Sample records for detailed quantitative results

  1. Save Energy Now Assessments Results 2008 Detailed Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Anthony L [ORNL; Martin, Michaela A [ORNL; Nimbalkar, Sachin U [ORNL; Quinn, James [U.S. Department of Energy; Glatt, Ms. Sandy [DOE Industrial Technologies Program; Orthwein, Mr. Bill [U.S. Department of Energy

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In October 2005, U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Bodman launched his Easy Ways to Save Energy campaign with a promise to provide energy assessments to 200 of the largest U.S. manufacturing plants. DOE's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) responded to the Secretary's campaign with its Save Energy Now initiative, featuring a new and highly cost-effective form of energy savings assessment. The approach for these assessments drew heavily on the existing resources of ITP's technology delivery component. Over the years, ITP Technology Delivery has worked with industry partners to assemble a suite of respected software tools, proven assessment protocols, training curricula, certified energy experts, and strong partnerships for deployment. The Save Energy Now assessments conducted in calendar year 2006 focused on natural gas savings and targeted many of the nation's largest manufacturing plants - those that consume at least 1 TBtu of energy annually. The 2006 Save Energy Now assessments focused primarily on assessments of steam and process heating systems, which account for an estimated 74% of all natural gas use by U.S. manufacturing plants. Because of the success of the Save Energy Now assessments conducted in 2006 and 2007, the program was expanded and enhanced in two major ways in 2008: (1) a new goal was set to perform at least 260 assessments; and (2) the assessment focus was expanded to include pumping, compressed air, and fan systems in addition to steam and process heating. DOE ITP also has developed software tools to assess energy efficiency improvement opportunities in pumping, compressed air, and fan systems. The Save Energy Now assessments integrate a strong training component designed to teach industrial plant personnel how to use DOE's opportunity assessment software tools. This approach has the advantages of promoting strong buy-in of plant personnel for the assessment and its outcomes and preparing them better to independently replicate the assessment process at the company's other facilities. Another important element of the Save Energy Now assessment process is the follow-up process used to identify how many of the recommended savings opportunities from individual assessments have been implemented in the industrial plants. Plant personnel involved with the Save Energy Now assessments are contacted 6 months, 12 months, and 24 months after individual assessments are completed to determine implementation results. A total of 260 Save Energy Now assessments were successfully completed in calendar year 2008. This means that a total of 718 assessments were completed in 2006, 2007, and 2008. As of July 2009, we have received a total of 239 summary reports from the ESAs that were conducted in year 2008. Hence, at the time that this report was prepared, 680 final assessment reports were completed (200 from year 2006, 241 from year 2007, and 239 from year 2008). The total identified potential cost savings from these 680 assessments is $1.1 billion per year, including natural gas savings of about 98 TBtu per year. These results, if fully implemented, could reduce CO{sub 2} emissions by about 8.9 million metric tons annually. When this report was prepared, data on implementation of recommended energy and cost savings measures from 488 Save Energy Now assessments were available. For these 488 plants, measures saving a total of $147 million per year have been implemented, measures that will save $169 million per year are in the process of being implemented, and plants are planning implementation of measures that will save another $239 million per year. The implemented recommendations are already achieving total CO{sub 2} reductions of about 1.8 million metric tons per year. This report provides a summary of the key results for the Save Energy Now assessments completed in 2008; details of the 6-month, 12-month, and 24-month implementation results obtained to date; and an evaluation of these implementation results. This report also summarizes key accomplishments, findings, and lessons learned from all the Save Energy No

  2. Process of Integrating Screening and Detailed Risk-based Modeling Analyses to Ensure Consistent and Scientifically Defensible Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buck, John W.; McDonald, John P.; Taira, Randal Y.

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To support cleanup and closure of these tanks, modeling is performed to understand and predict potential impacts to human health and the environment. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed a screening tool for the United States Department of Energy, Office of River Protection that estimates the long-term human health risk, from a strategic planning perspective, posed by potential tank releases to the environment. This tool is being conditioned to more detailed model analyses to ensure consistency between studies and to provide scientific defensibility. Once the conditioning is complete, the system will be used to screen alternative cleanup and closure strategies. The integration of screening and detailed models provides consistent analyses, efficiencies in resources, and positive feedback between the various modeling groups. This approach of conditioning a screening methodology to more detailed analyses provides decision-makers with timely and defensible information and increases confidence in the results on the part of clients, regulators, and stakeholders.

  3. A Detailed Look at the First Results from the Large Underground Xenon (LUX) Dark Matter Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Szydagis; D. S. Akerib; H. M. Araujo; X. Bai; A. J. Bailey; J. Balajthy; E. Bernard; A. Bernstein; A. Bradley; D. Byram; S. B. Cahn; M. C. Carmona-Benitez; C. Chan; J. J. Chapman; A. A. Chiller; C. Chiller; T. Coffey; A. Currie; L. de Viveiros; A. Dobi; J. Dobson; E. Druszkiewicz; B. Edwards; C. H. Faham; S. Fiorucci; C. Flores; R. J. Gaitskell; V. M. Gehman; C. Ghag; K. R. Gibson; M. G. D. Gilchriese; C. Hall; S. A. Hertel; M. Horn; D. Q. Huang; M. Ihm; R. G. Jacobsen; K. Kazkaz; R. Knoche; N. A. Larsen; C. Lee; A. Lindote; M. I. Lopes; D. C. Malling; R. Mannino; D. N. McKinsey; D. -M. Mei; J. Mock; M. Moongweluwan; J. Morad; A. St. J. Murphy; C. Nehrkorn; H. Nelson; F. Neves; R. A. Ott; M. Pangilinan; P. D. Parker; E. K. Pease; K. Pech; P. Phelps; L. Reichhart; T. Shutt; C. Silva; V. N. Solovov; P. Sorensen; K. O'Sullivan; T. Sumner; D. Taylor; B. Tennyson; D. R. Tiedt; M. Tripathi; S. Uvarov; J. R. Verbus; N. Walsh; R. Webb; J. T. White; M. S. Witherell; F. L. H. Wolfs; M. Woods; C. Zhang

    2014-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    LUX, the world's largest dual-phase xenon time-projection chamber, with a fiducial target mass of 118 kg and 10,091 kg-days of exposure thus far, is currently the most sensitive direct dark matter search experiment. The initial null-result limit on the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon scattering cross-section was released in October 2013, with a primary scintillation threshold of 2 phe, roughly 3 keVnr for LUX. The detector has been deployed at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, South Dakota, and is the first experiment to achieve a limit on the WIMP cross-section lower than $10^{-45}$ cm$^{2}$. Here we present a more in-depth discussion of the novel energy scale employed to better understand the nuclear recoil light and charge yields, and of the calibration sources, including the new internal tritium source. We found the LUX data to be in conflict with low-mass WIMP signal interpretations of other results.

  4. A Detailed Look at the First Results from the Large Underground Xenon (LUX) Dark Matter Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szydagis, M; Araujo, H M; Bai, X; Bailey, A J; Balajthy, J; Bernard, E; Bernstein, A; Bradley, A; Byram, D; Cahn, S B; Carmona-Benitez, M C; Chan, C; Chapman, J J; Chiller, A A; Chiller, C; Coffey, T; Currie, A; de Viveiros, L; Dobi, A; Dobson, J; Druszkiewicz, E; Edwards, B; Faham, C H; Fiorucci, S; Flores, C; Gaitskell, R J; Gehman, V M; Ghag, C; Gibson, K R; Gilchriese, M G D; Hall, C; Hertel, S A; Horn, M; Huang, D Q; Ihm, M; Jacobsen, R G; Kazkaz, K; Knoche, R; Larsen, N A; Lee, C; Lindote, A; Lopes, M I; Malling, D C; Mannino, R; McKinsey, D N; Mei, D -M; Mock, J; Moongweluwan, M; Morad, J; Murphy, A St J; Nehrkorn, C; Nelson, H; Neves, F; Ott, R A; Pangilinan, M; Parker, P D; Pease, E K; Pech, K; Phelps, P; Reichhart, L; Shutt, T; Silva, C; Solovov, V N; Sorensen, P; O'Sullivan, K; Taylor, D; Tennyson, B; Tiedt, D R; Tripathi, M; Uvarov, S; Verbus, J R; Walsh, N; Webb, R; White, J T; Witherell, M S; Wolfs, F L H; Woods, M; Zhang, C

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LUX, the world's largest dual-phase xenon time-projection chamber, with a fiducial target mass of 118 kg and 10,091 kg-days of exposure thus far, is currently the most sensitive direct dark matter search experiment. The initial null-result limit on the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon scattering cross-section was released in October 2013, with a primary scintillation threshold of 2 phe, roughly 3 keVnr for LUX. The detector has been deployed at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, South Dakota, and is the first experiment to achieve a limit on the WIMP cross-section lower than $10^{-45}$ cm$^{2}$. Here we present a more in-depth discussion of the novel energy scale employed to better understand the nuclear recoil light and charge yields, and of the calibration sources, including the new internal tritium source. We found the LUX data to be in conflict with low-mass WIMP signal interpretations of other results.

  5. NSTX Disruption Simulations of Detailed Divertor and Passive Plate Models by Vector Potential Transfer from OPERA Global Analysis Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. H. Titus, S. Avasaralla, A.Brooks, R. Hatcher

    2010-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) project is planning upgrades to the toroidal field, plasma current and pulse length. This involves the replacement of the center-stack, including the inner legs of the TF, OH, and inner PF coils. A second neutral beam will also be added. The increased performance of the upgrade requires qualification of the remaining components including the vessel, passive plates, and divertor for higher disruption loads. The hardware needing qualification is more complex than is typically accessible by large scale electromagnetic (EM) simulations of the plasma disruptions. The usual method is to include simplified representations of components in the large EM models and attempt to extract forces to apply to more detailed models. This paper describes a more efficient approach of combining comprehensive modeling of the plasma and tokamak conducting structures, using the 2D OPERA code, with much more detailed treatment of individual components using ANSYS electromagnetic (EM) and mechanical analysis. This capture local eddy currents and resulting loads in complex details, and allows efficient non-linear, and dynamic structural analyses.

  6. Report on Solar Pool Heating Quantitative Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Synapse Infusion Group, Inc. (Westlake Village, California)

    1999-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the results of a quantitative research study undertaken to better understand the marketplace for solar pool-heating systems from the perspective of residential pool owners.

  7. Prognostic Importance of Gleason 7 Disease Among Patients Treated With External Beam Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Results of a Detailed Biopsy Core Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spratt, Daniel E.; Zumsteg, Zach; Ghadjar, Pirus; Pangasa, Misha; Pei, Xin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Fine, Samson W. [Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yamada, Yoshiya; Kollmeier, Marisa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Zelefsky, Michael J., E-mail: zelefskm@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To analyze the effect of primary Gleason (pG) grade among a large cohort of Gleason 7 prostate cancer patients treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: From May 1989 to January 2011, 1190 Gleason 7 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with EBRT at a single institution. Of these patients, 613 had a Gleason 7 with a minimum of a sextant biopsy with nonfragmented cores and full biopsy core details available, including number of cores of cancer involved, percentage individual core involvement, location of disease, bilaterality, and presence of perineural invasion. Median follow-up was 6 years (range, 1-16 years). The prognostic implication for the following outcomes was analyzed: biochemical recurrence-free survival (bRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM). Results: The 8-year bRFS rate for pG3 versus pG4 was 77.6% versus 61.3% (P<.0001), DMFS was 96.8% versus 84.3% (P<.0001), and PCSM was 3.7% versus 8.1% (P=.002). On multivariate analysis, pG4 predicted for significantly worse outcome in all parameters. Location of disease (apex, base, mid-gland), perineural involvement, maximum individual core involvement, and the number of Gleason 3+3, 3+4, or 4+3 cores did not predict for distant metastases. Conclusions: Primary Gleason grade 4 independently predicts for worse bRFS, DMFS, and PCSM among Gleason 7 patients. Using complete core information can allow clinicians to utilize pG grade as a prognostic factor, despite not having the full pathologic details from a prostatectomy specimen. Future staging and risk grouping should investigate the incorporation of primary Gleason grade when complete biopsy core information is used.

  8. Results of detailed analyses performed on boring cores extracted from the concrete floors of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant reactor buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maeda, Koji; Sasaki, S.; Kumai, M.; Sato, Isamu; Osaka, Masahiko; Fukushima, Mineo; Kawatsuma, Shinji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Goto, Tetsuo; Sakai, Hitoshi [Toshiba Corporation, 8, Shinsugita, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8523 (Japan); Chigira, Takayuki; Murata, Hirotoshi [Tokyo Electric Power Company, 1-1-3 Uchisaiwai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, 100-8560 (Japan)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to the massive earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011, and the following severe accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, concrete surfaces within the reactor buildings were exposed to radioactive liquid and vapor phase contaminants. In order to clarify the situation of this contamination in the reactor buildings of Units 1, 2 and 3, selected samples were transported to the Fuels Monitoring Facility in the Oarai Engineering Center of JAEA where they were subjected to analyses to determine the surface radionuclide concentrations and to characterize the radionuclide distributions in the samples. In particular, penetration of radiocesium in the surface coatings layer and sub-surface concrete was evaluated. The analysis results indicate that the situation of contamination in the building of Unit 2 was different from others, and the protective surface coatings on the concrete floors provided significant protection against radionuclide penetration. The localized penetration of contamination in the concrete floors was found to be confined within a millimeter of the surface of the coating layer of some millimeters. (authors)

  9. Longitudinal, intermodality registration of quantitative breast PET and MRI data acquired before and during neoadjuvant chemotherapy: Preliminary results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atuegwu, Nkiruka C.; Williams, Jason M. [Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2310 and Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2675 (United States)] [Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2310 and Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2675 (United States); Li, Xia; Arlinghaus, Lori R. [Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2310 (United States)] [Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2310 (United States); Abramson, Richard G. [Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2310 (United States) [Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2310 (United States); Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2675 (United States); Vanderbilt Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-6838 (United States); Chakravarthy, A. Bapsi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-5671 and Vanderbilt Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-6838 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-5671 and Vanderbilt Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-6838 (United States); Abramson, Vandana G. [Department of Medical Oncology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-6307 and Vanderbilt Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-6838 (United States)] [Department of Medical Oncology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-6307 and Vanderbilt Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-6838 (United States); Yankeelov, Thomas E., E-mail: thomas.yankeelov@vanderbilt.edu [Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2310 (United States); Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2675 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37240-1807 (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-6838 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235-1631 (United States); Vanderbilt Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-6838 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The authors propose a method whereby serially acquired DCE-MRI, DW-MRI, and FDG-PET breast data sets can be spatially and temporally coregistered to enable the comparison of changes in parameter maps at the voxel level. Methods: First, the authors aligned the PET and MR images at each time point rigidly and nonrigidly. To register the MR images longitudinally, the authors extended a nonrigid registration algorithm by including a tumor volume-preserving constraint in the cost function. After the PET images were aligned to the MR images at each time point, the authors then used the transformation obtained from the longitudinal registration of the MRI volumes to register the PET images longitudinally. The authors tested this approach on ten breast cancer patients by calculating a modified Dice similarity of tumor size between the PET and MR images as well as the bending energy and changes in the tumor volume after the application of the registration algorithm. Results: The median of the modified Dice in the registered PET and DCE-MRI data was 0.92. For the longitudinal registration, the median tumor volume change was ?0.03% for the constrained algorithm, compared to ?32.16% for the unconstrained registration algorithms (p = 8 × 10{sup ?6}). The medians of the bending energy were 0.0092 and 0.0001 for the unconstrained and constrained algorithms, respectively (p = 2.84 × 10{sup ?7}). Conclusions: The results indicate that the proposed method can accurately spatially align DCE-MRI, DW-MRI, and FDG-PET breast images acquired at different time points during therapy while preventing the tumor from being substantially distorted or compressed.

  10. Detailed search Miscellaneous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Search Go Detailed search Miscellaneous Press sources (PhysicsWeb.org) Based on information from press sources (PhysicsWeb.org) Scientific Research; Nuclear Fusion; Renewable Sources of Energy

  11. ARM - Detailed Experiment Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m Documentation DataDatastreamsxsaprhsrhi Documentation DataAlaskaDefensiveDetailed

  12. Crucial role of detailed function, task, timeline, link and human vulnerability analyses in HRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, T.G.; Haney, L.N.; Ostrom, L.T.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper addresses one major cause for large uncertainties in human reliability analysis (HRA) results, that is, an absence of detailed function, task, timeline, link and human vulnerability analyses. All too often this crucial step in the HRA process is done in a cursory fashion using word of mouth or written procedures which themselves may incompletely or inaccurately represent the human action sequences and human error vulnerabilities being analyzed. The paper examines the potential contributions these detailed analyses can make in achieving quantitative and qualitative HRA results which are: (1) creditable, that is, minimize uncertainty, (2) auditable, that is, systematically linking quantitative results and qualitative information from which the results are derived, (3) capable of supporting root cause analyses on human reliability factors determined to be major contributors to risk, and (4) capable of repeated measures and being combined with similar results from other analyses to examine HRA issues transcending individual systems and facilities. Based on experience analyzing test and commercial nuclear reactors, and medical applications of nuclear technology, an iterative process is suggested for doing detailed function, task, timeline, link and human vulnerability analyses using documentation reviews, open-ended and structured interviews, direct observations, and group techniques. Finally, the paper concludes that detailed analyses done in this manner by knowledgeable human factors practitioners, can contribute significantly to the credibility, auditability, causal factor analysis, and combining goals of the HRA.

  13. Hawaii demand-side management resource assessment. Final report, Reference Volume 3 -- Residential and commercial sector DSM analyses: Detailed results from the DBEDT DSM assessment model; Part 1, Technical potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hawaii Demand-Side Management Resource Assessment was the fourth of seven projects in the Hawaii Energy Strategy (HES) program. HES was designed by the Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism (DBEDT) to produce an integrated energy strategy for the State of Hawaii. The purpose of Project 4 was to develop a comprehensive assessment of Hawaii`s demand-side management (DSM) resources. To meet this objective, the project was divided into two phases. The first phase included development of a DSM technology database and the identification of Hawaii commercial building characteristics through on-site audits. These Phase 1 products were then used in Phase 2 to identify expected energy impacts from DSM measures in typical residential and commercial buildings in Hawaii. The building energy simulation model DOE-2.1E was utilized to identify the DSM energy impacts. More detailed information on the typical buildings and the DOE-2.1E modeling effort is available in Reference Volume 1, ``Building Prototype Analysis``. In addition to the DOE-2.1E analysis, estimates of residential and commercial sector gas and electric DSM potential for the four counties of Honolulu, Hawaii, Maui, and Kauai through 2014 were forecasted by the new DBEDT DSM Assessment Model. Results from DBEDTs energy forecasting model, ENERGY 2020, were linked with results from DOE-2.1E building energy simulation runs and estimates of DSM measure impacts, costs, lifetime, and anticipated market penetration rates in the DBEDT DSM Model. Through its algorithms, estimates of DSM potential for each forecast year were developed. Using the load shape information from the DOE-2.1E simulation runs, estimates of electric peak demand impacts were developed. Numerous tables and figures illustrating the technical potential for demand-side management are included.

  14. Position Summary Employee Details

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    services for faculty and staff. Catalogue and compile assessment resource materials and results and make readily available to faculty and staff by contributing to an assessment resources website; provide STUDIES - 061003 Position: DIRECTOR OF ACADEMIC ASSESSMENT, STUDENT LEARNING ASSESSMENT HEERA

  15. Primary enzyme quantitation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saunders, G.C.

    1982-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure relates to the quantitation of a primary enzyme concentration by utilizing a substrate for the primary enzyme labeled with a second enzyme which is an indicator enzyme. Enzyme catalysis of the substrate occurs and results in release of the indicator enzyme in an amount directly proportional to the amount of primary enzyme present. By quantifying the free indicator enzyme one determines the amount of primary enzyme present.

  16. Introduction Some quantitative analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maume-Deschamps, Véronique

    Introduction Some quantitative analysis Simulations Conclusion, further work Risk indicators Simulations Conclusion, further work Plan 1 Introduction Context Risk indicators 2 Some quantitative analysis;Introduction Some quantitative analysis Simulations Conclusion, further work Context Risk indicators

  17. Crucial role of detailed function, task, timeline, link and human vulnerability analyses in HRA. [Human Reliability Analysis (HRA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, T.G.; Haney, L.N.; Ostrom, L.T.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper addresses one major cause for large uncertainties in human reliability analysis (HRA) results, that is, an absence of detailed function, task, timeline, link and human vulnerability analyses. All too often this crucial step in the HRA process is done in a cursory fashion using word of mouth or written procedures which themselves may incompletely or inaccurately represent the human action sequences and human error vulnerabilities being analyzed. The paper examines the potential contributions these detailed analyses can make in achieving quantitative and qualitative HRA results which are: (1) creditable, that is, minimize uncertainty, (2) auditable, that is, systematically linking quantitative results and qualitative information from which the results are derived, (3) capable of supporting root cause analyses on human reliability factors determined to be major contributors to risk, and (4) capable of repeated measures and being combined with similar results from other analyses to examine HRA issues transcending individual systems and facilities. Based on experience analyzing test and commercial nuclear reactors, and medical applications of nuclear technology, an iterative process is suggested for doing detailed function, task, timeline, link and human vulnerability analyses using documentation reviews, open-ended and structured interviews, direct observations, and group techniques. Finally, the paper concludes that detailed analyses done in this manner by knowledgeable human factors practitioners, can contribute significantly to the credibility, auditability, causal factor analysis, and combining goals of the HRA.

  18. Microfluidics for quantitative biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Micha

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Microfluidics for Quantitative BiologyChapter 1: Microfluidics.………………………………………………………..… 1 1.1OF THE DISSERTATION Microfluidics for Quantitative Biology

  19. Improving alternative fuel utilization: detailed kinetic combustion...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Improving alternative fuel utilization: detailed kinetic combustion modeling & experimental testing Improving alternative fuel utilization: detailed kinetic combustion modeling &...

  20. 2003 CBECS Detailed Tables: Summary

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25,9,1996 N Y M E2003 Detailed Tables 2003

  1. Electric Power detailed State data

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin:DeploymentSite Name: Email: Terminal2,7,7,of GreenhouseDetailed

  2. Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well Drilling Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well...

  3. Essays in Quantitative Macroeconomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumuller, Seth

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    quantitative model), I choose to focus on the volatility of permanent shocks to wages as the measure of risk for my analysis.

  4. Beyond bolts : architectural details, construction, meaning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Peter Dominic

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An architectural Detail is a small piece of the whole, yet it has the power to characterize and define the entire building. Details tell us what a building is; they are fundamental to the life and personality of a space. ...

  5. Improving alternative fuel utilization: detailed kinetic combustion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Improving alternative fuel utilization: detailed kinetic combustion modeling & experimental testing Salvador Aceves, Daniel Flowers, Bill Pitz, Charlie Westbrook, Emma Silke,...

  6. A detailed study of the nuclear dependence of the EMC effect and short-range correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arrington, John; Day, Donal; Fomin, Nadia; Gaskell, Dave; Solvignon, Patricia

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: The density of the nucleus has been important in explaining the nuclear dependence of the quark distributions, also known as the EMC effect, as well as the presence of highmomentum nucleons arising from short-range correlations (SRCs). Recent measurements of both of these effects on light nuclei have shown a clear deviation from simple density-dependent models. Purpose: A better understanding of the nuclear quark distributions and short-range correlations requires a careful examination of the experimental data on these effects to constrain models that attempt to describe these phenomena. Methods: We present a detailed analysis of the nuclear dependence of the EMC effect and the contribution of SRCs in nuclei, comparing to predictions and simple scaling models based on different pictures of the underlying physics. We also make a direct, quantitative comparison of the two effects to further examine the connection between these two observables related to nuclear structure. Results: We find that, with...

  7. Automated Quantitative Software Verification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    quantitative properties such as "the worst-case probability that the airbag fails to deploy within 10ms", instead of qualitative properties such as "the airbag eventually deploys". Although many model checking

  8. Ancillary service details: Voltage control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, B.; Hirst, E.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Voltage control is accomplished by managing reactive power on an alternating-current power system. Reactive power can be produced and absorbed by both generation and transmission equipment. Reactive-power devices differ substantially in the magnitude and speed of response and in their capital costs. System operators, transmission owners, generators, customers, power marketers, and government regulators need to pay close attention to voltage control as they restructure the U.S. electricity industry. Voltage control can affect reliability and commerce in three ways: (1) Voltages must be maintained within an acceptable range for both customer and power-system equipment to function properly. (2) The movement of reactive power consumes transmission resources, which limits the ability to move real power and worsens congestion. (3) The movement of reactive power results in real-power losses. When generators are required to supply excessive amounts of reactive power, their real-power production must be curtailed. These opportunity costs are not currently compensated for in most regions. Current tariffs are based on embedded costs. These embedded-cost tariffs average about $0.51/MWh, equivalent to $1.5 billion annually for the United States as a whole. Although this cost is low when compared with the cost of energy, it still aggregates to a significant amount of money. This report takes a basic look at why the power system requires reactive power (an appendix explains the fundamentals of real and reactive power). The report then examines the various types of generation and transmission resources used to supply reactive power and to control voltage. Finally it discusses how these resources are deployed and paid for in several reliability regions around the country. As the U.S. electricity industry is restructured, the generation, transmission, and system-control equipment and functions that maintain voltages within the appropriate ranges are being deintegrated.

  9. Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well Drilling John Casteel Nevada Geothermal Power Co. Validation of Innovative Exploration...

  10. The effect of network detail on traffic assignment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Gary Don

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    exceed the actual separation on the ground. Thus, with the coded networks common1y used, severs!. city blocks are appropri. ately aggregated to form a single zone. The zone centroid is connected to the network in a manner consistent with the physical... these facil- ities and underloading the arterials and collectors. CHAPTER II I NETWORK AS SIGNHENT Detailed Network The initial assignr, . ent of the detailed network resulted in con- siderable disagreement between assigned volumes and ground counts...

  11. Digital PCR and Quantitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perkins, Richard A.

    quantitation ­ qPCR measures specific (e.g. human) DNA targets Pet Hair #12;Applied Genetics Why Quantitate signal crosses threshold (Ct) 10,000 pg/uL 1,000 pg/uL 100 pg/uL 10 pg/uL ? pg/uL -1 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 10 20 30 40 DeltaRn Cycle qPCR with Calibration curve Ct=21.59 Ct=24.90 Ct=28.22 Ct=31.54 Ct=26.90 #12

  12. Honours APPLICATION UG 2. CONTACT DETAILS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Du, Jie

    of Sydney student number: Citizenship: Australian citizen New Zealand citizen Australian permanent resident.e. not an Australian citizen, permanent resident or New Zealand citizen) Title: Gender: Family Name: Given names school/unit/discipline for further details. #12;4. HONOURS DETAILS Majors in science subject area(s) (if

  13. Description of Axial Detail for ROK Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trellue, Holly R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Galloway, Jack D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    For the purpose of NDA simulations of the ROK fuel assemblies, we have developed an axial burnup distribution to represent the pins themselves based on gamma scans of rods in the G23 assembly. For the purpose of modeling the G23 assembly (both at ORNL and LANL), the pin-by-pin burnup map as simulated by ROK is being assumed to represent the radial burnup distribution. However, both DA and NDA results indicate that this simulated estimate is not 100% correct. In particular, the burnup obtained from the axial gamma scan of 7 pins does not represent exactly the same 'average' pin burnup as the ROK simulation. Correction for this discrepancy is a goal of the well-characterized assembly task but will take time. For now, I have come up with a correlation for 26 axial points of the burnup as obtained by gamma scans of 7 different rods (C13, G01, G02, J11, K10, L02, and M04, neglecting K02 at this time) to the average burnup given by the simulation for each of the rods individually. The resulting fraction in each axial zone is then averaged for the 7 different rods so that it can represent every fuel pin in the assembly. The burnup in each of the 26 axial zones of rods in all ROK assemblies will then be directly adjusted using this fraction, which is given in Table 1. Note that the gamma scan data given by ROK for assembly G23 included a length of {approx}3686 mm, so the first 12 mm and the last 14 mm were ignored to give an actual rod length of {approx}366 cm. To represent assembly F02 in which no pin-by-pin burnup distribution is given by ROK, we must model it using infinitely-reflected geometry but can look at the effects of measuring in different axial zones by using intermediate burnup files (i.e. smaller burnups than 28 GWd/MTU) and determining which axial zone(s) each burnup represents. Details for assembly F02 are then given in Tables 2 and 3, which is given in Table 1 and has 44 total axial zones to represent the top meter in explicit detail in addition to the other 26 zones. Note that the MCNP files for F02 were created using the Monte Carlo burnup linkage code Monteburns, which saves MCNP input files with detailed compositions as a function of burnup. The 'intermediate burnup files' produced for F02 include a cooling time of 27 years. The axial location of 5 spacers was also included in the ROK F02 assembly in which each spacer contained a length of 3.81 cm. Note that due to the nature of Monteburns, which was run in a special fashion for this problem, the step number increments after the 27 year decay, so the second column of Table 2 refers to the step number that should be used in the Monteburns files.

  14. Simulating plant motion with levels of detail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flannery, Rebecca Lynn

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    SIMULATING PLANT MOTION WITH LEVELS OF DETAIL A Senior Honors Thesis by REBECCA LYNN FLANNERY Submitted to the Office of Honors Programs k. Academic Scholarships Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... of the UNIVERSITY UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH FELLOWS April 2003 Group: Engineering & Physics I SIMULATING PLANT MOTION WITH LEVELS OF DETAIL A Senior Honors Thesis by REBECCA LYNN FLANNERY Submitted to the Office of Honors Programs & Academic Scholarships...

  15. Test Series 2. 3 detailed test plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Test Series 2.3 is chronologically the second of the five sub-series of tests which comprise Test Series 2, the second major Test Series as part of the combustion research phase to be carried out at the Grimethorpe Experimental Pressurised Fluidised Bed Combustion Facility. Test Series 2.3 will consist of 700 data gathering hours which is expected to require some 1035 coal burning hours. The tests will be performed using US supplied coal and dolomite. This will be the first major series of tests on the Facility with other than the UK datum coal and dolomite. The document summarises the background to the facility and the experimental program. Described are modifications which have been made to the facility following Test Series 2.1 and a series of Screening Tests. Detailed test objectives are specified as are the test conditions for the experiments which comprise the test series. The test results will provide information on the effects of the bed temperature, excess air level, Ca/S ratio, number of coal feed lines, and combustion efficiency and sulphur retention. A significant aspect of the test series will be part load tests which will investigate the performance of the facility under conditions of turn down which simulate load following concepts specified for two combined cycle concepts, i.e., their CFCC combined cycle and a turbo charged combined cycle. The material test plan is also presented. The principal feature of the materials programme is the planned exposure of a set of static turbine blade specimens in a cascade test loop to the high temperature, high pressure flue gas. A schedule for the programme is presented as are contingency plans.

  16. Theory and simulation of colloids near interfaces: quantitative mapping of interaction potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Mingqing

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of dense colloidal fluids near surfaces can now be probed in great detail with experimental techniques like video and confocal microscopy. In fact we are approaching a point where quantitative comparisons of experiments with particle...

  17. Combined confocal Raman and quantitative phase microscopy system for biomedical diagnosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Jeon Woong

    We have developed a novel multimodal microscopy system that incorporates confocal Raman, confocal reflectance, and quantitative phase microscopy (QPM) into a single imaging entity. Confocal Raman microscopy provides detailed ...

  18. A quantitative assessment of nuclear weapons proliferation risk utilizing probabilistic methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sentell, Dennis Shannon, 1971-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comparative quantitative assessment is made of the nuclear weapons proliferation risk between various nuclear reactor/fuel cycle concepts using a probabilistic method. The work presented details quantified proliferation ...

  19. RENDERING FILTERS FOR CONTROLLING DETAIL AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RENDERING FILTERS FOR CONTROLLING DETAIL AND CREATING EFFECTS CHRISTOPHER ROBERT DECORO may be unified under the general theme of the rendering filter. Generally stated, such a filter is a passive, stateless operator that acts upon a decomposition of terms in the rendering equation

  20. Detailed Financial Procedures Page 1 of 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Ran

    Detailed Financial Procedures Page 1 of 3 Inventories and Disposals Background In accordance with Standing Financial Regulation, Heads of Departments are responsible for maintaining inventories for all disposals thereof. (Ref 8.03 & 8.06) Inventory Spreadsheet The following information should be recorded

  1. Contact details: School of Architecture, BCU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    With 90% of the UK population living in urban areas, improving urban sustainability has become a pressing Economic Fabric This work package investigated opportunities and barriers to achieving sustainable is to be sustainable in the widest sense. Contact details: Centre for Urban and Regional Studies, U0B Dr. Austin Barber

  2. Property Loss / Damage Report Damage Loss Details

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    Property Loss / Damage Report Damage Loss Details Date & Time of Damage / Loss: Type of damage / loss: Location - specific address / room: Project / Grant associated with damage / loss - grant Police: When was damage / loss first discovered - BY WHOM: Pictures available or attached? Was personal

  3. Contact Details Journeying Beyond Breast Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    Home About Contact Details Facebook Search Journeying Beyond Breast Cancer making sense of the cancer experience Feeds: Posts Comments Cancer-fighting fountain pen May 20, 2009 by JBBC A research team be used both as a research tool in the development of next-generation cancer treatments

  4. Detailed balance analysis of nanophotonic solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Shanhui

    Detailed balance analysis of nanophotonic solar cells Sunil Sandhu, Zongfu Yu, and Shanhui Fan-voltage characteristic modeling of nanophotonic solar cells. This approach takes into account the intrinsic material non-idealities, and is useful for determining the theoretical limit of solar cell efficiency for a given structure. Our approach

  5. Factors influencing quantitative liquid (scanning) transmission...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Factors influencing quantitative liquid (scanning) transmission electron microscopy. Factors influencing quantitative liquid (scanning) transmission electron microscopy. Abstract:...

  6. Thirty Meter Telescope Detailed Science Case: 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skidmore, Warren; Fukugawa, Misato; Goswami, Aruna; Hao, Lei; Jewitt, David; Laughlin, Greg; Steidel, Charles; Hickson, Paul; Simard, Luc; Schöck, Matthias; Treu, Tommaso; Cohen, Judith; Anupama, G C; Dickinson, Mark; Harrison, Fiona; Kodama, Tadayuki; Lu, Jessica R; Macintosh, Bruce; Malkan, Matt; Mao, Shude; Narita, Norio; Sekiguchi, Tomohiko; Subramaniam, Annapurni; Tanaka, Masaomi; Tian, Feng; A'Hearn, Michael; Akiyama, Masayuki; Ali, Babar; Aoki, Wako; Bagchi, Manjari; Barth, Aaron; Bhalerao, Varun; Bradac, Marusa; Bullock, James; Burgasser, Adam J; Chapman, Scott; Chary, Ranga-Ram; Chiba, Masashi; Cooray, Asantha; Crossfield, Ian; Currie, Thayne; Das, Mousumi; Dewangan, G C; de Grijs, Richard; Do, Tuan; Dong, Subo; Evslin, Jarah; Fang, Taotao; Fang, Xuan; Fassnacht, Christopher; Fletcher, Leigh; Gaidos, Eric; Gal, Roy; Ghez, Andrea; Giavalisco, Mauro; Grady, Carol A; Greathouse, Thomas; Gogoi, Rupjyoti; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Ho, Luis; Hasan, Priya; Herczeg, Gregory J; Honda, Mitsuhiko; Imanishi, Masa; Inanmi, Hanae; Iye, Masanori; Kamath, U S; Kane, Stephen; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Kasliwal, Mansi; Kirby, Vishal KasliwalEvan; Konopacky, Quinn M; Lepine, Sebastien; Li, Di; Li, Jianyang; Liu, Junjun; Liu, Michael C; Lopez-Rodriguez, Enrigue; Lotz, Jennifer; Lubin, Philip; Macri, Lucas; Maeda, Keiichi; Marchis, Franck; Marois, Christian; Marscher, Alan; Martin, Crystal; Matsuo, Taro; Max, Claire; McConnachie, Alan; McGough, Stacy; Melis, Carl; Meyer, Leo; Mumma, Michael; Muto, Takayuki; Nagao, Tohru; Najita, Joan R; Navarro, Julio; Pierce, Michael; Prochaska, Jason X; Oguri, Masamune; Ojha, Devendra K; Okamoto, Yoshiko K; Orton, Glenn; Otarola, Angel; Ouchi, Masami; Packham, Chris; Padgett, Deborah L; Pandey, Shashi Bhushan; Pilachowsky, Catherine; Pontoppidan, Klaus M; Primack, Joel; Puthiyaveettil, Shalima; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Reddy, Naveen; Rich, Michael; Richter, Matthew J; Schombert, James; Sen, Anjan Ananda; Shi, Jianrong; Sheth, Kartik; Srianand, R; Tan, Jonathan C; Tanaka, Masayuki; Tanner, Angelle; Tominaga, Nozomu; Tytler, David; U, Vivian; Wang, Lingzhi; Wang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Yiping; Wilson, Gillian; Wright, Shelley; Wu, Chao; Wu, Xufeng; Xu, Renxin; Yamada, Toru; Yang, Bin; Zhao, Gongbo; Zhao, Hongsheng

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The TMT Detailed Science Case describes the transformational science that the Thirty Meter Telescope will enable. Planned to begin science operations in 2024, TMT will open up opportunities for revolutionary discoveries in essentially every field of astronomy, astrophysics and cosmology, seeing much fainter objects much more clearly than existing telescopes. Per this capability, TMT's science agenda fills all of space and time, from nearby comets and asteroids, to exoplanets, to the most distant galaxies, and all the way back to the very first sources of light in the Universe. More than 150 astronomers from within the TMT partnership and beyond offered input in compiling the new 2015 Detailed Science Case. The contributing astronomers represent the entire TMT partnership, including the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), the Indian Institute of Astrophysics (IIA), the National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC), the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ),...

  7. CBECS 1992 - Building Characteristics, Detailed Tables

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321 2,590 1,550 1,460 1977-2013164 167Detailed

  8. First Detailed Look at RNA Dicer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New MexicoFinancing Opportunities forFinishingFirst Detailed Look

  9. First Detailed Look at RNA Dicer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New MexicoFinancing Opportunities forFinishingFirst Detailed

  10. SAFETY ANALYSIS QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yinhai

    1 TOPIC C2 SAFETY ANALYSIS AND POLICY QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS ON ANGLE-ACCIDENT RISK AT SIGNALIZED-2700 Tel: (206) 543-9639 Fax: (206) 543-5965 Email: nihan@u.washington.edu #12;2 Quantitative Analysis on Angle-Accident Risk at Signalized Intersections Abstract: This paper demonstrates how a new modeling

  11. OHS certification and legal compliance management in France: a quantitative survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    OHS certification and legal compliance management in France: a quantitative survey Thomas the principal results. Keywords: Occupational health and safety, quantitative survey, management of legal, Sophia Antipolis, France b PREVENTEO, Le Cannet, France Abstract: Management of legal compliance

  12. New details on nuclear weapons program bared

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hileman, B.

    1994-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In a continuing effort to be more candid about Department of Energy nuclear weapons programs, Energy Secretary Hazel R. O'Leary recently declassified a substantial amount of information. On June 27, she revealed details about total US weapons-grade uranium production, testing of a bomb made of reactor-grade plutonium, radiation experiments conducted on humans since the 1920s, and underground and atmospheric nuclear weapons tests. O'Leary explains the new revelations by saying thousands of people in meetings across the country this year have told her that openness in government is very important. DOE is responding today in a manner that both satisfies the strong public interest and respects critical national security requirements.

  13. When the Details Matter – Sensitivities in PRA Calculations That Could Affect Risk-Informed Decision-Making

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dana L. Kelly; Nathan O. Siu

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) continues its efforts to increase its use of risk information in decision making, the detailed, quantitative results of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) calculations are coming under increased scrutiny. Where once analysts and users were not overly concerned with figure of merit variations that were less than an order of magnitude, now factors of two or even less can spark heated debate regarding modeling approaches and assumptions. The philosophical and policy-related aspects of this situation are well-recognized by the PRA community. On the other hand, the technical implications for PRA methods and modeling have not been as widely discussed. This paper illustrates the potential numerical effects of choices as to the details of models and methods for parameter estimation with three examples: 1) the selection of the time period data for parameter estimation, and issues related to component boundary and failure mode definitions; 2) the selection of alternative diffuse prior distributions, including the constrained noninformative prior distribution, in Bayesian parameter estimation; and 3) the impact of uncertainty in calculations for recovery of offsite power.

  14. Improving Combustion Software to Solve Detailed Chemical Kinetics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combustion Software to Solve Detailed Chemical Kinetics for HECC Improving Combustion Software to Solve Detailed Chemical Kinetics for HECC 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program...

  15. Atomic detail brownian dynamics simulations of concentrated protein...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    detail brownian dynamics simulations of concentrated protein solutions with a mean field treatment of hydrodynamic Atomic detail brownian dynamics simulations of concentrated...

  16. Residential Windows and Window Coverings: A Detailed View of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Windows and Window Coverings: A Detailed View of the Installed Base and User Behavior Residential Windows and Window Coverings: A Detailed View of the Installed Base...

  17. Quantitative imaging of turbulent and reacting flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, P.H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative digital imaging, using planar laser light scattering techniques is being developed for the analysis of turbulent and reacting flows. Quantitative image data, implying both a direct relation to flowfield variables as well as sufficient signal and spatial dynamic range, can be readily processed to yield two-dimensional distributions of flowfield scalars and in turn two-dimensional images of gradients and turbulence scales. Much of the development of imaging techniques to date has concentrated on understanding the requisite molecular spectroscopy and collision dynamics to be able to determine how flowfield variable information is encoded into the measured signal. From this standpoint the image is seen as a collection of single point measurements. The present effort aims at realizing necessary improvements in signal and spatial dynamic range, signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution in the imaging system as well as developing excitation/detection strategies which provide for a quantitative measure of particular flowfield scalars. The standard camera used for the study is an intensified CCD array operated in a conventional video format. The design of the system was based on detailed modeling of signal and image transfer properties of fast UV imaging lenses, image intensifiers and CCD detector arrays. While this system is suitable for direct scalar imaging, derived quantities (e.g. temperature or velocity images) require an exceptionally wide dynamic range imaging detector. To apply these diagnostics to reacting flows also requires a very fast shuttered camera. The authors have developed and successfully tested a new type of gated low-light level detector. This system relies on fast switching of proximity focused image-diode which is direct fiber-optic coupled to a cooled CCD array. Tests on this new detector show significant improvements in detection limit, dynamic range and spatial resolution as compared to microchannel plate intensified arrays.

  18. On Incremental Quantitative Verification for Probabilistic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    . Quantitative verification is an automated method to establish quantitative properties of a system model, non- probabilistic verification, which, in addition to exhaustive exploration of a system modelOn Incremental Quantitative Verification for Probabilistic Systems Marta Kwiatkowska, David Parker

  19. Detailed chemical kinetic oxidation mechanism for a biodiesel surrogate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2007-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of methyl decanoate, a surrogate for biodiesel fuels. This model has been built by following the rules established by Curran et al. for the oxidation of n-heptane and it includes all the reactions known to be pertinent to both low and high temperatures. Computed results have been compared with methyl decanoate experiments in an engine and oxidation of rapeseed oil methyl esters in a jet stirred reactor. An important feature of this mechanism is its ability to reproduce the early formation of carbon dioxide that is unique to biofuels and due to the presence of the ester group in the reactant. The model also predicts ignition delay times and OH profiles very close to observed values in shock tube experiments fueled by n-decane. These model capabilities indicate that large n-alkanes can be good surrogates for large methyl esters and biodiesel fuels to predict overall reactivity, but some kinetic details, including early CO{sub 2} production from biodiesel fuels, can be predicted only by a detailed kinetic mechanism for a true methyl ester fuel. The present methyl decanoate mechanism provides a realistic kinetic tool for simulation of biodiesel fuels.

