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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

CBECS 1989 - Energy End-use Intensities in Commercial Buildings -- Detailed  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Publication > Detailed Tables Publication > Detailed Tables 1989 Energy End-Use Intensities Detailed Tables Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. Table Organization The following 13 tables present detailed energy end-use consumption data from the 1989 CBECS. Summary tables for all major fuels (electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat) appear first, followed by separate tables for each of the four major fuels. Within each energy source’s group of tables, there is a table showing end-use consumption, a table showing end-use intensities (consumption per square foot), and a table (except for fuel oil and district heat) showing the end-use shares of total consumption.

2

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings1992 -- Overview/End-Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

> Overview > Overview 1992 Energy End-Use Intensities Overview Energy Consumption by End Use, 1992 Figure on Energy Consumption By End Use, 1992 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. End-Use Estimation Methodology The end-use estimates had two main sources: (1) survey data collected by the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) and (2) building energy simulations provided by the Facility Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system. The CBECS provided data on building characteristics and total energy consumption (i.e., for all end uses) for a national sample of commercial buildings. Using data collected by the CBECS, the FEDS engineering modules were used to produce estimates of energy consumption by end use. The FEDS engineering estimates were then statistically adjusted to match the CBECS total energy consumption.

3

Healthcare Energy End-Use Monitoring  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report describes the NREL partnership with two hospitals (MGH and SUNY UMU) to collect data on the energy used for multiple thermal and electrical end-use categories, which can be used to more effectively prioritize and refine the scope of investments in new metering and energy audits.

4

China End-Use Energy Demand Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

China End-Use Energy Demand Modeling China End-Use Energy Demand Modeling Speaker(s): Nan Zhou Date: October 8, 2009 (All day) Location: 90-3122 As a consequence of soaring energy demand due to the staggering pace of its economic growth, China overtook the United States in 2007 to become the world's biggest contributor to CO2 emissions (IEA, 2007). Since China is still in an early stage of industrialization and urbanization, economic development promises to keep China's energy demand growing strongly. Furthermore, China's reliance on fossil fuel is unlikely to change in the long term, and increased needs will only heighten concerns about energy security and climate change. In response, the Chinese government has developed a series of policies and targets aimed at improving energy efficiency, including both short-term targets and long-term strategic

5

Healthcare Energy End-Use Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

NREL partnered with two hospitals (MGH and SUNY UMU) to collect data on the energy used for multiple thermal and electrical end-use categories, including preheat, heating, and reheat; humidification; service water heating; cooling; fans; pumps; lighting; and select plug and process loads. Additional data from medical office buildings were provided for an analysis focused on plug loads. Facility managers, energy managers, and engineers in the healthcare sector will be able to use these results to more effectively prioritize and refine the scope of investments in new metering and energy audits.

Sheppy, M.; Pless, S.; Kung, F.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1992 - Index...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Energy End-Use Intensities 1992 Energy End-Use Intensities Overview Tables National estimates of energy consumption by fuel (electricity and natural gas) and end use (heating,...

7

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1995 - Index...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1995 End-Use Data 1995 End-Use Data Overview Tables National estimates of energy consumption by fuel (electricity and natural gas) and end use (heating, cooling, lighting, etc.)...

8

Energy end-use intensities in commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

This report examines energy intensities in commercial buildings for nine end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, water heating, cooking, refrigeration, office equipment, and other. The objective of this analysis was to increase understanding of how energy is used in commercial buildings and to identify targets for greater energy efficiency which could moderate future growth in demand. The source of data for the analysis is the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption survey (CBECS), which collected detailed data on energy-related characteristics and energy consumption for a nationally representative sample of approximately 6,000 commercial buildings. The analysis used 1989 CBECS data because the 1992 CBECS data were not yet available at the time the study was initiated. The CBECS data were fed into the Facility Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system, a building energy simulation program developed by the US Department of Energy`s Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to derive engineering estimates of end-use consumption for each building in the sample. The FEDS estimates were then statistically adjusted to match the total energy consumption for each building. This is the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) first report on energy end-use consumption in commercial buildings. This report is part of an effort to address customer requests for more information on how energy is used in buildings, which was an overall theme of the 1992 user needs study. The end-use data presented in this report were not available for publication in Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1989 (DOE/EIA-0318(89), Washington, DC, April 1992). However, subsequent reports on end-use energy consumption will be part of the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures series, beginning with a 1992 data report to be published in early 1995.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Healthcare Energy: Using End-Use Data to Inform Decisions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The relative magnitude of the energy consumption of different end uses can be a starting point for prioritizing energy investments and action, whether the scope under consideration involves new metering, targeted energy audits, or end-use equipment upgrades.

10

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1992  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Overview > Tables Overview > Tables 1992 Energy End-Use Intensities Tables Energy Consumption by End Use, 1992 Figure on Energy Consumption By End Use, 1992 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. divider line To View and/or Print Reports (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader) - Download Adobe Acrobat Reader If you experience any difficulties, visit our Technical Frequently Asked Questions. divider line Tables - (file size 31,655 bytes), pages 6. - requires Adobe Acrobat Reader Consumption of All Major Fuels by End Uses, 1992 Energy End-Use Intensities for All Major Fuels, 1992 Consumption of Electricity by End Uses, 1992 Energy End-Use Intensities for Electricity, 1992

11

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1989 -- Executive  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Energy End-Use Intensities > Executive Summary 9 Energy End-Use Intensities > Executive Summary Executive Summary Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. divider line The demand for energy in U.S. stores, offices, schools, hospitals, and other commercial buildings has been increasing. This report examines energy intensities in commercial buildings for nine end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, water heating, cooking, refrigeration, office equipment, and "other." The objective of this analysis was to increase understanding of how energy is used in commercial buildings and to identify targets for greater energy efficiency which could moderate future growth in demand.

12

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Energy Sources and End Uses  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Sources and End Uses Energy Sources and End Uses Topics: Energy Sources and End Uses End-Use Equipment Conservation Features and Practices Energy Sources and End Uses CBECS collects information that is used to answer questions about the use of energy in the commercial buildings sector. Questions such as: What kind of energy sources are used? What is energy used for? and What kinds of equipment use energy? Energy Sources Nearly all commercial buildings used at least one source of energy for some end use (Figure 1). Electricity was the most commonly used energy source in commercial buildings (94 percent of buildings comprising 98 percent of commercial floorspace). More than half of commercial buildings (57 percent) and two-thirds of commercial floorspace (68 percent) were served by natural gas. Three sources-fuel oil, district heat, and district chilled water-when used, were used more often in larger buildings.

13

Energy End-Use Flow Maps for the Buildings Sector  

SciTech Connect

Graphical presentations of energy flows are widely used within the industrial sector to depict energy production and use. PNNL developed two energy flow maps, one each for the residential and commercial buildings sectors, in response to a need for a clear, concise, graphical depiction of the flows of energy from source to end-use in the building sector.

Belzer, David B.

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

14

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

used to produce electrical energy and the technologies usedHealth Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency inhow increasing end-use electrical energy efficiency from

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Commercial building end-use energy metering inventory  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a comprehensive inventory of end-use metered data. The inventory did not discover many sources of metered end-use data; however, research into existing data bases and extensive discussions with professionals associated with building energy conservation have enabled a clear characterization to be developed of the types of metered data that are required to further energy conservation in commercial buildings. Based on the results of the inventory and this clarification of data requirements, the adequacy of existing data bases has been assessed, and recommendations have been developed for future federal data collection efforts. A summary of sources of existing metered end-use data is provided in Section 2.1 and its adequacy has been summarized. Collection of further end-use metered data is both desirable and valuable for many areas of building energy conservation research. Empirical data are needed to address many issues which to date have been addressed using only simulation techniques. The adequacy of using simulation techniques for various purposes needs to be assessed through comparison with measured data. While these data are expensive to acquire, it is cost-effective to do so in the long run, and the need is not being served by the private market. The preceding conclusion based on results from the inventory of existing data highlights two important facts: First, although the data are widely desired in the private sector, they are not widely available. Second, where suitable data are publicly available and contain the desired supporting information, their collection has generally been funded by government-sponsored research.

Heidell, J.A.; Mazzucchi, R.P.; Reilly, R.W.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Energy Information Administration - Table 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Page Last Modified: June 2010 Table 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS1 331111) 1998 2002 2006 Total 2 1,672 1,455 1,147 Net Electricity 3 158 184 175 Natural Gas 456 388 326 Coal 48 36 14 Boiler Fuel -- -- -- Coal 8 W 1 Residual Fuel Oil 10 * 4 Natural Gas 52 39 27 Process Heating -- -- -- Net Electricity 74 79 76 Residual Fuel Oil 19 * 11 Natural Gas 369 329 272 Machine Drive -- -- -- Net Electricity 68 86 77 Notes 1. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills. 2. 'Total' is the sum of all energy sources listed below, including net steam (the sum of purchases, generation from renewable resources, and net transfers), and other energy that respondents indicated was used to produce heat and power. It is the fuel quantities across all end-uses.

17

United States Industrial Sector Energy End Use Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas, petroleum, coal, steam, and biomass/byproducts, respectively disaggregated by end-use for each of the NAICS

Shehabi, Arman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Canadian Industrial Energy End-use Data and Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an inventory of existing databases related to industry in Canada. CIEEDAC is strategically working towards publications include: enerInfo Industrial (newsletter, published 3 times annually) An Inventory of Energy in Canadian Oil Refineries, 1990, 1994 to the current year Detailed reports on energy consumption

19

A new approach to estimate commercial sector end-use load shapes and energy use intensities  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the application of an end-use load shape estimation technique to develop annual energy use intensities (EUIs) and hourly end-use load shapes (LSs) for commercial buildings in the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) service territory. Results will update inputs for the commercial sector energy and peak demand forecasting models used by PG&E and the California Energy Commission (CEC). EUIs were estimated for 11 building types, up to 10 end uses, 3 fuel types, 2 building vintages, and up to 5 climate regions. The integrated methodology consists of two major parts. The first part is the reconciliation of initial end-use load-shape estimates with measured whole-building load data to produce intermediate EUIs and load shapes, using LBL`s End-use Disaggregation Algorithm, EDA. EDA is a deterministic hourly algorithm that relies on the observed characteristics of the measured hourly whole-building electricity use and disaggregates it into major end-use components. The end-use EUIs developed through the EDA procedure represent a snap-shot of electricity use by building type and end-use for two regions of the PG&E service territory, for the year that disaggregation is performed. In the second part of the methodology, we adjust the EUIs for direct application to forecasting models based on factors such as climatic impacts on space-conditioning EUIs, fuel saturation effects, building and equipment vintage, and price impacts. Core data for the project are detailed on-site surveys for about 800 buildings, mail surveys ({approximately}6000), load research data for over 1000 accounts, and hourly weather data for five climate regions.

Akbari, H.; Eto, J.; Konopacki, S.; Afzal, A.; Heinemeier, K.; Rainer, L.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Engineer End Uses for Maximum Efficiency | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Maximum Efficiency (August 2004) More Documents & Publications Maintaining System Air Quality Compressed Air Storage Strategies Alternative Strategies for Low Pressure End Uses...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detailed energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

United States Industrial Sector Energy End Use Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by end uses (e.g. , boilers, process, electric drives,MECS 2002, and MECS 1998 data. Indirect Uses-Boiler FuelConventional Boiler Use CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

Shehabi, Arman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - Energy Consumption by End-Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector International Energy Outlook 2007 Chapter 2 - Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector In the IEO2007 projections, end-use energy consumption depends on resource endowment, economic growth, and other political, social, and demographic factors.. One way of looking at the future of world energy markets is to consider trends in energy consumption at the end-use sector level. With the exception of the transportation sector, which is dominated by petroleum-based liquids products at present, the mix of energy use in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors varies widely by region, depending on a combination of regional factors, such as the availability of energy resources, the level of economic development, and political, social,

23

Integrated estimation of commercial sector end-use load shapes and energy use intensities  

SciTech Connect

The Southern California Edison Company (SCE) and the California Energy Commission (CEC) have contracted with the Energy Analysis Program of the Applied Science Division at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to develop an integrated set of commercial sector load shapes (LS) and energy utilization indices (EUI) for use in forecasting electricity demand. The objectives of this project are to conduct detailed analyses of SCE data on commercial building characteristics, energy use, and whole-building load shapes; and in conjunction with other data, to develop, test, and apply an integrated approach for the estimation of end-use LSs and EUIs. The project represents one of the first attempts to combine simulation-based, prototypical building analyses with direct reconciliation to measured hourly load data. The project examined electricity and gas use for nine building types, including large offices, small offices, large retails, small retails, food stores, sitdown restaurants, fastfood restaurants, refrigerated warehouses, and non-refrigerated warehouses. For each building type, nine end uses were examined, including cooling, heating, ventilation, indoor lighting, outdoor lighting, miscellaneous equipment, water heating, cooking, and refrigeration. For the HVAC end uses (cooling, ventilation, and heating), separate analyses were performed for three climate zones: coastal, inland, and desert.

Akbari, H.; Eto, J.; Turiel, I.; Heinemeier, K.; Lebot, B.; Nordman, B.; Rainer, L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for cooking and lighting. Biomass energy consumption willused in an economy, biomass energy consumption is certainlyby a large share of biomass energy use representing 50% of

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10. Final and Primary Energy Consumption in the Industry35 Figure 16. Primary Energy Consumption byby end users while primary energy consumption includes final

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institute, Curbing Global Energy Demand Growth: The Energyup Assessment of Energy Demand in India Transportationa profound effect on energy demand. Policy analysts wishing

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1989 data -- Publication  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End-Use Intensities Executive Summary > Publication and Tables End-Use Intensities Executive Summary > Publication and Tables Publication and Tables Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Figure on Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. Divider Bar To View and/or Print Reports (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader) - Download Adobe Acrobat Reader If you experience any difficulties, visit our Technical Frequently Asked Questions. Divider Bar You have the option of downloading the entire report or selected sections of the report. Full Report - Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings (1989 data) (file size .89 MB) pages: 140

28

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)"

29

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Factors"

30

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)"

31

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Factors"

32

Service Report Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Information Administration Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D C 20585 SR/EEUD/86/01 Residential Conservation Measures Energy End Use Division Office of Energy Markets and End Use Energy Information Administration July 1986 This report has not received a complete technical review by the Energy In formation Administration (EIA) and, therefore, should not be represented as an official EIA product. PREFACE This study was undertaken at the request of Senator James A. McClure, Chairman, Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, United States Senate. The purpose of the study is to examine the potential for achieving energy savings in the residential sector through conservation measures. The report is to be submitted

33

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an estimated total energy consumption of 19 GWh (0.07PJ),to 28% in 2005. Total energy consumption in 2020 in thecan have similar total energy consumption but produce very

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Integrated estimation of commercial sector end-use load shapes and energy use intensities  

SciTech Connect

The Southern California Edison Company (SCE) and the California Energy Commission (CEC) have contracted with Energy Analysis Program of the Applied Science Division at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to develop an integrated set of commercial sector load shapes (LS) and energy utilization indices (EUI) for use in forecasting electricity demand. The overall objectives of this project are to conduct detailed analyses of SCE data on commercial building characteristics, energy use, and whole-building load shapes, and, in conjunction with other data, to develop, test, and apply an integrated approach for the estimation of end-use LSs and EUIs. The project is one of the first attempts ever to combine simulation-based, prototypical building analyses with direct reconciliation to measured hourly load data.

Akbari, H.; Eto, J.; Turiel, I.; Heinemeier, K.; Lebot, B.; Nordman, B.; Rainer, L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007-Energy Consumption by End-Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by End Use Sector Energy Consumption by End Use Sector International Energy Outlook 2007 Figure 25. OECD and Non-OECD Transportation Sector Delivered Energy Consumption, 2004-2030 Figure 25 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 26. OECD and Non-OECD Residential Sector Delivered Energy Consumption, 2004-2030 Figure 26 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 27. Growth in OECD and Non-OECD Residential Sector Delivered Energy Consumption by Fuel, 2004 and 2030 Figure 27 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 28. OECD and Non-OECD Commercial Sector Delivered Energy Consumption, 2004-2030 Figure 28 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

36

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)","Row"

37

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," " " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)"

38

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Row"

39

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," " " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)"

40

The Value of End-Use Energy Efficiency in Mitigation of U.S. Carbon Emissions  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a scenario analysis exploring the value of advanced technologies in the U.S. buildings, industrial, and transportation sectors in stabilizing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. The analysis was conducted by staff members of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), working at the Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI) in support of the strategic planning process of the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The conceptual framework for the analysis is an integration of detailed buildings, industrial, and transportation modules into MiniCAM, a global integrated assessment model. The analysis is based on three technology scenarios, which differ in their assumed rates of deployment of new or presently available energy-saving technologies in the end-use sectors. These technology scenarios are explored with no carbon policy, and under two CO2 stabilization policies, in which an economic price on carbon is applied such that emissions follow prescribed trajectories leading to long-term stabilization of CO2 at roughly 450 and 550 parts per million by volume (ppmv). The costs of meeting the emissions targets prescribed by these policies are examined, and compared between technology scenarios. Relative to the reference technology scenario, advanced technologies in all three sectors reduce costs by 50% and 85% for the 450 and 550 ppmv policies, respectively. The 450 ppmv policy is more stringent and imposes higher costs than the 550 ppmv policy; as a result, the magnitude of the economic value of energy efficiency is four times greater for the 450 ppmv policy than the 550 ppmv policy. While they substantially reduce the costs of meeting emissions requirements, advanced end-use technologies do not lead to greenhouse gas stabilization without a carbon policy. This is due mostly to the effects of increasing service demands over time, the high consumption of fossil fuels in the electricity sector, and the use of unconventional feedstocks in the liquid fuel refining sector. Of the three end-use sectors, advanced transportation technologies have the greatest potential to reduce costs of meeting carbon policy requirements. Services in the buildings and industrial sectors can often be supplied by technologies that consume low-emissions fuels such as biomass or, in policy cases, electricity. Passenger transportation, in contrast, is especially unresponsive to climate policies, as the fuel costs are small compared to the time value of transportation and vehicle capital and operating costs. Delaying the transition from reference to advanced technologies by 15 years increases the costs of meeting 450 ppmv stabilization emissions requirements by 21%, but the costs are still 39% lower than the costs assuming reference technology. The report provides a detailed description of the end-use technology scenarios and provides a thorough analysis of the results. Assumptions are documented in the Appendix.

Kyle, G. Page; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detailed energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Data on energy end-use patterns and energy efficiencies in major CO sub 2 emitting countries  

SciTech Connect

This is a report of the basic data regarding energy end-uses and efficiencies in major CO{sub 2} emitting countries. The task is part of the multi-lab carbon dioxide energy system research program. Fossil energy production and use are the largest anthropogenic source of CO{sub 2} emissions. To gain an insight into the relationship between CO{sub 2} emission and energy use, the global energy consumption patterns and the changing energy efficiencies must be better analyzed and understood. This work attempts to collect and organize the data on energy use and energy efficiency for the ten major CO{sub 2} emitting countries: USA, USSR, the People's Republic of China, Japan, the Federal Republic of Germany, the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Italy, and Australia. A wide variety of information sources have been examined. The data base is presented in tabular format. It is documented by three main parts, the first shows the total final energy consumption by fuel type and end-use sector for each nation. The second shows the detailed energy use by fuel type and function for each end-use sector: residential, commercial, transportation and industrial. The third part shows the country-specific energy balances for electricity generation and use. The data base is a living document and will be updated as additional information becomes available. The data base is to be used to accomplish the ultimate objective of improving the reliability of future CO{sub 2}-emissions estimates. 7 refs., 12 tabs.

Cheng, Hsing C.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Service Report Enwgy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Enwgy Information Administration Enwgy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U;S. Department of Energy Washington, O.C. 20585 ^ ± SR-EEUD--84-I leather izat ion Program Evaluation §]*: b? .. Gerald E. Pealjody of Energy Markets and End Use Energy End Use Division August 20, 1984 This raport has not received a complete technical review by the Energy In formation Administration (E1A) and, therefore, should not be represented as an official EIA product. |||lsS|; program in 198 l^^lRia; study is based -on a scatii;f|^ipiiii|', national samp 1* Of : - households chac aarcicipscac in the pr; 3 §S||tMi-lfc|Sis2?ia covers ;he ^tiecrr^n: of conditions under vhich the p This ,s«;;5^H:«lil-lSi|iuGcaG ac che requesic of :rva

43

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fue -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use 41 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process -- 2,244 62 52 2,788 39 412 -- Process Heating -- 346 59 19 2,487 32 345 -- Process Cooling and Refrigeration -- 206 * 1 32 * * -- Machine Drive

44

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 41 71 17 1,281 8 129 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- -- 62 6 838 1 417 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 2,244 62 52 2,788 39 412 -- Process Heating -- 346 59 19 2,487

45

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

46

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process 773,574 10 9 2,709 10 19 Process Heating

47

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process

48

Estimates of Energy Consumption by Building Type and End Use at U.S. Army Installations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy use intensity (EUI) by end use for major buildingare shown in Table 3-4. EDA_EUI j k u a l ) l A v a C j i jk annualihvaCii jjj x EDA_EUI ai,hvac,FtHood = EDA.EUIaniiu^

Konopacki, S.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547 Conventional Boiler Use 84 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,639 62 52 2,788 39 412 Process Heating 379 59 19 2,487 32 345 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

50

Microsoft Word - US Industrial Sector Energy End Use Analysis_051812.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

United States Industrial Sector Energy End Use Analysis United States Industrial Sector Energy End Use Analysis Arman Shehabi, William R. Morrow, Eric Masanet This work was supported by the Advanced Manufacturing Office of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program through the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. 2 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process

51

Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency, Table 6b-End Uses of  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and 2002 > Table 6b and 2002 > Table 6b Table 6b. End Uses of Energy per Ton of Steel, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (thousand Btu per ton) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS1 331111) 19982 20022 20062 Total3 16,957 15,884 17,796 Net Electricity 4 1,602 2,009 4,673 Natural Gas 4,625 4,236 5,969 Coal 487 393 214 Boiler Fuel -- -- -- Coal 81 W 10 Residual Fuel Oil 101 W 266 Natural Gas 527 426 276 Process Heating -- -- -- Net Electricity 751 862 830 Residual Fuel Oil 193 W 112 Natural Gas 3,742 3,592 2,776 Machine Drive -- -- -- Net Electricity 690 939 786 Notes: 1. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills.

52

"Table B25. Energy End Uses, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Energy End Uses, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 5. Energy End Uses, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Energy Used For (more than one may apply)" ,,"Space Heating","Cooling","Water Heating","Cooking","Manu- facturing" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,60028,56940,56478,22237,3138 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,5668,5007,4759,997,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,5786,5408,5348,1136,214 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,10387,9922,9562,1954,472 "25,001 to 50,000 .............",8668,8060,7776,7734,2511,"Q"

53

End-use energy consumption estimates for U.S. commercial buildings, 1992  

SciTech Connect

An accurate picture of how energy is used in the nation`s stock of commercial buildings can serve a variety of program planning and policy needs of the US Department of Energy, utilities, and other groups seeking to improve the efficiency of energy use in the building sector. This report describes an estimation of energy consumption by end use based upon data from the 1992 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). The methodology used in the study combines elements of engineering simulations and statistical analysis to estimate end-use intensities for heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, refrigeration, hot water, cooking, and miscellaneous equipment. Statistical Adjusted Engineering (SAE) models were estimated by building type. The nonlinear SAE models used variables such as building size, vintage, climate region, weekly operating hours, and employee density to adjust the engineering model predicted loads to the observed consumption (based upon utility billing information). End-use consumption by fuel was estimated for each of the 6,751 buildings in the 1992 CBECS. The report displays the summary results for 11 separate building types as well as for the total US commercial building stock. 4 figs., 15 tabs.

Belzer, D.B.; Wrench, L.E.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Estimates of energy consumption by building type and end use at U.S. Army installations  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the use of LBNL`s End-use Disaggregation Alogrithm (EDA) to 12 US Army installations nationwide in order to obtain annual estimates of electricity use for all major building types and end uses. The building types include barrack, dining hall, gymnasium, administration, vehicle maintenance, hospital, residential, warehouse, and misc. Up to 8 electric end uses for each type were considered: space cooling, ventilation (air handling units, fans, chilled and hot water pumps), cooking, misc./plugs, refrigeration, exterior and interior lighting, and process loads. Through building simulations, we also obtained estimates of natural gas space heating energy use. Average electricity use for these 12 installations and Fort Hood are: HVAC, misc., and indoor lighting end uses consumed the most electricity (28, 27, and 26% of total[3.8, 3.5, and 3.3 kWh/ft{sup 2}]). Refrigeration, street lighting, exterior lighting, and cooking consumed 7, 7, 3, and 2% of total (0.9, 0.9, 0.4, and 0.3 kWh/ft{sup 2})

Konopacki, S.J.; Akbari, H.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

The evolution of carbon dioxide emissions from energy use in industrialized countries: an end-use analysis  

SciTech Connect

There has been much attention drawn to plans for reductions or restraint in future C02 emissions, yet little analysis of the recent history of those emissions by end use or economic activity. Understanding the components of C02 emissions, particularly those related to combustion of fossil fuels, is important for judging the likely success of plans for dealing with future emissions. Knowing how fuel switching, changes in economic activity and its structure, or changes in energy-use efficiency affected emissions in the past, we can better judge both the realism of national proposals to restrain future emissions and the outcome as well. This study presents a first step in that analysis. The organization of this paper is as follows. We present a brief background and summarize previous work analyzing changes in energy use using the factorial method. We then describe our data sources and method. We then present a series of summary results, including a comparison of C02 emissions in 1991 by end use or sector. We show both aggregate change and change broken down by factor, highlighting briefly the main components of change. We then present detailed results, sector by sector. Next we highlight recent trends. Finally, we integrate our results, discussing -the most important factors driving change - evolution in economic structure, changes in energy intensities, and shifts in the fuel mix. We discuss briefly some of the likely causes of these changes - long- term technological changes, effects of rising incomes, the impact of overall changes in energy prices, as well as changes in the relative prices of energy forms.

