiled tubing, the manufacturing quality will be improved and fatigue, collapse, and buckling models will become more mature, and eventually standard specifications will be available. This paper reviews the uses of coiled tubing and current research on mechanical behavior of said tubing. It also discusses several models used to help predict fatigue and failure levels.

  19. Mean Field Limits in Strongly Confined Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johannes von Keler

    2014-12-10

    We consider the dynamics of $N$ interacting bosons in three dimensions which are strongly confined in one or two directions. We analyze the two cases where the interaction potential $w$ is rescaled by either $N^{-1}w(\\cdot)$ or $a^{3\\theta-1}w(a^\\theta \\cdot)$ and choose the initial wavefunction to be close to a product wavefunction. For both scalings we prove that in the mean field limit $N\\rightarrow \\infty $ the dynamics of the $N$-particle system are described by a nonlinear equation in one or two dimensions. In the case of the scaling $N^{-1}w(\\cdot)$ this equation is the Hartree equation and for the scaling $a^{3\\theta-1}w(a^\\theta \\cdot) $ the nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation. In both cases we obtain explicit bounds for the rate of convergence of the $N$-particle dynamics to the one-particle dynamics.

  20. Neutral depletion and the helicon density limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magee, R. M.; Galante, M. E.; Carr, J. Jr.; Lusk, G.; McCarren, D. W.; Scime, E. E.

    2013-12-15

    It is straightforward to create fully ionized plasmas with modest rf power in a helicon. It is difficult, however, to create plasmas with density >10{sup 20} m{sup ?3}, because neutral depletion leads to a lack of fuel. In order to address this density limit, we present fast (1 MHz), time-resolved measurements of the neutral density at and downstream from the rf antenna in krypton helicon plasmas. At the start of the discharge, the neutral density underneath the antenna is reduced to 1% of its initial value in 15 ?s. The ionization rate inferred from these data implies that the electron temperature near the antenna is much higher than the electron temperature measured downstream. Neutral density measurements made downstream from the antenna show much slower depletion, requiring 14 ms to decrease by a factor of 1/e. Furthermore, the downstream depletion appears to be due to neutral pumping rather than ionization.

  1. Authorized limits for Fernald copper ingots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frink, N.; Kamboj, S.; Hensley, J.; Chen, S. Y.

    1997-09-01

    This development document contains data and analysis to support the approval of authorized limits for the unrestricted release of 59 t of copper ingots containing residual radioactive material from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). The analysis presented in this document comply with the requirements of DOE Order 5400.5, {open_quotes}Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment,{close_quotes} as well as the requirements of the proposed promulgation of this order as 10 CFR Part 834. The document was developed following the step-by-step process described in the Draft Handbook for Controlling Release for Reuse or Recycle Property Containing Residual Radioactive Material.

  2. Do Finite-Size Lyapunov Exponents detect coherent structures?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karrasch, Daniel; Haller, George, E-mail: georgehaller@ethz.ch [Institute of Mechanical Systems, ETH Zurich, Tannenstrasse 3, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland)] [Institute of Mechanical Systems, ETH Zurich, Tannenstrasse 3, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2013-12-15

    Ridges of the Finite-Size Lyapunov Exponent (FSLE) field have been used as indicators of hyperbolic Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCSs). A rigorous mathematical link between the FSLE and LCSs, however, has been missing. Here, we prove that an FSLE ridge satisfying certain conditions does signal a nearby ridge of some Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE) field, which in turn indicates a hyperbolic LCS under further conditions. Other FSLE ridges violating our conditions, however, are seen to be false positives for LCSs. We also find further limitations of the FSLE in Lagrangian coherence detection, including ill-posedness, artificial jump-discontinuities, and sensitivity with respect to the computational time step.

  3. Detection and Imaging of He_2 Molecules in Superfluid Helium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. G. Rellergert; S. B. Cahn; A. Garvan; J. C. Hanson; W. H. Lippincott; J. A. Nikkel; D. N. McKinsey

    2007-12-18

    We present data that show a cycling transition can be used to detect and image metastable He$_2$ triplet molecules in superfluid helium. We demonstrate that limitations on the cycling efficiency due to the vibrational structure of the molecule can be mitigated by the use of repumping lasers. Images of the molecules obtained using the method are also shown. This technique gives rise to a new kind of ionizing radiation detector. The use of He$_2$ triplet molecules as tracer particles in the superfluid promises to be a powerful tool for visualization of both quantum and classical turbulence in liquid helium.

  4. Method for detecting toxic gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stetter, Joseph R. (Naperville, IL); Zaromb, Solomon (Hinsdale, IL); Findlay, Jr., Melvin W. (Bolingbrook, IL)

    1991-01-01

    A method capable of detecting low concentrations of a pollutant or other component in air or other gas, utilizing a combination of a heating filament having a catalytic surface of a noble metal for exposure to the gas and producing a derivative chemical product from the component, and an electrochemical sensor responsive to the derivative chemical product for providing a signal indicative of the product. At concentrations in the order of about 1-100 ppm of tetrachloroethylene, neither the heating filament nor the electrochemical sensor is individually capable of sensing the pollutant. In the combination, the heating filament converts the benzyl chloride to one or more derivative chemical products which may be detected by the electrochemical sensor.

  5. Method for detecting toxic gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stetter, J.R.; Zaromb, S.; Findlay, M.W. Jr.

    1991-10-08

    A method is disclosed which is capable of detecting low concentrations of a pollutant or other component in air or other gas. This method utilizes a combination of a heating filament having a catalytic surface of a noble metal for exposure to the gas and producing a derivative chemical product from the component. An electrochemical sensor responds to the derivative chemical product for providing a signal indicative of the product. At concentrations in the order of about 1-100 ppm of tetrachloroethylene, neither the heating filament nor the electrochemical sensor is individually capable of sensing the pollutant. In the combination, the heating filament converts the benzyl chloride to one or more derivative chemical products which may be detected by the electrochemical sensor. 6 figures.

  6. Multiplex detection of agricultural pathogens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McBride, Mary Teresa (Brentwood, CA); Slezak, Thomas Richard (Livermore, CA); Messenger, Sharon Lee (Kensington, CA)

    2010-09-14

    Described are kits and methods useful for detection of seven agricultural pathogens (BPSV; BHV; BVD; FMDV; BTV; SVD; and VESV) in a sample. Genomic sequence information from 7 agricultural pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

  7. Detection of malicious computer executables

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cai, Dongming M. (Los Alamos, NM); Gokhale, Maya (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-04-14

    A method of detecting malicious binary executable files is accomplished by inputting a binary executable file; converting the binary executable file to byte hexadecimal text strings; calculating the frequency of each byte pattern in the byte hexadecimal text strings; selecting characteristic byte pattern frequencies as discriminating features; classifying the discriminating features as malicious or benign; labeling the binary executable file as malicious or benign; and outputting the labeled malicious or benign binary executable file.

  8. Detection of a concealed object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keller, Paul E [Richland, WA; Hall, Thomas E [Kennewick, WA; McMakin, Douglas L [Richland, WA

    2010-11-16

    Disclosed are systems, methods, devices, and apparatus to determine if a clothed individual is carrying a suspicious, concealed object. This determination includes establishing data corresponding to an image of the individual through interrogation with electromagnetic radiation in the 200 MHz to 1 THz range. In one form, image data corresponding to intensity of reflected radiation and differential depth of the reflecting surface is received and processed to detect the suspicious, concealed object.

  9. Detection of a concealed object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keller, Paul E. (Richland, WA); Hall, Thomas E. (Kennewick, WA); McMakin, Douglas L. (Richland, WA)

    2008-04-29

    Disclosed are systems, methods, devices, and apparatus to determine if a clothed individual is carrying a suspicious, concealed object. This determination includes establishing data corresponding to an image of the individual through interrogation with electromagnetic radiation in the 200 MHz to 1 THz range. In one form, image data corresponding to intensity of reflected radiation and differential depth of the reflecting surface is received and processed to detect the suspicious, concealed object.

  10. Multiplex detection of agricultural pathogens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siezak, Thomas R.; Gardner, Shea; Torres, Clinton; Vitalis, Elizabeth; Lenhoff, Raymond J.

    2013-01-15

    Described are kits and methods useful for detection of agricultural pathogens in a sample. Genomic sequence information from agricultural pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay and/or an array assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

  11. Compensated intruder-detection systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McNeilly, David R. (Maryville, TN); Miller, William R. (Andersonville, TN)

    1984-01-01

    Intruder-detection systems in which intruder-induced signals are transmitted through a medium also receive spurious signals induced by changes in a climatic condition affecting the medium. To combat this, signals received from the detection medium are converted to a first signal. The system also provides a reference signal proportional to climate-induced changes in the medium. The first signal and the reference signal are combined for generating therefrom an output signal which is insensitive to the climatic changes in the medium. An alarm is energized if the output signal exceeds a preselected value. In one embodiment, an acoustic cable is coupled to a fence to generate a first electrical signal proportional to movements thereof. False alarms resulting from wind-induced movements of the fence (detection medium) are eliminated by providing an anemometer-driven voltage generator to provide a reference voltage proportional to the velocity of wind incident on the fence. An analog divider receives the first electrical signal and the reference signal as its numerator and denominator inputs, respectively, and generates therefrom an output signal which is insensitive to the wind-induced movements in the fence.

  12. A new way to detect volcanic plumes Kristine M. Larson1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Kristine

    , is important both for public health and aircraft safety. A variety of geophysical tools and satellite data and limitations of the method are assessed using GPS data collected during the 2008 and 2009 eruptions with independently collected seismic and radar data. Citation: Larson, K. M. (2013), A new way to detect volcanic

  13. Malicious Node Detection in Wireless Sensor Networks using Weighted Trust Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yu

    network. Another concern is about energy efficiency. In a WSN, each sensor node may need to support battery lifetime, security mechanisms for sensor networks must be energy efficient [19]. Especially such as limited battery lifetime, memory space and computing capability. It is critical to detect and isolate

  14. Anomaly Detection in Dynamic Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turcotte, Melissa

    2014-10-14

    Anomaly detection in dynamic communication networks has many important security applications. These networks can be extremely large and so detecting any changes in their structure can be computationally challenging; hence, computationally fast, parallelisable methods for monitoring the network are paramount. For this reason the methods presented here use independent node and edge based models to detect locally anomalous substructures within communication networks. As a first stage, the aim is to detect changes in the data streams arising from node or edge communications. Throughout the thesis simple, conjugate Bayesian models for counting processes are used to model these data streams. A second stage of analysis can then be performed on a much reduced subset of the network comprising nodes and edges which have been identified as potentially anomalous in the first stage. The first method assumes communications in a network arise from an inhomogeneous Poisson process with piecewise constant intensity. Anomaly detection is then treated as a changepoint problem on the intensities. The changepoint model is extended to incorporate seasonal behavior inherent in communication networks. This seasonal behavior is also viewed as a changepoint problem acting on a piecewise constant Poisson process. In a static time frame, inference is made on this extended model via a Gibbs sampling strategy. In a sequential time frame, where the data arrive as a stream, a novel, fast Sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) algorithm is introduced to sample from the sequence of posterior distributions of the change points over time. A second method is considered for monitoring communications in a large scale computer network. The usage patterns in these types of networks are very bursty in nature and don’t fit a Poisson process model. For tractable inference, discrete time models are considered, where the data are aggregated into discrete time periods and probability models are fitted to the communication counts. In a sequential analysis, anomalous behavior is then identified from outlying behavior with respect to the fitted predictive probability models. Seasonality is again incorporated into the model and is treated as a changepoint model on the transition probabilities of a discrete time Markov process. Second stage analytics are then developed which combine anomalous edges to identify anomalous substructures in the network.

  15. Nuclear weapon detection categorization analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    This statement of work is for the Proof of Concept for nuclear weapon categories utility in Arms control. The focus of the project will be to collect, analyze and correlate Intrinsic Radiation (INRAD) calculation results for the purpose of defining measurable signatures that differentiate categories of nuclear weapons. The project will support START III negotiations by identifying categories of nuclear weapons. The categories could be used to clarify sub-limits on the total number of nuclear weapons.

  16. Challenging packaging limits and infectivity of phage ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elmar Nurmemmedov; Martin Castelnovo; Elizabeth Medina; Carlos Enrique Catalano; Alex Evilevitch

    2011-11-09

    The terminase motors of bacteriophages have been shown to be among the strongest active machines in the biomolecular world, being able to package several tens of kilobase pairs of viral genome into a capsid within minutes. Yet these motors are hindered at the end of the packaging process by the progressive build-up of a force resisting packaging associated with already packaged DNA. In this experimental work, we raise the issue of what sets the upper limit on the length of the genome that can be packaged by the terminase motor of phage {\\lambda} and still yield infectious virions, and the conditions under which this can be efficiently performed. Using a packaging strategy developed in our laboratory of building phage {\\lambda} from scratch, together with plaque assay monitoring, we have been able to show that the terminase motor of phage {\\lambda} is able to produce infectious particles with up to 110% of the wild-type (WT) {\\lambda}-DNA length. However, the phage production rate, and thus the infectivity, decreased exponentially with increasing DNA length, and was a factor of 103 lower for the 110% {\\lambda}-DNA phage. Interestingly, our in vitro strategy was still efficient in fully packaging phages with DNA lengths as high as 114% of the WT length, but these viruses were unable to infect bacterial cells efficiently. Further, we demonstrated that the phage production rate is modulated by the presence of multivalent ionic species. The biological consequences of these finding are discussed.

  17. Flow reversal power limit for the HFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, L.Y.; Tichler, P.R.

    1997-01-01

    The High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) is a pressurized heavy water moderated and cooled research reactor that began operation at 40 MW. The reactor was subsequently upgraded to 60 MW and operated at that level for several years. The reactor undergoes a buoyancy-driven reversal of flow in the reactor core following certain postulated accidents. Questions which were raised about the afterheat removal capability during the flow reversal transition led to a reactor shutdown and subsequent resumption of operation at a reduced power of 30 MW. An experimental and analytical program to address these questions is described in this report. The experiments were single channel flow reversal tests under a range of conditions. The analytical phase involved simulations of the tests to benchmark the physical models and development of a criterion for dryout. The criterion is then used in simulations of reactor accidents to determine a safe operating power level. It is concluded that the limit on the HFBR operating power with respect to the issue of flow reversal is in excess of 60 MW. Direct use of the experimental results and an understanding of the governing phenomenology supports this conclusion.

  18. The ultimate downscaling limit of FETs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mamaluy, Denis; Gao, Xujiao; Tierney, Brian David

    2014-10-01

    We created a highly efficient, universal 3D quant um transport simulator. We demonstrated that the simulator scales linearly - both with the problem size (N) and number of CPUs, which presents an important break-through in the field of computational nanoelectronics. It allowed us, for the first time, to accurately simulate and optim ize a large number of realistic nanodevices in a much shorter time, when compared to other methods/codes such as RGF[~N 2.333 ]/KNIT, KWANT, and QTBM[~N 3 ]/NEMO5. In order to determine the best-in-class for different beyond-CMOS paradigms, we performed rigorous device optimization for high-performance logic devices at 6-, 5- and 4-nm gate lengths. We have discovered that there exists a fundamental down-scaling limit for CMOS technology and other Field-Effect Transistors (FETs). We have found that, at room temperatures, all FETs, irre spective of their channel material, will start experiencing unacceptable level of thermally induced errors around 5-nm gate lengths.

  19. The limits of the nuclear landscape

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nazarewicz, Witold; Erler, J.; Birge, N.; Kortelainen, E. M.; Olsen, E.; Perhac, A.; Stoitsov, M.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, 100 new nuclides were discovered1. They joined the approximately 3,000 stable and radioactive nuclides that either occur naturally on Earth or are synthesized in the laboratory2,3. Every atomic nucleus, characterized by a specific number of protons and neutrons, occupies a spot on the chart of nuclides, which is bounded by drip lines indicating the values of neutron and proton number at which nuclear binding ends. The placement of the neutron drip line for the heavier elements is based on theoretical predictions using extreme extrapolations, and so is uncertain. However, it is not known how uncertain it is or how many protons and neutrons can be bound in a nucleus. Here we estimate these limits of the nuclear landscape and provide statistical and systematic uncertainties for our predictions. We use nuclear density functional theory, several Skyrme interactions and high-performance computing, and find that the number of bound nuclides with between 2 and 120 protons is around 7,000. We find that extrapolations for drip-line positions and selected nuclear properties, including neutron separation energies relevant to astrophysical processes, are very consistent between the models used.