  20. Detailed chemical kinetic oxidation mechanism for a biodiesel surrogate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of methyl decanoate, a surrogate for biodiesel fuels. This model has been built by following the rules established by Curran et al. for the oxidation of n-heptane and it includes all the reactions known to be pertinent to both low and high temperatures. Computed results have been compared with methyl decanoate experiments in an engine and oxidation of rapeseed oil methyl esters in a jet stirred reactor. An important feature of this mechanism is its ability to reproduce the early formation of carbon dioxide that is unique to biofuels and due to the presence of the ester group in the reactant. The model also predicts ignition delay times and OH profiles very close to observed values in shock tube experiments fueled by n-decane. These model capabilities indicate that large n-alkanes can be good surrogates for large methyl esters and biodiesel fuels to predict overall reactivity, but some kinetic details, including early CO2 production from biodiesel fuels, can be predicted only by a detailed kinetic mechanism for a true methyl ester fuel. The present methyl decanoate mechanism provides a realistic kinetic tool for simulation of biodiesel fuels.

  1. Detailed chemical kinetic oxidation mechanism for a biodiesel surrogate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herbinet, Olivier; Pitz, William J.; Westbrook, Charles K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of methyl decanoate, a surrogate for biodiesel fuels. This model has been built by following the rules established by Curran and co-workers for the oxidation of n-heptane and it includes all the reactions known to be pertinent to both low and high temperatures. Computed results have been compared with methyl decanoate experiments in an engine and oxidation of rapeseed oil methyl esters in a jet-stirred reactor. An important feature of this mechanism is its ability to reproduce the early formation of carbon dioxide that is unique to biofuels and due to the presence of the ester group in the reactant. The model also predicts ignition delay times and OH profiles very close to observed values in shock tube experiments fueled by n-decane. These model capabilities indicate that large n-alkanes can be good surrogates for large methyl esters and biodiesel fuels to predict overall reactivity, but some kinetic details, including early CO{sub 2} production from biodiesel fuels, can be predicted only by a detailed kinetic mechanism for a true methyl ester fuel. The present methyl decanoate mechanism provides a realistic kinetic tool for simulation of biodiesel fuels. (author)

  2. A detailed study of the nuclear dependence of the EMC effect and short-range correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Arrington; Aji Daniel; Donal Day; Nadia Fomin; Dave Gaskell; Patricia Solvignon

    2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: The density of the nucleus has been important in explaining the nuclear dependence of the quark distributions, also known as the EMC effect, as well as the presence of highmomentum nucleons arising from short-range correlations (SRCs). Recent measurements of both of these effects on light nuclei have shown a clear deviation from simple density-dependent models. Purpose: A better understanding of the nuclear quark distributions and short-range correlations requires a careful examination of the experimental data on these effects to constrain models that attempt to describe these phenomena. Methods: We present a detailed analysis of the nuclear dependence of the EMC effect and the contribution of SRCs in nuclei, comparing to predictions and simple scaling models based on different pictures of the underlying physics. We also make a direct, quantitative comparison of the two effects to further examine the connection between these two observables related to nuclear structure. Results: We find that, with the inclusion of the new data on light nuclei, neither of these observables can be well explained by common assumptions for the nuclear dependence. The anomalous behavior of both effects in light nuclei is consistent with the idea the the EMC effect is driven by either the presence of high-density configurations in nuclei or the large virtuality of the highmomentum nucleons associated with these configurations. Conclusions: The unexpected nuclear dependence in the measurements of the EMC effect and SRC contributions appear to suggest that the local environment of the struck nucleon is the most relevant quantity for explaining these results. The common behavior suggests a connection between the two seemingly disparate phenomena, but the data do not yet allow for a clear preference between models which aim to explain this connection.

  3. Detailed study of the nuclear dependence of the EMC effect and short-range correlations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Arrington, Aji Daniel, Donal Day, Nadia Fomin, David Gaskell, Patricia Solvignon

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: The density of the nucleus has been important in explaining the nuclear dependence of the quark distributions, also known as the EMC effect, as well as the presence of high-momentum nucleons arising from short-range correlations (SRCs). Recent measurements of both of these effects on light nuclei have shown a clear deviation from simple density-dependent models. Purpose: A better understanding of the nuclear quark distributions and short-range correlations requires a careful examination of the experimental data on these effects to constrain models that attempt to describe these phenomena. Methods: We present a detailed analysis of the nuclear dependence of the EMC effect and the contribution of SRCs in nuclei, comparing to predictions and simple scaling models based on different pictures of the underlying physics. We also make a direct, quantitative comparison of the two effects to further examine the connection between these two observables related to nuclear structure. Results: We find that, with the inclusion of the new data on light nuclei, neither of these observables can be well explained by common assumptions for the nuclear dependence. The anomalous behavior of both effects in light nuclei is consistent with the idea that the EMC effect is driven by either the presence of high-density configurations in nuclei or the large virtuality of the high-momentum nucleons associated with these configurations. Conclusions: The unexpected nuclear dependence in the measurements of the EMC effect and SRC contributions appear to suggest that the local environment of the struck nucleon is the most relevant quantity for explaining these results. The common behavior suggests a connection between the two seemingly disparate phenomena, but the data do not yet allow for a clear preference between models which aim to explain this connection.

  4. Geothermal Reconnaissance From Quantitative Analysis Of Thermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    From Quantitative Analysis Of Thermal Infrared Imagery Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Reference: Geothermal Reconnaissance From Quantitative...

  5. Microfluidics for optics and quantitative cell biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, James Kyle

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Microfluidics for Optics and6 2. Microfluidics for Quantitative CellTHE DISSERTATION Microfluidics for Optics and Quantitative

  6. Detailed Chemical Analysis of Two Giants in the SGR DSPH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Bonifacio; P. Molaro

    2001-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The 8m class telescopes allow for the first time to study stars of external galaxies with the same resolution and S/N ratio which has been so far used for Galactic stars. It is quite likely that this study will shake some of our current beliefs. In this poster we highlight some of the results which have been obtained for two giants in the Sgr dSph thanks to the UVES spectrograph on the ESO 8.2m Kueyen telescope. Further details on the observations and data analysis may be found in Bonifacio et al (2000).

  7. Alternate States of Proteins Revealed by Detailed Energy Landscape Mapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, David

    Alternate States of Proteins Revealed by Detailed Energy Landscape Mapping Michael D. Tyka1 Keywords: Rosetta; alternative conformations; protein mobility; structure prediction; validation What through analysis of detailed protein energy landscapes generated by large-scale, native- enhanced sampling

  8. Quantitative Risk Management Rudiger Frey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Rüdiger

    Lecture Quantitative Risk Management R¨udiger Frey Universit¨at Leipzig Wintersemester 2010 risk management C. Introduction to Portfolio Credit Derivatives c 2010 (Frey) 1 #12;A. Introduction of counterparties. Measuring and management of credit risk is of high importance for financial institutions

  9. CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Quantitative Genomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Quantitative Genomics Committee Membership Dr. Scott Jackson - committee chair Dr. Peng-Wah Chee Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Horticulture Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Georgia University of Georgia 2360 Rainwater Rd

  10. ABBGroup-1-Quantitative analysis of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basse, Nils Plesner

    of short-circuit current in high- voltage gas circuit breakers Pressure produced by the arc is used©ABBGroup-1- 3-Sep-07 Quantitative analysis of gas circuit breaker physics through direct;©ABBGroup-4- 3-Sep-07 CFD pressure animation #12;©ABBGroup-5- 3-Sep-07 Current interruption phases Sequence

  11. UoS Motor Accident Report Form COMPANY DETAILS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    UNIV01FL02 UoS Motor Accident Report Form COMPANY DETAILS INSURED: University of Sussex ADDRESS: LOCATION: DESCRIPTION OF HOW ACCIDENT HAPPENED: PLEASE DRAW A SKETCH OF THE ACCIDENT: #12;DRIVER DETAILS: PREVIOUS ACCIDENTS: ADDRESS: VEHICLE DETAILS DATE VEHICLE PURCHASED: MAKE/MODEL: REGISTRATION: MILEAGE

  12. Detailed Physical Trough Model for NREL's Solar Advisor Model: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, M. J.; Blair, N.; Dobos, A.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar Advisor Model (SAM) is a free software package made available by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Sandia National Laboratory, and the US Department of Energy. SAM contains hourly system performance and economic models for concentrating solar power (CSP) systems, photovoltaic, solar hot-water, and generic fuel-use technologies. Versions of SAM prior to 2010 included only the parabolic trough model based on Excelergy. This model uses top-level empirical performance curves to characterize plant behavior, and thus is limited in predictive capability for new technologies or component configurations. To address this and other functionality challenges, a new trough model; derived from physical first principles was commissioned to supplement the Excelergy-based empirical model. This new 'physical model' approaches the task of characterizing the performance of the whole parabolic trough plant by replacing empirical curve-fit relationships with more detailed calculations where practical. The resulting model matches the annual performance of the SAM empirical model (which has been previously verified with plant data) while maintaining run-times compatible with parametric analysis, adding additional flexibility in modeled system configurations, and providing more detailed performance calculations in the solar field, power block, piping, and storage subsystems.

  13. A detail study of defect models for cosmic structure formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Albrecht; R. A. Battye; J. Robinson

    1997-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate predictions from wide class of `active' models of cosmic structure formation which allows us to scan the space of possible defect models. We calculate the linear cold dark matter power spectrum and Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies over all observable scales using a full linear Einstein-Boltzmann code. Our main result, which has already been reported, points to a serious problem reconciling the observed amplitude of the large-scale galaxy distribution with the COBE normalization. Here, we describe our methods and results in detail. The problem is present for a wide range of defect parameters, which can be used to represent potential differences among defect models, as well as possible systematic numerical errors. We explicitly examine the impact of varying the defect model parameters and we show how the results substantiate these conclusions. The standard scaling defect models are in serious conflict with the current data, and we show how attempts to resolve the problem by considering non-scaling defects or modified stress-energy components would require radical departures from what has become the standard picture.

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: Quantitative Risk Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Materials & Components Compatibility Hydrogen Behavior Quantitative Risk Assessment Hydrogen Infrastructure Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Market Transformation...

  15. Details, details...The impact of market rules on emerging ``green'' energy markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, R.H.; Pickle, S.J.; Eto, J.H.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Green power marketing is creating a customer-driven market for renewable energy resources, including solar, wind, geothermal, biomass, and hydropower. Yet there are a number of market barriers to the creation of a workable green power market, and the ultimate success of retail markets for green power products will depend critically on the detailed market rules established at the onset of restructuring and on a number of market facilitation efforts. By surveying green power marketers and reviewing regulatory filings, this paper identifies and analyzes the types of restructuring market rules and market facilitation efforts that impact the competitive market for electricity services broadly, and the retail market for green power specifically. Taking a marketer perspective as the point of reference, they emphasize those rules and efforts that most effectively target key market barriers and that might be most successful in expanding the market for retail green power products. This information should help those interested in encouraging the development of the green power market during the early years of electricity restructuring.

  16. QUANTITATIVE RISK MANAGEMENT: CONCEPTS, TECHNIQUES AND TOOLS*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Embrechts, Paul

    QUANTITATIVE RISK MANAGEMENT: CONCEPTS, TECHNIQUES AND TOOLS* Paul Embrechts Department of Mathematics ETH Zurich www.math.ethz.ch/~embrechts #12;QUANTITATIVE RISK MANAGEMENT: CONCEPTS, TECHNIQUES Theorems of Quantitative Risk Management · PE's Desert-Island Copula · Example 1: Credit Risk · Example 2

  17. Economic evaluation of the Annual Cycle Energy System (ACES). Volume II. Detailed results. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy effectiveness and the economic viability of the ACES concept are examined. ACES is studied in a variety of different applications and compared to a number of conventional systems. The different applications are studied in two groups: the class of building into which the ACES is incorporated and the climatic region in which the ACES is located. Buildings investigated include single-family and multi-family residences and a commercial office building. The application of ACES to each of these building types is studied in Minneapolis, Atlanta, and Philadelphia. The economic evaluation of the ACES is based on a comparison of the present worth of the ACES to the present worth of conventional systems; namely, electric resistance heating, electric air conditioning, and electric domestic water heating; air-to-air heat pump and electric domestic water heating; oil-fired furnace, electric air conditioning, and electric domestic water heating; and gas-fired furnace, electric air conditioning, and gas domestic water heating.

  18. Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestration and Land Use Emissions Using Detailed Model Results and Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Atul Jain

    2005-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report outlines the progress on the development and application of Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestrations and Land Use Emissions supported by the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), U.S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DOE-DE-FG02-01ER63069. The overall objective of this collaborative project between the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was to unite the latest advances in carbon cycle research with scientifically based models and policy-related integrated assessment tools that incorporate computationally efficient representations of the latest knowledge concerning science and emission trajectories, and their policy implications. As part of this research we accomplished the following tasks that we originally proposed: (1) In coordination with LLNL and ORNL, we enhanced the Integrated Science Assessment Model's (ISAM) parametric representation of the ocean and terrestrial carbon cycles that better represent spatial and seasonal variations, which are important to study the mechanisms that influence carbon sequestration in the ocean and terrestrial ecosystems; (2) Using the MiniCAM modeling capability, we revised the SRES (IPCC Special Report on Emission Scenarios; IPCC, 2000) land use emission scenarios; and (3) On the application front, the enhanced version of ISAM modeling capability is applied to understand how short- and long-term natural carbon fluxes, carbon sequestration, and human emissions contribute to the net global emissions (concentrations) trajectories required to reach various concentration (emission) targets. Under this grant, 21 research publications were produced. In addition, this grant supported a number of graduate and undergraduate students whose fundamental research was to learn a disciplinary field in climate change (e.g., ecological dynamics and ocean circulations) and then complete research on how this field could be linked to the other factors we need to consider in its dynamics (e.g., land use, ocean and terrestrial carbon sequestration and climate change).

  19. New Argonne initiative to examine the details of the combustion...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne initiative to examine the details of the combustion process By Jared Sagoff * July 15, 2014 Tweet EmailPrint ARGONNE, Ill. - Every science experiment and every mathematical...

  20. Pumped Storage Hydropower (Detailed Analysis to Demonstrate Value...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pumped Storage Hydropower (Detailed Analysis to Demonstrate Value)-Modeling and Analysis of Value of Advanced Pumped Storage Hydropower in the U.S. Pumped Storage Hydropower...

  1. Detailed Assessment of Particulate Characteristics from Low-Temperatur...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessment of Particulate Characteristics from Low-Temperature Combustion Engines Detailed Assessment of Particulate Characteristics from Low-Temperature Combustion Engines 2012...

  2. Premiere issue of "Quest" magazine details PPPL's strides toward...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Premiere issue of "Quest" magazine details PPPL's strides toward fusion energy and advances in plasma science September 5, 2013 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Quest...

  3. Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function Print Our way of life is deeply intertwined with battery technologies that have enabled a mobile revolution powering cell...

  4. azobenzene detailed mechanism: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Post Graduate Activities Detail & History Materials Science Websites Summary: Raytheon Systems Engineer Tucson AZ MENG Rockwell Collins Mechanical Engineer Sterling VA MENG...

  5. A Stochastic Reactor Based Virtual Engine Model Employing Detailed...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Stochastic Reactor Based Virtual Engine Model Employing Detailed Chemistry for Kinetic Studies of In-Cylinder Combustion and Exhaust Aftertreatment A Stochastic Reactor Based...

  6. Letter from Commonwealth of Virginia to ENSR International Detailing...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ENSR International Detailing Responses to Comments made Concerning the Modified Protocol for Downwash Modeling-Mirant Potomac River, LLC. The comments are addressed for the most...

  7. Advances in Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging Enable Quantitative Tracking of Nanoscale Changes in Thickness and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutcher, John

    Advances in Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging Enable Quantitative Tracking of Nanoscale Changes: To date, detailed studies of the thickness of coatings using surface plasmon resonance have been limited a significant improvement to surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) that allows this sensitive technique

  8. Substrate Hydroxylation in Methane Monooxygenase: Quantitative Modeling via Mixed Quantum Mechanics/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gherman, Benjamin F.

    at an atomic level of detail.4-7 In particular, the use of ab initio quantum chemical methods based on densitySubstrate Hydroxylation in Methane Monooxygenase: Quantitative Modeling via Mixed Quantum Mechanics with mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods, the hydroxylation of methane

  9. BUILDING SURROGATE MODELS BASED ON DETAILED AND APPROXIMATE SIMULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seepersad, Carolyn Conner

    - Page 1 - BUILDING SURROGATE MODELS BASED ON DETAILED AND APPROXIMATE SIMULATIONS Zhiguang Qian is taken to integrate data from approximate and detailed simulations to build a surrogate model approximate simulations form the bulk of the data, and they are used to build a model based on a Gaussian

  10. A DETAILLED WEATHER DATA GENERATOR FOR BUILDINGS SIMULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A DETAILLED WEATHER DATA GENERATOR FOR BUILDINGS SIMULATION L. ADELARD*, H. BOYER, F. GARDE, J@iremia.univ-reunion.fr Abstract Thermal buildings simulation softwares need meteorological files in thermal comfort, energetic@iremia.univ-reunion.fr #12;1 A DETAILLED WEATHER DATA GENERATOR FOR BUILDINGS SIMULATION L. Adelard*, H. Boyer, F. Garde, J

  11. Structure of Partially Premixed Flames Using Detailed Chemistry Simulations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kluzek, Celine D.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    , and the attendant effects on a number of species. Using the detailed analysis of different reaction rates, the adiabatic and radiative nitric oxide concentrations are compared. The cross-transport effects, i.e. Soret and Dufour, were studied in detail. The Soret...

  12. A detailed systematic review of the recent literature on environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    EA 4272 A detailed systematic review of the recent literature on environmental Kuznets curve detailed systematic review of the recent literature on environmental Kuznets curve dealing with CO2 Marie the early 90', many articles have been published on Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC), especially empirical

  13. Detailed chemical kinetic oxidation mechanism for a biodiesel Olivier Herbineta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Detailed chemical kinetic oxidation mechanism for a biodiesel surrogate Olivier Herbineta , William of methyl decanoate, a surrogate for biodiesel fuels. This model has been built by following the rules and biodiesel fuels to predict overall reactivity, but some kinetic details, including early CO2 production from

  14. Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Frank (Bud) Bridges, University of California-Santa Cruz

    2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The two-and-a-half day symposium on the "Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials" will be the first comprehensive meeting on this topic held under the auspices of a major U.S. professional society. Spring MRS Meetings provide a natural venue for this symposium as they attract a broad audience of researchers that represents a cross-section of the state-of-the-art regarding synthesis, structure-property relations, and applications of nanostructured materials. Close interactions among the experts in local structure measurements and materials researchers will help both to identify measurement needs pertinent to â??real-worldâ? materials problems and to familiarize the materials research community with the state-of-the-art local structure measurement techniques. We have chosen invited speakers that reflect the multidisciplinary and international nature of this topic and the need to continually nurture productive interfaces among university, government and industrial laboratories. The intent of the symposium is to provide an interdisciplinary forum for discussion and exchange of ideas on the recent progress in quantitative characterization of structural order in nanomaterials using different experimental techniques and theory. The symposium is expected to facilitate discussions on optimal approaches for determining atomic structure at the nanoscale using combined inputs from multiple measurement techniques.

  15. An Explanation of Dayton Miller's Anomalous "Ether Drift" Result

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas J. Roberts

    2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1933 Dayton Miller published in this journal the results of his voluminous observations using his ether drift interferometer, and proclaimed that he had determined the "absolute motion of the earth". This result is in direct conflict with the prediction of Special Relativity, and also with numerous related experiments that found no such signal or "absolute motion". This paper presents a complete explanation for his anomalous result by: a) showing that his results are not statistically significant, b) describing in detail how flaws in his analysis procedure produced a false signal with precisely the properties he expected, and c) presenting a quantitative model of his systematic drift that shows there is no real signal in his data. In short, this is every experimenter's nightmare: he was unknowingly looking at statistically insignificant patterns in his systematic drift that mimicked the appearance of a real signal. An upper limit on "absolute motion" of 6 km/sec is derived from his raw data, fully consistent with similar experimental results and the prediction of Special Relativity. The key point of this paper is the need for a comprehensive and quantitative error analysis. The concepts and techniques used in this analysis were not available in Miller's day, but are now standard. These problems also apply to the famous measurements of Michelson and Morley, and to most if not all similar experiments; appendices are provided discussing several such experiments.

  16. Human Factors Considerations in New Nuclear Power Plants: Detailed Analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OHara,J.; Higgins, J.; Brown, W.; Fink, R.

    2008-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsored study has identified human-performance issues in new and advanced nuclear power plants. To identify the issues, current industry developments and trends were evaluated in the areas of reactor technology, instrumentation and control technology, human-system integration technology, and human factors engineering (HFE) methods and tools. The issues were organized into seven high-level HFE topic areas: Role of Personnel and Automation, Staffing and Training, Normal Operations Management, Disturbance and Emergency Management, Maintenance and Change Management, Plant Design and Construction, and HFE Methods and Tools. The issues where then prioritized into four categories using a 'Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table' methodology based on evaluations provided by 14 independent subject matter experts. The subject matter experts were knowledgeable in a variety of disciplines. Vendors, utilities, research organizations and regulators all participated. Twenty issues were categorized into the top priority category. This Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) technical report provides the detailed methodology, issue analysis, and results. A summary of the results of this study can be found in NUREG/CR-6947. The research performed for this project has identified a large number of human-performance issues for new control stations and new nuclear power plant designs. The information gathered in this project can serve as input to the development of a long-term strategy and plan for addressing human performance in these areas through regulatory research. Addressing human-performance issues will provide the technical basis from which regulatory review guidance can be developed to meet these challenges. The availability of this review guidance will help set clear expectations for how the NRC staff will evaluate new designs, reduce regulatory uncertainty, and provide a well-defined path to new nuclear power plant licensing.

  17. Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Past Events EventsDetail

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Events Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Past Events EventsDetail to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Past...

  18. CMPE 185 Spring 1998 Syllabus 1 1 Administrative details

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karplus, Kevin

    CMPE 185 Spring 1998 Syllabus 1 Syllabus 1 Administrative details Location and time Kresge 327, MWF of the quarter, and 10% on in­class work, Karplus & Larrabee Info 1 #12; 2 Syllabus CMPE 185 Spring 1998

  19. CMPE 185 Fall 1999 Syllabus 1 1 Administrative details

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karplus, Kevin

    CMPE 185 Fall 1999 Syllabus 1 Syllabus 1 Administrative details Location and time Kresge 327, MWF 2 Syllabus CMPE 185 Fall 1999 4 Special guest lecturers I may arrange to have some guest lectures

  20. CMPE 185 Winter 1999 Syllabus 1 1 Administrative details

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karplus, Kevin

    CMPE 185 Winter 1999 Syllabus 1 Syllabus 1 Administrative details Location and time Porter 144, MWF). Everything must be turned in by the last day of class, Friday March 12. Karplus Info 1 #12; 2 Syllabus CMPE

  1. CMPE 185 Fall 2000 Syllabus 1 1 Administrative details

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karplus, Kevin

    CMPE 185 Fall 2000 Syllabus 1 Syllabus 1 Administrative details Location and time Kresge 327, MWF 2, and need to do the grading mostly on Dec 2. Karplus Info 1 #12; 2 Syllabus CMPE 185 Fall 2000 4 Special

  2. Detailed Description of Key NIF Milestones for NNSA Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Detailed Description of Key NIF Milestones for NNSA Short Description NIC EP Rev 4.0 Approved = Milestone Reporting Tool, which NNSA uses to support quarterly status reporting of NIC Level 1-2 milestones

  3. The detailed proposal for ECN and IP: K. K. Ramakrishnan,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floyd, Sally

    #12;Details of ECN and IP: The IPv4 TOS byte is currently defined as follows. This byte is under +-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+ | PRECEDENCE | TOS | | +-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+ 2 #12;Our proposal is as follows: 0 1

  4. Quantitative proteomics analysis of adsorbed plasma proteins...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    proteomics analysis of adsorbed plasma proteins classifies nanoparticles with different surface properties and size Quantitative proteomics analysis of adsorbed plasma proteins...

  5. Optimization Online - Quantitative Stability Analysis of Stochastic ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jie Zhang

    2015-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 3, 2015 ... Quantitative Stability Analysis of Stochastic Quasi-Variational Inequality Problems and Applications. Jie Zhang(zhangjie04212001 ***at*** ...

  6. Quantitative Modeling of High Temperature Magnetization Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Shufeng

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Final Technical Report Project title: Quantitative Modeling of High Temperature Magnetization Dynamics DOE/Office of Science Program Manager Contact: Dr. James Davenport

  7. Quantitative Proteomic Approaches for Studying Phosphotyrosine...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In this review, we outline the recent advances in analytical methodologies for enrichment, identification, and accurate quantitation of tyrosine phosphorylated proteins and...

  8. Griffiss AFB integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Electric baseline detail

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Keller, J.M.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Air Force Air Combat Command has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program`s (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Griffiss Air Force Base (AFB). This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company (Niagara Mohawk). It will (1) identify and evaluate all electric cost-effective energy projects; (2) develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at one of Niagara Mohawk`s primary federal facilities, Griffiss AFB, an Air Combat Command facility located near Rome, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 3, the Electric Resource Assessment. The analysis examines the characteristics of electric, gas, oil, propane, coal, and purchased thermal capacity use for fiscal year (FY) 1990. The results include energy-use intensities for the facilities at Griffiss AFB by building type and electric energy end use. A complete electric energy consumption reconciliation is presented that accounts for the distribution of all major electric energy uses and losses among buildings, utilities, and central systems.

  9. Tile-based Level of Detail for the Parallel Age

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niski, K; Cohen, J D

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Today's PCs incorporate multiple CPUs and GPUs and are easily arranged in clusters for high-performance, interactive graphics. We present an approach based on hierarchical, screen-space tiles to parallelizing rendering with level of detail. Adapt tiles, render tiles, and machine tiles are associated with CPUs, GPUs, and PCs, respectively, to efficiently parallelize the workload with good resource utilization. Adaptive tile sizes provide load balancing while our level of detail system allows total and independent management of the load on CPUs and GPUs. We demonstrate our approach on parallel configurations consisting of both single PCs and a cluster of PCs.

  10. Quantitative multi-modal NDT data analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heideklang, René; Shokouhi, Parisa [Division 8.5, BAM Fed. Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A single NDT technique is often not adequate to provide assessments about the integrity of test objects with the required coverage or accuracy. In such situations, it is often resorted to multi-modal testing, where complementary and overlapping information from different NDT techniques are combined for a more comprehensive evaluation. Multi-modal material and defect characterization is an interesting task which involves several diverse fields of research, including signal and image processing, statistics and data mining. The fusion of different modalities may improve quantitative nondestructive evaluation by effectively exploiting the augmented set of multi-sensor information about the material. It is the redundant information in particular, whose quantification is expected to lead to increased reliability and robustness of the inspection results. There are different systematic approaches to data fusion, each with its specific advantages and drawbacks. In our contribution, these will be discussed in the context of nondestructive materials testing. A practical study adopting a high-level scheme for the fusion of Eddy Current, GMR and Thermography measurements on a reference metallic specimen with built-in grooves will be presented. Results show that fusion is able to outperform the best single sensor regarding detection specificity, while retaining the same level of sensitivity.

  11. Three-dimensional local structure of photoexcited Cu diimine complex refined by quantitative XANES analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smolentsev, G.; Soldatov, A. V.; Chen, L. X.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Southern Federal Univ.; Northwestern Univ.

    2008-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The structural details of [Cu(dmp){sub 2}]{sup +} (dmp = 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline) at its metal-to-ligand charge-transfer (MLCT) excited-state in acetonitrile were extracted using quantitative analysis of Cu K-edge X-ray adsorption near edge structure (XANES). The study combines two techniques: fitting experimental XANES spectra with a multidimensional interpolation approximation, and calculating theoretical XANES spectra with molecular potentials beyond the muffin-tin approximation. The results of the study show that the best fit of the experimental XANES data must include a solvent molecule binding to the Cu with a short Cu-N distance of 2.00 {angstrom}. This confirms that the formation of an exciplex is responsible for the excited-state quenching in coordinating solvents, such as acetonitrile. Moreover, the calculations suggest that the formation of this exciplex state is accompanied by significant rocking distortions of the dmp ligands resulting in a 108{sup o} angle between the N(solvent)-Cu bond and the C{sub 2} symmetry axis of the dmp ligand. This combined approach allows us to extract molecular configurations that would otherwise be missed in a conventional qualitative XANES analysis.

  12. Detailed Execution Planning for Large Oil and Gas Construction Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    Detailed Execution Planning for Large Oil and Gas Construction Projects Presented by James Lozon, University of Calgary There is currently 55.8 billion dollars worth of large oil and gas construction projects scheduled or underway in the province of Alberta. Recently, large capital oil and gas projects

  13. Math 241: Fourier series: details and convergence University of Pennsylvania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeTurck, Dennis

    Math 241: Fourier series: details and convergence D. DeTurck University of Pennsylvania October 15, 2012 D. DeTurck Math 241 002 2012C: Fourier series 1 / 22 #12;Fourier series We've been using Fourier questions: · Do Fourier series converge? · What do they converge to? Do they converge to the functions we

  14. EMIS Quick User Guide Search page (details on page 2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    search terms in foreign languages You can enter search terms in foreign languages by: - Using your: Please note that we have a Cyrillic and Arabic keyboards available through the Search page. EnteringEMIS Quick User Guide Search page (details on page 2) The News page: Access the latest news

  15. Methods for Detailed Energy Data Collection of Miscellaneous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    94720 USA b University of California, Berkeley Berkeley, CA 94720 USA Environmental Energy Technologies primary energy consumption in the U.S., with 22% consumed by the residential sector and 18LBNL-6384E Methods for Detailed Energy Data Collection of Miscellaneous and Electronic Loads

  16. Medical Plan Detail Document for Funded Graduate Students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-05 Medical Plan Detail Document for Funded Graduate Students Program Provisions for Status Change Medical/Prescription Drug Card Medical Care Outside Ohio Dual Coverage Case Management Managed Health Care Systems (MHCS) 19 How Payment Is Determined 20 Annual Deductible Annual Out

  17. Quantitative Phosphoproteome Analysis of Lysophosphatidic Acid...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stimulation. The approach combines trypsin-catalyzed 16O18O labeling plus 16O18O-methanol esterification labeling for quantitation, a macro- Immobilized Metal-ion Affinity...

  18. A quantitative, parametric model of musical tension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farbood, Morwaread Mary

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a quantitative, parametric model for describing musical tension. While the phenomenon of tension is evident to listeners, it is difficult to formalize due to its subjective and multi-dimensional nature. ...

  19. Quantitative nondestructive testing using Infrared Thermography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manohar, Arun

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    steady, and selective heating scenarios. Infrared Physics &heating thermography and lock-in ther- mography to quantitative nondestructive evaluations. Infraredheating is very difficult to achieve in a practical scenario. The Infrared

  20. Detailed Hydrographic Feature Extraction from High-Resolution LiDAR Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danny L. Anderson

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed hydrographic feature extraction from high-resolution light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data is investigated. Methods for quantitatively evaluating and comparing such extractions are presented, including the use of sinuosity and longitudinal root-mean-square-error (LRMSE). These metrics are then used to quantitatively compare stream networks in two studies. The first study examines the effect of raster cell size on watershed boundaries and stream networks delineated from LiDAR-derived digital elevation models (DEMs). The study confirmed that, with the greatly increased resolution of LiDAR data, smaller cell sizes generally yielded better stream network delineations, based on sinuosity and LRMSE. The second study demonstrates a new method of delineating a stream directly from LiDAR point clouds, without the intermediate step of deriving a DEM. Direct use of LiDAR point clouds could improve efficiency and accuracy of hydrographic feature extractions. The direct delineation method developed herein and termed “mDn”, is an extension of the D8 method that has been used for several decades with gridded raster data. The method divides the region around a starting point into sectors, using the LiDAR data points within each sector to determine an average slope, and selecting the sector with the greatest downward slope to determine the direction of flow. An mDn delineation was compared with a traditional grid-based delineation, using TauDEM, and other readily available, common stream data sets. Although, the TauDEM delineation yielded a sinuosity that more closely matches the reference, the mDn delineation yielded a sinuosity that was higher than either the TauDEM method or the existing published stream delineations. Furthermore, stream delineation using the mDn method yielded the smallest LRMSE.

  1. Towards a detailed soot model for internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosbach, Sebastian; Celnik, Matthew S.; Raj, Abhijeet; Kraft, Markus [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3RA (United Kingdom); Zhang, Hongzhi R. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Utah, 1495 East 100 South, Kennecott Research Building, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Kubo, Shuichi [Frontier Research Center, Toyota Central R and D Labs., Inc., Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Kim, Kyoung-Oh [Higashifuji Technical Center, Toyota Motor Corporation, Mishuku 1200, Susono, Shizuoka 480-1193 (Japan)

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we present a detailed model for the formation of soot in internal combustion engines describing not only bulk quantities such as soot mass, number density, volume fraction, and surface area but also the morphology and chemical composition of soot aggregates. The new model is based on the Stochastic Reactor Model (SRM) engine code, which uses detailed chemistry and takes into account convective heat transfer and turbulent mixing, and the soot formation is accounted for by SWEEP, a population balance solver based on a Monte Carlo method. In order to couple the gas-phase to the particulate phase, a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism describing the combustion of Primary Reference Fuels (PRFs) is extended to include small Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) such as pyrene, which function as soot precursor species for particle inception in the soot model. Apart from providing averaged quantities as functions of crank angle like soot mass, volume fraction, aggregate diameter, and the number of primary particles per aggregate for example, the integrated model also gives detailed information such as aggregate and primary particle size distribution functions. In addition, specifics about aggregate structure and composition, including C/H ratio and PAH ring count distributions, and images similar to those produced with Transmission Electron Microscopes (TEMs), can be obtained. The new model is applied to simulate an n-heptane fuelled Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine which is operated at an equivalence ratio of 1.93. In-cylinder pressure and heat release predictions show satisfactory agreement with measurements. Furthermore, simulated aggregate size distributions as well as their time evolution are found to qualitatively agree with those obtained experimentally through snatch sampling. It is also observed both in the experiment as well as in the simulation that aggregates in the trapped residual gases play a vital role in the soot formation process. (author)

  2. Sources of Technical Variability in Quantitative LC-MS Proteomics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sources of Technical Variability in Quantitative LC-MS Proteomics: Human Brain Tissue Sample Analysis. Sources of Technical Variability in Quantitative LC-MS Proteomics: Human...

  3. Quantitatively Probing the Al Distribution in Zeolites. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantitatively Probing the Al Distribution in Zeolites. Quantitatively Probing the Al Distribution in Zeolites. Abstract: The degree of substitution of Si4+ by Al3+ in the...

  4. The Power of a Good Idea: Quantitative Modeling of the Spread of Ideas from Epidemiological Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bettencourt, L. M. A. (LANL); Cintron-Arias, A. (Cornell University); Kaiser, D. I. (MIT); Castillo-Chavez, C. (Arizona State University)

    2005-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The population dynamics underlying the diffusion of ideas hold many qualitative similarities to those involved in the spread of infections. In spite of much suggestive evidence this analogy is hardly ever quantified in useful ways. The standard benefit of modeling epidemics is the ability to estimate quantitatively population average parameters, such as interpersonal contact rates, incubation times, duration of infectious periods, etc. In most cases such quantities generalize naturally to the spread of ideas and provide a simple means of quantifying sociological and behavioral patterns. Here we apply several paradigmatic models of epidemics to empirical data on the advent and spread of Feynman diagrams through the theoretical physics communities of the USA, Japan, and the USSR in the period immediately after World War II. This test case has the advantage of having been studied historically in great detail, which allows validation of our results. We estimate the effectiveness of adoption of the idea in the three communities and find values for parameters reflecting both intentional social organization and long lifetimes for the idea. These features are probably general characteristics of the spread of ideas, but not of common epidemics.

  5. Detailed balance limit of power conversion efficiency for organic photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seki, Kazuhiko, E-mail: k-seki@aist.go.jp [NRI, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST Tsukuba Central 5, Higashi 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan)] [NRI, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST Tsukuba Central 5, Higashi 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan); Furube, Akihiro [RIIF, AIST Tsukuba Central 2, Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)] [RIIF, AIST Tsukuba Central 2, Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Yoshida, Yuji [RCPVT, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST Tsukuba Central 5, Higashi 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan)] [RCPVT, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST Tsukuba Central 5, Higashi 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan)

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A fundamental difference between inorganic photovoltaic (IPV) and organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells is that charges are generated at the interface in OPV cells, while free charges can be generated in the bulk in IPV cells. In OPV cells, charge generation involves intrinsic energy losses to dissociate excitons at the interface between the donor and acceptor. By taking into account the energy losses, we show the theoretical limits of the power conversion efficiency set by radiative recombination of the carriers on the basis of the detailed balance relation between radiation from the cell and black-body radiation.

  6. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Detailed Work Packages Examples

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferAprilOverviewEfficiencyofHSSPIA -HazardFeedback Examples Example 74Detailed

  7. Electric Utility Sales and Revenue - EIA-826 detailed data file

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEAWater Use Goal 4:Administration826 detailed data The

  8. Detailed computation of hot-plasma atomic spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pain, Jean-Christophe; Blenski, Thomas

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present recent evolutions of the detailed opacity code SCO-RCG which combines statistical modelings of levels and lines with fine-structure calculations. The code now includes the Partially-Resolved-Transition-Array model, which allows one to replace a complex transition array by a small-scale detailed calculation preserving energy and variance of the genuine transition array and yielding improved high-order moments. An approximate method for studying the impact of strong magnetic field on opacity and emissivity was also recently implemented. The Zeeman line profile is modeled by fourth-order Gram-Charlier expansion series, which is a Gaussian multiplied by a linear combination of Hermite polynomials. Electron collisional line broadening is often modeled by a Lorentzian function and one has to calculate the convolution of a Lorentzian with Gram-Charlier distribution for a huge number of spectral lines. Since the numerical cost of the direct convolution would be prohibitive, we propose, in order to obtain t...

  9. Study on detailed geological modelling for fluvial sandstone reservoir in Daqing oil field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao Hanqing; Fu Zhiguo; Lu Xiaoguang [Institute of Petroleum Exploration and Development, Daqing (China)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Guided by the sedimentation theory and knowledge of modern and ancient fluvial deposition and utilizing the abundant information of sedimentary series, microfacies type and petrophysical parameters from well logging curves of close spaced thousands of wells located in a large area. A new method for establishing detailed sedimentation and permeability distribution models for fluvial reservoirs have been developed successfully. This study aimed at the geometry and internal architecture of sandbodies, in accordance to their hierarchical levels of heterogeneity and building up sedimentation and permeability distribution models of fluvial reservoirs, describing the reservoir heterogeneity on the light of the river sedimentary rules. The results and methods obtained in outcrop and modem sedimentation studies have successfully supported the study. Taking advantage of this method, the major producing layers (PI{sub 1-2}), which have been considered as heterogeneous and thick fluvial reservoirs extending widely in lateral are researched in detail. These layers are subdivided into single sedimentary units vertically and the microfacies are identified horizontally. Furthermore, a complex system is recognized according to their hierarchical levels from large to small, meander belt, single channel sandbody, meander scroll, point bar, and lateral accretion bodies of point bar. The achieved results improved the description of areal distribution of point bar sandbodies, provide an accurate and detailed framework model for establishing high resolution predicting model. By using geostatistic technique, it also plays an important role in searching for enriched zone of residual oil distribution.

  10. Development and validation of detailed controls models of the Nelson River Bipole 1 HVDC system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuffel, P.; Kent, K.L.; Mazur, G.B.; Weekes, M.A. (Manitoba Hydro, Winnipeg (Canada))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the Nelson River Bipole 1 mercury arc valve group replacement project and planning for the expansion of the Nelson River HVDC system with a third bipole underway, it was decided to pursue a program to develop and validate detailed models of the existing HVDC transmission facilities and their associated ac systems for use in system studies. The first phase of the program concentrated on the development of detailed controls models associated with the Bipole 1 transmission facility. Based on previous experience at Manitoba Hydro with the Electromagnetic Transient DC simulation program (EMTDC), it was decided that model development and validation would use this program. This paper presents the reasons behind the development of detailed models, the methods used in developing models related to Bipole 1, results of validation tests, difficulties encountered during the process, and the overall benefits resulting from the project. An example of applying the models to investigate a low frequency oscillation which has occurred on the dc system in the past is also presented.

  11. On power-counting renormalizability of Ho?ava gravity with detailed balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniele Vernieri

    2015-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the version of Ho\\v{r}ava gravity where "detailed balance" is consistently implemented, such as to limitate the huge proliferation of couplings in the full theory and to obtain an healthy dynamics at low-energy. Since a superpotential which is third-order in spatial derivatives is not sufficient to guarantee the power-counting renormalizability of the spin-0 graviton, then one needs to go an order beyond in derivatives, building up a superpotential up to fourth-order spatial derivatives. Here, we perturb the action to quadratic order around flat space, and show that power-counting renormalizability of the spin-0 graviton is achieved only by setting to zero a specific coupling of the theory, while the spin-2 graviton is always power-counting renormalizable for any choice of the couplings. This result raises serious doubts about the use of detailed balance.

  12. On power-counting renormalizability of Ho\\v{r}ava gravity with detailed balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vernieri, Daniele

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the version of Ho\\v{r}ava gravity where "detailed balance" is consistently implemented, such as to limitate the huge proliferation of couplings in the full theory and to obtain an healthy dynamics at low-energy. Since a superpotential which is third-order in spatial derivatives is not sufficient to guarantee the power-counting renormalizability of the spin-0 graviton, then one needs to go an order beyond in derivatives, building up a superpotential up to fourth-order spatial derivatives. Here, we perturb the action to quadratic order around flat space, and show that power-counting renormalizability of the spin-0 graviton is achieved only by setting to zero a specific coupling of the theory, while the spin-2 graviton is always power-counting renormalizable for any choice of the couplings. This result raises serious doubts about the use of detailed balance.

  13. Topics in Quantitative Risk Management Paul Embrechts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Embrechts, Paul

    Topics in Quantitative Risk Management Paul Embrechts ETH-Z¨urich 1. Basel II and its risk management consequences 2. An overview of credit risk models 3. Modelling extremes: use and limitations 4@math.ethz.ch Homepage: http://www.math.ethz.ch/embrechts #12;Lecture 1: Basel II and its risk management consequences

  14. Quantitative multiplex detection of pathogen biomarkers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mukundan, Harshini; Xie, Hongzhi; Swanson, Basil I; Martinez, Jennifer; Grace, Wynne K

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention addresses the simultaneous detection and quantitative measurement of multiple biomolecules, e.g., pathogen biomarkers through either a sandwich assay approach or a lipid insertion approach. The invention can further employ a multichannel, structure with multi-sensor elements per channel.

  15. Quantitative Methods of Policy Analysis Spring 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    ENVS 5120 Quantitative Methods of Policy Analysis Spring 2013 Lecture: M/W 5:00-6:15pm Class. Some of these practical skill sets include: basic research design, cost-benefit analysis, risk and skill sets that are commonly used in the professional world of policymaking and policy analysis. Some

  16. Understanding Quantitative Wave-Particle Duality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabish Qureshi

    2015-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The complementary character of wave and particle natures of quantum objects (or quantons) was pointed out by Niels Bohr. This wave-particle duality, in the context of the two-slit experiment, is now quantitatively understood in terms of a duality relation. A very simple and intuitive derivation of the duality relation is presented, which should be understandable to a new student.