Schipper, L.; Ting, M.; Khrushch, M.; Unander, F.; Monahan, P.; Golove, W.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency-Table 6a- End uses of  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6a 6a Page Last Modified: June 2010 Table 6a. End Uses of Fuel Consumption per Value of Production, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (thousand Btu per constant 2000 dollar 1) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS2 331111) 1998 3 2002 3 2006 3 Total 4 32.0 30.2 18.7 Net Electricity 5 3.0 3.8 2.8 Natural Gas 8.7 8.1 5.3 Coal 0.9 0.7 0.2 Boiler Fuel -- -- -- Coal 0.2 W 0.02 Residual Fuel Oil 0.2 * 0.1 Natural Gas 1.0 0.8 0.4 Process Heating -- -- -- Net Electricity 1.4 1.6 1.2 Residual Fuel Oil 0.4 * 0.2 Natural Gas 7.1 6.8 4.4 Machine Drive -- -- -- Net Electricity 1.3 1.8 1.3 Notes:1. Value of production is deflated by the chain-type price indices for iron and steel mills shipments. 2. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills.

57

Estimates of Energy Consumption by Building Type and End Use at U.S. Army Installations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4. Figure 5-5. 1993 Electricity Consumption Estimates by EndkWh/ft ) 1993 Electricity Consumption Estimates by End Useof Total) 1993 Electricity Consumption Estimates by End Use

Konopacki, S.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Control Limits for Building Energy End Use Based on Engineering Judgment, Frequency Analysis, and Quantile Regression  

SciTech Connect

Approaches are needed to continuously characterize the energy performance of commercial buildings to allow for (1) timely response to excess energy use by building operators; and (2) building occupants to develop energy awareness and to actively engage in reducing energy use. Energy information systems, often involving graphical dashboards, are gaining popularity in presenting energy performance metrics to occupants and operators in a (near) real-time fashion. Such an energy information system, called Building Agent, has been developed at NREL and incorporates a dashboard for public display. Each building is, by virtue of its purpose, location, and construction, unique. Thus, assessing building energy performance is possible only in a relative sense, as comparison of absolute energy use out of context is not meaningful. In some cases, performance can be judged relative to average performance of comparable buildings. However, in cases of high-performance building designs, such as NREL's Research Support Facility (RSF) discussed in this report, relative performance is meaningful only when compared to historical performance of the facility or to a theoretical maximum performance of the facility as estimated through detailed building energy modeling.

Henze, G. P.; Pless, S.; Petersen, A.; Long, N.; Scambos, A. T.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

SciTech Connect

This study assesses for California how increasing end-use electrical energy efficiency from installing residential insulation impacts exposures and disease burden from power-plant pollutant emissions. Installation of fiberglass attic insulation in the nearly 3 million electricity-heated homes throughout California is used as a case study. The pollutants nitrous oxides (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), fine particulate matter (PM2.5), benzo(a)pyrene, benzene, and naphthalene are selected for the assessment. Exposure is characterized separately for rural and urban environments using the CalTOX model, which is a key input to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemicals and other environmental Impacts (TRACI). The output of CalTOX provides for urban and rural populations emissions-to-intake factors, which are expressed as an individual intake fraction (iFi). The typical iFi from power plant emissions are on the order of 10{sup -13} (g intake per g emitted) in urban and rural regions. The cumulative (rural and urban) product of emissions, population, and iFi is combined with toxic effects factors to determine human damage factors (HDFs). HDF are expressed as disability adjusted life years (DALYs) per kilogram pollutant emitted. The HDF approach is applied to the insulation case study. Upgrading existing residential insulation to US Department of Energy (DOE) recommended levels eliminates over the assmned 50-year lifetime of the insulation an estimated 1000 DALYs from power-plant emissions per million tonne (Mt) of insulation installed, mostly from the elimination of PM2.5 emissions. In comparison, the estimated burden from the manufacture of this insulation in DALYs per Mt is roughly four orders of magnitude lower than that avoided.

McKone, Thomas E.; Lobscheid, A.B.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547 Conventional Boiler Use 84 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,639 62 52 2,788 39 412 Process Heating 379 59 19 2,487 32 345 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detailed energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Measured commercial load shapes and energy-use intensities and validation of the LBL end-use disaggregation algorithm  

SciTech Connect

The Southern California Edison Company (SCE) has conducted an extensive metering project in which electricity end use in 53 commercial buildings in Southern California has been measured. The building types monitored include offices, retail stores, groceries, restaurants, and warehouses. One year (June 1989 through May 1990) of the SCE measured hourly end-use data are reviewed in this report. Annual whole-building and end-use energy use intensities (EUIs) and monthly load shapes (LSs) have been calculated for the different building types based on the monitored data. This report compares the monitored buildings' EUIs and LSs to EUIs and LSs determined using whole-building load data and the End-Use Disaggregation Algorithm (EDA). Two sets of EDA determined EUIs and LSs are compared to the monitored data values. The data sets represent: (1) average buildings in the SCE service territory and (2) specific buildings that were monitored.

Akbari, H.; Rainer, L.; Heinemeier, K.; Huang, J.; Franconi, E.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Code(a) End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3

63

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assessments for the current mix of energy technologies, thenaphthalene. The current mix of energy technologies employedis used to establish the mix of energy technologies that

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

ENERGY CONSERVATION: POLICY ISSUES AND END-USE SCENARIOS OF SAVINGS POTENTIAL PT.2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State Solid Waste Management Board Energy Analysis ofto Solid Waste Utilization as an Energy Source. Gordianto Solid Waste Utilization as an Energy Source. Washington,

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Buildings and Energy in the 80's -- Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed Tables Detailed Tables Total Residential and Commercial Primary Consumption by Type of Building Sources: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, EIA-457 of the 1980 Residential Energy Consumption Survey and Form EIA-871 of the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. This report introduces several innovations in energy data reporting that complement the previously published triennial reports of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). (1) Both residential and commercial sector buildings data are presented together in the report. Common units of analysis, the residential or commercial building and floorspace, are used to facilitate comparison.17 (2) Unlike the triennial RECS and CBECS that

66

CBECS - Buildings and Energy in the 1980's - Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by Type of Building Sources: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, EIA-457 of the 1980 Residential Energy Consumption Survey and...

67

Assessment of U.S. Electric End-Use Energy Efficiency Potential  

SciTech Connect

Demand-side management holds significant potential to reduce growth in U.S. energy consumption and peak demand, and in a cost-effective manner. But significant policy interventions will be required to achieve these benefits. (author)

Gellings, Clark W.; Wikler, Greg; Ghosh, Debyani

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

68

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas Kern Natural Gas/Eor Gas Turbine Kern Ag. &enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and NOx and S02 from digesterEnergy Information Agency EOR: enhanced oil recovery EP A:

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 - Derived measures of end-use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

eialogo eialogo Calculation of MECS Energy Measures Reported energy values were used to construct several derived values, which, in turn, were used to prepare the estimates appearing in MECS consumption tables--First Use, Total Inputs, Offsite-Produced. These derived values are displayed in Table 1 and defined as follows: Energy produced offsite and consumed as a fuel. This derived value represents onsite consumption of fuels that were originally produced offsite. That is, they arrived at the establishment as the result of a purchase or were transferred to the establishment from outside sources. As such, this derived value is equivalent to consumption of "purchased" fuels as reported by the Census Bureau for the years 1974-1981. The Census Bureau defines "purchased" fuels to include those actually purchased plus those

70

Property:Project Details | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Details Details Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Project Details Property Type Text Pages using the property "Project Details" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Projects/40MW Lewis project + Aquamarine Power is developing its first commercial 40MW Oyster wave farm off the north-west coast of Lewis in Scotland. The company was granted an exclusive option on the site by UK seabed owner The Crown Estate in May 2011. MHK Projects/ADM 3 + 1/4 scale model MHK Projects/ADM 4 + Shore based PTO test MHK Projects/ADM 5 + Framework 7 program of the European Union MHK Projects/AW Energy EMEC + AW Energy successfully demonstrated a 1:3 scale prototype device at EMEC (European Marine Energy Center) in both calm and rough winter conditions. Bottom wave velocity measurements were taken concurrently using a Doppler device.

71

China's energy and emissions outlook to 2050: Perspectives from bottom-up energy end-use model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Implications for Chinese energy demand and imports in 2020.for China to reduce energy demand and emissions. Thisand physical drivers of energy demand and thereby help

Zhou, Nan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ",,,"Fuel...

73

1995 Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Households, Buildings & Industry > Commercial Buildings Energy Households, Buildings & Industry > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey > Detailed Tables 1995 Detailed Tables Data from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in three groups of detailed tables: Buildings Characteristics Tables, number of buildings and amount of floorspace for major building characteristics. Energy Consumption and Expenditures Tables, energy consumption and expenditures for major energy sources. Energy End-Use Data, total, electricity and natural gas consumption and energy intensities for nine specific end-uses. Summary Table—All Principal Buildings Activities (HTML Format) Background information on detailed tables: Description of Detailed Tables and Categories of Data Statistical Significance of Data

74

Measured commercial load shapes and energy-use intensities and validation of the LBL end-use disaggregation algorithm. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Southern California Edison Company (SCE) has conducted an extensive metering project in which electricity end use in 53 commercial buildings in Southern California has been measured. The building types monitored include offices, retail stores, groceries, restaurants, and warehouses. One year (June 1989 through May 1990) of the SCE measured hourly end-use data are reviewed in this report. Annual whole-building and end-use energy use intensities (EUIs) and monthly load shapes (LSs) have been calculated for the different building types based on the monitored data. This report compares the monitored buildings` EUIs and LSs to EUIs and LSs determined using whole-building load data and the End-Use Disaggregation Algorithm (EDA). Two sets of EDA determined EUIs and LSs are compared to the monitored data values. The data sets represent: (1) average buildings in the SCE service territory and (2) specific buildings that were monitored.

Akbari, H.; Rainer, L.; Heinemeier, K.; Huang, J.; Franconi, E.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

","LPG and","(excluding Coal","RSE" " ","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Row" "End Use","(million kWh)","(million...

76

Integrated estimation of commercial sector end-use load shapes and energy use intensities in the PG&E service area  

SciTech Connect

This project represents a unique research effort to address the commercial sector end-use energy forecasting data needs of the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) and the California Energy Commission (CEC). The object of the project was to develop an updated set of commercial sector end-use energy use intensity (EUI) data that has been fully reconciled with measured data. The research was conducted in two stages. First, we developed reconciled electricity end-use EUIs and load shapes for each of the 11 building types in the inland and coastal regions of the PG&E service territory using information collected in 1986. Second, we developed procedures to translate these results into a consistent set of commercial sector forecasting model inputs recognizing the separate modeling conventions used by PG&E and CEC. EUIs have been developed for: II commercial building types; up to 10 end uses; up to 3 fuel types; 2 and 5 subservice territory forecasting regions (as specified by the PG&E and CEC forecasting models, respectively); and up to 2 distinct vintages corresponding to the period prior to and immediately following the adoption of the first generation of California building and equipment standards. For the electricity end uses, 36 sets of daily load shapes have been developed representing average weekday, average weekend, and peak weekday electricity use for each month of the year by building type for both the inland and coastal climate zones.

Akbari, H.; Eto, J.; Konopacki, S.; Afzal, A.; Heinemeier, K.; Rainer, L.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal","RSE" " ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal","Row" "End Use","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Factors"

78

Methods for Detailed Energy Data Collection of Miscellaneous  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

primary energy consumption in the U.S., with 22% consumed by the residential sector and 18 and electronic loads (MELs) consume about 20% of the primary energy used in U.S. buildings, and this share% by the commercial sector. Figure 1 shows how the #12;4 primary energy use is broken down by end-use in the U

79

Alternative Strategies for Low Pressure End Uses  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This tip sheet outlines alternative strategies for low-pressure end uses as a pathway to reduced compressed air energy costs.

80

End-use taxes: Current EIA practices  

SciTech Connect

There are inconsistencies in the EIA published end-use price data with respect to Federal, state, and local government sales and excise taxes; some publications include end-use taxes and others do not. The reason for including these taxes in end-use energy prices is to provide consistent and accurate information on the total cost of energy purchased by the final consumer. Preliminary estimates are made of the effect on prices (bias) reported in SEPER (State Energy Price and Expenditure Report) resulting from the inconsistent treatment of taxes. EIA has undertaken several actions to enhance the reporting of end-use energy prices.

Not Available

1994-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detailed energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Alternate States of Proteins Revealed by Detailed Energy Landscape Mapping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alternate States of Proteins Revealed by Detailed Energy Landscape Mapping Michael D. Tyka1 Keywords: Rosetta; alternative conformations; protein mobility; structure prediction; validation What through analysis of detailed protein energy landscapes generated by large-scale, native- enhanced sampling

Baker, David

82

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 3. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " ","Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)","RSE" " ","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Row"

83

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,"Distillate" ,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" ,"Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "End Use","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)" ,"Total United States" "TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION",2886,79,130,5211,69,868

84

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,"Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" ,"for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million" "End Use","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)"

85

Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP News Archives NewsDetail  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News & Events News & Events Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP News Archives NewsDetail to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP News Archives NewsDetail on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP News Archives NewsDetail on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP News Archives NewsDetail on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP News Archives NewsDetail on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP News Archives NewsDetail on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP News Archives NewsDetail on AddThis.com... News Events Back to News News Archives - 2014 There are no news archives for this year.

86

Quality Guidelines for Energy System Studies: Detailed Coal Specificat...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Office of Program Performance and Benefits 2 January 2012 Detailed Coal Specifications Quality Guidelines for Energy System Studies Disclaimer This report was...

87

Details Details... The Impact of Market Rules on Emerging "Green" Energy Markets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1812 1812 Details, Details . . . The Impact of Market Rules on Emerging "Green" Energy Markets Ryan Wiser, Steven Pickle, and Joseph Eto Environmental Energy Technologies Division September 1998 The work described in this study was funded by the Assistant Secretary of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Utility Technologies of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. For the sake of this paper, green power is defined as electricity that is differentiated based on its environmental attributes. 1 As a practical matter, nearly all such green power products include renewable energy. To the extent that customer purchases of green power offset conventional power supply, net environmental gains can be expected. 1 ABSTRACT

88

Energy Consumption Characteristics of Light Manufacturing Facilities in The Northern Plains: A Study of Detailed Data from 10 Industrial Energy Audits Conducted in 1993  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENERGY CONSUMPTION CHARACTERISTICS OF LIGHT MANUFACTURING FACll..ITIES IN THE NORTHERN PLAINS: A study of detailed data from 10 industrial energy audits conducted in 1993. Michael Twedt Graduate Research Assistant IEOPIEADC South Dakota... profiles and common energy conservation opportunities. A statistical breakdown of energy consumption of 10 light manufacturing facilities by process, equipment type, and end use is provided. Common energy optimization procedures are also summarized...

Twedt, M.; Bassett, K.

89

A detailed loads comparison of three building energy modeling programs:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

detailed loads comparison of three building energy modeling programs: detailed loads comparison of three building energy modeling programs: EnergyPlus, DeST and DOE-2.1E Title A detailed loads comparison of three building energy modeling programs: EnergyPlus, DeST and DOE-2.1E Publication Type Journal Year of Publication 2013 Authors Zhu, Dandan, Tianzhen Hong, Da Yan, and Chuang Wang Date Published 05/2013 Keywords building energy modeling program, building thermal loads, comparison, dest, DOE-2.1E, energyplus Abstract Building energy simulation is widely used to help design energy efficient building envelopes and HVAC systems, develop and demonstrate compliance of building energy codes, and implement building energy rating programs. However, large discrepancies exist between simulation results from different building energy modeling programs (BEMPs). This leads many users and stakeholders

90

Energy Conservation Policy Issues and End-Use Scenarios of Savings Potential--Part 5. Energy Efficient Buildings: The Cause of Litigation Against Energy Conservation Building Codes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impact Evaluation of New York State Energy Code (ASHRAE 90-N.Y. , N.Y. : New York State Energy Research and DevelopmentJ. "New York Puts Together Its Own State Energy Policy and

Benenson, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

End Use and Fuel Certification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2B: End Use and Fuel Certification John Eichberger, Vice President of Government Relations, National Association for Convenience Stores

92

Energy Conservation Policy Issues and End-Use Scenarios of Savings Potential--Part 5. Energy Efficient Buildings: The Cause of Litigation Against Energy Conservation Building Codes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New York State Energy Code (ASHRAE 90-75) on Office Buildinga model code known as ASHRAE 90-75. Codes based on thisthe lighting section of ASHRAE 90-75 (Los Angeles Federal

Benenson, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Department of Energy Releases Details of Tribal Summit | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WASHINGTON, D.C. - U.S. Department of Energy today released details of the WASHINGTON, D.C. - U.S. Department of Energy today released details of the upcoming Tribal Summit with American Indian and Alaska Native Leaders that will be held on May 4-5, 2011, at the Crystal City Gateway Marriott in Arlington, Va. The summit will build on Secretary Chu's continued commitment to partnering with Native Americans to support the development of clean energy projects on tribal lands that will help reduce energy use, limit carbon pollution, and create new jobs for tribal communities across the country "Tribal Nations are well-positioned to take advantage of the benefits of clean energy. This summit will provide an opportunity for meaningful dialogue between the Department of Energy and Tribal Nations on a broad range of energy and environmental issues," said Secretary Chu. "Working

94

Methods for Detailed Energy Data Collection of Miscellaneous and Electronic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methods for Detailed Energy Data Collection of Miscellaneous and Electronic Methods for Detailed Energy Data Collection of Miscellaneous and Electronic Loads in a Commercial Office Building Title Methods for Detailed Energy Data Collection of Miscellaneous and Electronic Loads in a Commercial Office Building Publication Type Report Refereed Designation Unknown LBNL Report Number LBNL-6384E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Lanzisera, Steven, Stephen Dawson-Haggerty, Iris H. Y. Cheung, Jay Taneja, David Culler, and Richard E. Brown Date Published 04/2013 Keywords Commercial Office Building, Data Collection, Electronic loads Abstract Miscellaneous and electronic loads (MELs) consume about 20% of the primary energy used in U.S. buildings, and this share is projected to increase for the foreseeable future. Our understanding, however, of which devices are most responsible for this energy use is still rudimentary due to the difficulty and expense of performing detailed studies on MELs and their energy use. In order to better understand the energy use of MELs and the design of MELs field metering studies, we conducted a year-long study of MELs in an 89,500 sq. ft. (8310 m2) office building.

95

Biomass Resource Allocation among Competing End Uses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Resource Allocation Biomass Resource Allocation among Competing End Uses Emily Newes, Brian Bush, Daniel Inman, Yolanda Lin, Trieu Mai, Andrew Martinez, David Mulcahy, Walter Short, Travis Simpkins, and Caroline Uriarte National Renewable Energy Laboratory Corey Peck Lexidyne, LLC Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-54217 May 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Biomass Resource Allocation among Competing End Uses Emily Newes, Brian Bush, Daniel Inman,

96

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," ","RSE"

97

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS",,,"Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States"

98

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)","Factors"

99

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)"

100

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detailed energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)","Factors"

102

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal","RSE" "NAICS"," ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Factors"

103

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS",,,"Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States"

104

1992 CBECS Detailed Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Detailed Tables Detailed Tables To download all 1992 detailed tables: Download Acrobat Reader for viewing PDF files. Yellow Arrow Buildings Characteristics Tables (PDF format) (70 tables, 230 pages, file size 1.39 MB) Yellow Arrow Energy Consumption and Expenditures Tables (PDF format) (47 tables, 208 pages, file size 1.28 MB) Yellow Arrow Energy End-Use Tables (PDF format) (6 tables, 6 pages, file size 31.7 KB) Detailed tables for other years: Yellow Arrow 1999 CBECS Yellow Arrow 1995 CBECS Background information on detailed tables: Yellow Arrow Description of Detailed Tables and Categories of Data Yellow Arrow Statistical Significance of Data 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) Detailed Tables Data from the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in three groups of detailed tables:

105

Methods for detailed energy data collection of miscellaneous and electronic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methods for detailed energy data collection of miscellaneous and electronic Methods for detailed energy data collection of miscellaneous and electronic loads in a commercial office building Title Methods for detailed energy data collection of miscellaneous and electronic loads in a commercial office building Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Lanzisera, Steven, Stephen Dawson-Haggerty, Iris H. Y. Cheung, Jay Taneja, David Culler, and Richard E. Brown Journal Building and Environment Volume 65 Start Page 170 Pagination 170 - 177 Date Published 7/2013 ISSN 03601323 Keywords benchmarking, field study, MELs, office buildings, Plug-loads Abstract Miscellaneous and electronic loads (MELs) consume about 20% of the primary energy used in U.S. buildings, and this share is projected to increase for the foreseeable future. Our understanding, however, of which devices are most responsible for this energy use is still rudimentary due to the difficulty and expense of performing detailed studies on MELs and their energy use. In order to better understand the energy use of MELs and the design of MELs field metering studies, we conducted a year-long study of MELs in an 89,500 sq. ft. (8310 m2) office building. We present insights obtained from this study using 455 wireless plug-load power meters including the study design process, the tools needed for success, and key other methodology issues. Our study allowed us to quantify, for the study buildings, how many devices we needed to inventory and meter as well as for how long we needed to collect meter data. We find that the study design of earlier work would not have yielded accurate results in our study building. This paper presents these findings along with a brief summary of the energy related results.

106

Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. DOE Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Study aims to improve the understanding of lighting energy usage in U.S. residential dwellings using a regional estimation framework. The framework allows for the estimation of lamp usage and energy consumption 1) nationally and by region of the United States, 2) by certain household characteristics, 3) by location within the home, 4) by certain lamp characteristics, and 5) by certain categorical cross-classifications.

107

Department of Energy Releases Details of Tribal Summit | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WASHINGTON, D.C. - U.S. Department of Energy today released details of the upcoming Tribal Summit with American Indian and Alaska Native Leaders that will be held on May 4-5, 2011, at the Crystal City Gateway Marriott in Arlington, Va. The summit will build on Secretary Chu's continued commitment to partnering with Native Americans to support the development of clean energy projects on tribal lands that will help reduce energy use, limit carbon pollution, and create new jobs for tribal communities across the country. "Tribal Nations are well-positioned to take advantage of the benefits of clean energy. This summit will provide an opportunity for meaningful dialogue between the Department of Energy and Tribal Nations on a broad range of energy and environmental issues," said Secretary Chu. "Working

108

Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand...

109

Part 5: For Detailed Information | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: For Detailed Information 5: For Detailed Information Part 5: For Detailed Information 42 U.S.C. §9601 et. seq., The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA) 40 CFR Part 300, National Oil and Hazardous Substance Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) (March 1990) Executive Order 12580: Superfund Implementation DOE Order 5400.4: CERCLA Requirements Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under CERCLA (May 22, 1995) Decommissioning Implementation Guide (May 1995) Guidance on Accelerating CERCLA Environmental Restoration at Federal Facilities (August 1994) This question and Answer Sheet is designed to provide answers to common questions regarding decommissioning under CERCLA. If you have questions or

110

Enhanced End-Use Efficiency  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy efficiency has been dubbed the sixth source of energy (Fig. 14.1). The other five sources of energy are coal, natural gas, petroleum, nuclear and renewable energy. This chapter is about energy success s...

David Hafemeister

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Implications of maximizing China's technical potential for residential end-use energy efficiency: A 2030 outlook from the bottom-up  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 3. Basis for Residential Energy Demandand the subsequent energy demand and CO 2 emissionsa smaller share of total energy demand followed by space

Khanna, Nina

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal" " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS"," ","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million"

113

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)","Row"

114

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 3. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)","RSE" "NAICS"," ","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","Row"

115

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal" " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS"," ","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million"

116

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Row"

117

Enabling Detailed Energy Analyses via the Technology Performance Exchange: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

One of the key tenets to increasing adoption of energy efficiency solutions in the built environment is improving confidence in energy performance. Current industry practices make extensive use of predictive modeling, often via the use of sophisticated hourly or sub-hourly energy simulation programs, to account for site-specific parameters (e.g., climate zone, hours of operation, and space type) and arrive at a performance estimate. While such methods are highly precise, they invariably provide less than ideal accuracy due to a lack of high-quality, foundational energy performance input data. The Technology Performance Exchange was constructed to allow the transparent sharing of foundational, product-specific energy performance data, and leverages significant, external engineering efforts and a modular architecture to efficiently identify and codify the minimum information necessary to accurately predict product energy performance. This strongly-typed database resource represents a novel solution to a difficult and established problem. One of the most exciting benefits is the way in which the Technology Performance Exchange's application programming interface has been leveraged to integrate contributed foundational data into the Building Component Library. Via a series of scripts, data is automatically translated and parsed into the Building Component Library in a format that is immediately usable to the energy modeling community. This paper (1) presents a high-level overview of the project drivers and the structure of the Technology Performance Exchange; (2) offers a detailed examination of how technologies are incorporated and translated into powerful energy modeling code snippets; and (3) examines several benefits of this robust workflow.

Studer, D.; Fleming, K.; Lee, E.; Livingood, W.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,,,"Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","End Use","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

119

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,,,"Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","End Use","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

120

Energy Conservation: Policy Issues and End-Use Scenarios of Savings Potential -- Part 3, Policy Barriers and Investment Decisions in Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Nu- clear and Alternative Energy Systems ( CONAES) andCommittee on Nuclear and Alternative Energy Systems (CONAES)on Nu- clear and Alternative Energy Systems (CONAES) and FEA

Benenson, Peter

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detailed energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

1999 CBECS Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) > Detailed Tables Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) > Detailed Tables 1999 CBECS Detailed Tables Building Characteristics | Consumption & Expenditures Data from the 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in the Building Characteristics tables, which include number of buildings and total floorspace for various Building Characteristics, and Consumption and Expenditures tables, which include energy usage figures for major energy sources. A table of Relative Standard Errors (RSEs) is included as a worksheet tab in each Excel tables. Complete sets of RSE tables are also available in .pdf format. (What is an RSE?) Preliminary End-Use Consumption Estimates for 1999 | Description of 1999 Detailed Tables and Categories of Data

122

Quality Guidelines for Energy System Studies: Detailed Coal Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Q Q U U A A L L I I T T Y Y G G U U I I D D E E L L I I N N E E S S F F O O R R E E N N E E R R G G Y Y S S Y Y S S T T E E M M S S T T U U D D I I E E S S D D e e t t a a i i l l e e d d C C o o a a l l S S p p e e c c i i f f i i c c a a t t i i o o n n s s DOE/NETL-2010/???? DOE/NETL-401/012111 National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Program Planning and Analysis 2 January 2012 Detailed Coal Specifications Quality Guidelines for Energy System Studies Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights.