  20. First direct limits on Lightly Ionizing Particles with electric charge less than $e/6$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Agnese; A. J. Anderson; D. Balakishiyeva; R. Basu Thakur; D. A. Bauer; J. Billard; A. Borgland; M. A. Bowles; D. Brandt; P. L. Brink; R. Bunker; B. Cabrera; D. O. Caldwell; D. G. Cerdeno; H. Chagani; Y. Chen; J. Cooley; B. Cornell; C. H. Crewdson; P. Cushman; M. Daal; P. C. F. Di Stefano; T. Doughty; L. Esteban; S. Fallows; E. Figueroa-Feliciano; G. L. Godfrey; S. R. Golwala; J. Hall; H. R. Harris; S. A. Hertel; T. Hofer; D. Holmgren; L. Hsu; M. E. Huber; A. Jastram; O. Kamaev; B. Kara; M. H. Kelsey; A. Kennedy; M. Kiveni; K. Koch; A. Leder; B. Loer; E. Lopez Asamar; R. Mahapatra; V. Mandic; C. Martinez; K. A. McCarthy; N. Mirabolfathi; R. A. Moffatt; D. C. Moore; H. Nelson; R. H. Nelson; R. W. Ogburn; K. Page; W. A. Page; R. Partridge; M. Pepin; A. Phipps; K. Prasad; M. Pyle; H. Qiu; W. Rau; P. Redl; A. Reisetter; Y. Ricci; H. E. Rogers; T. Saab; B. Sadoulet; J. Sander; K. Schneck; R. W. Schnee; S. Scorza; B. Serfass; B. Shank; D. Speller; S. Upadhyayula; A. N. Villano; B. Welliver; D. H. Wright; S. Yellin; J. J. Yen; B. A. Young; J. Zhang

    2015-02-03

    While the Standard Model of particle physics does not include free particles with fractional charge, experimental searches have not ruled out their existence. We report results from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II) experiment that give the first direct-detection limits for cosmogenically-produced relativistic particles with electric charge lower than $e$/6. A search for tracks in the six stacked detectors of each of two of the CDMS II towers found no candidates, thereby excluding new parameter space for particles with electric charges between $e$/6 and $e$/200.

  1. FERMI LIMIT ON THE NEUTRINO FLUX FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Zhuo [Department of Astronomy and Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing (China); Key Laboratory for the Structure and Evolution of Celestial Objects, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming (China)

    2013-06-20

    If gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) produce high-energy cosmic rays, neutrinos are expected to be generated in GRBs via photo-pion productions. However, we stress that the same process also generates electromagnetic (EM) emission induced by the secondary electrons and photons, and that the EM emission is expected to be correlated with neutrino flux. Using Fermi/Large Area Telescope results on gamma-ray flux from GRBs, the GRB neutrino emission is limited to be <20 GeV m{sup -2} per GRB event on average, which is independent of the unknown GRB proton luminosity. This neutrino limit suggests that IceCube, operating at full scale, requires stacking of more than 130 GRBs in order to detect one GRB muon neutrino.

  2. Limits on optical polarization during the prompt phase of GRB 140430A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kopac, D; Japelj, J; Arnold, D M; Steele, I A; Guidorzi, C; Dichiara, S; Kobayashi, S; Gomboc, A; Harrison, R M; Lamb, G P; Melandri, A; Smith, R J; Virgili, F J; Castro-Tirado, A J; Gorosabel, J; Jarvinen, A; Sanchez-Ramirez, R; Oates, S R; Jelinek, M

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst GRB 140430A was detected by the Swift satellite and observed promptly with the imaging polarimeter RINGO3 mounted on the Liverpool Telescope, with observations beginning while the prompt $\\gamma$-ray emission was still ongoing. In this paper, we present densely sampled (10-second temporal resolution) early optical light curves in 3 optical bands and limits to the degree of optical polarization. We compare optical, X-ray and gamma-ray properties and present an analysis of the optical emission during a period of high-energy flaring. The complex optical light curve cannot be explained merely with a combination of forward and reverse shock emission from a standard external shock, implying additional contribution of emission from internal shock dissipation. We estimate an upper limit for time averaged optical polarization during the prompt phase to be as low as P optical flares and early afterglow emission in this GRB are not highly polarized. Alternativ...

  3. Fermi Limit on the Neutrino Flux from Gamma-ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuo Li

    2013-06-14

    If gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) produce high energy cosmic rays, neutrinos are expected to be generated in GRBs due to photo-pion productions. However we stress that the same process also generates electromagnetic (EM) emission induced by the production of secondary electrons and photons, and that the EM emission is expected to be correlated to the neutrino flux. Using the Fermi/LAT observational results on gamma-ray flux from GRBs, the GRB neutrino emission is limited to be below ~20 GeV/m^2 per GRB event on average, which is independent of the unknown GRB proton luminosity. This neutrino limit suggests that the full IceCube needs stacking more than 130 GRBs in order to detect one GRB muon neutrino.

  4. Suspended microchannel resonators for biomolecular detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burg, Thomas P. (Thomas Peter)

    2005-01-01

    Microfabricated transducers enable the label-free detection of biological molecules in nanoliter sized samples. Integrating microfluidic detection and sample-preparation can greatly leverage experimental efforts in systems ...

  5. The effect of laser pulse duration on ICP-MS signal intensity, elemental fractionation, and detection limits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    and alloys,7,8 geology,9 archaeology,6,10 biological samples,11 radioactive waste anal- ysis,9 etc-stoichiometric ICP-MS results, can occur during laser ablation, during transport from the ablation chamber to the ICP

  6. Bias-limited extraction of cosmological parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shimon, Meir; Itzhaki, Nissan; Rephaeli, Yoel, E-mail: meirs@wise.tau.ac.il, E-mail: nitzhaki@post.tau.ac.il, E-mail: yoelr@wise.tau.ac.il [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2013-03-01

    It is known that modeling uncertainties and astrophysical foregrounds can potentially introduce appreciable bias in the deduced values of cosmological parameters. While it is commonly assumed that these uncertainties will be accounted for to a sufficient level of precision, the level of bias has not been properly quantified in most cases of interest. We show that the requirement that the bias in derived values of cosmological parameters does not surpass nominal statistical error, translates into a maximal level of overall error O(N{sup ?½}) on |?P(k)|/P(k) and |?C{sub l}|/C{sub l}, where P(k), C{sub l}, and N are the matter power spectrum, angular power spectrum, and number of (independent Fourier) modes at a given scale l or k probed by the cosmological survey, respectively. This required level has important consequences on the precision with which cosmological parameters are hoped to be determined by future surveys: in virtually all ongoing and near future surveys N typically falls in the range 10{sup 6}?10{sup 9}, implying that the required overall theoretical modeling and numerical precision is already very high. Future redshifted-21-cm observations, projected to sample ? 10{sup 14} modes, will require knowledge of the matter power spectrum to a fantastic 10{sup ?7} precision level. We conclude that realizing the expected potential of future cosmological surveys, which aim at detecting 10{sup 6}?10{sup 14} modes, sets the formidable challenge of reducing the overall level of uncertainty to 10{sup ?3}?10{sup ?7}.

  7. Alternative Neutron Detection Testing Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Erikson, Luke E.; Kernan, Warnick J.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Stromswold, David C.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2010-04-08

    Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. Most currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large area neutron detector. This type of neutron detector is used in the TSA and other RPMs installed in international locations and in the Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation RPMs deployed primarily for domestic applications. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world and, thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Four technologies have been identified as being currently commercially available, potential alternative neutron detectors to replace the use of 3He in RPMs. These technologies are: 1) Boron trifluoride-filled proportional counters, 2) Boron-lined proportional counters, 3) Lithium-loaded glass fibers, and 4) Coated wavelength-shifting plastic fibers. Reported here is a summary of the testing carried out at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on these technologies to date, as well as measurements on 3He tubes at various pressures. Details on these measurements are available in the referenced reports. Sponsors of these tests include the Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and the Department of Defense (DoD), as well as internal Pacific Northwest National Laboratory funds.

  8. Radiation Detection Computational Benchmark Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaver, Mark W.; Casella, Andrew M.; Wittman, Richard S.; McDonald, Ben S.

    2013-09-24

    Modeling forms an important component of radiation detection development, allowing for testing of new detector designs, evaluation of existing equipment against a wide variety of potential threat sources, and assessing operation performance of radiation detection systems. This can, however, result in large and complex scenarios which are time consuming to model. A variety of approaches to radiation transport modeling exist with complementary strengths and weaknesses for different problems. This variety of approaches, and the development of promising new tools (such as ORNL’s ADVANTG) which combine benefits of multiple approaches, illustrates the need for a means of evaluating or comparing different techniques for radiation detection problems. This report presents a set of 9 benchmark problems for comparing different types of radiation transport calculations, identifying appropriate tools for classes of problems, and testing and guiding the development of new methods. The benchmarks were drawn primarily from existing or previous calculations with a preference for scenarios which include experimental data, or otherwise have results with a high level of confidence, are non-sensitive, and represent problem sets of interest to NA-22. From a technical perspective, the benchmarks were chosen to span a range of difficulty and to include gamma transport, neutron transport, or both and represent different important physical processes and a range of sensitivity to angular or energy fidelity. Following benchmark identification, existing information about geometry, measurements, and previous calculations were assembled. Monte Carlo results (MCNP decks) were reviewed or created and re-run in order to attain accurate computational times and to verify agreement with experimental data, when present. Benchmark information was then conveyed to ORNL in order to guide testing and development of hybrid calculations. The results of those ADVANTG calculations were then sent to PNNL for compilation. This is a report describing the details of the selected Benchmarks and results from various transport codes.

  9. Acoustic enhancement for photo detecting devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, Thomas G; Senesac, Lawrence R; Van Neste, Charles W

    2013-02-19

    Provided are improvements to photo detecting devices and methods for enhancing the sensitivity of photo detecting devices. A photo detecting device generates an electronic signal in response to a received light pulse. An electro-mechanical acoustic resonator, electrically coupled to the photo detecting device, damps the electronic signal and increases the signal noise ratio (SNR) of the electronic signal. Increased photo detector standoff distances and sensitivities will result.

  10. Foreign WMD Proliferation Detection | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    WMD Proliferation Detection | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering...

  11. COLLOQUIUM: Starlight Detectives: How Astronomers, Inventors...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Detectives: How Astronomers, Inventors, and Eccentrics Discovered the Modern Universe Professor Alan Hirshfeld University of Massachusetts - Dartmouth Presentation:...

  12. Fire suppression and detection equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.E. Bates [HSB Professional Loss Control, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2006-01-15

    Inspection and testing guidelines go beyond the 'Code of Federal Regulation'. Title 30 of the US Code of Federal Regulations (30 CFR) contains requirements and references to national standards for inspection, testing and maintenance of fire suppression and detection equipment for mine operators. However, federal requirements have not kept pace with national standards and best practices. The article lists National Fire Protection (NFPA) standards that are referenced by the US Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) in 30 CFR. It then discusses other NFPA Standards excluded from 30 CFR and explains the NFPA standard development process. 2 refs., 3 tabs., 5 photos.

  13. Singularity detection using holder exponent.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sohn, H. (Hoon); Robertson, A. N. (Amy N.); Farrar, C. R. (Charles R.)

    2002-01-01

    A signal processing technique called Holder exponent is presented to detect the presence of a discontinuity and when the discontinuity occurs in a dynamic signal. Wavelet transforms are incorporated with the Holder exponent to capture the time varying nature of discontinuities, and a classification procedure is developed to quantify when changes in the Holder exponent are significant, The proposed Holder exponent analysis is applied to acceleration response of a mechanical system with a rattling internal part. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the Holder exponent for identifying certain types of events that introduce discontinuities into the measured dynamic response data.

  14. Conducting Polymers for Neutron Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimblin, Clare; Miller, Kirk; Vogel, Bob; Quam, Bill; McHugh, Harry; Anthony, Glen; Mike, Grover

    2007-12-01

    Conjugated polymers have emerged as an attractive technology for large-area electronic applications. As organic semiconductors, they can be used to make large-area arrays of diodes or transistors using fabrication techniques developed for polymer coatings, such as spraying and screen-printing. We have demonstrated both neutron and alpha detection using diodes made from conjugated polymers and have done preliminary work to integrate a boron carbide layer into the conventional polymer device structure to capture thermal neutrons. The polymer devices appear to be insensitive to gamma rays, due to their small physical thickness and low atomic number.

  15. Multiplex detection of respiratory pathogens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McBride, Mary (Brentwood, CA); Slezak, Thomas (Livermore, CA); Birch, James M. (Albany, CA)

    2012-07-31

    Described are kits and methods useful for detection of respiratory pathogens (influenza A (including subtyping capability for H1, H3, H5 and H7 subtypes) influenza B, parainfluenza (type 2), respiratory syncytial virus, and adenovirus) in a sample. Genomic sequence information from the respiratory pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

  16. Pulsed helium ionization detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, Roswitha S. (Knoxville, TN); Todd, Richard A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1987-01-01

    A helium ionization detection system is provided which produces stable operation of a conventional helium ionization detector while providing improved sensitivity and linearity. Stability is improved by applying pulsed dc supply voltage across the ionization detector, thereby modifying the sampling of the detectors output current. A unique pulse generator is used to supply pulsed dc to the detector which has variable width and interval adjust features that allows up to 500 V to be applied in pulse widths ranging from about 150 nsec to about dc conditions.

  17. Pulsed helium ionization detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, R.S.; Todd, R.A.

    1985-04-09

    A helium ionization detection system is provided which produces stable operation of a conventional helium ionization detector while providing improved sensitivity and linearity. Stability is improved by applying pulsed dc supply voltage across the ionization detector, thereby modifying the sampling of the detectors output current. A unique pulse generator is used to supply pulsed dc to the detector which has variable width and interval adjust features that allows up to 500 V to be applied in pulse widths ranging from about 150 nsec to about dc conditions.

  18. Producing and Detecting Correlated atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christoph I. Westbrook; Martijn Schellekens; Aurélien Perrin; Valentina Krachmalnicoff; Jose Carlos Viana Gomes; Jean-Baptiste Trebbia; Jérôme Estève; Hong Chang; Isabelle Bouchoule; Denis Boiron; Alain Aspect; Tom Jeltes; John McNamara; Wim Hogervorst; Wim Vassen

    2006-09-04

    We discuss experiments to produce and detect atom correlations in a degenerate or nearly degenerate gas of neutral atoms. First we treat the atomic analog of the celebrated Hanbury Brown Twiss experiment, in which atom correlations result simply from interference effects without any atom interactions.We have performed this experiment for both bosons and fermions. Next we show how atom interactions produce correlated atoms using the atomic analog of spontaneous four-wavemixing. Finally, we briefly mention experiments on a one dimensional gas on an atom chip in which correlation effects due to both interference and interactions have been observed.

  19. A very reduced upper limit on the interstellar abundance of beryllium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillaume Hébrard; Martin Lemoine; Roger Ferlet; Alfred Vidal-Madjar

    1997-02-26

    We present the results of observations of the $\\lambda 3130.4$ \\AA interstellar absorption line of Be II in the direction of zeta Per. The data were obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii 3.6m Telescope using the Coud\\'e f/4 Gecko spectrograph at a resolving power $\\simeq 1.1 \\times 10^5$, and a signal-to-noise ratio S/N $\\simeq$ 2000. The Be II line is not detected, and we obtain an upper limit on the equivalent width $W_{3130.4}\\leq30$ $\\mu$\\AA. This upper limit is 7 times below the lowest upper limit ever reported hitherto. The derived interstellar abundance is ($^9$Be/H) $\\leq 7 \\times 10^{-13}$, not corrected for the depletion of Be onto interstellar grains; it corresponds to an upper limit $\\delta_{Be} \\leq -1.5$ dex on the depletion factor of Be. As such, it argues in favour of models of formation of dust grains in stellar atmospheres.