  17. On Quantitative Software Verification Marta Kwiatkowska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    for establish- ing quantitative properties of a system model, such as the probability of battery power dropping concentrated on methods for analysing qualitative properties of system models. Many pro- grams, however to analyse system models in several application domains, including security and network protocols. However

  18. Quantitative organic vapor-particle sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gundel, Lara (Berkeley, CA); Daisey, Joan M. (Walnut Creek, CA); Stevens, Robert K. (Cary, NC)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A quantitative organic vapor-particle sampler for sampling semi-volatile organic gases and particulate components. A semi-volatile organic reversible gas sorbent macroreticular resin agglomerates of randomly packed microspheres with the continuous porous structure of particles ranging in size between 0.05-10 .mu.m for use in an integrated diffusion vapor-particle sampler.

  19. Evolution Effects on Parton Energy Loss with Detailed Balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luan cheng; Enke Wang

    2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial conditions in the chemical non-equilibrated medium and Bjorken expanding medium at RHIC are determined. With a set of rate equations describing the chemical equilibration of quarks and gluons based on perturbative QCD, we investigate the consequence for parton evolution at RHIC. With considering parton evolution, it is shown that the Debye screening mass and the inverse mean free-path of gluons reduce with increasing proper time in the QGP medium. The parton evolution affects the parton energy loss with detailed balance, both parton energy loss from stimulated emission in the chemical non-equilibrated expanding medium and in Bjorken expanding medium are linear dependent on the propagating distance rather than square dependent in the static medium. The energy absorption can not be neglected at intermediate jet energies and small propagating distance of the energetic parton in contrast with that it is important only at intermediate jet energy in the static medium. This will increase the energy and propagating distance dependence of the parton energy loss and will affect the shape of suppression of moderately high P_T hadron spectra.

  20. Flow Effects on Jet Energy Loss with Detailed Balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luan Cheng; Jia Liu; Enke Wang

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In the presence of collective flow a new model potential describing the interaction of the hard jet with scattering centers is derived based on the static color-screened Yukawa potential. The flow effect on jet quenching with detailed balance is investigated in pQCD. It turns out, considering the collective flow with velocity $v_z$ along the jet direction, the collective flow decreases the LPM destructive interference comparing to that in the static medium. The gluon absorption plays a more important role in the moving medium. The collective flow increases the energy gain from gluon absorption, however, decreases the energy loss from gluon radiation, which is $(1 - v_z )$ times as that in the static medium to the first order of opacity. In the presence of collective flow, the second order in opacity correction is relatively small compared to the first order. So that the total effective energy loss is decreased. The flow dependence of the energy loss will affect the suppression of high $p_T$ hadron spectrum and anisotropy parameter $v_2$ in high-energy heavy-ion collisions.

  1. GRB 050822: Detailed analysis of an XRF observed by Swift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godet, O; Osborne, J; Zhang, B; Burrows, D N; O'Brien, P T; Hill, J E; Racusin, J; Beardmore, A P; Goad, M R; Falcone, A; Morris, D C; Ziaeepour, H

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the temporal and spectral characteristics of the early X-ray emission from the GRB 050822 as observed by Swift. This burst is likely to be an XRF showing major X-ray flares in its XRT light-curve. The quality of the data allows a detailed spectral analysis of the early afterglow in the X-ray band. During the X-ray flares, a positive correlation between the count rate and the spectral hardness (i.e. higher the count rate is and harder the spectrum is) is clearly seen for the X-ray flares. This behaviour similar to that seen for Gamma-ray pulses indicates that the energy peak of the spectrum is in the XRT energy band and it moves at lower energy with time. We show evidence for the possible detection of the emergence of the forward-shock emission produced at a radius larger than 4 x 10^{16} cm (a forming region clearly different to that producing the prompt emission). Finally, we show that the null detection of a jet break up to T_0+4 x 10^6s in the X-ray light curve of this XRF can be understood: i...

  2. Detailed model for practical pulverized coal furnaces and gasifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Philips, S.D.; Smoot, L.D.

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need to improve efficiency and reduce pollutant emissions commercial furnaces has prompted energy companies to search for optimized operating conditions and improved designs in their fossil-fuel burning facilities. Historically, companies have relied on the use of empirical correlations and pilot-plant data to make decisions about operating conditions and design changes. The high cost of collecting data makes obtaining large amounts of data infeasible. The main objective of the data book is to provide a single source of detailed three-dimensional combustion and combustion-related data suitable for comprehensive combustion model evaluation. Five tasks were identified as requirements to achieve the main objective. First, identify the types of data needed to evaluate comprehensive combustion models, and establish criteria for selecting the data. Second, identify and document available three-dimensional combustion data related to pulverized coal combustion. Third, collect and evaluate three-dimensional data cases, and select suitable cases based on selection criteria. Fourth, organize the data sets into an easy-to-use format. Fifth, evaluate and interpret the nature and quality of the data base. 39 refs., 15 figs., 14 tabs.

  3. Sources of Technical Variability in Quantitative LC-MS Proteomics: Human Brain Tissue Sample Analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piehowski, Paul D.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Orton, Daniel J.; Xie, Fang; Moore, Ronald J.; Ramirez Restrepo, Manuel; Engel, Anzhelika; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Albin, Roger L.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Myers, Amanda J.

    2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    To design a robust quantitative proteomics study, an understanding of both the inherent heterogeneity of the biological samples being studied as well as the technical variability of the proteomics methods and platform is needed. Additionally, accurately identifying the technical steps associated with the largest variability would provide valuable information for the improvement and design of future processing pipelines. We present an experimental strategy that allows for a detailed examination of the variability of the quantitative LC-MS proteomics measurements. By replicating analyses at different stages of processing, various technical components can be estimated and their individual contribution to technical variability can be dissected. This design can be easily adapted to other quantitative proteomics pipelines. Herein, we applied this methodology to our label-free workflow for the processing of human brain tissue. For this application, the pipeline was divided into four critical components: Tissue dissection and homogenization (extraction), protein denaturation followed by trypsin digestion and SPE clean-up (digestion), short-term run-to-run instrumental response fluctuation (instrumental variance), and long-term drift of the quantitative response of the LC-MS/MS platform over the 2 week period of continuous analysis (instrumental stability). From this analysis, we found the following contributions to variability: extraction (72%) >> instrumental variance (16%) > instrumental stability (8.4%) > digestion (3.1%). Furthermore, the stability of the platform and its’ suitability for discovery proteomics studies is demonstrated.

  4. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanism for Biodiesel Components Methyl Stearate and Methyl Oleate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naik, C; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M

    2010-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    New chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms are developed for two of the five major components of biodiesel fuel, methyl stearate and methyl oleate. The mechanisms are produced using existing reaction classes and rules for reaction rates, with additional reaction classes to describe other reactions unique to methyl ester species. Mechanism capabilities were examined by computing fuel/air autoignition delay times and comparing the results with more conventional hydrocarbon fuels for which experimental results are available. Additional comparisons were carried out with measured results taken from jet-stirred reactor experiments for rapeseed methyl ester fuels. In both sets of computational tests, methyl oleate was found to be slightly less reactive than methyl stearate, and an explanation of this observation is made showing that the double bond in methyl oleate inhibits certain low temperature chain branching reaction pathways important in methyl stearate. The resulting detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism includes more approximately 3500 chemical species and more than 17,000 chemical reactions.

  5. HCCI in a CFR engine: experiments and detailed kinetic modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flowers, D; Aceves, S; Smith, R; Torres, J; Girard, J; Dibble, R

    1999-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Single cylinder engine experiments and chemical kinetic modeling have been performed to study the effect of variations in fuel, equivalence ratio, and intake charge temperature on the start of combustion and the heat release rate. Neat propane and a fuel blend of 15% dimethyl-ether in methane have been studied. The results demonstrate the role of these parameters on the start of combustion, efficiency, imep, and emissions. Single zone kinetic modeling results show the trends consistent with the experimental results.

  6. Fort Drum integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Brodrick, J.R.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Di Massa, F.V.; Keller, J.M.; Richman, E.E.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program`s mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Drum. This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company. It will identify and evaluate all electric and fossil fuel cost-effective energy projects; develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at one of Niagara Mohawk`s primary federal facilities, the FORSCOM Fort Drum facility located near Watertown, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 3, the Resource Assessment. This analysis examines the characteristics of electric, gas, oil, propane, coal, and purchased thermal capacity use for fiscal year (FY) 1990. It records energy-use intensities for the facilities at Fort Drum by building type and energy end use. It also breaks down building energy consumption by fuel type, energy end use, and building type. A complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that includes the accounting of all energy use among buildings, utilities, central systems, and applicable losses.

  7. Enabling Detailed Energy Analyses via the Technology Performance Exchange: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Studer, D.; Fleming, K.; Lee, E.; Livingood, W.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the key tenets to increasing adoption of energy efficiency solutions in the built environment is improving confidence in energy performance. Current industry practices make extensive use of predictive modeling, often via the use of sophisticated hourly or sub-hourly energy simulation programs, to account for site-specific parameters (e.g., climate zone, hours of operation, and space type) and arrive at a performance estimate. While such methods are highly precise, they invariably provide less than ideal accuracy due to a lack of high-quality, foundational energy performance input data. The Technology Performance Exchange was constructed to allow the transparent sharing of foundational, product-specific energy performance data, and leverages significant, external engineering efforts and a modular architecture to efficiently identify and codify the minimum information necessary to accurately predict product energy performance. This strongly-typed database resource represents a novel solution to a difficult and established problem. One of the most exciting benefits is the way in which the Technology Performance Exchange's application programming interface has been leveraged to integrate contributed foundational data into the Building Component Library. Via a series of scripts, data is automatically translated and parsed into the Building Component Library in a format that is immediately usable to the energy modeling community. This paper (1) presents a high-level overview of the project drivers and the structure of the Technology Performance Exchange; (2) offers a detailed examination of how technologies are incorporated and translated into powerful energy modeling code snippets; and (3) examines several benefits of this robust workflow.

  8. Modeling HCCI using CFD and Detailed Chemistry with Experimental Validation and a Focus on CO Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hessel, R; Foster, D; Aceves, S; Flowers, D; Pitz, B; Dec, J; Sjoberg, M; Babajimopoulos, A

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-zone CFD simulations with detailed kinetics were used to model engine experiments performed on a diesel engine that was converted for single cylinder, HCCI operation, here using iso-octane as the fuel. The modeling goals were to validate the method (multi-zone combustion modeling) and the reaction mechanism (LLNL 857 species iso-octane), both of which performed very well. The purpose of this paper is to document the validation findings and to set the ground work for further analysis of the results by first looking at CO emissions characteristics with varying equivalence ratio.

  9. Quantitatively Probing the Al Distribution in Zeolites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vjunov, Aleksei; Fulton, John L.; Huthwelker, Thomas; Pin, Sonia; Mei, Donghai; Schenter, Gregory K.; Govind, Niranjan; Camaioni, Donald M.; Hu, Jian Z.; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2014-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The degree of substitution of Si4+ by Al3+ in the oxygen-terminated tetrahedra (Al T-sites) of zeolites determines the concentration of ion-exchange and Brønsted acid sites. As the location of the tetrahedra and the associated subtle variations in bond angles influence the acid strength, quantitative information about Al T-sites in the framework is critical to rationalize catalytic properties and to design new catalysts. A quantitative analysis is reported that uses a combination of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis and 27Al MAS NMR spectroscopy supported by DFT-based molecular dynamics simulations. To discriminate individual Al atoms, sets of ab initio EXAFS spectra for various T-sites are generated from DFT-based molecular dynamics simulations allowing quantitative treatment of the EXAFS single- and multiple-photoelectron scattering processes out to 3-4 atom shells surrounding the Al absorption center. It is observed that identical zeolite types show dramatically different Al-distributions. A preference of Al for T-sites that are part of one or more 4-member rings in the framework over those T-sites that are part of only 5- and 6-member rings in the HBEA150 sample has been determined from a combination of these methods. This work was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences.

  10. Quantitative Methods for Comparing Different Polyline Stream Network Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danny L. Anderson; Daniel P. Ames; Ping Yang

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two techniques for exploring relative horizontal accuracy of complex linear spatial features are described and sample source code (pseudo code) is presented for this purpose. The first technique, relative sinuosity, is presented as a measure of the complexity or detail of a polyline network in comparison to a reference network. We term the second technique longitudinal root mean squared error (LRMSE) and present it as a means for quantitatively assessing the horizontal variance between two polyline data sets representing digitized (reference) and derived stream and river networks. Both relative sinuosity and LRMSE are shown to be suitable measures of horizontal stream network accuracy for assessing quality and variation in linear features. Both techniques have been used in two recent investigations involving extracting of hydrographic features from LiDAR elevation data. One confirmed that, with the greatly increased resolution of LiDAR data, smaller cell sizes yielded better stream network delineations, based on sinuosity and LRMSE, when using LiDAR-derived DEMs. The other demonstrated a new method of delineating stream channels directly from LiDAR point clouds, without the intermediate step of deriving a DEM, showing that the direct delineation from LiDAR point clouds yielded an excellent and much better match, as indicated by the LRMSE.

  11. Detailed Studies of Hydrocarbon Radicals: C2H Dissociation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wittig, Curt

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel experimental technique was examined whose goal was the ejection of radical species into the gas phase from a platform (film) of cold non-reactive material. The underlying principle was one of photo-initiated heat release in a stratum that lies below a layer of CO2 or a layer of amorphous solid water (ASW) and CO2. A molecular precursor to the radical species of interest is deposited near or on the film's surface, where it can be photo-dissociated. It proved unfeasible to avoid the rampant formation of fissures, as opposed to large "flakes." This led to many interesting results, but resulted in our aborting the scheme as a means of launching cold C2H radical into the gas phase. A journal article resulted that is germane to astrophysics but not combustion chemistry.

  12. A quantitative analysis of singular inflation with scalar-tensor and modified gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Nojiri; S. D. Odintsov; V. K. Oikonomou

    2015-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a detailed quantitative description of singular inflation. Its close analogy with finite-time future singularity which is associated to dark energy era is described. Calling and classifying the singularities of such inflation as finite-time cosmological singularities we investigate their occurrence, with special emphasis on the Type IV singularity. The study is performed in the context of a general non-canonical scalar-tensor theory. In addition, the impact of finite time singularities on the slow-roll parameters is also investigated. Particularly, we study three cases, in which the singularity occurs during the inflationary era, at the end, and also we study the case that the singularity occurs much more later than inflation ends. Using the obtained slow-roll parameters, for each case, we calculate explicitly the spectral index of primordial curvature perturbations $n_s$, the associated running of the spectral index $a_s$ and of the scalar-to-tensor ratio $r$ and compare the resulting values to the Planck and BICEP2 data. As we demonstrate, in some cases corresponding to the Type IV singularity, there might be the possibility of agreement with the observational data, when the singularity occurs at the end, or after inflation. However, absolute concordance of all observational indices is not achieved. On the contrary, if the singularity occurs during the inflationary era, this is catastrophic for the theory, since the observational indices become divergent. We also show how a Type IV singularity may be consistently accommodated in the Universe's late time evolution. Finally, we investigate which $F(R)$ gravity can generate the Type IV singularity, with special emphasis on the behavior near the finite time singularity.

  13. THE SAP3 COMPUTER PROGRAM FOR QUANTITATIVE MULTIELEMENT ANALYSIS BY ENERGY DISPERSIVE X-RAY FLUORESCENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielson,, K. K.; Sanders,, R. W.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SAP3 is a dual-function FORTRAN computer program which performs peak analysis of energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectra and then quantitatively interprets the results of the multielement analysis. It was written for mono- or bi-chromatic excitation as from an isotopic or secondary excitation source, and uses the separate incoherent and coherent backscatter intensities to define the bulk sample matrix composition. This composition is used in performing fundamental-parameter matrix corrections for self-absorption, enhancement, and particle-size effects, obviating the need for specific calibrations for a given sample matrix. The generalized calibration is based on a set of thin-film sensitivities, which are stored in a library disk file and used for all sample matrices and thicknesses. Peak overlap factors are also determined from the thin-film standards, and are stored in the library for calculating peak overlap corrections. A detailed description is given of the algorithms and program logic, and the program listing and flow charts are also provided. An auxiliary program, SPCAL, is also given for use in calibrating the backscatter intensities. SAP3 provides numerous analysis options via seventeen control switches which give flexibility in performing the calculations best suited to the sample and the user needs. User input may be limited to the name of the library, the analysis livetime, and the spectrum filename and location. Output includes all peak analysis information, matrix correction factors, and element concentrations, uncertainties and detection limits. Twenty-four elements are typically determined from a 1024-channel spectrum in one-to-two minutes using a PDP-11/34 computer operating under RSX-11M.

  14. Key Research Results Achievement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , such as: · Methods to significantly improve lighting power densities and building envelopes · Detailed

  15. Page 1 of 11 INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP ON QUANTITATIVE FINANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jagannatham, Aditya K.

    Page 1 of 11 4th INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP ON QUANTITATIVE FINANCE December 22nd to 25th , 2012 at IIT a four (4) days International Workshop on Quantitative Finance at IIT Kanpur, Kanpur, INDIA from 22nd December to 25th December 2012. Information about the Quantitative Finance Workshop The 4th International

  16. Math 576: Quantitative Risk Management lih@math.wsu.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Haijun

    Math 576: Quantitative Risk Management Haijun Li lih@math.wsu.edu Department of Mathematics Washington State University Week 3 Haijun Li Math 576: Quantitative Risk Management Week 3 1 / 26 #12;Outline Li Math 576: Quantitative Risk Management Week 3 2 / 26 #12;Purposes of Accurate Risk Assessment

  17. MATH 576: Quantitative Risk Management (3 credits) Instructor: Haijun Li

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Haijun

    MATH 576: Quantitative Risk Management (3 credits) Instructor: Haijun Li Office Locations: Neill: Quantitative Risk Management, Ch 1~7, Princeton University Press, New Jersey Course Purpose This course/computational methods in quantitative risk management. Concepts and methods covered in this course can be applied

  18. Math 576: Quantitative Risk Management lih@math.wsu.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Haijun

    1 Factor Models 2 Principal Component Analysis Haijun Li Math 576: Quantitative Risk Management WeekMath 576: Quantitative Risk Management Haijun Li lih@math.wsu.edu Department of Mathematics Washington State University Week 6 Haijun Li Math 576: Quantitative Risk Management Week 6 1 / 24 #12;Outline

  19. Quantitative Models for Operational Risk: Extremes, Dependence and Aggregation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Embrechts, Paul

    risk data lend themselves easily to a full quantitative analysis. For example, legal risk defiesQuantitative Models for Operational Risk: Extremes, Dependence and Aggregation V. Chavez, the financial industry is looking for qualitative approaches to and quantitative models for operational risk

  20. Quantitative Verification: Models, Techniques and Tools Marta Kwiatkowska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    verification is an analogous technique for establishing quantitative properties of a system modelQuantitative Verification: Models, Techniques and Tools Marta Kwiatkowska Oxford University of the state-transition graph of the model and is therefore more powerful than test- ing. Quantitative

  1. Structure of Partially Premixed Flames Using Detailed Chemistry Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kluzek, Celine D.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    obtained at Sandia National Labs in 2001. The study is focused on axisymmetric laminar partially-premixed methane/air flames with varying premixture strength values of 1.8, 2.2, and 3.17. The combination of computational and experimental results is used...

  2. Wax precipitation for gas condensate fluids was studied in detail with a thermodynamic model. It was found that the precipitated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    Summary Wax precipitation for gas condensate fluids was studied in detail with a thermodynamic to that in gas condensates. As a result of pressure decrease (at a constant tem- perature), the amount is undesirable. The flowlines may be plugged by wax deposition. For both crude oils and gas condensates, one may

  3. Theoretical Sensitivity Analysis for Quantitative Operational Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kato, Takashi

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study an asymptotic behaviour of the difference between value-at-risks VaR(L) and VaR(L+S) for heavy-tailed random variables L and S as an application to sensitivity analysis of quantitative operational risk management in the framework of an advanced measurement approach (AMA) of Basel II. We have different types of results according to the magnitude relationship of thickness of tails of L and S. Especially if the tail of S is enough thinner than the one of L, then VaR(L + S) - VaR(L) is asymptotically equivalent to an expected loss of S when L and S are independent. We also give some generalized results without the assumption of independence.

  4. Quantitative Monte Carlo-based holmium-166 SPECT reconstruction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elschot, Mattijs; Smits, Maarten L. J.; Nijsen, Johannes F. W.; Lam, Marnix G. E. H.; Zonnenberg, Bernard A.; Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den; Jong, Hugo W. A. M. de [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands); Viergever, Max A. [Image Sciences Institute, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands)] [Image Sciences Institute, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Quantitative imaging of the radionuclide distribution is of increasing interest for microsphere radioembolization (RE) of liver malignancies, to aid treatment planning and dosimetry. For this purpose, holmium-166 ({sup 166}Ho) microspheres have been developed, which can be visualized with a gamma camera. The objective of this work is to develop and evaluate a new reconstruction method for quantitative {sup 166}Ho SPECT, including Monte Carlo-based modeling of photon contributions from the full energy spectrum.Methods: A fast Monte Carlo (MC) simulator was developed for simulation of {sup 166}Ho projection images and incorporated in a statistical reconstruction algorithm (SPECT-fMC). Photon scatter and attenuation for all photons sampled from the full {sup 166}Ho energy spectrum were modeled during reconstruction by Monte Carlo simulations. The energy- and distance-dependent collimator-detector response was modeled using precalculated convolution kernels. Phantom experiments were performed to quantitatively evaluate image contrast, image noise, count errors, and activity recovery coefficients (ARCs) of SPECT-fMC in comparison with those of an energy window-based method for correction of down-scattered high-energy photons (SPECT-DSW) and a previously presented hybrid method that combines MC simulation of photopeak scatter with energy window-based estimation of down-scattered high-energy contributions (SPECT-ppMC+DSW). Additionally, the impact of SPECT-fMC on whole-body recovered activities (A{sup est}) and estimated radiation absorbed doses was evaluated using clinical SPECT data of six {sup 166}Ho RE patients.Results: At the same noise level, SPECT-fMC images showed substantially higher contrast than SPECT-DSW and SPECT-ppMC+DSW in spheres ?17 mm in diameter. The count error was reduced from 29% (SPECT-DSW) and 25% (SPECT-ppMC+DSW) to 12% (SPECT-fMC). ARCs in five spherical volumes of 1.96–106.21 ml were improved from 32%–63% (SPECT-DSW) and 50%–80% (SPECT-ppMC+DSW) to 76%–103% (SPECT-fMC). Furthermore, SPECT-fMC recovered whole-body activities were most accurate (A{sup est}= 1.06 × A ? 5.90 MBq, R{sup 2}= 0.97) and SPECT-fMC tumor absorbed doses were significantly higher than with SPECT-DSW (p = 0.031) and SPECT-ppMC+DSW (p = 0.031).Conclusions: The quantitative accuracy of {sup 166}Ho SPECT is improved by Monte Carlo-based modeling of the image degrading factors. Consequently, the proposed reconstruction method enables accurate estimation of the radiation absorbed dose in clinical practice.

  5. Quantitative WDS analysis using electron probe microanalyzer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ul-Hamid, Anwar [Research Institute, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, P.O. Box 1073, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)]. E-mail: anwar@kfupm.edu.sa; Tawancy, Hani M. [Research Institute, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, P.O. Box 1073, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Mohammed, Abdul-Rashid I. [Research Institute, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, P.O. Box 1073, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Jaroudi, Said S. [Saudi Aramco, P.O. Box 65, Tanajib 31311 (Saudi Arabia); Abbas, Nureddin M. [Research Institute, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, P.O. Box 1073, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the procedure for conducting quantitative elemental analysis by ZAF correction method using wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (WDS) in an electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA) is elaborated. Analysis of a thermal barrier coating (TBC) system formed on a Ni-based single crystal superalloy is presented as an example to illustrate the analysis of samples consisting of a large number of major and minor elements. The analysis was performed by known standards and measured peak-to-background intensity ratios. The procedure for using separate set of acquisition conditions for major and minor element analysis is explained and its importance is stressed.

  6. Unraveling pancreatic islet biology by quantitative proteomics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Jianying; Dann, Geoffrey P.; Liew, Chong W.; Smith, Richard D.; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Qian, Weijun

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The pancreatic islets of Langerhans play a critical role in maintaining blood glucose homeostasis by secreting insulin and several other important peptide hormones. Impaired insulin secretion due to islet dysfunction is linked to the pathogenesis underlying both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Over the past 5 years, emerging proteomic technologies have been applied to dissect the signaling pathways that regulate islet functions and gain an understanding of the mechanisms of islet dysfunction relevant to diabetes. Herein, we briefly review some of the recent quantitative proteomic studies involving pancreatic islets geared towards gaining a better understanding of islet biology relevant to metabolic diseases.

  7. Category:Quantitative Incentives | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here. Category:Conceptual ModelListsPolitical ActionQuantitative

  8. Vapor space characterization of waste Tank 241-TY-101: Results from samples collected on 4/6/95

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klinger, G.S.; Clauss, T.W.; Ligotke, M.W.; Pool, K.H.; McVeety, B.D.; Olsen, K.B.; Bredt, O.P.; Fruchter, J.S.; Goheen, S.C.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-TY-101 (referred to as Tank TY-101). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), and water vapor (H{sub 2}O). Sampling for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) was not requested. In addition, quantitative results were obtained for the 39 TO-14 compounds plus an additional 14 analytes. Off these, 5 were observed above the 5-ppbv reporting cutoff. One tentatively identified compound (TIC) was observed above the reporting cutoff of (ca.) 10 ppbv and are reported with concentrations that are semiquantitative estimates based on internal-standard response factors. The six organic analyses identified are listed in Table 1 and account for approximately 100% of the total organic components in Tank TY-101. Two permanent gases, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), were also detected. Tank TY-101 is on the Ferrocyanide Watch List.

  9. A quantitative method for measuring the quality of history matches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, T.S. [Kerr-McGee Corp., Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Knapp, R.M. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    History matching can be an efficient tool for reservoir characterization. A {open_quotes}good{close_quotes} history matching job can generate reliable reservoir parameters. However, reservoir engineers are often frustrated when they try to select a {open_quotes}better{close_quotes} match from a series of history matching runs. Without a quantitative measurement, it is always difficult to tell the difference between a {open_quotes}good{close_quotes} and a {open_quotes}better{close_quotes} matches. For this reason, we need a quantitative method for testing the quality of matches. This paper presents a method for such a purpose. The method uses three statistical indices to (1) test shape conformity, (2) examine bias errors, and (3) measure magnitude of deviation. The shape conformity test insures that the shape of a simulated curve matches that of a historical curve. Examining bias errors assures that model reservoir parameters have been calibrated to that of a real reservoir. Measuring the magnitude of deviation assures that the difference between the model and the real reservoir parameters is minimized. The method was first tested on a hypothetical model and then applied to published field studies. The results showed that the method can efficiently measure the quality of matches. It also showed that the method can serve as a diagnostic tool for calibrating reservoir parameters during history matching.

  10. Impacts of Climate Change on Energy Consumption and Peak Demand in Buildings: A Detailed Regional Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dirks, James A.; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Hathaway, John E.; Skorski, Daniel C.; Scott, Michael J.; Pulsipher, Trenton C.; Huang, Maoyi; Liu, Ying; Rice, Jennie S.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of numerous commercial and residential building simulations, with the purpose of examining the impact of climate change on peak and annual building energy consumption over the portion of the Eastern Interconnection (EIC) located in the United States. The climate change scenario considered (IPCC A2 scenario as downscaled from the CASCaDE data set) has changes in mean climate characteristics as well as changes in the frequency and duration of intense weather events. This investigation examines building energy demand for three annual periods representative of climate trends in the CASCaDE data set at the beginning, middle, and end of the century--2004, 2052, and 2089. Simulations were performed using the Building ENergy Demand (BEND) model which is a detailed simulation platform built around EnergyPlus. BEND was developed in collaboration with the Platform for Regional Integrated Modeling and Analysis (PRIMA), a modeling framework designed to simulate the complex interactions among climate, energy, water, and land at decision-relevant spatial scales. Over 26,000 building configurations of different types, sizes, vintages, and, characteristics which represent the population of buildings within the EIC, are modeled across the 3 EIC time zones using the future climate from 100 locations within the target region, resulting in nearly 180,000 spatially relevant simulated demand profiles for each of the 3 years. In this study, the building stock characteristics are held constant based on the 2005 building stock in order to isolate and present results that highlight the impact of the climate signal on commercial and residential energy demand. Results of this analysis compare well with other analyses at their finest level of specificity. This approach, however, provides a heretofore unprecedented level of specificity across multiple spectrums including spatial, temporal, and building characteristics. This capability enables the ability to perform detailed hourly impact studies of building adaptation and mitigation strategies on energy use and electricity peak demand within the context of the entire grid and economy.

  11. Idiopathic juvenile osteoporosis: a cross-sectional single-centre experience with bone histomorphometry and quantitative computed tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bacchetta, Justine; Wesseling-Perry, Katherine; Gilsanz, Vicente; Gales, Barbara; Pereira, Renata C; Salusky, Isidro B

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and quantitative computed tomography. Pediatric Rheumatologyand quantitative computed tomography Justine Bacchetta 1 ,by quantitative computed tomography (QCT) and their

  12. A DETAILED COMPARISON BETWEEN THE OBSERVED AND SYNTHESIZED PROPERTIES OF A SIMULATED TYPE II SPICULE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez-Sykora, Juan; De Pontieu, Bart; Pereira, Tiago M. D.; Stern, Julie V. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Leenaarts, Jorrit; Carlsson, Mats; Hansteen, Viggo; Van der Voort, Luc Rouppe [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Tian Hui [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); McIntosh, Scott W., E-mail: j.m.sykora@astro.uio.no [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed a three-dimensional radiative MHD simulation of the solar atmosphere. This simulation shows a jet-like feature that shows similarities to the type II spicules observed for the first time with Hinode's Solar Optical Telescope. Rapid blueshifted events (RBEs) on the solar disk are associated with these spicules. Observational results suggest they may contribute significantly in supplying the corona with hot plasma. We perform a detailed comparison of the properties of the simulated jet with those of type II spicules (observed with Hinode) and RBEs (with ground-based instruments). We analyze a wide variety of synthetic emission and absorption lines from the simulations including chromospheric (Ca II 8542 A, Ca II H, and H{alpha}) to transition region and coronal temperatures (10,000 K to several million K). We compare their synthetic intensities, line profiles, Doppler shifts, line widths, and asymmetries with observations from Hinode/SOT and EIS, SOHO/SUMER, the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope, and SDO/AIA. Many properties of the synthetic observables resemble the observations, and we describe in detail the physical processes that lead to these observables. Detailed analysis of the synthetic observables provides insight into how observations should be analyzed to derive information about physical variables in such a dynamic event. For example, we find that line-of-sight superposition in the optically thin atmosphere requires the combination of Doppler shifts and spectral line asymmetry to determine the velocity in the jet. In our simulated type II spicule, the lifetime of the asymmetry of the transition region lines is shorter than that of the coronal lines. Other properties differ from the observations, especially in the chromospheric lines. The mass density of the part of the spicule with a chromospheric temperature is too low to produce significant opacity in chromospheric lines. The synthetic Ca II 8542 A and H{alpha} profiles therefore do not show signal resembling RBEs. These and other discrepancies are described in detail, and we discuss which mechanisms and physical processes may need to be included in the MHD simulations to mimic the thermodynamic processes of the chromosphere and corona, in particular to reproduce type II spicules.

  13. Incorporation of Detailed Chemical Mechanisms in Reactive Flow Simulations Using Element-Flux Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Androulakis, Ioannis (Yannis)

    ignition (HCCI) combustion with detailed chemistry by using the proposed on-the-fly reduction scheme detailed characterizations of in-cylinder behaviors in stratified HCCI engines by incorporating detailed was proposed for HCCI engines in which homogeneous charge was used. However, although termed "homogeneous

  14. Detailed heat transfer distributions in two-pass smooth and turbulated square channels with bleed holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekkad, S.V.; Huang, Y.; Han, J.C. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern gas turbine blades have internal serpentine passage for providing effective cooling. Rib turbulators are added periodically on the cooling passage surface to enhance heat transfer. Some of the cooling air is ejected out through bleed (or film) holes for external blade film cooling. The presence of periodic rib turbulators and bleed holes creates strong axial and spanwise variations in the heat transfer distributions on the passage surface. Detailed heat transfer coefficient distributions are presented in this study for a two-pass square channel with a 180{degree} turn. One wall of the channel has periodically placed bleed holes. Four different configurations of 90{degree} parallel, 60{degree} parallel, 60{degree} V ribs, and 60{degree} inverted V ribs are studied in conjunction with the effect of bleed holes on the same wall. The surface is coated with a thin layer of thermochromic liquid crystals and a transient test is run to obtain the detailed heat transfer distributions. The 60{degree} parallel, 60{degree} V, and 60{degree} inverted ribbed channels produce similar levels of heat transfer enhancement in the first pass. However, the 60{degree} inverted V ribbed channel produces higher enhancement in the second pass. Regional averaged heat transfer results indicate that a test surface with bleed holes provides similar heat transfer enhancement as that for a test surface without bleed holes although 20--25% of the inlet mass flow exits through the bleed holes.

  15. Fort Stewart integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, J.M.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Larson, L.L.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at Fort Stewart, a US Army Forces Command facility located near Savannah, Georgia. This is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 3, Integrated Resource Assessment. The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Stewart. PNL, in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), has designed a model program applicable to the federal sector for this purpose. The model program (1) identifies and evaluates all cost-effective energy projects; (2) develops a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) targets 100% of the financing required to implement energy efficiency projects. PNL applied this model program to Fort Stewart. The analysis examines the characteristics of electric, natural gas, oil, propane, and wood chip use for fiscal year (FY) 1990. The results include energy-use intensities for the facilities at Fort Stewart by building type, fuel type, and energy end use. A complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that accounts for the distribution of all major energy uses and losses among buildings, utilities, and central systems.

  16. Waste receiving and processing facility module 1, detailed design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WRAP 1 baseline documents which guided the technical development of the Title design included: (a) A/E Statement of Work (SOW) Revision 4C: This DOE-RL contractual document specified the workscope, deliverables, schedule, method of performance and reference criteria for the Title design preparation. (b) Functional Design Criteria (FDC) Revision 1: This DOE-RL technical criteria document specified the overall operational criteria for the facility. The document was a Revision 0 at the beginning of the design and advanced to Revision 1 during the tenure of the Title design. (c) Supplemental Design Requirements Document (SDRD) Revision 3: This baseline criteria document prepared by WHC for DOE-RL augments the FDC by providing further definition of the process, operational safety, and facility requirements to the A/E for guidance in preparing the design. The document was at a very preliminary stage at the onset of Title design and was revised in concert with the results of the engineering studies that were performed to resolve the numerous technical issues that the project faced when Title I was initiated, as well as, by requirements established during the course of the Title II design.

  17. Vapor space characterization of waste tank 241-C-112: Results from samples collected on 8/11/94

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ligotke, M.W.; McVeety, B.D.; Pool, K.H. [and others

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes organic analyses results from samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-C-112 (referred to as Tank C-112). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), and water (H{sub 2}O). Sampling for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) was not requested. Organic compounds were also quantitatively determined. Five organic tentatively identified compounds (TICs) were observed above the detection limit of (ca.) 10 ppbv, but standards for most of these were not available at the time of analysis, and the reported concentrations are semiquantitative estimates. In addition, we looked for the 40 standard TO-14 analytes. None were observed above the 2-ppbv detection limit. The five organic analytes with the highest concentration are listed in Table 1 and account for 100% of the total organic components in Tank C-112.

  18. Vapor space characterization of waste Tank 241-C-107: Results from samples collected on 9/29/94

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pool, K.H.; Clauss, T.W.; Ligotke, M.W. [and others

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-C-107 (referred to as Tank C-107). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), and water vapor (H{sub 2}O). Sampling for sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) was not requested. Organic compounds were also quantitatively determined. Twenty organic tentatively identified compounds (TICs) were observed above the detection limit of (ca.) 10 ppbv, but standards for most of these were not available at the time of analysis, and the reported concentrations are semiquantitative estimates. In addition, the authors looked for the 55 TO-14 extended analytes. Of these, 3 were observed above the 5-ppbv detection limit. The 10 organic analytes with the highest estimated concentrations are listed in Summary Table 1 and account for approximately 96% of the total organic components in Tank C-107. Two permanent gases, carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide, were also detected.

  19. RESULTS OF SLICE MEASUREMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudolph, J

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The linear accelerator ELBE delivers high-brightness electron bunches to multiple user stations, including two IR-FEL oscillators [1], [2]. In the framework of an upgrade program the current thermionic injector is being replaced by a SRF-photoinjector [3], [4]. The SRF injector promises higher beam quality, especially required for future experiments with high power laser radiation. During the commissioning phase, the SRF-injector was running in parallel to the thermionic gun. After installation of a injection beamline (dogleg), beam from the SRF-injector can now be injected into the ELBE linac. Detailed characterization of the electron beam quality delivered by the new electron injector includes vertical slice emittance measurements in addition to measurements of projected emittance values. This report gives an overview of the status of the project and summarizes first measurement results as well as results of simulations performed with measurement settings.

  20. ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2013 Preliminary Determination: Quantitative Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, Mark A.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Wang, Weimin; Zhang, Jian; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Athalye, Rahul A.; Xie, YuLong; Hart, Reid; Goel, Supriya

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a preliminary quantitative analysis to assess whether buildings constructed according to the requirements of ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2013 would result in energy savings compared with buildings constructed to ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010.

  1. Selenium and Lung Cancer: A Quantitative Analysis of Heterogeneity in the Current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Selenium and Lung Cancer: A Quantitative Analysis of Heterogeneity in the Current Epidemiological on sele- nium and lung cancer and identify sources of heterogeneity among studies. When all studies were.30). Overall, these results suggest that selenium may have some protective effect against lung cancer

  2. Quantitative analysis of forest island pattern in selected Ohio landscapes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowen, G.W.; Burgess, R.L.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively describe the various aspects of regional distribution patterns of forest islands and relate those patterns to other landscape features. Several maps showing the forest cover of various counties in Ohio were selected as representative examples of forest patterns to be quantified. Ten thousand hectare study areas (landscapes) were delineated on each map. A total of 15 landscapes representing a wide variety of forest island patterns was chosen. Data were converted into a series of continuous variables which contained information pertinent to the sizes, shape, numbers, and spacing of woodlots within a landscape. The continuous variables were used in a factor analysis to describe the variation among landscapes in terms of forest island pattern. The results showed that forest island patterns are related to topography and other environmental features correlated with topography.

  3. Axions and 'light shining through a wall': A detailed theoretical analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adler, Stephen L. [Institute for Advanced Study, Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)], E-mail: adler@ias.edu; Gamboa, J. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Casilla 307, Santiago (Chile)], E-mail: jgamboa@usach.cl; Mendez, F. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Casilla 307, Santiago (Chile)], E-mail: fmendez@usach.cl; Lopez-Sarrion, J. [Department of Physics, The City College of the CUNY, NY 10031 (United States)], E-mail: justinux75@gmail.com

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a detailed study of axion-photon and photon-axion conversion amplitudes, which enter the analysis of 'light shining through a wall' experiments. Several different calculational methods are employed and compared, and in all cases we retain a nonzero axion mass. To leading order, we find that when the photon frequency {omega} is very close to the axion mass m, there is a threshold cusp which significantly enhances the photon to axion conversion amplitude, by a factor {omega}/{radical}({omega}{sup 2}-m{sup 2}) relative to the corresponding axion to photon conversion process. When m=0, the enhancement factor reduces to unity and the results of previous calculations are recovered. Our calculations include an exact wave matching analysis, which shows how unitarity is maintained near threshold at {omega}=m, and a discussion of the case when the magnetic field extends into the 'wall' region.

  4. Co-Simulation of Detailed Whole Building with the Power System to Study Smart Grid Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makhmalbaf, Atefe; Fuller, Jason C.; Srivastava, Viraj; Ciraci, Selim; Daily, Jeffrey A.

    2014-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Modernization of the power system in a way that ensures a sustainable energy system is arguably one of the most pressing concerns of our time. Buildings are important components in the power system. First, they are the main consumers of electricity and secondly, they do not have constant energy demand. Conventionally, electricity has been difficult to store and should be consumed as it is generated. Therefore, maintaining the demand and supply is critical in the power system. However, to reduce the complexity of power models, buildings (i.e., end-use loads) are traditionally modeled and represented as aggregated “dumb” nodes in the power system. This means we lack effective detailed whole building energy models that can support requirements and emerging technologies of the smart power grid. To gain greater insight into the relationship between building energy demand and power system performance, it is important to constitute a co-simulation framework to support detailed building energy modeling and simulation within the power system to study capabilities promised by the modern power grid. This paper discusses ongoing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and presents underlying tools and framework needed to enable co-simulation of building, building energy systems and their control in the power system to study applications such as demand response, grid-based HVAC control, and deployment of buildings for ancillary services. The optimal goal is to develop an integrated modeling and simulation platform that is flexible, reusable, and scalable. Results of this work will contribute to future building and power system studies, especially those related to the integrated ‘smart grid’. Results are also expected to advance power resiliency and local (micro) scale grid studies where several building and renewable energy systems transact energy directly. This paper also reviews some applications that can be supported and studied using the framework introduced to understand their implications before they can be successfully implemented in the power system.

  5. Quantitative Infrared Intensity Studies of Vapor-PhaseGlyoxal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrared Intensity Studies of Vapor-Phase Glyoxal,Methylglyoxal, and 2,3-Butanedione (Diacetyl) with Quantitative Infrared Intensity Studies of Vapor-Phase Glyoxal,Methylglyoxal,...

  6. assaying quantitative: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    511-100. + 1 12;+ + Outline) quantitative traits Song, Suzuki, Slocum, Williams and Osborn (1990) Song, Slocum and Osborn (1990) + 3 12 Yandell, Brian S. 153 and...

  7. amplicon quantitative pcr: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: Guidelines for Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Digital PCR Experiments Jim F this process we present the Minimum Information for...

  8. analysis quantitative chemical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    deals, including the following: ENERGY: Chemical engineers work in all aspects of the energy industry developing Firestone, Jeremy 6 Conservation biology Quantitative analysis...

  9. Quantitative Site-specific Reactivity Profiling of S-Nitrosylation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Profiling of S-Nitrosylation in Mouse Skeletal Muscle Using Cysteinyl Peptide Enrichment Quantitative Site-specific Reactivity Profiling of S-Nitrosylation in Mouse Skeletal...

  10. Results from NA49

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Hoehne

    2005-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of results from the CERN experiment NA49 is presented with emphasis on most recent measurements. NA49 has systematically studied the dependence of hadron production on energy and system size or centrality. At top-SPS energy the detailed investigation of hadron production, now also extending to elliptic flow of Lambda-baryons and to identified particle yields at high p_t, shows that the created matter behaves in a similar manner as at RHIC energies. In the lower SPS energy range a distinct structure is observed in the energy dependence of the rate of strangeness production and in the slopes of p_t-spectra suggesting the onset of the creation of a deconfined phase of matter.