123

Enhanced End-Use Efficiency  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter is about energy success stories and potential success stories. Since the oil embargo, the United States has reduced its energy-use growth rate from 4.4% per year (196070) to about 1% per year. Th...

David Hafemeister

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Save Energy Now Assessments Results 2008 Detailed Report  

SciTech Connect

In October 2005, U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Bodman launched his Easy Ways to Save Energy campaign with a promise to provide energy assessments to 200 of the largest U.S. manufacturing plants. DOE's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) responded to the Secretary's campaign with its Save Energy Now initiative, featuring a new and highly cost-effective form of energy savings assessment. The approach for these assessments drew heavily on the existing resources of ITP's technology delivery component. Over the years, ITP Technology Delivery has worked with industry partners to assemble a suite of respected software tools, proven assessment protocols, training curricula, certified energy experts, and strong partnerships for deployment. The Save Energy Now assessments conducted in calendar year 2006 focused on natural gas savings and targeted many of the nation's largest manufacturing plants - those that consume at least 1 TBtu of energy annually. The 2006 Save Energy Now assessments focused primarily on assessments of steam and process heating systems, which account for an estimated 74% of all natural gas use by U.S. manufacturing plants. Because of the success of the Save Energy Now assessments conducted in 2006 and 2007, the program was expanded and enhanced in two major ways in 2008: (1) a new goal was set to perform at least 260 assessments; and (2) the assessment focus was expanded to include pumping, compressed air, and fan systems in addition to steam and process heating. DOE ITP also has developed software tools to assess energy efficiency improvement opportunities in pumping, compressed air, and fan systems. The Save Energy Now assessments integrate a strong training component designed to teach industrial plant personnel how to use DOE's opportunity assessment software tools. This approach has the advantages of promoting strong buy-in of plant personnel for the assessment and its outcomes and preparing them better to independently replicate the assessment process at the company's other facilities. Another important element of the Save Energy Now assessment process is the follow-up process used to identify how many of the recommended savings opportunities from individual assessments have been implemented in the industrial plants. Plant personnel involved with the Save Energy Now assessments are contacted 6 months, 12 months, and 24 months after individual assessments are completed to determine implementation results. A total of 260 Save Energy Now assessments were successfully completed in calendar year 2008. This means that a total of 718 assessments were completed in 2006, 2007, and 2008. As of July 2009, we have received a total of 239 summary reports from the ESAs that were conducted in year 2008. Hence, at the time that this report was prepared, 680 final assessment reports were completed (200 from year 2006, 241 from year 2007, and 239 from year 2008). The total identified potential cost savings from these 680 assessments is $1.1 billion per year, including natural gas savings of about 98 TBtu per year. These results, if fully implemented, could reduce CO{sub 2} emissions by about 8.9 million metric tons annually. When this report was prepared, data on implementation of recommended energy and cost savings measures from 488 Save Energy Now assessments were available. For these 488 plants, measures saving a total of $147 million per year have been implemented, measures that will save $169 million per year are in the process of being implemented, and plants are planning implementation of measures that will save another $239 million per year. The implemented recommendations are already achieving total CO{sub 2} reductions of about 1.8 million metric tons per year. This report provides a summary of the key results for the Save Energy Now assessments completed in 2008; details of the 6-month, 12-month, and 24-month implementation results obtained to date; and an evaluation of these implementation results. This report also summarizes key accomplishments, findings, and lessons learned from all the Save Energy No

Wright, Anthony L [ORNL; Martin, Michaela A [ORNL; Nimbalkar, Sachin U [ORNL; Quinn, James [U.S. Department of Energy; Glatt, Ms. Sandy [DOE Industrial Technologies Program; Orthwein, Mr. Bill [U.S. Department of Energy

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Distribution Infrastructure and End Use  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The expanded Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS2) created under the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 requires 36 billion gallons of biofuels to be blended into transportation fuel by...

126

FY 2014 Funding History Detail Spreadsheet | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Detail Spreadsheet (3.5 MB) More Documents & Publications Commercial Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Residential Clothes Washers (Appendix J2) FY 2014 Budget Request Statistical...

127

2015 Race to Zero Competition Details | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

2015 Race to Zero Competition Details The registration for the DOE Race to Zero Student Design Competition has closed, and 40 teams are registered to compete. These teams...

128

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey 2003 - Detailed Tables  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The tables contain information about energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. commercial buildings and information about energy-related characteristics of these buildings.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program: Analysis of residential refrigerator/freezer performance  

SciTech Connect

The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) is conducting a large end-use data acquisition program in an effort to understand how energy is utilized in buildings with permanent electric space heating equipment in the Pacific Northwest. The initial portion of effort, known as the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP), was conducted for Bonneville by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The collection of detailed end-use data provided an opportunity to analyze the amount of energy consumed by both refrigerators and separate freezers units located in residential buildings. By obtaining this information, the uncertainty of long- term regional end-use forecasting can be improved and potential utility marketing programs for new appliances with a reduced overall energy demand can be identified. It was found that standby loads derived from hourly averages between 4 a.m. and 5 a.m. reflected the minimum consumption needed to maintain interior refrigerator temperatures at a steady-state condition. Next, an average 24-hour consumption that included cooling loads from door openings and cooling food items was also determined. Later, analyses were conducted to develop a model capable of predicting refrigerator standby loads and 24-hour consumption for comparison with national refrigerator label ratings. Data for 140 residential sites with a refrigeration end-use were screened to develop a sample of 119 residences with pure refrigeration for use in this analysis. To identify those refrigerators that were considered to be pure (having no other devices present on the circuit) in terms of their end-use classification, the screening procedure used a statistical clustering technique that was based on standby loads with 24-hour consumption. 5 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

Ross, B.A.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

,"Colorado Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Natural Gas Consumption by End Use",6,"Monthly","112014","1151989" ,"Release...

131

,"California Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Consumption by End Use",11,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Release...

132

Table 5.2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 27 46 19 2,134 10 572 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 27 20 4 733 3 72 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 26 15 1,401 7 500 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 1,912 26 54 2,623 29 289 -- Process Heating -- 297 25 14 2,362 24 280

133

Table 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 714,166 13 22 5,064 18 39 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 7,788 7 3 2,074 3 26 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 7,788 3 1 712 1 3 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

134

Table 5.7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 845,727 13 22 5,064 18 39 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 12,979 7 3 2,074 3 26 Conventional Boiler Use 12,979 3 1 712 1 3 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 4 3 1,362 2 23 Direct Uses-Total Process 675,152 4 9 2,549 7 13 Process Heating

135

Table 5.5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 714,166 13 22 5,064 18 39 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 7,788 7 3 2,074 3 26 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 7,788 3 1 712 1 3 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 4 3 1,362 2 23 -- Direct Uses-Total Process

136

Table 5.6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 27 46 19 2,134 10 572 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 27 20 4 733 3 72 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 26 15 1,401 7 500 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 1,912 26 54 2,623 29 289 -- Process Heating -- 297 25 14 2,362 24 280 -- Process Cooling and Refrigeration -- 182 * Q 25

137

Table 5.4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 2,886 79 130 5,211 69 868 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 44 46 19 2,134 10 572 Conventional Boiler Use 44 20 4 733 3 72 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 26 15 1,401 7 500 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,304 26 54 2,623 29 289 Process Heating 318 25 14 2,362 24 280 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

138

1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption and Expenditures Tables Table C1. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel ............................................... 124 Table C2. Total Energy Expenditures by Major Fuel................................................ 130 Table C3. Consumption for Sum of Major Fuels ...................................................... 135 Table C4. Expenditures for Sum of Major Fuels....................................................... 140 Table C5. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels................................................................................................... 145 Table C6. Expenditures by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels......................... 150 Table C7. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Building Size for Sum of

139

Technology data characterizing refrigeration in commercial buildings: Application to end-use forecasting with COMMEND 4.0  

SciTech Connect

In the United States, energy consumption is increasing most rapidly in the commercial sector. Consequently, the commercial sector is becoming an increasingly important target for state and federal energy policies and also for utility-sponsored demand side management (DSM) programs. The rapid growth in commercial-sector energy consumption also makes it important for analysts working on energy policy and DSM issues to have access to energy end-use forecasting models that include more detailed representations of energy-using technologies in the commercial sector. These new forecasting models disaggregate energy consumption not only by fuel type, end use, and building type, but also by specific technology. The disaggregation of the refrigeration end use in terms of specific technologies, however, is complicated by several factors. First, the number of configurations of refrigeration cases and systems is quite large. Also, energy use is a complex function of the refrigeration-case properties and the refrigeration-system properties. The Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Commercial End-Use Planning System (COMMEND 4.0) and the associated data development presented in this report attempt to address the above complications and create a consistent forecasting framework. Expanding end-use forecasting models so that they address individual technology options requires characterization of the present floorstock in terms of service requirements, energy technologies used, and cost-efficiency attributes of the energy technologies that consumers may choose for new buildings and retrofits. This report describes the process by which we collected refrigeration technology data. The data were generated for COMMEND 4.0 but are also generally applicable to other end-use forecasting frameworks for the commercial sector.

Sezgen, O.; Koomey, J.G.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Sec. Chu Announces More 'SunShot' Details | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sec. Chu Announces More 'SunShot' Details Sec. Chu Announces More 'SunShot' Details Sec. Chu Announces More 'SunShot' Details February 4, 2011 - 1:30pm Addthis Sec. Chu Announces More 'SunShot' Details. | Department of Energy Photo | Courtesy of National Renewable Energy Laboratory | Public Domain | Sec. Chu Announces More 'SunShot' Details. | Department of Energy Photo | Courtesy of National Renewable Energy Laboratory | Public Domain | Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor for Energy.gov, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? The SunShot initiative will bring the cost of solar energy down by about 75 percent, making it cost competitive with fossil fuels, like coal, by the end of the decade. Visit the SunShot website for more information. Today, Secretary Chu announced more details of the Department's

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detailed energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Realizing Building End-Use Efficiency with Ermerging Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Realizing Building End-Use Efficiency Realizing Building End-Use Efficiency with Emerging Technologies Jonathan Livingston Livingston Energy Innovations, LLC What is End-Use Efficiency (EE)? * EE is an energy resource * Broadly accepted in the U.S. as the single most effective step toward reducing pollution, power costs and price volatility * Treated as equivalent to supply-side resources * Recognized by states and regions as first priority when costs are comparable (CA, MO, NM, Pacific Northwest) The Northwest Power Act 839b(e)(1). The plan shall, as provided in this paragraph, give priority to resources which the Council determines to be cost-effective. Priority shall be given: first, to conservation; second, to renewable resources; third, to generating resources utilizing waste heat or generating resources of high fuel conversion

142

EIA - Appendix F-Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Country  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Country Grouping Data Tables (2005-2030) Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Country Grouping Data Tables (2005-2030) International Energy Outlook 2008 Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Country Grouping Data Tables (2005-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 19 complete) Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Country Gruping Data Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Projections of Nuclear Generating Capacity Data Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. F1 Total World Delivered Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector and Fuel Table F1. Total World Delivered Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector and Fuel. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

143

The RECS relies on the respondents to provide the energy related details of their homes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Householder's Perceptions of Insulation Adequacy and Householder's Perceptions of Insulation Adequacy and Drafts in the Home in 2001 Behjat Hojjati , PhD Energy Information Administration U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW, EI-63 Washington, DC 20585 behjat.hojjati@eia.doe.gov September 2004 Abstract In order to improve the estimation of end-use heating consumption, the Energy Information Administration's (EIA), 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), for the first time, asked respondents to judge how drafty they perceived their homes to be as a measure of insulation quality. The analysis of the 2001 RECS data shows that householders in newly- constructed homes perceived their homes to be better insulated and less drafty than do householders in older homes. Single-family homes are perceived to be better insulated and less

144

Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Medical Equipment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Building Technologies Office conducted a healthcare energy end-use monitoring project for two sites. Read details about large medical imaging equipment energy results.

145

Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Fans and Pumps  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Building Technologies Office conducted a healthcare energy end-use monitoring project for two sites. Read details about the fan and pump energy results.

146

Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Chiller Plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Building Technologies Office conducted a healthcare energy end-use monitoring project for two sites. Read details about the chiller plant energy results.

147

Technology data characterizing space conditioning in commercial buildings: Application to end-use forecasting with COMMEND 4.0  

SciTech Connect

In the US, energy consumption is increasing most rapidly in the commercial sector. Consequently, the commercial sector is becoming an increasingly important target for state and federal energy policies and also for utility-sponsored demand side management (DSM) programs. The rapid growth in commercial-sector energy consumption also makes it important for analysts working on energy policy and DSM issues to have access to energy end-use forecasting models that include more detailed representations of energy-using technologies in the commercial sector. These new forecasting models disaggregate energy consumption not only by fuel type, end use, and building type, but also by specific technology. The disaggregation of space conditioning end uses in terms of specific technologies is complicated by several factors. First, the number of configurations of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems and heating and cooling plants is very large. Second, the properties of the building envelope are an integral part of a building`s HVAC energy consumption characteristics. Third, the characteristics of commercial buildings vary greatly by building type. The Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Commercial End-Use Planning System (COMMEND 4.0) and the associated data development presented in this report attempt to address the above complications and create a consistent forecasting framework. This report describes the process by which the authors collected space-conditioning technology data and then mapped it into the COMMEND 4.0 input format. The data are also generally applicable to other end-use forecasting frameworks for the commercial sector.

Sezgen, O.; Franconi, E.M.; Koomey, J.G.; Greenberg, S.E.; Afzal, A.; Shown, L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Office Buildings - End-Use Equipment  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End-Use Equipment End-Use Equipment The types of space heating equipment used in office buildings were similar to those of the commercial buildings sector as a whole (Table 8 and Figure 5). Furnaces were most used followed by packaged heating systems. Individual space heaters were third-most used but were primarily used to supplement the building's main heating system. Boilers and district heat systems were more often used in larger buildings. Table 8. Types of Heating Equipment Used in Office Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings* All Office Buildings All Buildings* All Office Buildings All Buildings 4,645 824 64,783 12,208 All Buildings with Space Heating 3,982 802 60,028 11,929 Heating Equipment (more than one may apply)

149

Detailed Energy Data Collection for Miscellaneous and Electronic Loads in a Commercial Office Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detailed Energy Data Collection for Miscellaneous and Electronic Loads in a Commercial Office Miscellaneous and electronic loads (MELs) consume about 20% of the primary energy used in U.S. buildings and accurate data to inform MELs energy use. Introduction Background Buildings account for 40% of the total

Culler, David E.

150

Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Lighting and Other Electric Loads  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Building Technologies Office conducted a healthcare energy end-use monitoring project for two sites. Read details about the lighting and plug load energy results.

151

Realizing Building End-Use Efficiency with Ermerging Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Information about the implementation of emerging technologies to maximize end-use efficiency in buildings.

152

Detailed Renewable Energy Resource Assessment Data Inventory (US) | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Detailed Renewable Energy Resource Assessment Data Inventory (US) Detailed Renewable Energy Resource Assessment Data Inventory (US) Dataset Summary Description Detailed inventory of available renewable energy (RE) resource assessment data. Although the type, amount, and regional distribution of resource information vary by resource, assessments are available for each RE category (conducted by DOE and various private and public organizations). Solar, wind and geothermal resources have assessment products available at numerous scales (national, regional, and site specific). Assessments are available for biomass and hydropower resources at a national level, with only limited information available at the regional and site-specific levels. Ocean energy has the least resource assessment information available. This information was compiled by NREL and initially published in the 2006 Report to Congress on Renewable Energy Resource Assessment Information for the United States (Original document courtesy of archive.org). This datasets was last updated in January, 2011. For each assessment, the inventory includes: data name, data type, source, period of record, spatial coverage, spatial resolution, temporal scale, units, stated accuracy, availability, URL, update frequency, and additional notes.

153

Theory of Solutions in Energy Representation in NPT-ensemble: Derivation Details  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theory of solutions in energy representation (ER method) developed by Matubayasi and Nakahara provides with an approximate way of calculating solvation free energies (or, identically, the excess chemical potentials) from atomistic simulations. In this document we provide some derivation details of this, to our opinion, theoretically involved method, which will help a non-specialist to follow. There are three points which differ this document from a regular textbook on statistical mechanics or research articles: 1) Derivation is detailed and all approximations are explicitly stated; 2) Statistical mechanics derivations are performed in NPT-ensemble; 3) We perform the derivations for the case when a molecule is represented as a set of (atomic) sites interacting via spherically symmetric potentials (a classical Force Field representation). In ER method, a new collective coordinate is introduced - the interaction energy of a solute and a solvent molecule. The excess chemical potential is expressed as a functional...

Frolov, Andrey I

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Distribution Category UC-98 Consumption End-Use A Comparison of Measures  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Distribution Category UC-98 Distribution Category UC-98 Consumption End-Use A Comparison of Measures by Consumption and Supply Surveys Energy information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585 General information concerning the contents of the report may be obtained from Lynda T. Carlson, Director of the Energy End Use Division (202/586-1112). Specific information regarding the contents or preparation of the publication may be obtained from Nancy L. Leach, Chief of the Residential and Commercial Branch (202/586-1114). The Residential Energy Consumption Survey manager and a major contributor to this report is Wendel Thompson (202/586-1119). The report was written by Gerald Peabody (202/586-6160). Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector

155

EIA - Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 > Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Tables (2003-2030) 6 > Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Tables (2003-2030) International Energy Outlook 2006 Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Tables (2003-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 19 complete) Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Data Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Data Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table D1 Total World Delivered Energy Consumption Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Data Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Data Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

156

BUDGET DETAILS BOOK FOUR DPRMN OF N RGY U.S. Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BUDGET DETAILS BUDGET DETAILS BOOK FOUR DPRMN OF N RGY U.S. Department of Energy Transition Team Budget Book Office of the Chief Financial Officer Office of Budget 1. Budget Overview 2. Funding Tables and Charts 3. Appropriations Subcommittees 4. Program Overviews 5. Major Construction Projects, Activities, and Initiatives 6. Laboratory and State Data Acronyms commonly used in budget documents. ACI American Competitiveness Initiative AEI Advanced Energy Initiative AFP Approved Funding Program (monthly financial plan that dictates how funding is to be executed) AlP Accelerator Improvement Project Ames Ames National Laboratory ANL Argonne National Laboratory B&R Budget and Reference Code BA Budget Authority BAPL Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory BNL Brookhaven National Laboratory BO Budget Outlay

157

Metering Campaign on All Cooking End-Uses in 100 Households  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the findings of an experimental study performed in 100 French households on the end-use power demand and energy consumption of domestic appliances focusing on cooking appliances [1].

Olivier Sidler

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

China's Building Energy Use: A Long-Term Perspective based on a Detailed Assessment  

SciTech Connect

We present here a detailed, service-based model of China's building energy use, nested in the GCAM (Global Change Assessment Model) integrated assessment framework. Using the model, we explore long-term pathways of China's building energy use and identify opportunities of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The inclusion of a structural model of building energy demands within an integrated assessment framework represents a major methodological advance. It allows for a structural understanding of the drivers of building energy consumption while simultaneously considering the other human and natural system interactions that influence changes in the global energy system and climate. We also explore a range of different scenarios to gain insights into how China's building sector might evolve and what the implications might be for improved building energy technology and carbon policies. The analysis suggests that China's building energy growth will not wane anytime soon, although technology improvement will put downward pressure on this growth. Also, regardless of the scenarios represented, the growth will involve the continued, rapid electrification of the buildings sector throughout the century, and this transition will be accelerated by the implementation of carbon policy.

Eom, Jiyong; Clarke, Leon E.; Kim, Son H.; Kyle, G. Page; Patel, Pralit L.

2012-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

159

,"U.S. Total Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residual Fuel Oil by End Use" Residual Fuel Oil by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Total Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use",8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1984" ,"Release Date:","11/15/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","10/31/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_821rsd_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_821rsd_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

160

,"U.S. Adjusted Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residual Fuel Oil by End Use" Residual Fuel Oil by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Adjusted Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use",8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1984" ,"Release Date:","11/15/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","10/31/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_821rsda_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_821rsda_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detailed energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

,"New York Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas Consumption by End Use",6,"Monthly","102014","1151989" ,"Release...

162

,"New York Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas Consumption by End Use",10,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10...

163

Assessment of Interval Data and Their Potential Application to Residential Electricity End-Use Modeling, An  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is investigating the potential benefits of incorporating interval electricity data into its residential energy end use models. This includes interval smart meter and submeter data from utility assets and systems. It is expected that these data will play a significant role in informing residential energy efficiency policies in the future. Therefore, a long-term strategy for improving the RECS end-use models will not be complete without an investigation of the current state of affairs of submeter data, including their potential for use in the context of residential building energy modeling.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Development of an End-Use Sector- Based Low-Carbon Indicator System for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of an End-Use Sector- Based Low-Carbon Indicator System for Development of an End-Use Sector- Based Low-Carbon Indicator System for Cities in China Title Development of an End-Use Sector- Based Low-Carbon Indicator System for Cities in China Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2012 Authors Price, Lynn K., Nan Zhou, David Fridley, Hongyou Lu, Nina Zheng, Cecilia Fino-Chen, and Stephanie Ohshita Conference Name the ACEEE's 2012 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Date Published 08/2012 Publisher the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy Conference Location Pacific Grove, California, U.S.A. Keywords 12th five year plan, buildings, china, china energy, china energy group, co2 emissions, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, low carbon indicator, policy studies

165

Monitoring of Electrical End-Use Loads in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Southern California Edison is currently conducting a program to collect end-use metered data from commercial buildings in its service area. The data will provide actual measurements of end-use loads and will be used in research and in designing...

Martinez, M.; Alereza, T.; Mort, D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Estimation of Energy End-use Consumption Estimation of Energy End-use Consumption 2003 CBECS The energy end-use consumption tables for 2003 (Detailed Tables E1-E11 and E1A-E11A) provide estimates of the amount of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat used for ten end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, water heating, lighting, cooking, refrigeration, personal computers, office equipment (including servers), and other uses. Although details vary by energy source (Table 1), there are four basic steps in the end-use estimation process: Regressions of monthly consumption on degree-days to establish reference temperatures for the engineering models, Engineering modeling by end use, Cross-sectional regressions to calibrate the engineering estimates and account for additional energy uses, and

167

Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBL-34045 UC-1600 Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting-uses include Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC). Our analysis uses the modeling framework provided by the HVAC module in the Residential End-Use Energy Planning System (REEPS), which was developed

168

AEO2011: Natural Gas Delivered Prices by End-Use Sector and Census Division  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Delivered Prices by End-Use Sector and Census Division Delivered Prices by End-Use Sector and Census Division Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 137, and contains only the reference case. This dataset is in trillion cubic feet. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, electric power and transportation. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Natural Gas Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Natural Gas Delivered Prices by End-Use Sector and Census Division- Reference Case (xls, 140.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

169

AEO2011: Natural Gas Consumption by End-Use Sector and Census Division |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption by End-Use Sector and Census Division Consumption by End-Use Sector and Census Division Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 136, and contains only the reference case. This dataset is in trillion cubic feet. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, electric power and transportation. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Natural gas consumption Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Natural Gas Consumption by End-Use Sector and Census Division- Reference Case (xls, 138.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

170

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8 Table 3. Electric and Diesel Pump Characteristics andhectare by fuel type (electric or diesel pump) in number perTable 3. Electric and Diesel Pump Characteristics and

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rural, k=Kerosene m=rural, k=biogas m =urban, k=LPG m=urban,k=LPG k=wood k=kerosene k=biogas k=electricity k=electricity

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

United States Industrial Sector Energy End Use Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel Conventional Boiler Use CHP and/or Cogeneration ProcessFuel Conventional Boiler Use CHP and/or Cogeneration ProcessFuel Conventional Boiler Use CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

Shehabi, Arman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficiency in Electricity Consumption", HWWA Discussionelectricity includes electricity consumption plus thedistribution. Total electricity consumption represents 1,654

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s=retail k=electricity, s=private office k=electricity, s==private office s=gov office s=hotel s=other k=electricity k

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5% of its reserve is coking coal used by the steel industry.imports around 70% of coking coal annually. More recently,

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

COMBINED THERMAL MEASUREMENT AND SIMULATION FOR THE DETAILED ANALYSIS OF FOUR OCCUPIED LOW-ENERGY BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-ENERGY BUILDINGS U.D.J. Gieseler, F.D. Heidt1 , W. Bier Division of Building Physics and Solar Energy, University energy and temperature measurements of occupied buildings very well. These buildings repre- sent small to medium size residential low-energy buildings of different construction type, which are typical for mid

Gieseler, Udo D. J.

177

Industrial Steam Power Cycles Final End-Use Classification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Final end uses of steam include two major classifications: those uses that condense the steam against heat transfer surfaces to provide heat to an item of process or service equipment; and those that require a mass flow of steam for stripping...

Waterland, A. F.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Sec. Chu Announces More 'SunShot' Details | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Editor for Energy.gov, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? The SunShot initiative will bring the cost of solar energy down by about 75 percent, making it...

179

http://www1.eere.energy.gov/financing/solicitations_detail.html  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

EERE Financial Opportunities Home | EERE Home | U.S. Department of Energy Webmaster | Web Site Policies | Security & Privacy | USA.gov Page 1 of 1 EERE Financial Opportunities:...

180

REFINING AND END USE STUDY OF COAL LIQUIDS  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes all of the work conducted as part of the Refining and End Use Study of Coal Liquids. There were several distinct objectives set, as the study developed over time: (1) Demonstration of a Refinery Accepting Coal Liquids; (2) Emissions Screening of Indirect Diesel; (3) Biomass Gasification F-T Modeling; and (4) Updated Gas to Liquids (GTL) Baseline Design/Economic Study.