  20. H.E.S.S. upper limits for Kepler's supernova remnant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aharonian, F; Barresde Almeida, U; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Behera, B; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Berge, D; Bernlöhr, K; Boisson, C; Bolz, O; Borrel, V; Braun, I; Brion, E; Brucker, J; Buhler, R; Bulik, T; Büsching, I; Boutelier, T; Carrigan, S; Chadwick, P M; Chounet, L M; Clapson, A C; Coignet, G; Cornils, R; Costamante, L; Dalton, M; Degrange, B; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ata, A; Domainko, i W; O'Connor-Drury, L; Dubois, F; Dubus, G; Dyks, J; Egberts, K; Emmanoulopoulos, D; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Feinstein, F; Fiasson, A; Förster, A; Fontaine, G; Fuling, M; Gallant, Y A; Giebels, B; Glück, B; Goret, P; Hadjichristidis, C; Hauser, D; Hauser, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, J F Glicenstein G; Hinton, J A; Hoffmann, A; Hofmann, W; Holleran, M; Hoppe, S; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; De Jager, O C; Jung, I; Katarzynski, K; Kendziorra, E; Kerschhaggl, M; Khelifi, B; Keogh, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Lamanna, G; Latham, I J; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J P; Lohse, T; Martin, J M; Martineau-Huynh, O; Marcowith, A; Masterson, C; Maurin, D; McComb, T J L; Moderski, R; Moulin, E; Naumann-Godo, M; De Naurois, Mathieu; Nedbal, D; Nekrassov, D; Nolan, S J; Ohm, S; Olive, J P; de Ona Wilhelmi, E; Orford, K J; Osborne, J L; Ostrowski, M; Panter, M; Pedaletti, G; Pelletier, G; Petrucci, P O; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, Andreas G; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Rayner, S M; Renaud, M; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Ruppel, J; Sahakian, V V; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schock, F M; Schroder, R; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Shalchi, A; Sol, H; Spangler, D; Stawarz, L; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Superina, G; Tam, P H; Tavernet, J P; Terrier, R; Van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Vialle, J P; Vincent, P; Vivier, M; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Ward, M; Zdziarski, A A; Wagner, A; Zech, J

    2008-01-01

    Observations of Kepler's supernova remnant (G4.5+6.8) with the H.E.S.S. telescope array in 2004 and 2005 with a total live time of 13 h are presented. Stereoscopic imaging of Cherenkov radiation from extensive air showers is used to reconstruct the energy and direction of the incident gamma rays. No evidence for a very high energy (VHE: >100 GeV) gamma-ray signal from the direction of the remnant is found. An upper limit (99% confidence level) on the energy flux in the range 230 GeV - 12.8 TeV of 8.6 x 10^{-13} erg cm^{-2} s^{-1} is obtained. In the context of an existing theoretical model for the remnant, the lack of a detectable gamma-ray flux implies a distance of at least 6.4 kpc. A corresponding upper limit for the density of the ambient matter of 0.7 cm^{-3} is derived. With this distance limit, and assuming a spectral index Gamma = 2, the total energy in accelerated protons is limited to E_p law measured by RX...

  1. Limit on an Isotropic Diffuse Gamma-Ray Population with HAWC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,

    2015-01-01

    Data from 105 days from the High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory (HAWC) have been used to place a new limit on an isotropic diffuse gamma-ray population above 10 TeV. High- energy isotropic diffuse gamma-ray emission is produced by unresolved extragalactic objects such as active galactic nuclei, with potential contributions from interactions of high-energy cosmic rays with the inter-Galactic medium, or dark matter annihilation. Isotropic diffuse gamma-ray emission has been observed up to nearly 1 TeV. Above this energy, only upper limits have been reported. Observations or limits of the isotropic photon population above these energies are very sensitive to local astrophysical particle production. Of particular note, we expect a photon population to accompany the TeV-PeV astrophysical neutrino detection seen in the IceCube instrument. Observations or limits of a photon population above this energy can point to the origin of these neutrinos, indicating whether they are within the gamma-ray horizon or not. ...

  2. Immune System for Virus Detection and Elimination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    consider the aspects of designing a computer immune system for virus detection and elimination using to modelling the biological immune system in a computer we design a computer immune system for virus detectionImmune System for Virus Detection and Elimination Rune Schmidt Jensen IMM-THESIS-2002-08-31 IMM #12

  3. Automatic Detection and Classification of Sunspot Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    Automatic Detection and Classification of Sunspot Images Thomas C. M. Lee tlee with Alex Young and the SaFeDe Solar Imaging Group JSM 2007 ­ p. 1/2 #12;Outline Title: Automatic Detection and Classification of Sunspot Images JSM 2007 ­ p. 2/2 #12;Outline Title: Automatic Detection and Classification

  4. Monocular Pedestrian Detection: Survey and Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Zhigang

    1 Monocular Pedestrian Detection: Survey and Experiments Markus Enzweiler1 Student Member, IEEE. Restrictions apply. #12;2 Abstract Pedestrian detection is a rapidly evolving area in computer vision with key. The first part of the paper consists of a survey. We cover the main components of a pedestrian detection

  5. Monocular Pedestrian Detection: Survey and Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gavrila, Dariu M.

    Monocular Pedestrian Detection: Survey and Experiments Markus Enzweiler, Student Member, IEEE, and Dariu M. Gavrila Abstract--Pedestrian detection is a rapidly evolving area in computer vision with key. The first part of the paper consists of a survey. We cover the main components of a pedestrian detection

  6. Trainable Pedestrian Detection Constantine Papageorgiou Tomaso Poggio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    Trainable Pedestrian Detection Constantine Papageorgiou Tomaso Poggio Center for Biological types of objects; we will focus on the task of pedestrian detection. This paradigm of learning from examples allows us to avoid the need for a hand­crafted solution. Unlike many pedestrian detection systems

  7. Molecular Detection and Characterization of Avian Bornavirus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirhosseini, Negin

    2012-07-16

    ...... 42 Figure 7 PCR for the detection of ABV sequences in bird feces using primer mix 3. ........................................................................................... 44 Figure 8 ABV genome organization... Page Table 1 Primers used for detecting ABV ............................................................... 28 Table 2 Primer mixes and PCR conditions to detect ABV .................................... 29 Table 3 Percent nucleotide identity between...

  8. Weak Quenched Limiting Distributions for One-dimensional RWRE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathon Peterson

    2010-09-12

    Sep 13, 2010 ... Ladder locations {?n} defined by ?0 = 0, ?n := inf{i > ?n?1 : V(i) < V(?n?1)} .... Weak quenched limits. Proofs. Heuristics of Quenched Limit Laws.

  9. Diesel Particulate Filters and NO2 Emission Limits | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Filters and NO2 Emission Limits Diesel Particulate Filters and NO2 Emission Limits EPAs New air quality standards for NO2 will impact future DPF designs deer09ibrahim.pdf More...

  10. Overcoming the far-field diffraction limit via absorbance modulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Hsin-Yu Sidney

    2011-01-01

    Diffraction limits the resolution of far-field lithography and imaging to about half of the wavelength, which greatly limits the capability of optical techniques. The proposed technique with absorbance modulation aims to ...

  11. Avalanche Photo-Detection for High Data Rate Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. B. Coldenstrodt-Ronge; C. Silberhorn

    2007-09-19

    Avalanche photo detection is commonly used in applications which require single photon sensitivity. We examine the limits of using avalanche photo diodes (APD) for characterising photon statistics at high data rates. To identify the regime of linear APD operation we employ a ps-pulsed diode laser with variable repetition rates between 0.5MHz and 80MHz. We modify the mean optical power of the coherent pulses by applying different levels of well-calibrated attenuation. The linearity at high repetition rates is limited by the APD dead time and a non-linear response arises at higher photon-numbers due to multiphoton events. Assuming Poissonian input light statistics we ascertain the effective mean photon-number of the incident light with high accuracy. Time multiplexed detectors (TMD) allow to accomplish photon- number resolution by photon chopping. This detection setup extends the linear response function to higher photon-numbers and statistical methods may be used to compensate for non-linearity. We investigated this effect, compare it to the single APD case and show the validity of the convolution treatment in the TMD data analysis.

  12. Limited success of heat treatments for curing HLB affected trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopes, S. A.; Luiz, F. Q.B.F.; Fassini, C. G.; Oliveira, H. T.; Oliveira, S. L.A.

    2014-01-01

    Limited success of heat treatments for curing HLB affectedthe lack of success of the heat treatments against HLB. 3rd

  13. Does Superstring Theory Have a Conformally Invariant Limit?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John H. Schwarz

    2000-08-01

    This talk describes a proposal, due to Hull, for a conformally invariant limit of superstring theory in six dimensions.

  14. One-dimensional long-range diffusion-limited aggregation III -- The limit aggregate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gideon Amir

    2015-04-06

    In this paper we study the structure of the limit aggregate $A_\\infty = \\bigcup_{n\\geq 0} A_n$ of the one-dimensional long range diffusion limited aggregation process defined in [AABK09]. We show (under some regularity conditions) that for walks with finite third moment $A_\\infty$ has renewal structure and positive density, while for walks with finite variance the renewal structure no longer exists and $A_\\infty$ has 0 density. We define a tree structure on the aggregates and show some results on the degrees and number of ends of these random trees. We introduce a new "harmonic competition" model where different colours compete for harmonic measure, and show how the tree structure is related to coexistence in this model.

  15. Limited Electricity Generation Supply and Limited Natural Gas Supply Cases (released in AEO2008)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2008-01-01

    Development of U.S. energy resources and the permitting and construction of large energy facilities have become increasingly difficult over the past 20 years, and they could become even more difficult in the future. Growing public concern about global warming and CO2 emissions also casts doubt on future consumption of fossil fuels -- particularly coal, which releases the largest amount of CO2 per unit of energy produced. Even without regulations to limit greenhouse gas emissions in the United States, the investment community may already be limiting the future use of some energy options. In addition, there is considerable uncertainty about the future availability of, and access to, both domestic and foreign natural gas resources.

  16. Scaling Limits of Two-Dimensional Percolation: an Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federico Camia

    2008-10-06

    We present a review of the recent progress on percolation scaling limits in two dimensions. In particular, we will consider the convergence of critical crossing probabilities to Cardy's formula and of the critical exploration path to chordal SLE(6), the full scaling limit of critical cluster boundaries, and near-critical scaling limits.

  17. Salary Limitation on Grants, Cooperative Agreements, and Contracts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salary Limitation on Grants, Cooperative Agreements, and Contracts Notice Number: NOT-OD-08-035 Key://www.nih.gov) This notice provides updated information regarding the salary limitation for NIH grant and cooperative). On February 22, 2007 NIH published Fiscal Year (FY) 2007 information on the salary limitation in the NIH Guide

  18. A Subject-Delegated Decryption Scheme with "Tightly" Limited Authority

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    A Subject-Delegated Decryption Scheme with "Tightly" Limited Authority Lihua Wang1 , Takeshi@cs.tsukuba.ac.jp Abstract. In this paper, we present a new proxy cryptosystem named subject-delegated decryption scheme subjects. The advantage of our scheme is that the proxy authorities are tightly limited ("Tightly" Limited

  19. Finding the Lower Stellar Mass Limit Observationally Justin Cantrell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiita, Paul J.

    saying: "1. Objects with true masses below the limiting mass for thermonuclear fusion of deuterium masses above the limiting mass for thermonuclear fusion of deuterium are "brown dwarfs", no matter how below the limiting mass for thermonuclear fusion of deuterium are not "planets", but are "sub

  20. MFR PAPER 1152 An Empirical Study of Limited Entry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MFR PAPER 1152 An Empirical Study of Limited Entry in Alaska's Salmon Fisheries JAMES E. OWERS to a point where the marginal cost ofan additional unit of fishing effort just equals the revenue it produces both before and after passing limited entry legislation in 1973 strongly suggests that, first, limited

  1. Upper limits to surface-force disturbances on LISA proof masses and the possibility of observing galactic binaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carbone, Ludovico; Ciani, Giacomo; Dolesi, Rita; Hueller, Mauro; Tombolato, David; Vitale, Stefano; Weber, William Joseph; Cavalleri, Antonella

    2007-02-15

    We have measured surface-force noise on a hollow replica of a LISA proof mass surrounded by its capacitive motion sensor. Forces are detected through the torque exerted on the proof mass by means of a torsion pendulum in the 0.1-30 mHz range. The sensor and electronics have the same design as for the flight hardware, including 4 mm gaps around the proof mass. The measured upper limit for forces would allow detection of a number of galactic binaries signals with signal-to-noise ratio up to {approx_equal}40 for 1 yr integration. We also discuss how LISA Pathfinder will substantially improve this limit, approaching the LISA performance.

  2. Spectral analysis method for detecting an element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blackwood, Larry G [Idaho Falls, ID; Edwards, Andrew J [Idaho Falls, ID; Jewell, James K [Idaho Falls, ID; Reber, Edward L [Idaho Falls, ID; Seabury, Edward H [Idaho Falls, ID

    2008-02-12

    A method for detecting an element is described and which includes the steps of providing a gamma-ray spectrum which has a region of interest which corresponds with a small amount of an element to be detected; providing nonparametric assumptions about a shape of the gamma-ray spectrum in the region of interest, and which would indicate the presence of the element to be detected; and applying a statistical test to the shape of the gamma-ray spectrum based upon the nonparametric assumptions to detect the small amount of the element to be detected.

  3. Single molecule detection using charge-coupled device array technology. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denton, M.B.

    1992-07-29

    A technique for the detection of single fluorescent chromophores in a flowing stream is under development. This capability is an integral facet of a rapid DNA sequencing scheme currently being developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory. In previous investigations, the detection sensitivity was limited by the background Raman emission from the water solvent. A detection scheme based on a novel mode of operating a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) is being developed which should greatly enhance the discrimination between fluorescence from a single molecule and the background Raman scattering from the solvent. Register shifts between rows in the CCD are synchronized with the sample flow velocity so that fluorescence from a single molecule is collected in a single moving charge packet occupying an area approaching that of a single pixel while the background is spread evenly among a large number of pixels. Feasibility calculations indicate that single molecule detection should be achieved with an excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  4. Detecting very-high-frequency relic gravitational waves by electromagnetic wave polarizations in a waveguide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. L. Tong; Y. Zhang

    2007-11-30

    The polarization vector (PV) of an electromagnetic wave (EW) will experience a rotation in a region of spacetime perturbed by gravitational waves (GWs). Based on this idea, Cruise's group has built an annular waveguide to detect GWs. We give detailed calculations of the rotations of the polarization vector of an EW caused by incident GWs from various directions and in various polarization states, and then analyze the accumulative effects on the polarization vector when the EW passes n cycles along the annular waveguide. We reexamine the feasibility and limitation of this method to detect GWs of high frequency around 100 MHz, in particular, the relic gravitational waves (RGWs). By comparing the spectrum of RGWs in the accelerating universe with the detector sensitivity of the current waveguide, it is found that the amplitude of the RGWs is too low to be detected by the waveguide detectors currently running. Possible ways of improvements on detection are discussed also.

  5. Measuring the effectiveness of infrastructure-level detection of large-scale botnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Guanhua; Eidenbenz, Stephan; Zeng, Yuanyuan; Shin, Kang G

    2010-12-16

    Botnets are one of the most serious security threats to the Internet and its end users. In recent years, utilizing P2P as a Command and Control (C&C) protocol has gained popularity due to its decentralized nature that can help hide the hotmaster's identity. Most bot detection approaches targeting P2P botnets either rely on behavior monitoring or traffic flow and packet analysis, requiring fine-grained information collected locally. This requirement limits the scale of detection. In this paper, we consider detection of P2P botnets at a high-level - the infrastructure level - by exploiting their structural properties from a graph analysis perspective. Using three different P2P overlay structures, we measure the effectiveness of detecting each structure at various locations (the Autonomous System (AS), the Point of Presence (PoP), and the router rendezvous) in the Internet infrastructure.