  11. Quantitative genetic activity graphical profiles for use in chemical evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waters, M.D. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States); Stack, H.F.; Garrett, N.E.; Jackson, M.A. [Environmental Health Research and Testing, Inc., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A graphic approach, terms a Genetic Activity Profile (GAP), was developed to display a matrix of data on the genetic and related effects of selected chemical agents. The profiles provide a visual overview of the quantitative (doses) and qualitative (test results) data for each chemical. Either the lowest effective dose or highest ineffective dose is recorded for each agent and bioassay. Up to 200 different test systems are represented across the GAP. Bioassay systems are organized according to the phylogeny of the test organisms and the end points of genetic activity. The methodology for producing and evaluating genetic activity profile was developed in collaboration with the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Data on individual chemicals were compiles by IARC and by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Data are available on 343 compounds selected from volumes 1-53 of the IARC Monographs and on 115 compounds identified as Superfund Priority Substances. Software to display the GAPs on an IBM-compatible personal computer is available from the authors. Structurally similar compounds frequently display qualitatively and quantitatively similar profiles of genetic activity. Through examination of the patterns of GAPs of pairs and groups of chemicals, it is possible to make more informed decisions regarding the selection of test batteries to be used in evaluation of chemical analogs. GAPs provided useful data for development of weight-of-evidence hazard ranking schemes. Also, some knowledge of the potential genetic activity of complex environmental mixtures may be gained from an assessment of the genetic activity profiles of component chemicals. The fundamental techniques and computer programs devised for the GAP database may be used to develop similar databases in other disciplines. 36 refs., 2 figs.

  12. GyPSuM: A Detailed Tomographic Model of Mantle Density and Seismic Wave Speeds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, N A; Forte, A M; Boschi, L; Grand, S P

    2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    GyPSuM is a tomographic model fo mantle seismic shear wave (S) speeds, compressional wave (P) speeds and detailed density anomalies that drive mantle flow. the model is developed through simultaneous inversion of seismic body wave travel times (P and S) and geodynamic observations while considering realistic mineral physics parameters linking the relative behavior of mantle properties (wave speeds and density). Geodynamic observations include the (up to degree 16) global free-air gravity field, divergence of the tectonic plates, dynamic topography of the free surface, and the flow-induced excess ellipticity of the core-mantle boundary. GyPSuM is built with the philosophy that heterogeneity that most closely resembles thermal variations is the simplest possible solution. Models of the density field from Earth's free oscillations have provided great insight into the density configuration of the mantle; but are limited to very long-wavelength solutions. Alternatively, simply scaling higher resolution seismic images to density anomalies generates density fields that do not satisfy geodynamic observations. The current study provides detailed density structures in the mantle while directly satisfying geodynamic observations through a joint seismic-geodynamic inversion process. Notable density field observations include high-density piles at the base of the superplume structures, supporting the fundamental results of past normal mode studies. However, these features are more localized and lower amplitude than past studies would suggest. When we consider all seismic anomalies in GyPSuM, we find that P and S-wave speeds are strongly correlated throughout the mantle. However, correlations between the high-velocity S zones in the deep mantle ({approx} 2000 km depth) and corresponding P-wave anomalies are very low suggesting a systematic divergence from simplified thermal effects in ancient subducted slab anomalies. Nevertheless, they argue that temperature variations are the primary cause of P-wave, S-wave, and density anomalies in the mantle.

  13. River Corridor Cleanup Contract Fiscal Year 2006 Detailed Work Plan: DWP Summary, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Project Integration

    2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This detailed work plan provides the scope, cost, and schedule for the Fiscal Year 2006 activities required to support River Corridor cleanup objectives within the directed guidance.

  14. Webinar: Guidance for Filling Out a Detailed H2A Production Case Study

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, Guidance for Filling Out a Detailed H2A Production Case Study, originally presented on July 9, 2013.

  15. Hydrogen quantitative risk assessment workshop proceedings.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groth, Katrina M.; Harris, Aaron P.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA) Toolkit Introduction Workshop was held at Energetics on June 11-12. The workshop was co-hosted by Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and HySafe, the International Association for Hydrogen Safety. The objective of the workshop was twofold: (1) Present a hydrogen-specific methodology and toolkit (currently under development) for conducting QRA to support the development of codes and standards and safety assessments of hydrogen-fueled vehicles and fueling stations, and (2) Obtain feedback on the needs of early-stage users (hydrogen as well as potential leveraging for Compressed Natural Gas [CNG], and Liquefied Natural Gas [LNG]) and set priorities for %E2%80%9CVersion 1%E2%80%9D of the toolkit in the context of the commercial evolution of hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEV). The workshop consisted of an introduction and three technical sessions: Risk Informed Development and Approach; CNG/LNG Applications; and Introduction of a Hydrogen Specific QRA Toolkit.

  16. Statistics and Quantitative Risk Management for Banking and In-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Embrechts, Paul

    Statistics and Quantitative Risk Management for Banking and In- surance Paul Embrechts Risk practice Abstract As an emerging field of applied research, Quantitative Risk Management (QRM) poses a lot management. Topics treated include the use of risk measures in regulation, including their statistical

  17. Application of Evidential Networks in quantitative analysis of railway accidents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Application of Evidential Networks in quantitative analysis of railway accidents Felipe Aguirre1 during the qualitative or quantitative evaluation of risk. Several new techniques for HRA were invented. As a consequence, safety engineers try to take into account this factor in risk assessment. However, human

  18. Climate policy and competitiveness: Policy guidance and quantitative evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate policy and competitiveness: Policy guidance and quantitative evidence Jared C. Carbone NicholasRivers July 2014 Abstract When considering adoption of a domestic climate change policy survey the literature on the quantitative impacts of unilateral climate change policy derived from

  19. Brief Genetics Report Quantitative Trait Loci for Obesity-and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheverud, James M.

    Brief Genetics Report Quantitative Trait Loci for Obesity- and Diabetes-Related Traits led to increases in obesity and type 2 diabetes. The examination of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for both obesity- and diabetes-related traits and their responses to a high-fat diet can be effectively

  20. A general quantitative theory of forest structure and dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saleska, Scott

    A general quantitative theory of forest structure and dynamics Geoffrey B. Westa , Brian J for review October 1, 2008) We present the first part of a quantitative theory for the structure and dynamics to predict numerous structural and dynamical properties of idealized forests. allometry size spectra metaboic

  1. Quantitative estimation in Health Impact Assessment: Opportunities and challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhatia, Rajiv, E-mail: rajiv.bhatia@sfdph.or [San Francisco Department of Public Health, CA (United States); Seto, Edmund [University of California at Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Health Impact Assessment (HIA) considers multiple effects on health of policies, programs, plans and projects and thus requires the use of diverse analytic tools and sources of evidence. Quantitative estimation has desirable properties for the purpose of HIA but adequate tools for quantification exist currently for a limited number of health impacts and decision settings; furthermore, quantitative estimation generates thorny questions about the precision of estimates and the validity of methodological assumptions. In the United States, HIA has only recently emerged as an independent practice apart from integrated EIA, and this article aims to synthesize the experience with quantitative health effects estimation within that practice. We use examples identified through a scan of available identified instances of quantitative estimation in the U.S. practice experience to illustrate methods applied in different policy settings along with their strengths and limitations. We then discuss opportunity areas and practical considerations for the use of quantitative estimation in HIA.

  2. Detailed Characterization of Particulates Emitted by Pre-Commercial Single-Cylinder Gasoline Compression Ignition Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zelenyuk, Alla; Reitz, Paul; Stewart, Mark L.; Imre, D.; Loeper, Paul; Adams, Cory; Andrie, Michael; Rothamer, David; Foster, David E.; Narayanaswamy, Kushal; Najt, Paul M.; Solomon, Arun S.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gasoline Compression Ignition (GCI) engines have the potential to achieve high fuel efficiency and to significantly reduce both NOx and particulate matter (PM) emissions by operating under dilute partially-premixed conditions. This low temperature combustion strategy is dependent upon direct-injection of gasoline during the compression stroke and potentially near top dead center (TDC). The timing and duration of the in-cylinder injections can be tailored based on speed and load to create optimized conditions that result in a stable combustion. We present the results of advanced aerosol analysis methods that have been used for detailed real-time characterization of PM emitted from a single-cylinder GCI engine operated at different speed, load, timing, and number and duration of near-TDC fuel injections. PM characterization included 28 measurements of size and composition of individual particles sampled directly from the exhaust and after mass and/or mobility classification. We use these data to calculate particle effective density, fractal dimension, dynamic shape factors in free-molecular and transition flow regimes, average diameter of primary spherules, number of spherules, and void fraction of soot agglomerates.

  3. Quantitative modeling of the accuracy in registering preoperative patient-specific anatomic models into left atrial cardiac ablation procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rettmann, Maryam E., E-mail: rettmann.maryam@mayo.edu; Holmes, David R.; Camp, Jon J.; Cameron, Bruce M.; Robb, Richard A. [Biomedical Imaging Resource, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)] [Biomedical Imaging Resource, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Kwartowitz, David M. [Department of Bioengineering, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States)] [Department of Bioengineering, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Gunawan, Mia [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Washington D.C. 20057 (United States)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Washington D.C. 20057 (United States); Johnson, Susan B.; Packer, Douglas L. [Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)] [Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Dalegrave, Charles [Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology, Cardiology Division Hospital Sao Paulo, Federal University of Sao Paulo, 04024-002 Brazil (Brazil)] [Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology, Cardiology Division Hospital Sao Paulo, Federal University of Sao Paulo, 04024-002 Brazil (Brazil); Kolasa, Mark W. [David Grant Medical Center, Fairfield, California 94535 (United States)] [David Grant Medical Center, Fairfield, California 94535 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: In cardiac ablation therapy, accurate anatomic guidance is necessary to create effective tissue lesions for elimination of left atrial fibrillation. While fluoroscopy, ultrasound, and electroanatomic maps are important guidance tools, they lack information regarding detailed patient anatomy which can be obtained from high resolution imaging techniques. For this reason, there has been significant effort in incorporating detailed, patient-specific models generated from preoperative imaging datasets into the procedure. Both clinical and animal studies have investigated registration and targeting accuracy when using preoperative models; however, the effect of various error sources on registration accuracy has not been quantitatively evaluated. Methods: Data from phantom, canine, and patient studies are used to model and evaluate registration accuracy. In the phantom studies, data are collected using a magnetically tracked catheter on a static phantom model. Monte Carlo simulation studies were run to evaluate both baseline errors as well as the effect of different sources of error that would be present in a dynamicin vivo setting. Error is simulated by varying the variance parameters on the landmark fiducial, physical target, and surface point locations in the phantom simulation studies. In vivo validation studies were undertaken in six canines in which metal clips were placed in the left atrium to serve as ground truth points. A small clinical evaluation was completed in three patients. Landmark-based and combined landmark and surface-based registration algorithms were evaluated in all studies. In the phantom and canine studies, both target registration error and point-to-surface error are used to assess accuracy. In the patient studies, no ground truth is available and registration accuracy is quantified using point-to-surface error only. Results: The phantom simulation studies demonstrated that combined landmark and surface-based registration improved landmark-only registration provided the noise in the surface points is not excessively high. Increased variability on the landmark fiducials resulted in increased registration errors; however, refinement of the initial landmark registration by the surface-based algorithm can compensate for small initial misalignments. The surface-based registration algorithm is quite robust to noise on the surface points and continues to improve landmark registration even at high levels of noise on the surface points. Both the canine and patient studies also demonstrate that combined landmark and surface registration has lower errors than landmark registration alone. Conclusions: In this work, we describe a model for evaluating the impact of noise variability on the input parameters of a registration algorithm in the context of cardiac ablation therapy. The model can be used to predict both registration error as well as assess which inputs have the largest effect on registration accuracy.

  4. A Detailed Chemical Kinetic Analysis of Low Temperature Non-Sooting Diesel Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aceves, S M; Flowers, D L

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a model of the diesel fuel injection process for application to analysis of low temperature non-sooting combustion. The model uses a simplified mixing correlation and detailed chemical kinetics, and analyzes a parcel of fuel as it moves along the fuel jet, from injection into evaporation and ignition. The model predicts chemical composition and soot precursors, and is applied at conditions that result in low temperature non-sooting combustion. Production of soot precursors is the first step toward production of soot, and modeling precursor production is expected to give insight into the overall evolution of soot inside the engine. The results of the analysis show that the model has been successful in describing many of the observed characteristics of low temperature combustion. The model predicts results that are qualitatively similar to those obtained for soot formation experiments at conditions in which the EGR rate is increased from zero to very high values as the fueling rate is kept constant. The model also describes the two paths to achieve non-sooting combustion. The first is smokeless rich combustion and the second is modulated kinetics (MK). The importance of the temperature after ignition and the equivalence ratio at the time of ignition is demonstrated, as these parameters can be used to collapse onto a single line all the results for soot precursors for multiple fueling rates. A parametric analysis indicates that precursor formation increases considerably as the gas temperature in the combustion chamber and the characteristic mixing time are increased. The model provides a chemical kinetic description of low temperature diesel combustion that improves the understanding of this clean and efficient regime of operation.

  5. Waste Tank Vapor Program: Vapor space characterization of Waste Tank 241-T-107. Results from samples collected on January 18, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pool, K.H.; Lucke, R.B.; McVeety, B.D. [and others

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-T-107 (referred to as Tank T-107). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), and water (H{sub 2}O). Sampling for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) was not requested. In addition, quantitative results were obtained for the 39 TO-14 compounds plus an additional 14 analytes. Of these, I was observed above the 5-ppbv reporting cutoff. Six organic tentatively identified compounds (TICs) were observed above the reporting cutoff of (ca.) 10 ppbv and are reported with concentrations that are semiquantitative estimates based on internal-standard response factors. The estimated concentration of all 7 organic analytes observed in the tank headspace are listed in Table I and account for approximately 100% of the total organic components in Tank T-107. Two permanent gases, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), were also detected in the tank-headspace samples.

  6. Asbestos exposure--quantitative assessment of risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, J.M.; Weill, H.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for deriving quantitative estimates of asbestos-associated health risks are reviewed and their numerous assumptions and uncertainties described. These methods involve extrapolation of risks observed at past relatively high asbestos concentration levels down to usually much lower concentration levels of interest today--in some cases, orders of magnitude lower. These models are used to calculate estimates of the potential risk to workers manufacturing asbestos products and to students enrolled in schools containing asbestos products. The potential risk to workers exposed for 40 yr to 0.5 fibers per milliliter (f/ml) of mixed asbestos fiber type (a permissible workplace exposure limit under consideration by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) ) are estimated as 82 lifetime excess cancers per 10,000 exposed. The risk to students exposed to an average asbestos concentration of 0.001 f/ml of mixed asbestos fiber types for an average enrollment period of 6 school years is estimated as 5 lifetime excess cancers per one million exposed. If the school exposure is to chrysotile asbestos only, then the estimated risk is 1.5 lifetime excess cancers per million. Risks from other causes are presented for comparison; e.g., annual rates (per million) of 10 deaths from high school football, 14 from bicycling (10-14 yr of age), 5 to 20 for whooping cough vaccination. Decisions concerning asbestos products require participation of all parties involved and should only be made after a scientifically defensible estimate of the associated risk has been obtained. In many cases to date, such decisions have been made without adequate consideration of the level of risk or the cost-effectiveness of attempts to lower the potential risk. 73 references.

  7. Method of quantitating dsDNA

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stark, Peter C. (Los Alamos, NM); Kuske, Cheryl R. (Los Alamos, NM); Mullen, Kenneth I. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for quantitating dsDNA in an aqueous sample solution containing an unknown amount of dsDNA. A first aqueous test solution containing a known amount of a fluorescent dye-dsDNA complex and at least one fluorescence-attenutating contaminant is prepared. The fluorescence intensity of the test solution is measured. The first test solution is diluted by a known amount to provide a second test solution having a known concentration of dsDNA. The fluorescence intensity of the second test solution is measured. Additional diluted test solutions are similarly prepared until a sufficiently dilute test solution having a known amount of dsDNA is prepared that has a fluorescence intensity that is not attenuated upon further dilution. The value of the maximum absorbance of this solution between 200-900 nanometers (nm), referred to herein as the threshold absorbance, is measured. A sample solution having an unknown amount of dsDNA and an absorbance identical to that of the sufficiently dilute test solution at the same chosen wavelength is prepared. Dye is then added to the sample solution to form the fluorescent dye-dsDNA-complex, after which the fluorescence intensity of the sample solution is measured and the quantity of dsDNA in the sample solution is determined. Once the threshold absorbance of a sample solution obtained from a particular environment has been determined, any similarly prepared sample solution taken from a similar environment and having the same value for the threshold absorbance can be quantified for dsDNA by adding a large excess of dye to the sample solution and measuring its fluorescence intensity.

  8. Topological Reconstruction of Complex 3D Buildings and Automatic Extraction of Levels of Detail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    and outdoor topology of a detailed 3D building model from its geometry and to extract different levelsTopological Reconstruction of Complex 3D Buildings and Automatic Extraction of Levels of Detail A is needed for most of the applications using 3D building models after the architects design it. While

  9. EconoGrid: A detailed Simulation Model of a Standards-based Grid Compute Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EconoGrid: A detailed Simulation Model of a Standards-based Grid Compute Economy EconoGrid is a detailed simulation model, implemented in SLX1 , of a grid compute economy that implements selected of users. In a grid compute economy, computing resources are sold to users in a market where price

  10. Cyclic Testing of Concrete-Filled Circular Steel Bridge Piers having Encased Fixed-Based Detail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruneau, Michel

    Cyclic Testing of Concrete-Filled Circular Steel Bridge Piers having Encased Fixed-Based Detail elements during earthquakes, this paper reports on cyclic inelastic tests executed to determine the maximum strength and ductility of four concrete-filled circular steel piers joined to a foundation detail proposed

  11. Dendrodendritic Inhibition and Simulated Odor Responses in a Detailed Olfactory Bulb Network Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jianfeng

    Dendrodendritic Inhibition and Simulated Odor Responses in a Detailed Olfactory Bulb Network Model responses in a detailed olfac- tory bulb network model. J Neurophysiol 90: 1921­1935, 2003. First published May 7, 2003; 10.1152/jn.00623.2002. In the olfactory bulb, both the spatial distribution

  12. Applications of Geophysical and Geological Techniques to Identify Areas for Detailed Exploration in Black Mesa Basin, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George, S.; Reeves, T.K.; Sharma, Bijon; Szpakiewicz, M.

    1999-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent report submitted to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (NIPER/BDM-0226) discussed in considerable detail, the geology, structure, tectonics, and history of oil production activities in the Black Mesa basin in Arizona. As part of the final phase of wrapping up research in the Black Mesa basin, the results of a few additional geophysical studies conducted on structure, stratigraphy, petrophysical analysis, and oil and gas occurrences in the basin are presented here. A second objective of this study is to determine the effectiveness of relatively inexpensive, noninvasive techniques like gravity or magnetic in obtaining information on structure and tectonics in sufficient detail for hydrocarbon exploration, particularly by using the higher resolution satellite data now becoming available to the industry.

  13. Quantitative Tools for Dissection of Hydrogen-Producing Metabolic Networks-Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Dismukes, G.Charles.; Rabitz, Herschel A.; Amador-Noguez, Daniel

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    During this project we have pioneered the development of integrated experimental-computational technologies for the quantitative dissection of metabolism in hydrogen and biofuel producing microorganisms (i.e. C. acetobutylicum and various cyanobacteria species). The application of these new methodologies resulted in many significant advances in the understanding of the metabolic networks and metabolism of these organisms, and has provided new strategies to enhance their hydrogen or biofuel producing capabilities. As an example, using mass spectrometry, isotope tracers, and quantitative flux-modeling we mapped the metabolic network structure in C. acetobutylicum. This resulted in a comprehensive and quantitative understanding of central carbon metabolism that could not have been obtained using genomic data alone. We discovered that biofuel production in this bacterium, which only occurs during stationary phase, requires a global remodeling of central metabolism (involving large changes in metabolite concentrations and fluxes) that has the effect of redirecting resources (carbon and reducing power) from biomass production into solvent production. This new holistic, quantitative understanding of metabolism is now being used as the basis for metabolic engineering strategies to improve solvent production in this bacterium. In another example, making use of newly developed technologies for monitoring hydrogen and NAD(P)H levels in vivo, we dissected the metabolic pathways for photobiological hydrogen production by cyanobacteria Cyanothece sp. This investigation led to the identification of multiple targets for improving hydrogen production. Importantly, the quantitative tools and approaches that we have developed are broadly applicable and we are now using them to investigate other important biofuel producers, such as cellulolytic bacteria.

  14. Modelling cycle to cycle variations in an SI engine with detailed chemical kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Etheridge, Jonathan; Mosbach, Sebastian; Kraft, Markus [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Wu, Hao; Collings, Nick [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents experimental results and a new computational model that investigate cycle to cycle variations (CCV) in a spark ignition (SI) engine. An established stochastic reactor model (SRM) previously used to examine homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion has been extended by spark initiation, flame propagation and flame termination sub-models in order to simulate combustion in SI engines. The model contains a detailed chemical mechanism but relatively short computation times are achieved. The flame front is assumed to be spherical and centred at the spark location, and a pent roof and piston bowl geometry are accounted for. The model is validated by simulating the pressure profile and emissions from an iso-octane fuelled single cylinder research engine that showed low CCV. The effects of key parameters are investigated. Experimental results that show cycle to cycle fluctuations in a four-cylinder naturally aspirated gasoline fuelled SI engine are presented. The model is then coupled with GT-Power, a one-dimensional engine simulation tool, which is used to simulate the breathing events during a multi-cycle simulation. This allows an investigation of the cyclic fluctuations in peak pressure. The source and magnitude of nitric oxide (NO) emissions produced by different cycles are then investigated. It was found that faster burning cycles result in increased NO emissions compared with cycles that have a slower rate of combustion and that more is produced in the early stages of combustion compared with later in the cycle. The majority of NO was produced via the thermal mechanism just after combustion begins. (author)

  15. Quantitative determinations of tryptophane in cottonseed meats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Bryant Richard

    1937-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    their determinations on the blue color developed by tryptophane and the phosphomolybdio-phosphotungstic acid phenol reagent of Folin and . )enis . Their results are low in comparison with the results of other workers. Looney contends that it was the unfamiliarity... method. Another frequently used colorimetric method is based on the reaction of tryptophane and p-dimethylaminobensaldehyde in 20 per cent hydrochloric acid solution, in which a blue color results. This was first o'bserved by Rhode19, but Hersfeld20...

  16. Quantitative molecular graphics what is it? -use of molecular graphics at quantitative level employing high-quality pictures of molecules in various views (orthographic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, Márcia M. C.

    Quantitative molecular graphics ­ what is it? -use of molecular graphics at quantitative level by using quantitative molecular graphics (34) and a priori QSAR (54- 60).2 A STUDY OF HIV-1 PROTEASE-INHIBITOR INTERMOLECULAR INTERACTIONS BY USING QUANTITATIVE MOLECULAR GRAPHICS AND A PRIORI QSAR Rudolf Kiralj and Márcia M

  17. Detailed design of a resonantly enhanced axion-photon regeneration experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Guido; Sikivie, Pierre; Tanner, D. B.; Bibber, Karl van [Department of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California 93943 (United States)

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A resonantly enhanced photon-regeneration experiment to search for the axion or axionlike particles is described. This experiment is a shining light through walls study, where photons traveling through a strong magnetic field are (in part) converted to axions; the axions can pass through an opaque wall and convert (in part) back to photons in a second region of strong magnetic field. The photon regeneration is enhanced by employing matched Fabry-Perot optical cavities, with one cavity within the axion generation magnet and the second within the photon-regeneration magnet. Compared to simple single-pass photon regeneration, this technique would result in a gain of (F/{pi}){sup 2}, where F is the finesse of each cavity. This gain could feasibly be as high as 10{sup 10}, corresponding to an improvement in the sensitivity to the axion-photon coupling, g{sub a{gamma}}{sub {gamma}}, of order (F/{pi}){sup 1/2}{approx}300. This improvement would enable, for the first time, a purely laboratory experiment to probe axion-photon couplings at a level competitive with, or superior to, limits from stellar evolution or solar axion searches. This report gives a detailed discussion of the scheme for actively controlling the two Fabry-Perot cavities and the laser frequencies, and describes the heterodyne signal detection system, with limits ultimately imposed by shot noise.

  18. Low-frequency quantitative ultrasound imaging of cell death in vivo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Falou, Omar; Czarnota, Gregory J. [Imaging Research – Physical Science, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada) [Imaging Research – Physical Science, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Papanicolau, Naum; Tadayyon, Hadi [Imaging Research – Physical Science, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Medical Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)] [Imaging Research – Physical Science, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Medical Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Lee, Justin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Zubovits, Judit [Department of Pathology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)] [Department of Pathology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Sadeghian, Alireza [Department of Computer Science, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada)] [Department of Computer Science, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada); Karshafian, Raffi [Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada); Al-Mahrouki, Azza; Giles, Anoja [Imaging Research – Physical Science, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)] [Imaging Research – Physical Science, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Kolios, Michael C. [Department of Medical Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada)] [Department of Medical Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Currently, no clinical imaging modality is used routinely to assess tumor response to cancer therapies within hours to days of the delivery of treatment. Here, the authors demonstrate the efficacy of ultrasound at a clinically relevant frequency to quantitatively detect changes in tumors in response to cancer therapies using preclinical mouse models.Methods: Conventional low-frequency and corresponding high-frequency ultrasound (ranging from 4 to 28 MHz) were used along with quantitative spectroscopic and signal envelope statistical analyses on data obtained from xenograft tumors treated with chemotherapy, x-ray radiation, as well as a novel vascular targeting microbubble therapy.Results: Ultrasound-based spectroscopic biomarkers indicated significant changes in cell-death associated parameters in responsive tumors. Specifically changes in the midband fit, spectral slope, and 0-MHz intercept biomarkers were investigated for different types of treatment and demonstrated cell-death related changes. The midband fit and 0-MHz intercept biomarker derived from low-frequency data demonstrated increases ranging approximately from 0 to 6 dBr and 0 to 8 dBr, respectively, depending on treatments administrated. These data paralleled results observed for high-frequency ultrasound data. Statistical analysis of ultrasound signal envelope was performed as an alternative method to obtain histogram-based biomarkers and provided confirmatory results. Histological analysis of tumor specimens indicated up to 61% cell death present in the tumors depending on treatments administered, consistent with quantitative ultrasound findings indicating cell death. Ultrasound-based spectroscopic biomarkers demonstrated a good correlation with histological morphological findings indicative of cell death (r{sup 2}= 0.71, 0.82; p < 0.001).Conclusions: In summary, the results provide preclinical evidence, for the first time, that quantitative ultrasound used at a clinically relevant frequency, in addition to high-frequency ultrasound, can detect tissue changes associated with cell death in vivo in response to cancer treatments.

  19. A quantitative analysis of baroclinic instability in extratropical cyclogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gold, David Arthur

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the participating potential vorticity (PV) anomalies, thereby allowing a complete quantitative estimation of the contribution made by cyclogenetic mechanisms such as Bi to cyclone growth. In all three episodes examined, it is found that baroclinic amplification...

  20. Quantitative tumor heterogeneity assessment on a nuclear population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quantitative tumor heterogeneity assessment on a nuclear population basis Anne-Sofie Wessel score in this area was performed. 110 of the 226 TMA cores were scored by a pathologist. The automatic

  1. Development of quantitative tools for assessment of cerebellar dysfunction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garg, Aditi

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two tools for the quantitative assessment of cerebellar dysfunction are developed and explored. One is based on a battery of laptop tests desgined for clinical use. Extensive analysis of one of the tests using a speed/accuracy ...

  2. Quantitative Analysis of Human Salivary Gland-Derived Intact...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis of Human Salivary Gland-Derived Intact Proteome Using Top-Down Mass Spectrometry. Quantitative Analysis of Human Salivary Gland-Derived Intact Proteome Using Top-Down Mass...

  3. Midwest Quantitative Biology Conference Mission Point Resort, Mackinac Island, Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Midwest Quantitative Biology Conference Mission Point Resort, Mackinac Island, Michigan September Exchange Method for the Free Energy of Conformational Fluctuations Michigan State University 3:05-3:30 Role

  4. Qualitative Reasoning Feeding Back into Quantitative Model-Based Tracking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebel, Bernhard

    Qualitative Reasoning Feeding Back into Quantitative Model-Based Tracking Christian K¨ohler, 1- bilize basic signal processing and pattern recognition processes like the reliable extraction of some

  5. Qualitative Reasoning Feeding Back into Quantitative ModelBased Tracking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebel, Bernhard

    Qualitative Reasoning Feeding Back into Quantitative Model­Based Tracking Christian KË? ohler, 1­ bilize basic signal processing and pattern recognition processes like the reliable extraction of some

  6. High resolution linkage and association study of quantitative trait loci

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Jeesun

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) of complex human disease. For many complex diseases, quantitative phenotype values contain more information than dichotomous traits do. Much research has been done on conducting high resolution mapping using information of linkage and linkage disequilibrium...

  7. Quantitative, directional measurement of electric field heterogeneity in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boxer, Steven G.

    Quantitative, directional measurement of electric field heterogeneity in the active site SUMMARY Extensive structural studies of enzymes have revealed that biological catalysis occurs within substantial electrostatic field heterogeneity, widely differing sensitivities of discrete probes to a set

  8. Bridging boolean and quantitative synthesis using smoothed proof search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Swarat

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new technique for parameter synthesis under boolean and quantitative objectives. The input to the technique is a "sketch" --- a program with missing numerical parameters --- and a probabilistic assumption about ...

  9. High resolution linkage and association study of quantitative trait loci 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Jeesun

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and microsatellite markers are available, high resolution mapping employing multiple markers or multiple allele markers is an important step to identify quantitative ...

  10. Quantitative Financial Analysis of Alternative Energy Efficiency Shareholder Incentive Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles; Chait, Michele; Edgar, George; Schlegel, Jeff; Shirley, Wayne

    2008-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Rising energy prices and climate change are central issues in the debate about our nation's energy policy. Many are demanding increased energy efficiency as a way to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and lower the total cost of electricity and energy services for consumers and businesses. Yet, as the National Action Plan on Energy Efficiency (NAPEE) pointed out, many utilities continue to shy away from seriously expanding their energy efficiency program offerings because they claim there is insufficient profit-motivation, or even a financial disincentive, when compared to supply-side investments. With the recent introduction of Duke Energy's Save-a-Watt incentive mechanism and ongoing discussions about decoupling, regulators and policymakers are now faced with an expanded and diverse landscape of financial incentive mechanisms, Determining the 'right' way forward to promote deep and sustainable demand side resource programs is challenging. Due to the renaissance that energy efficiency is currently experiencing, many want to better understand the tradeoffs in stakeholder benefits between these alternative incentive structures before aggressively embarking on a path for which course corrections can be time-consuming and costly. Using a prototypical Southwest utility and a publicly available financial model, we show how various stakeholders (e.g. shareholders, ratepayers, etc.) are affected by these different types of shareholder incentive mechanisms under varying assumptions about program portfolios. This quantitative analysis compares the financial consequences associated with a wide range of alternative incentive structures. The results will help regulators and policymakers better understand the financial implications of DSR program incentive regulation.

  11. Comprehensive Quantitative Analysis of Ovarian and Breast Cancer Tumor Peptidomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Zhe; Wu, Chaochao; Xie, Fang; Slysz, Gordon W.; Tolic, Nikola; Monroe, Matthew E.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Payne, Samuel H.; Fujimoto, Grant M.; Moore, Ronald J.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Levine, Douglas; Townsend, Reid; Davies, Sherri; Li, Shunqiang; Ellis, Matthew; Boja, Emily; Rodriguez, Henry; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aberrant degradation of proteins is associated with many pathological states, including cancers. Mass spectrometric analysis of tumor peptidomes, the intracellular and intercellular products of protein degradation, has the potential to provide biological insights on proteolytic processing in cancer. However, attempts to use the information on these smaller protein degradation products from tumors for biomarker discovery and cancer biology studies have been fairly limited to date, largely due to the lack of effective approaches for robust peptidomics identification and quantification, and the prevalence of confounding factors and biases associated with sample handling and processing. Herein, we have developed an effective and robust analytical platform for comprehensive analyses of tissue peptidomes, and which is suitable for high throughput quantitative studies. The reproducibility and coverage of the platform, as well as the suitability of clinical ovarian tumor and patient-derived breast tumor xenograft samples with post-excision delay of up to 60 min before freezing for peptidomics analysis, have been demonstrated. Moreover, our data also show that the peptidomics profiles can effectively separate breast cancer subtypes, reflecting tumor-associated protease activities. Peptidomics complements results obtainable from conventional bottom-up proteomics, and provides insights not readily obtainable from such approaches.

  12. New Measurements and Quantitative Analysis of Electron Backscattering in the Energy Range of Neutron Beta-Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, J W; Filippone, B W; Hoedl, S A; Ito, T M; Plaster, B; Young, A R; Yuan, J

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the first detailed measurements of electron backscattering from plastic scintillator targets, extending our previous work on beryllium and silicon targets. The scintillator experiment posed several additional experimental challenges associated with charging of the scintillator target, and those challenges are addressed in detail. In addition, we quantitatively compare the energy and angular distributions of this data, and our previous data, with electron transport simulations based on the Geant4 and Penelope Monte Carlo simulation codes. The Penelope simulation is found globally to give a superior description of the data. Such information is crucial for a broad array of weak-interaction physics experiments, where electron backscattering can give rise to the dominant detector-related systematic uncertainty.

  13. New Measurements and Quantitative Analysis of Electron Backscattering in the Energy Range of Neutron Beta-Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. W. Martin; J. Yuan; M. J. Betancourt; B. W. Filippone; S. A. Hoedl; T. M. Ito; B. Plaster; A. R. Young

    2005-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the first detailed measurements of electron backscattering from plastic scintillator targets, extending our previous work on beryllium and silicon targets. The scintillator experiment posed several additional experimental challenges associated with charging of the scintillator target, and those challenges are addressed in detail. In addition, we quantitatively compare the energy and angular distributions of this data, and our previous data, with electron transport simulations based on the Geant4 and Penelope Monte Carlo simulation codes. The Penelope simulation is found globally to give a superior description of the data. Such information is crucial for a broad array of weak-interaction physics experiments, where electron backscattering can give rise to the dominant detector-related systematic uncertainty.

  14. Quantitative Modeling of Polymer Scratch Behavior 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hossain, Mohammad Motaher

    2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    dependent mechanical behavior and pressure dependent frictional behavior in the FEM model, good agreement has been found between FEM simulation and experimental observations. The results suggest that, by including proper constitutive relationship...

  15. Quantitative NDA Measurements of Advanced Reprocessing Product Materials Containing U, NP, PU, and AM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard, Braden

    2013-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    of this first principle technique have been identified: (1) quantitative measurement of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, and americium materials; (2) quantitative measurement of mixed oxide (MOX) materials; (3) quantitative measurement of uranium materials; and (4...

  16. Challenges in the Modeling and Quantitative Analysis of Safety-Critical Automotive Systems!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leue, Stefan

    ! Probabilistic FMEA! Probabilistic Analysis of System Architectures! ! Conclusion! 3! #12;ISO 26262: Road! ,,identify Failures"! - Qualitative FMEA! ! - Qualitative Fault Tree Analysis! ! - Event Tree Analysis! Quantitative Methods! ,,predict frequency of failures"! - Quantitative FMEA! ! - Quantitative Fault Tree

  17. School of Electrical & Computer Engineering -Undergraduate Post Graduate Activities Detail & History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipson, Michal

    & Computer Engineering - Undergraduate (continued) 2010 Employment Employer Title City State General Motors2010 School of Electrical & Computer Engineering - Undergraduate Post Graduate Activities Detail Engineering undergraduate students from the Class of 2010. Historical data is provided to allow for comparison

  18. A Detailed Multi-Zone Thermodynamic Simulation For Direct-Injection Diesel Engine Combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Xingyu 1985-

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed multi-zone thermodynamic simulation has been developed for the direct-injection (DI) diesel engine combustion process. For the purpose of predicting heterogeneous type combustion systems, the model explores the formation of pre...

  19. Embedding methods for massing and detail design in computer generated design of skyscrapers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Shouheng, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis proposes a new digital system to construct the massing and details of skyscrapers. It extracts underlying rules and design conventions from significant projects in contemporary skyscraper design practice. These ...

  20. A brief overview of some historical details of the city of Oak...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    very detailed document was published in 1961 by the Atomic Energy Commission as the city had just completed becoming incorporated in the state of Tennessee. Changes began to be...

  1. Detailed Modeling of HCCI and PCCI combustion and Multi-cylinder...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Modeling of HCCI and PCCI combustion and Multi-cylinder HCCI Engine Control Detailed Modeling of HCCI and PCCI combustion and Multi-cylinder HCCI Engine Control 2003 DEER...

  2. http://www.regulations.gov/#!documentDetail;D=EERE-2014-BT-STD...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    http:www.regulations.govdocumentDetail;DEERE-2014-BT-STD-0031-0002 EERE-2014-BT-STD-0031-0002 spreadsheet Sheet "Summary Switching" - Before ME1 19421032v.1 http:...

  3. A Detailed Multi-Zone Thermodynamic Simulation For Direct-Injection Diesel Engine Combustion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Xingyu 1985-

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed multi-zone thermodynamic simulation has been developed for the direct-injection (DI) diesel engine combustion process. For the purpose of predicting heterogeneous type combustion systems, the model explores the formation of pre...

  4. Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy and Environmental Engineering Civil Systems Program mchester@cal.berkeley.edu Project Director: Arpad Horvath, Associate Professor University of California, Berkeley Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

  5. Program Details Investing in your education with the Master of Management -International Accounting and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Business Strategy Consolidated Financial Statements Accounting Systems Control & Auditing CorporateProgram Details Investing in your education with the Master of Management - International Accounting and Finance, will provide you with thorough business knowledge that will serve as a foundation

  6. Clinical Instructor Responsibilities The APTA has detailed voluntary guidelines for clinical instructors. The guidelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contractor, Anis

    Clinical Instructor Responsibilities The APTA has detailed voluntary guidelines for clinical instructors. The guidelines are divided into six key areas: · Clinical competence and legal and ethical behavior that meets or exceeds

  7. Fracture mechanics analysis on the resistance of welded details under variable amplitude long life loading 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Minjian

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fracture mechanics approach has been used to analyze the behavior of fatigue resistance of welded details existing in highway steel bridges under variable amplitude long life loading which means most of the stress ranges will be below constant...

  8. Detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for the oxidation of biodiesel fuels blend surrogate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for the oxidation of biodiesel fuels blend surrogate of biodiesel fuels in diesel and homogeneous charge compression ignition engines. Keywords: Methyl decanoate; Methyl decenoate; Surrogate; Oxidation; Biodiesel fuels; Kinetic modeling; Engine; Low

  9. Heat Transfer Enhancement for Finned-Tube Heat Exchangers with Vortex Generators: Experimental and Numerical Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Brien, James Edward; Sohal, Manohar Singh; Huff, George Albert

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined experimental and numerical investigation is under way to investigate heat transfer enhancement techniques that may be applicable to large-scale air-cooled condensers such as those used in geothermal power applications. The research is focused on whether air-side heat transfer can be improved through the use of finsurface vortex generators (winglets,) while maintaining low heat exchanger pressure drop. A transient heat transfer visualization and measurement technique has been employed in order to obtain detailed distributions of local heat transfer coefficients on model fin surfaces. Pressure drop measurements have also been acquired in a separate multiple-tube row apparatus. In addition, numerical modeling techniques have been developed to allow prediction of local and average heat transfer for these low-Reynolds-number flows with and without winglets. Representative experimental and numerical results presented in this paper reveal quantitative details of local fin-surface heat transfer in the vicinity of a circular tube with a single delta winglet pair downstream of the cylinder. The winglets were triangular (delta) with a 1:2 height/length aspect ratio and a height equal to 90% of the channel height. Overall mean fin-surface Nusselt-number results indicate a significant level of heat transfer enhancement (average enhancement ratio 35%) associated with the deployment of the winglets with oval tubes. Pressure drop measurements have also been obtained for a variety of tube and winglet configurations using a single-channel flow apparatus that includes four tube rows in a staggered array. Comparisons of heat transfer and pressure drop results for the elliptical tube versus a circular tube with and without winglets are provided. Heat transfer and pressure-drop results have been obtained for flow Reynolds numbers based on channel height and mean flow velocity ranging from 700 to 6500.

  10. Quantitative supersonic flow visualization by hydraulic analogy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rani, Sarma Laxminarasimha

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydraulic analogy, which forms the basis for the phics. current investigation, can be used to study supersonic gas flows with great ease by means of a water table. As a result of the analogy, water heights in free surface water flow correspond...

  11. SciTech Connect: Results and code predictions for ABCOVE aerosol...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Results and code predictions for ABCOVE aerosol code validation - Test AB5 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Results and code predictions for ABCOVE aerosol code...

  12. Quantitative Adaptation Analytics for Assessing Dynamic Systems of Systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauthier, John H.; Miner, Nadine E.; Wilson, Michael L.; Le, Hai D.; Kao, Gio K; Melander, Darryl J.; Longsine, Dennis Earl [Sandia National Laboratories, Unknown, Unknown; Vander Meer, Robert Charles,

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our society is increasingly reliant on systems and interoperating collections of systems, known as systems of systems (SoS). These SoS are often subject to changing missions (e.g., nation- building, arms-control treaties), threats (e.g., asymmetric warfare, terrorism), natural environments (e.g., climate, weather, natural disasters) and budgets. How well can SoS adapt to these types of dynamic conditions? This report details the results of a three year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project aimed at developing metrics and methodologies for quantifying the adaptability of systems and SoS. Work products include: derivation of a set of adaptability metrics, a method for combining the metrics into a system of systems adaptability index (SoSAI) used to compare adaptability of SoS designs, development of a prototype dynamic SoS (proto-dSoS) simulation environment which provides the ability to investigate the validity of the adaptability metric set, and two test cases that evaluate the usefulness of a subset of the adaptability metrics and SoSAI for distinguishing good from poor adaptability in a SoS. Intellectual property results include three patents pending: A Method For Quantifying Relative System Adaptability, Method for Evaluating System Performance, and A Method for Determining Systems Re-Tasking.

  13. Apparatus and method for quantitatively evaluating total fissile and total fertile nuclide content in samples. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caldwell, J.T.; Kunz, W.E.; Cates, M.R.; Franks, L.A.

    1982-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Simultaneous photon and neutron interrogation of samples for the quantitative determination of total fissile nuclide and total fertile nuclide material present is made possible by the use of an electron accelerator. Prompt and delayed neutrons produced from resulting induced fission are counted using a single detection system and allow the resolution of the contributions from each interrogating flux leading in turn to the quantitative determination sought. Detection limits for /sup 239/Pu are estimated to be about 3 mg using prompt fission neutrons and about 6 mg using delayed neutrons.

  14. A microfluidic platform for high-throughput multiplexed protein quantitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volpetti, Francesca; Maerkl, Sebastian

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a high-throughput microfluidic platform capable of quantitating up to 384 biomarkers in 4 distinct samples by immunoassay. The microfluidic device contains 384 unit cells, which can be individually programmed with pairs of capture and detection antibody. Samples are quantitated in each unit cell by four independent MITOMI detection areas, allowing four samples to be analyzed in parallel for a total of 1,536 assays per device. We show that the device can be pre-assembled and stored for weeks at elevated temperature and we performed proof-of-concept experiments simultaneously quantitating IL-6, IL-1\\b{eta}, TNF-{\\alpha}, PSA, and GFP. Finally, we show that the platform can be used to identify functional antibody combinations by screening 64 antibody combinations requiring up to 384 unique assays per device.

  15. A Quantitative Analysis of Pricing Behavior In California's Wholesale Electricity Market During Summer 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul; Kahn, Edward

    2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A Quantitative Analysis of Pricing Behavior In California's Wholesale Electricity Market During Summer 2000...

  16. Quantitative adhesion data for electroless nickel deposited on various substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dini, J.W.; Johnson, H.R.