Unknown

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detailed energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Calculation method for electricity end-use for residential lighting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Knowledge of the electricity demand for different electrical appliances in households is very important in the work to reduce electricity use in households. Metering of end-uses is expensive and time consuming and therefore other methods for calculation of end-use electricity can be very useful. This paper presents a method to calculate the electricity used for lighting in households based on regression analysis of daily electricity consumption, out-door temperatures and the length of daylight at the same time and location. The method is illustrated with analyses of 45 Norwegian households. The electricity use for lighting in an average Norwegian household is calculated to 1050kWh/year or 6% of total electricity use. The results are comparable to metering results of lighting in other studies in the Nordic countries. The methodology can also be used to compensate for the seasonal effect when metering electricity for lighting less than a year. When smart meters are more commonly available, the possible adaption of this method will increase, and the need for end-use demand calculations will still be present.

Eva Rosenberg

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Master Plan and Energy Audits at a Large Texas Medical Campus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Audits. The Master Plan summarized our methodology for disaggregation of historical energy use by building and end use. We also defined our proposed system for prioritizing buildings for the individual Detailed Building Energy Audits. We proposed a...

Simpson, K.; Stinson, M.; Haag, S.; Hart, M.

183

CBECS 1993 - Federal Buildings Supplement Survey - Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Publication > Detailed Tables Publication > Detailed Tables Detailed Tables Percent of FBSS Buildings and Floorspace by Selected Agencies, FY 1993 Percent of FBSS Buildings and Floorspace by Selected Agencies, FY 1993 Sources: Energy Information Administration, Energy Markets and End Use, 1993 Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey. Divider Line To View and/or Print Reports (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader) - Download Adobe Acrobat Reader If you experience any difficulties, visit our Technical Frequently Asked Questions. Divider Line You have the option of downloading the entire set of tables or selected tables by data item. Full Set of Tables - Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey, 1993 (file size 770,290 bytes) pages: 123 Detailed Table Information (file size 45,044 bytes) pages: 7, includes:

184

End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program: motivation and overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP) was a major end-use data collection program undertaken by the Bonneville Power Administration from 1983 through 1990 to obtain specific information to support a variety of conservation and forecasting activities. The objectives of the program were to test key assumptions used in current engineering and forecasting models, provide insights regarding how various factors affect energy consumption, provide information to support load management conservation and marketing programs, and identify conservation resource potential from new demand-side technologies or programs. To accomplish this, a well-designed experiment was required that accounted for adequate representation of both existing and new buildings in the residential and commercial sector of the Pacific Northwest. This paper summarizes the motivations for obtaining the data, information regarding the sample, an overview of the analysis agenda, and specifics regarding the data set, both engineering and characteristics.

F.J. Peterson; J.E. Patton; M.E. Miller; R.A. Gillman; W.M. Warwick; W.F. Sandusky

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 5 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in three groups of detailed tables: Buildings Characteristics Tables, number of buildings and amount of floorspace for major building characteristics. Energy Consumption and Expenditures Tables, energy consumption and expenditures for major energy sources. Energy End-Use Data, total, electricity and natural gas consumption and energy intensities for nine specific end-uses. All Principal Buildings Activities Number of Buildings, Total Floorspace, and Total Site and Primary Energy Consumption for All Principal Building Activities, 1995

186

Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Study: Estimation Framework and Initial Estimates  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. DOE Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Study is an initiative of the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) Solid-State Lighting Program that aims to improve the understanding of lighting energy usage in residential dwellings. The study has developed a regional estimation framework within a national sample design that allows for the estimation of lamp usage and energy consumption 1) nationally and by region of the United States, 2) by certain household characteristics, 3) by location within the home, 4) by certain lamp characteristics, and 5) by certain categorical cross-classifications (e.g., by dwelling type AND lamp type or fixture type AND control type).

Gifford, Will R.; Goldberg, Miriam L.; Tanimoto, Paulo M.; Celnicker, Dane R.; Poplawski, Michael E.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

chapter 5. Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Detailed Tables 5. Detailed Tables Chapter 5. Detailed Tables The following tables present detailed characteristics of vehicles in the residential sector. Data are from the 1994 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey. Table Organization The "Detailed Tables" section consists of three types of tables: (1) Tables of totals such as number of vehicle-miles traveled (VMT) or gallons consumed; (2) tables of per household statistics such as VMT per household; and (3) tables of per-vehicle statistics, such as vehicle fuel consumption per vehicle. The tables have been grouped together by specific topics such as model-year data or family-income data to facilitate finding related information. The Quick-Reference Guide to the detailed tables indicates major topics of each table.

188

SOLERAS - Solar Energy Water Desalination Project: Exxon Research and Engineering. System design final report, Volume 2. Appendices baseline plant design details seawater feed (System A)  

SciTech Connect

The details of the design of a conceptual baseline solar desalination plant are provided. Yanbu, Saudi Arabia is the site for the plant. Details are defined for several of the plant subsystems including: energy storage, energy delivery, reverse osmosis/multiple effect distillation, water storage, waste disposal, backup power generation, controls and instrumentation, data acquisition, and facilities and enclosures subsystems. The plant equipment is listed and process flow diagrams are included. Cost estimates and economic analyses of the plant are documented. (BCS)

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

2003 CBECS Detailed Tables: Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2003 Detailed Tables 2003 Detailed Tables 2003 CBECS Detailed Tables most recent available Released: September 2008 Building Characteristics | Consumption & Expenditures | End-Use Consumption In the 2003 CBECS, the survey procedures for strip shopping centers and enclosed malls ("mall buildings") were changed from those used in previous surveys, and, as a result, mall buildings are now excluded from most of the 2003 CBECS tables. Therefore, some data in the majority of the tables are not directly comparable with previous CBECS tables, all of which included mall buildings. Some numbers in the 2003 tables will be slightly lower than earlier surveys since the 2003 figures do not include mall buildings. See "Change in Data Collection Procedures for Malls" for a more detailed explanation.

190

Detailed Course Module Description  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Course Module Description Course Module Description Module/Learning Objectives Level of Detail in Module by Audience Consumers Gen Ed/ Community College Trades 1. Energy Issues and Building Solutions High High High Learning Objectives: * Define terms of building science, ecological systems, economics of consumption * Relate building science perspective, ecology, social science * Explain historical energy and environmental issues related to buildings * Compare Site and source energy * Examine the health, safety and comfort issues in buildings * Examine the general context for building solutions (zero energy green home with durability as the goal) * Explain a basic overview of alternative energy (total solar flux) - do we have enough energy * Examine cash flow to homeowners

191

Technology data characterizing water heating in commercial buildings: Application to end-use forecasting  

SciTech Connect

Commercial-sector conservation analyses have traditionally focused on lighting and space conditioning because of their relatively-large shares of electricity and fuel consumption in commercial buildings. In this report we focus on water heating, which is one of the neglected end uses in the commercial sector. The share of the water-heating end use in commercial-sector electricity consumption is 3%, which corresponds to 0.3 quadrillion Btu (quads) of primary energy consumption. Water heating accounts for 15% of commercial-sector fuel use, which corresponds to 1.6 quads of primary energy consumption. Although smaller in absolute size than the savings associated with lighting and space conditioning, the potential cost-effective energy savings from water heaters are large enough in percentage terms to warrant closer attention. In addition, water heating is much more important in particular building types than in the commercial sector as a whole. Fuel consumption for water heating is highest in lodging establishments, hospitals, and restaurants (0.27, 0.22, and 0.19 quads, respectively); water heating`s share of fuel consumption for these building types is 35%, 18% and 32%, respectively. At the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, we have developed and refined a base-year data set characterizing water heating technologies in commercial buildings as well as a modeling framework. We present the data and modeling framework in this report. The present commercial floorstock is characterized in terms of water heating requirements and technology saturations. Cost-efficiency data for water heating technologies are also developed. These data are intended to support models used for forecasting energy use of water heating in the commercial sector.

Sezgen, O.; Koomey, J.G.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Analysis of PG&E`s residential end-use metered data to improve electricity demand forecasts -- final report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes findings from a unique project to improve the end-use electricity load shape and peak demand forecasts made by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) and the California Energy Commission (CEC). First, the direct incorporation of end-use metered data into electricity demand forecasting models is a new approach that has only been made possible by recent end-use metering projects. Second, and perhaps more importantly, the joint-sponsorship of this analysis has led to the development of consistent sets of forecasting model inputs. That is, the ability to use a common data base and similar data treatment conventions for some of the forecasting inputs frees forecasters to concentrate on those differences (between their competing forecasts) that stem from real differences of opinion, rather than differences that can be readily resolved with better data. The focus of the analysis is residential space cooling, which represents a large and growing demand in the PG&E service territory. Using five years of end-use metered, central air conditioner data collected by PG&E from over 300 residences, we developed consistent sets of new inputs for both PG&E`s and CEC`s end-use load shape forecasting models. We compared the performance of the new inputs both to the inputs previously used by PG&E and CEC, and to a second set of new inputs developed to take advantage of a recently added modeling option to the forecasting model. The testing criteria included ability to forecast total daily energy use, daily peak demand, and demand at 4 P.M. (the most frequent hour of PG&E`s system peak demand). We also tested the new inputs with the weather data used by PG&E and CEC in preparing their forecasts.

Eto, J.H.; Moezzi, M.M.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Realizing Building End-Use Efficiency with Ermerging Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

通过新兴技术实现终端能效 通过新兴技术实现终端能效 Jonathan Livingston Livingston Energy Innovations, LLC 第二届中美能效论坛 5月5-6日,2011|劳伦斯伯克利国家实验室,伯克利市,加州 什么是终端能效(EE)? * 能效是一种能源资源 * 在美国广泛认为,就单一措施效果而言,能效是降低污 染、降低发电成本和减少能源价格波动的最有效的方法 * 能效是供应侧资源的一种 * 在价格可比的情况下,各州和地方政府将能效当作他们 的首要选择 (加州、密苏里州、新墨西哥州和美国西北 地区) 西北电力法案 839b(e)(1). 项目规划将把委员会认为是成本有效的资源

194

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 2 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in three groups of detailed tables: Buildings characteristics tables-number of buildings and amount of floorspace for major building characteristics. Energy consumption and expenditures tables-energy consumption and expenditures for major energy sources. Energy end-use tables-total, electricity and natural gas consumption and energy intensities for nine specific end-uses. Guide to the 1992 CBECS Detailed Tables Released: Nov 1999 Column Categories Row Categories The first set of detailed tables for the 1992 CBECS, Tables A1 through A70,

195

A functional analysis of electrical load curve modelling for some households specific electricity end-uses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

domestic end-uses, the development of plug-in hybrid and electric vehicles, the increase of heat pumps heating systems such as heat pumps in new building or which will replace old installed fossil fuels based systems; · integration of new end-uses such as Plug-in Electric Vehicles and an always growing number

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

196

Global warming and end-use efficiency implications of replacing CFCs  

SciTech Connect

The direct contribution of CFCs to calculated global warming has been recognized for some time. As a result of the international agreement to phase out CFCs due to stratospheric ozone and the ensuing search for suitable alternatives, there has recently been increased attention on the DIRECT global warming potential (GWP) of the fluorocarbon alternatives as greenhouse gases. However, to date there has been little focus on the INDIRECT global warming effect arising from end-use efficiency changes and associated CO{sub 2} emissions. A study being conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) addresses this combined or total global warming impact of viable options to replace CFCs in their major energy-related applications. This paper reviews selected results for air-conditioning, refrigeration, and heat pump applications. The analysis indicates that the CFC user industries have made substantial progress in approaching near-equal energy efficiency with the HCFC/HFC alternative refrigerants. The findings also bring into question the relative importance of the DIRECT (chemical-related) effect in many applications. Replacing CFCs is an important step in reducing the total global warming impact, and at present the HCFC and HFCS appear to offer the best efficiency and lowest total impact of options available in the relatively short time period required for the transition away from CFCs.

Fairchild, P.D.; Fischer, S.K.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

197

Developing cost curves for conserved energy in new refrigerators and freezers: Demonstration of methodology and detailed engineering results  

SciTech Connect

This paper develops and demonstrates a procedure for determining the cost of conserved energy in residential refrigerators and freezers and for ranking conservation measures according to economic feasibility and practicality. Prepared jointly by the Natural Resources Defense Council and ACEE for the Solar Energy Research Institute.

Goldstein, D.; Miller, P.; Watson, R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency-Table 6a- End uses of  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

a a Table 7a. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption per Value Of Production 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Btu per constant 2000 dollar 1) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS2 331111) 19983 20024 20064 Total NA 19,716 12,179 Electricity NA 3,839 2,846 Natural Gas NA 8,052 5,301 Coal NA 747 228 Residual Fuel NA 21 309 Coke and Breeze NA 6,496 3,025 Notes: 1. Value of production is deflated by the chain-type price indices for iron and steel mills shipments. 2. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills. 3. 1998 data unavailable due to disclosure avoidance procedures in place at the time. 4. Denominators represent the value of production for the entire iron and still mills (NAICS 331111), not those based mainly on electric, natural gas, coal, residual fuel oil or coke.

199

Significant ELCAP analysis results: Summary report. [End-use Load and Consumer Assessment Program  

SciTech Connect

The evolution of the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP) since 1983 at Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) has been eventful and somewhat tortuous. The birth pangs of a data set so large and encompassing as this have been overwhelming at times. The early adolescent stage of data set development and use has now been reached and preliminary results of early analyses of the data are becoming well known. However, the full maturity of the data set and the corresponding wealth of analytic insights are not fully realized. This document is in some sense a milestone in the brief history of the program. It is a summary of the results of the first five years of the program, principally containing excerpts from a number of previous reports. It is meant to highlight significant accomplishments and analytical results, with a focus on the principal results. Many of the results have a broad application in the utility load research community in general, although the real breadth of the data set remains largely unexplored. The first section of the document introduces the data set: how the buildings were selected, how the metering equipment was installed, and how the data set has been prepared for analysis. Each of the sections that follow the introduction summarize a particular analytic result. A large majority of the analyses to date involve the residential samples, as these were installed first and had highest priority on the analytic agenda. Two exploratory analyses using commercial data are included as an introduction to the commercial analyses that are currently underway. Most of the sections reference more complete technical reports which the reader should refer to for details of the methodology and for more complete discussion of the results. Sections have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Pratt, R.G.; Conner, C.C.; Drost, M.K.; Miller, N.E.; Cooke, B.A.; Halverson, M.A.; Lebaron, B.A.; Lucas, R.G.; Jo, J.; Richman, E.E.; Sandusky, W.F. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Ritland, K.G. (Ritland Associates, Seattle, WA (USA)); Taylor, M.E. (USDOE Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR (USA)); Hauser, S.G. (Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (USA))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Detailed HBT measurements with respect to the event plane and collision energy in Au+Au collisions at PHENIX  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The azimuthal dependence of 3D HBT radii relative to the event plane gives us information about the source shape at freeze-out. It also provides information on the system's evolution by comparing it to the initial source shape. In recent studies, higher harmonic event planes and flow have been measured at RHIC and the LHC, which result primarily from spatial fluctuations of the initial density across the collision area. If the shape caused by initial fluctuations still exists at freeze-out, the HBT measurement relative to higher order event plane may show these features. We present recent results of azimuthal HBT measurements relative to $2^{nd}$- and $3^{rd}$-order event planes in Au+Au 200 GeV collisions with the PHENIX experiment. Recent HBT measurements at lower energies will be also shown and compared with the 200 GeV result.

Takafumi Niida for the PHENIX Collaboration

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detailed energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

System for the Analysis of Global Energy Markets (SAGE) System for the Analysis of Global Energy Markets (SAGE) Projections of world energy consumption and supply in IEO2007 were generated using EIA's SAGE model. SAGE is used to project energy use in detail at the end- use sector level. It is an integrated set of regional models that provide a technology-rich basis for estimating regional energy consumption. For each region, reference case estimates of 42 end-use energy service demands (e.g., car, commercial truck, and heavy truck road travel; residential lighting; steam heat requirements in the paper industry) are developed on the basis of economic and demographic projections. Projections of energy con- sumption to meet the energy demands are estimated on the basis of each region's existing energy use patterns, the existing stock of energy-using equipment, and the characteristics of available new technologies, as well

202

Current and future industrial energy service characterizations  

SciTech Connect

Current and future energy demands, end uses, and cost used to characterize typical applications and resultant services in the industrial sector of the United States and 15 selected states are examined. A review and evaluation of existing industrial energy data bases was undertaken to assess their potential for supporting SERI research on: (1) market suitability analysis, (2) market development, (3) end-use matching, (3) industrial applications case studies, and (4) identification of cost and performance goals for solar systems and typical information requirements for industrial energy end use. In reviewing existing industrial energy data bases, the level of detail, disaggregation, and primary sources of information were examined. The focus was on fuels and electric energy used for heat and power purchased by the manufacturing subsector and listed by 2-, 3-, and 4-digit SIC, primary fuel, and end use. Projections of state level energy prices to 1990 are developed using the energy intensity approach. The effects of federal and state industrial energy conservation programs on future industrial sector demands were assessed. Future end-use energy requirements were developed for each 4-digit SIC industry and were grouped as follows: (1) hot water, (2) steam (212 to 300/sup 0/F, each 100/sup 0/F interval from 300 to 1000/sup 0/F, and greater than 1000/sup 0/F), and (3) hot air (100/sup 0/F intervals). Volume I details the activities performed in this effort.

Krawiec, F.; Thomas, T.; Jackson, F.; Limaye, D.R.; Isser, S.; Karnofsky, K.; Davis, T.D.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Trends in Renewable Energy Consumption and Electricity  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presents a summary of the nations renewable energy consumption in 2010 along with detailed historical data on renewable energy consumption by energy source and end-use sector. Data presented also includes renewable energy consumption for electricity generation and for non-electric use by energy source, and net summer capacity and net generation by energy source and state. The report covers the period from 2006 through 2010.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

The Matter of Detailing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Project success is truly a matter of detailing! So, it is imperative that the strongest of cases must be made for the process of detailing!

Ralph W. Liebing RA; CSI; CPCA; CBO

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Calendar Year 2009 Program Benefits for ENERGY STAR Labeled Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use.Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use.ICF Consulting. 2003. Energy Star Market Penetration Report

Homan, Gregory K

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Calendar Year 2008 Program Benefits for ENERGY STAR Labeled Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use.Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use.Protection Agency: ENERGY STAR Market Share of computers,

Homan, GregoryK

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Calendar Year 2007 Program Benefits for ENERGY STAR Labeled Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use.Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use.Protection Agency: ENERGY STAR Market Share of computers,

Sanchez, Marla Christine

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

INTERNATIONAL RESIDENTIAL ENERGY END USE DATA: ANALYSIS OF HISTORICAL AND PRESENT DAY STRUCTURE AND DYNAMICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

all fuels except district heating. Only for Germany andSweden, and Germany had district heating. The Swedish/German

Schipper, Lee

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Woodwaste Natural Gas Steam Turbine Cogen Sierra Tulare GasGas Turbine Combined Cycle Steam Turbine Cogen Not Cogen NotNot Cogen Cogen Cogen Kern Steam Turbine Steam Turbne Lassen

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of upper end steam (condensing) turbines designed for largesteam turbines used in industry or e backpressure (non-condensing)

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hanford Woodwaste Steam Turbine, Cfb Fresno Petroleum Coke,Woodwaste MSW Steam Turbine, Cfb Riverside Corona Landfill

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas Reciprocating Engine Steam Turbne Cogen Cogengas turbine Steam hlrbine Reciprocating engine WTE Digestergas turbine Steam turbine Reciprocating engines WTE Digester

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogen Cogen Natural Gas Landfill Gas Tulare Tulare Woodwasteand wood waste, landfill gas, and mlmicipal solid waste andscf digester gas, or Btu/ scf landfill gas. HVs are given in

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel, lignite, and petroleum coke and/ or crude oil), 86% ofalternatives such as petroleum coke and/ or crude oil withinEFj,js relevant to petroleum coke and crude oil were not

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Turbine Gas Turbine Combined Cycle Steam Turbine CogenEastridge Sunrise Ii Combined Cycle Expansion Midway-Sunset0.33-0.39 a CHP/cogen/ Combined cycle O.4 b c 0.58-0.84 d

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3. Assumptions and conversion factors used to calculate the7human): oral ingestion conversion factor from rat to humanshuman): oral ingestion conversion factor from mouse to human

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

ENERGY CONSERVATION: POLICY ISSUES AND END-USE SCENARIOS OF SAVINGS POTENTIAL PT.2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Waste Landfilled and Landfill Closure Dates For The Lostradeoffs between landfill and com- bined programs ofare the tradeoffs between landfill and com- bined resource

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogen Cogen Natural Gas Landfill Gas Tulare Tulare Woodwasteas agricultural and wood waste, landfill gas, and mlmicipalscf digester gas, or Btu/ scf landfill gas. HVs are given in

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

ENERGY CONSERVATION: POLICY ISSUES AND END-USE SCENARIOS OF SAVINGS POTENTIAL PT.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tradeotts between landfill and coa- bined programs otare the tradeoffs between landfill and com- bined resourceprocessing or disposal ( landfill) techniques, and to

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Estimates of Energy Consumption by Building Type and End Use at U.S. Army Installations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Irwin Fort Sill Yuma Pg Fort Bliss Fort Sam Houston FortEstimated H V A C EUIs at Fort Bliss Table 5-12. Annual DOE-Estimated Electricity Use at Fort Bliss [GWh/yr] Table 5-24.

Konopacki, S.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detailed energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

INTERNATIONAL RESIDENTIAL ENERGY END USE DATA: ANALYSIS OF HISTORICAL AND PRESENT DAY STRUCTURE AND DYNAMICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cooking tables, only for rice-cookers and microwave ovens.cooking (microwave rice cooker). n) Disposable Income not

Schipper, Lee

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Griffiss AFB integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Electric baseline detail  

SciTech Connect

The US Air Force Air Combat Command has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program`s (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Griffiss Air Force Base (AFB). This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company (Niagara Mohawk). It will (1) identify and evaluate all electric cost-effective energy projects; (2) develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at one of Niagara Mohawk`s primary federal facilities, Griffiss AFB, an Air Combat Command facility located near Rome, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 3, the Electric Resource Assessment. The analysis examines the characteristics of electric, gas, oil, propane, coal, and purchased thermal capacity use for fiscal year (FY) 1990. The results include energy-use intensities for the facilities at Griffiss AFB by building type and electric energy end use. A complete electric energy consumption reconciliation is presented that accounts for the distribution of all major electric energy uses and losses among buildings, utilities, and central systems.

Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Keller, J.M.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Residential Sector End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1: Summary Input Assumptions and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the size of refrigerators and freezers; for all otherwhile water heating, refrigerator, and freezer end-uses showas projected by REEPS. Refrigerator and freezer percentage

Koomey, Jonathan G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, July - September 1996  

SciTech Connect

Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M. W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. This 47-month study, with an approved budget of $4.4 million dollars, is being performed under DOE Contract Number DE-AC22-93PC91029. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products. The cost analyses is for the incremental processing cost; in other words, the feed is priced at zero dollars. The study reflects costs for operations using state of the art refinery technology; no capital costs for building new refineries is considered. Some modifications to the existing refinery may be required. Economy of scale dictates the minimum amount of feedstock that should be processed. The major efforts conducted during the third quarter of 1996 were in the areas of hydrotreating production runs and FCC production run. 3 figs., 8 tabs.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

225

Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, January--March 1996  

SciTech Connect

Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M. W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products. The cost analyses is for the incremental processing cost; in other words, the feed is priced at zero dollars. The study reflects costs for operations using state of the art refinery technology; no capital costs for building new refineries is considered. Some modifications to the existing refinery may be required. Economy of scale dictates the minimum amount of feedstock that should be processed. The major efforts conducted during the first quarter of 1996 were in the areas of: DL2 light distillate hydrotreating; and DL2 heave distillate catalytic cracking.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Calendar Year 2007 Program Benefits for U.S. EPA Energy Star Labeled Products: Expanded Methodology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use.Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use.Total Shipments Star Energy Market Star Share Shipments

Sanchez, Marla

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

values. Figure 7. Global Primary Energy by End-Use Sector,Scenario Figure 8. Global Primary Energy by End-Use Sector,

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Electric Power detailed State data  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed State Data Detailed State Data Annual data for 2012 Release Date: November 12, 2013 Next Release Date: November 2014 Revision/Corrections Annual data format 1990 - 2012 Net Generation by State by Type of Producer by Energy Source (EIA-906, EIA-920, and EIA-923)1 XLS 1990 - 2012 Fossil Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation by Year, Industry Type and State (EIA-906, EIA-920, and EIA-923)2 XLS 1990 - 2011 Existing Nameplate and Net Summer Capacity by Energy Source, Producer Type and State (EIA-860)1, 3 XLS 2011 - 2016 Proposed Nameplate and Net Summer Capacity by Year, Energy Source, and State (EIA-860)1 XLS 1990 - 2011 U.S. Electric Power Industry Estimated Emissions by State (EIA-767, EIA-906, EIA-920, and EIA-923)4 XLS 1990 - 2012 Average Price by State by Provider (EIA-861)5 XLS

229

The Reality and Future Scenarios of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China  

SciTech Connect

While China's 11th Five Year Plan called for a reduction of energy intensity by 2010, whether and how the energy consumption trend can be changed in a short time has been hotly debated. This research intends to evaluate the impact of a variety of scenarios of GDP growth, energy elasticity and energy efficiency improvement on energy consumption in commercial buildings in China using a detailed China End-use Energy Model. China's official energy statistics have limited information on energy demand by end use. This is a particularly pertinent issue for building energy consumption. The authors have applied reasoned judgments, based on experience of working on Chinese efficiency standards and energy related programs, to present a realistic interpretation of the current energy data. The bottom-up approach allows detailed consideration of end use intensity, equipment efficiency, etc., thus facilitating assessment of potential impacts of specific policy and technology changes on building energy use. The results suggest that: (1) commercial energy consumption in China's current statistics is underestimated by about 44%, and the fuel mix is misleading; (2) energy efficiency improvements will not be sufficient to offset the strong increase in end-use penetration and intensity in commercial buildings; (3) energy intensity (particularly electricity) in commercial buildings will increase; (4) different GDP growth and elasticity scenarios could lead to a wide range of floor area growth trajectories , and therefore, significantly impact energy consumption in commercial buildings.