  6. Single-Pedestrian Detection aided by Multi-pedestrian Detection Wanli Ouyang1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaogang

    Single-Pedestrian Detection aided by Multi-pedestrian Detection Wanli Ouyang1,2 and Xiaogang Wang 1 pedestrians who appear in groups and have inter- action. A new approach is proposed for single-pedestrian detection aided by multi-pedestrian detection. A mixture model of multi-pedestrian detectors is designed

  7. Indirect detection of radiation sources through direct detection of radiolysis products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farmer, Joseph C. (Tracy, CA); Fischer, Larry E. (Los Gatos, CA); Felter, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    2010-04-20

    A system for indirectly detecting a radiation source by directly detecting radiolytic products. The radiation source emits radiation and the radiation produces the radiolytic products. A fluid is positioned to receive the radiation from the radiation source. When the fluid is irradiated, radiolytic products are produced. By directly detecting the radiolytic products, the radiation source is detected.

  8. Cellular telephone-based radiation detection instrument

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Craig, William W. (Pittsburg, CA); Labov, Simon E. (Berkeley, CA)

    2011-06-14

    A network of radiation detection instruments, each having a small solid state radiation sensor module integrated into a cellular phone for providing radiation detection data and analysis directly to a user. The sensor module includes a solid-state crystal bonded to an ASIC readout providing a low cost, low power, light weight compact instrument to detect and measure radiation energies in the local ambient radiation field. In particular, the photon energy, time of event, and location of the detection instrument at the time of detection is recorded for real time transmission to a central data collection/analysis system. The collected data from the entire network of radiation detection instruments are combined by intelligent correlation/analysis algorithms which map the background radiation and detect, identify and track radiation anomalies in the region.

  9. Buried object detection in GPR images

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paglieroni, David W; Chambers, David H; Bond, Steven W; Beer, W. Reginald

    2014-04-29

    A method and system for detecting the presence of subsurface objects within a medium is provided. In some embodiments, the imaging and detection system operates in a multistatic mode to collect radar return signals generated by an array of transceiver antenna pairs that is positioned across the surface and that travels down the surface. The imaging and detection system pre-processes the return signal to suppress certain undesirable effects. The imaging and detection system then generates synthetic aperture radar images from real aperture radar images generated from the pre-processed return signal. The imaging and detection system then post-processes the synthetic aperture radar images to improve detection of subsurface objects. The imaging and detection system identifies peaks in the energy levels of the post-processed image frame, which indicates the presence of a subsurface object.

  10. An alternative approach to achieving water quality-based limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, C.M.; Graeser, W.C.

    1995-12-01

    Since May 1982, members of the Iron and Steel Industry have been required to meet effluent limits based on Best Available Technology (BAT) for a process water discharge to receiving stream. US Steel Clairton Works has been successful in meeting these limits in the last three years; however, the current regulatory thrust is toward more stringent limits based on water quality. In cases of smaller streams such as the receiving stream for Clairton Works` process outfall, these limits can be very rigid. This paper will discuss the alternative approaches investigated to meet the new more stringent limits including the solution chosen.

  11. 679.24 Gear Limitations 50 CFR 679b24.docx 679.24 Gear Limitations Page 1 of 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    § 679.24 Gear Limitations 50 CFR 679b24.docx § 679.24 Gear Limitations Page 1 of 5 Updated May 5, 2014 § 679.24 Gear limitations. Regulations pertaining to vessel and gear markings are set forth to § 300.62 of chapter III of this title. (a) Marking of hook-and-line, longline pot, and pot-and-line gear

  12. 1Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

    #12;#12;1Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines UpWind Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines A 20 MW turbine is feasible March 2011 Supported by: #12;March 20112 Photo:Nordex #12;3Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines Contents 1. UpWind: Summary

  13. 2014 Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan- Chapter 2, Limited Areas, Vault-Type Rooms and Temporary Limited Areas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2014 Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan - Chapter 2, Limited Areas, Vault-Type Rooms and Temporary Limited Areas Describes DOE Headquarters procedures for establishing, maintaining, and deactivating Limited Areas and Vault-Type Rooms and protecting the classified information handled within those Areas.

  14. Vertical flow chemical detection portal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Linker, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM); Hannum, David W. (Albuquerque, NM); Conrad, Frank James (Russellville, SC)

    1999-01-01

    A portal apparatus for screening objects or persons for the presence of trace amounts of chemical substances such as illicit drugs or explosives. The apparatus has a test space, in which a person may stand, defined by two generally upright sides spanned by a horizontal transom. One or more fans in the transom generate a downward air flow (uni-directional) within the test space. The air flows downwardly from a high pressure upper zone, past the object or person to be screened. Air moving past the object dislodges from the surface thereof both volatile and nonvolatile particles of the target substance. The particles are entrained into the air flow which continues flowing downward to a lower zone of reduced pressure, where the particle-bearing air stream is directed out of the test space and toward preconcentrator and detection components. The sides of the portal are specially configured to partially contain and maintain the air flow.

  15. Vertical flow chemical detection portal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Linker, K.L.; Hannum, D.W.; Conrad, F.J.

    1999-06-22

    A portal apparatus is described for screening objects or persons for the presence of trace amounts of chemical substances such as illicit drugs or explosives. The apparatus has a test space, in which a person may stand, defined by two generally upright sides spanned by a horizontal transom. One or more fans in the transom generate a downward air flow (uni-directional) within the test space. The air flows downwardly from a high pressure upper zone, past the object or person to be screened. Air moving past the object dislodges from the surface thereof both volatile and nonvolatile particles of the target substance. The particles are entrained into the air flow which continues flowing downward to a lower zone of reduced pressure, where the particle-bearing air stream is directed out of the test space and toward preconcentrator and detection components. The sides of the portal are specially configured to partially contain and maintain the air flow. 3 figs.

  16. Intrusion detection using secure signatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Trent Darnel; Haile, Jedediah

    2014-09-30

    A method and device for intrusion detection using secure signatures comprising capturing network data. A search hash value, value employing at least one one-way function, is generated from the captured network data using a first hash function. The presence of a search hash value match in a secure signature table comprising search hash values and an encrypted rule is determined. After determining a search hash value match, a decryption key is generated from the captured network data using a second hash function, a hash function different form the first hash function. One or more of the encrypted rules of the secure signatures table having a hash value equal to the generated search hash value are then decrypted using the generated decryption key. The one or more decrypted secure signature rules are then processed for a match and one or more user notifications are deployed if a match is identified.

  17. Methanol detection in M82

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Martín; J. Martín-Pintado; R. Mauersberger

    2006-03-07

    We present a multilevel study of the emission of methanol, detected for the first time in this galaxy, and discuss the origin of its emission. The high observed methanol abundance of a few 10^-9 can only be explained if injection of methanol from dust grains is taken into account. While the overall [CH3OH]/[NH3] ratio is much larger than observed towards other starbursts, the dense high excitation component shows a similar value to that found in NGC 253 and Maffei 2. Our observations suggest the molecular material in M 82 to be formed by dense warm cores, shielded from the UV radiation and similar to the molecular clouds in other starbursts, surrounded by a less dense photodissociated halo. The dense warm cores are likely the location of recent and future star formation within M 82.

  18. Explosives detection system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reber, Edward L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jewell, James K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Rohde, Kenneth W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Seabury, Edward H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Blackwood, Larry G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Edwards, Andrew J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Derr, Kurt W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2007-12-11

    A method of detecting explosives in a vehicle includes providing a first rack on one side of the vehicle, the rack including a neutron generator and a plurality of gamma ray detectors; providing a second rack on another side of the vehicle, the second rack including a neutron generator and a plurality of gamma ray detectors; providing a control system, remote from the first and second racks, coupled to the neutron generators and gamma ray detectors; using the control system, causing the neutron generators to generate neutrons; and performing gamma ray spectroscopy on spectra read by the gamma ray detectors to look for a signature indicative of presence of an explosive. Various apparatus and other methods are also provided.

  19. Sequential detection of web defects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eichel, Paul H. (Albuquerque, NM); Sleefe, Gerard E. (Cedar Crest, NM); Stalker, K. Terry (Albuquerque, NM); Yee, Amy A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01

    A system for detecting defects on a moving web having a sequential series of identical frames uses an imaging device to form a real-time camera image of a frame and a comparitor to comparing elements of the camera image with corresponding elements of an image of an exemplar frame. The comparitor provides an acceptable indication if the pair of elements are determined to be statistically identical; and a defective indication if the pair of elements are determined to be statistically not identical. If the pair of elements is neither acceptable nor defective, the comparitor recursively compares the element of said exemplar frame with corresponding elements of other frames on said web until one of the acceptable or defective indications occur.

  20. Community detection for interaction networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crane, Harry

    2015-01-01

    In many applications, it is common practice to obtain a network from interaction counts by thresholding each pairwise count at a prescribed value. Our analysis calls attention to the dependence of certain methods, notably Newman--Girvan modularity, on the choice of threshold. Essentially, the threshold either separates the network into clusters automatically, making the algorithm's job trivial, or erases all structure in the data, rendering clustering impossible. By fitting the original interaction counts as given, we show that minor modifications to classical statistical methods outperform the prevailing approaches for community detection from interaction datasets. We also introduce a new hidden Markov model for inferring community structures that vary over time. We demonstrate each of these features on three real datasets: the karate club dataset, voting data from the U.S.\\ Senate (2001--2003), and temporal voting data for the U.S. Supreme Court (1990--2004).

  1. Oxygen detection using evanescent fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duan, Yixiang (Los Alamos, NM); Cao, Weenqing (Los Alamos, NM)

    2007-08-28

    An apparatus and method for the detection of oxygen using optical fiber based evanescent light absorption. Methylene blue was immobilized using a sol-gel process on a portion of the exterior surface of an optical fiber for which the cladding has been removed, thereby forming an optical oxygen sensor. When light is directed through the optical fiber, transmitted light intensity varies as a result of changes in the absorption of evanescent light by the methylene blue in response to the oxygen concentration to which the sensor is exposed. The sensor was found to have a linear response to oxygen concentration on a semi-logarithmic scale within the oxygen concentration range between 0.6% and 20.9%, a response time and a recovery time of about 3 s, ant to exhibit good reversibility and repeatability. An increase in temperature from 21.degree. C. to 35.degree. C. does not affect the net absorption of the sensor.

  2. Microsoft Word - TYSP 2015 Limited Update Final-2

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    maintainability and reliability. As examples, manufacturers of the Ultraviolet Flame Detection System, Radiation Alarm Monitoring System (RAMS), PIDAS, and HE Synthesis...

  3. Towards Exploring Fundamental Limits of System-Specific Cryptanalysis Within Limited Attack Classes: Application to ABSG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Altug, Yucel

    2008-01-01

    A new approach on cryptanalysis is proposed where the goal is to explore the fundamental limits of a specific class of attacks against a particular cryptosystem. As a first step, the approach is applied on ABSG, which is an LFSR-based stream cipher where irregular decimation techniques are utilized. Consequently, under some mild assumptions, which are common in cryptanalysis, the tight lower bounds on the algorithmic complexity of successful Query-Based Key-Recovery attacks are derived for two different setups of practical interest. The proofs rely on the concept of ``typicality'' of information theory.

  4. Predetermining acceptable noise limits in EXAFS spectra in the limit of stochastic noise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Yung-Jin; Booth, Corwin H

    2009-12-14

    EXAFS measurements are used to probe a variety of experimental systems, but excel at elucidating local structure in samples which have slight disorder or no long-range crystalline order. Of special interest to the authors is the use of EXAFS in understanding the molecular-level binding structure and characteristics of actinides on the surface of environmental minerals and model mineral analogs. In environmental systems the element of interest can be on the order of 10-7% by weight of the total sample. Obviously such samples would be impossible to measure using EXAFS techniques. It is therefore essential to increase the concentration of the element of interest while still preserving a sample's ability to represent environmental conditions. Under such low concentration limits it is expected that the collected data is countrate, or stochastically limited. This condition occurs as we approach the signal-to-noise (S/N) limit of the technique where the random noise of the measurement process dominates over possible systematic errors. When stochastic error is expected to dominate systematic error, it is possible to predict, with the use of simulations, the ability of model fits to tolerate a certain level of stochastic noise. Elsewhere in these proceedings, we discuss how to tell when systematic errors dominate in measured EXAFS spectrum. Here, we outline a technique for determining the number of EXAFS scans necessary to test the relevance of a given structural model. Appropriate stochastic noise levels are determined for each point in r-space by collecting data on a real system. These noise levels are then applied to EXAFS simulations using a test model. In this way, all significant systematic error sources are eliminated in the simulated data. The structural model is then fit to the simulated data, decreasing the noise and increasing the k-range of the fit until the veracity of the model passes an F-test. This paper outlines a method of testing model systems in EXAFS fitting before measurements are conducted to determine the quality of measured data required for fitting of a particular model system with statistical confidence. It is important to reiterate that the calculated {alpha}surface in figure 1 is only applicable to the particular model presented in this paper. Furthermore, this procedure only takes into account stochastic noise; consequentially any confidence levels calculated should be viewed as upper limits to the confidence levels in systems which also contain a significant amount of systematic noise.

  5. Reevaluating the feasibility of ground-based Earth-mass microlensing planet detections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Youn Kil; Park, Hyuk; Han, Cheongho; Hwang, Kyu-Ha; Shin, In-Gu; Choi, Joon-Young, E-mail: cheongho@astroph.chungbuk.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Institute for Astrophysics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 371-763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-10

    An important strength of the microlensing method to detect extrasolar planets is its high sensitivity to low-mass planets. However, many believe that microlensing detections of Earth-mass planets from ground-based observation would be difficult because of limits set by finite-source effects. This view comes from the previous estimation of planet detection probability based on the fractional deviation of planetary signals; however, a proper probability estimation is required when considering the source brightness, which is directly related to the photometric precision. In this paper, we reevaluate the feasibility of low-mass planet detections by considering photometric precision for different populations of source stars. From this, we find that the contribution of improved photometric precision to the planetary signal of a giant-source event is large enough to compensate for the decrease in magnification excess caused by finite-source effects. As a result, we conclude that giant-source events are suitable targets for Earth-mass planet detections with significantly higher detection probability than events involved with source stars of smaller radii, and we predict that Earth-mass planets could be detected by prospective high-cadence surveys.

  6. Detecting terrorist nuclear weapons at sea: The 10th door problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slaughter, D R

    2008-09-15

    While screening commercial cargo containers for the possible presence of WMD is important and necessary smugglers have successfully exploited the many other vehicles transporting cargo into the US including medium and small vessels at sea. These vessels provide a venue that is currently not screened and widely used. Physics limits that make screening of large vessels prohibitive impractical do not prohibit effective screening of the smaller vessels. While passive radiation detection is probably ineffective at sea active interrogation may provide a successful approach. The physics limits of active interrogation of ships at sea from standoff platforms are discussed. Autonomous platforms that could carry interrogation systems at sea, both airborne and submersible, are summarized and their utilization discussed. An R&D program to investigate the limits of this approach to screening ships at sea is indicated and limitations estimated.

  7. Optimized performance for neutron interrogation to detect SNM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slaughter, D R; Asztalos, S J; Biltoft, P J; Church, J A; Descalle, M; Hall, J M; Luu, T C; Manatt, D R; Mauger, G J; Norman, E B; Petersen, D C; Pruet, J A; Prussin, S G

    2007-02-14

    A program of simulations and validating experiments was utilized to evaluate a concept for neutron interrogation of commercial cargo containers that would reliably detect special nuclear material (SNM). The goals were to develop an interrogation system capable of detecting a 5 kg solid sphere of high-enriched uranium (HEU) even when deeply embedded in commercial cargo. Performance goals included a minimum detection probability, P{sub d} {ge} 95%, a maximum occurrence of false positive indications, P{sub fA} {le} 0.001, and maximum scan duration of t {le} 1 min. The conditions necessary to meet these goals were demonstrated in experimental measurements even when the SNM is deeply buried in any commercial cargo, and are projected to be met successfully in the most challenging cases of steel or hydrocarbons at areal density {rho}L {le} 150 g/cm{sup 2}. Optimal performance was obtained with a collimated ({Delta}{Theta} = {+-} 15{sup o}) neutron beam at energy E{sub n} = 7 MeV produced by the D(d,n) reaction with the deuteron energy E{sub d} = 4 MeV. Two fission product signatures are utilized to uniquely identify SNM, including delayed neutrons detected in a large array of polyethylene moderated 3He proportional counters and high energy {beta}-delayed fission product {gamma}-radiation detected in a large array of 61 x 61 x 25 cm{sup 3} plastic scintillators. The latter detectors are nearly blind to normal terrestrial background radiation by setting an energy threshold on the detection at E{sub min} {ge} 3 MeV. Detection goals were attained with a low beam current (I{sub d} = 15-65 {micro}A) source up to {rho}L = 75 g/cm{sup 2} utilizing long irradiations, T = 30 sec, and long counting times, t = 30-100 sec. Projecting to a higher beam current, I{sub d} {ge} 600 {micro}A and larger detector array the detection and false alarm goals would be attained even with intervening cargo overburden as large as {rho}L {le} 150 g/cm{sup 2}. The latter cargo thickness corresponds to 8 ft of hydrogenous or metallic cargo at the highest density allowed by the weight limit of the container. Simulations support the efficacy of this technique in the most challenging cases and experimental measurements are shown validating these predictions. Signal and background levels have been assessed and utilized to predict error rates due to false positive and false negative results. The laboratory system demonstrates the ability to detect HEU in amounts as small as m {ge} 250 g buried in the middle of a maximum density cargo and to do so with error rates that meet the goals given above. Higher beam current allows reliable SNM detection in shorter irradiation and/or counting times and with more challenging cargo threat scenarios.