    1982-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper includes a review of the literature on quantitative adhesion of electroless nickel coatings and then presents recent ring shear quantitative data for the electroless nickel deposited on a variety of substrates. Procedures for obtaining good adhesion between electroless nickel coatings and a variety of aluminum alloys (1100, 2024, 5083, 6061 and 7075), beryllium-copper, 4340 steel, HP 9-4-20 steel, and U-0.75 Ti are outlined. In addition, data are presented on a procedure for activating electroless nickel for subsequent coating with electrodeposited nickel. 6 tables.

  17. Quantitative adhesion data for electroless nickel deposited on various substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dini, J.W.; Johnson, H.R.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of the literature on quantitative adhesion of electroless nickel coatings is given and recent ring shear quantitative data for the electroless nickel deposited on a variety of substrates are presented. Procedures for obtaining good adhesion between electroless nickel coatings and a variety of aluminum alloys (1100, 2024, 5083, 6061 and 7075), beryllium-copper, 4340 steel and HP 9-4-20 steel are outlined. In addition, data are presented on a procedure for activating electroless nickel for subsequent coating with electrodeposited nickel.

  18. ASPEN PLUS modeling of the SRC-I Demonstration Plant. Task 2: SRC unit detailed model report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalb, C.E.; Guro, D.E.; Bixler, A.D.; Vakil, T.D.

    1984-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed model of the SRC process areas of the SRC-I Demonstration Plant was developed using the ASPEN PLUS process simulator. The model permits, for the first time, steady-state flowsheet convergence for the entire SRC process area in a single computer run. Simulation results are presented based on new thermodynamic correlations derived from experimental data on coal liquids. The correlations predict separations in certain key vessels which are rather different from those in the current SRC-I Baseline Design, which was based on conventional petroleum thermophysical properties. The differences are discussed in-light of their effects on equipment configuration and size. Distillation column parameters were adjusted to maintain the purity specifications of the major product streams. Split fractions based on the coal-liquids results are presented which can be used in the Task 1 SRC area summary model. Notes: Task 2, Appendices 2 is DOE/OR/21486--T8. 5 references, 32 tables.

  19. *Please note: Some details in syllabus are subject to change City University London and Utrecht University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    *Please note: Some details in syllabus are subject to change City University London and Utrecht on the course website) In-residence London/Utrecht: 8 July ­ 10 August 2012 Programme requires a total of seven and Utrecht, the Netherlands. This innovative programme provides an ideal opportunity for students to develop

  20. Combining Global and Local Virtual Lights for Detailed Glossy Illumination Tomas Davidovic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bala, Kavita

    approach Figure 1: Comparison of our approach with Virtual Spherical Lights (VSLs). Left: VSLs fail of these algorithms in design applications. Recently, virtual spherical lights [Hasan et al. 2009] were introducedCombining Global and Local Virtual Lights for Detailed Glossy Illumination Tom´as Davidovic

  1. 2008-01-0333 Detailed Effects of a Diesel Particulate Filter on the Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Mingshen

    2008-01-0333 Detailed Effects of a Diesel Particulate Filter on the Reduction of Chemical Species of Wisconsin-Madison Copyright © 2008 SAE International ABSTRACT Diesel particulate filters are designed to reduce the mass emissions of diesel particulate matter and have been proven to be effective

  2. POTENTIAL OF THORIUM MOLTEN SALT REACTORS : DETAILED CALCULATIONS AND CONCEPT EVOLUTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    POTENTIAL OF THORIUM MOLTEN SALT REACTORS : DETAILED CALCULATIONS AND CONCEPT EVOLUTIONS IN VIEW the concept of Thorium Molten Salt Reactor dedicated to future nuclear energy production. The fuel of such reactors being liquid, it can be easily reprocessed to overcome neutronic limits. In the late sixties

  3. On the spherically symmetrical combustion of methyl decanoate droplets and comparisons with detailed numerical modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    .53­0.57 mm and the combustion gas is normal atmospheric pressure air. A detailed numerical simulationOn the spherically symmetrical combustion of methyl decanoate droplets and comparisons Biodiesel Biofuel Microgravity Numerical Droplet combustion a b s t r a c t This study presents

  4. Detailed Analysis of the Microbial Population in Malaysian Spontaneous Cocoa Pulp Fermentations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are the key players of this fermentationDetailed Analysis of the Microbial Population in Malaysian Spontaneous Cocoa Pulp Fermentations), Leuven, Belgium, 3 Barry Callebaut AG, Zurich, Switzerland Abstract The fermentation of cocoa pulp is one

  5. PREDICTION OF DELAM INATION IN WIND TURBINE BLADE STRUCTURAL DETAILS John F. Mandell, Douglas S. Cairns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    materials structures such as wind turbine blades. Design methodologies to prevent such failures have static and fatigue loading. INTRODUCTION Composite material structures such as wind turbine blades1 PREDICTION OF DELAM INATION IN WIND TURBINE BLADE STRUCTURAL DETAILS John F. Mandell, Douglas S

  6. Presented at 1999 EWEC Effects of Materials Parameters and Design Details on the Fatigue of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Composite Materials for Wind Turbine Blades John F. Mandell and Herbert J. Sutherland* Daniel D. SamborskyPresented at 1999 EWEC Effects of Materials Parameters and Design Details on the Fatigue Wind Energy Technology Dept. Dept. of Chemical Engineering Sandia National Laboratories Montana State

  7. Rental Rates & Details Karen Clark Events Coordinator Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    Rental Rates & Details Karen Clark · Events Coordinator · Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum Washington_clark@ wustl.edu kemperartmuseum.wustl.edu Updated 10.08.14 Consider the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum for your next event. Designed by the award-winning architect Fumihiko Maki, the Kemper Art Museum

  8. New study details glacier ice loss following ice shelf July 25, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    of several ice shelves in Antarctica led to acceleration of the glaciers that feed into them. CombiningNew study details glacier ice loss following ice shelf collapse July 25, 2011 Contact: Anthony Lane further demonstrates how important ice shelves are to Antarctic glaciers.' Shuman is lead author

  9. Detailed design report for an operational phase panel-closure system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Under contract to Westinghouse Electric Corporation (Westinghouse), Waste Isolation Division (WID), IT Corporation has prepared a detailed design of a panel-closure system for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Preparation of this detailed design of an operational-phase closure system is required to support a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit application and a non-migration variance petition. This report describes the detailed design for a panel-closure system specific to the WIPP site. The recommended panel-closure system will adequately isolate the waste-emplacement panels for at least 35 years. This report provides detailed design and material engineering specifications for the construction, emplacement, and interface-grouting associated with a panel-closure system at the WIPP repository, which would ensure that an effective panel-closure system is in place for at least 35 years. The panel-closure system provides assurance that the limit for the migration of volatile organic compounds (VOC) will be met at the point of compliance, the WIPP site boundary. This assurance is obtained through the inherent flexibility of the panel-closure system.

  10. Chemical Engineering Journal 113 (2005) 205214 A detailed model of a biofilter for ammonia removal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical Engineering Journal 113 (2005) 205­214 A detailed model of a biofilter for ammonia removal Manresa, Spain b Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Riverside, 92521 CA, USA c Department of Chemical Engineering, Universitat Aut`onoma de Barcelona, Edifici C, 08193

  11. Impaired Oral Reading in Surface Dyslexia: Detailed Comparison of a Patient and a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plaut, David C.

    Impaired Oral Reading in Surface Dyslexia: Detailed Comparison of a Patient and a Connectionist connectionist network. ¤ Both MP and the network exhibit the characteristic pattern of surface dyslexia system masters some but not all exception words, and that surface dyslexia arises when this system

  12. Elucidating secondary organic aerosol from diesel and gasoline vehicles through detailed characterization of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    Elucidating secondary organic aerosol from diesel and gasoline vehicles through detailed 19, 2012 (received for review July 22, 2012) Emissions from gasoline and diesel vehicles and diesel vehicles, and find diesel exhaust is seven times more efficient at forming aerosol than gasoline

  13. Chemistry Major, Geology Emphasis See www.chem.utah.edu for details or contact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Jack

    Chemistry Major, Geology Emphasis See www.chem.utah.edu for details or contact Professor Richard Laboratory for Scientists and Engineers I, II (1, 1) E. Chemistry, Geology Emphasis Core courses, plus: CHEM to Earth Systems (3) GEO 1115 Laboratory for Introduction to Earth Systems (1) GEO 3060 Structural Geology

  14. Texas A&M University A detailed account of how one university

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    20 percent · Decrease greenhouse gas emissions associated with energy consumption by 30 percentTexas A&M University A detailed account of how one university is improving its energy efficiency and campus environment through effective management and performance contracting usa.siemens.com/tamu #12;One

  15. Program Details Investing in your education with the Master of Management -Logistics and Supply Chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Program Details Investing in your education with the Master of Management - Logistics and Supply business world. The course based Master of Management - Logistics and Supply Chain Management will prepare you for a leadership position within the Logistics industry in Canada or abroad. You will study

  16. Faculty of Engineering Courses click on a course to view details

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    ENGINEERING MSc/PgDip 37 MARINE TECHNOLOGY MSc/PgDip/PgCert 04 MECHANICAL ENGINEERING, ADVANCED MSc/PgDip 39 URBAN DESIGN MSc/PgDip/PgCert 08 WIND ENERGY SYSTEMS MSc 33 #12;FACULTY OF ENGINEERING 2 back1 Faculty of Engineering Courses click on a course to view details FACULTY OF ENGINEERING COURSE

  17. COMBINED THERMAL MEASUREMENT AND SIMULATION FOR THE DETAILED ANALYSIS OF FOUR OCCUPIED LOW-ENERGY BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gieseler, Udo D. J.

    COMBINED THERMAL MEASUREMENT AND SIMULATION FOR THE DETAILED ANALYSIS OF FOUR OCCUPIED LOW-ENERGY BUILDINGS U.D.J. Gieseler, F.D. Heidt1 , W. Bier Division of Building Physics and Solar Energy, University energy and temperature measurements of occupied buildings very well. These buildings repre- sent small

  18. Soclety of Petroteum Engineers CT Scan and Neural Network Technology for Construction of Detailed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    of Detailed Distribution of Residual Oil Saturation During Waterflooding A. Garg', A.R. Kovscek2, M. Nikravesh reservoirs. Fractured petroleum reservoirs provide over 20 ?ZO of the world oil reserves [1]. Examples of prolific fmctured reservoirs are: the Monterey Shales in California (estimated tens of billions of barrels

  19. Detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism for biodiesel components methyl stearate and methyl oleate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism for biodiesel components methyl stearate and methyl are developed for two of the five major components of biodiesel fuel, methyl stearate and methyl oleate renewable sources, can reduce net emissions of greenhouse gases. An important class of biodiesel fuels

  20. Detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms for soy and rapeseed biodiesel fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms for soy and rapeseed biodiesel fuels C.K. Westbrooka chemical kinetic reaction mechanism is developed for the five major components of soy biodiesel and rapeseed biodiesel fuels. These components, methyl stearate, methyl oleate, methyl linoleate, methyl

  1. JOURNAL PRODUCTION CHECKLIST For detailed instructions, refer to the Student Journal Editors Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    JOURNAL PRODUCTION CHECKLIST For detailed instructions, refer to the Student Journal Editors before agreements are forwarded to authors. Executed agreements are mandatory ­ no journal may by the printer for any additional corrections after your files have been submitted. #12; JOURNAL PRODUCTION

  2. Program Director/Principal Investigator (Last, First, Middle): DETAILED BUDGET FOR INITIAL BUDGET PERIOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ungerleider, Leslie G.

    Program Director/Principal Investigator (Last, First, Middle): DETAILED BUDGET FOR INITIAL BUDGET SUBTOTAL DIRECT COSTS FOR INITIAL BUDGET PERIOD (Item 7a, Face Page) $ CONSORTIUM/CONTRACTUAL COSTS FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS TOTAL DIRECT COSTS FOR INITIAL BUDGET PERIOD $ PHS 398 (Rev. 6/09) Page

  3. Program Director/Principal Investigator (Last, First, Middle): DETAILED BUDGET FOR NEXT BUDGET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    Program Director/Principal Investigator (Last, First, Middle): DETAILED BUDGET FOR NEXT BUDGET by category) OTHER EXPENSES (Itemize by category) SUBTOTAL DIRECT COSTS FOR NEXT BUDGET PERIOD $ CONSORTIUM FOR NEXT BUDGET PERIOD (Item 8a, Face Page) $ Page Form Page 2PHS 2590 (Rev. 08/12) #12;

  4. Program Director/Principal Investigator (Last, First, Middle): DETAILED BUDGET FOR INITIAL BUDGET PERIOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    Program Director/Principal Investigator (Last, First, Middle): DETAILED BUDGET FOR INITIAL BUDGET SUBTOTAL DIRECT COSTS FOR INITIAL BUDGET PERIOD (Item 7a, Face Page) $ CONSORTIUM/CONTRACTUAL COSTS FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS TOTAL DIRECT COSTS FOR INITIAL BUDGET PERIOD $ Page Form Page 4 PHS 398

  5. Reliability of Quantitative Ultrasonic Assessment of Normal-Tissue Toxicity in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshida, Emi J.; Chen Hao [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Torres, Mylin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Andic, Fundagul [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Liu Haoyang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Chen Zhengjia [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Department of Statistics, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Sun, Xiaoyan [Department of Statistics, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Curran, Walter J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Liu Tian, E-mail: tliu34@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: We have recently reported that ultrasound imaging, together with ultrasound tissue characterization (UTC), can provide quantitative assessment of radiation-induced normal-tissue toxicity. This study's purpose is to evaluate the reliability of our quantitative ultrasound technology in assessing acute and late normal-tissue toxicity in breast cancer radiotherapy. Method and Materials: Our ultrasound technique analyzes radiofrequency echo signals and provides quantitative measures of dermal, hypodermal, and glandular tissue toxicities. To facilitate easy clinical implementation, we further refined this technique by developing a semiautomatic ultrasound-based toxicity assessment tool (UBTAT). Seventy-two ultrasound studies of 26 patients (720 images) were analyzed. Images of 8 patients were evaluated for acute toxicity (<6 months postradiotherapy) and those of 18 patients were evaluated for late toxicity ({>=}6 months postradiotherapy). All patients were treated according to a standard radiotherapy protocol. To assess intraobserver reliability, one observer analyzed 720 images in UBTAT and then repeated the analysis 3 months later. To assess interobserver reliability, three observers (two radiation oncologists and one ultrasound expert) each analyzed 720 images in UBTAT. An intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to evaluate intra- and interobserver reliability. Ultrasound assessment and clinical evaluation were also compared. Results: Intraobserver ICC was 0.89 for dermal toxicity, 0.74 for hypodermal toxicity, and 0.96 for glandular tissue toxicity. Interobserver ICC was 0.78 for dermal toxicity, 0.74 for hypodermal toxicity, and 0.94 for glandular tissue toxicity. Statistical analysis found significant changes in dermal (p < 0.0001), hypodermal (p = 0.0027), and glandular tissue (p < 0.0001) assessments in the acute toxicity group. Ultrasound measurements correlated with clinical Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity scores of patients in the late toxicity group. Patients with RTOG Grade 1 or 2 had greater ultrasound-assessed toxicity percentage changes than patients with RTOG Grade 0. Conclusion: Early and late radiation-induced effects on normal tissue can be reliably assessed using quantitative ultrasound.

  6. Self-adaptive software needs quantitative verification at Radu Calinescu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    , performance and operating cost (e.g., energy consumption) of software. These techniques include model checkingSelf-adaptive software needs quantitative verification at runtime Radu Calinescu Department 1: The world and the machine. [19, 30]. In contrast, several mathematically-based modelling

  7. Self-adaptive software needs quantitative verification at Radu Calinescu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , performance and operating cost (e.g., energy consumption) of software. These techniques include model checkingSelf-adaptive software needs quantitative verification at runtime Radu Calinescu Department"#.&*#.+$ Figure 1: The world and the machine. [19, 30]. In contrast, several mathematically-based modelling

  8. Quantitative analysis of SCIAMACHY carbon monoxide total column measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laat, Jos de

    , SCIAMACHY CO total column retrievals are of sufficient quality to provide useful new information]. Ground-based FTIR measurements provide high quality total column measurements but have very limitedQuantitative analysis of SCIAMACHY carbon monoxide total column measurements A. T. J. de Laat,1,2 A

  9. Math 576: Quantitative Risk Management lih@math.wsu.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Haijun

    , that a bomb had gone off in the White House, and the S&P Index lose $136 billion in a matter of four minutes, 2004) Financial markets are ecological systems in which various agents ("species") compete frequency trading). Haijun Li Math 576: Quantitative Risk Management Week 1 6 / 26 #12;Ecology of Agent

  10. Quantitative Analysis of the Full Bitcoin Transaction Graph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quantitative Analysis of the Full Bitcoin Transaction Graph Dorit Ron and Adi Shamir Department.ron,adi.shamir}@weizmann.ac.il Abstract. The Bitcoin scheme is a rare example of a large scale global payment system in which all and how they spend their bitcoins, the balance of bitcoins they keep in their accounts, and how they move

  11. Quantitative Imaging of Corrosion in Plates by Eddy Current Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santosa, Fadil

    Quantitative Imaging of Corrosion in Plates by Eddy Current Methods Bruno Luong \\Lambda and Fadil the problem of determining material loss due to cor­ rosion in a plate. Eddy current data are collected on one the relationship between eddy current loop impedance change with the loss profile. In this context, we show

  12. Original article Quantitative review of ruminal and total tract digestion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Quantitative review of ruminal and total tract digestion of mixed diet organic reviewed using a data base involving 157 papers. The ruminal digestion (mean ± SE%) of organic matter, cell), respectively and the proportion of each component digested in the rumen in relation to total tract

  13. The Fifth European Conference on Symbolic and Quantitative Approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunter, Anthony

    ecsqaru99 The Fifth European Conference on Symbolic and Quantitative Approaches to Reasoning and applications of formalisms. The main European forum for the subject is the European Conference on Symbolic the previous ECSQARU conference proceedings. In addition, a special issue of the Knowledge En­ gineering Review

  14. Implications of Power Control in Wireless Networks: A Quantitative Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnamurthy, Srikanth

    Implications of Power Control in Wireless Networks: A Quantitative Study Ioannis Broustis, Jakob of power control in wireless networks can lead to two con- flicting effects. An increase- posite effects. Our primary goal in this work is to understand the implications of power control

  15. ORIGINAL RESEARCH Open Access Acquisition setting optimization and quantitative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    studies with the Inveon microPET-CT system Nadège Anizan1* , Thomas Carlier1 , Cecilia Hindorf1 was the Inveon PET/CT system dedicated to small animal imaging. Methods: The noise equivalent count rate [NECR. Keywords: small animal imaging, PET/CT, iodine-124, quantitative imaging Background Small animal imaging

  16. Quantitative verification of ab initio self-consistent laser theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, A. Douglas

    ­1564 (1998). 6. O. Painter, R. K. Lee, A. Scherer, A. Yariv, J. D. O'Brien, P. D. Dapkus, and I. Kim, "TwoQuantitative verification of ab initio self-consistent laser theory Li Ge,1 Robert J. Tandy,1 A¨ureci, A. D. Stone, and B. Collier, "Self-consistent multimode lasing theory for complex or random lasing

  17. FRA-MOWGS2MKT-049 Quantitative (Credit) Portfolio Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fulmek, Markus

    FRA-MOWGS2MKT-049 Quantitative (Credit) Portfolio Management Topics in Banking and Finance 24 Mai Concepts of (Credit) Portfolio Management 2. Definition of Risk Appetite 3. Portfolio Optimization Contents management models Passive Defensive Reactive Active Traditional banking Portfolio modelling & analysis Ex

  18. Structured Language for Specifications of Quantitative Requirements Mario Dal Cin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fey, Dietmar

    are derived from risk measures. Then, the analysis gives useful information to improve system performance and to reduce risk. However, as computer-based analysis deals with more complex system behavior a rigorousStructured Language for Specifications of Quantitative Requirements Mario Dal Cin University

  19. QUANTITATIVE SONOGRAPHIC PROSTATE CANCER CHARACTERIZTION A Thesis Presented

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huston, Dryver R.

    QUANTITATIVE SONOGRAPHIC PROSTATE CANCER CHARACTERIZTION A Thesis Presented by Zhi He are at risk for developing prostate cancer, and as a man ages, his risk of developing prostate cancer acquiring the ultrasound data, the specimen is sectioned for histological analysis at 2 mm intervals

  20. Quantitative selection of hedge funds using data envelopment analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Quantitative selection of hedge funds using data envelopment analysis Huyen Nguyen-Thi-Thanh First Envelopment Analysis (DEA) could be a good tool to evaluate fund performance, especially the performance of hedge funds as it can incorporate multiple risk-return attributes characterizing hedge fund's non normal

  1. The significance of nucleotides within DNA codons: a quantitative approach.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerra Hernández, Alejandro

    The significance of nucleotides within DNA codons: a quantitative approach. Alejandro Guerra amino acids coded by triplets of nucleotides (codons) in the Genetic Code, ap- pears to depend on the nucleotide position within a codon, as well as its physico-chemical features. Although differ- ent orders

  2. Speeding Up SMT-Based Quantitative Program Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seshia, Sanjit A.

    Speeding Up SMT-Based Quantitative Program Analysis Daniel J. Fremont and Sanjit A. Seshia-free program. These problems can be solved using a combi- nation of path enumeration, SMT solving, and model present a formalization and satisfiability modulo theories (SMT) based solution to a family

  3. Probabilistic Quantitative Precipitation Forecasting Using Bayesian Model Averaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    February 24, 2006 1J. McLean Sloughter is Graduate Research Assistant, Adrian E. Raftery is BlumsteinProbabilistic Quantitative Precipitation Forecasting Using Bayesian Model Averaging J. McLean Sloughter, Adrian E. Raftery and Tilmann Gneiting 1 Department of Statistics, University of Washington

  4. Application of Quantitative Fluorescence and Absorption-Edge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Application of Quantitative Fluorescence and Absorption-Edge Computed Microtomography to Image, Chicago, Illinois 60637 This paper shows that synchrotron-based fluorescence and absorption-edge computed, which had a well-correlated metal coating. Absorption-edge CMT showed the three-dimensional distribution

  5. Dynamical evolution of neutrino--cooled accretion disks: detailed microphysics, lepton-driven convection, and global energetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William H. Lee; Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz; Dany Page

    2005-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed, two dimensional numerical study of the microphysical conditions and dynamical evolution of accretion disks around black holes when neutrino emission is the main source of cooling. Such structures are likely to form after the gravitational collapse of massive rotating stellar cores, or the coalescence of two compact objects in a binary (e.g., the Hulse--Taylor system). The physical composition is determined self consistently by considering two regimes: neutrino--opaque and neutrino--transparent, with a detailed equation of state which takes into account neutronization, nuclear statistical equilibrium of a gas of free nucleons and alpha particles, blackbody radiation and a relativistic Fermi gas of arbitrary degeneracy. Various neutrino emission processes are considered, with electron/positron capture onto free nucleons providing the dominant contribution to the cooling rate. We find that important temporal and spatial scales, related to the optically thin/optically thick transition are present in the disk, and manifest themselves clearly in the energy output in neutrinos. This transition produces an inversion of the lepton gradient in the innermost regions of the flow which drives convective motions, and affects the density and disk scale height radial profiles. The electron fraction remains low in the region close to the black hole, and if preserved in an outflow, could give rise to heavy element nucleosynthesis. Our specific initial conditions arise from the binary merger context, and so we explore the implications of our results for the production of gamma ray bursts.

  6. A Detailed Study of FDIRC Prototype with Waveform Digitizing Electronics in Cosmic Ray Telescope Using 3D Tracks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishimura, K

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed study of a novel Cherenkov imaging detector called the Focusing DIRC (FDIRC) with waveform digitizing electronics. In this test study, the FDIRC prototype has been instrumented with seven Hamamatsu H-8500 MaPMTs. Waveforms from ~450 pixels are digitized with waveform sampling electronics based on the BLAB2 ASIC, operating at a sampling speed of ~2.5 GSa/s. The FDIRC prototype was tested in a large cosmic ray telescope (CRT) providing 3D muon tracks with ~1.5 mrad angular resolution and muon energy of Emuon greater than 1.6 GeV. In this study we provide a detailed analysis of the tails in the Cherenkov angle distribution as a function of various variables, compare experimental results with simulation, and identify the major contributions to the tails. We demonstrate that to see the full impact of these tails on the Cherenkov angle resolution, it is crucial to use 3D tracks, and have a full understanding of the role of ambiguities. These issues could not be fully explored in previous FDIRC studies where the beam was perpendicular to the quartz radiator bars. This work is relevant for the final FDIRC prototype of the PID detector at SuperB, which will be tested this year in the CRT setup.

  7. A Detailed Study of FDIRC Prototype with Waveform Digitizing Electronics in Cosmic Ray Telescope Using 3D Tracks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishimura, K.; Dey, B.; /Hawaii U. /UC, Riverside; Aston, D.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Ratcliff, B.; /SLAC; Roberts, D.; /Maryland U.; Ruckman, L.; /Hawaii U.; Shtol, D.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Varner, G.S.; /Hawaii U.; Va'vra, J.; Vavra, Jerry; /SLAC; ,

    2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed study of a novel Cherenkov imaging detector called the Focusing DIRC (FDIRC) with waveform digitizing electronics. In this test study, the FDIRC prototype has been instrumented with seven Hamamatsu H-8500 MaPMTs. Waveforms from {approx}450 pixels are digitized with waveform sampling electronics based on the BLAB2 ASIC, operating at a sampling speed of {approx}2.5 GSa/s. The FDIRC prototype was tested in a large cosmic ray telescope (CRT) providing 3D muon tracks with {approx}1.5 mrad angular resolution and muon energy of E{sub muon} > 1.6 GeV. In this study we provide a detailed analysis of the tails in the Cherenkov angle distribution as a function of various variables, compare experimental results with simulation, and identify the major contributions to the tails. We demonstrate that to see the full impact of these tails on the Cherenkov angle resolution, it is crucial to use 3D tracks, and have a full understanding of the role of ambiguities. These issues could not be fully explored in previous FDIRC studies where the beam was perpendicular to the quartz radiator bars. This work is relevant for the final FDIRC prototype of the PID detector at SuperB, which will be tested this year in the CRT setup.

  8. Vapor space characterization of waste Tank 241-BY-108: Results from samples collected on 10/27/94

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McVeety, B.D.; Clauss, T.W.; Ligotke, M.W. [and others

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-BY-108 (referred to as Tank BY-108). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitric oxide (NO), and water vapor (H{sub 2}O). Trends in NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2}O samples indicated a possible sampling problem. Sampling for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) was not requested. In addition, the authors looked for the 40 TO-14 compounds plus an additional 15 analytes. Of these, 17 were observed above the 5-ppbv reporting cutoff. Also, eighty-one organic tentatively identified compounds (TICs) were observed above the reporting cutoff (ca.) 10 ppbv, and are reported with concentrations that are semiquantitative estimates based on internal standard response factors. The nine organic analytes with the highest estimated concentrations are listed in Summary Table 1 and account for approximately 48% of the total organic components in the headspace of Tank BY-108. Three permanent gases, hydrogen (H{sub 2}), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) were also detected. Tank BY-108 is on the Ferrocyanide Watch List.

  9. Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113, Detail Design Report (Title II). Volume 2: Solid waste retrieval facilities -- Phase 1, detail design drawings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solid Waste Retrieval Facility--Phase 1 (Project W113) will provide the infrastructure and the facility required to retrieve from Trench 04, Burial ground 4C, contact handled (CH) drums and boxes at a rate that supports all retrieved TRU waste batching, treatment, storage, and disposal plans. This includes (1) operations related equipment and facilities, viz., a weather enclosure for the trench, retrieval equipment, weighing, venting, obtaining gas samples, overpacking, NDE, NDA, shipment of waste and (2) operations support related facilities, viz., a general office building, a retrieval staff change facility, and infrastructure upgrades such as supply and routing of water, sewer, electrical power, fire protection, roads, and telecommunication. Title I design for the operations related equipment and facilities was performed by Raytheon/BNFL, and that for the operations support related facilities including infrastructure upgrade was performed by KEH. These two scopes were combined into an integrated W113 Title II scope that was performed by Raytheon/BNFL. Volume 2 provides the complete set of the Detail Design drawings along with a listing of the drawings. Once approved by WHC, these drawings will be issued and baselined for the Title 3 construction effort.

  10. Uranium Isotopic and Quantitative Analysis Using a Mechanically-Cooled HPGe Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solodov, Alexander A [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new, portable high-resolution spectroscopy system based on a high-purity germanium detector cooled with a miniature Stirling-cycle cooler, ORTEC trans-SPEC, has recently become commercially available. The use of a long-life mechanical cooling system eliminates the need for liquid nitrogen. The purpose of this study was to determine the applicability of this new instrument for isotopic and quantitative analyses of uranium samples. The results of the performance of the trans-SPEC with the combination of PC-FRAM and ISOTOPIC software packages are described in this paper. An optimal set of analysis parameters for uranium measurements is proposed.

  11. Diffusive transport without detailed balance in motile bacteria: Does microbiology need statistical physics?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. E. Cates

    2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbiology is the science of microbes, particularly bacteria. Many bacteria are motile: they are capable of self-propulsion. Among these, a significant class execute so-called run-and-tumble motion: they follow a fairly straight path for a certain distance, then abruptly change direction before repeating the process. This dynamics has something in common with Brownian motion (it is diffusive at large scales), and also something in contrast. Specifically, motility parameters such as the run speed and tumble rate depend on the local environment and hence can vary in space. When they do so, even if a steady state is reached, this is not generally invariant under time-reversal: the principle of detailed balance, which restores the microscopic time-reversal symmetry of systems in thermal equilibrium, is mesoscopically absent in motile bacteria. This lack of detailed balance (allowed by the flux of chemical energy that drives motility) creates pitfalls for the unwary modeller. Here I review some statistical mechanical models for bacterial motility, presenting them as a paradigm for exploring diffusion without detailed balance. I also discuss the extent to which statistical physics is useful in understanding real or potential microbiological experiments.

  12. The Role of Comprehensive Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanisms in Combustion Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Curran, H J; Mehl, M

    2008-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent developments by the authors in the field of comprehensive detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms for hydrocarbon fuels are reviewed. Examples are given of how these mechanisms provide fundamental chemical insights into a range of combustion applications. Practical combustion consists primarily of chemical heat release from reactions between a fuel and an oxidizer, and computer simulations of practical combustion systems have become an essential tool of combustion research (Westbrook et al., 2005). At the heart of most combustion simulations, the chemical kinetic submodel frequently is the most detailed, complex and computationally costly part of a system model. Historically, the chemical submodel equations are solved using time-implicit numerical algorithms, due to the extreme stiffness of the coupled rate equations, with a computational cost that varies roughly with the cube of the number of chemical species in the model. While early mechanisms (c. 1980) for apparently simple fuels such as methane (Warnatz, 1980) or methanol (Westbrook and Dryer, 1979) included perhaps 25 species, current detailed mechanisms for much larger, more complex fuels such as hexadecane (Fournet et al., 2001; Ristori et al., 2001; Westbrook et al., 2008) or methyl ester methyl decanoate (Herbinet et al., 2008) have as many as 2000 or even 3000 species. Rapid growth in capabilities of modern computers has been an essential feature in this rapid growth in the size and complexity of chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms.

  13. Detailed mineralogical characterization of the Bullfrog and Tram members USW-G1, with emphasis on clay mineralogy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bish, D.L.

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The detailed mineralogy of the Bullfrog and Tram Members of the Crater Flat Tuff from drill hole USW-G1 has been examined, primarily to characterize fully the amounts and types of clay minerals in the tuffs and the possible effects clay minerals have on rock properties. Results of bulk sample x-ray diffraction analyses agree closely with previous determinations, although slightly higher clay mineral contents were found in this study. X-ray diffraction analysis of fine fractions revealed that the clay minerals in the tuffs are sodium-saturated montmorillonite-beidellites with typical layer charges and no high-charge layers. These smectites are found in virtually all samples of the Bullfrog and Tram, and there is no correlation between the amounts of smectites and the amounts of zeolite, quartz, and feldspar. Smectites are present in both welded and nonwelded horizons and are scarce in some zones with slight-to-absent welding.

  14. Extended investigation of intermartensitic transitions in Ni-Mn-Ga magnetic shape memory alloys: A detailed phase diagram determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Çakir, Asli; Aktürk, Selçuk [Mu?la Üniversitesi, Fizik Bölümü, 48000 Mu?la (Turkey); Righi, Lara [Dipartimento Chimica GIAF, Universita di Parma, Parco Area delle Scienze 17/A, 43010 Parma (Italy); Albertini, Franca [IMEM-CNR, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, 43010 Parma (Italy); Acet, Mehmet; Farle, Michael [Faculty of Physics and Center for Nanointegration (CENIDE), Universität Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany)

    2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Martensitic transitions in shape memory Ni-Mn-Ga Heusler alloys take place between a high temperature austenite and a low temperature martensite phase. However, intermartensitic transformations have also been encountered that occur from one martensite phase to another. To examine intermartensitic transitions in magnetic shape memory alloys in detail, we carried out temperature dependent magnetization, resistivity, and x-ray diffraction measurements to investigate the intermartensitic transition in Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 50–x}Ga{sub x} in the composition range 12?x?25 at. %. Rietveld refined x-ray diffraction results are found to be consistent with magnetization and resistivity data. Depending on composition, we observe that intermartensitic transitions occur in the sequences 7M?L1{sub 0},?5M?7M, and 5M?7M?L1{sub 0} with decreasing temperature. The L1{sub 0} non-modulated structure is most stable at low temperature.

  15. Direct and quantitative photothermal absorption spectroscopy of individual particulates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tong, Jonathan K.; Hsu, Wei-Chun; Eon Han, Sang; Burg, Brian R.; Chen, Gang, E-mail: gchen2@mit.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Zheng, Ruiting [Key Laboratory of Radiation Beam Technology and Materials Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Radiation Beam Technology and Materials Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Shen, Sheng [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States)

    2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Photonic structures can exhibit significant absorption enhancement when an object's length scale is comparable to or smaller than the wavelength of light. This property has enabled photonic structures to be an integral component in many applications such as solar cells, light emitting diodes, and photothermal therapy. To characterize this enhancement at the single particulate level, conventional methods have consisted of indirect or qualitative approaches which are often limited to certain sample types. To overcome these limitations, we used a bilayer cantilever to directly and quantitatively measure the spectral absorption efficiency of a single silicon microwire in the visible wavelength range. We demonstrate an absorption enhancement on a per unit volume basis compared to a thin film, which shows good agreement with Mie theory calculations. This approach offers a quantitative approach for broadband absorption measurements on a wide range of photonic structures of different geometric and material compositions.

  16. Terascale High-Fidelity Simulations of Turbulent Combustion with Detailed Chemistry: Spray Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutland, Christopher J.

    2009-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Terascale High-Fidelity Simulations of Turbulent Combustion (TSTC) project is a multi-university collaborative effort to develop a high-fidelity turbulent reacting flow simulation capability utilizing terascale, massively parallel computer technology. The main paradigm of the approach is direct numerical simulation (DNS) featuring the highest temporal and spatial accuracy, allowing quantitative observations of the fine-scale physics found in turbulent reacting flows as well as providing a useful tool for development of sub-models needed in device-level simulations. Under this component of the TSTC program the simulation code named S3D, developed and shared with coworkers at Sandia National Laboratories, has been enhanced with new numerical algorithms and physical models to provide predictive capabilities for turbulent liquid fuel spray dynamics. Major accomplishments include improved fundamental understanding of mixing and auto-ignition in multi-phase turbulent reactant mixtures and turbulent fuel injection spray jets.

  17. Review of progress in quantitative NDE. [Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This booklet is composed of abstracts from papers submitted at a meeting on quantitative NDE. A multitude of topics are discussed including analysis of composite materials, NMR uses, x-ray instruments and techniques, manufacturing uses, neural networks, eddy currents, stress measurements, magnetic materials, adhesive bonds, signal processing, NDE of mechanical structures, tomography,defect sizing, NDE of plastics and ceramics, new techniques, optical and electromagnetic techniques, and nonlinear techniques. (GHH)

  18. Quantitative NMR Analysis of Partially Substituted Biodiesel Glycerols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagy, M.; Alleman, T. L.; Dyer, T.; Ragauskas, A. J.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phosphitylation of hydroxyl groups in biodiesel samples with 2-chloro-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphospholane followed by 31P-NMR analysis provides a rapid quantitative analytical technique for the determination of substitution patterns on partially esterified glycerols. The unique 31P-NMR chemical shift data was established with a series mono and di-substituted fatty acid esters of glycerol and then utilized to characterize an industrial sample of partially processed biodiesel.

  19. Quantitative and qualitative productivity in nominal brainstorming groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selivanoff, Sophia G

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . A. , Lorna Linda University Chair of Committee: Dr. Charles Samuelson This research investigated the effects of evaluation apprehension and social comparison feedback on the quantitative and qualitative productivity of brainstorming. Both... with these characteristics. However, this study goes one step further and uses truly nominal groups in order to isolate the effects of evaluation apprehension and social comparison feedback. One hundred three undergraduate students were used to investigate the following...

  20. SciTech Connect: Field Test Results from Lidar Measured Yaw Control...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Field Test Results from Lidar Measured Yaw Control for Improved Yaw Alignment with the NREL Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint Citation Details In-Document...

  1. Detailed analysis of quantum phase transitions within the $u(2)$ algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Fortunato; L. Sartori

    2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze in detail the quantum phase transitions that arise in models based on the $u(2)$ algebraic description for bosonic systems with two types of scalar bosons. First we discuss the quantum phase transition that occurs in hamiltonians that admix the two dynamical symmetry chains $u(2)\\supset u(1)$ and $u(2)\\supset so(2)$ by diagonalizing the problem exactly in the $u(1)$ basis. Then we apply the coherent state formalism to determine the energy functional. Finally we show that a quantum phase transition of a different nature, but displaying similar characteristics, may arise also within a single chain just by including higher order terms in the hamiltonian.

  2. Deciphering the details of RNA aminoglycoside interactions: from atomistic models to biotechnological applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilgu, Muslum

    2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed study was done of the neomycin-B RNA aptamer for determining its selectivity and binding ability to both neomycin– and kanamycin-class aminoglycosides. A novel method to increase drug concentrations in cells for more efficiently killing is described. To test the method, a bacterial model system was adopted and several small RNA molecules interacting with aminoglycosides were cloned downstream of T7 RNA polymerase promoter in an expression vector. Then, the growth analysis of E. coli expressing aptamers was observed for 12-hour period. Our analysis indicated that aptamers helped to increase the intracellular concentration of aminoglycosides thereby increasing their efficacy.

  3. A study of clear-air turbulence from detailed wind profiles over Cape Kennedy, Florida 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackburn, James Harvey

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A STUDY OF CLEAR-AIR TURBULENCE FROM DETAII. ED WIND PROFILES OVER CAPE KENNEDY, FLORIDA A Thesis by James Harvey Blackburn, Jr. Captain United States Air Force Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of ittee) (Head of Dep tment...) (Amber) (Member) May 1969 ABSTRACT A Study of Clear-Air Turbulence from Detailed Wind Profiles Over Cape Kennedy, Florida. James H. Blackburn, Jr. , B. S. , Texas A6N University Directed by: Dr. James R. Scoggins Clear-air turbulence (CAT...

  4. Detailed Monthly and Annual LNG Import Statistics (2004-2012) | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you0andEnergyGlobal Nuclearof aDepartment-of Energy Detailed Monthly and

  5. Details of the FY 2014 Budget Request for FE | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you0andEnergyGlobal Nuclearof aDepartment-of Energy Detailed Monthly

  6. Details of the FY 2014 Congressional Budget Request for OE | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube| DepartmentStatementDepartment ofVisits KazakhstanSummitMillofDetails of the

  7. Quantitative Network Signal Combinations Downstream of TCR Activation Can Predict IL-2 Production Response1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quantitative Network Signal Combinations Downstream of TCR Activation Can Predict IL-2 Production of intense ongoing study, but understanding how the consequent downstream signaling networks integrate hypothesized that a quantitative combination of key downstream network signals across multiple pathways must

  8. Quantitative ultrasound characterization of locally advanced breast cancer by estimation of its scatterer properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tadayyon, Hadi [Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada) [Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Czarnota, Gregory, E-mail: Gregory.Czarnota@sunnybrook.ca [Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada) [Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5T 1P5 (Canada); Wirtzfeld, Lauren [Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada); Wright, Frances C. [Division of Surgical Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)] [Division of Surgical Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Tumor grading is an important part of breast cancer diagnosis and currently requires biopsy as its standard. Here, the authors investigate quantitative ultrasound parameters in locally advanced breast cancers that can potentially separate tumors from normal breast tissue and differentiate tumor grades. Methods: Ultrasound images and radiofrequency data from 42 locally advanced breast cancer patients were acquired and analyzed. Parameters related to the linear regression of the power spectrum—midband fit, slope, and 0-MHz-intercept—were determined from breast tumors and normal breast tissues. Mean scatterer spacing was estimated from the spectral autocorrelation, and the effective scatterer diameter and effective acoustic concentration were estimated from the Gaussian form factor. Parametric maps of each quantitative ultrasound parameter were constructed from the gated radiofrequency segments in tumor and normal tissue regions of interest. In addition to the mean values of the parametric maps, higher order statistical features, computed from gray-level co-occurrence matrices were also determined and used for characterization. Finally, linear and quadratic discriminant analyses were performed using combinations of quantitative ultrasound parameters to classify breast tissues. Results: Quantitative ultrasound parameters were found to be statistically different between tumor and normal tissue (p < 0.05). The combination of effective acoustic concentration and mean scatterer spacing could separate tumor from normal tissue with 82% accuracy, while the addition of effective scatterer diameter to the combination did not provide significant improvement (83% accuracy). Furthermore, the two advanced parameters, including effective scatterer diameter and mean scatterer spacing, were found to be statistically differentiating among grade I, II, and III tumors (p = 0.014 for scatterer spacing, p = 0.035 for effective scatterer diameter). The separation of the tumor grades further improved when the textural features of the effective scatterer diameter parametric map were combined with the mean value of the map (p = 0.004). Conclusions: Overall, the binary classification results (tumor versus normal tissue) were more promising than tumor grade assessment. Combinations of advanced parameters can further improve the separation of tumors from normal tissue compared to the use of linear regression parameters. While the linear regression parameters were sufficient for characterizing breast tumors and normal breast tissues, advanced parameters and their textural features were required to better characterize tumor subtypes.

  9. Going Beyond a Resnet Certification for Code-Compliant Simulations: A Sensitivity Analysis of Detailed Results of Three RESNET-Certified, Code-Compliant Residential Simulation Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J.; Liu, Z.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Baltazar, J. C.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Montgomery, C.; Kim, H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .5 Heating Fan 0.3 0.5 Heating 15.1 17.7 Lgt+Appl 26.3 29.2 Cooling Fan 2.6 2.6 Cooling 12.2 12.3 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 M M B tu /y r Software 2 Propose d House 2000 IECC TOTAL 84.3 90.9 Water Heating 19.6 19.6 Heating... 22.9 26.2 Lgt+Appl 26.3 26.3 Cooling 15.5 18.8 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 M M B tu /y r Software 1 Proposed House 2000 IECC TOTAL 74.5 77.7 Water Heating 18.2 18.2 Heating Fan 0.5 0.5 Heating 14.3 14.3 Misc 0.2 0...