Zhou, Nan; Lin, Jiang

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Residential Behavioral Savings: An Analysis of Principal Electricity End Uses in British Columbia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for the Study of Energy Markets. California EnergyThe Economics of Energy Market Transformation Programs,and J.E. Eto. 1996. Market Barriers to Energy Efficiency: A

Tiedemann, Kenneth Mr.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

to totals. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A, C, and E of the 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey....

232

Detailed Test Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detailed Test Information Detailed Test Information EPA tests vehicles by running them through a series of driving routines, also called cycles or schedules, that specify vehicle speed for each point in time during the laboratory tests. For 2007 and earlier model year vehicles, only the city and highway schedules were used. Beginning with 2008 models, three additional tests will be used to adjust the city and highway estimates to account for higher speeds, air conditioning use, and colder temperatures. Note: EPA has established testing criteria for electric vehicles and plug-in hybrids that are slightly different than those for conventional vehicles. New Tests City Highway High Speed Air Conditioning Cold Temperature Detailed Comparison EPA Federal Test Procedure (City Schedule): Shows vehicle speed (mph) at each second of test

233

Overview of energy-conservation research opportunities  

SciTech Connect

This document is a study of research opportunities that are important to developing advanced technologies for efficient energy use. The study's purpose is to describe a wide array of attractive technical areas from which specific research and development programs could be implemented. Research areas are presented for potential application in each of the major end-use sectors. The study develops and applies a systematic approach to identifying and screening applied energy conservation research opportunities. To broadly cover the energy end-use sectors, this study develops useful information relating to the areas where federally-funded applied research will most likely play an important role in promoting energy conservation. This study is not designed to produce a detailed agenda of specific recommended research activities. The general information presented allows uniform comparisons of disparate research areas and as such provides the basis for formulating a cost-effective, comprehensive federal-applied energy conservation research strategy. Chapter 2 discusses the various methodologies that have been used in the past to identify research opportunities and details the approach used here. In Chapters 3, 4, and 5 the methodology is applied to the buildings, transportation, and industrial end-use sectors and the opportunities for applied research in these sectors are discussed.Chapter 6 synthesizes the results of the previous three chapters to give a comprehensive picture of applied energy conservation research opportunities across all end-use sectors and presents the conclusions to the report.

Hopp, W.J.; Hauser, S.G.; Hane, G.J.; Gurwell, W.E.; Bird, S.P.; Cliff, W.C.; Williford, R.E.; Williams, T.A.; Ashton, W.B.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Public Meeting: Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Building End-Use Equipment and Appliances  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These documents contain slide decks presented at the Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances public meeting held on April 30, 2014.

235

Residential Sector End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1: Summary Input Assumptions and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Richard E. Brown, James W. Hanford, Alan H . Sanstad, andFrancis X . , James W. Hanford, Richard E. Brown, Alan H.place for these end-uses (Hanford et al. 1994, Hwang et al.

Koomey, Jonathan G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Science Expo Detailed Activities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Education and Outreach Director UC Davis Tahoe Environmental Research Center 291 Country Club Drive Incline.........................................................................................25 ENERGY Extra Bounce

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

237

Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environment Agency, 12/2006. [EERE 2002] U.S. LightingVersion: its_report_06.doc) [EERE 2007] 2007 BuildingsRenewable Energy, 2007. [EERE] U.S. Department of Energy,

Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

News Release Details  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Facility IDAHO FALLS - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently designated Idaho National Laboratory's (INL) Wireless Test Bed as a National User Facility....

239

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

NewEnergy, Inc","Investor-Owned",23069067,628346,18074330,3584569,781822 3,"Ameren Illinois Company","Investor-Owned",14319873,9507424,3198994,1594862,18593 4,"Ameren Energy...

240

China's energy and emissions outlook to 2050: Perspectives from bottom-up energy end-use model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CCS) technology and demand side management. 2.1. Scenariosgeneration and demand-side management that differentiate thedispatch order Demand side management Installed capacity of

Zhou, Nan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detailed energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

China's energy and emissions outlook to 2050: Perspectives from bottom-up energy end-use model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Qin, H. , , 2007. China Wind Power Report. Beijing: Chinachina/ en/press/reports/wind-power-report.pdf NBS (NationalAIS scenarios CIS AIS Wind power Nuclear power Natural gas

Zhou, Nan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

China Energy Databook - Rev. 4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consumption: Commercial and Biomass Energy, 1979 and 1987;Consumption: Commercial and Biomass Energy Energy IntensityEnd Use, Commercial and Biomass Energy Shares of Total

Sinton Editor, J.E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

T T he NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 21 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region forecast using the SEDS 25 data.

244

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 9 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The distinction between the two sets of manufacturing industries pertains to the level of modeling. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 19). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region levels; energy consumption at the Census Division level is allocated

245

Abstract 3214: Definition of biosimilars: Energy Resolved Oxonium Ion Monitoring (Erexim) technology grasps detailed N-glycan microheterogeneity on therapeutic antibodies.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Association for Cancer Research. 1 October 2014 meeting-abstract...Presentations - Proffered Abstracts Poster Presentations...4324: BNip3 connects energy sensing to hepatic lipid...Macleod. BNip3 connects energy sensing to hepatic lipid...Association for Cancer Research; 2014 Apr 5-9; San...

Koji Ueda; Atsuhiko Toyama; Taka-Aki Sato; Yusuke Nakamura; and Hidewaki Nakagawa

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,"Commonwealth Edison Co","Investor-Owned",31650966,21724278,9244133,682555,0 2,"Constellation NewEnergy, Inc","Investor-Owned",23069067,628346,18074330,3584569,781822...

247

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Provider","All Sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"First Energy Solutions Corp.","Investor-Owned",18912606,3579076,8038708,7294822,0...

248

Development of a Toolkit for Calculating Linear, ChangePoint Linear and MultipleLinear Inverse Building Energy Analysis Models, ASHRAE Research Project 1050-RP, Detailed Test Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

data file (.DAT). Each SAS run contains a procedure file (.SAS) and an output file (.LST) and also shares the same data file as IMT. For each PRISM run, there are three files included: a weather file (.TPS), a data file or meter file (.MTR..., there are three files included: a weather file (.TPS), a data file or meter file (.MTR), and an output file (.DOC). The ?Status? column summarized the results of IMT as compared to other programs used. In Table 1.2, the detailed results from the IMT bounds...

Sreshthaputra, A.; Haberl, J. S.; Claridge, D. E.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

,"U.S. Total Adjusted Distillate Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Distillate Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales by End Use" Distillate Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Residential",4,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1984" ,"Data 2","Commercial",10,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1984" ,"Data 3","Industrial",9,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1984" ,"Data 4","Farm",4,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1984" ,"Data 5","Electric Power",2,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1984" ,"Data 6","Oil Company",2,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1984"

250

Analysis of the differences in energy simulation results between building information modeling (BIM)-based simulation method and the detailed simulation method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Building Information Modeling (BIM)-based simulation models have been used to automate lengthy building energy modeling processes and it enable fast acquisition of results. Recent improvements of simulation programs have continued to the increase in ...

Seongchan Kim; Jeong-Han Woo

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

District of Columbia" District of Columbia" "1. Potomac Electric Power Co","Investor-Owned",3388490,2014044,1374446,"-","-" "2. Constellation NewEnergy, Inc","Other Provider",2427380,"-",2369901,12091,45388 "3. PEPCO Energy Services","Other Provider",2099946,1012,2098934,"-","-" "4. Washington Gas Energy Services","Other Provider",1759773,39513,1720260,"-","-" "5. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg.","Other Provider",801256,"-",536225,265031,"-" "Total Sales, Top Five Providers",,10476845,2054569,8099766,277122,45388 "Percent of Total State Sales",,88,97,88,100,14

252

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maine" Maine" "1. NextEra Energy Power Marketing LLC","Other Provider",3876276,3548267,316308,11701,"-" "2. Dominion Retail Inc","Other Provider",1308742,"-",1308742,"-","-" "3. Constellation NewEnergy, Inc","Other Provider",987998,"-",704002,283996,"-" "4. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg.","Other Provider",593324,"-",593324,"-","-" "5. Suez Energy Resources North America","Other Provider",483466,"-",483466,"-","-" "Total Sales, Top Five Providers",,7249806,3548267,3405842,295697,"-" "Percent of Total State Sales",,63,81,83,10

253

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4857,978053,226804,0,0 3,"City of Dover - (DE)","Public",710086,196389,230572,283125,0 4,"Constellation NewEnergy, Inc","Investor-Owned",701449,0,524400,177049,0 5,"Washington Gas...

254

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas & Electric Co","Investor-Owned",12341895,9273225,2912064,156606,0 2,"Washington Gas Energy Services","Investor-Owned",7980574,1259564,6721010,0,0 3,"Potomac Electric Power...

255

Distribution Load Modelling for Demand Side Management and End-Use Efficiency  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The problem of electric load modelling for low aggregation levels is addressed in the paper, being the object to obtain good response behaviour models of any group of loads in an electric energy distribution...

C. lvarez; A. Gabaldn

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Massachusetts" Massachusetts" "1. Massachusetts Electric Co","Investor-Owned",12522051,8884116,3167592,470343,"-" "2. NSTAR Electric Company","Investor-Owned",8946038,5484797,2382635,1078606,"-" "3. Constellation NewEnergy, Inc","Other Provider",4767773,"-",3478609,1289164,"-" "4. Strategic Energy LLC","Other Provider",3708146,"-",3708146,"-","-" "5. Consolidated Edison Sol Inc","Other Provider",2891778,1290581,1601197,"-","-" "Total Sales, Top Five Providers",,32835786,15659494,14338179,2838113,"-" "Percent of Total State Sales",,57,73,79,17

257

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Rhode Island" Rhode Island" "1. The Narragansett Electric Co","Investor-Owned",5287440,3068731,1938910,279799,"-" "2. Constellation NewEnergy, Inc","Other Provider",594900,"-",387627,191168,16105 "3. TransCanada Power Mktg Ltd","Other Provider",501659,"-","-",501659,"-" "4. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg.","Other Provider",389583,"-",116875,272708,"-" "5. Glacial Energy Holdings","Other Provider",283973,"-",283973,"-","-" "Total Sales, Top Five Providers",,7057555,3068731,2727385,1245334,16105 "Percent of Total State Sales",,90,98,74,100,59

258

RCPO1 - A Monte Carlo program for solving neutron and photon transport problems in three dimensional geometry with detailed energy description and depletion capability  

SciTech Connect

The RCP01 Monte Carlo program is used to analyze many geometries of interest in nuclear design and analysis of light water moderated reactors such as the core in its pressure vessel with complex piping arrangement, fuel storage arrays, shipping and container arrangements, and neutron detector configurations. Written in FORTRAN and in use on a variety of computers, it is capable of estimating steady state neutron or photon reaction rates and neutron multiplication factors. The energy range covered in neutron calculations is that relevant to the fission process and subsequent slowing-down and thermalization, i.e., 20 MeV to 0 eV. The same energy range is covered for photon calculations.

Ondis, L.A., II; Tyburski, L.J.; Moskowitz, B.S.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Developing Information on Energy Savings and Associated Costs and Benefits of Energy Efficient Emerging Technologies Applicable in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on energy efficiency, energy savings, market adoption, andIndustries End-use(s) Energy types Market segment 2015Industries End-use(s) Energy types Market segment 2015

Xu, Tengfang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, April--June 1996  

SciTech Connect

Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M.W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. This 47-month study, with an approved budget of $4.4 million dollars, is being performed under DOE Contract Number DE-AC22-93PC91029. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detailed energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Property Types, Definitions, and Use Detail  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Types, Definitions, and Use Details Types, Definitions, and Use Details The property types listed on pages 1 through 7 are eligible to receive the 1-100 ENERGY STAR score. The Use Details marked with an asterisk are required in order to receive a score. Portfolio Manager now contains more than 80 property types to choose from when setting up your property, in order to best identify the primary use of your property. Although the building types for which the 1-100 ENERGY STAR score is currently available will not change, the expanded list of property types that can be selected will offer users more specific and accurate categorization for comparison. See below for the full list of property types available in Portfolio Manager, along with their definitions and the property use details that you will need to enter.

262

Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 3: End-Use Electricity Demand  

SciTech Connect

The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Hostick, D.; Belzer, D.B.; Hadley, S.W.; Markel, T.; Marnay, C.; Kintner-Meyer, M.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Second quarter 1995 technical progress report, April--June 1995  

SciTech Connect

Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M.W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. This 47-month study, with an approved budget of $4.4 million dollars, is being performed under DOE Contract Number DE-AC22-93PC91029. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

NETL: Gasifipedia - Gasification in Detail  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Gasifiers Commercial Gasifiers Types of Gasifiers Although there are various types of gasifers (gasification reactors), different in design and operational characteristics, there are three main gasifier classifications into which most of the commercially available gasifiers fall. These categories are as follows: Fixed-bed gasifiers (also referred as moving-bed gasifiers) Entrained-flow gasifiers Fluidized-bed gasifiers Commercial gasifiers of GE Energy, ConocoPhillips E-Gas(tm) and Shell SCGP are examples of entrained-flow types. Fixed-or moving-bed gasifiers include that of Lurgi and British Gas Lurgi (BGL). Fluidized-bed gasifiers include the catalytic gasifier technology being commercialized by Great Point Energy, the Winkler gasifier, and the KBR transport gasifiers. For more specific information on these gasifiers, follow the links for the bulleted gasifier types above. NOTE: Although specific gasifiers named above are described in detail throughout this website, it is realized that other gasification technologies exist. The gasifiers discussed herein were not preferentially chosen by NETL.

265

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 12 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region forecast using the SEDS27 data.

266

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

EIA household energy use data now includes detail on 16 States EIA household energy use data now includes detail on 16 States RECS 2009 - Release date: March 28, 2011 EIA is releasing new benchmark estimates for home energy use for the year 2009 that include detailed data for 16 States, 12 more than in past EIA residential energy surveys. EIA has conducted the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) since 1978 to provide data on home energy characteristics, end uses of energy, and expenses for the four Census Regions and nine Divisions. In 1997, EIA produced additional tabulations for the four most populous States (California, New York, Texas, and Florida). A threefold increase in the number of households included in the 2009 RECS offers more accuracy and coverage for understanding energy usage for all estimated States, Regions and Divisions.

267

Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

end-use Residential primary energy consumption was 6.6 EJ inof primary energy. Primary energy consumption includes final14 Residential Primary Energy Consumption by Fuel (with

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Agenda for Public Meeting on the Physical Characterization of Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Download the agenda below for the July 11 Public Meeting on the Physical Characterization of Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances.

269

Review of Existing Energy Retrofit Tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercial End-Use Survey (CEUS) database and other sources. The data fields include the building's energy usage,

Lee, Sang Hoon

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Sixth quarterly technical progress report, December 19, 1994--March 26, 1995  

SciTech Connect

Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M.W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. This 47-month study, with an approved budget of $4.4 million dollars, is being performed under DOE Contract Number DE-AC22-93PC91029. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products. The cost analyses is for the incremental processing cost; in other words, the feed is priced at zero dollars. The study reflects costs for operations using state of the art refinery technology; no capital costs for building new refineries is considered. Some modifications to the existing refinery may be required. Economy of scale dictates the minimum amount of feedstock that should be processed.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conservation and Renewable Energy, Building EquipmentConservation and Renewable Energy, Building EquipmentEnergy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Equipment

Johnson, F.X.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

CBECS 1992 - Consumption & Expenditures, Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed Tables Detailed Tables Detailed Tables Figure on Energy Consumption in Commercial Buildings by Energy Source, 1992 Divider Line The 49 tables present detailed energy consumption and expenditure data for buildings in the commercial sector. This section provides assistance in reading the tables by explaining some of the headings for the data categories. It will also explain the use of row and column factors to compute both the confidence levels of the estimates given in the tables and the statistical significance of differences between the data in two or more categories. The section concludes with a "Quick-Reference Guide" to the statistics in the different tables. Categories of Data in the Tables After Table 3.1, which is a summary table, the tables are grouped into the major fuel tables (Tables 3.2 through 3.13) and the specific fuel tables (Tables 3.14 through 3.29 for electricity, Tables 3.30 through 3.40 for natural gas, Tables 3.41 through 3.45 for fuel oil, and Tables 3.46 through 3.47 for district heat). Table 3.48 presents energy management and DSM data as reported by the building respondent. Table 3.49 presents data on participation in electric utility-sponsored DSM programs as reported by both the building respondent and the electricity supplier.

273

Detailed Course Module Description | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

lists the course modules for building science courses offered at Cornell's Collaborator Sustainable Buildingi Practice course. coursemodule.pdf More Documents & Publications...

274

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

or fewer than 20 buildings were sampled. NNo responding cases in sample. Notes: Statistics for the "Energy End Uses" category represent total consumption in buildings that...

275

2008_Transition_Program_Details_Book_Three.pdf | Department of...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

ProgramDetailsBookThree.pdf More Documents & Publications Presentation: DOE Nuclear Nonproliferation FY 2014 Budget Justification FY 2014 Department of Energy Budget Highlights...

276

The Quadrennial Energy Review (QER) | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

energy infrastructure, the QER analyses will consider the impacts of transformations in energy supply, markets, and patterns of end use; issues of aging and capacity; impacts of...

277

Researching Energy Use in Hospitals | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Use in Hospitals Historically, when hospital facility and energy managers have compared alternative energy efficiency investments for various end-use systems, their benchmarks...

278

Computed tomography:the details.  

SciTech Connect

Computed Tomography (CT) is a well established technique, particularly in medical imaging, but also applied in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging. Basic CT imaging via back-projection is treated in many texts, but often with insufficient detail to appreciate subtleties such as the role of non-uniform sampling densities. Herein are given some details often neglected in many texts.

Doerry, Armin Walter

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

loans Energy Doctor Energy Audits Incentives to Builders/Developers New building/shell technologies Passive solar

Johnson, F.X.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 53 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module (IDM) estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are subdivided further into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure. The non-manufacturing industries are modeled with less detail because processes are simpler and there is less available data. The petroleum refining

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detailed energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

CHARACTERIZING COSTS, SAVINGS AND BENEFITS OF A SELECTION OF ENERGY EFFICIENT EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on energy efficiency, energy savings, market adoption, andIndustries End-use(s) Energy types Market segment 2015Industries End-use(s) Energy types Market segment 2020

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 9 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 20). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region levels; energy consumption at the Census Division level is allocated by using the SEDS24 data. The energy-intensive industries (food and kindred products, paper and allied products, bulk chemicals, glass and glass products, hydraulic cement, blast furnace and basic steel products, and aluminum) are modeled in considerable detail. Each industry is modeled as three separate but interrelated components consisting of the Process Assembly (PA) Component, the Buildings Component (BLD), and the Boiler/Steam/Cogenera- tion (BSC) Component. The BSC Component satisfies the steam demand from the PA and BLD Components. In some industries, the PA Component produces byproducts that are consumed in the BSC Component. For the manufacturing industries, the PA Component is separated into the major production processes or end uses.

283

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

sum to totals. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A, C, and E of the 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey....

284

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy Information...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Heating and cooling no longer majority of U.S. home energy use Pie chart of energy consumption in homes by end uses Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Residential...

285

Final Detailed Measurement Program Plan Detailed Measurement Program Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by TrueWind Solutions, LLC Albany, New York for California Energy Commission Sacramento, California was developed by TrueWind Solutions, hereon referred to as TrueWind, to guide Task 4 of the Wind Energy Resource Modeling and Measurement Project, contact number 500-03-006, with the California Energy Commission

286

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - Appendix J  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

J - System for the Analysis of Global Energy Markets (SAGE) J - System for the Analysis of Global Energy Markets (SAGE) International Energy Outlook 2007 Appendix J - System for the Analysis of Global Energy Markets (SAGE) Projections of world energy consumption and supply in IEO2007 were generated using EIA’s SAGE model. SAGE is used to project energy use in detail at the end-use sector level. It is an integrated set of regional models that provide a technology-rich basis for estimating regional energy consumption. For each region, reference case estimates of 42 end-use energy service demands (e.g., car, commercial truck, and heavy truck road travel; residential lighting; steam heat requirements in the paper industry) are developed on the basis of economic and demographic projections. Projections of energy consumption to meet the energy demands are estimated on the basis of each region’s existing energy use patterns, the existing stock of energy-using equipment, and the characteristics of available new technologies, as well as new sources of primary energy supply.

287

Residential Sector End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1: Summary Input Assumptions and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consumption and Expenditures 1992. Energy Information Administration, U.S.92). April. US DOE. 1995c. Residential Energy ConsumptionConsumption and Expenditures 1993. EIA, Energy Information Administration, U.S.

Koomey, Jonathan G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

2014-04-30 Public Meeting Agenda: Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document is the agenda for the Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances public meeting being held on April 30, 2014.

289

Analysis of Michigan's demand-side electricity resources in the residential sector: Volume 3, End-use studies: Revised final report  

SciTech Connect

This volume of the ''Analysis of Michigan's Demand-Side Electricity Resources in the Residential Sector'' contains end-use studies on various household appliances including: refrigerators, freezers, lighting systems, water heaters, air conditioners, space heaters, and heat pumps. (JEF)

Krause, F.; Brown, J.; Connell, D.; DuPont, P.; Greely, K.; Meal, M.; Meier, A.; Mills, E.; Nordman, B.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Cooperative Education Detailed Operational Procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

credits of Cooperative education for one of the required elective courses in the ME programME 3990 Cooperative Education Detailed Operational Procedures Overview Cooperative education and Aeronautical Engineering faculty. Cooperative education is not a required component of the ME program

de Doncker, Elise

291

Assessment of energy efficiency solutions in a commissary  

SciTech Connect

An integrated approach was used to evaluate the cost effectiveness of various combinations of energy efficient end-use technologies for the Twenty nine Palms Marine Corps Base Commissary. The commissary's functional characteristics were similar to a large commercial supermarket. A detailed monitoring plan was developed and implemented to collect electrical end-use load data and other critical parameters such as indoor and outdoor temperature and relative humidity, and refrigeration systems' pressures. Sixty-two measurement points were recorded on five minute intervals for ten months. Additionally, a detailed on-site energy audit was conducted to develop appropriate inputs for the energy simulation model. The Department of Energy's hourly simulation program DOE-2.1E was utilized to analyze the building's energy systems. The DOE-2 model was calibrated with the end-use monitored data and used to evaluate the energy use and economics of a set of 28 Energy Efficiency Measures (EEMs). The most energy efficient package meeting governmental savings to investment ratio guidelines was comprised of 21 EEMs which produced a 58% reduction in the annual energy use of the site. This energy efficiency package saved 1,200,200 kWh/yr. and included the use of energy efficient lighting, daylighting controls, advanced refrigeration controls, multiplex refrigeration system, energy efficient condensers, liquid-to-suction heat exchangers, high efficiency display cases equipped with aluminum shields, and energy efficient air conditioning. The results obtained from this study were intended to assist the Defense Commissary in developing the most energy efficient and cost-effective platform for future designs.

Alereza, T.; Faramarzi, R.; Mort, D.; Reeves, P.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

RESIDENTIAL SECTOR END-USE FORECASTING WITH EPRI-REEPS 2.1: SUMMARY INPUT ASSUMPTIONS AND RESULTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-76SF00098. #12;#12;i ABSTRACT This paper describes current and projected future energy use by end energy intensity per household of the residential sector is declining, and the electricity intensity per. Sanstad, and Leslie Shown Energy Analysis Program Energy and Environment Division Ernest Orlando Lawrence

293

Understanding Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints, October 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints provide a mapping of energy use and carbon emissions from energy supply to end use

294

Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Reheat and Heating  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Building Technologies Office conducted a healthcare energy end-use monitoring project in partnership with two hospitals. Read highlights from monitoring heating and reheating energy.

295

New Details of Ferroelectric Switching  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Details of Ferroelectric Switching New Details of Ferroelectric Switching All of our current information technology relies on devices that process information as binary ones and zeroes. Ferroelectric materials are of special interest to developers of the next generation of such devices because they exhibit polarized electronic states that can represent bits of information. Moreover, these materials retain their polarization states without consuming electrical power, making ferroelectrics the subject of intense study for nonvolatile memory applications in which data is stored even when the power is turned off. One problem, however, is polarization fatigue: after a number of cycles, the switchable polarization begins to taper off, rendering the device unusable. Recently, a team of researchers

296

Canada: Automobile Innovation Fund - Program Detail & Criteria...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Canada: Automobile Innovation Fund - Program Detail & Criteria Canada: Automobile Innovation Fund - Program Detail & Criteria Information from the Canadian Embassy Canada:...

297

Improving alternative fuel utilization: detailed kinetic combustion...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

alternative fuel utilization: detailed kinetic combustion modeling & experimental testing Improving alternative fuel utilization: detailed kinetic combustion modeling &...

298

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

18 Figure 6 Primary Energy Consumption by End-Use in24 Figure 7 Primary Energy Consumption by Fuel in Commercialbased on total primary energy consumption (source energy),

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Residential and Transport Energy Use in India: Past Trend and Future Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by end users while primary energy consumption includes finalelectricity. When primary energy consumption in the end use37%) in terms of primary energy consumption. However, energy

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

2003 CBECS Detailed Tables: Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Expenditures by Major Fuel c2-pdf c2.xls c2.html Table C3. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels c3.pdf c3.xls c3.html Table C4. Expenditures for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detailed energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure < Back Eligibility Utility Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs Massachusetts's 1997 electric utility restructuring legislation authorized the Massachusetts Department of Telecommunications and Energy (DTE)* to require certain electricity providers to disclose details on their fuel mix and emissions to end-use customers. In February 1998, the DTE issued final rules requiring competitive suppliers and distribution companies providing standard offer generation service or default generation service to provide this information to customers quarterly and upon request. * In 2007, the Massachusetts Department of Telecommunications and Energy

302

Department of Energy Announces First Quadrennial Energy Review...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

The Nation's current infrastructure is increasingly challenged by transformations in energy supply, markets, and patterns of end use; issues of ageing and capacity; impacts of...