  8. Characterising dark matter searches at colliders and direct detection experiments: Vector mediators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchmueller, Oliver; Dolan, Matthew J.; Malik, Sarah A.; McCabe, Christopher

    2015-01-09

    We introduce a Minimal Simplified Dark Matter (MSDM) framework to quantitatively characterise dark matter (DM) searches at the LHC. We study two MSDM models where the DM is a Dirac fermion which interacts with a vector and axial-vector mediator. The models are characterised by four parameters: mDM, Mmed , gDM and gq, the DM and mediator masses, and the mediator couplings to DM and quarks respectively. The MSDM models accurately capture the full event kinematics, and the dependence on all masses and couplings can be systematically studied. The interpretation of mono-jet searches in this framework can be used to establish an equal-footing comparison with direct detection experiments. For theories with a vector mediator, LHC mono-jet searches possess better sensitivity than direct detection searches for light DM masses (?5 GeV). For axial-vector mediators, LHC and direct detection searches generally probe orthogonal directions in the parameter space. We explore the projected limits of these searches from the ultimate reach of the LHC and multi-ton xenon direct detection experiments, and find that the complementarity of the searches remains. In conclusion, we provide a comparison of limits in the MSDM and effective field theory (EFT) frameworks to highlight the deficiencies of the EFT framework, particularly when exploring the complementarity of mono-jet and direct detection searches.

  9. Characterising dark matter searches at colliders and direct detection experiments: Vector mediators

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Buchmueller, Oliver; Dolan, Matthew J.; Malik, Sarah A.; McCabe, Christopher

    2015-01-09

    We introduce a Minimal Simplified Dark Matter (MSDM) framework to quantitatively characterise dark matter (DM) searches at the LHC. We study two MSDM models where the DM is a Dirac fermion which interacts with a vector and axial-vector mediator. The models are characterised by four parameters: mDM, Mmed , gDM and gq, the DM and mediator masses, and the mediator couplings to DM and quarks respectively. The MSDM models accurately capture the full event kinematics, and the dependence on all masses and couplings can be systematically studied. The interpretation of mono-jet searches in this framework can be used to establishmore »an equal-footing comparison with direct detection experiments. For theories with a vector mediator, LHC mono-jet searches possess better sensitivity than direct detection searches for light DM masses (?5 GeV). For axial-vector mediators, LHC and direct detection searches generally probe orthogonal directions in the parameter space. We explore the projected limits of these searches from the ultimate reach of the LHC and multi-ton xenon direct detection experiments, and find that the complementarity of the searches remains. In conclusion, we provide a comparison of limits in the MSDM and effective field theory (EFT) frameworks to highlight the deficiencies of the EFT framework, particularly when exploring the complementarity of mono-jet and direct detection searches.« less

  10. Characterising Dark Matter Searches at Collider and Direct Detection Experiments: Vector Mediators

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Buchmueller, Oliver; Dolan, Matthew J.; Malik, Sarah A.; McCabe, Christopher

    2015-01-09

    We introduce a Minimal Simplified Dark Matter (MSDM) framework to quantitatively characterise dark matter (DM) searches at the LHC. We study two MSDM models where the DM is a Dirac fermion which interacts with a vector and axial-vector mediator. The models are characterised by four parameters: m DM , M med , g DM and g q, the DM and mediator masses, and the mediator couplings to DM and quarks respectively. The MSDM models accurately capture the full event kinematics, and the dependence on all masses and couplings can be systematically studied. The interpretation of mono-jet searches in this frameworkmore »can be used to establish an equal-footing comparison with direct detection experiments. For theories with a vector mediator, LHC mono-jet searches possess better sensitivity than direct detection searches for light DM masses (?5 GeV). For axial-vector mediators, LHC and direct detection searches generally probe orthogonal directions in the parameter space. We explore the projected limits of these searches from the ultimate reach of the LHC and multi-ton xenon direct detection experiments, and find that the complementarity of the searches remains. Finally, we provide a comparison of limits in the MSDM and effective field theory (EFT) frameworks to highlight the deficiencies of the EFT framework, particularly when exploring the complementarity of mono-jet and direct detection searches.« less

  11. Spot test kit for explosives detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pagoria, Philip F; Whipple, Richard E; Nunes, Peter J; Eckels, Joel Del; Reynolds, John G; Miles, Robin R; Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L

    2014-03-11

    An explosion tester system comprising a body, a lateral flow membrane swab unit adapted to be removeably connected to the body, a first explosives detecting reagent, a first reagent holder and dispenser operatively connected to the body, the first reagent holder and dispenser containing the first explosives detecting reagent and positioned to deliver the first explosives detecting reagent to the lateral flow membrane swab unit when the lateral flow membrane swab unit is connected to the body, a second explosives detecting reagent, and a second reagent holder and dispenser operatively connected to the body, the second reagent holder and dispenser containing the second explosives detecting reagent and positioned to deliver the second explosives detecting reagent to the lateral flow membrane swab unit when the lateral flow membrane swab unit is connected to the body.

  12. Summary tables of six commercially available entry control and contraband detection technologies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, John Anthony

    2005-07-01

    Existing contraband detection and entry control devices such as metal detectors, X-ray machines, and radiation monitors were investigated for their capability to operate in an automated environment. In addition, a limited number of new devices for detection of explosives, chemicals, and biological agents were investigated for their feasibility for inclusion in future physical security systems. The tables in this document resulted from this investigation, which was part of a conceptual design upgrade for the United States Mints. This summary of commercially available technologies was written to provide a reference for physical security upgrades at other sites.

  13. Connection between a possible fifth force and the direct detection of Dark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jo Bovy; Glennys R. Farrar

    2008-08-12

    If there is a fifth force in the dark sector and dark sector particles interact non-gravitationally with ordinary matter, quantum corrections generically lead to a fifth force in the visible sector. We show how the strong experimental limits on fifth forces in the visible sector constrain the direct detection cross section, and the strength of the fifth force in the dark sector. If the latter is comparable to gravity, the spin-independent direct detection cross section must typically be <~ 10^{-55} cm^2. The anomalous acceleration of ordinary matter falling towards dark matter is also constrained: \\eta_{OM-DM} <~ 10^{-8}.

  14. Detection of foreign body using fast thermoacoustic tomography with a multielement linear transducer array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nie Liming; Xing Da; Yang Diwu; Zeng Lvming; Zhou Quan

    2007-04-23

    Current imaging modalities face challenges in clinical applications due to limitations in resolution or contrast. Microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging may provide a complementary modality for medical imaging, particularly for detecting foreign objects due to their different absorption of electromagnetic radiation at specific frequencies. A thermoacoustic tomography system with a multielement linear transducer array was developed and used to detect foreign objects in tissue. Radiography and thermoacoustic images of objects with different electromagnetic properties, including glass, sand, and iron, were compared. The authors' results demonstrate that thermoacoustic imaging has the potential to become a fast method for surgical localization of occult foreign objects.

  15. Detection of single-ion spectra by Coulomb-crystal heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Craig R.; Goeders, James E.; Dodia, Yatis K.; Viteri, C. Ricardo; Brown, Kenneth R. [Schools of Chemistry and Biochemistry Computational Science and Engineering and Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    The coupled motion of ions in a radiofrequency trap has been used to connect the frequency-dependent laser-induced heating of a sympathetically cooled spectroscopy ion with changes in the fluorescence of a laser-cooled control ion. This technique, sympathetic heating spectroscopy, is demonstrated using two isotopes of calcium. In the experiment, a few scattered photons from the spectroscopy ion are transformed into a large deviation from the steady-state fluorescence of the control ion. This allows us to detect an optical transition where the number of scattered photons is below our fluorescence detection limit. Possible applications of the technique to molecular ion spectroscopy are briefly discussed.

  16. Detection and prevention of mycoplasma hominis infection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DelVecchio, Vito G. (Scranton, PA); Gallia, Gary L. (Philadelphia, PA); McCleskey, Ferne K. (San Antonio, TX)

    1997-01-21

    The present invention is directed to a rapid and sensitive method for detecting Mycoplasma hominis using M. hominis-specific probes, oligonucleotides or antibodies. In particular a target sequence can be amplified by in vitro nucleic acid amplification techniques, detected by nucleic acid hybridization using the subject probes and oligonucleotides or detected by immunoassay using M. hominis-specific antibodies. M. hominis-specific nucleic acids which do not recognize or hybridize to genomic nucleic acid of other Mycoplasma species are also provided.

  17. Upper limits on gravitational wave emission from 78 radio pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; B. Abbott; M. Kramer; A. G. Lyne

    2007-10-12

    We present upper limits on the gravitational wave emission from 78 radio pulsars based on data from the third and fourth science runs of the LIGO and GEO600 gravitational wave detectors. The data from both runs have been combined coherently to maximise sensitivity. For the first time pulsars within binary (or multiple) systems have been included in the search by taking into account the signal modulation due to their orbits. Our upper limits are therefore the first measured for 56 of these pulsars. For the remaining 22, our results improve on previous upper limits by up to a factor of 10. For example, our tightest upper limit on the gravitational strain is 2.6e-25 for PSRJ1603-7202, and the equatorial ellipticity of PSRJ2124-3358 is less than 10^{-6}. Furthermore, our strain upper limit for the Crab pulsar is only 2.2 times greater than the fiducial spin-down limit.

  18. Transport Test Problems for Radiation Detection Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaver, Mark W.; Miller, Erin A.; Wittman, Richard S.; McDonald, Benjamin S.

    2012-09-30

    This is the final report and deliverable for the project. It is a list of the details of the test cases for radiation detection scenarios.

  19. Prof. Alessandro De Luca Collision detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Luca, Alessandro

    European project (2011-15) #12;Collision detection in industrial robots ! advanced option available torque joint torque caused by link collision inertia matrix Coriolis/centrifugal (with "good

  20. Communication error detection using facial expressions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Sy Bor, 1976-

    2008-01-01

    Automatic detection of communication errors in conversational systems typically rely only on acoustic cues. However, perceptual studies have indicated that speakers do exhibit visual communication error cues passively ...

  1. Nuclear Detonation Detection | National Nuclear Security Administratio...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    the entire planet from space to detect and report surface, atmospheric, or space nuclear detonations; produces and updates the regional geophysical datasets enabling...

  2. SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH DETECTION OF MOLECULAR HYDROGEN...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH DETECTION OF MOLECULAR HYDROGEN ROTATIONAL EMISSION TOWARDS TRANSLUCENT CLOUDS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: SPITZER INFRARED...

  3. Radionuclide detection devices and associated methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mann, Nicholas R. (Rigby, ID); Lister, Tedd E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-03-08

    Radionuclide detection devices comprise a fluid cell comprising a flow channel for a fluid stream. A radionuclide collector is positioned within the flow channel and configured to concentrate one or more radionuclides from the fluid stream onto at least a portion of the radionuclide collector. A scintillator for generating scintillation pulses responsive to an occurrence of a decay event is positioned proximate at least a portion of the radionuclide collector and adjacent to a detection system for detecting the scintillation pulses. Methods of selectively detecting a radionuclide are also provided.

  4. On the no-gravity limit of gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Kowalski-Glikman; M. Szczachor

    2012-12-21

    We argue that Relative Locality may arise in the no gravity $G\\rightarrow0$ limit of gravity. In this limit gravity becomes a topological field theory of the BF type that, after coupling to particles, may effectively deform its dynamics. We briefly discuss another no gravity limit with a self dual ground state as well as the topological ultra strong $G\\rightarrow\\infty$ one.

  5. DN detection during SLSF tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braid, T.H.; Harper, H.A.; Wilson, R.E.; Baldwin, R.D.; Gilbert, D.M.; Baxter, D.E.; Gillins, R.L.; Jeffries, G.L.

    1982-01-01

    During two tests in the Sodium Loop Safety Facility (W2 and P4), two systems were operated to detect delayed neutrons from exposed fuel. One monitored directly the sodium in the in-pile loop with a transit delay from the flux region of approx.2 seconds; the other conducted a sample stream of sodium to external detectors with a transit delay which could be varied from approx.10 to approx. 40 seconds. Detectors of a wide range of sensitivity were operated in pulse and current mode; DN signals varying from <1 mm/sup 2/ recoil to many grams of molten fuel could be recorded reliably without saturation. During the W2 and P4 tests a continuous DN record was made. Massive fuel failure signals were observed during reactor transients in both tests, including events interpreted as fuel melting and exposure of large areas. The steady signal from the blockage in P4 was studied as a function of reactor power and sodium temperature.

  6. Detecting Tampering in Random Graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinsky, Ross G

    2012-01-01

    Let $\\mathcal{G}_n=(V_n,E_n)$ be a growing sequence of deterministic finite graphs, with $V_n$ denoting the vertices and $E_n$ denoting the edges. Consider the random graph $\\mathcal{G}_n(p_n)=(V_n, E_n(p_n))$ obtained by including any given edge with probability $p_n$, independent of other edges, and let $P_n^{p_n}$ denote the corresponding probability measure on $\\mathcal{G}_n$. Now tamper with the random graph in some regular way. For example, if $\\mathcal{G}_n$ is the complete graph on $n$ vertices, so that $\\mathcal{G}_n(p_n)$ is the Erdos-Renyi graph, then one might tamper with it by disconnecting all the edges of a randomly chosen vertex, or by adding all the edges of a randomly chosen Hamiltonian path from $\\mathcal{G}_n$, or by adding all the edges of a randomly chosen clique of order $k_n$ from $\\mathcal{G}_n$. Denote the resulting induced measure on $\\mathcal{G}_n$ by $P_n^{p_n,\\text{tamper}}$. The tampering is called \\it detectable\\rm\\ if $\\lim_{n\\to\\infty}||P_n^{p_n,\\text{tamper}}-P_n^{p_n}||_{\\t...

  7. Limit on UHE Neutrino Flux from the Parkes Lunar Radio Cherenkov Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. W. James; R. M. Crocker; R. D. Ekers; T. H. Hankins; J. D. O'Sullivan; R. J. Protheroe

    2007-05-14

    The first search for ultra-high energy (UHE) neutrinos using a radio telescope was conducted by Hankins, Ekers and O'Sullivan (1996). This was a search for nanosecond duration radio Cherenkov pulses from electromagnetic cascades initiated by ultra-high energy (UHE) neutrino interactions in the lunar regolith, and was made using a broad-bandwidth receiver fitted to the Parkes radio telescope, Australia. At the time, no simulations were available to convert the null result into a neutrino flux limit. Since then, similar experiments at Goldstone, USA, and Kalyazin, Russia, have also recorded null results, and computer simulations have been used to model the experimental sensitivities of these two experiments and put useful limits on the UHE neutrino flux. Proposed future experiments include the use of broad-bandwidth receivers, making the sensitivity achieved by the Parkes experiment highly relevant to the future prospects of this field. We have therefore calculated the effective aperture for the Parkes experiment and found that when pointing at the lunar limb, the effective aperture at all neutrino energies was superior to single-antenna, narrow-bandwidth experiments, and that the detection threshold was comparable to that of the double-antenna experiment at Goldstone. However, because only a small fraction of the observing time was spent pointing the limb, the Parkes experiment places only comparatively weak limits on the UHE neutrino flux. Future efforts should use multiple telescopes and broad-bandwidth receivers.