  10. Going Beyond a RESNET Certification for Code-Compliant Simulations: A Comparison of Detailed Results of Three RESNET-Certified, Code-Compliant Residential Simulation Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Z.; Kim, H.; Malhotra, M.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Baltazar, J. C.; Haberl, J.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Montgomery, C.

    the performance-path of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) (IECC 2000, 2001). A performance path analysis requires a building energy simulation to determine whether or not the total annual energy use of a proposed design consumes less energy... Center. IECC 2000. International Energy Conservation Code. International Code Congress, Falls Church, VA, Second printing, January 2001. IECC 2001. 2001 Supplement to the International Codes. International Code Congress, Falls Church, VA, Second...

  11. Detailed modeling of spectroscopic data: Modeling support for ORNL PMI WORK: TEXTORALT-II, TORE SUPRA, ATF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, J.; Klepper, C.; Hillis, D.; Uckan, T.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper contains vugraphs on particle source effects on confinement time scaling. Detailed modeling of H/sub ..cap alpha../ intensity spatial distribution is discussed. (LSP)

  12. Modelling the molecular Zeeman effect in M-dwarfs: methods and first results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shulyak, D; Wende, S; Kochukhov, O; Piskunov, N; Seifahrt, A

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present first quantitative results of the surface magnetic field measurements in selected M-dwarfs based on detailed spectra synthesis conducted simultaneously in atomic and molecular lines of the FeH Wing-Ford $F^4\\,\\Delta-X^4\\,\\Delta$ transitions. A modified version of the Molecular Zeeman Library (MZL) was used to compute Land\\'e g-factors for FeH lines in different Hund's cases. Magnetic spectra synthesis was performed with the Synmast code. We show that the implementation of different Hund's case for FeH states depending on their quantum numbers allows us to achieve a good fit to the majority of lines in a sunspot spectrum in an automatic regime. Strong magnetic fields are confirmed via the modelling of atomic and FeH lines for three M-dwarfs YZ~CMi, EV~Lac, and AD~Leo, but their mean intensities are found to be systematically lower than previously reported. A much weaker field ($1.7-2$~kG against $2.7$~kG) is required to fit FeH lines in the spectra of GJ~1224. Our method allows us to measure average...

  13. Diffusive transport without detailed balance in motile bacteria: Does microbiology need statistical physics?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cates, M E

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbiology is the science of microbes, particularly bacteria. Many bacteria are motile: they are capable of self-propulsion. Among these, a significant class execute so-called run-and-tumble motion: they follow a fairly straight path for a certain distance, then abruptly change direction before repeating the process. This dynamics has something in common with Brownian motion (it is diffusive at large scales), and also something in contrast. Specifically, motility parameters such as the run speed and tumble rate depend on the local environment and hence can vary in space. When they do so, even if a steady state is reached, this is not generally invariant under time-reversal: the principle of detailed balance, which restores the microscopic time-reversal symmetry of systems in thermal equilibrium, is mesoscopically absent in motile bacteria. This lack of detailed balance (allowed by the flux of chemical energy that drives motility) creates pitfalls for the unwary modeller. Here I review some statistical mecha...

  14. Detailed lensing properties of the MS2137-2353 core and reconstruction of sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammer, F; Shaya, E J; Gioia, I M; Luppino, G A; Lefèvre, O

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A deep HST image of the MS 2137-2353 core has revealed detailed morphological structures in two arc systems, which are modelled and well reproduced after a complete analysis of the lensing properties of the dark matter component. Latter could have a simple elliptical mass distribution with ellipticity and angular orientation similar to those of the visible and X-ray light, which suggests that the MS 2137-2353 is a relaxed cluster at z=0.313. The predicted density profile ($\\rho$ $\\sim$ $r^{-1.56\\pm0.1}$ with $r_{c}$ $\\le$ 22.5$h_{50}^{-1}$ kpc) within 150$h_{50}^{-1}$ kpc implies increasing M/L ratio with the radius, and could be in agreement with predictions from standard CDM simulations. At least two faint sources (unlensed magnitude, R=23.9 and 26, respectively) are aligned with the cluster core and are responsible of the arc systems. They have been reconstructed with details as small as 0".02 (or 160$h_{50}^{-1}$ pc in the source assumed at z= 1), one could be a nearly edge-on barred spiral galaxy, and th...

  15. Detailed Shape and Evolutionary Behavior of the X-ray Luminosity Function of Active Galactic Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyaji, T; Salvato, M; Brusa, M; Cappelluti, N; Civano, F; Puccetti, S; Elvis, M; Brunner, H; Fotopoulou, S; Ueda, Y; Griffiths, R E; Koekemoer, A M; Akiyama, M; Comastri, A; Gilli, R; Lanzuisi, G; Merloni, A; Vignali, C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct the rest-frame 2--10 keV intrinsic X-ray luminosity function of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) from a combination of X-ray surveys from the all-sky Swift BAT survey to the Chandra Deep Field-South. We use ~3200 AGNs in our analysis, which covers six orders of magnitude in flux. The inclusion of the XMM and Chandra COSMOS data has allowed us to investigate the detailed behavior of the XLF and evolution. In deriving our XLF, we take into account realistic AGN spectrum templates, absorption corrections, and probability density distributions in photometric redshift. We present an analytical expression for the overall behavior of the XLF in terms of the luminosity-dependent density evolution, smoothed two power-law expressions in 11 redshift shells, three-segment power-law expression of the number density evolution in four luminosity classes, and binned XLF. We observe a sudden flattening of the low luminosity end slope of the XLF slope at z>~0.6. Detailed structures of the AGN downsizing have been als...

  16. Detailed spectroscopic analysis of SN 1987A: The distance to the LMC using the SEAM method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, Robert C.; Baron, E.; Branch, David; Hauschildt, Peter H.; Nugent, Peter E.; Lundqvist, Peter; Blinnikov, Sergei; Pun, Chun S.J.

    2002-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Supernova 1987A remains the most well-studied supernova to date. Observations produced excellent broad-band photometric and spectroscopic coverage over a wide wavelength range at all epochs. We model the observed spectra from Day 1 to Day 81 using a hydrodynamical model. We show that good agreement can be obtained at times up to about 60 days, if we allow for extended nickel mixing. Later than about 60 days the observed Balmer lines become stronger than our models can reproduce. We show that this is likely due to a more complicated distribution of gamma-rays than we allow for in our spherically symmetric calculations. We present synthetic light curves in UBVRIJHK and a synthetic bolometric light curve. Using this broad baseline of detailed spectroscopic models we find a distance modulus mu = 18.5 +/- 0.2 using the SEAM method of determining distances to supernovae. We find that the explosion time agrees with that of the neutrino burst and is constrained at 68 percent confidence to within +/- 0.9 days. We argue that the weak Balmer lines of our detailed model calculations casts doubt on the accuracy of the purely photometric EPM method. We also suggest that Type IIP supernovae will be most useful as distance indicators at early times due to a variety of effects.

  17. Detailed Spectral Modeling of a 3-D Pulsating Reverse Detonation Model: Too Much Nickel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Baron; David J. Jeffery; David Branch; Eduardo Bravo; Domingo Garcia-Senz; Peter H. Hauschildt

    2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate detailed NLTE synthetic spectra of a Pulsating Reverse Detonation (PRD) model, a novel explosion mechanism for Type Ia supernovae. While the hydro models are calculated in 3-D, the spectra use an angle averaged hydro model and thus some of the 3-D details are lost, but the overall average should be a good representation of the average observed spectra. We study the model at 3 epochs: maximum light, seven days prior to maximum light, and 5 days after maximum light. At maximum the defining Si II feature is prominent, but there is also a prominent C II feature, not usually observed in normal SNe Ia near maximum. We compare to the early spectrum of SN 2006D which did show a prominent C II feature, but the fit to the observations is not compelling. Finally we compare to the post-maximum UV+optical spectrum of SN 1992A. With the broad spectral coverage it is clear that the iron-peak elements on the outside of the model push too much flux to the red and thus the particular PRD realizations studied would be intrinsically far redder than observed SNe Ia. We briefly discuss variations that could improve future PRD models.

  18. Quantitative Finance, Vol. 12, No. 1, January 2012, 1114 Financial engineering at Columbia University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hone, James

    Quantitative Finance, Vol. 12, No. 1, January 2012, 11­14 Financial engineering at Columbia of quantitative finance, including derivative securi- ties, risk management, portfolio optimization, trading. Photographs by Mark Broadie. Quantitative Finance ISSN 1469­7688 print/ISSN 1469­7696 online ß 2012 Taylor

  19. A Mathematical Programming Model for Optimal Layout Considering Quantitative Risk Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    A Mathematical Programming Model for Optimal Layout Considering Quantitative Risk Analysis Nancy of plant layout with safety considerations. The model considers a quantitative risk analysis to take safety aims at providing a more elaborate analysis of risk sources by considering a complete quantitative risk

  20. Improved Protein Arrays for Quantitative Systems Analysis of the Dynamics of Signaling Pathway Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    YANG, CHIN-RANG [NHLBI, NIH] [NHLBI, NIH

    2013-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Astronauts and workers in nuclear plants who repeatedly exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation (IR, <10 cGy) are likely to incur specific changes in signal transduction and gene expression in various tissues of their body. Remarkable advances in high throughput genomics and proteomics technologies enable researchers to broaden their focus from examining single gene/protein kinetics to better understanding global gene/protein expression profiling and biological pathway analyses, namely Systems Biology. An ultimate goal of systems biology is to develop dynamic mathematical models of interacting biological systems capable of simulating living systems in a computer. This Glue Grant is to complement Dr. Boothman’s existing DOE grant (No. DE-FG02-06ER64186) entitled “The IGF1/IGF-1R-MAPK-Secretory Clusterin (sCLU) Pathway: Mediator of a Low Dose IR-Inducible Bystander Effect” to develop sensitive and quantitative proteomic technology that suitable for low dose radiobiology researches. An improved version of quantitative protein array platform utilizing linear Quantum dot signaling for systematically measuring protein levels and phosphorylation states for systems biology modeling is presented. The signals are amplified by a confocal laser Quantum dot scanner resulting in ~1000-fold more sensitivity than traditional Western blots and show the good linearity that is impossible for the signals of HRP-amplification. Therefore this improved protein array technology is suitable to detect weak responses of low dose radiation. Software is developed to facilitate the quantitative readout of signaling network activities. Kinetics of EGFRvIII mutant signaling was analyzed to quantify cross-talks between EGFR and other signaling pathways.

  1. Detailed investigation of a pulverized fuel swirl flame in CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toporov, D.; Bocian, P.; Heil, P.; Kellermann, A.; Stadler, H.; Tschunko, S.; Foerster, M.; Kneer, R. [Institute of Heat and Mass Transfer, RWTH Aachen University, Eilfschornsteinstrasse 18, D-52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel approach to oxycoal flame stabilization has been developed at the Institute of Heat and Mass Transfer at RWTH Aachen University [D. Toporov, M. Foerster, R. Kneer, in: Third Int. Conf. on Clean Coal Technologies for Our Future, Cagliari, Sardinia, Italy, 15-17 May 2007]. The swirl burner design and its operating conditions have been adjusted in order to enforce CO formation thus stabilizing the flame and obtaining a full burnout at levels of O{sub 2} content in the O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixture similar to those in air. The paper presents results of detailed numerical and experimental investigations of a stable oxy-fired pulverized coal swirl flame (type-2) obtained with a 21 vol% O{sub 2} concentration. The combustion tests were performed in a vertical pilot-scale furnace (100 kW{sub th}) in the framework of the OXYCOAL-AC research project aiming to develop a membrane-based oxyfuel process. The experimental results concerning gas velocities, gas and particle temperatures, and gas compositions are presented and discussed, focusing on the underlying mechanisms as well as on the aerodynamics of the oxycoal flame. A comparison between measurements and simulations has shown the validity of the numerical method used. The reported data set can be used for validation of numerical models developed for prediction of oxyfuel combustion. (author)

  2. Quantitative uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of a PWR control rod ejection accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasichnyk, I.; Perin, Y.; Velkov, K. [Gesellschaft flier Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit - GRS mbH, Boltzmannstasse 14, 85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper describes the results of the quantitative Uncertainty and Sensitivity (U/S) Analysis of a Rod Ejection Accident (REA) which is simulated by the coupled system code ATHLET-QUABOX/CUBBOX applying the GRS tool for U/S analysis SUSA/XSUSA. For the present study, a UOX/MOX mixed core loading based on a generic PWR is modeled. A control rod ejection is calculated for two reactor states: Hot Zero Power (HZP) and 30% of nominal power. The worst cases for the rod ejection are determined by steady-state neutronic simulations taking into account the maximum reactivity insertion in the system and the power peaking factor. For the U/S analysis 378 uncertain parameters are identified and quantified (thermal-hydraulic initial and boundary conditions, input parameters and variations of the two-group cross sections). Results for uncertainty and sensitivity analysis are presented for safety important global and local parameters. (authors)

  3. Comprehensive, Quantitative Risk Assessment of CO{sub 2} Geologic Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lepinski, James

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A Quantitative Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (QFMEA) was developed to conduct comprehensive, quantitative risk assessments on CO{sub 2} capture, transportation, and sequestration or use in deep saline aquifers, enhanced oil recovery operations, or enhanced coal bed methane operations. The model identifies and characterizes potential risks; identifies the likely failure modes, causes, effects and methods of detection; lists possible risk prevention and risk mitigation steps; estimates potential damage recovery costs, mitigation costs and costs savings resulting from mitigation; and ranks (prioritizes) risks according to the probability of failure, the severity of failure, the difficulty of early failure detection and the potential for fatalities. The QFMEA model generates the necessary information needed for effective project risk management. Diverse project information can be integrated into a concise, common format that allows comprehensive, quantitative analysis, by a cross-functional team of experts, to determine: What can possibly go wrong? How much will damage recovery cost? How can it be prevented or mitigated? What is the cost savings or benefit of prevention or mitigation? Which risks should be given highest priority for resolution? The QFMEA model can be tailored to specific projects and is applicable to new projects as well as mature projects. The model can be revised and updated as new information comes available. It accepts input from multiple sources, such as literature searches, site characterization, field data, computer simulations, analogues, process influence diagrams, probability density functions, financial analysis models, cost factors, and heuristic best practices manuals, and converts the information into a standardized format in an Excel spreadsheet. Process influence diagrams, geologic models, financial models, cost factors and an insurance schedule were developed to support the QFMEA model. Comprehensive, quantitative risk assessments were conducted on three (3) sites using the QFMEA model: (1) SACROC Northern Platform CO{sub 2}-EOR Site in the Permian Basin, Scurry County, TX, (2) Pump Canyon CO{sub 2}-ECBM Site in the San Juan Basin, San Juan County, NM, and (3) Farnsworth Unit CO{sub 2}-EOR Site in the Anadarko Basin, Ochiltree County, TX. The sites were sufficiently different from each other to test the robustness of the QFMEA model.

  4. Terascale High-Fidelity Simulations of Turbulent Combustion with Detailed Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Im, Hong G [University of Michigan] [University of Michigan; Trouve, Arnaud [University of Maryland] [University of Maryland; Rutland, Christopher J [University of Wisconsin] [University of Wisconsin; Chen, Jacqueline H [Sandia National Laboratories] [Sandia National Laboratories

    2012-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The TSTC project is a multi-university collaborative effort to develop a high-fidelity turbulent reacting flow simulation capability utilizing terascale, massively parallel computer technology. The main paradigm of our approach is direct numerical simulation (DNS) featuring highest temporal and spatial accuracy, allowing quantitative observations of the fine-scale physics found in turbulent reacting flows as well as providing a useful tool for development of sub-models needed in device-level simulations. The code named S3D, developed and shared with Chen and coworkers at Sandia National Laboratories, has been enhanced with new numerical algorithms and physical models to provide predictive capabilities for spray dynamics, combustion, and pollutant formation processes in turbulent combustion. Major accomplishments include improved characteristic boundary conditions, fundamental studies of auto-ignition in turbulent stratified reactant mixtures, flame-wall interaction, and turbulent flame extinction by water spray. The overarching scientific issue in our recent investigations is to characterize criticality phenomena (ignition/extinction) in turbulent combustion, thereby developing unified criteria to identify ignition and extinction conditions. The computational development under TSTC has enabled the recent large-scale 3D turbulent combustion simulations conducted at Sandia National Laboratories.

  5. Electricity Used by Office Equipment and Network Equipment in the U.S.: Detailed Report and Appendices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-45917 Electricity Used by Office Equipment and Network Equipment in the U.S.: Detailed Report..............................................................................................46 #12;#12;1 Electricity Used by Office Equipment and Network Equipment in the U.S. Kaoru Kawamoto and network equipment, there has been no recent study that estimates in detail how much electricity

  6. A Detailed Analysis of Guard-Heated Wall Shear Stress Sensors for Turbulent Flows Seyed Ali Ale Etrati Khosroshahi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    A Detailed Analysis of Guard-Heated Wall Shear Stress Sensors for Turbulent Flows by Seyed Ali Ale A Detailed Analysis of Guard-Heated Wall Shear Stress Sensors for Turbulent Flows by Seyed Ali Ale Etrati-dimensional analysis of the performance of multi-element guard-heated hot-film wall shear stress microsensors

  7. First Steps: Initial Planning Details Client point of contact schedules a meeting with the event planner (if applicable).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013 1 First Steps: Initial Planning Details · Client point of contact schedules a meeting closely with the division in developing a detailed budget of estimated costs. For larger conferences. § Provide project ID. Make sure funds are in place before charges are made against the PID#. § Determine

  8. Quantitative evaluation of turbidity in coastal waters from Lansat imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bright, Jon Branson

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    December 1977 ABSTRACT Quantitative Evaluation of Turbi. dity in Coastal Waters From Landsat Image y (December 1977) Jon Branson Bright, B. S. , Texas AhII Dniversity Directed by: Dr. Wesley P. James The purpose of this research program... that turbi tlity did not always give the same values of suspended solid' as did other methods. NcCluney (13) found nine definitions of turbidity in a search of the literature and classified them into two & roups& those based on compari. son wi. th si...

  9. Evaluation of respirator fit training by quantitative fit testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chute, Daniel Otis

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Instrument to Obtain Informed Consent APPENDIX B Health Screening Form V11 v111 ix 3 4 5 6 8 12 14 15 17 17 30 33 50 56 61 62 TA8LE OF CONTENTS (continued) APPENDIX C Resp1 rator Quantitative Fit Test Record APPENDIX D Resp1rator Tra... Test Session Grou Subject Ex erimental log PF Control Combined lo PF 1 2 3 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 2. 016 2. 715 2. 789 1. 468 2. 168 3. 783 2. 836 3. 129 2. 378 2. 685 2. 328 1. 925 2. 132 1. 740 2. 446 . 36. 538...

  10. Quantitative phylogenetic assessment of microbial communities indiverse environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    von Mering, C.; Hugenholtz, P.; Raes, J.; Tringe, S.G.; Doerks,T.; Jensen, L.J.; Ward, N.; Bork, P.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The taxonomic composition of environmental communities is an important indicator of their ecology and function. Here, we use a set of protein-coding marker genes, extracted from large-scale environmental shotgun sequencing data, to provide a more direct, quantitative and accurate picture of community composition than traditional rRNA-based approaches using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). By mapping marker genes from four diverse environmental data sets onto a reference species phylogeny, we show that certain communities evolve faster than others, determine preferred habitats for entire microbial clades, and provide evidence that such habitat preferences are often remarkably stable over time.

  11. Quantitative infrared absorption cross sections of isoprene for atmospheric measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brauer, Carolyn S.; Blake, Thomas A.; Guenther, Alex B.; Sharpe, Steven W.; Sams, Robert L.; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The OH- and O3- initiated oxidations of isoprene, which is one of the primary volatile organic compounds produced by vegetation, are a major source of atmospheric formaldehyde and other oxygenated organics, yet little quantitative IR data exists for isoprene. We thus report absorption coefficients and integrated band intensities for isoprene in the 600 - 6500 cm-1 region. The pressure-broadened (1 atmosphere N2) spectra were recorded at 278, 298 and 323 K in a 19.96 cm path length cell at 0.112 cm-1 resolution, using a Bruker 66V FTIR. Composite spectra are derived from a minimum of seven pressures at each temperature.

  12. Detailed Balance Condition and Effective Free Energy in the Primitive Chain Network Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takashi Uneyama; Yuichi Masubuchi

    2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider statistical mechanical properties of the primitive chain network (PCN) model for entangled polymers from its dynamic equations. We show that the dynamic equation for the segment number of the PCN model does not reduce to the standard Langevin equation which satisfies the detailed balance condition. We propose heuristic modifications for the PCN dynamic equation for the segment number, to make it reduce to the standard Langevin equation. We analyse some equilibrium statistical properties of the modified PCN model, by using the effective free energy obtained from the modified PCN dynamic equations. The PCN effective free energy can be interpreted as the sum of the ideal Gaussian chain free energy and the repulsive interaction energy between slip-links. By using the single chain approximation, we calculate several distribution functions of the PCN model. The obtained distribution functions are qualitatively different from ones for the simple slip-link model without any direct interactions between slip-links.

  13. Review of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) detailed design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Dr. Martha Krebs, Director, Office of Energy Research at the US Department of Energy (DOE), wrote to the Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC), in letters dated September 23 and November 6, 1996, requesting that FESAC review the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Detailed Design Report (DDR) and provide its view of the adequacy of the DDR as part of the basis for the United States decision to enter negotiations with the other interested Parties regarding the terms and conditions for an agreement for the construction, operations, exploitation and decommissioning of ITER. The letter from Dr. Krebs, referred to as the Charge Letter, provided context for the review and a set of questions of specific interest.

  14. Detail design of a 10.4-m stretched-membrane dish. Phase 2, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes efforts conducted under Tasks 3 and 4 of the second phase of the project to develop a single-element stretched-membrane dish concept to reduce the cost of a high-performance concentrating solar collector. We completed the detailed design for such a collector suitable to drive a 25-kWe Stirling motor generator. The design includes the collectors, optical element, the drive, and support systems. The aperture of the optical element was sized to provide the required energy to the engine based on test data and analytical models of the concentrator receiver, and engine. The design of the optical element was improved based on experience gained from the design, fabrication, and testing of several prototypes.

  15. Detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for the oxidation of biodiesel fuels blend surrogate.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms were developed and used to study the oxidation of two large unsaturated esters: methyl-5-decenoate and methyl-9-decenoate. These models were built from a previous methyl decanoate mechanism and were compared with rapeseed oil methyl esters oxidation experiments in a jet stirred reactor. A comparative study of the reactivity of these three oxygenated compounds was performed and the differences in the distribution of the products of the reaction were highlighted showing the influence of the presence and the position of a double bond in the chain. Blend surrogates, containing methyl decanoate, methyl-5-decenoate, methyl-9-decenoate and n-alkanes, were tested against rapeseed oil methyl esters and methyl palmitate/n-decane experiments. These surrogate models are realistic kinetic tools allowing the study of the combustion of biodiesel fuels in diesel and homogeneous charge compression ignition engines.

  16. Final technical report for project titled Quantitative Characterization of Cell Aggregation/Adhesion as Predictor for Distribution and Transport of Microorganisms in Subsurface Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, April Z [Northeastern University; Wan, Kai-tak [Northeastern Univeristy

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This project aims to explore and develop enabling methodology and techniques for nano-scale characterization of microbe cell surface contact mechanics, interactions and adhesion quantities that allow for identification and quantification of indicative properties related to microorganism migration and transport behavior in porous media and in subsurface environments. Microbe transport has wide impact and therefore is of great interest in various environmental applications such as in situ or enhanced subsurface bioremediation,filtration processes for water and wastewater treatments and protection of drinking water supplies. Although great progress has been made towards understanding the identities and activities of these microorganisms in the subsurface, to date, little is known of the mechanisms that govern the mobility and transport of microorganisms in DOE’s contaminated sites, making the outcomes of in situ natural attenuation or contaminant stability enhancement unpredictable. Conventionally, movement of microorganisms was believed to follows the rules governing solute (particle) transport. However, recent studies revealed that cell surface properties, especially those pertaining to cell attachment/adhesion and aggregation behavior, can cause the microbe behavior to deviate from non-viable particles and hence greatly influence the mobility and distribution of microorganisms in porous media.This complexity highlights the need to obtain detailed information of cell-cell and cell-surface interactions in order to improve and refine the conceptual and quantitative model development for fate and transport of microorganisms and contaminant in subsurface. Traditional cell surface characterization methods are not sufficient to fully predict the deposition rates and transport behaviors of microorganism observed. A breakthrough of methodology that would allow for quantitative and molecular-level description of intrinsic cell surface properties indicative for cell-surface interactions is essential for the field. To tackle this, we have developed a number of new Bio-nanomechanical techniques, including reflection interference contrast microscopy (RICM) and bio-AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy), for cell adhesion-detachment measurement of the long-range surface interactions, in combination with mathematical modeling, which would allow us to characterize the mechanical behavior from single cell to multi-cell aggregate, critical thresholds for large scale coaggregation and transportation of cells and aggregates in the presence of long range inter-surface forces etc. Although some technical and mathematical challenges remain, the preliminary results promise great breakthrough potential. In this study, we investigated the cellular surface characteristics of representative bio-remediating microorganisms relevant to DOE IFRC (Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenges) sites and their transport behaviors in porous media, aiming to draw a groundbreaking correlation between the micro-scale genetic and biological origin-based cell surface properties, the consequent mechanical adhesion and aggregation behaviors, and the macro-scale microbial mobility and retention in porous media, which are unavailable in the literature. The long-term goal is to significantly improve the mechanistic and quantitative understanding of microbial mobility, sorption, and transport within reactive transport models as needed to manipulate subsurface contaminant fate and transport predictions.

  17. Surface and grain boundary scattering in nanometric Cu thin films: A quantitative analysis including twin boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barmak, Katayun [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 and Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Darbal, Amith [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Ganesh, Kameswaran J.; Ferreira, Paulo J. [Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Rickman, Jeffrey M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Department of Physics, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States); Sun, Tik; Yao, Bo; Warren, Andrew P.; Coffey, Kevin R., E-mail: kb2612@columbia.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relative contributions of various defects to the measured resistivity in nanocrystalline Cu were investigated, including a quantitative account of twin-boundary scattering. It has been difficult to quantitatively assess the impact twin boundary scattering has on the classical size effect of electrical resistivity, due to limitations in characterizing twin boundaries in nanocrystalline Cu. In this study, crystal orientation maps of nanocrystalline Cu films were obtained via precession-assisted electron diffraction in the transmission electron microscope. These orientation images were used to characterize grain boundaries and to measure the average grain size of a microstructure, with and without considering twin boundaries. The results of these studies indicate that the contribution from grain-boundary scattering is the dominant factor (as compared to surface scattering) leading to enhanced resistivity. The resistivity data can be well-described by the combined Fuchs–Sondheimer surface scattering model and Mayadas–Shatzkes grain-boundary scattering model using Matthiessen's rule with a surface specularity coefficient of p?=?0.48 and a grain-boundary reflection coefficient of R?=?0.26.

  18. Quantitative Electrochemical Measurements using in situ ec-S/TEM Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unocic, Raymond R [ORNL] [ORNL; Sacci, Robert L [ORNL] [ORNL; Brown, Gilbert M [ORNL] [ORNL; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL] [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL] [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL] [ORNL; Gardiner, Daniel [Protochips Inc., Raleigh, NC] [Protochips Inc., Raleigh, NC; Walden II, Franklin S [Protochips Inc., Raleigh, NC] [Protochips Inc., Raleigh, NC; Damiano, John [Protochips Inc., Raleigh, NC] [Protochips Inc., Raleigh, NC; Nackashi, David P. [Protochips Inc., Raleigh, NC] [Protochips Inc., Raleigh, NC

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Insight into dynamic electrochemical processes can be obtained with in situ ec-S/TEM, which utilizes microfluidic electrochemical cells to characterize electrochemical processes with S/TEM imaging, diffraction or spectroscopy. The microfluidic electrochemical cell is composed of microfabricated devices with glassy carbon and platinum microband electrodes in a three-electrode cell configuration. To establish the validity of this method for quantitative in situ electrochemistry research, cyclic voltammetry, choronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were performed using a standard one electron transfer redox couple using a [Fe(CN)6]3-/4- based electrolyte. Established relationships of the electrode geometry and microfluidic conditions were fitted with cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometic measurements of analyte diffusion coefficients and was found to agree with well-accepted values that are on the order of 10-5 cm2 s-1. Influence of the electron beam on electrochemical measurements was found to be negligible during CV scans where the current profile varied only within a few nA with the electron beam on and off which is well within the hysteresis between multiple CV scans. The combination of experimental results provides a validation that quantitative electrochemistry experiments can be performed with these small-scale microfluidic electrochemical cells provided that accurate geometrical electrode configurations, diffusion boundary layers and microfluidic conditions are accounted for.

  19. Automated simulation of areal bone mineral density assessment in the distal radius from high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burghardt, A. J.; Kazakia, G. J.; Link, T. M.; Majumdar, S.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    quantitative computed tomography A. J. Burghardt & G. J.2017–2024 Micro-computed tomography has become an importantperipheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) is a

  20. Quantitative Constraints on the Transport Properties of Hot Partonic Matter from Semi-Inclusive Single High Transverse Momentum Pion Suppression in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PHENIX Collaboration; A. Adare

    2008-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The PHENIX experiment has measured the suppression of semi-inclusive single high transverse momentum pi^0's in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV. The present understanding of this suppression is in terms of energy-loss of the parent (fragmenting) parton in a dense color-charge medium. We have performed a quantitative comparison between various parton energy-loss models and our experimental data. The statistical point-to-point uncorrelated as well as correlated systematic uncertainties are taken into account in the comparison. We detail this methodology and the resulting constraint on the model parameters, such as the initial color-charge density dN^g/dy, the medium transport coefficient , or the initial energy-loss parameter epsilon_0. We find that high transverse momentum pi^0 suppression in Au+Au collisions has sufficient precision to constrain these model dependent parameters at the +/1 20%-25% (one standard deviation) level. These constraints include only the experimental uncertainties, and further studies are needed to compute the corresponding theoretical uncertainties.

  1. Detailed microearthquake survey of Long Valley, California, known geothermal resource area, July-September 1981. Final technical report, 30 September 1980-31 June 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cramer, C.H.; Stierman, D.J.; Lee, T.C.

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a detailed microearthquake survey of the geothermal area at Long Valley, California. High quality digital data from a dense 3-component array covering a three-month period during the summer of 1981 have been processed for locations, velocity structure, magnitudes, focal mechanisms, and source parameters. Hypocenter locations determined from this array have estimated errors of 0.5 km in epicenter and 1.0 km in depth relative to one another. Detailed hypocentral locations show two complex zones of seismicity beneath the south moat of the caldera which seems associated with the major hot spring activity within the caldera and could be part of the conduit system feeding hydrothermal waters to these hot springs. Seismic activity at Long Valley appears to be influenced by both regional tectonic stresses and local volcanotectonic activity.

  2. Single beam Fourier transform digital holographic quantitative phase microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anand, A., E-mail: arun-nair-in@yahoo.com; Chhaniwal, V. K.; Mahajan, S.; Trivedi, V. [Optics Laboratory, Applied Physics Department, Faculty of Technology and Engineering, M.S. University of Baroda, Vadodara 390001 (India)] [Optics Laboratory, Applied Physics Department, Faculty of Technology and Engineering, M.S. University of Baroda, Vadodara 390001 (India); Faridian, A.; Pedrini, G.; Osten, W. [Institut für Technische Optik, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 9, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)] [Institut für Technische Optik, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 9, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Dubey, S. K. [Siemens Technology and Services Pvt. Ltd, Corporate Technology—Research and Technology Centre, Bangalore 560100 (India)] [Siemens Technology and Services Pvt. Ltd, Corporate Technology—Research and Technology Centre, Bangalore 560100 (India); Javidi, B. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, U-4157, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269-2157 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, U-4157, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269-2157 (United States)

    2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative phase contrast microscopy reveals thickness or height information of a biological or technical micro-object under investigation. The information obtained from this process provides a means to study their dynamics. Digital holographic (DH) microscopy is one of the most used, state of the art single-shot quantitative techniques for three dimensional imaging of living cells. Conventional off axis DH microscopy directly provides phase contrast images of the objects. However, this process requires two separate beams and their ratio adjustment for high contrast interference fringes. Also the use of two separate beams may make the system more vulnerable to vibrations. Single beam techniques can overcome these hurdles while remaining compact as well. Here, we describe the development of a single beam DH microscope providing whole field imaging of micro-objects. A hologram of the magnified object projected on to a diffuser co-located with a pinhole is recorded with the use of a commercially available diode laser and an arrayed sensor. A Fourier transform of the recorded hologram directly yields the complex amplitude at the image plane. The method proposed was investigated using various phase objects. It was also used to image the dynamics of human red blood cells in which sub-micrometer level thickness variation were measurable.

  3. Detailed microscopic calculation of stellar electron and positron capture rates on $^{24}$Mg for O+Ne+Mg core simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jameel-Un Nabi

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Few white dwarfs, located in binary systems, may acquire sufficiently high mass accretion rates resulting in the burning of carbon and oxygen under nondegenerate conditions forming a O+Ne+Mg core. These O+Ne+Mg cores are gravitationally less bound than more massive progenitor stars and can release more energy due to the nuclear burning. They are also amongst the probable candidates for low entropy r-process sites. Recent observations of subluminous Type II-P supernovae (e.g., 2005cs, 2003gd, 1999br, 1997D) were able to rekindle the interest in 8 -- 10 M$_{\\odot}$ which develop O+Ne+Mg cores. Microscopic calculations of capture rates on $^{24}$Mg, which may contribute significantly to the collapse of O+Ne+Mg cores, using shell model and proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (pn-QRPA) theory, were performed earlier and comparisons made. Simulators, however, may require these capture rates on a fine scale. For the first time a detailed microscopic calculation of the electron and positron capture rates on $^{24}$Mg on an extensive temperature-density scale is presented here. This type of scale is more appropriate for interpolation purposes and of greater utility for simulation codes. The calculations are done using the pn-QRPA theory using a separable interaction. The deformation parameter, believed to be a key parameter in QRPA calculations, is adopted from experimental data to further increase the reliability of the QRPA results. The resulting calculated rates are up to a factor of 14 or more enhanced as compared to shell model rates and may lead to some interesting scenario for core collapse simulators.

  4. On the nature and origin of acidic species in petroleum. 1. Detailed acid type distribution in a California crude oil.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomczyk, N. A.; Winans, R. E.; Shinn, J. H.; Robinson, R. C.; Chemistry; Chevron Research and Technology Co.

    2001-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Acidity in crude oils has long been a problem for refining. Knowledge of the detailed chemical composition of the acids responsible for corrosion can facilitate identification of problem crude oils and potentially lead to improved processing options for corrosive oils. A highly aerobically biodegraded crude from the San Joaquin Valley, which has a long history of causing corrosion problems during refining, was the subject of this study. The oil was first extracted with base, then acidified and extracted with petroleum ether. A portion of the resulting acid fraction was methylated. The unmethylated extract was analyzed by FTIR, NMR, and the methylated sample was analyzed by high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). Over 96% of the ions observed in HRMS have been assigned reliable formulas. Considerably greater functionality is seen in this sample than would be presumed from the 'naphthenic acid' title typically assigned to these species. Although over 60% of the compounds contained two or more oxygens, compounds containing only oxygen heteroatoms accounted for less than 10% of the acidic compounds identified. Approximately one-half of the species contained nitrogen and about one-fourth contained sulfur. It is believed that microbial degradation is a major source of these acidic components. It was also observed that acid species with higher degrees of heteroatom substitution generally also had a higher degree of saturation than those species having less heteroatoms, possibly due to impeded migration of highly substituted, less-saturated species.

  5. The gas-rich circumbinary disk of HR 4049. I. A detailed study of the mid-infrared spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malek, S. E.; Cami, J., E-mail: sarahemalek@gmail.com, E-mail: jcami@uwo.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed analysis of the mid-infrared spectrum of the peculiar evolved object HR 4049. The full Spitzer-IRS high-resolution spectrum shows a wealth of emission with prominent features from CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O and possible contributions from HCN and OH. We model the molecular emission and find that it originates from a massive (M ? 8 × 10{sup –3} M {sub ?}), warm (T {sub ex} ? 500 K) and radially extended gas disk that is optically thick at infrared wavelengths. We also report less enrichment in {sup 17}O and {sup 18}O than previously found and a comparison of the Spitzer observations to earlier data obtained by the Short Wavelength Spectrometer on board the Infrared Space Observatory reveals that the CO{sub 2} flux has more than doubled in 10 yr time, indicating active and ongoing chemical evolution in the circumbinary disk. If the gas originates from interaction between the stellar wind and the dust, this suggests that the dust could be oxygen-rich in nature. The molecular gas plays a crucial role in the thermal properties of the circumbinary disk by allowing visible light to heat the dust and then trapping the infrared photons emitted by the dust. This results in higher temperatures and a more homogeneous temperature structure in the disk.

  6. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanisms for Primary Reference Fuels for Diesel Cetane Number and Spark-Ignition Octane Number

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M; Curran, H J

    2010-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    For the first time, a detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism is developed for primary reference fuel mixtures of n-hexadecane and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethyl nonane for diesel cetane ratings. The mechanisms are constructed using existing rules for reaction pathways and rate expressions developed previously for the primary reference fuels for gasoline octane ratings, n-heptane and iso-octane. These reaction mechanisms are validated by comparisons between computed and experimental results for shock tube ignition and for oxidation under jet-stirred reactor conditions. The combined kinetic reaction mechanism contains the submechanisms for the primary reference fuels for diesel cetane ratings and submechanisms for the primary reference fuels for gasoline octane ratings, all in one integrated large kinetic reaction mechanism. Representative applications of this mechanism to two test problems are presented, one describing fuel/air autoignition variations with changes in fuel cetane numbers, and the other describing fuel combustion in a jet-stirred reactor environment with the fuel varying from pure 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethyl nonane (Cetane number of 15) to pure n-hexadecane (Cetane number of 100). The final reaction mechanism for the primary reference fuels for diesel fuel and gasoline is available on the web.

  7. Plans, Implementation, and Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    About the Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs Office (WIPO) including information on plans, implementations, and results.

  8. China's Building Energy Demand: Long-Term Implications from a Detailed Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eom, Jiyong; Clarke, Leon E.; Kim, Son H.; Kyle, G. Page; Patel, Pralit L.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present here a detailed, service-based model of China’s building energy use, nested in the GCAM (Global Change Assessment Model) integrated assessment framework. Using the model, we explore long-term pathways of China’s building energy use and identify opportunities of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The inclusion of a structural model of building energy demands within an integrated assessment framework represents a major methodological advance. It allows for a structural understanding of the drivers of building energy consumption while simultaneously considering the other human and natural system interactions that influence changes in the global energy system and climate. We also explore a range of different scenarios to gain insights into how China’s building sector might evolve and what the implications might be for improved building energy technology and carbon policies. The analysis suggests that China’s building energy growth will not wane anytime soon, although technology improvement will put downward pressure on this growth. Also, regardless of the scenarios represented, the growth will involve the continued, rapid electrification of the buildings sector throughout the century, and this transition will be accelerated by the implementation of carbon policy.

  9. China's Building Energy Use: A Long-Term Perspective based on a Detailed Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eom, Jiyong; Clarke, Leon E.; Kim, Son H.; Kyle, G. Page; Patel, Pralit L.

    2012-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present here a detailed, service-based model of China's building energy use, nested in the GCAM (Global Change Assessment Model) integrated assessment framework. Using the model, we explore long-term pathways of China's building energy use and identify opportunities of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The inclusion of a structural model of building energy demands within an integrated assessment framework represents a major methodological advance. It allows for a structural understanding of the drivers of building energy consumption while simultaneously considering the other human and natural system interactions that influence changes in the global energy system and climate. We also explore a range of different scenarios to gain insights into how China's building sector might evolve and what the implications might be for improved building energy technology and carbon policies. The analysis suggests that China's building energy growth will not wane anytime soon, although technology improvement will put downward pressure on this growth. Also, regardless of the scenarios represented, the growth will involve the continued, rapid electrification of the buildings sector throughout the century, and this transition will be accelerated by the implementation of carbon policy.

  10. Detailed Calculation of Test-Mass Charging in the LISA Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. M. Araujo; P. Wass; D. Shaul; G. Rochester; T. J. Sumner

    2004-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrostatic charging of the LISA test masses due to exposure of the spacecraft to energetic particles in the space environment has implications in the design and operation of the gravitational inertial sensors and can affect the quality of the science data. Robust predictions of charging rates and associated stochastic fluctuations are therefore required for the exposure scenarios expected throughout the mission. We report on detailed charging simulations with the Geant4 toolkit, using comprehensive geometry and physics models, for Galactic cosmic-ray protons and helium nuclei. These predict positive charging rates of 50 +e/s (elementary charges per second) for solar minimum conditions, decreasing by half at solar maximum, and current fluctuations of up to 30 +e/s/Hz^{1/2}. Charging from sporadic solar events involving energetic protons was also investigated. Using an event-size distribution model, we conclude that their impact on the LISA science data is manageable. Several physical processes hitherto unexplored as potential charging mechanisms have also been assessed. Significantly, the kinetic emission of very low-energy secondary electrons due to bombardment of the inertial sensors by primary cosmic rays and their secondaries can produce charging currents comparable with the Monte Carlo rates.

  11. Details in Semiconductors Gordon Conference, New London, NH, August 3-8, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shengbai Zhang and Nancy Ryan Gray

    2009-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuing its tradition of excellence, this Gordon Conference will focus on research at the forefront of the field of defects in homogeneous and structured semiconductors. The conference will have a strong emphasis on the control of defects during growth and processing, with an increases emphasis on nanostructures as compared to previous conferences. Electronic, magnetic, and optical properties of bulk, thin film, and nanoscale semiconductors will be discussed in detail. In contrast to many conferences, which tend to focus on specific semiconductors, this conference deals with defects in a broad range of bulk and nanoscale electronic materials. This approach has proved to be extremely fruitful for advancing fundamental understanding in emerging materials such as wide-band-gap semiconductors, doped nanoparticles, and organic semiconductors. Presentations of state-of-the-art theoretical methods will contribute to a fundamental understanding of atomic-scale phenomena. The program consists of about twenty invited talks, with plenty of discussion time, and a number of contributed poster sessions. Because of the large amount of discussion time, the conference provides an ideal forum for dealing with topics that are new and/or controversial.

  12. Detailed analysis of feed and product asphaltenes in coal/bitumen co-processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selucky, M.L.; Bizzotto, D.; Manske, T. (Alberta Research Council, Devon (Canada))

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Asphaltenes, by definition, are a class of compounds from petroleum and bitumen, soluble in benzene, but insoluble in a non-polar solvent with surface tension of less than 25 dynes/cm{sup {minus}1}. The solvent originally used for asphaltene precipitation was n-pentane. Today, a host of standard procedures are available for the separation of asphaltenes. In a previous paper it was shown by combined GPC, TGA and ESR that the properties of the product asphaltene radical from coal/bitumen co-processing substantially differed from those of the radical from coal/anthracene oil reaction and were practically identical with the properties of asphaltenes derived from bitumen alone. Since this finding puts in question the most frequently used formulation of the reaction path in a co-processing reaction, a more detailed analysis of the feed and product asphaltenes was undertaken to shed more light on the scope and limitations of their analytical tools in elucidating asphaltenes chemistry. This paper describes the implementation of asphaltene analysis, using three related asphaltenes to demonstrate method sensitivity to structural differences.

  13. Preliminary evaluation of crisis-relocation fallout-shelter options. Volume 2. Detailed analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santini, D.J.; Clinch, J.M.; Davis, F.H.; Hill, L.G.; Lynch, E.P.; Tanzman, E.A.; Wernette, D.R.