303

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Industrial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 21 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module projects energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region projection using the SEDS1 data.

304

The Program Administrator Cost of Saved Energy for Utility Customer-Funded Energy Efficiency Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Energy Demand-Side Management Energy Informationcomparing the Demand-Side Management (DSM) Program relativexvii Introduction Demand side management (DSM), and end-use

Billingsley, Megan A.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

China Energy Databook - Rev. 4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1992 12. End Use Electricity Consumption by Sector, 1992 13.Sources) Per Capita Electricity Consumption, 1990 EnergyUrban Rural 2. Electricity Consumption Shares Year Urban TWh

Sinton Editor, J.E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Event:Second International 100% Renewable Energy Conference and Exhibition  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

% Renewable Energy Conference and Exhibition % Renewable Energy Conference and Exhibition Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png Second International 100% Renewable Energy Conference and Exhibition: on 2012/06/28 "IRENEC 2012 is organized by EUROSOLAR Turkey, the Turkish section of the European Association for Renewable Energies, and will serve as an international platform to discuss technical, economic and political aspects of a transition to 100% renewable energy. General topics of the conference include: renewable energy supply technologies; smart grid technologies; energy end use efficiency; energy policies; local self sufficiency; investment and financial models for renewable energy; capacity building; climate change mitigation and adaptation; and community power." Event Details Name Second International 100% Renewable Energy Conference and Exhibition

307

Assessment of Supply Chain Energy Efficiency Potentials: A U.S. Case Study  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes a modeling framework that characterizes the key underlying technologies and processes that contribute to the supply chain energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of a variety of goods and services purchased by U.S. consumers. The framework couples an input-output supply chain modeling approach with"bottom-up" fuel end use models for individual IO sectors. This fuel end use modeling detail allows energy and policy analysts to better understand the underlying technologies and processes contributing to the supply chain energy and GHG"footprints" of goods and services. To illustrate the policy-relevance of thisapproach, a case study was conducted to estimate achievable household GHG footprint reductions associated with the adoption of best practice energy-efficient supply chain technologies.

Masanet, Eric; Kramer, Klaas Jan; Homan, Gregory; Brown, Richard; Worrell, Ernst

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Paraho environmental data. Part IV. Land reclamation and revegetation. Part V. Biological effects. Part VI. Occupational health and safety. Part VII. End use  

SciTech Connect

Characteristics of the environment and ecosystems at Anvil Points, reclamation of retorted shale, revegetation of retorted shale, and ecological effects of retorted shale are reported in the first section of this report. Methods used in screening shale oil and retort water for mutagens and carcinogens as well as toxicity studies are reported in the second section of this report. The third section contains information concerning the industrial hygiene and medical studies made at Anvil Points during Paraho research operations. The last section discusses the end uses of shale crude oil and possible health effects associated with end use. (DMC)

Limbach, L.K.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Iron and Steel Energy Intensities  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

If you are having trouble, call 202-586-8800 for help. Home > >Energy Users > Energy Efficiency Page > Iron and Steel Energy Intensities First Use of Energy Blue Bullet First Use/Value of Production Blue Bullet First Use/Ton of steel End Uses of Consumption Blue Bullet Total End Use/Value of Production Blue Bullet Total End Use/Ton of Steel Boiler Fuel as End Use Blue Bullet Boiler Fuel /Value of Production Blue Bullet Boiler Fuel /Ton of Steel Process Heating as End Use Blue Bullet Process Heating Fuel /Ton of Steel Blue Bullet Process Heating /Value of Production Machine Drive as End Use Blue Bullet Machine Drive Fuel/Ton of Steel Blue Bullet Machine Drive Fuel /Value of Production Expenditures Blue Bullet Purchased Fuel /Ton of Steel Blue Bullet Purchased Fuel /Value of Production

310

Detailed Modeling and Response of Demand Response Enabled Appliances  

SciTech Connect

Proper modeling of end use loads is very important in order to predict their behavior, and how they interact with the power system, including voltage and temperature dependencies, power system and load control functions, and the complex interactions that occur between devices in such an interconnected system. This paper develops multi-state time variant residential appliance models with demand response enabled capabilities in the GridLAB-DTM simulation environment. These models represent not only the baseline instantaneous power demand and energy consumption, but the control systems developed by GE Appliances to enable response to demand response signals and the change in behavior of the appliance in response to the signal. These DR enabled appliances are simulated to estimate their capability to reduce peak demand and energy consumption.

Vyakaranam, Bharat; Fuller, Jason C.

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

311

Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

volume) of the equipment (AHAM 1991, ARI1991, G A M A 1992).Energy Factors (SWEFs), (AHAM 1991). b. 1990 RECS (EIAdata for their members (AHAM 1991, ARI1991, G A M A 1992).

Johnson, F.X.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Directory of Energy Information Administration models, 1990  

SciTech Connect

This directory revises and updates the Directory of Energy Information Administration Models, DOE/EIA-0293(89), Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy, May 1989. The major changes are the inclusion of the Building Energy End-Use Model (BEEM-PC), Residential Energy End-Use Model (REEM-PC), the Refinery Yield Model Spreadsheet System (RYMSS-PC), and the Capital Stock Model (CAPSTOCK-PC). Also, the following models have been inactivated: Energy Disaggregated Input-Output Model (EDIO), Household Model of Energy (HOME3-PC), Commercial Sector Energy Model (CSEM-PC), Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Supply Model (OCSM), and the Stock Module of the Intermediate Future Forecasting System (STOCK). This directory contains descriptions about each basic and auxiliary model, including the title, acronym, purpose, and type, followed by more detailed information on characteristics, uses, and requirements. For developing models, limited information is provided. Sources for additional information are identified. Included in this directory are 38 EIA models active as of March 1, 1990, as well as the PC-AEO Forecasting Model Overview and the three Subsystems for the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) Model. Models that run on personal computers are identified by PC'' as part of the acronym.

Not Available

1990-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

313

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 projections, end-use energy consumption depends on 7 projections, end-use energy consumption depends on resource endowment, economic growth, and other political, social, and demographic factors. One way of looking at the future of world energy mar- kets is to consider trends in energy consumption at the end-use sector level. With the exception of the transpor- tation sector, which is dominated by petroleum-based liquids products at present, the mix of energy use in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors varies widely by region, depending on a combination of regional factors, such as the availability of energy resources, the level of economic development, and polit- ical, social, and demographic factors. This chapter out- lines IEO2007 reference case projections for delivered energy consumption by end-use sector in the OECD and non-OECD regions. Transportation Sector Energy use in the transportation

314

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Most Popular Tables PDFXLS 3.1.4 2010 Commercial Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type PDFXLS 1.1.1 U.S. Residential and Commercial Buildings Total Primary Energy Consumption PDFXLS...

315

Uncertainty in Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from United States Natural Gas End-Uses and its Effects on Policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The U.S. imports LNG from a number of countries such as Trinidad and Tobago, Egypt, Nigeria and Norway. ... A study by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)(43) reports that nearly 25% of U.S. transit buses purchased over the past decade and a half were CNG powered. ...

Aranya Venkatesh; Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

316

TECHNOLOGY DATA CHARACTERIZING LIGHTING IN COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS: APPLICATION TO END-USE FORECASTING WITH COMMEND 4.0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBL-34243 UC - 1600 TECHNOLOGY DATA CHARACTERIZING LIGHTING IN COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS: APPLICATION Technologies, and the Office of Environmental Analysis, Office of Policy, Planning, and Analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. #12;Technology Data Characterizing Lighting

317

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OpportunitiesforEnergy EfficiencyandDemandResponseinAgricultural/WaterEnd?UseEnergyEfficiencyProgram. i1 4.0 EnergyEfficiencyandDemandResponse

Olsen, Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

ResPoNSe: modeling the wide variability of residential energy consumption.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

affect appliance energy consumption. For example, differentStates, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: HousingModeling of End-Use Energy Consumption in the Residential

Peffer, Therese; Burke, William; Auslander, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Current Status and Future Scenarios of Residential Building Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

liters Figure 7 Primary Energy Consumption (EJ) Refrigeratorby Efficiency Class Primary Energy Consumption (EJ) Figure 8by Fuel Figure 1 Primary Energy Consumption by End-use)

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Deadline for public comments for the Quadrennial Energy Review...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

energy infrastructure, the QER analyses will consider the impacts of transformations in energy supply, markets, and patterns of end use; issues of aging and capacity; impacts of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detailed energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Workshop Proceedings of the Industrial Building Energy Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy savings are more than those predicted by the auditors!energy end uses were, and also to get an idea of what the PG&E auditors

Akbari, H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures 3.4 Commercial Environmental Emissions 3.5 Commercial Builders and Construction 3.6 Office Building Markets and Companies 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies 3.8 Hospitals and Medical Facilities 3.9 Educational Facilities 3.10 Hotels/Motels 4Federal Sector 5Envelope and Equipment 6Energy Supply 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to the tables Chapter 3 focuses on energy use in the commercial sector. Section 3.1 covers primary and site energy consumption in commercial buildings, as well as the delivered energy intensities of various building types and end uses. Section 3.2 provides data on various characteristics of the commercial sector, including floorspace, building types, ownership, and lifetimes. Section 3.3 provides data on commercial building expenditures, including energy prices. Section 3.4 covers environmental emissions from the commercial sector. Section 3.5 briefly addresses commercial building construction and retrofits. Sections 3.6, 3.7, 3.8, 3.9, and 3.10 provide details on select commercial buildings types, specifically office and retail space, medical facilities, educational facilities, and hotels and motels.

323

FAQ Detail | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

ASCR ASCR Leadership Computing Challenge (ALCC) » FAQ Detail Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Facilities Accessing ASCR Supercomputers Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) Research & Evaluation Prototypes (REP) Innovative & Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) ASCR Leadership Computing Challenge (ALCC) ALCC Application Details ALCC Past Awards Frequently Asked Questions Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) News & Resources Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy

324

VEHICLE DETAILS AND BATTERY SPECIFICATIONS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RR0DF106791 RR0DF106791 Hybrid Propulsion System: Mild Parallel Belt-Alternator Starter (BAS) Number of Electric Machines: 1 Motor: 15 kW (peak), AC induction Battery Specifications Manufacturer: Hitachi Type: Cylindrical Lithium-ion Number of Cells: 32 Nominal Cell Voltage: 3.6 V Nominal System Voltage: 115.2 V Rated Pack Capacity: 4.4 Ah Maximum Cell Charge Voltage 2 : 4.10 V Minimum Cell Discharge Voltage 2 : 3.00 V Thermal Management: Active - Forced air Pack Weight: 65 lb BEGINNING-OF-TEST: BATTERY LABORATORY TEST RESULTS SUMMARY Vehicle Mileage and Testing Date Vehicle Odometer: 5,715 mi Date of Test: January 8, 2013 Static Capacity Test Measured Average Capacity: 3.98 Ah Measured Average Energy Capacity: 460 Wh HPPC Test Pulse Discharge Power @ 50% DOD

325

OUTLINE OF DETAILED TEST PLAN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0/ 177 0/ 177 Implementation Plan and Initial Development of Nuclear Concrete Materials Database for Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program September 30, 2010 Prepared by Weiju Ren and Dan Naus Oak Ridge National Laboratory Barry Oland XCEL Engineering DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge. Web site http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the following source. National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Telephone 703-605-6000 (1-800-553-6847) TDD 703-487-4639 Fax 703-605-6900 E-mail info@ntis.gov

326

VEHICLE DETAILS AND BATTERY SPECIFICATIONS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RRXDF106605 RRXDF106605 Hybrid Propulsion System: Mild Parallel Belt-Alternator Starter (BAS) Number of Electric Machines: 1 Motor: 15 kW (peak), AC induction Battery Specifications Manufacturer: Hitachi Type: Cylindrical Lithium-ion Number of Cells: 32 Nominal Cell Voltage: 3.6 V Nominal System Voltage: 115.2 V Rated Pack Capacity: 4.4 Ah Maximum Cell Charge Voltage 2 : 4.10 V Minimum Cell Discharge Voltage 2 : 3.00 V Thermal Management: Active - Forced air Pack Weight: 65 lb BEGINNING-OF-TEST: BATTERY LABORATORY TEST RESULTS SUMMARY Vehicle Mileage and Testing Date Vehicle Odometer: 4,244 mi Date of Test: January 9, 2013 Static Capacity Test Measured Average Capacity: 3.88 Ah Measured Average Energy Capacity: 450 Wh HPPC Test Pulse Discharge Power @ 50% DOD

327

NETL: Gasifipedia - Gasification in Detail  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fundamentals Fundamentals Gasification is a partial oxidation process. The term partial oxidation is a relative term which simply means that less oxygen is used in gasification than would be required for combustion (i.e., burning or complete oxidation) of the same amount of fuel. Gasification typically uses only 25 to 40 percent of the theoretical oxidant (either pure oxygen or air) to generate enough heat to gasify the remaining unoxidized fuel, producing syngas. The major combustible products of gasification are carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen (H2), with only a minor amount of the carbon completely oxidized to carbon dioxide (CO2) and water. The heat released by partial oxidation provides most of the energy needed to break up the chemical bonds in the feedstock, to drive the other endothermic gasification reactions, and to increase the temperature of the final gasification products.

328

OI FAB for EP Detail  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Live Incident Response Live Incident Response The Law Enforcement Perspective Assistant Special Agent-in-Charge Daniel Persson U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Technology Crimes Section DOE Office of Inspector General 2  Background  Law Enforcement (LE) Mindset  Collection of Evidence  Triage  Final Thoughts OVERVIEW DOE Office of Inspector General 3 Background DOE Office of Inspector General 4  Current Duties - Assistant Special Agent-in-Charge OIG Technology Crimes Section (TCS)  Handle all LE related Tech Crimes for DOE  Digital media analysis  LE-centric intrusion cases  CP cases in DOE complex  LE POC for DOE in all joint investigations - FBI, AFOSI, ICE, etc DOE Office of Inspector General 5  What I Don't Do - I am not a Lawyer

329

EIA - Forecasts and Analysis of Energy Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Tables (2002-2025) Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Tables (2002-2025) Formats Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Data Tables (1 to 15 complete) Excel PDF Table Title Table D1 Delivered Energy Consumption in the United States by End-Use Sector and Fuel Excel PDF Table D2 Delivered Energy Consumption in Canada by End-Use Sector and Fuel Excel PDF Table D3 Delivered Energy Consumption in Mexico by End-Use Sector and Fuel Excel PDF Table D4 Delivered Energy Consumption in Western Europe by End-Use Sector and Fuel Excel PDF Table D5 Delivered Energy Consumption in Japan by End-Use Sector and Fuel Excel PDF Table D6 Delivered Energy Consumption in Australia/New Zealand by End-Use Sector and Fuel Excel PDF Table D7 Delivered Energy Consumption in the Former Soviet Union by End-Use Sector and Fuel

330

Space-Heating energy used by households in the residential sector.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed Tables Detailed Tables Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 The following 28 tables present detailed data describing the consumption of and expenditures for energy used by households in the residential sector. The data are presented at the national level, Census region and division levels, for climate zones and for the most populous States, as well as for other selected characteristics of households. This section provides assistance in reading the tables by explaining some of the headings for the categories of data. It also explains the use of the row and column factors to compute the relative standard error of the estimates given in the tables. Organization of the Tables The tables cover consumption and expenditures for six topical areas: Major Energy Source

331

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 projections, end-use energy consumption in the 6 projections, end-use energy consumption in the residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation sectors varies widely among regions and from country to country. One way of looking at the future of world energy mar- kets is to consider trends in energy consumption at the end-use sector level. With the exception of the transpor- tation sector, which is almost universally dominated by petroleum products at present, the mix of energy use in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors varies widely by region, depending on a combination of regional factors, such as the availability of energy resources, the level of economic development, and polit- ical, social, and demographic factors. This chapter out- lines the IEO2006 projections for delivered energy consumption by end-use sector in the OECD and non- OECD regions. Residential Sector

332

Manufacturing consumption of energy 1991  

SciTech Connect

This report provides estimates on energy consumption in the manufacturing sector of the US economy. These estimates are based on data from the 1991 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). This survey--administered by the Energy End Use and Integrated Statistics Division, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Energy Information Administration (EIA)--is the most comprehensive source of national-level data on energy-related information for the manufacturing industries.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Ancillary service details: Voltage control  

SciTech Connect

Voltage control is accomplished by managing reactive power on an alternating-current power system. Reactive power can be produced and absorbed by both generation and transmission equipment. Reactive-power devices differ substantially in the magnitude and speed of response and in their capital costs. System operators, transmission owners, generators, customers, power marketers, and government regulators need to pay close attention to voltage control as they restructure the U.S. electricity industry. Voltage control can affect reliability and commerce in three ways: (1) Voltages must be maintained within an acceptable range for both customer and power-system equipment to function properly. (2) The movement of reactive power consumes transmission resources, which limits the ability to move real power and worsens congestion. (3) The movement of reactive power results in real-power losses. When generators are required to supply excessive amounts of reactive power, their real-power production must be curtailed. These opportunity costs are not currently compensated for in most regions. Current tariffs are based on embedded costs. These embedded-cost tariffs average about $0.51/MWh, equivalent to $1.5 billion annually for the United States as a whole. Although this cost is low when compared with the cost of energy, it still aggregates to a significant amount of money. This report takes a basic look at why the power system requires reactive power (an appendix explains the fundamentals of real and reactive power). The report then examines the various types of generation and transmission resources used to supply reactive power and to control voltage. Finally it discusses how these resources are deployed and paid for in several reliability regions around the country. As the U.S. electricity industry is restructured, the generation, transmission, and system-control equipment and functions that maintain voltages within the appropriate ranges are being deintegrated.

Kirby, B.; Hirst, E.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Comleted Copy in PDF Format Comleted Copy in PDF Format Related Links Annual Energy Outlook 2001 Supplemental Data to the AEO 2001 NEMS Conference To Forecasting Home Page EIA Homepage Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 9 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The distinction between the two sets of manufacturing industries pertains to the level of modeling. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 19). The

335

Energy Efficiency Program Impact Evaluation Guide  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

This Energy Efficiency Program Impact Evaluation Guide describes and provides guidance on approaches for determining and documenting energy and non-energy benefits resulting from end-use energy efficiency programs and portfolios of programs.

336

April 30 Public Meeting: Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Building End-Use Equipment and Appliances  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These documents contain slide decks presented at the Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances public meeting held on April 30, 2014. The first document includes the first presentation from the meeting: DOE Vision and Objectives. The second document includes all other presentations from the meeting: Terminology and Definitions; End-User and Grid Services; Physical Characterization Framework; Value, Benefits & Metrics.

337

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 21 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region forecast using the SEDS25 data.

338

EIA - Forecasts and Analysis of Energy Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector In the IEO2005 projections, end-use energy consumption in the residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation sectors varies widely among regions and from country to country. One way of looking at the future of world energy markets is to consider trends in energy consumption at the end-use sector level. With the exception of the transportation sector, which is almost universally dominated by petroleum products at present, the mix of energy use in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors can vary widely from country to country, depending on a combination of regional factors, such as the availability of energy resources, the level of economic development, and political, social, and demographic factors. This chapter outlines the International Energy Outlook 2005 (IEO2005) forecast for regional energy consumption by end-use sector.

339

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California -- Phase I Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Processing Industry Energy Efficiency Initiative, CaliforniaK. (2004). Bringing Energy Efficiency to the Water andAgricultural/Water End-Use Energy Efficiency Program. Lyco

Lekov, Alex

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Healthcare Energy Efficiency Research and Development  

SciTech Connect

Hospitals are known to be among the most energy intensive commercial buildings in California. Estimates of energy end-uses (e.g. for heating, cooling, lighting, etc.) in hospitals are uncertain for lack of information about hospital-specific mechanical system operations and process loads. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory developed and demonstrated a benchmarking system designed specifically for hospitals. Version 1.0 featured metrics to assess energy performance for the broad variety of ventilation and thermal systems that are present in California hospitals. It required moderate to extensive sub-metering or supplemental monitoring. In this new project, we developed a companion handbook with detailed equations that can be used toconvert data from energy and other sensors that may be added to or already part of hospital heating, ventilation and cooling systems into metrics described in the benchmarking document.This report additionally includes a case study and guidance on including metering into designs for new hospitals, renovations and retrofits. Despite widespread concern that this end-use is large and growing, there is limited reliable information about energy use by distributed medical equipment and other miscellaneouselectrical loads in hospitals. This report proposes a framework for quantifying aggregate energy use of medical equipment and miscellaneous loads. Novel approaches are suggested and tried in an attempt to obtain data to support this framework.

Black, Douglas R.; Lai, Judy; Lanzisera, Steven M; Parrish, Kristen D.; Singer, Brett C.

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detailed energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air v.2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environment Agency, 12/2006. [EERE 2002] U.S. LightingConsulting, Inc. , 9/2002 [EERE 2007] 2007 Buildings Energyand Renewable Energy, 2007. [EERE 2007b] U.S. Department of

Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rate of technology penetration and rate of intensity change,energy. In addition, the penetration rate of each end-use isinstalled base (i.e. penetration rate) for each end-use set

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments Details about the Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments program and its implementation in...

344

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT PRODUCTION, and reliable energy services and products to the marketplace. The Energy Research and Development Division Generation · Industrial/Agricultural/Water EndUse Energy Efficiency · Renewable Energy Technologies

345

The Program Administrator Cost of Saved Energy for Utility Customer-Funded Energy Efficiency Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capital viii Executive Summary End-use energy efficiency is increasingly being relied upon as a resource for meeting electricity and natural gas

Billingsley, Megan A.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

ENERGY ANALYSIS PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1980  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

considered too low. Because fuel prices have doubled duringin response to changing fuel prices, For each end-use (whereof energy consumption to fuel price; engineering curves

Authors, Various

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

3rd year final contractor report for: U.S. Department of Energy Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Program Project Title: Detailed Measurements of Rayleigh-Taylor Mixing at Large and Small Atwood Numbers  

SciTech Connect

This project had two major tasks: Task 1. The construction of a new air/helium facility to collect detailed measurements of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing at high Atwood number, and the distribution of these data to LLNL, LANL, and Alliance members for code validation and design purposes. Task 2. The collection of initial condition data from the new Air/Helium facility, for use with validation of RT simulation codes at LLNL and LANL. This report describes work done in the last twelve (12) months of the project, and also contains a summary of the complete work done over the three (3) life of the project. As of April 1, 2006, the air/helium facility (Task 1) is now complete and extensive testing and validation of diagnostics has been performed. Initial condition studies (Task 2) is also comp lete. Detailed experiments with air/helium with Atwood numbers up to 0.1 have been completed, and Atwood numbers of 0.25. Within the last three (3) months we have been able to successfully run the facility at Atwood numbers of 0.5. The progress matches the project plan, as does the budget. We have finished the initial condition studies using the water channel, and this work has been accepted for publication on the Journal of Fluid Mechanics (the top fluid mechanics journal). Mr. Nick Mueschke and Mr. Wayne Kraft are continuing with their studies to obtain PhDs in the same field, and will also continue their collaboration visits to LANL and LLNL. Over its three (3) year life the project has supported two(2) Ph.D.s and three (3) MScs, and produced nine (9) international journal publications, twenty four (24) conference publications, and numerous other reports. The highlight of the project has been our close collaboration with LLNL (Dr. Oleg Schilling) and LANL (Drs. Dimonte, Ristorcelli, Gore, and Harlow).

Malcolm J. Andrews

2006-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

348

List of Portfolio Manager property types, definitions, and use details |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

List of Portfolio Manager property types, definitions, and use List of Portfolio Manager property types, definitions, and use details Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

349

Third Climate Change Science Program Report Issued; Report Details Effects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Third Climate Third Climate Change Science Program Report Issued; Report Details Effects of Climate Change on Energy Production and Use in the United States News Featured Articles Science Headlines 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Presentations & Testimony News Archives Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 10.18.07 Third Climate Change Science Program Report Issued; Report Details Effects of Climate Change on Energy Production and Use in the United States Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Climate Change Science Program (CCSP) today announced the release of its third in a series of 21 Synthesis and Assessment Products (SAPs). Coordinated by the U.S. Department of Energy

350

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Industrial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Industrial Demand Module Table 6.1. Industry Categories. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version Table 6.2.Retirement Rates. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting

351

Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function Print Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function Print Our way of life is deeply intertwined with battery technologies that have enabled a mobile revolution powering cell phones, laptops, medical devices, and cars. As conventional lithium-ion batteries approach their theoretical energy-storage limits, new technologies are emerging to address the long-term energy-storage improvements needed for mobile systems, electric vehicles in particular. Battery performance depends on the dynamics of evolving electronic and chemical states that, despite advances in material synthesis and structural probes, remain elusive and largely unexplored. At Beamlines 8.0.1 and 9.3.2, researchers studied lithium-ion and lithium-air batteries, respectively, using soft x-ray spectroscopy techniques. The detailed information they obtained about the evolution of electronic and chemical states will be indispensable for understanding and optimizing better battery materials.

352

Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function Print Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function Print Our way of life is deeply intertwined with battery technologies that have enabled a mobile revolution powering cell phones, laptops, medical devices, and cars. As conventional lithium-ion batteries approach their theoretical energy-storage limits, new technologies are emerging to address the long-term energy-storage improvements needed for mobile systems, electric vehicles in particular. Battery performance depends on the dynamics of evolving electronic and chemical states that, despite advances in material synthesis and structural probes, remain elusive and largely unexplored. At Beamlines 8.0.1 and 9.3.2, researchers studied lithium-ion and lithium-air batteries, respectively, using soft x-ray spectroscopy techniques. The detailed information they obtained about the evolution of electronic and chemical states will be indispensable for understanding and optimizing better battery materials.