  8. A new look at microlensing limits on dark matter in the Galactic halo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawkins, M R S

    2015-01-01

    The motivation for this paper is to review the limits set on the MACHO content of the Galactic halo by microlensing experiments in the direction of the Large Magellanic Cloud. This has been prompted by recent measurements of the Galactic rotation curve, which suggest that the limits have been biassed by the assumption of an over-massive halo. The paper first discusses the security of the detection efficiency calculations which are central to deriving the MACHO content of the Galactic halo. It then sets out to compare the rotation curves from various halo models with recent observations, with a view to establishing what limits can be put on an all-MACHO halo. The main thrust of the paper is to investigate whether lighter halo models which are consistent with microlensing by an all-MACHO halo are also consistent with recent measures of the Galactic rotation curve. In this case the population of bodies discovered by the MACHO collaboration would make up the entire dark matter content of the Galactic halo. The ma...

  9. LIMITS ON PROMPT, DISPERSED RADIO PULSES FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannister, K. W.; Murphy, T.; Gaensler, B. M. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics A29, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Reynolds, J. E., E-mail: keith.bannister@csiro.au [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)

    2012-09-20

    We have searched for prompt radio emission from nine gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with a 12 m telescope at 1.4 GHz, with a time resolution of 64 {mu}s to 1 s. We detected single dispersed radio pulses with significances >6{sigma} in the few minutes following two GRBs. The dispersion measures of both pulses are well in excess of the expected Galactic values, and the implied rate is incompatible with known sources of single dispersed pulses. The arrival times of both pulses also coincide with breaks in the GRB X-ray light curves. A null trial and statistical arguments rule out random fluctuations as the origin of these pulses with >95% and {approx}97% confidence, respectively, although a simple population argument supports a GRB origin with confidence of only 2%. We caution that we cannot rule out radio frequency interference (RFI) as the origin of these pulses. If the single pulses are not related to the GRBs, we set an upper limit on the flux density of radio pulses emitted between 200 and 1800 s after a GRB of 1.27w {sup -1/2} Jy, where 6.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} s < w < 32 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} s is the pulse width. We set a limit of less than 760 Jy for long timescale (>1 s) variations. These limits are some of the most constraining at high time resolution and GHz frequencies in the early stages of the GRB phenomenon.

  10. Critical Issues in NPH Categorization and Limit State Selection...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and the public. This step also includes defining what constitutes failure (e.g., for seismic design, determination of a Limit State associated with SSC failure) * Step 2:...

  11. Experimental Evidence for Self-Limiting Reactive Flow through...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Experimental Evidence for Self-Limiting Reactive Flow through a Fractured Cement Core: Implications for Time-Dependent Wellbore Leakage Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  12. Call for emission limits heats debate on global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singer, S.F.

    1997-08-01

    Emission limits on carbon dioxide is recommended by an Intergovernmental Panel in a discussion on global warming. (AIP) {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Anisotropic Fermi Surface and Quantum Limit Transport in High...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Anisotropic Fermi Surface and Quantum Limit Transport in High Mobility Three-Dimensional Dirac Semimetal Cd 3 As 2 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Anisotropic Fermi...

  14. Jordan cells in logarithmic limits of conformal field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jorgen Rasmussen

    2006-11-25

    It is discussed how a limiting procedure of conformal field theories may result in logarithmic conformal field theories with Jordan cells of arbitrary rank. This extends our work on rank-two Jordan cells. We also consider the limits of certain three-point functions and find that they are compatible with known results. The general construction is illustrated by logarithmic limits of (unitary) minimal models in conformal field theory. Characters of quasi-rational representations are found to emerge as the limits of the associated irreducible Virasoro characters.

  15. Resource Limits and Conversion Efficiency with Implications for Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Croft, Gregory Donald

    2009-01-01

    in resource limits declined with oil prices after 1985, butthe surge in oil prices since 1999 has elevated Hubbertfavored. Along with higher oil prices has come a discussion

  16. Articulated limiter blade for a tokamak fusion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doll, D.W.

    1982-10-21

    A limiter blade for a large tokomak fusion reactor includes three articulated blade sections for enabling the limiter blade to be adjusted for plasmas of different sizes. Each blade section is formed of a rigid backing plate carrying graphite tiles coated with titanium carbide, and the limiter blade forms a generally elliptic contour in both the poloidal and toroidal directions to uniformly distribute the heat flow to the blade. The limiter blade includes a central blade section movable along the major radius of the vacuum vessel, and upper and lower pivotal blade sections which may be pivoted by linear actuators having rollers held to the back surface of the pivotal blade sections.

  17. Articulated limiter blade for a tokamak fusion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doll, David W. (San Diego, CA)

    1985-01-01

    A limiter blade for a large tokomak fusion reactor includes three articulated blade sections for enabling the limiter blade to be adjusted for plasmas of different sizes. Each blade section is formed of a rigid backing plate carrying graphite tiles coated with titanium carbide, and the limiter blade forms a generally elliptic contour in both the poloidal and toroidal directions to uniformly distribute the heat flow to the blade. The limiter blade includes a central blade section movable along the major radius of the vacuum vessel, and upper and lower pivotal blade sections which may be pivoted by linear actuators having rollers held to the back surface of the pivotal blade sections.

  18. Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan - Chapter 2, Limited...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Temporary Limited Areas This chapter covers the establishment, maintenance, and termination of areas within HQ buildings where classified activities take place. It covers the...

  19. COLD BUBBLE FORMATION DURING TOKAMAK DENSITY LIMIT DISRUPTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, John

    COLD BUBBLE FORMATION DURING TOKAMAK DENSITY LIMIT DISRUPTIONS J. HOWARD, M. PERSSON* Plasma Research Laboratory, Research School of Physical Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra

  20. Comments on Emergency Order to Resume Limited Operation at the...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Operation at the Potomac River Generating Station, Alexandria, VA from the Chesapeake Climate Action Network. Comments on Emergency Order to Resume Limited Operation at the...

  1. Parameterized post-Newtonian limit of Horndeski's gravity theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manuel Hohmann

    2015-08-20

    We present a recent result on the parameterized post-Newtonian (PPN) limit of Horndeski's gravity theory and its consistency with solar system observations.

  2. Massive gravity as a limit of bimetric gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin-Moruno, Prado; Visser, Matt

    2013-01-01

    Massive gravity may be viewed as a suitable limit of bimetric gravity. The limiting procedure can lead to an interesting interplay between the "background" and "foreground" metrics in a cosmological context. The fact that in bimetric theories one always has two sets of metric equations of motion continues to have an effect even in the massive gravity limit. Thus, solutions of bimetric gravity in the limit of vanishing kinetic term are also solutions of massive gravity, but the contrary statement is not necessarily true.

  3. Stainless steel 304 cladding mechanical properties and limitations...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    mechanical properties and limitations during steady state operation of U-ZrH TRIGA type fuel. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Stainless steel 304 cladding mechanical...

  4. Electrochemical detection of leukemia oncogenes using enzyme-loaded carbon nanotube labels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Ai Cheng; Du, Dan; Chen, Baowei; Heng, Chew-Kiat; Lim, Tit-Meng; Lin, Yuehe

    2014-09-07

    Here we describe an ultrasensitive electrochemical nucleic acids assay amplified by carbon nanotubes (CNTs)-based labels for the detection of human acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) related p185 BCR-ABL fusion transcript. The carboxylated CNTs were functionalized with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) molecules and target-specific detection probes (DP) via diimide-activated amidation, and used to label and amplify target hybridization signal. The activity of captured HRP was monitored by square-wave voltammetry measuring the electroactive enzymatic product in the presence of 2-aminophenol and hydrogen peroxide substrate solution. The effect of DP and HRP loading of the CNT-based labels on its signal-to-noise ratio of electrochemical detection was studied systematically for the first time. Under optimized conditions, the signal-amplified assay achieved a detection limit of 83 fM targets oligonuecleotides and a 4-order wide dynamic range of target concentration. The resulting assay allowed a robust discrimination between the perfect match and a three-base mismatch sequence. When subjected to full-length (491 bp) DNA oncogene, the approach demonstrated a detection limit of approximately 33 pg of the target gene. The high sensitivity and specificity of assay enabled PCR-free detection of target transcripts in as little as 65 ng of mRNA extracted from positive ALL cell lines SUP-B15, in comparison to those obtained from negative cell lines HL-60. The approach holds promise for simple, low cost and ultrasensitive electrochemical nucleic acids detection in portable devices, point-of-care and early disease diagnostic applications.

  5. Conditions for diffusion-limited and reaction-limited recombination in nanostructured solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ansari-Rad, Mehdi; Department of Physics, University of Shahrood, Shahrood ; Anta, Juan A.; Arzi, Ezatollah

    2014-04-07

    The performance of Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSC) and related devices made of nanostructured semiconductors relies on a good charge separation, which in turn is achieved by favoring charge transport against recombination. Although both processes occur at very different time scales, hence ensuring good charge separation, in certain cases the kinetics of transport and recombination can be connected, either in a direct or an indirect way. In this work, the connection between electron transport and recombination in nanostructured solar cells is studied both theoretically and by Monte Carlo simulation. Calculations using the Multiple-Trapping model and a realistic trap distribution for nanostructured TiO{sub 2} show that for attempt-to-jump frequencies higher than 10{sup 11}–10{sup 13} Hz, the system adopts a reaction limited (RL) regime, with a lifetime which is effectively independent from the speed of the electrons in the transport level. For frequencies lower than those, and depending on the concentration of recombination centers in the material, the system enters a diffusion-limited regime (DL), where the lifetime increases if the speed of free electrons decreases. In general, the conditions for RL or DL recombination depend critically on the time scale difference between recombination kinetics and free-electron transport. Hence, if the former is too rapid with respect to the latter, the system is in the DL regime and total thermalization of carriers is not possible. In the opposite situation, a RL regime arises. Numerical data available in the literature, and the behavior of the lifetime with respect to (1) density of recombination centers and (2) probability of recombination at a given center, suggest that a typical DSC in operation stays in the RL regime with complete thermalization, although a transition to the DL regime may occur for electrolytes or hole conductors where recombination is especially rapid or where there is a larger dispersion of energies of electron acceptors.

  6. DETECTION OF POTENTIAL TRANSIT SIGNALS IN THE FIRST 12 QUARTERS OF KEPLER MISSION DATA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tenenbaum, Peter; Jenkins, Jon M.; Seader, Shawn; Burke, Christopher J.; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Rowe, Jason F.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Li, Jie; Quintana, Elisa V.; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Thompson, Susan E.; Twicken, Joseph D.; Girouard, Forrest R. [Orbital Sciences Corporation and others

    2013-05-01

    We present the results of a search for potential transit signals in the first three years of photometry data acquired by the Kepler mission. The targets of the search include 112,321 targets that were observed over the full interval and an additional 79,992 targets that were observed for a subset of the full interval. From this set of targets we find a total of 11,087 targets that contain at least one signal that meets the Kepler detection criteria: periodicity of the signal, an acceptable signal-to-noise ratio, and three tests that reject false positives. Each target containing at least one detected signal is then searched repeatedly for additional signals, which represent multi-planet systems of transiting planets. When targets with multiple detections are considered, a total of 18,406 potential transiting planet signals are found in the Kepler mission data set. The detected signals are dominated by events with relatively low signal-to-noise ratios and by events with relatively short periods. The distribution of estimated transit depths appears to peak in the range between 20 and 30 parts per million, with a few detections down to fewer than 10 parts per million. The detections exhibit signal-to-noise ratios from 7.1{sigma}, which is the lower cutoff for detections, to over 10,000{sigma}, and periods ranging from 0.5 days, which is the shortest period searched, to 525 days, which is the upper limit of achievable periods given the length of the data set and the requirement that all detections include at least three transits. The detected signals are compared to a set of known transit events in the Kepler field of view, many of which were identified by alternative methods; the comparison shows that the current search recovery rate for targets with known transit events is 98.3%.

  7. Leak detection on an ethylene pipeline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamande, A.; Condacse, V.; Modisette, J.

    1995-12-31

    A model-based leak detection system has been in operation on the Solvay et Cie ethylene pipeline from Antwerp to Jemeppe on Sambre since 1989. The leak detection system, which is the commercial product PLDS of Modisette Associations, Inc., was originally installed by the supplier. Since 1991, all system maintenance and configuration changes have been done by Solvay et Cie personnel. Many leak tests have been performed, and adjustments have been made in the configuration and the automatic tuning parameters. The leak detection system is currently able to detect leaks of 2 tonnes/hour in 11 minutes with accurate location. Larger leaks are detected in about 2 minutes. Leaks between 0.5 and 1 tonne per hour are detected after several hours. (The nominal mass flow in the pipeline is 15 tonnes/hour, with large fluctuations.) Leaks smaller than 0.5 tonnes per hour are not detected, with the alarm thresholds set at levels to avoid false alarms. The major inaccuracies of the leak detection system appear to be associated with the ethylene temperatures.

  8. Bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuit detection methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, Michael L.; Paulus, Michael J.; Sayler, Gary S.; Applegate, Bruce M.; Ripp, Steven A.

    2005-06-14

    Disclosed are monolithic bioelectronic devices comprising a bioreporter and an OASIC. These bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuit are useful in detecting substances such as pollutants, explosives, and heavy-metals residing in inhospitable areas such as groundwater, industrial process vessels, and battlefields. Also disclosed are methods and apparatus for detection of particular analytes, including ammonia and estrogen compounds.

  9. Anomaly Intrusion Detection in Dynamic Execution Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    of Microsoft's .NET project [10]. These technologies will further decouple hardware and software, allowing intrusion detection with extremely low performance penal- ties. Because each virtual machine (VM to improve intrusion detection[27, 36, 3]. Several such systems have been constructed, many with the idea

  10. Multivariate Change Detection in Multispectral, Multitemporal Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multivariate Change Detection in Multispectral, Multitemporal Images Knut Conradsen Allan Aasbjerg, Building 321 DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark Abstract This paper introduces a new orthogonal transfonn the multivariate change detection (MeD) transfonn based on an established multivariate statistical tech- nique

  11. Pedestrian Detection: A Benchmark Piotr Dollar1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Zhigang

    Pedestrian Detection: A Benchmark Piotr Doll´ar1 Christian Wojek2 Bernt Schiele2 Pietro Perona1 1 Darmstadt {pdollar,perona}@caltech.edu {wojek,schiele}@cs.tu-darmstadt.de Abstract Pedestrian detection- ing public datasets. To continue the rapid rate of innova- tion, we introduce the Caltech Pedestrian

  12. Compressed Sensing Meets Change-Point Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Yao

    of weak signals: How to use signal correlation? Technical Report, 2011. 2/53 #12;Solar flare detection June, 2012. I solar storm: a large explosion in the sun's atmosphere I a direct hit by solar storm can shut down power lines, and destroy airplane communications I predict major solar storms: detecting

  13. Z' boson detection in the minimal quiver standard model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berenstein, D.; Martinez, R.; Ochoa, F.; Pinansky, S.

    2009-05-01

    We undertake a phenomenological study of the extra neutral Z' boson in the minimal quiver standard model and discuss limits on the model's parameters from previous precision electroweak experiments, as well as detection prospects at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. We find that masses lower than around 700 GeV are excluded by the Z-pole data from the CERN LEP collider, and below 620 GeV by experimental data from di-electron events at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We also find that at a mass of 1 TeV the LHC cross section would show a small peak in the di-lepton and top pair channel.

  14. Directional Dark Matter Detection Beyond the Neutrino Bound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philipp Grothaus; Malcolm Fairbairn; Jocelyn Monroe

    2014-09-30

    Coherent scattering of solar, atmospheric and diffuse supernovae neutrinos creates an irreducible background for direct dark matter experiments with sensitivities to WIMP-nucleon spin-independent scattering cross-sections of 10^(-46)-10^(-48) cm^2, depending on the WIMP mass. Even if one could eliminate all other backgrounds, this "neutrino floor" will limit future experiments with projected sensitivities to cross-sections as small as 10^(-48) cm^2. Direction-sensitive detectors have the potential to study dark matter beyond the neutrino bound by fitting event distributions in multiple dimensions: recoil kinetic energy, recoil track angle with respect to the sun, and event time. This work quantitatively explores the impact of direction-sensitivity on the neutrino bound in dark matter direct detection.