    1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a preliminary, detailed evaluation of various shelter options for use if the President orders crisis relocation of the US urban population because of strong expectation of a nuclear war. The availability of livable shelter space at 40 ft/sup 2/ per person (congregate-care space) by state is evaluated. Options are evaluated for construction of fallout shelters allowing 10 ft/sup 2/ per person - such shelters are designed to provide 100% survival at projected levels of radioactive fallout. The FEMA concept of upgrading existing buildings to act as fallout shelters can, in principle, provide adequate shelter throughout most of the US. Exceptions are noted and remedies proposed. In terms of upgrading existing buildings to fallout shelter status, great benefits are possible by turning away from a standard national approach and adopting a more site-specific approach. Existing FEMA research provides a solid foundation for successful crisis relocation planning, but the program can be refined by making suitable modifications in its locational, engineering, and institutionally specific elements.

  14. Preliminary environmental assessment for the Satellite Power System (SPS). Revision 1. Volume 2. Detailed assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is considering several options for generating electrical power to meet future energy needs. The satellite power system (SPS), one of these options, would collect solar energy through a system of satellites in space and transfer this energy to earth. A reference system has been described that would convert the energy to microwaves and transmit the microwave energy via directive antennas to large receiving/rectifying antennas (rectennas) located on the earth. At the rectennas, the microwave energy would be converted into electricity. The potential environmental impacts of constructing and operating the satellite power system are being assessed as a part of the Department of Energy's SPS Concept Development and Evaluation Program. This report is Revision I of the Preliminary Environmental Assessment for the Satellite Power System published in October 1978. It refines and extends the 1978 assessment and provides a basis for a 1980 revision that will guide and support DOE recommendations regarding future SPS development. This is Volume 2 of two volumes. It contains the technical detail suitable for peer review and integrates information appearing in documents referenced herein. The key environmental issues associated with the SPS concern human health and safety, ecosystems, climate, and electromagnetic systems interactions. In order to address these issues in an organized manner, five tasks are reported: (I) microwave-radiation health and ecological effects; (II) nonmicrowave health and ecological effectss; (III) atmospheric effects; (IV) effects on communication systems due to ionospheric disturbance; and (V) electromagnetic compatibility. (WHK)

  15. Implementation of the NCN pathway of prompt-NO formation in the detailed reaction mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konnov, A.A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents revised detailed reaction mechanism for small hydrocarbons combustion with possibly full implementation of available kinetic data related to the prompt NO route via NCN. It was demonstrated that model predictions with the rate constant of reaction CH + N{sub 2} = NCN + H measured by Vasudevan and co-workers are much higher than experimental concentrations of NO in rich premixed flames at atmospheric pressure. Analysis of the correlations of NO formation with calculated concentrations of C{sub 2}O radicals strongly supports the inclusion of reaction between C{sub 2}O and N{sub 2} and reduction of the rate constant of reaction between CH and N{sub 2}. Rate constants of the reactions of NCN consumption were mostly taken from the works of Lin and co-workers. Some of these reactions affect calculated profiles of NCN in flames. Proposed modifications allow accurate prediction of NO formation in lean and rich flames of methane, ethylene, ethane and propane. Agreement of the experiments and the modeling was much improved as compared to the previous Release 0.5 of the Konnov mechanism. Satisfactory agreement with available measurements of NCN radicals in low pressure flames was also demonstrated. (author)

  16. Quantitative Analysis of Solar Technologies For Net-Zero Design Affordable Homes Research Group, School of Architecture, McGill University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    Cost per Watt (U.S.) Mono-crystalline - thick modular panels on roof, walls or separate structure 17Quantitative Analysis of Solar Technologies For Net-Zero Design Affordable Homes Research Group PRINCIPLES & RESULTS CONCLUSIONS Photovoltaic (PV) Energy Production Water-Based Solar Thermal Collectors Air

  17. Databases applicable to quantitative hazard/risk assessment-Towards a predictive systems toxicology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waters, Michael [ILS, Inc., P.O. Box 13501, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)], E-mail: mwaters@ils-inc.com; Jackson, Marcus [ILS, Inc., P.O. Box 13501, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Workshop on The Power of Aggregated Toxicity Data addressed the requirement for distributed databases to support quantitative hazard and risk assessment. The authors have conceived and constructed with federal support several databases that have been used in hazard identification and risk assessment. The first of these databases, the EPA Gene-Tox Database was developed for the EPA Office of Toxic Substances by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and is currently hosted by the National Library of Medicine. This public resource is based on the collaborative evaluation, by government, academia, and industry, of short-term tests for the detection of mutagens and presumptive carcinogens. The two-phased evaluation process resulted in more than 50 peer-reviewed publications on test system performance and a qualitative database on thousands of chemicals. Subsequently, the graphic and quantitative EPA/IARC Genetic Activity Profile (GAP) Database was developed in collaboration with the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). A chemical database driven by consideration of the lowest effective dose, GAP has served IARC for many years in support of hazard classification of potential human carcinogens. The Toxicological Activity Profile (TAP) prototype database was patterned after GAP and utilized acute, subchronic, and chronic data from the Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards. TAP demonstrated the flexibility of the GAP format for air toxics, water pollutants and other environmental agents. The GAP format was also applied to developmental toxicants and was modified to represent quantitative results from the rodent carcinogen bioassay. More recently, the authors have constructed: 1) the NIEHS Genetic Alterations in Cancer (GAC) Database which quantifies specific mutations found in cancers induced by environmental agents, and 2) the NIEHS Chemical Effects in Biological Systems (CEBS) Knowledgebase that integrates genomic and other biological data including dose-response studies in toxicology and pathology. Each of the public databases has been discussed in prior publications. They will be briefly described in the present report from the perspective of aggregating datasets to augment the data and information contained within them.

  18. Energy Audit Results for Residential Building Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Audit Results for Residential Building Energy Efficiency Forrest City Phases I and II This report analyses complete energy audit results from 28 homes within the Forest City residential complex. Relationships between temperature, humidity, comfort, and energy consumption are detailed. Recommendations

  19. ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2013 Determination of Energy Savings: Quantitative Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, Mark A.; Athalye, Rahul A.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Wang, Weimin; Hart, Philip R.; Zhang, Jian; Goel, Supriya; Mendon, Vrushali V.

    2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a final quantitative analysis to assess whether buildings constructed according to the requirements of ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2013 would result in improved energy efficiency in commercial buildings. The final analysis considered each of the 110 addenda to Standard 90.1-2010 that were included in Standard 90.1-2013. PNNL reviewed all addenda included by ASHRAE in creating Standard 90.1-2013 from Standard 90.1-2010, and considered their combined impact on a suite of prototype building models across all U.S. climate zones. Most addenda were deemed to have little quantifiable impact on building efficiency for the purpose of DOE’s final determination. However, out of the 110 total addenda, 30 were identified as having a measureable and quantifiable impact.

  20. Quantitative comparison of fuel spray images obtained using ultrafast coherent and incoherent double-pulsed illumination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purwar, Harsh; Idlahcen, Saïd; Rozé, Claude; Blaisot, Jean-Bernard; Ménard, Thibault

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a quantitative comparison between the high-pressure fuel spray images obtained experimentally using classical imaging with coherent and incoherent ultrafast illuminations recorded using a compatible CMOS camera. The ultrafast, incoherent illumination source was extracted from the supercontinuum generated by tightly focusing the femtosecond laser pulses in water. The average velocity maps computed using time-correlated image-pairs and spray edge complexity computed using the average curvature scale space maps are compared for the spray images obtained with the two illumination techniques and also for the numerically simulated spray using the coupled volume of fluid and level set method for interface tracking (direct numerical simulation or DNS). The spray images obtained with supercontinuum-derived, incoherent, ultrafast illumination are clearer, since the artifacts arising due to laser speckles and multiple diffraction effects are largely reduced and show a better correlation with the DNS results.

  1. Quantitative degenerate four-wave mixing spectroscopy: Probes for molecular species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrow, R.; Rakestraw, D.; Paul, P.; Lucht, R.; Danehy, P.; Friedman-Hill, E.; Germann, G. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resonant degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) is currently the subject of intensive investigation as a sensitive diagnostic tool for molecular species. DFWM has the advantage of generating a coherent (beam-like) signal which results in null-background detection and provides excellent immunity to background-light interference. Since multiple one-photon resonances are involved in the signal generation process, the DFWM technique can allow sensitive detection of molecules via electronic, vibrational or rotational transitions. These properties combine to make DFWM a widely applicable diagnostic technique for the probing of molecular species. The authors are conducting fundamental and applied investigations of DFWM for quantitative measurements of trace species in reacting gases. During the past year, efforts have been focussed in two areas: (1) understanding the effects of collisional processes on the DFWM signal generation process, and (2) exploring the applicability of infrared DFWM to detect polyatomic molecules via rovibrational transitions.

  2. On quantitative analysis of interband recombination dynamics: Theory and application to bulk ZnO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lettieri, S. [Institute for Superconductors, Oxides and Innovative Materials, National Research Council (CNR-SPIN), U.O.S. Napoli, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy)] [Institute for Superconductors, Oxides and Innovative Materials, National Research Council (CNR-SPIN), U.O.S. Napoli, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Capello, V.; Santamaria, L. [Physics Department, University of Naples “Federico II,” Via Cintia I-80126 Napoli (Italy)] [Physics Department, University of Naples “Federico II,” Via Cintia I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Maddalena, P. [Institute for Superconductors, Oxides and Innovative Materials, National Research Council (CNR-SPIN), U.O.S. Napoli, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy) [Institute for Superconductors, Oxides and Innovative Materials, National Research Council (CNR-SPIN), U.O.S. Napoli, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Physics Department, University of Naples “Federico II,” Via Cintia I-80126 Napoli (Italy)

    2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The issue of the quantitative analysis of time-resolved photoluminescence experiments is addressed by developing and describing two approaches for determination of unimolecular lifetime, bimolecular recombination coefficient, and equilibrium free-carrier concentration, based on a quite general second-order expression of the electron-hole recombination rate. Application to the case of band-edge emission of ZnO single crystals is reported, evidencing the signature of sub-nanosecond second-order recombination dynamics for optical transitions close to the interband excitation edge. The resulting findings are in good agreement with the model prediction and further confirm the presence, formerly evidenced in literature by non-optical methods, of near-surface conductive layers in ZnO crystals with sheet charge densities of about 3–5×10{sup 13} cm{sup ?2}.

  3. The Food Crises: A quantitative model of food prices including speculators and ethanol conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lagi, Marco; Bertrand, Karla Z; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent increases in basic food prices are severely impacting vulnerable populations worldwide. Proposed causes such as shortages of grain due to adverse weather, increasing meat consumption in China and India, conversion of corn to ethanol in the US, and investor speculation on commodity markets lead to widely differing implications for policy. A lack of clarity about which factors are responsible reinforces policy inaction. Here, for the first time, we construct a dynamic model that quantitatively agrees with food prices. The results show that the dominant causes of price increases are investor speculation and ethanol conversion. Models that just treat supply and demand are not consistent with the actual price dynamics. The two sharp peaks in 2007/2008 and 2010/2011 are specifically due to investor speculation, while an underlying upward trend is due to increasing demand from ethanol conversion. The model includes investor trend following as well as shifting between commodities, equities and bonds to take ad...

  4. Quantitative Methods for Comparing Different HVAC Control Schemes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aswani, Anil; Taneja, Jay; Krioukov, Andrew; Culler, David; Tomlin, Claire

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimentally comparing the energy usage and comfort characteristics of different controllers in heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems is difficult because variations in weather and occupancy conditions preclude the possibility of establishing equivalent experimental conditions across the order of hours, days, and weeks. This paper is concerned with defining quantitative metrics of energy usage and occupant comfort, which can be computed and compared in a rigorous manner that is capable of determining whether differences between controllers are statistically significant in the presence of such environmental fluctuations. Experimental case studies are presented that compare two alternative controllers (a schedule controller and a hybrid system learning-based model predictive controller) to the default controller in a building-wide HVAC system. Lastly, we discuss how our proposed methodology may also be able to quantify the efficiency of other building automation systems.

  5. A brief overview of some historical details of Oak Ridge, part...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the national laboratory also resulted in the formation of Oak Ridge Institute for Nuclear Studies, which evolved into the Oak Ridge Associated Universities and Oak Ridge...

  6. The impact of detailed urban-scale processing on the composition, distribution, and radiative forcing of anthropogenic aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Jason Blake

    Detailed urban-scale processing has not been included in global 3D chemical transport models due to its large computational demands. Here we present a metamodel for including this processing, and compare it with the use ...

  7. Passport Scanning: Quick guide First enter the passport number on CMS (Personal Details form) if not already present.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    Passport Scanning: Quick guide First enter the passport number on CMS (Personal Details form) if not already present. Before scanning the passport, make sure that the `Category' option (1) is set to `Passport'. Scan the image

  8. Interaction of the magnetic field with plasmas is an in-triguing subject of modern plasma physics. Detailed and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Abstract Interaction of the magnetic field with plasmas is an in- triguing subject of modern plasma physics. Detailed and reliable measurements of the key plasma parameters, as well

  9. This paper works out in detail an interpretation of Buss' theory S 1 into the Ferreira's theory b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollett, Chris

    This paper works out in detail an interpretation of Buss' theory S 1 2 , [1], into the Ferreira clear and well-written. References [1] S. Buss. Bounded Arithmetic. Bibliopolis, Napoli (1986). [2] F

  10. This paper works out in detail an interpretation of Buss' theory S1 into the Ferreira's theory b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollett, Chris

    This paper works out in detail an interpretation of Buss' theory S1 2, [1], into the Ferreira. Buss. Bounded Arithmetic. Bibliopolis, Napoli (1986). [2] F. Ferreira. Polynomial Time Computable

  11. SECTION 1: APPLICANT DETAILS Surname (as on Passport) First Name Middle Initial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qualification SECTION 3: EDUCATIONAL HISTORY Name of Exam Year Taken List Subjects and Results Schools Attended note that Irish State Exam results are available from the State Examinations Board e-mail: statements. Signature Date I agree to be bound by the rules and regulations of UCD Dublin. secTion 6: si

  12. Combustion in Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engines: Experiments and Detailed Chemical Kinetic Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flowers, D L

    2002-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines are being considered as an alternative to diesel engines. The HCCI concept involves premixing fuel and air prior to induction into the cylinder (as is done in current spark-ignition engine) then igniting the fuel-air mixture through the compression process (as is done in current diesel engines). The combustion occurring in an HCCI engine is fundamentally different from a spark-ignition or Diesel engine in that the heat release occurs as a global autoignition process, as opposed to the turbulent flame propagation or mixing controlled combustion used in current engines. The advantage of this global autoignition is that the temperatures within the cylinder are uniformly low, yielding very low emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}, the chief precursors to photochemical smog). The inherent features of HCCI combustion allows for design of engines with efficiency comparable to, or potentially higher than, diesel engines. While HCCI engines have great potential, several technical barriers exist which currently prevent widespread commercialization of this technology. The most significant challenge is that the combustion timing cannot be controlled by typical in-cylinder means. Means of controlling combustion have been demonstrated, but a robust control methodology that is applicable to the entire range of operation has yet to be developed. This research focuses on understanding basic characteristics of controlling and operating HCCI engines. Experiments and detailed chemical kinetic simulations have been applied to the characterize some of the fundamental operational and design characteristics of HCCI engines. Experiments have been conducted on single and multi-cylinder engines to investigate general features of how combustion timing affects the performance and emissions of HCCI engines. Single-zone modeling has been used to characterize and compare the implementation of different control strategies. Multi-zone modeling has been applied to investigate combustion chamber design with respect to increasing efficiency and reducing emissions in HCCI engines.

  13. Autoignition of toluene reference fuels at high pressures modeled with detailed chemical kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrae, J.C.G. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Shell Global Solutions, P.O. Box 1, Chester CH1 3SH (United Kingdom); Bjoernbom, P. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Cracknell, R.F.; Kalghatgi, G.T. [Shell Global Solutions, P.O. Box 1, Chester CH1 3SH (United Kingdom)

    2007-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed chemical kinetic model for the autoignition of toluene reference fuels (TRF) is presented. The toluene submechanism added to the Lawrence Livermore Primary Reference Fuel (PRF) mechanism was developed using recent shock tube autoignition delay time data under conditions relevant to HCCI combustion. For two-component fuels the model was validated against recent high-pressure shock tube autoignition delay time data for a mixture consisting of 35% n-heptane and 65% toluene by liquid volume. Important features of the autoignition of the mixture proved to be cross-acceleration effects, where hydroperoxy radicals produced during n-heptane oxidation dramatically increased the oxidation rate of toluene compared to the case when toluene alone was oxidized. Rate constants for the reaction of benzyl and hydroperoxyl radicals previously used in the modeling of the oxidation of toluene alone were untenably high for modeling of the mixture. To model both systems it was found necessary to use a lower rate and introduce an additional branching route in the reaction between benzyl radicals and O{sub 2}. Good agreement between experiments and predictions was found when the model was validated against shock tube autoignition delay data for gasoline surrogate fuels consisting of mixtures of 63-69% isooctane, 14-20% toluene, and 17% n-heptane by liquid volume. Cross reactions such as hydrogen abstractions between toluene and alkyl and alkylperoxy radicals and between the PRF were introduced for completion of chemical description. They were only of small importance for modeling autoignition delays from shock tube experiments, even at low temperatures. A single-zone engine model was used to evaluate how well the validated mechanism could capture autoignition behavior of toluene reference fuels in a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine. The model could qualitatively predict the experiments, except in the case with boosted intake pressure, where the initial temperature had to be increased significantly in order to predict the point of autoignition. (author)

  14. Assessment of the peat resources of Florida, with a detailed survey of the northern everglades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, G.M.; Wieland, C.C.; Hood, L.Q.; Goode, R.W. III; Sawyer, R.K.; McNeill, D.F.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Available data, including previous publications, modern soil surveys, and detailed coring in the Northern Everglades for this project have been used to update information on Florida's peat resources. It is now estimated that Florida could, if no other constraints existed, produce 606 million tons of moisture-free fuel-grade peat, which may yield approximately 10.0 x 10/sup 15/ Btu of energy. These estimates are much lower than previously published projections for the state. The principal effort of this survey was in the largest peat region of the state, the Northern Everglades of Palm Beach and adjacent counties, where more than 800 core holes were drilled. Based on analyses of these cores, the Northern Everglades is now estimated to contain 191 million tons of moisture-free peat, with a potential energy yield of 2.98 x 10/sup 15/ Btu. These values are considerably less than previously published estimates, probably due to bacterial oxidation and other forms of drainage-induced subsidence in the Everglades agricultural areas. The present fuel-peat resources of the Northern Everglades occur in 19 separate deposits. Of these, the deposits in the Port Mayaca, Bryant, Six Mile Bend, and Loxahatchee Quadrangles comprise the highest concentration of the resource. These lands are generally privately owned and used for sugar cane and other crops, and the conversion of these lands to peat removal seems unlikely. It seems even less likely that the extensive peat deposits within the Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge will be available for fuel use, barring a dire national emergency. The utilization of peat as a fuel must be approached with caution and careful study; large scale use may require state or federal action. 34 references.

  15. Hazard analysis results report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niemi, B.J., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes and defines the Hazard Analysis Results for the Tank Waste Remediation System Final Safety Analysis Report.

  16. Quantitative Analysis of Biofuel Sustainability, Including Land Use Change GHG Emissions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plenary V: Biofuels and Sustainability: Acknowledging Challenges and Confronting MisconceptionsQuantitative Analysis of Biofuel Sustainability, Including Land Use Change GHG EmissionsJennifer B....

  17. 11.220 Quantitative Reasoning and Statistical Method for Planning I, Spring 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zegras, P. Christopher

    This course develops logical, empirically based arguments using statistical techniques and analytic methods. It covers elementary statistics, probability, and other types of quantitative reasoning useful for description, ...

  18. GINI COEFFICIENTS, SOCIAL NETWORK ANALYSIS, AND MARKOV CHAINS: QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR ANA-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GINI COEFFICIENTS, SOCIAL NETWORK ANALYSIS, AND MARKOV CHAINS: QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR ANA- LYZING Management Project No.: 538 Title of Project: Gini Coefficients, social network analysis and Markov Chains

  19. Network-constrained models of liberalized electricity markets: the devil is in the details

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barquin, J; Boots, M G; Ehrenmann, A; Hobbs, Benjamin F; Neuhoff, Karsten; Rijkers, F A M

    2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical models for electricity markets are frequently used to inform and support decisions. How robust are the results? Three research groups used the same, realistic data set for generators, demand and transmission network as input...

  20. Sulfur chemistry in the envelope of VY Canis Majoris: Detailed analysis of SO and SO{sub 2} emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adande, G. R.; Edwards, J. L.; Ziurys, L. M., E-mail: lziurys@email.arizona.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arizona, 1306 East University Boulevard, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed radiative transfer modeling has been carried out for SO{sub 2} and SO originating in the envelope of the O-rich supergiant star VY Canis Majoris (VY CMa). A total of 27 transitions of SO{sub 2} and 7 transitions of SO lying in the energy range 3.0-138.2 cm{sup –1} were analyzed using a new non-LTE radiative transfer code that incorporates non-spherical geometries. The spectra were primarily obtained from the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO) 1 mm spectral survey of VY CMa, conducted with the Submillimeter Telescope; additional lines were measured with the ARO 12 m antenna at 2 and 3 mm. SO{sub 2} and SO were found to arise from five distinct outflows within the envelope, four which are asymmetric with respect to the star. Three flows arise from high-velocity red-shifted material, one from a blue-shifted wind, and the final from a classic 'spherical' expansion. In the spherical component, the peak fractional abundance, relative to H{sub 2}, of both molecules is f ? 2.5 × 10{sup –7} at r ? 25 R {sub *}, and steadily decreases outward. SO{sub 2} appears to be a 'parent' molecule, formed near the stellar photosphere. In the asymmetric outflows, both SO and SO{sub 2} are more prominent at large stellar radii in dense (10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} cm{sup –3}), clumpy material, achieving their maximum abundance between 200 and 600 R {sub *} with f ? 3.0 × 10{sup –8}-1.5 × 10{sup –7}. These results suggest that in the collimated outflows, both species are either produced by shock chemistry or are remnant inner shell material swept up in the high-velocity winds.

  1. Geothermal: Search Results

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Search Results Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced Search New Hot Docs News Related Links The...

  2. User Survey Results | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    have accessed computing resources during the prior year. The results of the most recent survey are posted here with management responses to concerns or issues identified by our...

  3. Use of Quantitative Uncertainty Analysis to Support M&VDecisions in ESPCs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathew, Paul A.; Koehling, Erick; Kumar, Satish

    2005-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurement and Verification (M&V) is a critical elementof an Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC) - without M&V, thereisno way to confirm that the projected savings in an ESPC are in factbeing realized. For any given energy conservation measure in an ESPC,there are usually several M&V choices, which will vary in terms ofmeasurement uncertainty, cost, and technical feasibility. Typically,M&V decisions are made almost solely based on engineering judgmentand experience, with little, if any, quantitative uncertainty analysis(QUA). This paper describes the results of a pilot project initiated bythe Department of Energy s Federal Energy Management Program to explorethe use of Monte-Carlo simulation to assess savings uncertainty andthereby augment the M&V decision-making process in ESPCs. The intentwas to use QUA selectively in combination with heuristic knowledge, inorder to obtain quantitative estimates of the savings uncertainty withoutthe burden of a comprehensive "bottoms-up" QUA. This approach was used toanalyze the savings uncertainty in an ESPC for a large federal agency.The QUA was seamlessly integrated into the ESPC development process andthe incremental effort was relatively small with user-friendly tools thatare commercially available. As the case study illustrates, in some casesthe QUA simply confirms intuitive or qualitative information, while inother cases, it provides insight that suggests revisiting the M&Vplan. The case study also showed that M&V decisions should beinformed by the portfolio risk diversification. By providing quantitativeuncertainty information, QUA can effectively augment the M&Vdecision-making process as well as the overall ESPC financialanalysis.

  4. Demonstration of lactogenic receptors in rat endocrine pancreases by quantitative autoradiography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polak, M.; Scharfmann, R.; Ban, E.; Haour, F.; Postel-Vinay, M.C.; Czernichow, P. (National Institute of Health and Medical Research, Paris (France))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A direct effect of growth hormone and/or prolactin on the growth of the pancreatic beta-cell has been proposed. This study assessed the presence of human growth hormone (hGH)-binding sites in male adult rat endocrine pancreas via quantitative autoradiography. The binding of 125I-labeled hGH was evaluated by receptor autoradiography on frozen-pancreas cryostat cut sections. The sections were incubated with 125I-hGH (10(-10) M) for 75 min at room temperature, and nonspecific binding was determined in the presence of excess native hGH (5 X 10(-7) M). The specificity of the binding was assessed in competition experiments with bovine GH and ovine prolactin. The autoradiograms were quantified with a computer-assisted image-processing system. The sections were then stained to visualize the endocrine islets. Nondiabetic control and streptozocin (STZ)-injected rats were used. Our results show that (1) there is specific binding of iodinated hGH in small areas of the pancreas, which appear as the Langerhans islets when the autoradiogram and the stained sections are superimposed; (2) the specificity of hGH binding in rat islets is lactogenic; (3) the density of the hGH-binding sites in the endocrine pancreas is estimated at 4.8 fmol/mg protein, with IC50 ranging from 0.98 to 2.50 nM; and (4) binding sites may be present on the beta-cell, because specific binding disappears in STZ-injected rats. In conclusion, by use of a quantitative autoradiographic technique, we provide evidence for the presence of lactogenic receptors on rat beta-cells.

  5. Aleph Field Solver Challenge Problem Results Summary.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooper, Russell; Moore, Stan Gerald

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aleph models continuum electrostatic and steady and transient thermal fields using a finite-element method. Much work has gone into expanding the core solver capability to support enriched mod- eling consisting of multiple interacting fields, special boundary conditions and two-way interfacial coupling with particles modeled using Aleph's complementary particle-in-cell capability. This report provides quantitative evidence for correct implementation of Aleph's field solver via order- of-convergence assessments on a collection of problems of increasing complexity. It is intended to provide Aleph with a pedigree and to establish a basis for confidence in results for more challeng- ing problems important to Sandia's mission that Aleph was specifically designed to address.

  6. Overview of ALICE results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kryshen, E L

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Selected ALICE results on the global event properties, particle spectra, azimuthal anisotropy, heavy flavour and quarkonium production in Pb-Pb collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 2.76 TeV are presented. First results on p-Pb collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 5.02 TeV are briefly reviewed.

  7. Diffraction Results from CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goulianos, Konstantin

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present final results by the CDF II collaboration on diffractive W and Z production, report on the status of ongoing analyses on diffractive dijet production and on rapidity gaps between jets, and briefly summarize results obtained on exclusive production pointing to their relevance to calibrating theoretical models used to predict exclusive Higgs-boson production at the LHC.

  8. Recent results from TRISTAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enomoto, Ryoji [National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TRISTAN results on {gamma}{gamma} physics from 1994 to 1995 are reviewed in this report. We have systematically investigated jet production, the {gamma}-structure function, and charm pair production in {gamma}{gamma} processes. The results are discussed, and future prospects are presented.

  9. Overview of LHC physics results at ICHEP

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

     This month LHC physics day will review the physics results presented by the LHC experiments at the 2010 ICHEP in Paris. The experimental presentations will be preceeded by the bi-weekly LHC accelerator status report.The meeting will be broadcast via EVO (detailed info will appear at the time of the meeting in the "Video Services" item on the left menu bar)For those attending, information on accommodation, access to CERN and laptop registration is available from http://cern.ch/lpcc/visits

  10. Medical Radioisotope Data Survey: 2002 Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siciliano, Edward R.

    2004-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A limited, but accurate amount of detailed information about the radioactive isotopes used in the U.S. for medical procedures was collected from a local hospital and from a recent report on the U.S. Radiopharmaceutical Markets. These data included the total number of procedures, the specific types of procedures, the specific radioisotopes used in these procedures, and the dosage administered per procedure. The information from these sources was compiled, assessed, pruned, and then merged into a single, comprehensive and consistent set of results presented in this report. (PIET-43471-TM-197)

  11. Global Positioning System receiver evaluation results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byrne, R.H.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Sandia project currently uses an outdated Magnavox 6400 Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver as the core of its navigation system. The goal of this study was to analyze the performance of the current GPS receiver compared to newer, less expensive models and to make recommendations on how to improve the performance of the overall navigation system. This paper discusses the test methodology used to experimentally analyze the performance of different GPS receivers, the test results, and recommendations on how an upgrade should proceed. Appendices contain detailed information regarding the raw data, test hardware, and test software.

  12. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VISUALIZATION AND COMPUTER GRAPHICS 1 Interactive Level-of-Detail Selection Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chaoli

    . Experimental results on large scientific and medical data sets demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency, generated as part of the Visible Human Project. Another example is the Richtmyer-Meshkov Insta- bility (RMI are with the Department of Computer Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, 395 Dreese Laboratories, 2015 Neil

  13. Effect of Detailed Power System Models in Traditional and Voltage Stability Constrained

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cañizares, Claudio A.

    problems to improve the accuracy of the results. It is shown in [2] that reactive power limits play], [9], [10], it is demonstrated that reactive power limits play a significant role in voltage collapse of power systems. Therefore, particular attention is placed here to the modeling of reactive power limits

  14. Quantitative high dynamic range beam profiling for fluorescence microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, T. J., E-mail: t.j.mitchell@dur.ac.uk; Saunter, C. D.; O’Nions, W.; Girkin, J. M.; Love, G. D. [Centre for Advanced Instrumentation and Biophysical Sciences Institute, Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern developmental biology relies on optically sectioning fluorescence microscope techniques to produce non-destructive in vivo images of developing specimens at high resolution in three dimensions. As optimal performance of these techniques is reliant on the three-dimensional (3D) intensity profile of the illumination employed, the ability to directly record and analyze these profiles is of great use to the fluorescence microscopist or instrument builder. Though excitation beam profiles can be measured indirectly using a sample of fluorescent beads and recording the emission along the microscope detection path, we demonstrate an alternative approach where a miniature camera sensor is used directly within the illumination beam. Measurements taken using our approach are solely concerned with the illumination optics as the detection optics are not involved. We present a miniature beam profiling device and high dynamic range flux reconstruction algorithm that together are capable of accurately reproducing quantitative 3D flux maps over a large focal volume. Performance of this beam profiling system is verified within an optical test bench and demonstrated for fluorescence microscopy by profiling the low NA illumination beam of a single plane illumination microscope. The generality and success of this approach showcases a widely flexible beam amplitude diagnostic tool for use within the life sciences.

  15. Multi observation PET image analysis for patient follow-up quantitation and therapy assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brest, Université de

    1 Multi observation PET image analysis for patient follow-up quantitation and therapy assessment S Institut Telecom - Telecom Bretagne, Brest, F-29200 France. Abstract. In Positron Emission Tomography (PET-quantitative parameters restricted to maximum SUV measured in PET scans during the treatment. Such measurements do

  16. Fuel Cell Generation in Geo-Distributed Cloud Services: A Quantitative Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baochun

    Fuel Cell Generation in Geo-Distributed Cloud Services: A Quantitative Study Zhi Zhou1 Fangming Liu of fuel cell energy in cloud computing, yet it is unclear what and how much benefit it may bring. This paper, for the first time, attempts to quantitatively examine the benefits brought by fuel cell

  17. Quantitative Depth Recovery from Time-Varying Optical Flow in a Kalman Filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barron, John

    Quantitative Depth Recovery from Time-Varying Optical Flow in a Kalman Filter Framework John Barron Julich, 52425 Julich, Germany h.spies@fz-juelich.de Abstract. We present a Kalman lter framework, Depth from Optical Flow, Kalman Filter, 3D Camera Motion, Quantitative Error Analysis 1 Introduction We

  18. Guidelines for Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Digital PCR Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    this process we present the Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Digital PCR ExperimentsGuidelines for Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Digital PCR Experiments Jim F Vandesompele,6 Carl T. Wittwer,12 and Stephen A. Bustin13 There is growing interest in digital PCR (dPCR) be

  19. 1 Copyright 2014 by ASME SEMI-QUANTITATIVE RISK ASSESSMENT OF ADJACENT TRACK ACCIDENTS ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    1 Copyright © 2014 by ASME SEMI-QUANTITATIVE RISK ASSESSMENT OF ADJACENT TRACK ACCIDENTS ON SHARED risk analysis is developed to investigate various factors affecting train accident rate, intrusion rate and provides a basis for future quantitative risk analyses and risk mitigation implementations. NOMENCLATURE

  20. Four dimensional visualization of highly transient fuel sprays by microsecond quantitative x-ray tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Sol M.

    -resolved quantitative fuel distribution allowed a realistic numerical fluid dynamic simulation with initial conditions- timal for probing the fuel, a blend of a calibration fluid and a cerium-containing fuel additiveFour dimensional visualization of highly transient fuel sprays by microsecond quantitative x

  1. Quantitative analysis of infrared contrast enhancement algorithms Seth Weith-Glushko1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvaggio, Carl

    , and quantitatively evaluate infrared contrast enhancement algorithms for use in a real-time long-wave infrared imageQuantitative analysis of infrared contrast enhancement algorithms Seth Weith-Glushko1 and Carl range imagery output from current sensors are compressed in a pleasing way for display on lower dynamic

  2. Detection and Quantitation of -2-Microglobulin Glycosylated End Products in Human Serum by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    32, Columbia, Maryland 21044 -2-Microglobulin ( 2M) is a major protein component found in the amyloidDetection and Quantitation of -2-Microglobulin Glycosylated End Products in Human Serum by Matrix as a quantitative tool. -2-Microglobulin ( 2M) is a globular protein with 99 amino acids and is usually located

  3. The Quantitative Assessment of Risk Caused By Fire and Explosion in Chemical Process Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    The Quantitative Assessment of Risk Caused By Fire and Explosion in Chemical Process Industry Farid by the domino effect are the most destructive accidents related to industrial plants. Fire and explosion; Quantitative risk assessment; Explosions; Fires; Storage areas. 1. Introduction The accidents caused

  4. Extensions and evaluations of a general quantitative theory of forest structure and dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saleska, Scott

    Extensions and evaluations of a general quantitative theory of forest structure and dynamics Brian of a quantitative theory for the structure and dynamics of forests under demographic and resource steady state distribution competitive thinning Understanding the key forces that shape the structure, function, and dynamics

  5. Sensitivity and Scenario Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Winston

    Presents the results of various scenarios using models used to study water, climate, agriculture and the economy in Pakistan's Indus Basin, and discusses the policy and investment implications. The water allocations per ...

  6. Electroweak results from CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. S. Waters

    2004-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Inclusive W and Z production cross-sections have been measured by CDF and certain electroweak parameters extracted with high precision from these measurements. New results on diboson production at the Tevatron are also presented.

  7. ‘God is in the details’: visual culture of closeness in the circle of Cardinal Reginald Pole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Verpillière, Lorraine

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , a magnifying glass and a mirror, suggests that the poetess managed to project an enlarged version of the drawing in the mirror. As Hugo Chapman rightly suggested, ‘The reversal of the design, and the resulting image’s disassociation from the drawing... are several miniatures.82 Between 1548 and 1549, he commissioned one for the frontispiece of the 14 account book of the English Hospice in Rome, the Liber Rationarius Hospitalis, when he directed this institution: it represented the Holy Trinity, to whom...

  8. Recent MEG results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Cavoto

    2010-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    New results of a search for the ultra-rare decay $\\mu \\to e \\gamma$ by the MEG collaboration are reported in this contribution. The data were taken during 2009 and correspond to approximately 6.5 10$^{13}$ muon stopped on target. A maximum likelihood analysis sets an upper limit at 90\\% C.L. on the branching ratio, BF($\\mu \\to e \\gamma$) $< $1.5 10$^{-11}$. The results presented here are preliminary.

  9. Detailed validation of an empirical model for viscous fingering with gravity effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fayers, F.J.; Newley, T.M.J.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper extends to two-dimensional (2D) flows the derivation and validation of an empirical model for viscous fingering previously developed. Fine-scale numerical simulations are used to provide basic data for validating the approximations, and these fingering results are also checked against a range of experiments. The flow rate dependence of gravity segregation in vertical section experiments conducted by van der Poel is examined, where the broadly acceptable agreement of the empirical model is limited by some identified additional features.

  10. NURE aerial gamma ray and magnetic detail survey of portions of northeast Washington. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Northeast Washington Survey was performed under the United States Department of Energy's National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program, which is designed to provide radioelement distribution information to assist in assessing the uraniferous material potential of the United States. The radiometric and ancilliary data were digitally recorded and processed. The results are presented in the form of stacked profiles, contour maps, flight path maps, statistical tables and frequency distribution histograms. These graphical outputs are presented at a scale of 1:62,500 and are contained in the individual Volume 2 reports.

  11. Detailed design, fabrication and testing of an engineering prototype compensated pulsed alternator. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, W.L. Jr.; Woodson, H.H.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design, fabrication, and test results of a prototype compensated pulsed alternator are discussed. The prototype compulsator is a vertical shaft single phase alternator with a rotating armature and salient pole stator. The machine is designed for low rep rate pulsed duty and is sized to drive a modified 10 cm Beta amplifier. The load consists of sixteen 15 mm x 20 mm x 112 cm long xenon flashlamps connected in parallel. The prototype compulsator generates an open circuit voltage of 6 kV, 180 Hz, at a maximum design speed of 5400 rpm. At maximum speed, the inertial energy stored in the compulsator rotor is 3.4 megajoules.

  12. On the Quantitative Impact of the Schechter-Valle Theorem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Duerr; Manfred Lindner; Alexander Merle

    2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluate the Schechter-Valle (Black Box) theorem quantitatively by considering the most general Lorentz invariant Lagrangian consisting of point-like operators for neutrinoless double beta decay. It is well known that the Black Box operators induce Majorana neutrino masses at four-loop level. This warrants the statement that an observation of neutrinoless double beta decay guarantees the Majorana nature of neutrinos. We calculate these radiatively generated masses and find that they are many orders of magnitude smaller than the observed neutrino masses and splittings. Thus, some lepton number violating New Physics (which may at tree-level not be related to neutrino masses) may induce Black Box operators which can explain an observed rate of neutrinoless double beta decay. Although these operators guarantee finite Majorana neutrino masses, the smallness of the Black Box contributions implies that other neutrino mass terms (Dirac or Majorana) must exist. If neutrino masses have a significant Majorana contribution then this will become the dominant part of the Black Box operator. However, neutrinos might also be predominantly Dirac particles, while other lepton number violating New Physics dominates neutrinoless double beta decay. Translating an observed rate of neutrinoless double beta decay into neutrino masses would then be completely misleading. Although the principal statement of the Schechter-Valle theorem remains valid, we conclude that the Black Box diagram itself generates radiatively only mass terms which are many orders of magnitude too small to explain neutrino masses. Therefore, other operators must give the leading contributions to neutrino masses, which could be of Dirac or Majorana nature.

  13. Development of Comprehensive Detailed and Reduced Reaction Mechanisms for Syngas and Hydrogen Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chih-Jen Sung; Hai Wang; Angela Violi

    2009-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The collaborative research initiative culminated in amassing a substantial combustion database of experimental results for dry and moist mixtures of syngas and hydrogen (SGH), including autoignition times using a rapid compression machine as well as laminar flame speeds using a counterflow twin-flame configuration. These experimental data provided the basis for assessment of the kinetics of SGH combustion at elevated pressures using global uncertainty analysis methods. A review of the fundamental combustion characteristics of H{sub 2}/CO mixtures, with emphasis on ignition and flame propagation at high pressures was also conducted to understand the state of the art in SGH combustion. Investigation of the reaction kinetics of CO+HO{sub 2}{center_dot} {yields} CO{sub 2} + {center_dot}OH and HO{sub 2}+OH {yields} H{sub 2}O+O{sub 2} by ab initio calculations and master equation modeling was further carried out in order to look into the discrepancies between the experimental data and the results predicted by the mechanisms.

  14. A Plug-in Hybrid Consumer Choice Model with Detailed Market Segmentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Zhenhong [ORNL] [ORNL; Greene, David L [ORNL] [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a consumer choice model for projecting U.S. demand for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) in competition among 13 light-duty vehicle technologies over the period 2005-2050. New car buyers are disaggregated by region, residential area, attitude toward technology risk, vehicle usage intensity, home parking and work recharging. The nested multinomial logit (NMNL) model of vehicle choice incorporates daily vehicle usage distributions, refueling and recharging availability, technology learning by doing, and diversity of choice among makes and models. Illustrative results are presented for a Base Case, calibrated to the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) 2009 Reference Updated Case, and an optimistic technology scenario reflecting achievement of U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE s) FreedomCAR goals. PHEV market success is highly dependent on the degree of technological progress assumed. PHEV sales reach one million in 2037 in the Base Case but in 2020 in the FreedomCARGoals Case. In the FreedomCARGoals Case, PHEV cumulative sales reach 1.5 million by 2015. Together with efficiency improvements in other technologies, petroleum use in 2050 is reduced by about 45% from the 2005 level. After technological progress, PHEV s market success appears to be most sensitive to recharging availability, consumers attitudes toward novel echnologies, and vehicle usage intensity. Successful market penetration of PHEVs helps bring down battery costs for electric vehicles (EVs), resulting in a significant EV market share after 2040.

  15. Proceedings of the Combustion Institute, Volume 28, 2000/pp. 16631669 COMBUSTION CHEMISTRY OF PROPANE: A CASE STUDY OF DETAILED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hai

    1663 Proceedings of the Combustion Institute, Volume 28, 2000/pp. 1663­1669 COMBUSTION CHEMISTRY Detailed chemical reaction mechanisms describing hydrocarbon combustion chemistry are conceptually to small-hydrocarbon combustion data are secure foundations upon which to optimize the rate parameters

  16. Details of the Electro-Mechanical (E/M) Impedance Health Monitoring of Spot-Welded Structural Joints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    1 Details of the Electro-Mechanical (E/M) Impedance Health Monitoring of Spot-Welded Structural sensors for health monitoring spot-welded structural joints. Experiments were performed on aluminum-electric transducer; Crack propagation; Crack detection. 1. INTRODUCTION Health monitoring of structural joints

  17. The Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium. Quarterly progress detailed report, 1 November 1996--31 January 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress for this quarter is given for each of the following Center programs: (1) plutonium information resource; (2) advisory function (DOE and state support); (3) environmental, public health and safety; (3) communication, education, and training; and (4) nuclear and other material studies. Both summaries of the activities and detailed reports are included.

  18. Development of a precise size-controllable pellet injector for the detailed studies of ablation phenomena and mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Development of a precise size-controllable pellet injector for the detailed studies of ablation, pellet injection experiments have been actively carried out in many toroidal devices in the sense. In order to have a common measure of pellet ablation, the regression study has been performed

  19. Heating in the tropical atmosphere: what level of detail is critical for accurate MJO simulations in GCMs?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heating in the tropical atmosphere: what level of detail is critical for accurate MJO simulations processes that affect heating in some facet. In this study, we examine various heating adjustments in Community Atmospheric Model version 4 (CAM4) to determine what the vertical and horizontal heating

  20. REQUIRED SECTIONS OF YOUR PROFILE Create your profile, be as detailed as possible. The following sections are required

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiblen, George D

    Page 1 REQUIRED SECTIONS OF YOUR PROFILE Create your profile, be as detailed as possible of the SELP program requirements is that you need to create a Linkedin profile. To learn more about how to use. It is not required, but you may want to also add other organizations you are part of to this section of your profile

  1. Clinical Instructor Responsibilities The APTA has detailed voluntary guidelines for clinical instructors. The guidelines are divided into six key

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chisholm, Rex L.