353

Energy-Efficiency Labels and Standards: A Guidebook for Appliances, Equipment, and Lighting - 2nd Edition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

minimum efficiency standards, initiated in 1989, was strengthened by the Energy Conservation Law in 1997, which put end- use energy efficiency and standards

Wiel, Stephen; McMahon, James E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Central Government Buildings. Available at: http://Energy Commission, PIER Building End-Use Energy Efficiencythe total lifecycle of a building such as petroleum and

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(RD&D) projects to benefit the electricity and natural gas ratepayers in California. The Energy for natural gas RD&D. The PIER program strives to conduct the most promising public interest energy: · Buildings EndUse Energy Efficiency · Industrial/Agricultural/Water EndUse Energy Efficiency · Renewable

356

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and demonstration (RD&D) projects to benefit the electricity and natural gas ratepayers in California. The Energy EndUse Energy Efficiency · Industrial/Agricultural/Water EndUse Energy Efficiency · Renewable Energy for natural gas RD&D. PIER funding efforts are focused on the following RD&D program areas: · Buildings

357

Plastics End Use Application Fundamentals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An important aspect of the electrical/electronic market in many applications is the fast ... such applications. Without plastics, most of the electronic products used today would not be practical ... their electr...

Donald V. Rosato

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Deep Energy Retrofits - Eleven California Case Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

usage of P4. The electric car energy use is not included inseasonal furnace energy. The electric car is pictured in theEnergy End Uses HVAC: Furnace DHW: Tankless Appliances Plugs Lighting Transportation: Electric Car

Less, Brennan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Implications of maximizing China's technical potential for residential end-use energy efficiency: A 2030 outlook from the bottom-up  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5 4. Efficiency Improvement and Technology5 4.1. Appliance Technology7 4.2. Residential Heating Technology

Khanna, Nina

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Energy Conservation: Policy Issues and End-Use Scenarios of Savings Potential -- Part 3, Policy Barriers and Investment Decisions in Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New Plant Construction, Waste Heat Recovery, and Processattributes associated with Waste Heat Recovery and Processin place of new stock. 3) Waste Heat Recovery--use of waste

Benenson, Peter

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detailed energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

International Energy Outlook 2006 - World Energy and Economic Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2: Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector 2: Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector In the IEO2006 projections, end-use energy consumption in the residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation sectors varies widely among regions and from country to country. One way of looking at the future of world energy markets is to consider trends in energy consumption at the end-use sector level. With the exception of the transportation sector, which is almost universally dominated by petroleum products at present, the mix of energy use in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors varies widely by region, depending on a combination of regional factors, such as the availability of energy resources, the level of economic development, and political, social, and demographic factors. This chapter outlines the IEO2006 projections for

362

Simulation levels of detail for plant motion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and determine the allowable error in the simulation of branch motion. This allows us to choose the appropriate simulation level of detail and we provide smooth transitions from level to level. Our level of detail approach affects only the simulation parameters...

Beaudoin, Jacob Michael

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

363

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Household Expenditures Module Household Expenditures Module The Household Expenditures Module (HEM) constructs household energy expenditure profiles using historical survey data on household income, population and demographic characteristics, and consumption and expenditures for fuels for various end-uses. These data are combined with NEMS forecasts of household disposable income, fuel consumption, and fuel expenditures by end-use and household type. The HEM disaggregation algorithm uses these combined results to forecast household fuel consumption and expenditures by income quintile and Census Division. Key Assumptions The historical input data used to develop the HEM version for the AEO2003 consists of recent household survey responses, aggregated to the desired level of detail. Two surveys performed by the Energy Information Administration are included in the AEO2003 HEM database, and together these input data are used to develop a set of baseline household consumption profiles for the direct fuel expenditure analysis. These surveys are the 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS).

364

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

71 - 18180 of 28,905 results. 71 - 18180 of 28,905 results. Rebate Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure Rhode Island requires all entities that sell electricity in the state to disclose details regarding the fuel mix and emissions of their electric generation to end-use customers. This information... http://energy.gov/savings/fuel-mix-and-emissions-disclosure-11 Download Microsoft Word- WAPA Trans. Comment Extension Request.doc http://energy.gov/downloads/microsoft-word-wapa-trans-comment-extension-requestdoc Article EM's Top Official Celebrates 'Cocooning' of Reactor Dedicated by President Kennedy Decades Ago RICHLAND, Wash. - In 1963, President John F. Kennedy visited the Hanford site in southeastern Washington state to dedicate N Reactor. http://energy.gov/em/articles/em-s-top-official-celebrates-cocooning-reactor-dedicated-president

365

Representation of Energy Use in the Food Products Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traditional representations of energy in the manufacturing sector have tended to represent energy end-uses rather than actual energy service demands. While this representation if quite adequate for understanding how energy is used today...

Elliott, N. R.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

CBECS 1992 - Building Characteristics, Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed Tables Detailed Tables Detailed Tables Percent of Buildings and Floorspace by Census Region, 1992 Percent of Buildings and Floorspace by Census Region, 1992 The following 70 tables present extensive cross-tabulations of commercial buildings characteristics. These data are from the Buildings Characteristics Survey portion of the 1992 CBECS. The "Quick-Reference Guide," indicates the major topics of each table. Directions for calculating an approximate relative standard error (RSE) for each estimate in the tables are presented in Figure A1, "Use of RSE Row and Column Factor." The Glossary contains the definitions of the terms used in the tables. See the preceding "At A Glance" section for highlights of the detailed tables. Table Organization

367

Route selection and detailed line design  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The requirements for route selection and detailed line design of a high-voltage overhead line are established by the preparatory work, studies ... the required starting and terminal point of a transmission connec...

Dr.-Ing. Friedrich Kiessling; Dipl.-Ing. Peter Nefzger

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Simulating plant motion with levels of detail  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SIMULATING PLANT MOTION WITH LEVELS OF DETAIL A Senior Honors Thesis by REBECCA LYNN FLANNERY Submitted to the Office of Honors Programs k. Academic Scholarships Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... of the UNIVERSITY UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH FELLOWS April 2003 Group: Engineering & Physics I SIMULATING PLANT MOTION WITH LEVELS OF DETAIL A Senior Honors Thesis by REBECCA LYNN FLANNERY Submitted to the Office of Honors Programs & Academic Scholarships...

Flannery, Rebecca Lynn

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

369

Vandenberg Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail  

SciTech Connect

The US Air Force Space Command has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program, to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB). This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG and E). The primary goal of the VAFB project is to identify all electric energy efficiency opportunities, and to negotiate with PG and E to acquire those resources through a customized demand-side management program for its federal clients. That customized program should have three major characteristics: (1) 100% up-front financing; (2) substantial utility cost-sharing; and (3) utility implementation through energy service companies under contract to the utility. A similar arrangement will be pursued with Southern California Gas for non-electric resource opportunities if that is deemed desirable by the site and if the gas utility seems open to such an approach. This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at VAFB located near Lompoc, California. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 3, Resource Assessment. This analysis examines the characteristics of electric, natural gas, fuel oil, and propane use for fiscal year 1991. It records energy-use intensities for the facilities at VAFB by building type and energy end use. It also breaks down building energy consumption by fuel type, energy end use, and building type. A more complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that includes the accounting of all energy use among buildings, utilities, and applicable losses.

Halverson, M.A.; Richman, E.E.; Dagle, J.E.; Hickman, B.J.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Sullivan, G.P.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Achieving Energy Savings Through Residential Energy Use Behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Achieving Energy Savings Through Residential Energy Use Behavior Studies Energy Efficiency Research Office PIER Buildings End-use Energy Efficiency Research Program www.energy.ca.gov/research/buildings May 2012 The Issue Understanding the factors that influence energy use behavior is a largely uninvestigated

371

Energy Demand Staff Scientist  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Demand in China Lynn Price Staff Scientist February 2, 2010 #12;Founded in 1988 Focused on End-Use Energy Efficiency ~ 40 Current Projects in China Collaborations with ~50 Institutions in China Researcher #12;Talk OutlineTalk Outline · Overview · China's energy use and CO2 emission trends · Energy

Eisen, Michael

372

First Detailed Look at RNA Dicer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detailed Look at RNA Dicer Print Detailed Look at RNA Dicer Print Scientists have gotten their first detailed look at the molecular structure of an enzyme that Nature has been using for eons to help silence unwanted genetic messages. A team of researchers with Berkeley Lab and the University of California, Berkeley, used x-ray crystallography at ALS Beamlines 8.2.1 and 8.2.2 to determine the crystal structure of Dicer, an enzyme that plays a critical role in a process known as RNA interference. The Dicer enzyme is able to snip a double-stranded form of RNA into segments that can attach themselves to genes and block their activity. With this crystal structure, the researchers learned that Dicer serves as a molecular ruler, with a clamp at one end and a cleaver at the other end a set distance away, that produces RNA fragments of an ideal size for gene-silencing.

373

First Detailed Look at RNA Dicer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

First Detailed Look at RNA Dicer Print First Detailed Look at RNA Dicer Print Scientists have gotten their first detailed look at the molecular structure of an enzyme that Nature has been using for eons to help silence unwanted genetic messages. A team of researchers with Berkeley Lab and the University of California, Berkeley, used x-ray crystallography at ALS Beamlines 8.2.1 and 8.2.2 to determine the crystal structure of Dicer, an enzyme that plays a critical role in a process known as RNA interference. The Dicer enzyme is able to snip a double-stranded form of RNA into segments that can attach themselves to genes and block their activity. With this crystal structure, the researchers learned that Dicer serves as a molecular ruler, with a clamp at one end and a cleaver at the other end a set distance away, that produces RNA fragments of an ideal size for gene-silencing.

374

Detailed balance limit of power conversion efficiency for organic photovoltaics  

SciTech Connect

A fundamental difference between inorganic photovoltaic (IPV) and organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells is that charges are generated at the interface in OPV cells, while free charges can be generated in the bulk in IPV cells. In OPV cells, charge generation involves intrinsic energy losses to dissociate excitons at the interface between the donor and acceptor. By taking into account the energy losses, we show the theoretical limits of the power conversion efficiency set by radiative recombination of the carriers on the basis of the detailed balance relation between radiation from the cell and black-body radiation.

Seki, Kazuhiko, E-mail: k-seki@aist.go.jp [NRI, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST Tsukuba Central 5, Higashi 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan)] [NRI, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST Tsukuba Central 5, Higashi 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan); Furube, Akihiro [RIIF, AIST Tsukuba Central 2, Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)] [RIIF, AIST Tsukuba Central 2, Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Yoshida, Yuji [RCPVT, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST Tsukuba Central 5, Higashi 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan)] [RCPVT, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST Tsukuba Central 5, Higashi 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

375

ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 RESIDENTIAL TRANSPORTATION 5 RESIDENTIAL TRANSPORTATION ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY Prepared for: UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION OFFICE OF ENERGY MARKETS AND END USE ENERGY END USE DIVISION RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL BRANCH WASHINGTON, DC 20585 Prepared by: THE ORKAND CORPORATION 8484 GEORGIA AVENUE SILVER SPRING, MD 20910 October 1986 Contract Number DE-AC01-84EI19658 TABLE OF CONTENTS FRONT MATTER Index to Program Descriptions........................................... vi List of Exhibits ....................................................... viii Acronyms and Abbreviations ............................................. ix SECTION 1: GENERAL INFORMATION ........................................ 1-1 1.1. Summary ....................................................... 1-1

376

State energy price system. Volume I: overview and technical documentation  

SciTech Connect

This study utilizes existing data sources and previous analyses of state-level energy prices to develop consistent state-level energy prices series by fuel type and by end-use sector. The fuels are electricity, natural gas, coal, distillate fuel oil, motor gasoline, diesel, kerosene, jet fuel, residual fuel, and liquefied petroleum gas. The end-use sectors are residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, and electric utility. Based upon an evaluation of existing data sources, recommendations were formulated on the feasible approaches for developing a consistent state energy price series. The data series were compiled based upon the approaches approved after a formal EIA review. Detailed documentation was provided, including annual updating procedures. Recommendations were formulated for future improvements in the collection of data or in data processing. Generally, the geographical coverage includes the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Information on state-level energy use was generally taken from the State Energy Data System (SEDS). Corresponding average US prices are also developed using volumes reported in SEDS. To the extent possible, the prices developed are quantity weighted average retail prices. Both a Btu price series and a physical unit price series are developed for each fuel. The period covered by the data series is 1970 through 1980 for most fuels, though prices for electricity and natural gas extend back to 1960. (PSB)

Fang, J.M.; Nieves, L.A.; Sherman, K.L.; Hood, L.J.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

First Detailed Look at RNA Dicer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detailed Look at RNA Dicer Detailed Look at RNA Dicer First Detailed Look at RNA Dicer Print Wednesday, 25 January 2006 00:00 Scientists have gotten their first detailed look at the molecular structure of an enzyme that Nature has been using for eons to help silence unwanted genetic messages. A team of researchers with Berkeley Lab and the University of California, Berkeley, used x-ray crystallography at ALS Beamlines 8.2.1 and 8.2.2 to determine the crystal structure of Dicer, an enzyme that plays a critical role in a process known as RNA interference. The Dicer enzyme is able to snip a double-stranded form of RNA into segments that can attach themselves to genes and block their activity. With this crystal structure, the researchers learned that Dicer serves as a molecular ruler, with a clamp at one end and a cleaver at the other end a set distance away, that produces RNA fragments of an ideal size for gene-silencing.

378

Contact Details Journeying Beyond Breast Cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Home About Contact Details Facebook Search Journeying Beyond Breast Cancer making sense of the cancer experience Feeds: Posts Comments Cancer-fighting fountain pen May 20, 2009 by JBBC A research team be used both as a research tool in the development of next-generation cancer treatments

Espinosa, Horacio D.

379

Advanced Fossil Energy Projects Loan Guarantee Solicitation  

Energy Savers (EERE)

of production and use, including resource development, energy generation, and end use. Fossil fuels currently account for more than 80 percent of U.S. energy production and are...

380

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Your H2IQ Hydrogen Fuel Cell Basics Hydrogen Fuel Cell Basics Hydrogen is a versatile energy carrier that can be used to power nearly every end-use energy need. The fuel...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detailed energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Detailed Monthly and Annual LNG Import Statistics (2004-2012...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Detailed Monthly and Annual LNG Import Statistics (2004-2012) Detailed Monthly and Annual LNG Import Statistics (2004-2012) Detailed Monthly and Annual LNG Import Statistics...

382

Quality Guidelines for Energy System Studies: Detailed Coal Specificat...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(dry) process in the U.S. It is typically applied to the coal less than inch in size. The raw coal may be screened upstream from the cleaning plant with larger fractions...

383

State Energy Price System: 1982 update  

SciTech Connect

The State Energy Price System (STEPS) contains estimates of energy prices for ten major fuels (electricity, natural gas, metallurgical coal, steam coal, distillate, motor gasoline, diesel, kerosene/jet fuel, residual fuel, and liquefied petroleum gas), by major end-use sectors (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, and electric utility), and by state through 1982. Both physical unit prices and prices per million Btu are included in STEPS. Major changes in STEPS data base for 1981 and 1982 are described. The most significant changes in procedures for the updates occur in the residential sector distillate series and the residential sector kerosene series. All physical unit and Btu prices are shown with three significant digits instead of with four significant digits as shown in the original documentation. Details of these and other changes are contained in this report, along with the updated data files. 31 references, 65 tables.

Imhoff, K.L.; Fang, J.M.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Fuel (with biomass) Primary Energy Consumption (EJ) RuralEnd-use (without biomass) Commercial Energy Use by Fuel andfor 9% of primary energy excluding biomass fuels. Figure 10

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Energy Data Sourcebook for the U.S. Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that forecast US residential energy consumption by end-use.new unit energy consumption in the U.S. DOE appliancethe Residential Energy Consumption Survey, or RECS (US DOE

Wenzel, T.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Cape Canaveral Air Force Station integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail  

SciTech Connect

The US Air Force (USAF) has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), to assess energy use at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (AFS). The information obtained from this assessment will be used in identifying energy resource opportunities to reduce overall energy consumption by the station. The primary focus of this report is to assess the current baseline energy consumption at Cape Canaveral AFS. It is A companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 3, the Resource Assessment. This assessment requires that information be obtained and characterized for buildings, utilities, energy sources, energy uses, and load profiles to be used to improve the current energy system on the station. The characteristics of electricity, diesel fuel, No. 2 fuel oil, and motor vehicle gasoline (MOGAS) are analyzed for on-base facilities. The assessment examines basic regional information used to determine energy-use intensity (EUI) values for Cape Canaveral AFS facilities by building, fuel type, and energy end use. It also provides a summary of electricity consumption from Florida Power and Light Company (FPL) metered data for 1985--1991. Load profile information obtained from FPL data is presented for the North, South, and Titan Substations for the four seasons of the year, including weekdays and weekends.

Wahlstrom, R.R.; McMordie, K.L.; Parker, S.A.; King, D.A.; Sandusky, W.F.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Patrick Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail  

SciTech Connect

The US Air Force has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), to assess energy use at Patrick Air Force Base (AFB). The information obtained from this assessment will be used in identifying energy resource opportunities to reduce overall energy consumption on the base. The primary focus of this report is to assess the current baseline energy consumption at Patrick AFB. It is a comparison report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 3, the Resource Assessment. This assessment requires that information be obtained and characterized for buildings, utilities, energy sources, energy uses, and load profile information to be used to improve the characterization of energy use on the base. The characteristics of electricity, natural gas, and No. 2 fuel oil are analyzed for on-base facilities and housing. The assessment examines basic regional information used to determine energy-use intensity (EUI) values for Patrick AFB facilities by building, fuel type, and energy end use. It also provides a summary of electricity consumption from Florida Power and Light Company (FPL) metered data for 1985-1991. Load profile information obtained from FPL data is presented for the north and south substations for the four seasons of the year, including weekdays and weekends.

Wahlstrom, R.R.; King, D.A.; Parker, S.A.; Sandusky, W.F.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Details of U.S. Climate Zones:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Details of U.S. Climate Zones Details of U.S. Climate Zones Details of U.S. Climate Zones: The CBECS climate zones are groups of climate divisions, as defined by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), which are regions within a state that are as climatically homogeneous as possible. Each NOAA climate division is placed into one of five CBECS climate zones based on its 30-year average heating degree-days (HDD) and cooling degree-days (CDD) for the period 1971 through 2000. (These climate zones have been updated for the 2003 CBECS. All previous CBECS used averages for the 45-year period from 1931 through 1975.) A HDD is a measure of how cold a location was over a period of time, relative to a base temperature (in CBECS, 65 degrees Fahrenheit). The heating degree-day is the difference between that day's average temperature and 65 degrees if the daily average is less than 65; it is zero if the daily average temperature is greater than or equal to 65. For example, if the average temperature for a given day is 40 degrees, then the heating degree-days for that single day equal 25. Heating degree-days for a year are the sum of the daily heating degree-days that year.

389

ALCC Application Details | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Application Details Application Details Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Facilities Accessing ASCR Supercomputers Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) Research & Evaluation Prototypes (REP) Innovative & Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) ASCR Leadership Computing Challenge (ALCC) ALCC Application Details ALCC Past Awards Frequently Asked Questions Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) News & Resources Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-21/Germantown Building

390

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1) 1) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 2001 January 2003 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This report was prepared in the Office of Energy Markets and End Use of the Energy Information Administration

391

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Household Expenditures  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Key Assumptions Key Assumptions The historical input data used to develop the HEM version for the AEO2000 consists of recent household survey responses, aggregated to the desired level of detail. Two surveys performed by the Energy Information Administration are included in the AEO2000 HEM database, and together these input data are used to develop a set of baseline household consumption profiles for the direct fuel expenditure analysis. These surveys are the 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). HEM uses the consumption forecast by NEMS for the residential and transportation sectors as inputs to the disaggregation algorithm that results in the direct fuel expenditure analysis. Household end-use and personal transportation service consumption are obtained by HEM from the NEMS Residential and Transportation Demand Modules. Household disposable income is adjusted with forecasts of total disposable income from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module.

392

EIA- Energy Efficiency Related Links: EIA Reports and Analyses  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reports Reports Energy-Efficiency Related: EIA Reports and Analyses Released Release Date: October 1999 Last Updated: August 2010 End Users: Commercial Buildings / Manufacturing / Residential / Transportation Energy Source: Coal / Electricity / Natural Gas / Nuclear / Petroleum / Renewable / All Sectors Commercial Buildings 2003 CBECS Detailed Tables, most recent data on building characteristics and consumption expenditures 2003 Building Characteristics Overview, the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) estimates that there were nearly 4.9 million commercial buildings and more than 71.6 billion square feet of commercial floorspace in the U. S. in 2003 1999 Building Characteristics Overview, the 1999 CBECS collected information about HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning) system, building shell, and lighting conservation features and practices plus information on off-hour reduction of end-use equipment. In general, commercial buildings that were larger than average were more likely to have used these conservation features or measures (May 2002)

393

Microsoft Word - Appendix I - Additional Field Implementation Detail for Selected Monitoring.docx  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

I I Additional Field Implementation Detail for Selected Monitoring Objectives This page intentionally left blank LMS/RFS/S08202-1.0 Rocky Flats Site, Colorado Additional Field Implementation Detail for Selected Monitoring Objectives July 2013 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Additional Field Implementation Detail for Selected Monitoring Objectives July 2013 Doc. No. S08202-1.0 Page i Contents Abbreviations ................................................................................................................................. iii 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................1 2.0 Investigative Monitoring ........................................................................................................2

394

China Energy Databook -- User Guide and Documentation, Version 7.0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercial and Biomass Energy Table 4B.2. Actual PrimaryCommercial and Biomass Energy Figure 4B.2. Energy IntensityEnd Use, Commercial and Biomass Energy Figure 9B.10. Shares

Fridley, Ed., David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Refining building energy modeling through aggregate analysis and probabilistic methods associated with occupant presence.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The building sector represents the largest energy consumer among the United States' end use sectors. As a result, the public and private sector will continue (more)

Stoppel, Christopher Michael

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Table A10. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Fuel Type, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and End Use, 1994:" " Part 2" " (Estimates in Trillion...

397

Detailed stability analysis of electroweak strings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We give a detailed stability analysis of the Z-string in the standard electroweak model. We identify the mode that determines the stability of the string and numerically map the region of parameter space where the string is stable. For sin2?W = 0.23, we find that the strings are unstable for a Higgs mass larger than 23 GeV. Given the latest constraints of the Higgs mass from LEP, this shows that, if the standard electroweak model is realized in nature, the existing vortex solutions are unstable.

Margaret James; Leandros Perivolaropoulos; Tanmay Vachaspati

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Appendix J. Models Used To Generate  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

J. Models Used To Generate the IEO2008 Projections J. Models Used To Generate the IEO2008 Projections International Energy Outlook 2008 Appendix J. Models Used To Generate the IEO2008 Projections World Energy Projections Plus (WEPS+) The IEO2008 projections of world energy consumption and supply were generated from EIA’s World Energy Projections Plus (WEPS+) model. WEPS+ is a system of sectoral energy models that provide a loosely linked, integrated equilibrium modeling system. It is used primarily to provide alternative energy projections based on different assumptions for GDP growth and fossil fuel prices. The WEPS+ common platform allows the models to communicate with each other and provides a comprehensive, central series of output reports for analysis. For IEO2008, WEPS+ incorporates a separate transportation sector model with an extensive level of detail for modes and vehicle types. WEPS+ also incorporates some additional detail on industrial energy use in China and India, additional detail on end-use electricity consumption, and an interface to the System for the Analysis of Global Energy Markets/Global Electricity Module (see below) for generation, capacity, and fuel consumption in the electricity sector.

399

Detailed balance theory of excitonic and bulk heterojunction solar cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A generalized solar cell model for excitonic and classical bipolar solar cells describes the combined transport and interaction of electrons, holes, and excitons in accordance with the principle of detailed balance. Conventional inorganic solar cells, single-phase organic solar cells and bulk heterojunction solar cells, i.e., nanoscale mixtures of two organic materials, are special cases of this model. For high mobilities, the compatibility with the principle of detailed balance ensures that our model reproduces the Shockley-Queisser limit irrespective of how the energy transport is achieved. For less ideal devices distinct differences become visible between devices that are described by linear differential equations and those with nonlinear effects, such as a voltage-dependent collection in bipolar p-i-n-type devices. These differences in current-voltage characteristics are also decisive for the validity of the reciprocity theorem between photovoltaic quantum efficiency and electroluminescent emission. Finally, we discuss the effect of band offset at the heterointerface in a bulk heterojunction cell and the effect of the average distances between these heterointerfaces on the performance of a solar cell in order to show how our detailed balance model includes also these empirically important quantities.

Thomas Kirchartz; Julian Mattheis; Uwe Rau

2008-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

400

Detailed study of nuclear fusion from femtosecond laser-driven explosions of deuterium clusters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detailed study of nuclear fusion from femtosecond laser-driven explosions of deuterium clusters J that these clusters can explode with sufficient kinetic energy to drive nuclear fusion. Irradiating deuterium clusters

Ditmire, Todd

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detailed energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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401

Detailed characterization of Mo/Au TES microcalorimeters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We are optimizing Mo/Au transition-edge-sensor (TES) calorimeters to meet the specifications of NASAs Constellation-X mission. Our calorimeters have already demonstrated very good energy resolution of X rays (2.4 eV at 1.5 keV). We wish to further improve the energy resolution by reducing excess noise in the calorimeters. Development of a detailed model and understanding of the noise is instrumental to reaching this goal. Towards that end we employ a linear model that describes the response of a calorimeter to signal and various sources of noise. The model is based on detailed measurements of the parameters that affect the calorimeters performance such as current-voltage characteristics of the TES thermal conductance of our silicon-nitride membranes and inductance in the electronic circuit used to bias the TES. We determine the sharpness of the superconducting phase transition by fitting the model to the measured responsivity of the calorimeter. The model relates sources of noise such as phonon noise Johnson noise and hypothetical sources of excess noise to measurements of noise in the TES. Based on this analysis we find that the excess noise is consistent with frequency-independent voltage noise in the TES

Mark A. Lindeman; Regis P. Brekosky; Enectali Figueroa-Feliciano; Fred M. Finkbeiner; Mary Li; Caroline K. Stahle; Carl M. Stahle; Nilesh Tralshawala

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Assessment of Energy Use in Multibuilding Facilities  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3)/1 3)/1 Energy Information Administration Energy Consumption Series Assessment of Energy Use in Multibuilding Facilities August 1993 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This publication was prepared under the general direction of W. Calvin Kilgore, Director of the Office of Energy Markets and End Use (202/586-1617) and Lynda T. Carlson, Director of the Energy End Use and Integrated Statistics Division (EEUISD) (202/586-1112). Specific information regarding the contents or preparation of

403

International energy outlook 2006  

SciTech Connect

This report presents international energy projections through 2030, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. After a chapter entitled 'Highlights', the report begins with a review of world energy and economic outlook, followed by energy consumption by end-use sector. The next chapter is on world oil markets. Natural gas, world coal market and electricity consumption and supply are then discussed. The final chapter covers energy-related carbon dioxide emissions.