  15. BIOMASS FOR HYDROGEN AND OTHER TRANSPORT FUELS -POTENTIALS, LIMITATIONS & COSTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BIOMASS FOR HYDROGEN AND OTHER TRANSPORT FUELS - POTENTIALS, LIMITATIONS & COSTS Senior scientist - "Towards Hydrogen Society" ·biomass resources - potentials, limits ·biomass carbon cycle ·biomass for hydrogen - as compared to other H2- sources and to other biomass paths #12;BIOMASS - THE CARBON CYCLE

  16. LIMITS TO CBA IN UK AND EUROPEAN ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Ian J.

    LIMITS TO CBA IN UK AND EUROPEAN ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY: RETROSPECTS & FUTURE PROSPECTS by R.K. Turner CSERGE Working Paper EDM 06-17 #12;Limits to CBA in UK and European Environmental Policy the contemporary debate and the now long standing role of CBA in UK and European environmental policy appraisal

  17. Broadcasting with a Battery Limited Energy Harvesting Rechargeable Transmitter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulukus, Sennur

    . The proposed algorithm uses directional water-filling repetitively. I. INTRODUCTION Energy harvestingBroadcasting with a Battery Limited Energy Harvesting Rechargeable Transmitter Omur Ozel1 , Jing with a battery limited energy harvesting trans- mitter in a two-user AWGN broadcast channel. The transmitter has

  18. Cooling at the quantum limit and RF refrigeration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    Cooling at the quantum limit and RF refrigeration Jukka Pekola Low Temperature Laboratory, Helsinki (electromagnetic) heat transport Cooling at the quantum limit: experiments RF refrigeration in a single as a refrigerator Optimum cooling power is reached at V 2/e: Cooling power of a NIS junction: Temperature TN

  19. Dynamic Limit Growth Indices in Discrete Time Tomasz R. Bielecki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    Dynamic Limit Growth Indices in Discrete Time Tomasz R. Bielecki 1 bielecki@iit.edu Igor Cialenco 1, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, 60616 IL, USA 2 Institute of Mathematics, Jagiellonian propose a new class of mappings, called Dynamic Limit Growth Indices, that are designed to measure

  20. Limited Sectoral Trading between the EU ETS and China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limited Sectoral Trading between the EU ETS and China Claire Gavard, Niven Winchester and Sergey established research centers at MIT: the Center for Global Change Science (CGCS) and the Center for Energy://globalchange.mit.edu/ Printed on recycled paper #12;1 Limited Sectoral Trading between the EU ETS and China Claire Gavard

  1. Limited Flooding Protocol for Mobile Ad hoc Networks Mieso Denko

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard, Wayne

    Limited Flooding Protocol for Mobile Ad hoc Networks Mieso Denko Department of Computing propose a multipath routing protocol called Limited Flooding. The protocol is fully reactive and does not entail the compu- tation of routing tables. It uses the basic features of flooding but restricts packet

  2. Broadcasting with a Battery Limited Energy Harvesting Rechargeable Transmitter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulukus, Sennur

    ) at the transmitter at random instants. The battery at the transmitter has a finite storage capacity, hence energy mayBroadcasting with a Battery Limited Energy Harvesting Rechargeable Transmitter Omur Ozel1 , Jing with a battery limited energy harvesting trans- mitter in a two-user AWGN broadcast channel. The transmitter has

  3. Dynamic Query Optimization under Access Limitations and Dependencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calvanese, Diego

    : Unlike relational tables in a database, data sources on the Web typically can only be accessed in limited ways. In particular, some of the source fields may be required as input and thus need to be mandatorily filled in order to access the source. Answering queries over sources with access limitations is a complex

  4. COGARCH as a continuous-time limit of Jan Kallsen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kallsen, Jan

    of a sequence of GARCH(1,1) processes. As a by-product we derive the infinitesimal generator of the bivariate. Key words: GARCH, continuous time, limit theorem, Markov process, generator Mathematics SubjectCOGARCH as a continuous-time limit of GARCH(1,1) Jan Kallsen Bernhard Vesenmayer Abstract COGARCH

  5. On the ChapmanJouguet Limit for a Combustion Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On the Chapman­Jouguet Limit for a Combustion Model Bernard Hanouzet \\Lambda , Roberto Natalini y and Alberto Tesei z Abstract We study the limiting behaviour of solutions to a simple model for combustion detonations and deflagrations with respect to the reaction rate. Key words and phrases: combustion

  6. CMC Markets Stockbroking Limited Financial Services Guide (FSG)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Richard

    and responsibility of CMC Markets Stockbroking when it provides retail clients with the financial services describedCMC Markets Stockbroking Limited Financial Services Guide (FSG) 1 October 2013 AFSL No. 246381 and ABN 69 081 002 851 #12;Table of Contents CMC Markets Stockbroking Limited | Financial Services Guide 2

  7. Energy Harvesting Communications with Energy and Data Storage Limitations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    Energy Harvesting Communications with Energy and Data Storage Limitations Burak Varan Aylin Yener time minimization problem with finite data and energy storage. The communication set up in [10] does limited energy and data storage. The data transmission policies allow the transmitter to drop some

  8. One-level limit order books with sparsity and memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-10-17

    Oct 17, 2014 ... Keywords and phrases: Limit Order Book Modeling, Price Process Formation, Long-run Price Process ... In recent years, the study of continuous double auction trading ... By nature, the market orders are matched with limit orders at the .... LOB features, some of which are relevant for trading and intraday.

  9. Aalborg Universitet Switching speed limitations of high power IGBT modules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munk-Nielsen, Stig

    of the total power loss. Therefore, by design, it is critical that switching losses are reduced to a minimumAalborg Universitet Switching speed limitations of high power IGBT modules Incau, Bogdan Ioan.aau.dk on: november 29, 2015 #12;Switching speed limitations of high power IGBT modules Bogdan Ioan Incau

  10. Detecting concentration changes with cooperative receptors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bo, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Cells constantly need to monitor the state of the environment to detect changes and timely respond. The detection of concentration changes of a ligand by a set of receptors can be cast as a problem of hypothesis testing, and the cell viewed as a Neyman-Pearson detector. Within this framework, we investigate the role of receptor cooperativity in improving the cell's ability to detect changes. We find that cooperativity decreases the probability of missing an occurred change. This becomes especially beneficial when difficult detections have to be made. Concerning the influence of cooperativity on how fast a desired detection power is achieved, we find in general that there is an optimal value at finite levels of cooperation, even though easy discrimination tasks can be performed more rapidly by noncooperative receptors.

  11. Intrusion Detection 1 02/09/00 Computer System Intrusion Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Ruby B.

    Intrusion Detection 1 02/09/00 Computer System Intrusion Detection: A Survey1 Anita K. Jones in computer systems increases in importance as computers are increasingly integrated into the systems that we detection as performed in software in the context of operating systems for a single computer, a distributed

  12. Annual Groundwater Detection Monitoring Report for the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (2008)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorie Cahn

    2009-07-31

    This report presents the data collected for groundwater detection monitoring at the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility (ICDF) during calendar year 2008. The detection-monitoring program developed for the ICDF groundwater-monitoring wells is applicable to six wells completed in the uppermost portion of the Snake River Plain Aquifer. Five wells downgradient of the ICDF and one well upgradient. The ICDF detection-monitoring program was established to meet the substantive requirements of Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Parts 264.97 and 264.98, which are applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements under CERCLA. Semiannal groundwater samples were collected and analyzed for indicator parameters in March and September. The indicator parameters focus on constituents that are found in higher concentrations in ICDF leachate than in groundwater (bicarbonate alkalinity, sulfate, U-233, and U-238). The only detection monitoring limits that were exceeded were for bicarbonate alkalinity. Bicarbonate alkalinity is naturally occuring in groundwater. Bicarbonate alkalinity found in ICDF detection monitoring wells is not a result of waste migration from the ICDF landfill or the evaporation pond. The U.S. Department of Energy will continue with detection monitoring for the ICDF, which is semiannual sampling for indicator parameters.

  13. Annual Groundwater Detection Monitoring Report for the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (2008)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorie Cahn

    2009-07-31

    This report presents the data collected for groundwater detection monitoring at the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility (ICDF) during calendar year 2008. The detection-monitoring program developed for the ICDF groundwater-monitoring wells is applicable to six wells completed in the uppermost portion of the Snake River Plain Aquifer ? five wells downgradient of the ICDF and one well upgradient. The ICDF detection-monitoring program was established to meet the substantive requirements of Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Parts 264.97 and 264.98, which are applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements under CERCLA. Semiannual groundwater samples were collected and analyzed for indicator parameters in March and September. The indicator parameters focus on constituents that are found in higher concentrations in ICDF leachate than in groundwater (bicarbonate alkalinity, sulfate, U-233, U-234, and U-238). The only detection monitoring limits that were exceeded were for bicarbonate alkalinity. Bicarbonate alkalinity is naturally occurring in groundwater. Bicarbonate alkalinity found in ICDF detection monitoring wells is not a result of waste migration from the ICDF landfill or the evaporation pond. The U.S. Department of Energy will continue with detection monitoring for the ICDF, which is semiannual sampling for indicator parameters.

  14. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SIGNAL PROCESSING, VOL. 56, NO. 7, JULY 2008 2625 Sample Eigenvalue Based Detection of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masci, Frank

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SIGNAL PROCESSING, VOL. 56, NO. 7, JULY 2008 2625 Sample Eigenvalue Based, IEEE, and Alan Edelman Abstract--The detection and estimation of signals in noisy, limited data versions of one or more of the figures in this paper are available online at http://ieeexplore.ieee

  15. Pulse Detection in Initial Value ODEs Amy Marie Hynick 1 Patrick Keast a,1 Paul H. Muir b,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keast, Patrick

    Pulse Detection in Initial Value ODEs Amy Marie Hynick 1 Patrick Keast a,1 Paul H. Muir b,1 of limited duration, known as pulses, occur in g(t, y). These pulses may begin at times which are not known#erential equation solvers may miss the pulse completely, stepping over it, especially if, prior to the pulse

  16. Detection of Formaldehyde Towards the Extreme Carbon Star IRC+10216

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, K E S; Schilke, P; Melnick, G J; Neufeld, David A.; Schilke, Peter; Melnick, Gary J.

    2004-01-01

    We report the detection of H2CO (formaldehyde) around the carbon-rich AGB star, IRC+10216. We find a fractional abundance with respect to molecular hydrogen of x(H2CO)= (1.3 {+1.5}{-0.8}) x 10^{-8}. This corresponds to a formaldehyde abundance with respect to water vapor of x(H2CO)/x(H2O)=(1.1 +/- 0.2) x 10^{-2}, in line with the formaldehyde abundances found in Solar System comets, and indicates that the putative extrasolar cometary system around IRC+10216 may have a similar chemical composition to Solar System comets. However, we also failed to detect CH3OH (methanol) around IRC+10216 and our upper limit of x(CH3OH)/x(H2O) formaldehyde has an extended source in the envelope of IRC+10216 and may be produced by the photodissociation of a parent molecule, similar to the production mechanism for formaldehyde in Solar System come...

  17. Detection of Formaldehyde Towards the Extreme Carbon Star IRC+10216

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. E. Saavik Ford; David A. Neufeld; Peter Schilke; Gary J. Melnick

    2004-07-07

    We report the detection of H2CO (formaldehyde) around the carbon-rich AGB star, IRC+10216. We find a fractional abundance with respect to molecular hydrogen of x(H2CO)= (1.3 {+1.5}{-0.8}) x 10^{-8}. This corresponds to a formaldehyde abundance with respect to water vapor of x(H2CO)/x(H2O)=(1.1 +/- 0.2) x 10^{-2}, in line with the formaldehyde abundances found in Solar System comets, and indicates that the putative extrasolar cometary system around IRC+10216 may have a similar chemical composition to Solar System comets. However, we also failed to detect CH3OH (methanol) around IRC+10216 and our upper limit of x(CH3OH)/x(H2O) formaldehyde has an extended source in the envelope of IRC+10216 and may be produced by the photodissociation of a parent molecule, similar to the production mechanism for formaldehyde in Solar System comet comae. Preliminary mapping observations also indicate a possible asymmetry in the spatial distribution of formaldehyde around IRC+10216, but higher signal-to-noise observations are required to confirm this finding. This study is based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30m telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany) and IGN (Spain). (abridged)

  18. Amplification of interference color by using liquid crystal for protein detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Qingdi; Yang, Kun-Lin

    2013-12-09

    Micrometer-sized, periodic protein lines printed on a solid surface cause interference color which is invisible to the naked eye. However, the interference color can be amplified by using a thin layer of liquid crystal (LC) covered on the surface to form a phase diffraction grating. Strong interference color can thus be observed under ambient light. By using the LC-amplified interference color, we demonstrate naked-eye detection of a model protein—immunoglobulin G (IgG). Limit of detection can reach 20??g/ml of IgG without using any instrumentation. This detection method is potentially useful for the development of low-cost and portable biosensors.

  19. Reference-less detection, astrometry, and photometry of faint companions with adaptive optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szymon Gladysz; Julian C. Christou

    2009-07-14

    We propose a complete framework for the detection, astrometry, and photometry of faint companions from a sequence of adaptive optics corrected short exposures. The algorithms exploit the difference in statistics between the on-axis and off-axis intensity. Using moderate-Strehl ratio data obtained with the natural guide star adaptive optics system on the Lick Observatory's 3-m Shane Telescope, we compare these methods to the standard approach of PSF fitting. We give detection limits for the Lick system, as well as a first guide to expected accuracy of differential photometry and astrometry with the new techniques. The proposed approach to detection offers a new way of determining dynamic range, while the new algorithms for differential photometry and astrometry yield accurate results for very faint and close-in companions where PSF fitting fails. All three proposed algorithms are self-calibrating, i.e. they do not require observation of a calibration star thus improving the observing efficiency.

  20. Final LDRD report : infrared detection and power generation using self-assembled quantum dots.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cederberg, Jeffrey George; Ellis, Robert; Shaner, Eric Arthur

    2008-02-01

    Alternative solutions are desired for mid-wavelength and long-wavelength infrared radiation detection and imaging arrays. We have investigated quantum dot infrared photodetectors (QDIPs) as a possible solution for long-wavelength infrared (8 to 12 {mu}m) radiation sensing. This document provides a summary for work done under the LDRD 'Infrared Detection and Power Generation Using Self-Assembled Quantum Dots'. Under this LDRD, we have developed QDIP sensors and made efforts to improve these devices. While the sensors fabricated show good responsivity at 80 K, their detectivity is limited by high noise current. Following efforts concentrated on how to reduce or eliminate this problem, but with no clear path was identified to the desired performance improvements.

  1. Portable microfluidic raman system for rapid, label-free early disease signature detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Meiye; Davis, Ryan Wesley; Hatch, Anson

    2015-09-01

    In the early stages of infection, patients develop non-specific or no symptoms at all. While waiting for identification of the infectious agent, precious window of opportunity for early intervention is lost. The standard diagnostics require affinity reagents and sufficient pathogen titers to reach the limit of detection. In the event of a disease outbreak, triaging the at-risk population rapidly and reliably for quarantine and countermeasure is more important than the identification of the pathogen by name. To expand Sandia's portfolio of Biological threat management capabilities, we will utilize Raman spectrometry to analyze immune subsets in whole blood to rapidly distinguish infected from non-infected, and bacterial from viral infection, for the purpose of triage during an emergency outbreak. The goal of this one year LDRD is to determine whether Raman spectroscopy can provide label-free detection of early disease signatures, and define a miniaturized Raman detection system meeting requirements for low- resource settings.

  2. Tunable photonic cavities for in-situ spectroscopic trace gas detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bond, Tiziana; Cole, Garrett; Goddard, Lynford

    2012-11-13

    Compact tunable optical cavities are provided for in-situ NIR spectroscopy. MEMS-tunable VCSEL platforms represents a solid foundation for a new class of compact, sensitive and fiber compatible sensors for fieldable, real-time, multiplexed gas detection systems. Detection limits for gases with NIR cross-sections such as O.sub.2, CH.sub.4, CO.sub.x and NO.sub.x have been predicted to approximately span from 10.sup.ths to 10s of parts per million. Exemplary oxygen detection design and a process for 760 nm continuously tunable VCSELS is provided. This technology enables in-situ self-calibrating platforms with adaptive monitoring by exploiting Photonic FPGAs.

  3. Wireless Power Transfer for High-precision Position Detection of Railroad Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Hyun-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Detection of vehicle position is critical for successful operation of intelligent transportation system. In case of railroad transportation systems, position information of railroad vehicles can be detected by GPS, track circuits, and so on. In this paper, position detection based on tags onto sleepers of the track is investigated. Position information stored in the tags is read by a reader placed at the bottom of running railroad vehicle. Due to limited capacity of battery or its alternative in the tags, power required for transmission of position information to the reader is harvested by the tags from the power wirelessly transferred from the reader. Basic mechanism in wireless power transfer is magnetic induction and power transfer efficiency according to the relative location of the reader to a tag is discussed with simulation results. Since power transfer efficiency is significantly affected by the ferromagnetic material (steel) at the bottom of the railroad vehicle and the track, magnetic beam shaping b...

  4. Capability of environmental sampling to detect undeclared cask openings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckstead, L.W.; Efurd, D.W.; Hemberger, P.H.; Abhold, M.E.; Eccleston, G.W.

    1997-12-01

    The goal of this study is to determine the signatures that would allow monitors to detect diversion of nuclear fuel (by a diverter) from a storage area such as a geological repository. Due to the complexity of operations surrounding disposal of spent nuclear fuel in a geologic repository, there are several places that a diversion of fuel could take place. After the canister that contains the fuel rods is breached, the diverter would require a hot cell to process or repackage the fuel. A reference repository and possible diversion scenarios are discussed. When a canister is breached, or during reprocessing to extract nuclear weapons material (primarily Pu), several important isotopes or signatures including tritium, {sup 85}Kr, and {sup 129}I are released to the surrounding environment and have the potential for analysis. Estimates of release concentrations of the key signatures from the repository under a hypothetical diversion scenario are presented and discussed. Gas analysis data collected from above-ground storage casks at Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Test Area North (TAN) are included and discussed in the report. In addition, LANL participated in gas sampling of one TAN cask, the Castor V/21, in July 1997. Results of xenon analysis from the cask gas sample are presented and discussed. The importance of global fallout and recent commercial reprocessing activities and their effects on repository monitoring are discussed. Monitoring and instrumental equipment for analysis of the key signature isotopes are discussed along with limits of detection. A key factor in determining if diversion activities are in progress at a repository is the timeliness of detection and analysis of the signatures. Once a clandestine operation is suspected, analytical data should be collected as quickly as possible to support any evidence of diversion.

  5. Understanding WIMP-baryon interactions with direct detection: A Roadmap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vera Gluscevic; Annika H. G. Peter

    2014-06-30

    We study prospects of dark-matter direct-detection searches for probing non-relativistic effective theory for WIMP-baryon scattering. We simulate a large set of noisy recoil-energy spectra for different scattering scenarios (beyond the standard momentum-independent contact interaction), for Generation 2 and futuristic experiments. We analyze these simulations and quantify the probability of successfully identifying the operator governing the scattering, if a WIMP signal is observed. We find that the success rate depends on a combination of factors: the WIMP mass, the mediator mass, the type of interaction, and the experimental energy window. For example, for a 20 GeV WIMP, Generation 2 is only likely to identify the right operator if the interaction is Coulomb-like, and is unlikely to do so in any other case. For a WIMP with a mass of 200 GeV or higher, success is almost guaranteed. We also find that, regardless of the scattering model and the WIMP parameters, a single Generation 2 experiment is unlikely to successfully discern the momentum dependence of the underlying operator on its own, but prospects improve drastically when experiments with different target materials and energy windows are analyzed jointly. Furthermore, we examine the quality of parameter estimation and degeneracies in the multi-dimensional parameter space of the effective theory. We find in particular that the resulting WIMP mass estimates can be severely biased if data are analyzed assuming the standard (momentum-independent) operator while the actual operator has momentum-dependence. Finally, we evaluate the ultimate reach of direct detection, finding that the prospects for successful operator selection prior to reaching the irreducible backgrounds are excellent, if the signal is just below the current limits, but slim if Generation 2 does not report WIMP detection.

  6. Understanding WIMP-baryon interactions with direct detection: a roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gluscevic, Vera; Peter, Annika H.G. E-mail: apeter@physics.osu.edu

    2014-09-01

    We study prospects of dark-matter direct-detection searches for probing non-relativistic effective theory for WIMP-baryon scattering. We simulate a large set of noisy recoil-energy spectra for different scattering scenarios (beyond the standard momentum-independent contact interaction), for Generation 2 and futuristic experiments. We analyze these simulations and quantify the probability of successfully identifying the operator governing the scattering, if a WIMP signal is observed. We find that the success rate depends on a combination of factors: the WIMP mass, the mediator mass, the type of interaction, and the experimental energy window. For example, for a 20 GeV WIMP, Generation 2 is only likely to identify the right operator if the interaction is Coulomb-like, and is unlikely to do so in any other case. For a WIMP with a mass of 200 GeV or higher, success is almost guaranteed. We also find that, regardless of the scattering model and the WIMP parameters, a single Generation 2 experiment is unlikely to successfully discern the momentum dependence of the underlying operator on its own, but prospects improve drastically when experiments with different target materials and energy windows are analyzed jointly. Furthermore, we examine the quality of parameter estimation and degeneracies in the multi-dimensional parameter space of the effective theory. We find in particular that the resulting WIMP mass estimates can be severely biased if data are analyzed assuming the standard (momentum-independent) operator while the actual operator has momentum-dependence. Finally, we evaluate the ultimate reach of direct detection, finding that the prospects for successful operator selection prior to reaching the irreducible backgrounds are excellent, if the signal is just below the current limits, but slim if Generation 2 does not report WIMP detection.

  7. Upper and lower limits on the Crab pulsar's astrophysical parameters set from gravitational wave observations by LIGO: braking index and energy considerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanni Santostasi

    2008-07-16

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational Observatory (LIGO) has recently reached the end of its fifth science run (S5), having collected more than a year worth of data. Analysis of the data is still ongoing but a positive detection of gravitational waves, while possible, is not realistically expected for most likely sources. This is particularly true for what concerns gravitational waves from known pulsars. In fact, even under the most optimistic (and not very realistic) assumption that all the pulsar's observed spin-down is due to gravitational waves, the gravitational wave strain at earth from all the known isolated pulsars (with the only notable exception of the Crab pulsar) would not be strong enough to be detectable by existing detectors. By August 2006, LIGO had produced enough data for a coherent integration capable to extract signal from noise that was weaker than the one expected from the Crab pulsar's spin-down limit. No signal was detected, but beating the spin-down limit is a considerable achievement for the LIGO Scientific Collaboration (LSC). It is customary to translate the upper limit on strain from a pulsar into a more astrophysically significant upper limit on ellipticity. Once the spin-down limit has been beaten, it is possible to release the constraint that all the spin-down is due to gravitational wave emission. A more complete model with diverse braking mechanisms can be used to set limits on several astrophysical parameters of the pulsar. This paper shows possible values of such parameters for the Crab pulsar given the current limit on gravitational waves from this neutron star.

  8. The Swift short gamma-ray burst rate density: prospects for detecting binary neutron star mergers by aLIGO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Coward; Eric Howell; Tsvi Piran; Giulia Stratta; Marica Branchesi; Omer Bromberg; Bruce Gendre; Ronald Burman; Dafne Guetta

    2012-06-22

    Presently only 30% of short gamma ray bursts (SGRBs) have accurate redshifts, and this sample is highly biased by the limited sensitivity of {\\it Swift} to detect SGRBs. We account for the dominant biases to calculate a realistic SGRB rate density out to $z = 0.5$ using the {\\it Swift} sample of peak fluxes, redshifts, and those SGRBs with a beaming angle constraint from X-ray/optical observations. Assuming a significant fraction of binary neutron star mergers produce SGRBs, we calculate lower and upper detection rate limits of (1-180) per Yr by an advanced LIGO and Virgo coincidence search. Our detection rate is compatible with extrapolations using Galactic pulsar observations and population synthesis.

  9. Damage detection technique by measuring laser-based mechanical impedance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Hyeonseok; Sohn, Hoon [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (Daehak-ro 291, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701) (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-18

    This study proposes a method for measurement of mechanical impedance using noncontact laser ultrasound. The measurement of mechanical impedance has been of great interest in nondestructive testing (NDT) or structural health monitoring (SHM) since mechanical impedance is sensitive even to small-sized structural defects. Conventional impedance measurements, however, have been based on electromechanical impedance (EMI) using contact-type piezoelectric transducers, which show deteriorated performances induced by the effects of a) Curie temperature limitations, b) electromagnetic interference (EMI), c) bonding layers and etc. This study aims to tackle the limitations of conventional EMI measurement by utilizing laser-based mechanical impedance (LMI) measurement. The LMI response, which is equivalent to a steady-state ultrasound response, is generated by shooting the pulse laser beam to the target structure, and is acquired by measuring the out-of-plane velocity using a laser vibrometer. The formation of the LMI response is observed through the thermo-mechanical finite element analysis. The feasibility of applying the LMI technique for damage detection is experimentally verified using a pipe specimen under high temperature environment.

  10. Optical limiting device and method of preparation thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Hsing-Lin (Los Alamos, NM); Xu, Su (Santa Clara, CA); McBranch, Duncan W. (Santa Fe, NM)

    2003-01-01

    Optical limiting device and method of preparation thereof. The optical limiting device includes a transparent substrate and at least one homogeneous layer of an RSA material in polyvinylbutyral attached to the substrate. The device may be produced by preparing a solution of an RSA material, preferably a metallophthalocyanine complex, and a solution of polyvinylbutyral, and then mixing the two solutions together to remove air bubbles. The resulting solution is layered onto the substrate and the solvent is evaporated. The method can be used to produce a dual tandem optical limiting device.

  11. The multicomponent 2D Toda hierarchy: dispersionless limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manuel Manas; Luis Martinez Alonso

    2009-04-21

    The factorization problem of the multi-component 2D Toda hierarchy is used to analyze the dispersionless limit of this hierarchy. A dispersive version of the Whitham hierarchy defined in terms of scalar Lax and Orlov--Schulman operators is introduced and the corresponding additional symmetries and string equations are discussed. Then, it is shown how KP and Toda pictures of the dispersionless Whitham hierarchy emerge in the dispersionless limit. Moreover, the additional symmetries and string equations for the dispersive Whitham hierarchy are studied in this limit.

  12. Sensor for detecting changes in magnetic fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL)

    1981-01-01

    A sensor for detecting changes in the magnetic field of the equilibrium-field coil of a Tokamak plasma device comprises a pair of bifilar wires disposed circumferentially, one inside and one outside the equilibrium-field coil. Each is shorted at one end. The difference between the voltages detected at the other ends of the bifilar wires provides a measure of changing flux in the equilibrium-field coil. This difference can be used to detect faults in the coil in time to take action to protect the coil.

  13. Colorimetric detection of uranium in water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeVol, Timothy A. (Clemson, SC); Hixon, Amy E. (Piedmont, SC); DiPrete, David P. (Evans, GA)

    2012-03-13

    Disclosed are methods, materials and systems that can be used to determine qualitatively or quantitatively the level of uranium contamination in water samples. Beneficially, disclosed systems are relatively simple and cost-effective. For example, disclosed systems can be utilized by consumers having little or no training in chemical analysis techniques. Methods generally include a concentration step and a complexation step. Uranium concentration can be carried out according to an extraction chromatographic process and complexation can chemically bind uranium with a detectable substance such that the formed substance is visually detectable. Methods can detect uranium contamination down to levels even below the MCL as established by the EPA.

  14. Thermal wake/vessel detection technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roskovensky, John K. (Albuquerque, NM); Nandy, Prabal (Albuquerque, NM); Post, Brian N (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-01-10

    A computer-automated method for detecting a vessel in water based on an image of a portion of Earth includes generating a thermal anomaly mask. The thermal anomaly mask flags each pixel of the image initially deemed to be a wake pixel based on a comparison of a thermal value of each pixel against other thermal values of other pixels localized about each pixel. Contiguous pixels flagged by the thermal anomaly mask are grouped into pixel clusters. A shape of each of the pixel clusters is analyzed to determine whether each of the pixel clusters represents a possible vessel detection event. The possible vessel detection events are represented visually within the image.

  15. High sensitivity leak detection method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myneni, G.R.

    1994-09-06

    An improved leak detection method is provided that utilizes the cyclic adsorption and desorption of accumulated helium on a non-porous metallic surface. The method provides reliable leak detection at superfluid helium temperatures. The zero drift that is associated with residual gas analyzers in common leak detectors is virtually eliminated by utilizing a time integration technique. The sensitivity of the apparatus of this disclosure is capable of detecting leaks as small as 1 [times] 10[sup [minus]18] atm cc sec[sup [minus]1]. 2 figs.

  16. High sensitivity leak detection method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myneni, Ganapatic R. (Grafton, VA)

    1994-01-01

    An improved leak detection method is provided that utilizes the cyclic adsorption and desorption of accumulated helium on a non-porous metallic surface. The method provides reliable leak detection at superfluid helium temperatures. The zero drift that is associated with residual gas analyzers in common leak detectors is virtually eliminated by utilizing a time integration technique. The sensitivity of the apparatus of this disclosure is capable of detecting leaks as small as 1.times.10.sup.-18 atm cc sec.sup.-1.

  17. Sensor for detecting changes in magnetic fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Praeg, W.F.

    1980-02-26

    A sensor is described for detecting changes in the magnetic field of the equilibrium-field coil of a Tokamak plasma device that comprises a pair of bifilar wires disposed circumferentially, one inside and one outside the equilibrium-field coil. Each is shorted at one end. The difference between the voltages detected at the other ends of the bifilar wires provides a measure of changing flux in the equilibrium-field coil. This difference can be used to detect faults in the coil in time to take action to protect the coil.

  18. Detecting persons concealed in a vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tucker, Jr., Raymond W.

    2005-03-29

    An improved method for detecting the presence of humans or animals concealed within in a vehicle uses a combination of the continuous wavelet transform and a ratio-based energy calculation to determine whether the motion detected using seismic sensors placed on the vehicle is due to the presence of a heartbeat within the vehicle or is the result of motion caused by external factors such as the wind. The method performs well in the presence of light to moderate ambient wind levels, producing far fewer false alarm indications. The new method significantly improves the range of ambient environmental conditions under which human presence detection systems can reliably operate.

  19. Strict Limit on CPT Violation from Polarization of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenji Toma; Shinji Mukohyama; Daisuke Yonetoku; Toshio Murakami; Shuichi Gunji; Tatehiro Mihara; Yoshiyuki Morihara; Tomonori Sakashita; Takuya Takahashi; Yudai Wakashima; Hajime Yonemochi; Noriyuki Toukairin

    2012-11-09

    We report the strictest observational verification of CPT invariance in the photon sector, as a result of gamma-ray polarization measurement of distant gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which are brightest stellar-size explosions in the universe. We detected the gamma-ray polarization of three GRBs with high significance, and the source distances may be constrained by a well-known luminosity indicator for GRBs. For the Lorentz- and CPT-violating dispersion relation E_{\\pm}^2=p^2 \\pm 2\\xi p^3/M_{Pl}, where \\pm denotes different circular polarization states of the photon, the parameter \\xi is constrained as |\\xi|limit on the CPT-violating effect leads to the expectation that quantum gravity presumably respects the CPT invariance.

  20. Influence from cosmological uncertainties on galaxy number count at faint limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. J. Shen; Q. Zhang; Xin-he Meng

    2015-03-13

    Counting galaxy number density with wide range sky surveys has been well adopted in researches focusing on revealing evolution pattern of different types of galaxies. As understood intuitively the astrophysics environment physics is intimated affected by cosmology priors with theoretical estimation or vise versa, or simply stating that the astrophysics effect couples the corresponding cosmology observations or the way backwards. In this article we try to quantify the influence on galaxy number density prediction at faint luminosity limit from the uncertainties in cosmology, and how much the uncertainties blur the detection of galaxy evolution, with the hope that this trying may indeed help for precise and physical cosmology study in near future or vise versa