    Clinical Instructor Responsibilities The APTA has detailed voluntary guidelines for clinical instructors. The guidelines are divided into six key areas: · Clinical competence and legal and ethical and final). Northwestern University expects clinical instructors to: 1. Possess a desire to guide students

  2. A DETAILED RESEARCH PLAN TO ASSESS BEHAVIOR OF ADULT SUMMER/FALL CHINOOK UPSTREAM OF WELLS DAM USING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A DETAILED RESEARCH PLAN TO ASSESS BEHAVIOR OF ADULT SUMMER/FALL CHINOOK UPSTREAM OF WELLS DAM-8295 Final Draft April 19, 2004 #12;BioAnalysts, Inc Summer/Fall Chinook Research Plan Chief Joseph Dam Page........................................................................ 11 3.6.3 Chief Joseph Dam Powerhouse

  3. Detailed Hydration Maps of Benzene and Cyclohexane Reveal Distinct Water Structures Tanya M. Raschke* and Michael Levitt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raschke, Tanya M.

    Detailed Hydration Maps of Benzene and Cyclohexane Reveal Distinct Water Structures Tanya M of the hydrophobic solutes benzene and cyclohexane were investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations O and H atoms surrounding either benzene or cyclohexane were generated from the simulation data. MD

  4. This content has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text. Download details

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    -limited and shaped pulses the multiphoton and avalanche coefficients were determined using a generic rate equationThis content has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text. Download details: IP Address: 134.106.40.32 This content was downloaded on 13/01/2014 at 11:29 Please note

  5. Multiphysics modeling of carbon gasification processes in a well-stirred reactor with detailed gas-phase chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiao, Li

    : Coal gasification Carbon gasification Detailed chemistry Heterogeneous surface reactions Radiation Multi-physics numerical modeling a b s t r a c t Fuel synthesis through coal and biomass gasification Fuel synthesis through coal gasification offers a potential solu- tion to the problem of increasing

  6. Crosswell Seismic Amplitude-Versus-Offset for Detailed Imaging of Facies and Fluid Distribution within Carbonate Oil Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crosswell Seismic Amplitude-Versus-Offset for Detailed Imaging of Facies and Fluid Distribution, and demonstrate a method of using crosswell seismic profiling for identification of trapped oil, bypassed reservoir compartments, and location of fluid fronts in carbonate reefs. The method of crosswell seismic

  7. First Results from BNL E949 on K+ Steve Kettell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the experiment · ...some details · The results · Conclusions Fermilab Wine & Cheese, April 1, 2004 CPviolation Laboratory (FNAL)U.S. Department of EnergyU.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Measuring ÁVtd Áwith E949 at BNLFukui University Institute for High Energy Physics (IHEP) Institute for Nuclear Research

  8. Quantitative mineralogical composition of complex mineral wastes - Contribution of the Rietveld method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahieux, P.-Y. [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INSA, LMDC (Laboratoire Materiaux et Durabilite des Constructions), 135, Avenue de Rangueil, F-31 077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Aubert, J.-E., E-mail: aubert@insa-toulouse.f [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INSA, LMDC (Laboratoire Materiaux et Durabilite des Constructions), 135, Avenue de Rangueil, F-31 077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Cyr, M.; Coutand, M.; Husson, B. [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INSA, LMDC (Laboratoire Materiaux et Durabilite des Constructions), 135, Avenue de Rangueil, F-31 077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the work presented in this paper is the quantitative determination of the mineral composition of two complex mineral wastes: a sewage sludge ash (SSA) and a municipal solid waste incineration fly ash (MSWIFA). The mineral compositions were determined by two different methods: the first based on calculation using the qualitative mineralogical composition of the waste combined with physicochemical analyses; the second the Rietveld method, which uses only X-ray diffraction patterns. The results obtained are coherent, showing that it is possible to quantify the mineral compositions of complex mineral waste with such methods. The apparent simplicity of the Rietveld method (due principally to the availability of software packages implementing the method) facilitates its use. However, care should be taken since the crystal structure analysis based on powder diffraction data needs experience and a thorough understanding of crystallography. So the use of another, complementary, method such as the first one used in this study, may sometimes be needed to confirm the results.

  9. Plans, Implementation, and Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bioenergy Technologies Office carries out technology research, development, and deployment through an ongoing process of planning and analysis, implementation, and review. This Web page includes links to documents that support and document the program management process, and the results and public benefits that derive from it.

  10. Recent results from MAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MAC Collaboration

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some preliminary results from the MAC detector at PEP are presented. These include measurements of the angular distribution of ..gamma gamma.., ..mu mu.. and tau tau final states, a determination of the tau lifetime, a measurement of R, and a presentation of the inclusive muon p/sub perpendicular/ distribution for hadronic events.

  11. Sensitivity of natural gas HCCI combustion to fuel and operating parameters using detailed kinetic modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aceves, S; Dibble, R; Flowers, D; Smith, J R; Westbrook, C K

    1999-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper uses the HCT (Hydrodynamics, Chemistry and Transport) chemical kinetics code to analyze natural gas HCCI combustion in an engine. The HCT code has been modified to better represent the conditions existing inside an engine, including a wall heat transfer correlation. Combustion control and low power output per displacement remain as two of the biggest challenges to obtaining satisfactory performance out of an HCCI engine, and these are addressed in this paper. The paper considers the effect of natural gas composition on HCCI combustion, and then explores three control strategies for HCCI engines: DME (dimethyl ether) addition, intake heating and hot EGR addition. The results show that HCCI combustion is sensitive to natural gas composition, and an active control may be required to compensate for possible changes in composition. The three control strategies being considered have a significant effect in changing the combustion parameters for the engine, and should be able to control HCCI combustion.

  12. Thank you for your participation in the HHIM 2010 Conference! This note contains several last-minute details regarding your presentations and logistics.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    -minute details regarding your presentations and logistics. Please let me know as soon as possible what platform

  13. Sept, 1998./D. Barker, TJNAF.& S. Lewis, LBNL1 of 32EPICS Tutorial: Detail Intended for an audience of EPICS application developers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sept, 1998./D. Barker, TJNAF.& S. Lewis, LBNL1 of 32EPICS Tutorial: Detail Intended for an audience, 1998./D. Barker, TJNAF.& S. Lewis, LBNL2 of 32EPICS Tutorial: Detail ·Ai, Ao Analog In/Out. Read, 1998./D. Barker, TJNAF.& S. Lewis, LBNL3 of 32EPICS Tutorial: Detail Database records do not always

  14. Analysis of High-Penetration Levels of Photovoltaics into the Distribution Grid on Oahu, Hawaii: Detailed Analysis of HECO Feeder WF1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, E.; MacPherson, J.; Vasilic, S.; Nakafuji, D.; Aukai, T.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Renewable generation is growing at a rapid rate due to the incentives available and the aggressive renewable portfolio standard targets implemented by state governments. Distributed generation in particular is seeing the fastest growth among renewable energy projects, and is directly related to the incentives. Hawaii has the highest electricity costs in the country due to the high percentage of oil burning steam generation, and therefore has some of the highest penetration of distributed PV in the nation. The High Penetration PV project on Oahu aims to understand the effects of high penetration PV on the distribution level, to identify penetration levels creating disturbances on the circuit, and to offer mitigating solutions based on model results. Power flow models are validated using data collected from solar resources and load monitors deployed throughout the circuit. Existing interconnection methods and standards are evaluated in these emerging high penetration scenarios. A key finding is a shift in the level of detail to be considered and moving away from steady-state peak time analysis towards dynamic and time varying simulations. Each level of normal interconnection study is evaluated and enhanced to a new level of detail, allowing full understanding of each issue.

  15. Coupling geostatistics to detailed reservoir description allows better visualization and more accurate characterization/simulation of turbidite reservoirs: Elk Hills oil field, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allan, M.E.; Wilson, M.L.; Wightman, J. [Bechtel Petroleum, Elk Hills, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Elk Hills giant oilfield, located in the southern San Joaquin Valley of California, has produced 1.1 billion barrels of oil from Miocene and shallow Pliocene reservoirs. 65% of the current 64,000 BOPD production is from the pressure-supported, deeper Miocene turbidite sands. In the turbidite sands of the 31 S structure, large porosity & permeability variations in the Main Body B and Western 31 S sands cause problems with the efficiency of the waterflooding. These variations have now been quantified and visualized using geostatistics. The end result is a more detailed reservoir characterization for simulation. Traditional reservoir descriptions based on marker correlations, cross-sections and mapping do not provide enough detail to capture the short-scale stratigraphic heterogeneity needed for adequate reservoir simulation. These deterministic descriptions are inadequate to tie with production data as the thinly bedded sand/shale sequences blur into a falsely homogenous picture. By studying the variability of the geologic & petrophysical data vertically within each wellbore and spatially from well to well, a geostatistical reservoir description has been developed. It captures the natural variability of the sands and shales that was lacking from earlier work. These geostatistical studies allow the geologic and petrophysical characteristics to be considered in a probabilistic model. The end-product is a reservoir description that captures the variability of the reservoir sequences and can be used as a more realistic starting point for history matching and reservoir simulation.

  16. Coupling geostatistics to detailed reservoir description allows better visualization and more accurate characterization/simulation of turbidite reservoirs: Elk Hills oil field, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allan, M.E.; Wilson, M.L.; Wightman, J. (Bechtel Petroleum, Elk Hills, CA (United States))

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Elk Hills giant oilfield, located in the southern San Joaquin Valley of California, has produced 1.1 billion barrels of oil from Miocene and shallow Pliocene reservoirs. 65% of the current 64,000 BOPD production is from the pressure-supported, deeper Miocene turbidite sands. In the turbidite sands of the 31 S structure, large porosity permeability variations in the Main Body B and Western 31 S sands cause problems with the efficiency of the waterflooding. These variations have now been quantified and visualized using geostatistics. The end result is a more detailed reservoir characterization for simulation. Traditional reservoir descriptions based on marker correlations, cross-sections and mapping do not provide enough detail to capture the short-scale stratigraphic heterogeneity needed for adequate reservoir simulation. These deterministic descriptions are inadequate to tie with production data as the thinly bedded sand/shale sequences blur into a falsely homogenous picture. By studying the variability of the geologic petrophysical data vertically within each wellbore and spatially from well to well, a geostatistical reservoir description has been developed. It captures the natural variability of the sands and shales that was lacking from earlier work. These geostatistical studies allow the geologic and petrophysical characteristics to be considered in a probabilistic model. The end-product is a reservoir description that captures the variability of the reservoir sequences and can be used as a more realistic starting point for history matching and reservoir simulation.

  17. Tevatron Top Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christophe Clement

    2006-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    I present the latest results from the CDF and D0 collaborations on top quark production (single top and top quark pair production) at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider at sqrt(s) =1.96 TeV, measurements of the top quark decay properties such as the branching ratio B(t -> Wb), the W helicity in t -> Wb decays, and measurements of fundamental parameters such as the top quark charge and mass.

  18. Double Chooz: Latest results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. I. Crespo-Anadón; for the Double Chooz collaboration

    2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The latest results from the Double Chooz experiment on the neutrino mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ are presented. A detector located at an average distance of 1050 m from the two reactor cores of the Chooz nuclear power plant has accumulated a live time of 467.90 days, corresponding to an exposure of 66.5 GW-ton-year (reactor power $\\times$ detector mass $\\times$ live time). A revised analysis has boosted the signal efficiency and reduced the backgrounds and systematic uncertainties compared to previous publications, paving the way for the two detector phase. The measured $\\sin^2 2\\theta_{13} = 0.090^{+0.032}_{-0.029}$ is extracted from a fit to the energy spectrum. A deviation from the prediction above a visible energy of 4 MeV is found, being consistent with an unaccounted reactor flux effect, which does not affect the $\\theta_{13}$ result. A consistent value of $\\theta_{13}$ is measured in a rate-only fit to the number of observed candidates as a function of the reactor power, confirming the robustness of the result.

  19. Who Will More Likely Buy PHEV: A Detailed Market Segmentation Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Zhenhong [ORNL] [ORNL; Greene, David L [ORNL] [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the diverse PHEV purchase behaviors among prospective new car buyers is key for designing efficient and effective policies for promoting new energy vehicle technologies. The ORNL MA3T model developed for the U.S. Department of Energy is described and used to project PHEV purchase probabilities by different consumers. MA3T disaggregates the U.S. household vehicle market into 1458 consumer segments based on region, residential area, driver type, technology attitude, home charging availability and work charging availability and is calibrated to the EIA s Annual Energy Outlook. Simulation results from MA3T are used to identify the more likely PHEV buyers and provide explanations. It is observed that consumers who have home charging, drive more frequently and live in urban area are more likely to buy a PHEV. Early adopters are projected to be more likely PHEV buyers in the early market, but the PHEV purchase probability by the late majority consumer can increase over time when PHEV gradually becomes a familiar product. Copyright Form of EVS25.

  20. Robins Air Force Base Integrated Resource Assessment. Volume 2, Baseline Detail

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, J.M.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Larson, L.L.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at Robins Air Force Base (AFB), a US Air Force Materiel Command facility located near Macon, Georgia. This is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 3, Integrated Resource Assessment. The US Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC) has tasked the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Robins AFB. This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This program (1) identifies and evaluates all cost-effective energy projects; (2) develops a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) targets 100% of the financing required to implement energy efficiency projects. PNL applied this model program to Robins AFB. The analysis examines the characteristics of electric, natural gas, oil, propane, and wood chip use for fiscal year 1991. The results include energy-use intensities for the facilities at Robins AFB by building type, fuel type, and energy end use. A complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that accounts for the distribution of all major energy uses and losses among buildings, utilities, and central systems.

  1. Quantitative analysis of silicate certified reference materials by LA-ICPMS with and without an internal standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    August 2008 DOI: 10.1039/b801807n Quantitative analysis of silicate minerals by laser ablation Quantitative analysis of silicates by laser ablation inductively- coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA

  2. A TEM quantitative evaluation of strengthening in an Mg-RE alloy reinforced with SiC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabibbo, Marcello, E-mail: m.cabibbo@univpm.it; Spigarelli, Stefano

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnesium alloys containing rare earth elements are known to have high specific strength, good creep and corrosion resistance up to 523 K. The addition of SiC ceramic particles strengthens the metal matrix composite resulting in better wear and creep resistance while maintaining good machinability. The role of the reinforcement particles in enhancing strength can be quantitatively evaluated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). This paper presents a quantitative evaluation of the different strengthening contributions, determined through TEM inspections, in an SiC Mg-RE composite alloy containing yttrium, neodymium, gadolinium and dysprosium. Compression tests at temperatures ranging between 290 and 573 K were carried out. The microstructure strengthening mechanism was studied for all the compression conditions. Strengthening was compared to the mechanical results and the way the different contributions were combined is also discussed and justified. - Research Highlights: {yields} TEM yield strengthening terms evaluation on a Mg-RE SiC alloy. {yields} The evaluation has been extended to different compression temperature conditions. {yields} Linear and Quadratic sum has been proposed and validated. {yields} Hall-Petch was found to be the most prominent strengthening contributions.

  3. Results on the disconnected contributions for hadron structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constantia Alexandrou; Martha Constantinou; Vincent Drach; Kyriakos Hadjiyiannakou; Karl Jansen; Giannis Koutsou; Alejandro Vaquero

    2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results on the disconnected contributions to three point functions entering in studies of hadron structure. We use $N_F = 2+1+1$ twisted mass fermions and give a detailed description on the results of the nucleon {\\sigma}-terms, isoscalar axial charge and first moments of bare parton distributions for a range of pions masses. In addition we give the {\\sigma}-terms and the computations are performed using QUDA code implemented on GPUs.

  4. Quantitative electron density characterization of soft tissue substitute plastic materials using grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarapata, A.; Chabior, M.; Zanette, I.; Pfeiffer, F. [Lehrstuhl für Biomedizinische Physik, Physik-Department and Institut für Medizintechnik, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Cozzini, C.; Sperl, J. I.; Bequé, D. [GE Global Research, 85748 Garching (Germany); Langner, O.; Coman, J. [QRM GmbH, Möhrendorf (Germany); Ruiz-Yaniz, M. [Lehrstuhl für Biomedizinische Physik, Physik-Department and Institut für Medizintechnik, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Many scientific research areas rely on accurate electron density characterization of various materials. For instance in X-ray optics and radiation therapy, there is a need for a fast and reliable technique to quantitatively characterize samples for electron density. We present how a precise measurement of electron density can be performed using an X-ray phase-contrast grating interferometer in a radiographic mode of a homogenous sample in a controlled geometry. A batch of various plastic materials was characterized quantitatively and compared with calculated results. We found that the measured electron densities closely match theoretical values. The technique yields comparable results between a monochromatic and a polychromatic X-ray source. Measured electron densities can be further used to design dedicated X-ray phase contrast phantoms and the additional information on small angle scattering should be taken into account in order to exclude unsuitable materials.

  5. Recent Results from HAPPEX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Michaels

    2006-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    New measurements of the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic scattering of 3GeV electrons off hydrogen and helium-4 targets at theta{sub lab} = 6 degrees are reported. The helium-4 result is A = (+6.40 {+-} 0.23 (stat) {+-} 0.12 (syst)) * 10{sup -6}. The hydrogen result is A = (-1.58 {+-} 0.12 (stat) {+-} 0.04 (syst)) * 10{sup -6}. The asymmetry for hydrogen is a function of a linear combination of G{sub E}{sup s} and G{sub M}{sup s}, the strange quark contributions to the electric and magnetic form factors of the nucleon respectively, and that for helium-4 is a function solely of G{sub E}{sup s}. The combination of the two measurements separates G{sub E}{sup s} and G{sub M}{sup s} and provide new limits on the role of strange quarks in the nucleon charge and magnetization distributions. We extract G{sub E}{sup s} = 0.002 {+-} 0.014 {+-} 0.007 at Q{sup 2} = 0.077 GeV{sup 2} and G{sub E}{sup s} + 0.09 G{sub M}{sup s} = 0.007 {+-} 0.011 {+-} 0.006 at Q{sup 2} = 0.109 GeV{sup 2}.

  6. Organic Separation Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2014-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Separable organics have been defined as “those organic compounds of very limited solubility in the bulk waste and that can form a separate liquid phase or layer” (Smalley and Nguyen 2013), and result from three main solvent extraction processes: U Plant Uranium Recovery Process, B Plant Waste Fractionation Process, and Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Process. The primary organic solvents associated with tank solids are TBP, D2EHPA, and NPH. There is concern that, while this organic material is bound to the sludge particles as it is stored in the tanks, waste feed delivery activities, specifically transfer pump and mixer pump operations, could cause the organics to form a separated layer in the tank farms feed tank. Therefore, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is experimentally evaluating the potential of organic solvents separating from the tank solids (sludge) during waste feed delivery activities, specifically the waste mixing and transfer processes. Given the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste acceptance criteria per the Waste Feed Acceptance Criteria document (24590-WTP-RPT-MGT-11-014) that there is to be “no visible layer” of separable organics in the waste feed, this would result in the batch being unacceptable to transfer to WTP. This study is of particular importance to WRPS because of these WTP requirements.

  7. The Impact of Oil Consumption Mechanisms on Diesel Exhaust Particle Size Distributions and Detailed Exhaust Chemical Composition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stetter, J; Forster, N; Ghandhi, J; Foster, D

    2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed exhaust emission data have been taken from a Cummins N-14 single cylinder research engine in which the oil consumption was varied by different engine modifications. Low sulfur fuel was used, and oil consumption was varied by modifying the intake valve stem seals, the exhaust valve stem seals, the oil control ring and combinations of these modifications. Detailed measurements of exhaust gas particle size distributions and chemical composition were made for the various oil consumption configurations for a range of engine loads and speeds. The particulate mass was measured with TEOM and traditional gravimetric filter methods. Filter data for EC/OC, sulfates and trace metals have been taken and analyzed. The trace metals in the particulate mass serve as the basis for assessing oil consumption at the different operating conditions. The data indicate that the oil consumption for the steady state testing done here was approximately an order of magnitude below oil consumption values cited in the literature. We did measure changes in the details of the chemical composition of the particulate for the different engine operating conditions, but it did not correlate with changes in the oil consumption. Furthermore, the data indicate that the particle size distribution is not strongly impacted by low level oil consumption variations observed in this work.

  8. The Application of Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy to Quantitatively Map Mixing and Temperature in Microfluidic Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Emmelyn M

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technique of Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) has been employed to quantitatively and spatially map the fluid composition and temperature within microfluidic systems. A molecular probe with a ...

  9. Quantitative performance-based evaluation of a procedure for flexible design concept generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardin, Michel-Alexandre, 1979-

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents an experimental methodology for objective and quantitative design procedure evaluation based on anticipated lifecycle performance of design concepts, and a procedure for flexible design concept generation. ...

  10. Quantitative Analysis of Variability and Uncertainty in Environmental Data and Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, H. Christopher

    Quantitative Analysis of Variability and Uncertainty in Environmental Data and Models Volume 1 ........................................6 1.3 Is A Probabilistic Analysis Necessary? ................................................................8 1.4 Previous Work in Probabilistic Risk Assessment

  11. Quantitative Selection and Design of Model Generation Architectures for On-Orbit Autonomous Assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assembly Swati Mohan, David W. Miller March 2010 SSL # 3-10 #12;#12;Quantitative Selection and Design SSL # 3-10 This work is based on the unaltered text of the thesis by Swati Mohan submitted

  12. Applying petroleum geophysics to astrophysics: Quantitative 4D seismic study of the solar interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Ian

    Applying petroleum geophysics to astrophysics: Quantitative 4D seismic study, is to a significant extent based on tomographic methods developed in geophysics. The proposed time-lapse seismic methods developed in petroleum geophysics offer the next

  13. RECONSTRUCTING CLIMATE ON THE GREAT PLAINS FROM BURIED SOILS: A QUANTITATIVE APPROACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zung, Ashley B.

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Great Plains, U.S.A. lack quantitative paleoclimatic data for the late Quaternary largely because two common sources of paleoclimatic data, tree ring and pollen records, are rare in the region. Sequences of buried ...

  14. Automated Quantitative Analysis of Capnogram Shape for COPD–Normal and COPD–CHF Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mieloszyk, Rebecca J.

    We develop an approach to quantitative analysis of carbon dioxide concentration in exhaled breath, recorded as a function of time by capnography. The generated waveform – or capnogram – is currently used in clinical practice ...

  15. Qualitative and Quantitative Management Tools Used by Financial Officers in Public Research Universities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trexler, Grant 1961-

    2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    /or hypotheses (Hanacek, 2010). Quantitative tools may include activity based costing, cost-benefit analysis, trend analysis, responsibility centered management, ratio analysis, strengths-weaknesses-opportunities and threats (SWOT) analysis, data mining...

  16. Single molecule quantitation and sequencing of rare translocations using microfluidic nested digital PCR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuga, Joe; Zeng, Yong; Novak, Richard; Lan, Qing; Tang, Xiaojiang; Rothman, Nathaniel; Vermeulen, Roel; Li, Laiyu; Hubbard, Alan; Zhang, Luoping; Mathies, Richard A.; Smith, Martyn T.

    2013-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    of individual tumors. Here, we report the development and application of a bead-based hemi-nested microfluidic droplet digital PCR (dPCR) technology to achieve ‘quantitative’ measurement and single-molecule sequencing of somatically acquired carcinogenic...

  17. Revised process for work zone decision-making based on quantitative performance measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Thomas Wayne

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Work zones create one of the most challenging environments for drivers. Implementing work zones on urban freeways creates many issues, especially with respect to mobility. Decisions made regarding the work zone should be informed by quantitative...

  18. Atomic Force Microscopy of Photosystem II and Its Unit Cell Clustering Quantitatively Delineate the Mesoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geissler, Phillip

    the Mesoscale Variability in Arabidopsis Thylakoids Bibiana Onoa1 , Anna R. Schneider2 , Matthew D. Brooks3 Quantitatively Delineate the Mesoscale Variability in Arabidopsis Thylakoids. PLoS ONE 9(7): e101470. doi:10

  19. Quantitative genetic analysis of growth and survival in Penaeus vannamei versus temperature 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Tomas Kutz, Alvaro J

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two 8-week laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate quantitative genetic aspects of growth and survival in juveniles of the marine shrimp Penaeus vannamei versus temperature. Experiment I involved 4,486 progeny ...

  20. Surfactant Diffusion into Lysozyme Crystal Matrices Investigated by Quantitative Fluorescence Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velev, Orlin D.

    the infusion of lysozyme crystals with pyrene-based fluorescent surfactants by quantitative fluorescence × 10-10 to 30 × 10-10 cm2 /s, depending on the type and size of the surfactant. The slow infusion

  1. Lung Extraction, Lobe Segmentation and Hierarchical Region Assessment for Quantitative Analysis on High

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lung Extraction, Lobe Segmentation and Hierarchical Region Assessment for Quantitative Analysis Care Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA Abstract. Regional assessment of lung disease specific to different lung regions on high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) datasets. We present

  2. ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 Final Determination Quantitative Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, Mark A.; Liu, Bing; Richman, Eric E.; Winiarski, David W.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) conducted a final quantitative analysis to assess whether buildings constructed according to the requirements of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE)/Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) Standard 90.1-2007 would result in energy savings compared with buildings constructed to ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004. The final analysis considered each of the 44 addenda to ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004 that were included in ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007. All 44 addenda processed by ASHRAE in the creation of Standard 90.1-2007 from Standard 90.1-2004 were reviewed by DOE, and their combined impact on a suite of 15 building prototype models in 15 ASHRAE climate zones was considered. Most addenda were deemed to have little quantifiable impact on building efficiency for the purpose of DOE’s final determination. However, out of the 44 addenda, 9 were preliminarily determined to have measureable and quantifiable impact.

  3. ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2010 Preliminary Determination Quantitative Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, Mark A.; Liu, Bing; Rosenberg, Michael I.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) conducted a preliminary quantitative analysis to assess whether buildings constructed according to the requirements of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE)/Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010, Standard 90.1-2010, or 2010 edition) would result in energy savings compared with buildings constructed to ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007(ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007, Standard 90.1-2007, or 2007 edition). The preliminary analysis considered each of the 109 addenda to ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 that were included in ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010. All 109 addenda processed by ASHRAE in the creation of Standard 90.1-2010 from Standard 90.1-2007 were reviewed by DOE, and their combined impact on a suite of 16 building prototype models in 15 ASHRAE climate zones was considered. Most addenda were deemed to have little quantifiable impact on building efficiency for the purpose of DOE’s preliminary determination. However, out of the 109 addenda, 34 were preliminarily determined to have measureable and quantifiable impact.

  4. Quantitative study of mixing in annular and raschig ring filled tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fredrickson, M. A.

    1980-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A quantitative study of mixing, which utilized the exit age distribution theory, has been completed for bench-scale annular and raschig ring filled tanks, in addition to a pilot-scale annular tank. A study of mixing and fluid flow in a full-scale, single-entry, raschig ring filled tank also was initiated. Results showed the bench-scale raschig ring filled tank approached plug-flow (no mixing) behavior. In a bench-scale annular tank, regardless of whether fluid entered tangentially or nontangentially, the vessel approached continuously stirred tank reactor behavior (perfect mixing). The pilot-scale annular tank approached continuously stirred tank reactor behavior only when tangential entry was used. Mixing in the full-scale raschig ring filled tank he tank did not approach eithr the perfect or the no mixing situations. Instead, the tank had a flow pattern in which solution channeled through a small volume of the tank, leaving the regions outside the channel effectively inactive.

  5. Nucleophosmin in the pathogenesis of arsenic-related bladder carcinogenesis revealed by quantitative proteomics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Shuhui [Department of Chemistry, College of Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Wang Yiwen [Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Hsu Jueliang [Department of Chemistry, College of Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Chang Hongyi [Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Wang Chiyun [Graduate Institute of Molecular Medicine, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Shen Potsun [Department of Chemistry, College of Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Chiang Chiwu [Graduate Institute of Molecular Medicine, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Chuang Jingjing [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, National Chiayi University, Chiayi 600, Taiwan (China); Tsai Hungwen [Department of Pathology, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Tainan 704, Taiwan (China); Gu Powen [Department of Clinical Pathology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Chang Fangchih [Instrument Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Liu Hsiaosheng, E-mail: a713@mail.ncku.edu.t [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Chow Nanhaw, E-mail: chownh@mail.ncku.edu.t [Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Molecular Medicine, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To investigate the molecular mechanisms of arsenic (As)-associated carcinogenesis, we performed proteomic analysis on E7 immortalized human uroepithelial cells after treatment with As in vitro. Quantitative proteomics was performed using stable isotope dimethyl labeling coupled with two-dimensional liquid chromatography peptide separation and mass spectrometry (MS)/MS analysis. Among 285 proteins, a total of 26 proteins were upregulated (ratio > 2.0) and 18 proteins were downregulated (ratio < 0.65) by As treatment, which are related to nucleotide binding, lipid metabolism, protein folding, protein biosynthesis, transcription, DNA repair, cell cycle control, and signal transduction. This study reports the potential significance of nucleophosmin (NPM) in the As-related bladder carcinogenesis. NPM was universally expressed in all of uroepithelial cell lines examined, implying that NPM may play a role in human bladder carcinogenesis. Upregulation of NPM tends to be dose- and time-dependent after As treatment. Expression of NPM was associated with cell proliferation, migration and anti-apoptosis. On the contrary, soy isoflavones inhibited the expression of NPM in vitro. The results suggest that NPM may play a role in the As-related bladder carcinogenesis, and soybean-based foods may have potential in the suppression of As/NPM-related tumorigenesis.

  6. Results from NEMO 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. L. Flack; for the NEMO 3 collaboration

    2008-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The NEMO 3 experiment is located in the Modane Underground Laboratory and has been taking data since 2003 with seven isotopes. It is searching for the double beta decay process with two or zero neutrinos emitted in the final state. Precision measurements of the half-life of the isotopes due to two neutrino double beta decay have been performed and new results for 96Zr, 48Ca and 150Nd are presented here. Measurements of this process are important for reducing the uncertainties on the nuclear matrix elements. No evidence for zero neutrino double beta decay has been found and a 90% Confidence Level lower limit on the half-life of this process is derived. From this an upper limit can be set on the effective Majorana neutrino mass using the most recent nuclear matrix elements calculations.

  7. MELCOR validation results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh, C.D.; Byers, R.K.; Shaffer, C.J.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent comparisons of MELCOR predictions to three sets of experiments, the ABCOVE Aerosol Experiments, the HDR-V44 Steam Blowdown Experiments, and the Battelle-Frankfurt Gas Mixing Experiments are presentd. All three comparisons involve conditions that are of concern in an LWR containment during a severe accident. MELCOR results are compared to the experimental data and the predictions of at least one other state-of-the-art code for each test. In the ABCOVE comparisons, the MELCOR aerosol modeling is demonstrated. In comparisons to the HDR-V44 Steam Blowdown Experiments, MELCOR predictions of the response of the containment to the release of steam from the primary system are shown, and in the Battelle-Frankfurt comparisons, MELCOR predictions of the diffusion in a containment of an injected hydrogen-nitrogen gas are studied. These comparisons provide critical testing of the MELCOR control volume hydrodynamics package, the radionuclide package, and the flow path package.

  8. Quantitative comparison of noise texture across CT scanners from different manufacturers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, Justin B.; Christianson, Olav; Samei, Ehsan [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories and Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories and Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories and Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Departments of Radiology, Physics, Biomedical Engineering, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To quantitatively compare noise texture across computed tomography (CT) scanners from different manufacturers using the noise power spectrum (NPS). Methods: The American College of Radiology CT accreditation phantom (Gammex 464, Gammex, Inc., Middleton, WI) was imaged on two scanners: Discovery CT 750HD (GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI), and SOMATOM Definition Flash (Siemens Healthcare, Germany), using a consistent acquisition protocol (120 kVp, 0.625/0.6 mm slice thickness, 250 mAs, and 22 cm field of view). Images were reconstructed using filtered backprojection and a wide selection of reconstruction kernels. For each image set, the 2D NPS were estimated from the uniform section of the phantom. The 2D spectra were normalized by their integral value, radially averaged, and filtered by the human visual response function. A systematic kernel-by-kernel comparison across manufacturers was performed by computing the root mean square difference (RMSD) and the peak frequency difference (PFD) between the NPS from different kernels. GE and Siemens kernels were compared and kernel pairs that minimized the RMSD and |PFD| were identified. Results: The RMSD (|PFD|) values between the NPS of GE and Siemens kernels varied from 0.01 mm{sup 2} (0.002 mm{sup -1}) to 0.29 mm{sup 2} (0.74 mm{sup -1}). The GE kernels 'Soft,''Standard,''Chest,' and 'Lung' closely matched the Siemens kernels 'B35f,''B43f,''B41f,' and 'B80f' (RMSD < 0.05 mm{sup 2}, |PFD| < 0.02 mm{sup -1}, respectively). The GE 'Bone,''Bone+,' and 'Edge' kernels all matched most closely with Siemens 'B75f' kernel but with sizeable RMSD and |PFD| values up to 0.18 mm{sup 2} and 0.41 mm{sup -1}, respectively. These sizeable RMSD and |PFD| values corresponded to visually perceivable differences in the noise texture of the images. Conclusions: It is possible to use the NPS to quantitatively compare noise texture across CT systems. The degree to which similar texture across scanners could be achieved varies and is limited by the kernels available on each scanner.

  9. The Impact of Age on Quantitative Infrared Pupillometry in Healthy Children 1-18 Years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Jacob

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    THE IMPACT OF AGE ON QUANTITATIVE INFRARED PUPILLOMETRY IN HEALTHY CHILDREN 1-18 YEARS BY JACOB TYLER BROWN PharmD, Creighton University School of Pharmacy, 2010 Submitted to the graduate degree program in Clinical Research... thesis: THE IMPACT OF AGE ON QUANTITATIVE INFRARED PUPILLOMETRY IN HEALTHY CHILDREN 1-18 YEARS _________________________________________ Chairperson Theresa I. Shireman, RPh, PhD Date approved: April 8, 2014...

  10. Quantitative determination of mineral composition by powder x-ray diffraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pawloski, G.A.

    1984-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An external standard intensity ratio method is used for quantitatively determining mineralogic compositions of samples by x-ray diffraction. The method uses ratios of x-ray intensity peaks from a single run. Constants are previously determined for each mineral which is to be quantitatively measured. Ratios of the highest intensity peak of each mineral to be quantified in the sample and the highest intensity peak of a reference mineral contained in the sample are used to calculate sample composition.

  11. A quantitative model to predict the cost of quality nonconformance in the construction industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Opara, Ethelbert Okechukwu

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A QUANTITATIVE MODEL TO PREDICT THE COST OF QUALITY NONCONFORMANCE IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY A Thesis by ETHELBERT OKECHUKWU OPARA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1993 Major Subject: Construction Management A QUANTITATIVE MODEL TO PREDICT THE COST OF QUALITY NONCONFORMANCE IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY A Thesis by ETHELBERT OKECHUKWU OPARA Submitted to Texas A&M University...

  12. A quantitative application of the thermoelectric method for measuring water uptake by cotton plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naghshineh-Pour, Bahman

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A QUANTITATIVE APPLICATION OF THE THERMOELECTRIC METHOD FOR MEASURING WATER UPTAKE BY COTTON PLANTS A, Thesis by BAHMAN NAGHSHINEH-POUR Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in part al fulfillment of the requirements... for thc degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1965 Major-Subject: Soil Physics A QUANTITATIVE APPLICATION 'OF THE THERMOELECTRIC METHOD FOR MEASURING WATER UPTAKE BY COTTON PLANTS A Thesis by BAHMAN NAGHSHINEH:POUR Approved as to style and content...

  13. Validating the use of qualitative ratings of static wrist postures relative to quantitative measurements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohac, Melanie Dawn

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VALIDATING THE USE OF QUALITATIVE RATINGS OF STATIC WRIST POSTURES RELATIVE TO QUANTITATIVE MEASUREMENTS A Thesis by MELANIE DAWN BOHAC Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2000 Major Subject: Safety Engineering VALIDATING THE USE OF QUALITATIVE RATINGS OF STATIC WRIST POSTURES RELATIVE TO QUANTITATIVE MEASUREMENTS A Thesis by MELANIE DAWN BOHAC Submitted to Texas...

  14. A quantitative determination of the conditions for hot cracking during welding for aluminum alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steenbergen, James Everett

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A QUANTITATIVE DETERMINATION OF THE CONDITIONS FOR HOT CRACKING DURING WELDING FOR ALUMINUM ALLOYS A Thesis by JAMES EVERETT STEENBERGEN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1969 Major Subject: Materials Engineering A QUANTITATIVE DETERMINATION OF THE CONDITIONS FOR HOT CRACKING DURING WELDING FOR ALUMINUM ALLOYS A Thesis by JAMES EVERETT STEENBERGEN (Chairman of Committee) ( ead...

  15. A quantitative determination of the conditions for hot cracking during welding for aluminum alloys 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steenbergen, James Everett

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A QUANTITATIVE DETERMINATION OF THE CONDITIONS FOR HOT CRACKING DURING WELDING FOR ALUMINUM ALLOYS A Thesis by JAMES EVERETT STEENBERGEN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1969 Major Subject: Materials Engineering A QUANTITATIVE DETERMINATION OF THE CONDITIONS FOR HOT CRACKING DURING WELDING FOR ALUMINUM ALLOYS A Thesis by JAMES EVERETT STEENBERGEN (Chairman of Committee) ( ead...

  16. A Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanism for n-Alkane Hydrocarbons from n-Octane to n-Hexadecane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Herbinet, O; Silke, E J; Curran, H J

    2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms have been developed to describe the pyrolysis and oxidation of the n-alkanes, including n-octane (n-C{sub 8}H{sub 18}), n-nonane (n-C{sub 9}H{sub 20}), n-decane (n-C{sub 10}H{sub 22}), n-undecane (n-C{sub 11}H{sub 24}), n-dodecane (n-C{sub 12}H{sub 26}), n-tridecane (n-C{sub 13}H{sub 28}), n-tetradecane (n-C{sub 14}H{sub 30}), n-pentadecane (n-C{sub 15}H{sub 32}), and n-hexadecane (n-C{sub 16}H{sub 34}). These mechanisms include both high temperature and low temperature reaction pathways. The mechanisms are based on previous mechanisms for n-heptane, using the same reaction class mechanism construction developed initially for n-heptane. Individual reaction class rules are as simple as possible in order to focus on the parallelism between all of the n-alkane fuels included in the mechanisms, and there is an intent to develop these mechanisms further in the future to incorporate greater levels of accuracy and predictive capability. Several of these areas for improvement are identified and explained in detail. These mechanisms are validated through comparisons between computed and experimental data from as many different sources as possible. In addition, numerical experiments are carried out to examine features of n-alkane combustion in which the detailed mechanisms can be used to compare processes in all of the n-alkane fuels. The mechanisms for all of these n-alkanes are presented as a single detailed mechanism, which can be edited to produce efficient mechanisms for any of the n-alkanes included, and the entire mechanism, with supporting thermochemical and transport data, together with an explanatory glossary explaining notations and structural details, will be available on our web page when the paper is accepted for publication.

  17. LSND neutrino oscillation results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louis, W.C.; LSND Collaboration

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LSND (Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector) experiment at Los Alamos has conducted a search for muon antineutrino {r_arrow} electron antineutrino oscillations using muon neutrinos from antimuon decay at rest. The electron antineutrinos are detected via the reaction electron antineutrino + proton {r_arrow} positron + neutron, correlated with the 2.2-MeV gamma from neutron + proton {r_arrow} deuteron + gamma. The use of tight cuts to identify positron events with correlated gamma rays yields 22 events with positron energy between 36 and 60 MeV and only 4.6 {+-} 0.6 background events. The probability that this excess is due entirely to a statistical fluctuation is 4.1 {times} 10{sup -8}. A chi-squared fit to the entire positron sample results in a total excess of 51.8 {sup +18.7}{sub -16.9} {+-} 8.0 events with positron energy between 20 and 60 MeV. If attributed to muon antineutrino {r_arrow} electron antineutrino oscillations, this corresponds to an oscillation probability (averaged over the experimental energy and spatial acceptance) of (0.31 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.05){percent}. 10 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  18. LSND neutrino oscillation results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, D.H.; LSND Collaboration

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LSND experiment at Los Alamos has conducted a search for {anti v}{sub {mu}} {yields} {anti v}{sub e} oscillations using {anti v}{sub {mu}} from {mu}{sup +} decay at rest. The {anti v}{sub e} are detected via the reaction {anti v}{sub e} p {yields} e{sup +}n, correlated with the 2.2 MeV {gamma} from n p {yields} d {gamma}. The use of tight cuts to identify e{sup +} events with correlated {gamma} rays yielded 22 events with e{sup +} energy between 36 and 60 MeV and only 4.6 {+-} 0.6 background events. The probability that this excess is due entirely to a statistical fluctuation is 4.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}8}. A {chi}{sup 2} fit to the entire e{sup +} sample results in a total excess of 51.8{sub {minus}16.9}{sup +18.7} {+-} 8.0 events with e{sup +} energy between 20 and 60 MeV. If attributed to {anti v}{sub {mu}} {yields} {anti v}{sub e} oscillations, this corresponds to an oscillation probability (averaged over the experimental energy and spatial acceptance) of 0.31 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.05%.

  19. Label-Free Quantitative LC?MS Proteomics of Alzheimer’s Disease and Normally Aged Human Brains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreev, Victor P.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Brewer, Heather M.; Karpievitch, Yuliya; Xie, Fang; Clarke, Jennifer; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Albin, Roger L.; Nawaz, Zafar; Hokayem, Jimmy E.; Myers, Amanda J.

    2012-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative proteomics analysis of cortical samples of 10 Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brains versus 10 normally aged brains was performed by following the accurate mass and time tag (AMT) approach with the high resolution LTQ Orbitrap mass spectrometer. More than 1400 proteins were identified and quantitated. A conservative approach of selecting only the consensus results of four normalization methods was suggested and used. A total of 197 proteins were shown to be significantly differentially abundant (p-values <0.05, corrected for multiplicity of testing) in AD versus control brain samples. Thirty-seven of these proteins were reported as differentially abundant or modified in AD in previous proteomics and transcriptomics publications. The rest to the best of our knowledge are new. Mapping of the discovered proteins with bioinformatic tools revealed significant enrichment with differentially abundant proteins of pathways and processes known to be important in AD, including signal transduction, regulation of protein phosphorylation, immune response, cytoskeleton organization, lipid metabolism, energy production, and cell death.

  20. Parsing ERK Activation Reveals Quantitatively Equivalent Contributions From Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and HER2 In Human Mammary Epithelial Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendriks, Bart S.; Orr, Galya; Wells, Alan H.; Wiley, H. S.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    HER2, a member of the EGFR tyrosine kinase family, functions as an accessory EGFR signaling component and alters EGFR trafficking by heterodimerization. HER2 overexpression leads to aberrant cell behavior including enhanced proliferation and motility. Here we apply a combination of computational modeling and quantitative experimental studies of the dynamic interactions between EGFR and HER2, and their downstream activation of extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) to understand this complex signaling system. Using cells expressing different levels of HER2 relative to the EGFR, we can separate relative contributions of EGFR and HER2 to signaling amplitude and duration. Based on our model calculations, we demonstrate that, in contrast with previous suggestions in the literature, the intrinsic capabilities of EGFR and HER2 to activated ERK are quantitatively equivalent . We find that HER2-mediated effects on EGFR dimerization and trafficking are sufficient to explain the detected HER2-mediated amplification of EGF-induced ERK signaling. Our model suggests that transient amplification of ERK activity by HER2 arises predominantly from the 2-to-1 stoichiometry of receptor kinase to bound ligand in EGFR/HER2 heterodimers compared to the 1-to-1 stoichiometry of the EGFR homodimer, but alterations in receptor trafficking, with resultant EGFR sparing, cause the sustained HER2-mediated enhancement of ERK signaling.