NONE

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

News From the D.C. Office: Lubricating the Market for Energy-Efficient  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Aerial view of Washington D.C. 3 Aerial view of Washington D.C. News From the D.C. Office Lubricating the Market for Energy-Efficient Products: Snake Oil vs. Slick Databases A handful of tools are essential for those involved in analyzing energy-efficiency policies or designing and implementing programs, no matter what their area of interest or institutional or individual role. My own short list includes: Detailed information on the structure of energy end-use and market trends. Empirical data that document the real-world performance of technologies and programs. Simulation models that use these data to shed light on the future impact of policies and programs. Accessible, accurate information on the efficiency, costs, and other characteristics of energy-efficient products. My colleagues could certainly add to this list, but for now I want to focus

405

2007 Solar Decathlon Detailed Event Schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DETAILED EVENT SCHEDULE DETAILED EVENT SCHEDULE Last updated on September 14, 2007 Note: This schedule is subject to change at any time. 12:00 AM 12:30 AM 1:00 AM 1:30 AM 2:00 AM 2:30 AM 3:00 AM 3:30 AM 4:00 AM 4:30 AM 5:00 AM 5:30 AM 6:00 AM 6:30 AM 7:00 AM 7:30 AM 8:00 AM 8:30 AM 9:00 AM 9:30 AM 10:00 AM 10:30 AM 11:00 AM 11:30 AM 12:00 PM 12:30 PM 1:00 PM 1:30 PM 2:00 PM 2:30 PM 3:00 PM 3:30 PM 4:00 PM 4:30 PM 5:00 PM 5:30 PM 6:00 PM 6:30 PM 7:00 PM 7:30 PM 8:00 PM 8:30 PM 9:00 PM 9:30 PM 10:00 PM 10:30 PM 11:00 PM 11:30 PM 12:00 AM 12:30 AM 1:00 AM 1:30 AM 2:00 AM 2:30 AM 3:00 AM 3:30 AM 4:00 AM 4:30 AM 5:00 AM 5:30 AM 6:00 AM 6:30 AM 7:00 AM 7:30 AM 8:00 AM 8:30 AM 9:00 AM 9:30 AM 10:00 AM 10:30 AM 11:00 AM 11:30 AM 12:00 PM 12:30 PM 1:00 PM 1:30 PM 2:00 PM 2:30 PM 3:00 PM 3:30 PM 4:00 PM 4:30 PM 5:00 PM 5:30 PM 6:00 PM 6:30 PM 7:00 PM 7:30 PM 8:00

406

Detailed Assessment of Particulate Characteristics from Low-Temperatur...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Detailed Assessment of Particulate Characteristics from Low-Temperature Combustion Engines Detailed Assessment of Particulate Characteristics from Low-Temperature Combustion...

407

Overview of Detailed Chemical Speciation and Particle Sizing...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Detailed Chemical Speciation and Particle Sizing for Diesel Exhaust, Both Real Time and Filter Based Measurements Overview of Detailed Chemical Speciation and Particle Sizing for...

408

Data and Analytics to Inform Energy Retrofit of High Performance Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Buildings consume more than one-third of the world?s primary energy. Reducing energy use in buildings with energy efficient technologies is feasible and also driven by energy policies such as energy benchmarking, disclosure, rating, and labeling in both the developed and developing countries. Current energy retrofits focus on the existing building stocks, especially older buildings, but the growing number of new high performance buildings built around the world raises a question that how these buildings perform and whether there are retrofit opportunities to further reduce their energy use. This is a new and unique problem for the building industry. Traditional energy audit or analysis methods are inadequate to look deep into the energy use of the high performance buildings. This study aims to tackle this problem with a new holistic approach powered by building performance data and analytics. First, three types of measured data are introduced, including the time series energy use, building systems operating conditions, and indoor and outdoor environmental parameters. An energy data model based on the ISO Standard 12655 is used to represent the energy use in buildings in a three-level hierarchy. Secondly, a suite of analytics were proposed to analyze energy use and to identify retrofit measures for high performance buildings. The data-driven analytics are based on monitored data at short time intervals, and cover three levels of analysis ? energy profiling, benchmarking and diagnostics. Thirdly, the analytics were applied to a high performance building in California to analyze its energy use and identify retrofit opportunities, including: (1) analyzing patterns of major energy end-use categories at various time scales, (2) benchmarking the whole building total energy use as well as major end-uses against its peers, (3) benchmarking the power usage effectiveness for the data center, which is the largest electricity consumer in this building, and (4) diagnosing HVAC equipment using detailed time-series operating data. Finally, a few energy efficiency measures were identified for retrofit, and their energy savings were estimated to be 20percent of the whole-building electricity consumption. Based on the analyses, the building manager took a few steps to improve the operation of fans, chillers, and data centers, which will lead to actual energy savings. This study demonstrated that there are energy retrofit opportunities for high performance buildings and detailed measured building performance data and analytics can help identify and estimate energy savings and to inform the decision making during the retrofit process. Challenges of data collection and analytics were also discussed to shape best practice of retrofitting high performance buildings.

Hong , Tianzhen; Yang, Le; Hill, David; Feng , Wei

2014-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

409

Energy and GHG Emissions in British Columbia 1990 -2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supply and use, greenhouse gas emissions and energy efficiency in British Columbia Canadian Industrial Energy End-use Data and Analysis Centre (CIEEDAC) Simon Fraser University June 2012 Environment Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Aluminium Industry Association, Canadian Chemical Producers

Pedersen, Tom

410

DOETEIAO32l/2 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

General information about EIA data on energy consumption may be obtained from Wray Smith, Director, Office of Energy Markets and End Use (202- 252-1617); Lynda T. Carlson,...

411

Factors Influencing Water Heating Energy Use and Peak Demand in a Large Scale Residential Monitoring Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A load research project by the Florida Power Corporation (FPC) is monitoring 200 residences in Central Florida, collecting detailed end-use load data. The monitoring is being performed to better estimate the impact of FPC's load control program...

Bouchelle, M. P.; Parker, D. S.; Anello, M. T.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Ancillary-service details: Dynamic scheduling  

SciTech Connect

Dynamic scheduling (DS) is the electronic transfer from one control area to another of the time-varying electricity consumption associated with a load or the time-varying electricity production associated with a generator. Although electric utilities have been using this technique for at least two decades, its use is growing in popularity and importance. This growth is a consequence of the major changes under way in US bulk-power markets, in particular efforts to unbundle generation from transmission and to increase competition among generation providers. DS can promote competition and increase choices. It allows consumers to purchase certain services from entities outside their physical-host area and it allows generators to sell certain services to entities other than their physical host. These services include regulation (following minute-to-minute variations in load) and operating reserves, among others. Such an increase in the number of possible suppliers and customers should encourage innovation and reduce the costs and prices of providing electricity services. The purpose of the project reported here was to collect and analyze data on utility experiences with DS. Chapter 2 provides additional details and examples of the definitions of DS. Chapter 3 explains why DS might be an attractive service that customers and generators, as well as transmission providers, might wan to use. Chapter 4 presents some of the many current DS examples the authors uncovered in their interviews. Chapter 5 discusses the costs and cost-effectiveness of DS. Chapter 6 explains what they believe can and cannot be electronically moved from one control area to another, primarily in terms of the six ancillary services that FERC defined in Order 888. Chapter 7 discusses the need for additional research on DS.

Hirst, E.; Kirby, B.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Healthcare Energy: Massachusetts General Hospital Gray Building  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Building Technologies Office conducted a healthcare energy end-use monitoring project in partnership with two hospitals. This page contains highlights from monitoring at the Gray Building at Massachusetts General Hospital.

414

Renewable Energy and Climate Change Mitigation: An Overview of the IPCC Special Report  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Renewable energy systems currently meet only around 78... heating, cooling, electricity and transport end-use energy demands (Traditional biomass provides around 6.3% of global primary energy and all other ren...

Ralph E. H. Sims

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Measurement and verification strategies for energy savings certificates: meeting the challenges of an uncertain world  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

End-use energy efficiency is a cost-effective and rapidly deployable strategy for significantly reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and energy costs. Energy savings certificates (ESCs)instruments assigning t...

Steven Meyers; Steve Kromer

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Modelling useful energy demand system as derived from basic needs in the household sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Inter-fuel substitution in the household sector depends on whether their target energy use is similar or not. To account ... for the effect of end-use application on energy demand, the concept of useful energy is...

Zahra A. Barkhordar; Yadollah Saboohi

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

A Comprehensive System of Energy Intensity Indicators for the U.S.: Methods, Data and Key Trends  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a comprehensive system of energy intensity indicators for the United States that has been developed for the Department of Energys Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) over the past decade. This system of indicators is hierarchical in nature, beginning with detailed indexes of energy intensity for various sectors of the economy, which are ultimately aggregated to an overall energy intensity index for the economy as a whole. The aggregation of energy intensity indexes to higher levels in the hierarchy is performed with a version of the Log Mean Divisia Index (LMDI) method. Based upon the data and methods in the system of indicators, the economy-wide energy intensity index shows a decline of about 14% in 2010 relative to a 1985 base year. Discussion of energy intensity indicators for each of the broad end-use sectors of the economyresidential, commercial, industrial, and transportationis presented in the report. An analysis of recent changes in the efficiency of electricity generation in the U.S. is also included. A detailed appendix describes the data sources and methodology behind the energy intensity indicators for each sector.

Belzer, David B.

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

418

Annual Energy Review, 1996  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The The Annual Energy Review (AER) is prepared by the Energy Information Administration. General information may be obtained from W. Calvin Kilgore, Director, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, 202-586-1617, or Katherine E. Seiferlein, Chief, Integrated Statistics Branch, 202-586-5695. Questions and comments concerning the contents of the AER may be referred to Samuel E. Brown, 202-586-5103; Leigh Carleton, 202-586-1132; or the following subject specialists via telephone or Internet e-mail: Contacts 1. Energy Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sam.Brown@eia.doe.gov 202-586-5103 Leigh.Carleton@eia.doe.gov 202-586-1132 2. End-Use Energy Consumption Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey . . . . . . . Mark.Schipper@eia.doe.gov 202-586-1136 Residential Energy Consumption Survey . . . . . . . . Michael.Laurence@eia.doe.gov 202-586-2453 Residential Transportation Energy

419

Best Estimate Radiation Flux Value-Added Procedure: Algorithm Operational Details and Explanations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 Best Estimate Radiation Flux Value-Added Procedure: Algorithm Operational Details and Explanations October 2002 Y. Shi and C. N. Long DOE, ARM, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Research, Office of Health and Environmental Research Contents 1. Introduction ............................................................................................................................................ 1 2. Input Data ............................................................................................................................................... 1 3. Configuration Files.................................................................................................................................

420

PREDICTION OF DELAM INATION IN WIND TURBINE BLADE STRUCTURAL DETAILS John F. Mandell, Douglas S. Cairns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Reference 3, available on the Sandia web site www.sandia.gov/Renewable_Energy/Wind_Energy/. DELAMINATION1 PREDICTION OF DELAM INATION IN WIND TURBINE BLADE STRUCTURAL DETAILS John F. Mandell, Douglas S materials structures such as wind turbine blades. Design methodologies to prevent such failures have

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detailed energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

A detailed spectroscopic study of an Italian fresco  

SciTech Connect

In the present work we characterized samples of plasters and pictorial layers taken from a fresco in the Acireale Cathedral. The fresco represents the Coronation of Saint Venera, patron saint of this Ionian town. By performing a detailed spectroscopic analysis of the plaster preparation layer by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD), and of the painting layer by FTIR and confocal Raman microspectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy+energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and XRD, we were able to identify the pigments and the binders present. In particular, Raman investigation was crucial to the characterization of the pigments thanks to the high resolution of the confocal apparatus used. It is worth stressing that the simultaneous use of complementary techniques was able to provide more complete information for the conservation of the artifact we studied.

Barilaro, Donatella; Crupi, Vincenza; Majolino, Domenico; Barone, Germana; Ponterio, Rosina [Dipartimento di Fisica and Instituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia (INFM), Universita di Messina, Contrada Papardo, Salita Sperone 31, P.O. Box 55, 98166 Messina (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze dalla Terra, Universita di Messina, Contrada Papardo, Salita Sperone 31, P.O. Box 55, 98166 Messina (Italy); Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche-Istituto per i Processi Chimico Fisici (CNR-IPCF), Sezione di Messina, Via La Farina 237, 98123 Messina (Italy)

2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

422

Integrated Energy Policy Report Subsidiary Volume: PUBLIC INTEREST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Demonstration 21 Organization of this Report 22 #12;ii CHAPTER 2: ELECTRICITY AND NATURAL GAS CONSUMPTION TRENDS 23 Electricity Consumption Trends 23 Electricity Use by Sector 25 Electricity End-Use 28 Natural Gas Consumption Trends 30 Natural Gas Use by Sector 30 Natural Gas End-Use 32 CHAPTER 3: ENERGY EFFICIENCY

423

Monthly Energy Review - May 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

June 30, 2010 June 30, 2010 DOE/EIA-0035(2010/06) Monthly Energy Review June 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. Contacts The Monthly Energy Review is prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Integrated Energy Statistics Division, Domestic Energy Statistics Team, under the direction of Barbara T. Fichman,

424

Monthly Energy Review - February 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

February 26, 2010 February 26, 2010 DOE/EIA-0035(2010/02) Monthly Energy Review February 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. Contacts The Monthly Energy Review is prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Integrated Energy Statistics Division, Domestic Energy Statistics Team, under the direction of Barbara T. Fichman,

425

Monthly Energy Review - July 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

July 30, 2010 July 30, 2010 DOE/EIA-0035(2010/07) Monthly Energy Review July 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. Contacts The Monthly Energy Review is prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Integrated Energy Statistics Division, Domestic Energy Statistics Team, under the direction of Barbara T. Fichman,

426

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Sector Energy Sector Industrial Sector Energy Sector International Energy Outlook 2010 Graphic Data - Industrial Sector Energy Sector Figure 82. Annual changes in world industrial and all other end-use energy consumption from previous year, 2006-2010 Figure 83. World delivered energy consumption in the industral and all other end-use sectors, 2005-2035 Figure 84. OECD and Non-OECD industrial sector energy consumption, 2007-2035 Figure 85. World industrial sector energy consumption by fuel, 2007 and 2035 Figure 86. World industrial sector energy consumption by major energy-intensive industry shares, 2007 Figure 87. OECD and Non-OECD major steel producers, 2008 Figure 88. OECD industrial sector energy consumption by fuel, 2007 and 2035 Figure 89. Non-OECD industrial sector energy consumption by fuel, 2007 and 2035

427

Monthly Energy Review - April 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

April 30, 2010 April 30, 2010 DOE/EIA-0035(2010/04) Monthly Energy Review April 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. Contacts The Monthly Energy Review is prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Integrated Energy Statistics Division, Domestic Energy Statistics Team, under the direction of Barbara T. Fichman,

428

Monthly Energy Review - May 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May 27, 2010 May 27, 2010 DOE/EIA-0035(2010/05) Monthly Energy Review May 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. Contacts The Monthly Energy Review is prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Integrated Energy Statistics Division, Domestic Energy Statistics Team, under the direction of Barbara T. Fichman,

429

Monthly Energy Review - March 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

March 31, 2010 March 31, 2010 DOE/EIA-0035(2010/03) Monthly Energy Review March 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. Contacts The Monthly Energy Review is prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Integrated Energy Statistics Division, Domestic Energy Statistics Team, under the direction of Barbara T. Fichman,

430

Towards a Very Low Energy Building Stock: Modeling the U.S. Commercial Building Sector to Support Policy and Innovation Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and energy use intensity by fuel type and end use), based on historical data and user-defined scenarios for future projections.

Coffey, Brian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Ris Energy Report 7 This Ris Energy Report, the seventh of a series that began  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;3 1 Risø Energy Report 7 This Risø Energy Report, the seventh of a series. This report presents state-of-the-art and development per- spectives for energy supply technologies, new energy sys- tems, end-use energy efficiency improvements and new pol- icy measures. It also includes

432

"Code(a)","End Use","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)"," Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.3;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","for ","Residual","and","Natural","LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)"," Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION",2,3,6,2,4,9

433

Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function Two Studies Reveal Details of Lithium-Battery Function Print Wednesday, 27 February 2013 00:00 Our way of life is deeply...

434

Results of Detailed Hydrologic Characterization Tests - Fiscal Year 2003  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results obtained from detailed hydrologic characterization of the unconfined aquifer system conducted at the Hanford Site.

Spane, Frank A.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

2004-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

435

China Energy Primer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Meanwhile, Chapter 2 Energy Production solar water heatersSolar Resources 8 Figure 1-7 Chinas Wind Resources .. 9 CHAPTER 2 ENERGY PRODUCTIONsolar energy, geothermal, and ocean energy (for more details, please also see the energy production

Ni, Chun Chun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy newsroomassetsimagesenergy-icon.png Energy Research into alternative forms of energy, and improving and securing the power grid, is a major national security...

437

Historical Renewable Energy Consumption by Energy Use Sector and Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Historical Renewable Energy Consumption by Energy Use Sector and Energy Historical Renewable Energy Consumption by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 1989-2008 Dataset Summary Description Provides annual renewable energy consumption by source and end use between 1989 and 2008. This data was published and compiled by the Energy Information Administration. Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords annual energy consumption consumption EIA renewable energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon historical_renewable_energy_consumption_by_sector_and_energy_source_1989-2008.xls (xls, 41 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 1989-2008 License License Creative Commons CCZero Comment Rate this dataset

438

Analysis of water heater standby energy consumption from ELCAP homes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) routinely prepares forecasts of future energy demands in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. Bonneville also implements conservation programs to reduce load demands. Results from the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP), undertaken by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory for Bonneville, indicated that single-family homes with electric space-heating equipment consume more than 4700 kWh/yr to heat water for domestic uses. This energy use amounts to about 23% of the total electricity consumed. Additionally, the peak consumption for water heating coincides with regional system peak demands. Detailed analyses of the water heating end-use data acquired for residential buildings in ELCAP reveal that the average standby load for existing homes is 1200 kWh/yr, while homes built as part of the Residential Standards Demonstration Program averaged 1100 kWh/yr. These figures are consistent with the current figure of 1300 kWh/yr that is being used in the regional energy forecast. We also determined that standby loads for some of the participants were behaviorally driven. The data indicated the occurrence of vacancy setbacks in which the participant appears to lower the thermostat to save energy while the house is vacant. Anecdotal evidence from interviews revealed that this does occur. Reasons for setting back the thermostat ranged from not thinking about using the breaker, to fear that the tank would freeze in cold weather. These types of activities also appear to create the occurrence of dueling thermostats where the upper and lower thermostats, after the vacancy period, are not returned to the same temperature. This leads to additional energy use in an attempt to maintain a uniform temperature in the tank.

R.G. Pratt; B.A. Ross; W.F. Sandusky

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Deep Energy Retrofit Performance Metric Comparison: Eight California Case Studies  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we will present the results of monitored annual energy use data from eight residential Deep Energy Retrofit (DER) case studies using a variety of performance metrics. For each home, the details of the retrofits were analyzed, diagnostic tests to characterize the home were performed and the homes were monitored for total and individual end-use energy consumption for approximately one year. Annual performance in site and source energy, as well as carbon dioxide equivalent (CO{sub 2}e) emissions were determined on a per house, per person and per square foot basis to examine the sensitivity to these different metrics. All eight DERs showed consistent success in achieving substantial site energy and CO{sub 2}e reductions, but some projects achieved very little, if any source energy reduction. This problem emerged in those homes that switched from natural gas to electricity for heating and hot water, resulting in energy consumption dominated by electricity use. This demonstrates the crucial importance of selecting an appropriate metric to be used in guiding retrofit decisions. Also, due to the dynamic nature of DERs, with changes in occupancy, size, layout, and comfort, several performance metrics might be necessary to understand a projects success.

Walker, Iain; Fisher, Jeremy; Less, Brennan

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Impacts of Temperature Variation on Energy Demand in Buildings (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In the residential and commercial sectors, heating and cooling account for more than 40% of end-use energy demand. As a result, energy consumption in those sectors can vary significantly from year to year, depending on yearly average temperatures.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detailed energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Determination of the effect of part orientation to the strength value on additive manufacturing FDM for end-use parts by physical testing and validation via three-dimensional finite element analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Determining the mechanical properties of the parts manufactured from additive manufacturing (AM) technology is important for manufacture end-use functional parts, known as rapid manufacturing (RM). It is important, within RM design, to verify to some degree of confidence that a part designed to be manufactured using this technology will be suitable and fit to function as intended, prior to committing to manufacture. The method of doing this is to perform physical testing on fabricated parts and validate via finite element analysis (FEA) on the parts.

R.H. Hambali; P. Smith; A.E.W. Rennie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

INFOGRAPHIC: Wind Energy in America | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INFOGRAPHIC: Wind Energy in America INFOGRAPHIC: Wind Energy in America August 14, 2012 - 9:21am Addthis This infographic details key findings from the Energy Departments

443

SciTech Connect: Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy activities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

energy activities for biology Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy activities for biology You are accessing a document from the...

444

Report: An Updated Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Reference Case...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,0.3095597923,0.3089521229,0.3097482622,0.3104477823,0.3113028109,0.3122006357 "Delivered Energy Consumption by End Use" " Space Heating 1",1.659170747,1.786749244,1.892402887,1.9...

445

Report: An Updated Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Reference Case...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,0.3093057573,0.3091662526,0.3099833727,0.3105697036,0.3115277886,0.3126308322 "Delivered Energy Consumption by End Use" " Space Heating 1",1.65917182,1.786752224,1.892034054,1.96...

446

New Argonne initiative to examine the details of the combustion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Argonne initiative to examine the details of the combustion process By Jared Sagoff * July 15, 2014 Tweet EmailPrint ARGONNE, Ill. - Every science experiment and every...

447

Detailed Characterization of Lubricant-Derived Ash-Related Species...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Characterization of Lubricant-Derived Ash-Related Species in Diesel Exhaust and Aftertreatment Systems Detailed Characterization of Lubricant-Derived Ash-Related Species in Diesel...

448

ARM-UAV TWP-ICE Payload Instrumentation Details  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Payload Instrumentation Details McCoy, Robert Sandia National Laboratories Tooman, Tim Sandia National Laboratories McFarquhar, Greg University of Illinois Category: Field...

449

Pumped Storage Hydropower (Detailed Analysis to Demonstrate Value...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pumped Storage Hydropower (Detailed Analysis to Demonstrate Value)-Modeling and Analysis of Value of Advanced Pumped Storage Hydropower in the U.S. Pumped Storage Hydropower...

450

A Stochastic Reactor Based Virtual Engine Model Employing Detailed...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

A Stochastic Reactor Based Virtual Engine Model Employing Detailed Chemistry for Kinetic Studies of In-Cylinder Combustion and Exhaust Aftertreatment A Stochastic Reactor Based...

451

The Global Energy Challenge  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The expected doubling of global energy demand by 2050 challenges our traditional patterns of energy production, distribution and use. The continued use of fossil fuels raises concerns about supply, security, environment and climate. New routes are needed for the efficient conversion of energy from chemical fuel, sunlight, and heat to electricity or hydrogen as an energy carrier and finally to end uses like transportation, lighting, and heating. Opportunities for efficient new energy conversion routes based on nanoscale materials will be presented, with emphasis on the sustainable energy technologies they enable.

George Crabtree

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

452

The Global Energy Challenge  

SciTech Connect

The expected doubling of global energy demand by 2050 challenges our traditional patterns of energy production, distribution and use. The continued use of fossil fuels raises concerns about supply, security, environment and climate. New routes are needed for the efficient conversion of energy from chemical fuel, sunlight, and heat to electricity or hydrogen as an energy carrier and finally to end uses like transportation, lighting, and heating. Opportunities for efficient new energy conversion routes based on nanoscale materials will be presented, with emphasis on the sustainable energy technologies they enable.

George Crabtree

2007-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

453

Biofuels and Renewable Energy Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

detailed error information INL Home CONTACT US Center for Advanced Energy Studies Biofuels and Renewable Energy Renewable energy resources are expected to play major role in...

454

Kentucky Save Energy Now Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This fact sheet contains details regarding a Save Energy Now industrial energy efficiency project that the U.S. Department of Energy funded in Kentucky.

455

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed Tables 28 Energy Information AdministrationManufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 1. In previous MECS, the term "primary energy" was used to denote the "first use" of...

456

Delaware Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

457

Connecticut Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

458

Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

459

Colorado Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

460

Delaware Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detailed energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

California Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

462

Connecticut Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

463

Mississippi Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

464

Minnesota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

465

Michigan Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

466

Minnesota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

467

Arizona Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

468

Nevada Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

469

Arizona Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

470

Ohio Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

471

Montana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

472

Minnesota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

473

Idaho Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

474

California Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

475

Arkansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

476

Indiana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

477

Oregon Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

478

Mississippi Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

479

Kentucky Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

480

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "detailed energy end-use" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Florida Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

482

Idaho Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

483

Massachusetts Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

484

Nebraska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

485

Maryland Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

486

Maryland Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

487

Missouri Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

488

Missouri Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

489

Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

490

Kansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

491

Wisconsin Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

492

Alabama Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

493

Connecticut Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

494

Vermont Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

495

Wyoming Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

496

Arizona Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers