Sample records for desulfurization fgd equipment

  1. Utility FGD survey, January--December 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M. (IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States))

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is Volume 2 part 2, of the Utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. This volume particularly contains basic design and performance data.

  2. Utility FGD Survey, January--December 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M. (IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States))

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company.

  3. Utility FGD survey, Janurary--December 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M. (IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States))

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Utility FGD Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company. Simplified process flow diagrams of FGD systems, definitions, and a glossary of terms are attached to the report. Current data for domestic FGD systems show systems in operation, systems under construction, and systems planned. The current total FGD-controlled capacity in the United States is 67,091 MW. 2 figs., 9 tabs.

  4. Utility FGD survey, January--December 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M. (IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States))

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Utility FGD Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, systems designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company. Simplified process flow diagrams of FGD systems, definitions, and a glossary of terms are attached to the report. Current data for domestic FGD systems show systems in operation, systems under construction, and systems planned. The current total FGD-controlled capacity in the United States is 67,091 MW.

  5. Utility FGD survey, January--December 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M. (IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States))

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Utility FGD Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company. Simplified process flow diagrams of FGD systems, definitions, and a glossary of terms are attached to the report. Current data for domestic FGD systems show systems in operation, systems under construction, and systems planned. The current total FGD-controlled capacity in the United States is 67,091 MW.

  6. Utility FGD survey, January--December 1989. Volume 2, Design performance data for operating FGD systems: Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M. [IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States)] [IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is Volume 2 part 2, of the Utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. This volume particularly contains basic design and performance data.

  7. Utility FGD Survey, January--December 1989. Volume 2, Design performance data for operating FGD systems, Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M. [IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company.

  8. Utility FGD survey: January--December 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is Volume 1 of the Utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company.

  9. Utility FGD survey: January--December 1989. Volume 1, Categorical summaries of FGD systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is Volume 1 of the Utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company.

  10. High-volume, high-value usage of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products in underground mines - Phase I: Laboratory investigations. Quarterly report, October 1993--December 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project proposes to use pneumatically or hydraulically emplaced dry-flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products to backfill the adits left by highwall mining. Backfilling highwall mine adits with dry-FGD materials is technically attractive. The use of an active highwall mine would allow the dry-FGD material to be brought in using the same transportation network used to move the coal out, eliminating the need to recreated the transportation infrastructure, thereby saving costs. Activities during the period included the negotiations leading to the final cooperative agreement for the project and the implementation of the necessary instruments at the University of Kentucky to administer the project. Early in the negotiations, a final agreement on a task structure was reached and a milestone plan was filed. A review was initiated of the original laboratory plan as presented in the proposal, and tentative modifications were developed. Selection of a mine site was made early; the Pleasant Valley mine in Greenup County was chosen. Several visits were made to the mine site to begin work on the hydrologic monitoring plan. The investigation of the types of permits needed to conduct the project was initiated. Considerations concerning the acceptance and implementation of technologies led to the choice of circulating fluidized bed ash as the primary material for the study. Finally, the membership of a Technical Advisory Committee for the study was assembled.

  11. High volume - high value usage of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The amount of dry FGD materials produced in the U.S. has not been increasing at the high rate originally anticipated. This has been due to a number of economic factors affecting the utility industry. Technologies for the disposal of large amounts of materials are not going to be implemented in the near term. In light of this development the target application for this project is being changed from highwall adit filling to the filling of auger holes to allow for highwall mining. This application focuses on using the dry FGD material to recover coal isolated by excessive augering. It produces 10 or more times the amount of coal per ton of dry FGD utilized than the originally proposed methodology. It also does not require extensive equipment development and, if applied to abandoned mine lands, may have substantially more significant environmental benefit. We also propose to use a spray dryer material for the demonstration instead of the fluidized bed material originally proposed. The spray dryer material is already slacked eliminating problems associated with heat generation at the mine site. Auger hole grouting with FGD material is also best performed by hydraulic emplacement methods.

  12. Mercury Control for Plants Firing Texas Lignite and Equipped with ESP-wet FGD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katherine Dombrowski

    2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a multi-year test program conducted as part of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42779, 'Mercury Control for Plants Firing Texas Lignite and Equipped with ESP-wet FGD.' The objective of this program was to determine the level of mercury removal achievable using sorbent injection for a plant firing Texas lignite fuel and equipped with an ESP and wet FGD. The project was primarily funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory. EPRI, NRG Texas, Luminant (formerly TXU), and AEP were project co-funders. URS Group was the prime contractor, and Apogee Scientific and ADA-ES were subcontractors. The host site for this program was NRG Texas Limestone Electric Generating Station (LMS) Units 1 and 2, located in Jewett, Texas. The plant fires a blend of Texas lignite and Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. Full-scale tests were conducted to evaluate the mercury removal performance of powdered sorbents injected into the flue gas upstream of the ESP (traditional configuration), upstream of the air preheater, and/or between electric fields within the ESP (Toxecon{trademark} II configuration). Phases I through III of the test program, conducted on Unit 1 in 2006-2007, consisted of three short-term parametric test phases followed by a 60-day continuous operation test. Selected mercury sorbents were injected to treat one quarter of the flue gas (e.g., approximately 225 MW equivalence) produced by Limestone Unit 1. Six sorbents and three injection configurations were evaluated and results were used to select the best combination of sorbent (Norit Americas DARCO Hg-LH at 2 lb/Macf) and injection location (upstream of the ESP) for a two-month performance evaluation. A mercury removal rate of 50-70% was targeted for the long-term test. During this continuous-injection test, mercury removal performance and variability were evaluated as the plant operated under normal conditions. Additional evaluations were made to determine any balance-of-plant impacts of the mercury control process, including those associated with ESP performance and fly ash reuse properties. Upon analysis of the project results, the project team identified several areas of interest for further study. Follow-on testing was conducted on Unit 2 in 2009 with the entire unit treated with injected sorbent so that mercury removal across the FGD could be measured and so that other low-ash impact technologies could be evaluated. Three approaches to minimizing ash impacts were tested: (1) injection of 'low ash impact' sorbents, (2) alterations to the injection configuration, and (3) injection of calcium bromide in conjunction with sorbent. These conditions were tested with the goal of identifying the conditions that result in the highest mercury removal while maintaining the sorbent injection at a rate that preserves the beneficial use of ash.

  13. acid fgd additives: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of sulfur dioxide into the atmosphere. Efforts to curb damage to the environment by acid rain has necessitated the construction of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems...

  14. Corrosive environments experienced in FGD applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wess, T.J. [Seminole Electric Cooperative, Inc., Tampa, FL (United States); Crum, J.R.; Shoemaker, L.E. [Inco Alloys International, Inc., Huntington, WV (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of corrosive environments are encountered in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Some are intentional, such as the limestone slurry used in the absorber to remove SO{sub 2} gas, and others are unintentional, such as acid condensate in the outlet ducting and chimney. These acid condensate solutions are by far the most corrosive and most unpredictable. Condensate samples have been taken from various locations in an operating FGD unit and associated equipment. Actual samples have been taken from a low point in the bypass duct, the main outlet duct and the chimney flue drain sump. These samples were analyzed for pH, chloride and other constituents to determine the corrosivity of the fluids. These results were then related to performance of various alloy components in the system and to test samples exposed at representative locations in the Seminole Generating Station.

  15. FULL-SCALE TESTING OF ENHANCED MERCURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.K. McDonald; G.T. Amrhein; G.A. Kudlac; D. Madden Yurchison

    2003-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD) systems are currently installed on about 25% of the coal-fired utility generating capacity in the U.S., representing about 15% of the number of coal-fired units. Depending on the effect of operating parameters such as mercury content of the coal, form of mercury (elemental or oxidized) in the flue gas, scrubber spray tower configuration, liquid-to-gas ratio, and slurry chemistry, FGD systems can provide cost-effective, near-term mercury emissions control options with a proven history of commercial operation. For boilers already equipped with FGD systems, the incremental cost of any vapor phase mercury removal achieved is minimal. To be widely accepted and implemented, technical approaches that improve mercury removal performance for wet FGD systems should also have low incremental costs and have little or no impact on operation and SO{sub 2} removal performance. The ultimate goal of the Full-scale Testing of Enhanced Mercury Control for Wet FGD Systems Program was to commercialize methods for the control of mercury in coal-fired electric utility systems equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD). The program was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development, and Babcock & Wilcox. Host sites and associated support were provided by Michigan South Central Power Agency (MSCPA) and Cinergy. Field-testing was completed at two commercial coal-fired utilities with wet FGD systems: (1) MSCPA's 55 MW{sub e} Endicott Station and (2) Cinergy's 1300 MW{sub e} Zimmer Station. Testing was conducted at these two locations because of the large differences in size and wet scrubber chemistry. Endicott employs a limestone, forced oxidation (LSFO) wet FGD system, whereas Zimmer uses Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime (magnesium enhanced lime) and ex situ oxidation. Both locations burn Ohio bituminous coal.

  16. Electric utility engineer`s FGD manual -- Volume 1: FGD process design. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Part 1 of the Electric Utility Engineer`s Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Manual emphasizes the chemical and physical processes that form the basis for design and operation of lime- and limestone-based FGD systems applied to coal- or oil-fired steam electric generating stations. The objectives of Part 1 are: to provide a description of the chemical and physical design basis for lime- and limestone-based wet FGD systems; to identify and discuss the various process design parameters and process options that must be considered in developing a specification for a new FGD system; and to provide utility engineers with process knowledge useful for operating and optimizing a lime- or limestone-based wet FGD system.

  17. Investigation of a mercury speciation technique for flue gas desulfurization materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.Y.; Cho K.; Cheng L.; Keener, T.C.; Jegadeesan G.; Al-Abed, S.R. [University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH (United States). Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering

    2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Most of the synthetic gypsum generated from wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers is currently being used for wallboard production. Because oxidized mercury is readily captured by the wet FGD scrubber, and coal-fired power plants equipped with wet scrubbers desire to benefit from the partial mercury control that these systems provide, some mercury is likely to be bound in with the FGD gypsum and wallboard. In this study, the feasibility of identifying mercury species in the FGD gypsum and wallboard samples was investigated using a large sample size thermal desorption method and samples from power plants in Pennsylvania. Potential candidates of pure mercury standards including mercuric chloride, mercurous chloride, mercury oxide, mercury sulfide, and mercuric sulfate were analyzed to compare their results with those obtained from FGD gypsum and dry wallboard samples. Although any of the thermal evolutionary curves obtained from these pure mercury standards did not exactly match with those of the FGD gypsum and wallboard samples, it was identified that Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and HgCl{sub 2} could be candidates. An additional chlorine analysis from the gypsum and wallboard samples indicated that the chlorine concentrations were approximately 2 orders of magnitude higher than the mercury concentrations, suggesting possible chlorine association with mercury. 21 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Separation of Mercury from Flue Gas Desulfurization Scrubber Produced Gypsum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hensman, Carl, E., P.h.D; Baker, Trevor

    2008-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Frontier Geosciences (Frontier; FGS) proposed for DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER84669 that mercury control could be achieved in a wet scrubber by the addition of an amendment to the wet-FGD scrubber. To demonstrate this, a bench-scale scrubber and synthetic flue-gas supply was designed to simulate the limestone fed, wet-desulfurization units utilized by coal-fired power plants. Frontier maintains that the mercury released from these utilities can be controlled and reduced by modifying the existing equipment at installations where wet flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) systems are employed. A key element of the proposal was FGS-PWN, a liquid-based mercury chelating agent, which can be employed as the amendment for removal of all mercury species which enter the wet-FGD scrubber. However, the equipment design presented in the proposal was inadequate to demonstrate these functions and no significant progress was made to substantiate these claims. As a result, funding for a Phase II continuation of this work will not be pursued. The key to implementing the technology as described in the proposal and report appears to be a high liquid-to-gas ratio (L/G) between the flue-gas and the scrubber liquor, a requirement not currently implemented in existing wet-FGD designs. It may be that this constraint can be reduced through parametric studies, but that was not apparent in this work. Unfortunately, the bench-scale system constructed for this project did not function as intended and the funds and time requested were exhausted before the separation studies could occur.

  19. Utility FGD survey, January--December 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M. (IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States))

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The FGD survey report is prepared annually by International Technology (IT) Corporation (formerly PEI Associates, Inc.) for the US Department of Energy. The current issue (and preceding issues from 1974 to 1981 and October 1984 to the present) of the utility FGD survey are available only through the National Technical Information Service (NTIS). Preceding issues covering January 1982 through September 1984 may be purchased from the Research Reports Center of the Electric Power Research institute (EPRI). The information in this report is generated by a computerized data base system known as the Flue Gas Desulfurization Information System (FGDIS). The design information contained in the FGDIS encompasses the entire emission control system and the power generating unit to which it is applied. Performance data for operational FGD systems include monthly dependability parameters, service time, and descriptions of operational problems and solutions.

  20. Improved FGD dewatering process cuts solid wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moer, C.; Fernandez, J.; Carraro, B. [Duke Energy (United States)

    2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2007, Duke Energy's W.H. Zimmer Station set out to advance the overall performance of its flue gas desulfurization (FGD) dewatering process. The plant implemented a variety of measures, including upgrading water-solids separation, improving polymer program effectiveness and reliability, optimizing treatment costs, reducing solid waste sent to the landfill, decreasing labor requirements, and maintaining septic-free conditions in clarifiers. The changes succeeded in greatly reducing solid waste generation and achieving total annual savings of over half a million dollars per year. 8 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Synthetic aggregates prepared from flue gas desulfurization by-products using various binder materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellucci, J.; Graham, U.M.; Hower, J.C.; Robl, T.L. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) by-products can be converted into environmentally safe and structurally stable aggregates. One type of synthetic aggregate was prepared using an optimum mixture of (FGD) by-products, fly ash, and water. Mineral reactions have been examined using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope.

  2. Utility FGD survey, January--December 1989. Project summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M. [IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The FGD survey report is prepared annually by International Technology (IT) Corporation (formerly PEI Associates, Inc.) for the US Department of Energy. The current issue (and preceding issues from 1974 to 1981 and October 1984 to the present) of the utility FGD survey are available only through the National Technical Information Service (NTIS). Preceding issues covering January 1982 through September 1984 may be purchased from the Research Reports Center of the Electric Power Research institute (EPRI). The information in this report is generated by a computerized data base system known as the Flue Gas Desulfurization Information System (FGDIS). The design information contained in the FGDIS encompasses the entire emission control system and the power generating unit to which it is applied. Performance data for operational FGD systems include monthly dependability parameters, service time, and descriptions of operational problems and solutions.

  3. Land application uses for dry FGD by-products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigham, J.; Dick, W.; Forster, L.; Hitzhusen, F.; McCoy, E.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)); Haefner, R. (Geological Survey, Columbus, OH (United States). Water Resources Div.)

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act have spurred the development of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes, several of which produce a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction products containing sulfates and sulfites, and coal fly ash. Presently FGD by-product materials are treated as solid wastes and must be landfilled. However, landfill sites are becoming more scarce and tipping fees are constantly increasing. It is, therefore, highly desirable to find beneficial reuses for these materials provided the environmental impacts are minimal and socially acceptable. Phase 1 results of a 4 and 1/2 year study to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of FGD by-products are reported. The purpose of the Phase 1 portion of the project was to characterize the chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of the FGD by-product materials obtained from various FGD technologies being developed in the state of Ohio. Phase 1 also involved the collection of baseline economic data related to the beneficial reuse of these FGD materials. A total of 58 samples were collected and analyzed. In summary Phase 1 results revealed that FGD by-product materials are essentially coal fly ash materials diluted with unreacted sorbent and reaction products. High volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics of their substituting for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mines). Environmental constraints to the beneficial reuse of dry FGD byproduct materials, based on laboratory and leachate studies, seem to be less than for coal fly ash.

  4. Bench-scale Kinetics Study of Mercury Reactions in FGD Liquors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe; John Currie; David DeBerry

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42314, 'Kinetics Study of Mercury Reactions in FGD Liquors'. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory and EPRI. The objective of the project has been to determine the mechanisms and kinetics of the aqueous reactions of mercury absorbed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, and develop a kinetics model to predict mercury reactions in wet FGD systems. The model may be used to determine optimum wet FGD design and operating conditions to maximize mercury capture in wet FGD systems. Initially, a series of bench-top, liquid-phase reactor tests were conducted and mercury species concentrations were measured by UV/visible light spectroscopy to determine reactant and byproduct concentrations over time. Other measurement methods, such as atomic absorption, were used to measure concentrations of vapor-phase elemental mercury, that cannot be measured by UV/visible light spectroscopy. Next, a series of bench-scale wet FGD simulation tests were conducted. Because of the significant effects of sulfite concentration on mercury re-emission rates, new methods were developed for operating and controlling the bench-scale FGD experiments. Approximately 140 bench-scale wet FGD tests were conducted and several unusual and pertinent effects of process chemistry on mercury re-emissions were identified and characterized. These data have been used to develop an empirically adjusted, theoretically based kinetics model to predict mercury species reactions in wet FGD systems. The model has been verified in tests conducted with the bench-scale wet FGD system, where both gas-phase and liquid-phase mercury concentrations were measured to determine if the model accurately predicts the tendency for mercury re-emissions. This report presents and discusses results from the initial laboratory kinetics measurements, the bench-scale wet FGD tests, and the kinetics modeling efforts.

  5. Applications and experiences with super duplex stainless steel in wet FGD scrubber systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francis, R.; Byrne, G.; Warburton, G.; Hebdon, S. [Weir Materials Ltd., Manchester (United Kingdom)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents the properties of the author`s company`s proprietary super duplex stainless steel. Work is presented showing the development of a more realistic laboratory solution representing typical limestone slurries found in real flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The importance of additions of metal ions such as Fe{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+} as well as partially oxidized sulfur species is demonstrated. Results are presented comparing the crevice corrosion resistance of super duplex stainless steel in these slurries with other commonly used wrought and cast stainless steels, for both simulated anthracite and lignite type slurries. Data from loop tests on the erosion resistance of a range of alloys in simulated FGD slurries is presented. The results clearly show the superior resistance of super duplex stainless steel to both crevice corrosion and erosion in FGD slurries. Finally the experiences in UK FGD systems with both cast and wrought super duplex stainless steel are presented.

  6. Economics of dry FGD by sorbent injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naulty, D.J.; Hooper, R.G.; McDowell, D.A.; Scheck, R.W.

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The body of information in this paper is directed to engineers involved in desulfurization of boiler flue gas. The problems of wet scrubbing SO/sub 2/ from power plant flue gases have been well documented. The utility industry has been interested in developing new processes that would overcome problems associated with wet slurry systems. While spray dryer technology for FGD may alleviate many of these problems, this concept has problems as well. Dry injection FGD takes the development process one step further to a totally dry system, thus eliminating the difficulties of wet slurry handling. The concept of using the fabric filter as a chemical contactor for the SO/sub 2/ absorption was proposed in the late 1960s by Chaffee and Hill. In the early 1970s, Superior Oil Company, Wheelabrator Frye, Carborundum, and others investigated the use of nahcolite for SO/sub 2/ removal. Nahcolite is a natural occurring sodium bicarbonate found in great quantities in the oil shale regions of Colorado. In general, these developments were found viable in certain circumstances, but commercialization was hampered by the lack of nahcolite suppliers.

  7. Land application uses for dry FGD by-products. Phase 2 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stehouwer, R.; Dick, W.; Bigham, J. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)] [and others

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was initiated in December 1990 to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products. A Phase 1 report provided results of an extensive characterization of chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of 58 dry FGD by-product samples. The Phase 1 report concluded that high volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics related to their ability to substitute for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mine lands). Phase 2 objectives were (1) to conduct laboratory and greenhouse studies of FGD and soil (spoil) mixtures for agronomic and engineering applications, (2) to initiate field studies related to high volume agronomic and engineering uses, and (3) to develop the basic methodological framework for estimation of the financial and economic costs and benefits to society of several FGD reuse options and to make some preliminary runs of economic models. High volume beneficial reuses of dry FGD by-products have been successfully demonstrated. Adverse environmental impacts have been negligible. Although few sources of dry FGD by-products currently exist in Ohio and the United States there is potential for smaller coal-fired facilities to adopt S0{sub 2} scrubbing technologies that produce dry FGD material. Also much of what we have learned from studies on dry FGD by-products is applicable to the more prevalent wet FGD by-products. The adaptation of the technologies demonstrated in this project seem to be not only limited by economic constraints, but even more so, by the need to create awareness of the market potential of using these FGD by-products.

  8. Land application uses for dry FGD by-products, Phase 1 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigham, J.; Dick, W.; Forster, L.; Hitzhusen, F.; McCoy, E.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act have spurred the development of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes, several of which produce a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction products containing sulfates and sulfites, and coal fly ash. FGD by-product materials are treated as solid wastes and must be landfilled. It is highly desirable to find beneficial reuses for these materials provided the environmental impacts are minimal and socially acceptable. Phase 1 results of a 4 and 1/2 year study to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of FGD by-products are reported. The purpose of the Phase 1 portion of the project was to characterize the chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of the FGD by-product materials obtained from various FGD technologies being developed in the state of Ohio. Phase 1 also involved the collection of baseline economic data related to the beneficial reuse of these FGD materials. A total of 58 samples were collected and analyzed. The results indicated the chemical composition of the FGD by-product materials were dominated by Ca, S, Al, and Si. Many of the elements regulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency reside primarily in the fly ash. Phase 1 results revealed that FGD by-product materials are essentially coal fly ash materials diluted with unreacted sorbent and reaction products. High volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics of their substituting for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mines). Environmental constraints to the beneficial reuse of dry FGD by-product materials, based on laboratory and leachate studies, seem to be less than for coal fly ash.

  9. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Pilot-Scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, ''Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive.'' The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemissions of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate that the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project will conduct pilot and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosage requirements to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. A third utility, to be named later, will provide the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. This topical report presents the results from the Task 2 and Task 4 pilot-scale additive tests. The Task 3 and Task 5 full-scale additive tests will be conducted later in calendar year 2006.

  10. Land application uses for dry flue gas desulfurization by-products: Phase 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dick, W.; Bigham, J.; Forster, R.; Hitzhusen, F.; Lal, R.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W.; Haefner, R.; Rowe, G.

    1999-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    New flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbing technologies create a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction product that contains sulfate and sulfite, and coal fly ash. Generally, dry FGD by-products are treated as solid wastes and disposed in landfills. However, landfill sites are becoming scarce and tipping fees are constantly increasing. Provided the environmental impacts are socially and scientifically acceptable, beneficial uses via recycling can provide economic benefits to both the producer and the end user of the FGD. A study titled ''Land Application Uses for Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products'' was initiated in December, 1990 to develop and demonstrate large volume, beneficial uses of FGD by-products. Phase 1 and Phase 2 reports have been published by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA. Phase 3 objectives were to demonstrate, using field studies, the beneficial uses of FGD by-products (1) as an amendment material on agricultural lands and on abandoned surface coal mine land, (2) as an engineering material for soil stabilization and raid repair, and (3) to assess the environmental and economic impacts of such beneficial uses. Application of dry FGD by-product to three soils in place of agricultural limestone increased alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and corn (Zea may L.) yields. No detrimental effects on soil and plant quality were observed.

  11. Avoid stainless steel failures in FGD systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, J.P.; Schillmoller, C.M.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preventing pitting and localized corrosion is the key to success where low maintenance and high reliability are rime considerations in flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) designs. Knowing when to use a stainless steel, and when not to, is crucial. Operating parameters and environmental factors greatly affect alloy performance, especially pH, temperature, and chloride and oxygen levels. Failures of stainless steels can be avoided by understanding their limits in light of these variables. This article will focus on the capabilities of Types 316L, 317L, 317LM, 317LMN, 904L, and 6% Mo stainless steels and their applications, as well as provide details on unique combination of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of the 22% Cr duplex and 25% Cr super-duplex stainless steels in acid chloride systems. Guidelines will be presented on methods to prevent intergranular corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and pitting and crevice corrosion, and what process steps can be taken to assure reasonable performance of marginal alloy selections. Emphasis will be on the lime/limestone wet scrubbing process and the quencher/absorber.

  12. FGD Additives to Segregate and Sequester Mercury in Solid Byproducts - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Searcy, K; Bltyhe, G M; Steen, W A

    2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Many mercury control strategies for U.S. coal-fired power generating plants involve co-benefit capture of oxidized mercury from flue gases treated by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. For these processes to be effective at overall mercury control, the captured mercury must not be re-emitted to the atmosphere or into surface or ground water. The project sought to identify scrubber additives and FGD operating conditions under which mercury re-emissions would decrease and mercury would remain in the liquor and be blown down from the system in the chloride purge stream. After exiting the FGD system, mercury would react with precipitating agents to form stable solid byproducts and would be removed in a dewatering step. The FGD gypsum solids, free of most of the mercury, could then be disposed or processed for reuse as wallboard or in other beneficial reuse. The project comprised extensive bench-scale FGD scrubber tests in Phases I and II. During Phase II, the approaches developed at the bench scale were tested at the pilot scale. Laboratory wastewater treatment tests measured the performance of precipitating agents in removing mercury from the chloride purge stream. Finally, the economic viability of the approaches tested was evaluated.

  13. Land application uses of dry FGD by-products. [Quarterly] report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dick, W.A.; Beeghly, J.H.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Reclamation of mine-sites with acid overburden requires the use of alkaline amendments and represents a potential high-volume use of alkaline dry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by products. In a greenhouse study, 25-cm columns of acid mine spoil were amended with two FGD by-products; lime injection multistage burners (LIMB) fly ash or pressurized fluidized bed (PFBC) fly ash at rates of 0, 4, 8, 16, and 32% by weight (0, 40, 80, 160, and 320 tons/acre). Amended spoil was covered with 20 cm of acid topsoil amended with the corresponding FGD by-product to pH 7. Column leachate pH increased with FGD amendment rate while leachate Fe, Mn, and Zn decreased, Leachate Ca, S, and Mg decreased with LIMB amendment rate and increased with PFBC amendment. Leachate concentrations of regulated metals were decreased or unaffected by FGD amendment except for Se which was increased by PFBC. Spoil pH was increased up to 8.9 by PFBC, and up to 9.2 by LIMB amendment. Spoil pH also increased with depth with FGD amendments of 16 and 32%, Yield of fescue was increased by FGD amendment of 4 to 8%. Plant tissue content of most elements was unaffected by FGD amendment rate, and no toxicity symptoms were observed. Plant Ca and Mg were increased by LIMB and PFBC respectively, while plant S, Mn and Sr were decreased. Plant Ca and B was increased by LIMB, and plant Mg and S by PFBC amendment. These results indicate dry FGD by-products are effective in ameliorating acid, spoils and have a low potential for creating adverse environmental impacts.

  14. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Task 3 Full-scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate whether the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project is conducting pilot- and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB cofired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. IPL, an AES company, provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program as cost sharing. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High-sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Plant Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. The pilot-scale tests were completed in 2005 and have been previously reported. This topical report presents the results from the Task 3 full-scale additive tests, conducted at IPL's Petersburg Station Unit 2. The Task 5 full-scale additive tests will be conducted later in calendar year 2007.

  15. Land application uses for dry FGD by-products. Phase 1, [Annual report], December 1, 1991--November 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigham, J.; Dick, W.; Forster, L.; Hitzhusen, F.; McCoy, E.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Haefner, R. [Geological Survey, Columbus, OH (United States). Water Resources Div.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act have spurred the development of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes, several of which produce a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction products containing sulfates and sulfites, and coal fly ash. Presently FGD by-product materials are treated as solid wastes and must be landfilled. However, landfill sites are becoming more scarce and tipping fees are constantly increasing. It is, therefore, highly desirable to find beneficial reuses for these materials provided the environmental impacts are minimal and socially acceptable. Phase 1 results of a 4 and 1/2 year study to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of FGD by-products are reported. The purpose of the Phase 1 portion of the project was to characterize the chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of the FGD by-product materials obtained from various FGD technologies being developed in the state of Ohio. Phase 1 also involved the collection of baseline economic data related to the beneficial reuse of these FGD materials. A total of 58 samples were collected and analyzed. In summary Phase 1 results revealed that FGD by-product materials are essentially coal fly ash materials diluted with unreacted sorbent and reaction products. High volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics of their substituting for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mines). Environmental constraints to the beneficial reuse of dry FGD byproduct materials, based on laboratory and leachate studies, seem to be less than for coal fly ash.

  16. Manufacture of ammonium sulfate fertilizer from FGD-gypsum. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, M.I.M.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Lytle, J.M. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States); Hoeft, R. [Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States); Blevins, F.Z. [Allied-Signal, Inc., Morristown, NJ (United States); Achron, F. [Southeast Marketing Chemical Process, Inc. (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this project is to assess the technical and economic feasibility for producing commercial-grade ammonium sulfate fertilizer from gypsum produced as part of limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes. This is a cooperative effort among the ISGS, the UIUC, AlliedSignal, SE-ME, Henry Fertilizer, Illinois Power Co. (IP), and Central Illinois Public Services (CIPS). Bench-scale experiments will be conducted to obtain process engineering data for manufacture of ammonium sulfate from FGD-gypsum and to help evaluate technical and economical feasibility of the process. Controlled greenhouse experiments will be conducted at UIUC to evaluate the chemical impact of the produced ammonium sulfate on soil properties. A process flow sheet will be proposed and market demand for the products will be established. An engineering team at IP will provide an independent review of the economics of the process. AlliedSignal will be involved in testing and quality evaluation of ammonium sulfate samples and is interested in an agreement to market the finished product. CIPS will provide technical assistance and samples of FGD-gypsum for the project. In this quarter, a literature study that should give detailed insight into the chemistry, process schemes, and costs of producing ammonium sulfate from gypsum is in progress at the ISGS. Acquisition of a high quality FGD-gypsum sample was completed. Collecting of the other lower grade sample was scheduled to be conducted in December. Characterization of these feed materials is in progress.

  17. Manufacture of ammonium sulfate fertilizer from FGD-gypsum. Technical report, March 1--May 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, M.I.M.; Rostam-Abadi, Ml; Lytle, J.M.; Bruinius, J.A.; Li, Y.C. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Urbana, IL (United States); Hoeft, R. [Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States); Dewey, S. [AlliedSignal-Chemicals (United States); Achorn, F. [Southeast Marketing Chem. Process INc. (SE-ME) (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Goal is to assess technical and economic feasibility for producing fertilizer-grade ammonium sulfate from gypsum produced in limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD). This is the 1st year of a 2-year program among Illinois State Geological Survey, University of Illinois (Urbana-Champaign), Allied-Signal, Marketing Chem. Process Inc., Henry Fertilizer, Illinois Power Co., and Central Illinois Public Services. In previous quarter, chemistry and process conditions were reviewed and a reactor system set up and used to conduct laboratory tests. FGD-gypsum from Abbott power plant was used. The scrubber, a Chiyoda Thoroughbred 121 FGD, produced a filter cake (98.36% gypsum and < 0.01% CaSO{sub 3}). Conversion of FGD- gypsum to ammonium sulfate was tested at 60-70{degree}C for 5-6 hr. Yield up to 82% and purity up to 95% were achieved for the ammonium sulfate production. During this quarter, more bench-scale experiments including a mass balance analysis were conducted; a yield up to 83% and up to 99% purity were achieved. A literature survey was completed and a preliminary process flow sheet was developed. Economics of the process is being estimated.

  18. Flue gas desulfurization method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Madden, Deborah A. (Canfield, OH); Farthing, George A. (Washington Township, Stark County, OH)

    1998-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined furnace limestone injection and dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system collects solids from the flue gas stream in first particulate collection device located downstream of an outlet of a convection pass of the furnace and upstream of the dry scrubber. The collected solids are diverted to the dry scrubber feed slurry preparation system to increase sulfur oxide species removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The level of lime in the feed slurry provided to the dry scrubber is thus increased, which enhances removal of sulfur oxide species in the dry scrubber. The decreased particulate loading to the dry scrubber helps maintain a desired degree of free moisture in the flue gas stream entering the dry scrubber, which enhances sulfur oxide species removal both in the dry scrubber and downstream particulate collector, normally a baghouse.

  19. Flue gas desulfurization method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Madden, Deborah A. (Canfield, OH); Farthing, George A. (Washington Township, OH)

    1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined furnace limestone injection and dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system collects solids from the flue gas stream in first particulate collection device located downstream of an outlet of a convection pass of the furnace and upstream of the dry scrubber. The collected solids are diverted to the dry scrubber feed slurry preparation system to increase sulfur oxide species removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The level of lime in the feed slurry provided to the dry scrubber is thus increased, which enhances removal of sulfur oxide species in the dry scrubber. The decreased particulate loading to the dry scrubber helps maintain a desired degree of free moisture in the flue gas stream entering the dry scrubber, which enhances sulfur oxide species removal both in the dry scrubber and downstream particulate collector, normally a baghouse.

  20. Flue gas desulfurization method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Madden, D.A.; Farthing, G.A.

    1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined furnace limestone injection and dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system collects solids from the flue gas stream in first particulate collection device located downstream of an outlet of a convection pass of the furnace and upstream of the dry scrubber. The collected solids are diverted to the dry scrubber feed slurry preparation system to increase sulfur oxide species removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The level of lime in the feed slurry provided to the dry scrubber is thus increased, which enhances removal of sulfur oxide species in the dry scrubber. The decreased particulate loading to the dry scrubber helps maintain a desired degree of free moisture in the flue gas stream entering the dry scrubber, which enhances sulfur oxide species removal both in the dry scrubber and downstream particulate collector, normally a baghouse. 5 figs.

  1. Flue gas desulfurization method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Madden, D.A.; Farthing, G.A.

    1998-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined furnace limestone injection and dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system collects solids from the flue gas stream in first particulate collection device located downstream of an outlet of a convection pass of the furnace and upstream of the dry scrubber. The collected solids are diverted to the dry scrubber feed slurry preparation system to increase sulfur oxide species removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The level of lime in the feed slurry provided to the dry scrubber is thus increased, which enhances removal of sulfur oxide species in the dry scrubber. The decreased particulate loading to the dry scrubber helps maintain a desired degree of free moisture in the flue gas stream entering the dry scrubber, which enhances sulfur oxide species removal both in the dry scrubber and downstream particulate collector, normally a baghouse. 5 figs.

  2. COAL DESULFURIZATION PRIOR TO COMBUSTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wrathall, J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    90e COAL DESULFURIZATION PRIOR TO COMBUSTION J. Wrathall, T.of coal during combustion. The process involves the additionCOAL DESULFURIZATION PRIOR TO COMBUSTION Lawrence Berkeley

  3. Economic assessment of advanced flue gas desulfurization processes. Final report. Volume 2. Appendices G, H, and I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bierman, G. R.; May, E. H.; Mirabelli, R. E.; Pow, C. N.; Scardino, C.; Wan, E. I.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a project sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). The purpose of the study was to perform an economic and market assessment of advanced flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes for application to coal-fired electric utility plants. The time period considered in the study is 1981 through 1990, and costs are reported in 1980 dollars. The task was divided into the following four subtasks: (1) determine the factors affecting FGD cost evaluations; (2) select FGD processes to be cost-analyzed; (3) define the future electric utility FGD system market; and (4) perform cost analyses for the selected FGD processes. The study was initiated in September 1979, and separate reports were prepared for the first two subtasks. The results of the latter two subtasks appear only in this final report, since the end-date of those subtasks coincided with the end-date of the overall task. The Subtask 1 report, Criteria and Methods for Performing FGD Cost Evaluation, was completed in October 1980. A slightly modified and condensed version of that report appears as Appendix B to this report. The Subtask 2 report, FGD Candidate Process Selection, was completed in January 1981, and the principal outputs of that subtask appear in Appendices C and D to this report.

  4. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2002-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period July 1, 2002 through September 30, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates in a stable form with the byproducts from the FGD system. The coprecipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project will test previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, so as to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the fourth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, most of the project efforts were related to completing, installing and starting up the pilot unit, completing laboratory runs to size catalysts, and procuring catalysts for the pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

  5. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2002-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period April 1, 2002 through June 30, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates in a stable form with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project will test previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, so as to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the third full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, most of the project efforts were related to constructing the pilot unit and conducting laboratory runs to help size catalysts for the pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these two efforts.

  6. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period October 1, 2002 through December 31, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future fullscale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the fifth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included starting up the pilot unit with three catalysts at the first site, conducting catalyst activity measurements, completing comprehensive flue gas sampling and analyses, and procuring additional catalysts for the pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

  7. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe; MariJon Owens

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final report for DOE-NETL Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project has been to demonstrate the use of two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additives, Evonik Degussa Corporation's TMT-15 and Nalco Company's Nalco 8034, to prevent the re-emission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project was intended to demonstrate whether such additives can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project involved pilot- and full-scale tests of the additives in wet FGD absorbers. The tests were intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} re-emissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Powder River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, Luminant Power (was TXU Generation Company LP), Southern Company, IPL (an AES company), Evonik Degussa Corporation and the Nalco Company. Luminant Power provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests and project cost sharing. Southern Company provided the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems tested, and project cost sharing. IPL provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Evonik Degussa Corporation provided the TMT-15 additive, and the Nalco Company provided the Nalco 8034 additive. Both companies also supplied technical support to the test program as in-kind cost sharing. The project was conducted in six tasks. Of the six tasks, Task 1 involved project planning and Task 6 involved management and reporting. The other four tasks involved field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. These four tasks included: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High-sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Plant Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. The pilot-scale tests were completed in 2005 and the full-scale test using high-sulfur coal was completed in 2006; only the TMT-15 additive was tested in these efforts. The Task 5 full-scale additive tests conducted at Southern Company's Plant Yates Unit 1 were completed in 2007, and both the TMT-15 and Nalco 8034 additives were tested.

  8. Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe; Conor Braman; Katherine Dombrowski; Tom Machalek

    2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final technical report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, 'Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,' which was conducted over the time-period January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2010. The objective of this project has been to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid catalysts and/or fixed-structure mercury sorbents to promote the removal of total mercury and oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, followed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL), EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Energy (now called Luminant), Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP) and Duke Energy. URS Group was the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses fixed-structure sorbents and/or catalysts to promote the removal of total mercury and/or oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury not adsorbed is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project has tested candidate materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. Pilot-scale catalytic oxidation tests have been completed for periods of approximately 14 to19 months at three sites, with an additional round of pilot-scale fixed-structure sorbent tests being conducted at one of those sites. Additionally, pilot-scale wet FGD tests have been conducted downstream of mercury oxidation catalysts at a total of four sites. The sites include the two of three sites from this project and two sites where catalytic oxidation pilot testing was conducted as part of a previous DOE-NETL project. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests were also conducted at a fifth site, but with no catalyst or fixed-structure mercury sorbent upstream. This final report presents and discusses detailed results from all of these efforts, and makes a number of conclusions about what was learned through these efforts.

  9. Value-Added Products from FGD Sulfite-Rich Scrubber Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vivak Malhotra

    2010-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the American Coal Ash Association, about 29.25 million tons of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts were produced in the USA in 2003. Out of 29.25 million tons, 17.35 million tons were sulfite-rich scrubber materials. At present, unlike its cousin FGD gypsum, the prospect for effective utilization of sulfite-rich scrubber materials is not bright. In fact, almost 16.9 million tons are leftover every year. In our pursuit to mitigate the liability of sulfite-rich FGD scrubber materials' disposal, we are attempting to develop value-added products that can commercially compete. More specifically, for this Innovative Concept Phase I project, we have the following objectives: to characterize the sulfite-rich scrubber material for toxic metals; to optimize the co-blending and processing of scrubber material and natural byproducts; to formulate and develop structural composites from sulfite-rich scrubber material; and to evaluate the composites' mechanical properties and compare them with current products on the market. After successfully demonstrating the viability of our research, a more comprehensive approach will be proposed to take these value-added materials to fruition.

  10. Advanced fuel gas desulfurization (AFGD) demonstration project. Technical progress report No. 19, July 1, 1994--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The {open_quotes}Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) Demonstration Project{close_quotes} is a $150.5 million cooperative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy and Pure Air, a general partnership of Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries America, Inc. The AFGD process is one of several alternatives to conventional flue gas desulfurization (FGD) being demonstrated under the Department of Energy`s Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. The AFGD demonstration project is located at the Northern Indiana Public Service Company`s Bailly Generating Station, about 12 miles northeast of Gary, Indiana.

  11. COAL DESULFURIZATION PRIOR TO COMBUSTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wrathall, J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corporation, 5-25~79. on Coal Liquefaction at ChevronHamersma, et a L, "Meyers Process for Coal Desulfurization,"in Wheelock, Coal Desulfurization, ACS Symp. Ser 64 (1977(.

  12. Mechanistic understanding of microbial desulfurization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abín-Fuentes, Andrés

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The increasing global levels of sulfur content in crude oil have motivated the development of alternate desulfurization technologies. Microbial desulfurization or biodesulfurization (BDS) has gained interest due to the ...

  13. FGD gypsum's place in American agriculture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haynes, C. [US Department of Agriculture (United States). Agricultural Research Service

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface cracks and soil clumps form when saline-sodic, high-clay soil dries out. Treatment with FGD gypsum and irrigation water flowing into these cracks leaches salts until the aggregates swell and the cracks close up. The article describes research projects to develop agricultural uses of FGD gypsum from coal-fired power plants that have been conducted by university researchers and USDA-Agricultural Research Service scientists.

  14. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,'' during the time period January 1, 2003 through March 31, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project cofunders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the sixth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included continued operation of the pilot unit with three catalysts, conducting catalyst activity measurements, and procuring the fourth catalyst, all for the GRE Coal Creek pilot unit site. Laboratory efforts were also conducted to support catalyst selection for the second pilot unit site, at CPS' Spruce Plant. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

  15. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,'' during the time-period April 1, 2003 through June 30, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project cofunders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for approximately 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the seventh full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included continued operation of the first pilot unit, conducting catalyst activity measurements, installing sonic horns for on-line catalyst cleaning, and installing the fourth catalyst, all for the GRE Coal Creek site. CPS began installation of the second mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit at their Spruce Plant during the quarter. Laboratory efforts were conducted to support catalyst selection for that second pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

  16. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2002-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates in a stable form with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project will test previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, so as to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the first full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, most of the project efforts were related to project initiation and planning. There is no significant technical progress to report for the current period.

  17. Design, maintenance extend FGD system slurry valve life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeMay, B. [St. John`s River Power Park, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Willyard, B. [Grand River Dam Authority, Chouteau, OK (United States); Polasek, S. [Lower Colorado River Authority, Austin, TX (United States); Clarkson, C.W. [Clarkson Co., Sparks, NV (United States)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes how power plants in Florida, Oklahoma and Texas adopted improved maintenance techniques and sought better design criteria to gain greater slurry valve reliability. Slurry valves, a vital part of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system, are critical to a power plant`s ability to meet or exceed acid rain emission requirements. The performance and reliability of these valves can significantly affect unit operation and load capacity. For example, slurry valves installed on the suction and discharge ends of scrubber tower pumps are a main point of isolation. When these valves malfunction, the scrubber tower must be shut down. Problems with valves that control the feed system and reaction tank alter slurry pH and density, and also affect unit load. In addition, a single valve that serves dual-pumping systems from the slurry storage tank to the reaction tank can cause a system outage. Because of their key role in system operation, specific maintenance approaches were developed at several power plants to improve slurry valve reliability and run times.

  18. Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems'', during the time-period January 1 through March 31, 2006. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, and the use of a wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system downstream to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project is being co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory, EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Generation Company LP, the Southern Company, and Duke Energy. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified catalyst materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for approximately 14 months or longer at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests are being conducted periodically at each site to confirm the ability to scrub the catalytically oxidized mercury at high efficiency. This is the ninth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts primarily consisted of operating the catalyst pilot units at the TXU Generation Company LP's Monticello Steam Electric Station and at Georgia Power's Plant Yates. Two catalyst activity measurement trips were made to Plant Yates during the quarter. This Technical Progress Report presents catalyst activity results from the oxidation catalyst pilot unit at Plant Yates and discusses the status of the pilot unit at Monticello.

  19. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Task 5 Full-Scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe; MariJon Owens

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additives, Evonik Degussa Corporation's TMT-15 and Nalco Company's Nalco 8034, to prevent the re-emission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate whether the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project is conducting pilot- and full-scale tests of the additives in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} re-emissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Powder River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, Luminant Power (was TXU Generation Company LP), Southern Company, IPL (an AES company), Evonik Degussa Corporation and the Nalco Company. Luminant Power has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests and cost sharing. Southern Company has provided the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems tested. IPL provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Evonik Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive, and the Nalco Company is providing the Nalco 8034 additive. Both companies are also supplying technical support to the test program as in-kind cost sharing. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High-sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Plant Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. The pilot-scale tests and the full-scale test using high-sulfur coal were completed in 2005 and 2006 and have been previously reported. This topical report presents the results from the Task 5 full-scale additive tests, conducted at Southern Company's Plant Yates Unit 1. Both additives were tested there.

  20. Utility FGD survey, January--December 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M. (IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States))

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental data for 120 flue gas desulfurization systems of fossil-fuel power plants of US electrical utilities with information on the design and performance. No text--all data.

  1. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2002-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period January 1, 2002 through March 31, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE) and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates in a stable form with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project will test previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, so as to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the second full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, most of the project efforts were related to pilot unit design and conducting laboratory runs to help select candidate catalysts. This technical progress report provides an update on these two efforts. A Test Plan for the upcoming pilot-scale evaluations was also prepared and submitted to NETL for review and comment. Since this document was already submitted under separate cover, this information is not repeated here.

  2. Full-Scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe; Jennifer Paradis

    2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents and discusses results from Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42778, 'Full-scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System,' which was conducted over the time-period July 24, 2006 through June 30, 2010. The objective of the project was to demonstrate at full scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in pulverized-coal-fired flue gas. Oxidized mercury is removed downstream in wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and collected with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI, the Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA), who also provided the host site, Great River Energy, Johnson Matthey, Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP), the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), NRG Energy, Ontario Power and Westar. URS Group was the prime contractor and also provided cofunding. The scope of this project included installing and testing a gold-based catalyst upstream of one full-scale wet FGD absorber module (about 200-MW scale) at LCRA's Fayette Power Project (FPP) Unit 3, which fires Powder River Basin coal. Installation of the catalyst involved modifying the ductwork upstream of one of three wet FGD absorbers on Unit 3, Absorber C. The FGD system uses limestone reagent, operates with forced sulfite oxidation, and normally runs with two FGD modules in service and one spare. The full-scale catalyst test was planned for 24 months to provide catalyst life data. Over the test period, data were collected on catalyst pressure drop, elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst module, and mercury capture by the downstream wet FGD absorber. The demonstration period began on May 6, 2008 with plans for the catalyst to remain in service until May 5, 2010. However, because of continual increases in pressure drop across the catalyst and concerns that further increases would adversely affect Unit 3 operations, LCRA decided to end the demonstration early, during a planned unit outage. On October 2, 2009, Unit 3 was taken out of service for a fall outage and the catalyst upstream of Absorber C was removed. This ended the demonstration after approximately 17 months of the planned 24 months of operation. This report discusses reasons for the pressure drop increase and potential measures to mitigate such problems in any future application of this technology. Mercury oxidation and capture measurements were made on Unit 3 four times during the 17-month demonstration. Measurements were performed across the catalyst and Absorber C and 'baseline' measurements were performed across Absorber A or B, which did not have a catalyst upstream. Results are presented in the report from all four sets of measurements during the demonstration period. These results include elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst, mercury capture across Absorber C downstream of the catalyst, baseline mercury capture across Absorber A or B, and mercury re-emissions across both absorbers in service. Also presented in the report are estimates of the average mercury control performance of the oxidation catalyst technology over the 17-month demonstration period and the resulting mercury control costs.

  3. Coal Liquefaction desulfurization process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a solvent refined coal liquefaction process, more effective desulfurization of the high boiling point components is effected by first stripping the solvent-coal reacted slurry of lower boiling point components, particularly including hydrogen sulfide and low molecular weight sulfur compounds, and then reacting the slurry with a solid sulfur getter material, such as iron. The sulfur getter compound, with reacted sulfur included, is then removed with other solids in the slurry.

  4. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,'' during the time-period July 1, 2003 through September 30, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project cofunders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for approximately 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the eighth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included continued operation of the first pilot unit at the GRE Coal Creek site with all four catalysts in service and sonic horns installed for on-line catalyst cleaning. During the quarter, a catalyst activity measurement trip and mercury SCEM relative accuracy tests were completed, and catalyst pressure drop was closely monitored with the sonic horns in operation. CPS completed the installation of the second mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit at their Spruce Plant during the quarter, and the four catalysts to be tested in that unit were ordered. The pilot unit was started up with two of the four catalysts in service late in August, and initial catalyst activity results were measured in late September. The other two catalysts will not become available for testing until sometime in October. This technical progress report details these efforts at both sites.

  5. The Biocatalytic Desulfurization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Nunn; James Boltz; Philip M. DiGrazia; Larry Nace

    2006-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The material in this report summarizes the Diversa technical effort in development of a biocatalyst for the biodesulfurization of Petro Star diesel as well as an economic report of standalone and combined desulfurization options, prepared by Pelorus and Anvil, to support and inform the development of a commercially viable process. We will discuss goals of the projected as originally stated and their modification as guided by parallel efforts to evaluate commercialization economics and process parameters. We describe efforts to identify novel genes and hosts for the generation of an optimal biocatalyst, analysis of diesel fuels (untreated, chemically oxidized and hydrotreated) for organosulfur compound composition and directed evolution of enzymes central to the biodesulfurization pathway to optimize properties important for their use in a biocatalyst. Finally we will summarize the challenges and issues that are central to successful development of a viable biodesulfurization process.

  6. Value-Added Products From FGD Sulfite-Rich Scrubber Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vivak M. Malhotra

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Massive quantities of sulfite-rich flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber materials are produced every year in the USA. In fact, at present, the production of wet sulfite-rich scrubber cake outstrips the production of wet sulfate-rich scrubber cake by about 6 million tons per year. However, most of the utilization focus has centered on FGD gypsum. Therefore, we have recently initiated research on developing new strategies for the economical, but environmentally-sound, utilization of sulfite-rich scrubber material. In this exploratory project (Phase I), we attempted to ascertain whether it is feasible to develop reconstituted wood replacement products from sulfite-rich scrubber material. In pursuit of this goal, we characterized two different wet sulfite-rich scrubber materials, obtained from two power plants burning Midwestern coal, for their suitability for the development of value-added products. The overall strategy adopted was to fabricate composites where the largest ingredient was scrubber material with additional crop materials as additives. Our results suggested that it may be feasible to develop composites with flexural strength as high as 40 MPa (5800 psi) without the addition of external polymers. We also attempted to develop load-bearing composites from scrubber material, natural fibers, and phenolic polymer. The polymer-to-solid ratio was limited to {le} 0.4. The formulated composites showed flexural strengths as high as 73 MPa (10,585 psi). We plan to harness the research outcomes from Phase I to develop parameters required to upscale our value-added products in Phase II.

  7. Desulfurization apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rong, Charles; Jiang, Rongzhong; Chu, Deryn

    2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for desulfurization comprising first and second metal oxides; a walled enclosure having an inlet and an exhaust for the passage of gas to be treated; the first and second metal oxide being combinable with hydrogen sulfide to produce a reaction comprising a sulfide and water; the first metal oxide forming a first layer and the second metal oxide forming a second layer within the walled surroundings; the first and second layers being positioned so the first layer removes the bulk amount of the hydrogen sulfide from the treated gas prior to passage through the second layer, and the second layer removes substantially all of the remaining hydrogen sulfide from the treated gas; the first metal oxide producing a stoichiometrical capacity in excess of 500 mg sulfur/gram; the second metal oxide reacts with the hydrogen sulfide more favorably but has a stoichometrical capacity which is less than the first reactant; whereby the optimal amount by weight of the first and second metal oxides is achieved by utilizing two to three units by weight of the first metal oxide for every unit of the second metal oxide.

  8. Performance history over 10 years of super duplex stainless steel in flue gas desulfurization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bendall, K.C. [Langley Alloys Ltd., Maidenhead (United Kingdom)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    25 Cr duplex (austenitic/ferritic) stainless steel containing copper and nitrogen offers a cost effective solution to material selection for pollution control equipment. The properties of duplex stainless steel which make it suitable for this type of application are discussed and long term performance histories presented. It is concluded that high alloy duplex steel has an important role to play in the production of low maintenance reliable equipment for FGD and other pollution control systems.

  9. Production development and utilization of Zimmer Station wet FGD by-products. Final report. Volume 4, A laboratory study conducted in fulfillment of Phase 2, Objective 1 titled: Inhibition of acid production in coal refuse amended with calcium sulfite and calcium sulfate - containing FGD solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Control of S02 emission from coal combustion requires desulfurization of coal before its combustion to produce coal refuse. Alternatively, gaseous emissions from coal combustion may be scrubbed to yield flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products that include calcium sulfite (CaSO3?0.5H2O or simply CaS03). Acid production in coal refuse due to pyrite oxidation and disposal of large amounts of FGD can cause environmental degradation. Addition of CaS03 and CaS03-containing FGD to coal refuse may reduce the amounts of oxygen and ferric ion available to oxidize pyrite because the sulfite moiety in CaS03 is a strong reductant and thus may mitigate acid production in coal refuse. In Chapter 1, it was shown that CaS03 efficiently scavenged dissolved oxygen and ferric ion in water under the conditions commonly encountered in a coal refuse disposal environment. In the presence ofCaS03, the concentration of dissolved oxygen in water exposed to the atmosphere declined to below 0.01 mg L"1 at pH <8.0. In Chapter 2, it was demonstrated that CaS03 prevented a pH drop in coal refuse slurry when 0.2 gCaS03 was added to a 2% fresh coal refuse slurry every three days. Calcium sulfite also inhibited acid leaching from fresh coal refuse in bench-scale columns under controlled conditions. During the initial 13 weeks of leaching, the total amounts of titratable acidity, soluble H\\ Fe, and Al from CaS03-treated refuse (6.4 gin 50 g fresh coal refuse) were only 26%,10%, 32%, and 39% of those of the control columns, respectively. A combination of CaS03 with CaC03 or fly ash enhanced the inhibitory effect of CaS03 on acid leaching. Calcium sulfite-containing FGD which combined CaS03, CaC03, fly ash, and gypsum showed a much stronger inhibitory effect on acid leaching than CaS03 alone. This combination effect was partially due to the positive interaction of CaS03 with CaC03 and fly ash on inhibition of acid leaching. In Chapter 3, CaS03-containing FGD was found to inhibit acid leaching from both fresh and aged coal refuse in large scale columns under simulated field conditions. During 39 weeks of leaching, the reduction of leachate acidity and Fe concentration and the increase ofleachate pH were significant (p <0.05) for the 22% FGD treatment with a linear response to increasing FGD rates (0%, 5.5%, 11%, and 22%). I conclude that CaS03 and CaS03-containing FGD have the ability to inhibit acid production in coal refuse and the inhibitory effect shown in this experiment is likely to occur under field conditions. Thus, the research results present a potential new method for mitigation of acid production in coal refuse and another beneficial utilization of FGD by-products.

  10. Coke oven gas desulfurization: at Republic Steel's New Coking Facility, Warren, OH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boak, S.C.; Prucha, D.G.; Turic, H.L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our performance test indicates that the Sulfiban process is an effective method for removing H/sub 2/S from coke-oven gas. The process is able to handle variations in coke-oven gas flow and composition. Continuing efforts are underway to maintain optimum desulfurization conditions while trying to reduce waste production and MEA consumption. The problems which have prevented us from operating continuously have given us a better understanding of the process. This has contributed to better plant operations and greater equipment reliability for us to obtain continuous coke-oven gas desulfurization. 2 figures, 1 table.

  11. Low temperature aqueous desulfurization of coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slegeir, W.A.; Healy, F.E.; Sapienza, R.S.

    1985-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention describes a chemical process for desulfurizing coal, especially adaptable to the treatment of coal-water slurries, at temperatures as low as ambient, comprising treating the coal with aqueous titanous chloride whereby hydrogen sulfide is liberated and the desulfurized coal is separated with the conversion of titanous chloride to titanium oxides.

  12. Utility FGD survey, January--December 1989. Volume 2, Design performance data for operating FGD systems: Part 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M. [IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental data for 120 flue gas desulfurization systems of fossil-fuel power plants of US electrical utilities with information on the design and performance. No text--all data.

  13. Supercritical Water desulfurization of crude oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kida, Yuko

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supercritical Water (SCW) desulfurization was investigated for both model sulfur compounds and Arab Heavy crude. In part 1, the reactions of alkyl sulfides in SCW were studied. During hexyl sulfide decomposition in SCW, ...

  14. Selenium Speciation and Management in Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Searcy, K; Richardson, M; Blythe, G; Wallschlaeger, D; Chu, P; Dene, C

    2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses results from bench- and pilot-scale simulation tests conducted to determine the factors that impact selenium speciation and phase partitioning in wet FGD systems. The selenium chemistry in wet FGD systems is highly complex and not completely understood, thus extrapolation and scale-up of these results may be uncertain. Control of operating parameters and application of scrubber additives have successfully demonstrated the avoidance or decrease of selenite oxidation at the bench and pilot scale. Ongoing efforts to improve sample handling methods for selenium speciation measurements are also discussed. Bench-scale scrubber tests explored the impacts of oxidation air rate, trace metals, scrubber additives, and natural limestone on selenium speciation in synthetic and field-generated full-scale FGD liquors. The presence and concentration of redox-active chemical species as well as the oxidation air rate contribute to the oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) conditions in FGD scrubbers. Selenite oxidation to the undesirable selenate form increases with increasing ORP conditions, and decreases with decreasing ORP conditions. Solid-phase manganese [Mn(IV)] appeared to be the significant metal impacting the oxidation of selenite to selenate. Scrubber additives were tested for their ability to inhibit selenite oxidation. Although dibasic acid and other scrubber additives showed promise in early clear liquor (sodium based and without calcium solids) bench-scale tests, these additives did not show strong inhibition of selenite oxidation in tests with higher manganese concentrations and with slurries from full-scale wet FGD systems. In bench-tests with field liquors, addition of ferric chloride at a 250:1 iron-to-selenium mass ratio sorbed all incoming selenite to the solid phase, although addition of ferric salts had no impact on native selenate that already existed in the field slurry liquor sample. As ORP increases, selenite may oxidize to selenate more rapidly than it sorbs to ferric solids. Though it was not possible to demonstrate a decrease in selenium concentrations to levels below the project�¢����s target of 50 ���µg/L during pilot testing, some trends observed in bench-scale testing were evident at the pilot scale. Specifically, reducing oxidation air rate and ORP tends to either retain selenium as selenite in the liquor or shift selenium phase partitioning to the solid phase. Oxidation air flow rate control may be one option for managing selenium behavior in FGD scrubbers. Units that cycle load widely may find it more difficult to impact ORP conditions with oxidation air flow rate control alone. Because decreasing oxidation air rates to the reaction tank showed that all �¢����new�¢��� selenium reported to the solids, the addition of ferric chloride to the pilot scrubber could not show further improvements in selenium behavior. Ferric chloride addition did shift mercury to the slurry solids, specifically to the fine particles. Several competing pathways may govern the reporting of selenium to the slurry solids: co-precipitation with gypsum into the bulk solids and sorption or co-precipitation with iron into the fine particles. Simultaneous measurement of selenium and mercury behavior suggests a holistic management strategy is best to optimize the fate of both of these elements in FGD waters. Work conducted under this project evaluated sample handling and analytical methods for selenium speciation in FGD waters. Three analytical techniques and several preservation methods were employed. Measurements of selenium speciation over time indicated that for accurate selenium speciation, it is best to conduct measurements on unpreserved, filtered samples as soon after sampling as possible. The capital and operating costs for two selenium management strategies were considered: ferric chloride addition and oxidation air flow rate control. For ferric chloride addition, as migh

  15. Exploring the Mechanism of Biocatalyst Inhibition in Microbial Desulfurization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abin-Fuentes, Andres

    Microbial desulfurization, or biodesulfurization (BDS), of fuels is a promising technology because it can desulfurize compounds that are recalcitrant to the current standard technology in the oil industry. One of the ...

  16. Rubber lining for FGD scrubbers for waste incinerator plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rullmann, H.E. [Smith Corrosion Services, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flue gas desulfurization scrubbers for waste incineration plants can be lined with soft rubber or hard rubber for corrosion protection. Hard rubber is cured under high temperature and pressure in an autoclave. The advantage of hard rubber is the excellent temperature and chemical resistance. The authors have experience with hard rubber lined scrubbers that are in service without failures for over 20 years.

  17. Method for desulfurization of coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kelland, David R. (Lexington, MA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and apparatus for desulfurizing coal which removes sulfur in the inorganic and organic form by preferentially heating the inorganic iron sulfides in coal in a flowing gas to convert some of the inorganic iron sulfides from a pyrite form FeS.sub.2 to a troilite FeS form or a pyrrhotite form Fe.sub.1-x S and release some of the sulfur as a gaseous compound. The troilite and pyrrhotite forms are convenient catalyst for removing the organic sulfur in the next step, which is to react the coal with chemical agents such as alcohol, thus removing the organic sulfur as a liquid or a gas such as H.sub.2 S. The remaining inorganic sulfur is left in the predominantly higher magnetic form of pyrrhotite and is then removed by magnetic separation techniques. Optionally, an organic flocculant may be added after the organic sulfur has been removed and before magnetic separation. The flocculant attaches non-pyrite minerals with the pyrrhotite for removal by magnetic separation to reduce the ash-forming contents.

  18. Method for desulfurization of coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kelland, D.R.

    1987-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and apparatus are disclosed for desulfurizing coal which removes sulfur in the inorganic and organic form by preferentially heating the inorganic iron sulfides in coal in a flowing gas to convert some of the inorganic iron sulfides from a pyrite form FeS[sub 2] to a troilite FeS form or a pyrrhotite form Fe[sub 1[minus]x]S and release some of the sulfur as a gaseous compound. The troilite and pyrrhotite forms are convenient catalyst for removing the organic sulfur in the next step, which is to react the coal with chemical agents such as alcohol, thus removing the organic sulfur as a liquid or a gas such as H[sub 2]S. The remaining inorganic sulfur is left in the predominantly higher magnetic form of pyrrhotite and is then removed by magnetic separation techniques. Optionally, an organic flocculant may be added after the organic sulfur has been removed and before magnetic separation. The flocculant attaches non-pyrite minerals with the pyrrhotite for removal by magnetic separation to reduce the ash-forming contents. 2 figs.

  19. Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Rhudy

    2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report presents and discusses results from a mercury control process development project entitled ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems''. The objective of this project was to demonstrate at pilot scale a mercury control technology that uses solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. Oxidized mercury is removed in downstream wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and leaves with the FGD byproducts. The goal of the project was to achieve 90% oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas and 90% overall mercury capture with the downstream wet FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. Great River Energy (GRE) and City Public Service (now CPS Energy) of San Antonio were also project co-funders and provided host sites. URS Group, Inc. was the prime contractor. Longer-term pilot-scale tests were conducted at two sites to provide catalyst life data. GRE provided the first site, at their Coal Creek Station (CCS), which fires North Dakota lignite, and CPS Energy provided the second site, at their Spruce Plant, which fires Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. Mercury oxidation catalyst testing began at CCS in October 2002 and continued through the end of June 2004, representing nearly 21 months of catalyst operation. An important finding was that, even though the mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit was installed downstream of a high-efficiency ESP, fly ash buildup began to plug flue gas flow through the horizontal catalyst cells. Sonic horns were installed in each catalyst compartment and appeared to limit fly ash buildup. A palladium-based catalyst showed initial elemental mercury oxidation percentages of 95% across the catalyst, declining to 67% after 21 months in service. A carbon-based catalyst began with almost 98% elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst, but declined to 79% oxidation after nearly 13 months in service. The other two catalysts, an SCR-type catalyst (titanium/vanadium) and an experimental fly-ash-based catalyst, were significantly less active. The palladium-based and SCR-type catalysts were effectively regenerated at the end of the long-term test by flowing heated air through the catalyst overnight. The carbon-based catalyst was not observed to regenerate, and no regeneration tests were conducted on the fourth, fly-ash-based catalyst. Preliminary process economics were developed for the palladium and carbon-based catalysts for a scrubbed, North Dakota lignite application. As described above, the pilot-scale results showed the catalysts could not sustain 90% or greater oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas for a period of two years. Consequently, the economics were based on performance criteria in a later DOE NETL solicitation, which required candidate mercury control technologies to achieve at least a 55% increase in mercury capture for plants that fire lignite. These economics show that if the catalysts must be replaced every two years, the catalytic oxidation process can be 30 to 40% less costly than conventional (not chemically treated) activated carbon injection if the plant currently sells their fly ash and would lose those sales with carbon injection. If the plant does not sell their fly ash, activated carbon injection was estimated to be slightly less costly. There was little difference in the estimated cost for palladium versus the carbon-based catalysts. If the palladium-based catalyst can be regenerated to double its life to four years, catalytic oxidation process economics are greatly improved. With regeneration, the catalytic oxidation process shows over a 50% reduction in mercury control cost compared to conventional activated carbon injection for a case where the plant sells its fly ash. At Spruce Plant, mercury oxidation catalyst testing began in September 2003 and continued through the end of April 2005, interrupted only by a

  20. Anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheth, A.C.; Strevel, S.D.; Dharmapurikar, R.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under DOE Grant No. FG22-90PC90309, the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) is contracted to further develop its anion-exchange, resin-based desulfurization concept to desulfurize alkali metal sulfates. From environmental as well as economic viewpoints, it is necessary to remove soluble sulfates from the wastes created by flue gas desulfurization systems. In order to do this economically, a low-cost desulfurization process for spent sorbents is necessary. UTSI's anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization concept is believed to satisfy these requirements.

  1. Successful corrosion protection in FGD plants utilizing rubber lining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenner, J. [Keramchemie GmbH, Siershahn (Germany); Peavy, M. [Smith Corrosion Services, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the late 1970`s--and predominantly in the mid-1980`s--when the construction of flue gas desulfurization plants in Germany was still in its early stages, both the US and Japan had already accumulated several years of experience in the operation of such plants. Whereas Japan adopted the almost exclusive use of synthetic resin coatings--usually as flake coatings--applied on carbon steel as structural material, all three corrosion protection materials mentioned here (rubber linings, synthetic resin coatings, and stainless steel coatings) were applied in the US--in addition, stainless steel was also utilized as structural material. On the other hand, in Germany the use of soft rubber linings was much more widespread. The paper discusses rubber linings as corrosion protection and the experience gained with rubber linings in flue gas desulfurization plants.

  2. ADVANCED SULFUR CONTROL CONCEPTS FOR HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. LOPEZ ORTIZ; D.P. HARRISON; F.R. GROVES; J.D. WHITE; S. ZHANG; W.-N. HUANG; Y. ZENG

    1998-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This research project examined the feasibility of a second generation high-temperature coal gas desulfurization process in which elemental sulfur is produced directly during the sorbent regeneration phase. Two concepts were evaluated experimentally. In the first, FeS was regenerated in a H2O-O2 mixture. Large fractions of the sulfur were liberated in elemental form when the H2O-O2 ratio was large. However, the mole percent of elemental sulfur in the product was always quite small (<<1%) and a process based on this concept was judged to be impractical because of the low temperature and high energy requirements associated with condensing the sulfur. The second concept involved desulfurization using CeO2 and regeneration of the sulfided sorbent, Ce2O2S, using SO2 to produce elemental sulfur directly. No significant side reactions were observed and the reaction was found to be quite rapid over the temperature range of 500°C to 700°C. Elemental sulfur concentrations (as S2) as large as 20 mol% were produced. Limitations associated with the cerium sorbent process are concentrated in the desulfurization phase. High temperature and highly reducing coal gas such as produced in the Shell gasification process are required if high sulfur removal efficiencies are to be achieved. For example, the equilibrium H2S concentration at 800°C from a Shell gas in contact with CeO2 is about 300 ppmv, well above the allowable IGCC specification. In this case, a two-stage desulfurization process using CeO2 for bulk H2S removal following by a zinc sorbent polishing step would be required. Under appropriate conditions, however, CeO2 can be reduced to non-stoichiometric CeOn (n<2) which has significantly greater affinity for H2S. Pre-breakthrough H2S concentrations in the range of 1 ppmv to 5 ppmv were measured in sulfidation tests using CeOn at 700°C in highly reducing gases, as measured by equilibrium O2 concentration, comparable to the Shell gas. Good sorbent durability was indicated in a twenty-five-cycle test. The sorbent was exposed for 58 consecutive days to temperatures between 600°C and 800°C and gas atmospheres from highly reducing to highly oxidizing without measurable loss of sulfur capacity or reactivity. In the process analysis phase of this study, a two-stage desulfurization process using cerium sorbent with SO2 regeneration followed by zinc sorbent with dilute O2 regeneration was compared to a single-stage process using zinc sorbent and O2 regeneration with SO2 in the regeneration product gas converted to elemental sulfur using the direct sulfur recovery process (DSRP). Material and energy balances were calculated using the process simulation package PRO/II. Major process equipment was sized and a preliminary economic analysis completed. Sorbent replacement rate, which is determined by the multicycle sorbent durability, was found to be the most significant factor in both processes. For large replacement rates corresponding to average sorbent lifetimes of 250 cycles or less, the single-stage zinc sorbent process with DSRP was estimated to be less costly. However, the cost of the two-stage cerium sorbent process was more sensitive to sorbent replacement rate, and, as the required replacement rate decreased, the economics of the two-stage process improved. For small sorbent replacement rates corresponding to average sorbent lifetimes of 1000 cycles or more, the two-stage cerium process was estimated to be less costly. In the relatively wide middle range of sorbent replacement rates, the relative economics of the two processes depends on other factors such as the unit cost of sorbents, oxygen, nitrogen, and the relative capital costs.

  3. Recombinant DNA encoding a desulfurization biocatalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rambosek, John (Seattle, WA); Piddington, Chris S. (Seattle, WA); Kovacevich, Brian R. (Seattle, WA); Young, Kevin D. (Grand Forks, ND); Denome, Sylvia A. (Thompson, ND)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes which encode a biocatalyst capable of desulfurizing a fossil fuel which contains organic sulfur molecules. For example, the present invention encompasses a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes of a strain of Rhodococcus rhodochrous.

  4. Recombinant DNA encoding a desulfurization biocatalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rambosek, J.; Piddington, C.S.; Kovacevich, B.R.; Young, K.D.; Denome, S.A.

    1994-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes which encode a biocatalyst capable of desulfurizing a fossil fuel which contains organic sulfur molecules. For example, the present invention encompasses a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes of a strain of Rhodococcus rhodochrous. 13 figs.

  5. Construction and startup experience for Milliken FGD Retrofit Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvilla, J.; Mahlmeister, M. [New York State Electric and Gas Corp., Binghamton, NY (United States); Buchanan, T.; Jackson, C. [Parsons Power Group, Inc., Reading, PA (United States); Watts, J. [USDOE, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under Round 4 of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Clean Coal Technology program, New York State Electric & Gas Corp. (NYSEG), in partnership with Saarbereg-Stebbins Engineering and Manufacturing Company, has retrofitted a formic acid enhanced forced oxidation wet limestone scrubber on Units 1 & 2 at the Milliken Steam Electric Station. Units 1 & 2 are 1950`s vintage Combustion Engineering tangentially fired pulverized coal units which are rated at nominal 150 MW each and operate in balanced draft mode. The FGD system for Unit 2 was placed into operation in January 1995 and the Unit 1 system in June, 1995. The project incorporates several unique aspects including low pH operation, a ceramic tile-lined cocurrent/countercurrent, split module absorber, a wet stack supported on the roof of the FGD building, and closed loop, zero liquid discharge operation producing commercial grade gypsum, and calcium chloride brine. The project objectives include 98% SO{sub 2} removal efficiency while burning high sulfur coal, the production of marketable byproducts to minimize solid waste disposal, zero wastewater discharge and space-saving design. The paper provides a brief overview of the project design, discusses construction and startup issues and presents early operating results. Process capital cost and economics of this design, procure and construct approach are reviewed relative to competing technologies.

  6. Industry-Government-University Cooperative Research Program for the Development of Structural Materials from Sulfate-Rich FGD Scrubber Sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V. M. Malhotra; Y. P. Chugh

    2003-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The main aim of our project was to develop technology, which converts flue gas desulfurization (FGD) sulfate-rich scrubber sludge into value-added decorative materials. Specifically, we were to establish technology for fabricating cost effective but marketable materials, like countertops and decorative tiles from the sludge. In addition, we were to explore the feasibility of forming siding material from the sludge. At the end of the project, we were to establish the potential of our products by generating 64 countertop pieces and 64 tiles of various colors. In pursuit of our above-mentioned goals, we conducted Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements of the binders and co-processed binders to identify their curing behavior. Using our 6-inch x 6-inch and 4-inch x 4-inch high pressure and high temperature hardened stainless steel dies, we developed procedures to fabricate countertop and decorative tile materials. The composites, fabricated from sulfate-rich scrubber sludge, were subjected to mechanical tests using a three-point bending machine and a dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA). We compared our material's mechanical performance against commercially obtained countertops. We successfully established the procedures for the development of countertop and tile composites from scrubber sludge by mounting our materials on commercial boards. We fabricated more than 64 pieces of countertop material in at least 11 different colors having different patterns. In addition, more than 100 tiles in six different colors were fabricated. We also developed procedures by which the fabrication waste, up to 30-weight %, could be recycled in the manufacturing of our countertops and decorative tiles. Our experimental results indicated that our countertops had mechanical strength, which was comparable to high-end commercial countertop materials and contained substantially larger inorganic content than the commercial products. Our moisture sensitivity test suggested that our materials were non-water wettable and did not disintegrate on submerging the product in water for at least two months. Countertop polishing techniques were also established.

  7. Production of ammonium sulfate fertilizer from FGD waste liquors. Quarterly technical report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randolph, A.D.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Unrau, E.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    During this quarterly period, an experimental investigation was performed to study the precipitation kinetics and hydrolysis characteristics of calcium imido disulfonate crystals (CaADS). The CaADS crystals were precipitated by a metathetical reaction of lime, supplied by Dravo Lime Co., with flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber waste liquor. Before approaching for the continuous Double Draw-Off (DDO) crystallization studies, the influence of a Dravo lime slurry on the precipitation characteristics of N-S compounds will be established. A series of N-S compound batch crystallization studies were completed in a wide range of pH (7.0--9.0), and the influence of pH on the amount of lime required, as well as the amount of precipitate obtained, was investigated. Although the amount of precipitate increased with increase in solution pH, the safe or optimum pH for the precipitation of CaADS lies in the vicinity of 8.2 to 8.3. For studying the crystallization characteristics of CaADS crystals, a bench scale 7.0 liter DDO crystallizer was built. DDO crystallizer is found to be superior compared to Mixed Suspension Mixed Product Removal (MSMPR) crystallizer. The precipitated crystals were analyzed for elemental composition by chemical analysis. The crystals were also examined under optical microscope for their morphological features. The present studies confirmed our prediction that N-S compounds in the waste liquor can be precipitated by a reaction with lime slurry. The precipitated crystals were mostly calcium imido disulfonate.

  8. DESULFURIZATION OF COAL MODEL COMPOUNDS AND COAL LIQUIDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wrathall, James Anthony

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pollutants Associated With Coal Combustion. • E.P.A.Control Guidelines for Coal-Derived Pollutants .Forms of Sulfur in Coal • . . . . Coal Desulfurization

  9. Desulfurization of lignite using steam and air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Glenn Allen

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with nitrogen to remove oxygen and then the drums were sealed until needed for a run. This procedure was used to prevent weathering and loss of moisture from the coal. Prior to charging, t' he lignite was sized to minus 18 mesh. The larg- er particles...DESULFURIZATION OF LIGNITE USING STEAM AND AIR A Thesis by GLENN ALLEN CARTER, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1982 Major Subject: Chemical...

  10. Desulfurization Fuel Filter | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197E T A * S H I E L DBypassDesulfurization Fuel Filter

  11. Seminole Electric FGD study reveals corrosion mechanisms, duct material performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wess, T.J.; Crum, J.R.; Shoemaker, L.E.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes how once the corrosion rates of the materials used in the construction of scrubbers are known, specifying for longevity becomes an easier task. To properly evaluate the corrosion resistance of the materials used to fabricate the ducts, dampers, structural supports and other elements of a particular system, a testing scheme that systematically exposes material samples to the many environments representing areas of varying corrosivity is ideal. Because the exact composition, pH, and temperature of liquids and vapors in these areas are usually not known, gathering and analyzing samples of these elements is a prudent part of a systems' evaluation. Field testing of this type was conducted at the Seminole Generating Station which consists of two 650-MW coal-fired electric generating units that typically burn western Kentucky and eastern Illinois sub-bituminous coal with a sulfur content up to 3% and a 0.2%--0.3% chloride content. The plant has a typical wet limestone FGD system that sprays a solution of crushed limestone downward in a vertical rubber-lined scrubber module against a rising flue gas flow stream. There are five parallel scrubber modules available and a direct chimney bypass line that is used only during start up or during emergency conditions. Specially-welded test panels containing four different alloys and two weld filler metals were used in the field tests.

  12. METC hot gas desulfurization program overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cicero, D.C.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This overview provides a frame of reference for the Morgantown Energy Technology Center`s (METC`S) on-going hot gas desulfurization research. Although there are several methods to separate contaminant gases from fuel gases, that method receiving primary development is absorption through the use of metal oxides. Research into high-temperature and high-pressure control of sulfur species includes primarily those sorbents made of mixed-metal oxides, which offer the advantages of regenerability. These are predominantly composed of zinc and are made into media that can be utilized in reactors of either fixed-bed, moving-bed, fluidized-bed, or transport configurations. Zinc Ferrite (ZnO-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), Zinc Titanate (ZnO-TiO{sub 2}), Z-SORP{reg_sign}, and METC-2/METC-6 are the current mixed-metal sorbents being investigated. The METC desulfurization program is composed of three major components: bench-scale research, pilot-plant operation, and demonstration that is a portion of the Clean Coal Demonstration projects.

  13. A NOVEL APPROACH TO CATALYTIC DESULFURIZATION OF COAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John G. Verkade

    1998-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The nonionic superbase P(MeNCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}){sub 3}N (A) efficiently desulfurizes trisulfides to disulfides and monosulfides, disulfides to monosulfides, and propylene sulfide to propene. S=P(MeNCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}){sub 3}N (B) was formed as the sulfur acceptor. P(NMe{sub 2}){sub 3} was a much poorer desulfurizing agent than A under the same reaction conditions. Thiocyanates and triphenylphosphine sulfide were also desulfurized with A, but N-(phenylthio)phthalimide formed [A-SP]{sup +} phthalimide in quantitative yield.

  14. Anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheth, A.C.; Strevel, S.D.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) has been directed to further develop an anion-exchange, resin-based desulfurization concept. It is necessary that the soluble sulfates of alkali metal sorbents be desulfurized (regenerated) and recycled to make regenerative flue gas desulfurization options more attractive. In order to achieve this, a low-temperature, low-cost desulfurization process to reactivate spent alkali metal sorbents is necessary. UTSI's anion-exchange, resin-based concept is believed to satisfy this requirement. Investigators will perform the following investigations: screening of commercially available resins; process variables study and improving resin performance; optimization of resin-regeneration; evaluation of performance enhancers; development of Best-Process Schematic and related economics; and planing for proof-of-concept (POC) scale testing. 2 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. ADVANCED SULFUR CONTROL CONCEPTS FOR HOT GAS DESULFURIZATION TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to develop a hot-gas desulfurization process scheme for control of H{sub 2}S in HTHP coal gas that can be more simply and economically integrated with known regenerable sorbents in DOE/METC-sponsored work than current leading hot-gas desulfurization technologies. In addition to being more economical, the process scheme to be developed must yield an elemental sulfur byproduct.

  16. The Gonzaga desulfurization flue gas process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelleher, R.L.; O'Leary, T.J.; Shirk, I.A.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gonzaga desulfurization flue gas process removes sulfur dioxide from a flue by cold water scrubbing. Sulfur dioxide is significantly more soluable in cold water (35/sup 0/F to 60/sup 0/F) than in warm water (100/sup 0/F). Sulfur dioxide reacts in water similarly as carbon dioxide reacts in water, in that both gasses are released from the water as the temperature of the water increases. The researchers at the Gonzaga University developed this process from the observations and techniques used in studying the acid and aldehyde concentrations in flue gasses with varying of fuel to air ratios. The apparatus was fixed to a stationary engine and a gas/oil fired boiler. The flue gas was cooled to the dew point temperature of the air entering the combustion chamber on the pre-air heater. The system is described in two parts: the energies required for cooling in the scrubbing section and the energies required in the treatment section. The cold flue gas is utilized in cooling the scrubber section.

  17. Selecting the right pumps and valves for flue gas desulfurization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellis, D.; Ahluwalia, H. [ITT Engineered Valves, Lancaster, PA (United States)

    2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Limestone slurry needs to move efficiently through a complex process, meaning that selecting the right pumps and valves is critical. The article discusses factors to consider in selecting pumps and values for flue gas desulfurization process in coal-fired power plants. 2 photos.

  18. DEEP DESULFURIZATION OF DIESEL FUELS BY A NOVEL INTEGRATED APPROACH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiaoliang Ma; Michael Sprague; Lu Sun; Chunshan Song

    2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to reduce the sulfur level in liquid hydrocarbon fuels for environmental protection and fuel cell applications, deep desulfurization of a model diesel fuel and a real diesel fuel was conducted by our SARS (selective adsorption for removing sulfur) process using the adsorbent A-2. Effect of temperature on the desulfurization process was examined. Adsorption desulfurization at ambient temperature, 24 h{sup -1} of LHSV over A-2 is efficient to remove dibenzothiophene (DBT) in the model diesel fuel, but difficult to remove 4-methyldibenzothiophene (4-MDBT) and 4,6-dimethyl-dibenzothiophene (4,6-DMDBT). Adsorption desulfurization at 150 C over A-2 can efficiently remove DBT, 4-MDBT and 4,6-DMDBT in the model diesel fuel. The sulfur content in the model diesel fuel can be reduced to less than 1 ppmw at 150 C without using hydrogen gas. The adsorption capacity corresponding to the break-through point is 6.9 milligram of sulfur per gram of A-2 (mg-S/g-A-2), and the saturate capacity is 13.7 mg-S/g-A-2. Adsorption desulfurization of a commercial diesel fuel with a total sulfur level of 47 ppmw was also performed at ambient temperature and 24 h{sup -1} of LHSV over the adsorbent A-2. The results show that only part of the sulfur compounds existing in the low sulfur diesel can be removed by adsorption over A-2 at such operating conditions, because (1) the all sulfur compounds in the low sulfur diesel are the refractory sulfur compounds that have one or two alkyl groups at the 4- and/or 6-positions of DBT, which inhibit the approach of the sulfur atom to the adsorption site; (2) some compounds coexisting in the commercial low sulfur diesel probably inhibit the interaction between the sulfur compounds and the adsorbent. Further work in determining the optimum operating conditions and screening better adsorbent is desired.

  19. Control of acid mist emissions from FGD systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahlin, R S [Southern Research Inst., Birmingham, AL (United States)] [Southern Research Inst., Birmingham, AL (United States); Brown, T D [USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)] [USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved control of acid mist emissions can be achieved by replacing or augmenting the conventional mist eliminators with a wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP). This paper describes a two-phased study performed to determine the degree of control that can be achieved with this approach. Phase I was a study of the electrical operation of a lab-scale WESP collecting an acid mist from a coal combustion pilot plant equipped with a spray chamber. The results of this study were used to develop and validate a computer model of the WESP. In Phase II, measurements were made at two utility scrubber installations to determine the loadings of acid mist, fly ash, and scrubber carryover. These measurements were used as input to the model to project the performance of a retrofitted WESP.

  20. DEEP DESULFURIZATION OF DIESEL FUELS BY A NOVEL INTEGRATED APPROACH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiaoliang Ma; Uday Turaga; Shingo Watanabe; Subramani Velu; Chunshan Song

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is to explore a new desulfurization system concept, which consists of efficient separation of the refractory sulfur compounds from diesel fuel by selective adsorption, and effective hydrodesulfurization of the concentrated fraction of the refractory sulfur compounds in diesel fuels. Our approaches focused on (1) selecting and developing new adsorbents for selective adsorption of sulfur or sulfur compounds in commercial diesel fuel; (2) conducting the adsorption desulfurization of model fuels and real diesel fuels by the selective-adsorption-for-removing-sulfur (PSUSARS) process over various developed adsorbents, and examining the adsorptive desulfurization performance of various adsorbents; (3) developing and evaluating the regeneration methods for various spent adsorbent; (4) developing new catalysts for hydrodesulfurization of the refractory sulfur existing in the commercial diesel fuel; (5) on the basis of the fundamental understanding of the adsorptive performance and regeneration natures of the adsorbents, further confirming and improving the conceptual design of the novel PSU-SARS process for deep desulfurization of diesel fuel Three types of adsorbents, the metal-chloride-based adsorbents, the activated nickel-based adsorbents and the metal-sulfide-based adsorbents, have been developed for selective adsorption desulfurization of liquid hydrocarbons. All of three types of the adsorbents exhibit the significant selectivity for sulfur compounds, including alkyl dibenzothiophenes (DBTs), in diesel fuel. Adsorption desulfurization of real diesel fuels (regular diesel fuel (DF), S: 325 ppmw; low sulfur diesel fuel (LSD-I), S: 47 ppmw) over the nickel-based adsorbents (A-2 and A-5) has been conducted at different conditions by using a flowing system. The adsorption capacity of DF over A-2 corresponding to an outlet sulfur level of 30 ppmw is 2.8 mg-S/g-A. The adsorption capacity of LSD-I over A-5 corresponding to the break-through point at 5.0 ppmw sulfur level is 0.35 mg-S/g-A. The spent A-5 can be regenerated by using H2 gas at a flowing rate of 40-50 ml/min, 500 C, and ambient pressure. Adsorption desulfurization of model diesel fuels over metal-sulfide-based adsorbents (A-6-1 and A-6-2) has been conducted at different temperatures to examine the capacity and selectivity of the adsorbents. A regeneration method for the spent metal-sulfide-based adsorbents has been developed. The spent A-6-1 can be easily regenerated by washing the spent adsorbent with a polar solvent followed by heating the adsorbent bed to remove the remainder solvent. Almost all adsorption capacity of the fresh A-6-1 can be recovered after the regeneration. On the other hand, a MCM-41-supported HDS catalyst was developed for deep desulfurization of the refractory sulfur compounds. The results show that the developed MCM-41-supported catalyst demonstrates consistently higher activity for the HDS of the refractory dibenzothiophenic sulfur compounds than the commercial catalyst. On the basis of the fundamental understanding of the adsorptive performance and regeneration natures of the adsorbents, the conceptual design of the novel PSU-SARS process for deep desulfurization of diesel fuel is confirmed and improved further.

  1. anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Flue Gas Desulfurization GT Gas Turbine HHV Higher Heating Values HCN Hydrogen Cyanide HRSG Heat Recovery Steam Generation... ? Nuclear Power Plants ? Solar Power Plants ? Wind...

  2. Desulfurization Effects on a Light-Duty Diesel Vehicle NOx Adsorber Exhaust Emission Control System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tatur, M.; Tomazic, D.; Tyrer, H.; Thornton, M.; Kubsh, J.

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analyzes the effects on gaseous emissions, before and after desulfurization, on a light-duty diesel vehicle with a NOx adsorber catalyst.

  3. Hot coal gas desulfurization with manganese-based sorbents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hepworth, M.T.; Ben-Slimane, R.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary major deposit of manganese in the US which can be readily mined by an in situ process is located in the Emily district of Minnesota. The US Bureau of Mines Research Centers at both the Twin Cities and Salt Lake City have developed a process for extracting and refining manganese in the form of a high-purity carbonate product. This product has been formulated into pellets by a multi-step process of drying, calcination, and induration to produce relatively high-strength formulations which are capable of being used for hot fuel gas desulfurization. These pellets, which have been developed at the University of Minnesota under joint sponsorship of the US Department of Energy and the US Bureau of Mines, appear superior to other, more expensive, formulations of zinc titanate and zinc ferrite which have previously been studied for multi-cycle loading (desulfurization) and regeneration (evolution of high-strength SO{sub 2} and restoration of pellet reactivity). Although these other formulations have been under development for the past twelve years, their prices still exceed $7 per pound. If manganese pellets perform as predicted in fixed bed testing, and if a significant number of utilities which burn high-sulfur coals incorporate combined-cycle gasification with hot coal gas desulfurization as a viable means of increasing conversion efficiencies, then the potential market for manganese pellets may be as high as 200,000 tons per year at a price not less than $3 per pound. This paper discusses the role of manganese pellets in the desulfurization process with respect to the integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) for power generation.

  4. Desulfurization of Texas lignite using steam and air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, Robert Reginald

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OESULFURIZATION OF TEXAS LIGNITE USI, IG STEA 1 ANO AIR A Thesis by ROSERT REGINALD STONE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AIIN University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of , 'RASTER OF SCIENCE August 1981... Major Subject: Chemical Engineering DESULFURIZATION OF TEXAS LIGNITE USING STEAM AND AIR A Thesis by ROBERT REGINALD STONE Approved as to style and content by: Dr. . A . Bulli n ( Chai rman of Committee) R. G. Anthony (Member) J. W. J ni ngs ( ber...

  5. Two-stage coal gasification and desulfurization apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bissett, Larry A. (Morgantown, WV); Strickland, Larry D. (Morgantown, WV)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a system which effectively integrates a two-stage, fixed-bed coal gasification arrangement with hot fuel gas desulfurization of a first stream of fuel gas from a lower stage of the two-stage gasifier and the removal of sulfur from the sulfur sorbent regeneration gas utilized in the fuel-gas desulfurization process by burning a second stream of fuel gas from the upper stage of the gasifier in a combustion device in the presence of calcium-containing material. The second stream of fuel gas is taken from above the fixed bed in the coal gasifier and is laden with ammonia, tar and sulfur values. This second stream of fuel gas is burned in the presence of excess air to provide heat energy sufficient to effect a calcium-sulfur compound forming reaction between the calcium-containing material and sulfur values carried by the regeneration gas and the second stream of fuel gas. Any ammonia values present in the fuel gas are decomposed during the combustion of the fuel gas in the combustion chamber. The substantially sulfur-free products of combustion may then be combined with the desulfurized fuel gas for providing a combustible fluid utilized for driving a prime mover.

  6. Confined zone dispersion flue gas desulfurization demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the fifth quarterly report for this project. This project is divided into three phases. Phase 1, which has been completed, involved design, engineering, and procurement for the CZD system, duct and facility modifications, and supporting equipment. Phase 2, also completed, included equipment acquisition and installation, facility construction, startup, and operator training for parametric testing. Phase 3 broadly covers testing, operation and disposition, but only a portion of Phase 3 was included in Budget Period 1. That portion was concerned with parametric testing of the CZD system to establish the optimum conditions for an extended, one-year, continuous demonstration. As of December 31, 1991, the following goals have been achieved. (1) Nozzle Selection - A modified Spraying Systems Company (SSC) atomizing nozzle has been selected for the one-year continuous CZD demonstration. (2) SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] Reduction - Preliminary confirmation of 50% SO[sub 2] reduction has been achieved, but the NO[sub x] reduction target cannot be confirmed at this time. (3) Lime Selection - Testing indicated an injection rate of 40 to 50 gallons per minute with a lime slurry concentration of 8 to 10% to achieve 50% SO[sub 2] reduction. There has been no selection of the lime to be used in the one year demonstration. (4) ESP Optimization - Tests conducted to date have shown that lime injection has a very beneficial effect on ESP performance, and little adjustment may be necessary. (5) SO[sub 2] Removal Costs - Testing has not revealed any significant departure from the bases on which Bechtel's original cost estimates (capital and operating) were prepared. Therefore, SO[sub 2] removal costs are still expected to be in the range of $300/ton or less.

  7. Zevenhoven & Kilpinen SULPHUR 6.1.2004 3-25 3.10 Costs related to FGD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    ;Zevenhoven & Kilpinen SULPHUR 6.1.2004 3-26 3.11 High temperature SO2 capture during fluidised bed combustion One of the great benefits of fluidised bed combustion (FBC, 7 Chapter 2) is the option of in-situ SO2 of any of the above-mentioned FGD processes can be broken down into fixed and variable operation

  8. Zevenhoven & Kilpinen SULPHUR 13.6.2001 3-24 3.10 Costs related to FGD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    combustion One of the great benefits of fluidised bed combustion (FBC, 7 Chapter 2) is the option of in of any of the above-mentioned FGD processes can be broken down into fixed and variable operation & maintenance (O & M) costs and fixed capital charge costs (see e.g. Coulson and Richardson, 1993). For a few

  9. Anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization process. Quarterly technical progress report, Januray 1, 1992--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheth, A.C.; Strevel, S.D.; Dharmapurikar, R.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under DOE Grant No. FG22-90PC90309, the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) is contracted to further develop its anion-exchange, resin-based desulfurization concept to desulfurize alkali metal sulfates. From environmental as well as economic viewpoints, it is necessary to remove soluble sulfates from the wastes created by flue gas desulfurization systems. In order to do this economically, a low-cost desulfurization process for spent sorbents is necessary. UTSI`s anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization concept is believed to satisfy these requirements.

  10. DEEP DESULFURIZATION OF DIESEL FUELS BY A NOVEL INTEGRATED APPROACH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiaoliang Ma; Lu Sun; Chunshan Song

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to the increasingly stricter regulations for deep reduction of fuel sulfur content, development of new deep desulfurization processes for liquid transport fuels has become one of the major challenges to the refining industry and to the production of hydrocarbon fuels for fuel cell applications. The sulfur compounds in the current transport fuels corresponding to the S level of 350-500 ppm account for only about 0.12-0.25 wt % of the fuel. The conventional hydrotreating approaches will need to increase catalyst bed volume at high-temperature and high-pressure conditions for treating 100 % of the whole fuel in order to convert the fuel mass of less than 0.25 wt %. In the present study, we are exploring a novel adsorption process for desulfurization at low temperatures, which can effectively reduce the sulfur content in gasoline, jet fuel and diesel fuel at low investment and operating cost to meet the needs for ultra-clean transportation fuels and for fuel cell applications. Some adsorbents were prepared in this study for selective adsorption of sulfur compounds in the fuels. The adsorption experiments were conducted by using a model fuel and real fuels. The results show that the adsorbent (A-1) with a transition metal compound has a significant selectivity for sulfur compounds with a saturated adsorption capacity of {approx}0.12 mol of sulfur compounds per mol of the metal compound. Most sulfur compounds existing in the current commercial gasoline, jet fuel and diesel fuel can be removed by the adsorption using adsorbent A-1. On the basis of the preliminary results, a novel concept for integrated process for deep desulfurization of liquid hydrocarbons was proposed.

  11. Takahax-Hirohax process for coke oven gas desulfurization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gastwirth, H.; Miner, R.; Stengle, W.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the Takahax-Hirohax process to desulfurize coke oven gas and to produce an ammonium sulfate end product. A review is also made of current operating experience and recent technical developments. The Takahax-Hirohax process is extremely useful when the COG contains a suitable ammonia to sulfur ratio and when ammonium sulfate is a desirable end product. No contaminated effluent streams are emitted from the process. The process is simple, reliable, flexible, and responds easily to COG variations. 4 figures, 3 tables. (DP)

  12. New process for coke-oven gas desulfurization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Currey, J.H. [Citizens Gas and Coke Utility, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the EPA reclassifying spent iron oxide as a hazardous waste material in 1990, an alternative technology was sought for desulfurizing coke-oven gas. Vacasulf technology was adopted for reasons that included: producing of coke battery heating gas without further polishing and high-quality elemental sulfur; lowest operating cost in comparison with other methods; no waste products; and integrates with existing ammonia destruction facility. Vacasulf requires a single purchased material, potassium hydroxide, that reacts with carbon dioxide in coke-oven gas to form potassium carbonate which, in turn, absorbs hydrogen sulfide. Operation of the system has been successful following the resolution of relatively minor start-up problems.

  13. Methods, systems, and devices for deep desulfurization of fuel gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Liyu (Richland, WA); King, David L. (Richland, WA); Liu, Jun (Richland, WA); Huo, Qisheng (Richland, WA)

    2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A highly effective and regenerable method, system and device that enables the desulfurization of warm fuel gases by passing these warm gasses over metal-based sorbents arranged in a mesoporous substrate. This technology will protect Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalysts and other sulfur sensitive catalysts, without drastic cooling of the fuel gases. This invention can be utilized in a process either alone or alongside other separation processes, and allows the total sulfur in such a gas to be reduced to less than 500 ppb and in some instances as low as 50 ppb.

  14. Global evaluation of mass transfer effects: In-duct injection flue gas desulfurization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, J.A.; Newton, G.H.; Kramlich, J.C.; Payne, R.

    1990-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Sorbent injection is a low capital cost, low operating cost approach to SO{sub 2} control targeted primarily at older boilers for which conventional fuel gas desulfurization is not economically viable. Duct injection is one variation of this concept in which the sorbent, either a dry powder or a slurry, is injected into the cooler regions of the boiler, generally downstream of the air heaters. The attractiveness of duct injection is tied to the fact that it avoids much of the boiler heat transfer equipment and thus has minimal impact of boiler performance. Both capital and operating cost are low. This program has as its objectives three performance related issues to address: (1) experimentally identify limits on sorbent performance. (2) identify and test sorbent performance enhancement strategies. (3) develop a compute model of the duct injection process. Two major tasks are described: a laboratory-scale global experiment and development of process model. Both are aimed at understanding and quantifying the rate-limiting processes which control SO{sub 2} capture by lime slurry during boiler duct injection. 29 refs., 35 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheth, A.C.; Strevel, S.D.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the current grant (FG22-90PC90309), the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) will carry out the necessary bench scale experiments to further develop it anion-exchange, resin-based desulfurization concept to desulfurize alkali metal sulfates. In particular, it is planned to screen commercially available resins and then carry out process optimization work with three selected resins. Further optimization of the resin regeneration step as well as evaluation of the effect of various performance enhancers will then be carried out with one selected resin. A process schematic, to be developed based on the bench scale results, will be used to estimate the related economics. Some limited scope testing will also be carried out using the spent-seed and sorbent materials obtained from both the coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and the in-duct sorbent injection pilot scale facilities. During this reporting period, 90% of the planned batch mode screening experiments for the eleven samples of candidate resins were completed. Preliminary evaluation of the resulting data is continuing in order to select a smaller number (3--4) of samples for screening in the fixed-bed setup. The installation of the semi-automated fixed-bed setup is about 70% complete and shakedown experiments will be started in 3--4 weeks. Progress made in relation to these activities is presented below. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Method for enhancing the desulfurization of hot coal gas in a fluid-bed coal gasifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grindley, Thomas (Morgantown, WV)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and apparatus for providing additional desulfurization of the hot gas produced in a fluid-bed coal gasifier, within the gasifier. A fluid-bed of iron oxide is located inside the gasifier above the gasification bed in a fluid-bed coal gasifier in which in-bed desulfurization by lime/limestone takes place. The product gases leave the gasification bed typically at 1600.degree. to 1800.degree. F. and are partially quenched with water to 1000.degree. to 1200.degree. F. before entering the iron oxide bed. The iron oxide bed provides additional desulfurization beyond that provided by the lime/limestone.

  17. Flue gas desulfurization : cost and functional analysis of large-scale and proven plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilly, Jean

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flue Gas Desulfurization is a method of controlling the emission of sulfurs, which causes the acid rain. The following study is based on 26 utilities which burn coal, have a generating capacity of at least 50 Megawatts ...

  18. A NOVEL VAPOR-PHASE PROCESS FOR DEEP DESULFURIZATION OF NAPHTHA/DIESEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.S. Turk; R.P. Gupta; S.K. Gangwal

    2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Tier 2 regulations issued by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) require a substantial reduction in the sulfur content of gasoline. Similar regulations have been enacted for the sulfur level in on-road diesel and recently off-road diesel. The removal of this sulfur with existing and installed technology faces technical and economic challenges. These challenges created the opportunity for new emerging technologies. Research Triangle Institute (RTI) with subcontract support from Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc., (KBR) used this opportunity to develop RTI's transport reactor naphtha desulfurization (TReND) process. Starting with a simple conceptual process design and some laboratory results that showed promise, RTI initiated an accelerated research program for sorbent development, process development, and marketing and commercialization. Sorbent development has resulted in the identification of an active and attrition resistant sorbent that has been prepared in commercial equipment in 100 lb batches. Process development has demonstrated both the sulfur removal performance and regeneration potential of this sorbent. Process development has scaled up testing from small laboratory to pilot plant transport reactor testing. Testing in the transport reactor pilot plant has demonstrated the attrition resistance, selective sulfur removal activity, and regeneration activity of this sorbent material. Marketing and commercialization activities have shown with the existing information that the process has significant capital and operating cost benefits over existing and other emerging technologies. The market assessment and analysis provided valuable feedback about the testing and performance requirements for the technical development program. This market analysis also provided a list of potential candidates for hosting a demonstration unit. Although the narrow window of opportunity generated by the new sulfur regulations and the conservative nature of the refining industry slowed progress of the demonstration unit, negotiations with potential partners are proceeding for commercialization of this process.

  19. Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) demonstration project: Volume 2, Project performance and economics. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The project objective is to demonstrate removal of 90--95% or more of the SO{sub 2} at approximately one-half the cost of conventional scrubbing technology; and to demonstrate significant reduction of space requirements. In this project, Pure Air has built a single SO{sub 2} absorber for a 528-MWe power plant. The absorber performs three functions in a single vessel: prequencher, absorber, and oxidation of sludge to gypsum. Additionally, the absorber is of a co- current design, in which the flue gas and scrubbing slurry move in the same direction and at a relatively high velocity compared to conventional scrubbers. These features all combine to yield a state- of-the-art SO{sub 2} absorber that is more compact and less expensive than conventional scrubbers. The project incorporated a number of technical features including the injection of pulverized limestone directly into the absorber, a device called an air rotary sparger located within the base of the absorber, and a novel wastewater evaporation system. The air rotary sparger combines the functions of agitation and air distribution into one piece of equipment to facilitate the oxidation of calcium sulfite to gypsum. Additionally, wastewater treatment is being demonstrated to minimize water disposal problems inherent in many high-chloride coals. Bituminous coals primarily from the Indiana, Illinois coal basin containing 2--4.5% sulfur were tested during the demonstration. The Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) process has demonstrated removal of 95% or more of the SO{sub 2} while providing a commercial gypsum by-product in lieu of solid waste. A portion of the commercial gypsum is being agglomerated into a product known as PowerChip{reg_sign} gypsum which exhibits improved physical properties, easier flowability and more user friendly handling characteristics to enhance its transportation and marketability to gypsum end-users.

  20. KINETICS OF HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION SORBENTS FOR TRANSPORT REACTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.C. Kwon

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hot-gas desulfurization for the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process has been investigated by many researchers to remove effectively hydrogen sulfide with various metal oxide sorbents at elevated temperatures. Various metal oxide sorbents are formulated with metal oxides such as Fe, Co, Zn, and Ti. Initial reaction kinetics of formulated sorbents with hydrogen sulfide is studied in the presence of various amounts of moisture and hydrogen at various reaction temperatures. The objectives of this research are to study initial reaction kinetics for a sorbent-hydrogen sulfide heterogeneous reaction system, to investigate effects of concentrations of hydrogen sulfide, hydrogen, and moisture on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents, and to evaluate effects of temperature and sorbent amounts on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents. Experimental data on initial reaction kinetics of hydrogen sulfide with metal oxide sorbents were obtained with a 0.83-cm{sup 3} differential reactor. The reactivity of MCRH-67 was examined in this report. This sorbent was obtained from the Research Triangle Institute (RTI). The sorbent in the form of 130 mm particles are reacted with 18000-ppm hydrogen sulfide at 350-525 C. The range of space time of reaction gas mixtures is 0.069-0.088 s. The range of reaction duration is 4-180 s.

  1. Apparatus and method for the desulfurization of petroleum by bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lizama, H.M.; Scott, T.C.; Scott, C.D.

    1995-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for treating petroleum with anaerobic microorganisms acting as biocatalysts that can remove sulfur atoms from hydrocarbon molecules, under anaerobic conditions, and then convert the sulfur atoms to hydrogen sulfide. The microorganisms utilized are from the family known as the ``Sulfate Reducing Bacteria``. These bacteria generate metabolic energy from the oxidation of organic compounds, but use oxidized forms of sulfur as an electron acceptor. Because the biocatalyst is present in the form of bacteria in an aqueous suspension, whereas the reacting substrate consists of hydrocarbon molecules in an organic phase, the actual desulfurization reaction takes place at the aqueous-organic interphase. To ensure adequate interfacial contacting and mass transfer, a biphasic electrostatic bioreactor system is utilized. The bioreactor is utilized to disperse and recoalesce a biocatalyst contained in the aqueous liquid phase into the organic liquid phase containing the sulfur. High-intensity electrical fields rupture the aqueous drops into a plurality of microdroplets and induce continuous coalescence and redispersion as the microdroplets travel through the organic phase, thus increasing surface area. As the aqueous microdroplets progress through the organic phase, the biocatalyst then reacts with the sulfur to produce hydrogen sulfide which is then removed from the bioreactor. The organic liquid, now free of the sulfur, is ready for immediate use or further processing. 5 figs.

  2. Apparatus and method for the desulfurization of petroleum by bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lizama, Hector M. (Knoxville, TN); Scott, Timothy C. (Knoxville, TN); Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for treating petroleum with anaerobic microorganisms acting as biocatalysts that can remove sulfur atoms from hydrocarbon molecules, under anaerobic conditions, and then convert the sulfur atoms to hydrogen sulfide. The microorganisms utilized are from the family known as the "Sulfate Reducing Bacteria." These bacteria generate metabolic energy from the oxidation of organic compounds, but use oxidized forms of sulfur as an electron acceptor. Because the biocatalyst is present in the form of bacteria in an aqueous suspension, whereas the reacting substrate consists of hydrocarbon molecules in an organic phase, the actual desulfurization reaction takes place at the aqueous-organic interphase. To ensure adequate interfacial contacting and mass transfer, a biphasic electrostatic bioreactor system is utilized. The bioreactor is utilized to disperse and recoalesce a biocatalyst contained in the aqueous liquid phase into the organic liquid phase containing the sulfur. High-intensity electrical fields rupture the aqueous drops into a plurality of microdroplets and induce continuous coalescence and redispersion as the microdroplets travel through the organic phase, thus increasing surface area. As the aqueous microdroplets progress through the organic phase, the biocatalyst then reacts with the sulfur to produce hydrogen sulfide which is then removed from the bioreactor. The organic liquid, now free of the sulfur, is ready for immediate use or further processing.

  3. Dept. of Sol Science, UW-Madison/UW-Extension, 1525 Observatory Dr., Madison, WI 53706/608-262-0485 November 2010 Issue #2 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Teri C.

    /608-262-0485 ____________________________________________________________________________________ November 2010 Issue #2 2010 Using Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Gypsum in Wisconsin Dick Wolkowski, Birl plants burn low S coal and some have installed flue gas scrubbers to reduce sulfur emissions. Use of a wet scrubber results in the byproduct flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum. FGD gypsum is created

  4. The utilization of flue gas desulfurization waste by-products in construction brick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berryman, Charles Wayne

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    APPENDIX D. TEST PROCEDURES APPENDIX E. CONVERSION TABLES VITA 85 90 93 96 99 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page Model for FGD Waste By-Product Research Unconfined Compressive Strength for Fly Ash Mixed with Various Inductions of Portland Cement 15... properties such as weight, durability, strength, density, etc. Varying mixes of bottom ash, fly ash, portland cement, and sand will be tested for possible enhancement of the hemihydrate. Also, a mix design that best utilizes all the waste by...

  5. High Temperature Flue Gas Desulfurization In Moving Beds With Regenerable Copper Based Sorbents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cengiz, P.A.; Ho, K.K.; Abbasian, J.; Lau, F.S.

    2002-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to develop new and improved regenerable copper based sorbent for high temperature flue gas desulfurization in a moving bed application. The targeted areas of sorbent improvement included higher effective capacity, strength and long-term durability for improved process control and economic utilization of the sorbent.

  6. Bench-scale development of mild gasification char desulfurization. Technical report, 1 March--31 May 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knight, R.A. [Inst. of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to scale up a process, developed under a previous ICCI grant, for desulfurization of mild gasification char by treatment with hydrogen-rich process-derived fuel gas at 650--760 C and 7--15 atm. The char can be converted into a low-sulfur metallurgical form coke. In the prior study, IBC-105 coal with 4.0 wt% sulfur was converted to chars with less than 1.0 wt% sulfur in a laboratory-scale batch reactor. The susceptibility of the char to desulfurization was correlated with physicochemical char properties and mild gasification conditions. Acid pretreatment of the coal prior to mild gasification was also shown to significantly enhance subsequent sulfur removal. In this study, IGT is conducting continuous bench-scale tests in a 1-lb/h fluidized-bed reactor to determine the preferred process conditions and obtain steady-state data necessary for process design and scale-up. The desulfurized chars are to be used to produce low-sulfur form coke, which will be evaluated for density, reactivity, and strength properties relevant to utilization in blast furnaces. This quarter, 2,500 g of mild gasification char was produced from untreated IBC-105 coal in the bench-scale reactor. Half of this char will be subjected to sulfuric acid treatment to enhance subsequent desulfurization. Char-producing runs were also initiated with acid-pretreated coal, which will produce about 1,250 g of char.

  7. Method and apparatus for enhancing the desulfurization of hot coal gas in a fluid-bed coal gasifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grindley, T.

    1988-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and apparatus for providing additional desulfurization of the hot gas produced in a fluid-bed coal gasifier, within the gasifier is described. A fluid-bed of iron oxide is located inside the gasifier above the gasification bed in a fluid-bed coal gasifier in which in-bed desulfurization by lime/limestone takes place. The product gases leave the gasification bed typically at 1600 to 1800 F and are partially quenched with water to 1000 to 1200 F before entering the iron oxide bed. The iron oxide bed provides additional desulfurization beyond that provided by the lime /limestone. 1 fig.

  8. Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales -- Sulfur control. Topical report for Subtask 3.1, In-bed sulfur capture tests; Subtask 3.2, Electrostatic desulfurization; Subtask 3.3, Microbial desulfurization and denitrification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, M.J.; Abbasian, J.; Akin, C.; Lau, F.S.; Maka, A.; Mensinger, M.C.; Punwani, D.V.; Rue, D.M. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Gidaspow, D.; Gupta, R.; Wasan, D.T. [Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL (United States); Pfister, R.M.: Krieger, E.J. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This topical report on ``Sulfur Control`` presents the results of work conducted by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), and the Ohio State University (OSU) to develop three novel approaches for desulfurization that have shown good potential with coal and could be cost-effective for oil shales. These are (1) In-Bed Sulfur Capture using different sorbents (IGT), (2) Electrostatic Desulfurization (IIT), and (3) Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification (OSU and IGT). The objective of the task on In-Bed Sulfur Capture was to determine the effectiveness of different sorbents (that is, limestone, calcined limestone, dolomite, and siderite) for capturing sulfur (as H{sub 2}S) in the reactor during hydroretorting. The objective of the task on Electrostatic Desulfurization was to determine the operating conditions necessary to achieve a high degree of sulfur removal and kerogen recovery in IIT`s electrostatic separator. The objectives of the task on Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification were to (1) isolate microbial cultures and evaluate their ability to desulfurize and denitrify shale, (2) conduct laboratory-scale batch and continuous tests to improve and enhance microbial removal of these components, and (3) determine the effects of processing parameters, such as shale slurry concentration, solids settling characteristics, agitation rate, and pH on the process.

  9. Energy Audit Equipment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The tools (equipment) needed to perform an energy audit include those items which assist the auditor in measuring the energy used by equipment or lost in inefficiency. Each tool is designed for a specific measurement. They can be inexpensive simple...

  10. Development and evaluation of two reactor designs for desulfurization of Texas lignites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merritt, Stanley Duane

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    exhibited can be given at this time, but this behavior may be indicative of transformations of inorganic matter, changes in the forms of sulfur present in the lignite, and the overall composition. The results of this test series show a need for further...DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF TWO REACTOR DESIGNS FOR DESULFURIZATION OF TEXAS LIGNITES A Thesis by STANLEY DUANE MERRITT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  11. Preliminary evaluation of a process using plasma reactions to desulfurize heavy oils. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grimes, P.W.; Miknis, F.P.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Western Research Institute (WRI) has conducted exploratory experiments on the use of microwave-induced plasmas to desulfurize heavy oils. Batch mode experiments were conducted in a quartz reactor system using various reactive and nonreactive plasmas. In these experiments a high-sulfur asphalt was exposed to various plasmas, and the degree of conversion to distillate, gas, and solids was recorded. Products from selected experiments were analyzed to determine if the plasma exposure had resulted in a significant reduction in sulfur content. Exploratory experiments were conducted using reactive plasmas generated from hydrogen and methane and nonreactive plasmas generated from nitrogen. The effects of varying exposure duration, sample temperature, and location of the sample with respect to the plasma discharge were investigated. For comparative purposes two experiments were conducted in which the sample was heated under nitrogen with no plasma exposure. Distillates containing approximately 28% less sulfur than the feedstock represented the maximum desulfurization attained in the plasma experiments. It does not appear that plasma reactions using the simple configurations employed in this study represent a viable method for the desulfurization of heavy oils.

  12. Integrating desulfurization with CO{sub 2}-capture in chemical-looping combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solunke, Rahul; Veser, Goetz

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is an emerging technology for clean combustion. We have previously demonstrated that the embedding of metal nanoparticles into a nanostructured ceramic matrix can result in unusually active and sinter-resistant nanocomposite oxygen carrier materials for CLC which maintain high reactivity and high-temperature stability even when sulfur contaminated fuels are used in CLC. Here, we propose a novel process scheme for in situ desulfurization of syngas with simultaneous CO{sub 2}-capture in chemical looping combustion by using these robust nanocomposite oxygen carriers simultaneously as sulfur-capture materials. We found that a nanocomposite Cu-BHA carrier can indeed strongly reduce the H{sub 2}S concentration in the fuel reactor effluent. However, during the process the support matrix is also sulfidized and takes part in the redox process of CLC. This results in SO{sub 2} production during the reduction of the oxygen carrier and thus limits the degree of desulfurization attainable with this kind of carrier. Nevertheless, the results suggest that simultaneous desulfurization and CO{sub 2} capture in CLC is feasible with Cu as oxygen carrier as long as appropriate carrier support materials are chosen, and could result in a novel, strongly intensified process for low-emission, high efficiency combustion of sulfur contaminated fuel streams.

  13. Sector 1 - Equipment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    APS detector pool has a number of additional detectors Furnaces Powder diffraction furnace Infrared furnace Plate furnace Mechanical Testing Equipment The following mechanical...

  14. Process for the manufacture of an attrition resistant sorbent used for gas desulfurization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Venkataramani, Venkat S.; Ayala, Raul E.

    2003-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This process produces a sorbent for use in desulfurization of coal gas. A zinc titanate compound and a metal oxide are mixed by milling the compounds in an aqueous medium, the resulting mixture is dried and then calcined, crushed, sleved and formed into pellets for use in a moving-bed reactor. Metal oxides suitable for use as an additive in this process include: magnesium oxide, magnesium oxide plus molybdenum oxide, calcium oxide, yttrium oxide, hafnium oxide, zirconium oxide, cupric oxide, and tin oxide. The resulting sorbent has a percentage of the original zinc or titanium ions substituted for the oxide metal of the chosen additive.

  15. EPA reports advances in scrubber technology at Flue Gas Desulfurization symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smock, R.

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall message of the recent Symposium on Flue Gas Desulfurization was that the technology for sulfur dioxide scrubbing has matured enough for discussions to focus on future improvements rather than whether scrubbers work at all. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations will not change in the near future, however, unless there are changes in the Clean air Act to deal with acid rain, despite the improvements in performance data. The symposium covered reports on dual-alkali scrubbing, organic buffer additives, the probability that scrubber wastes will not be classified as hazardous, simultaneous removal of nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide, and continuous monitoring programs. 3 figures, 4 tables. (DCK)

  16. field_equipment.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FIELD EQUIPMENT INVENTORY Trucks * Five vacpressure trucks, 60-90 bbl, up to 5 bpm at 5,000 lb. * Waterfi re truck, 110 bbl * Two dump trucks: 5-yard and 12-yard * Belly dump...

  17. Utilizing secondary heat to heat wash oil in the coke-oven gas desulfurization division

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volkov, E.L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Removal of hydrogen sulfide from the coke-oven gas by the vacuum-carbonate method involves significant energy costs, comprising about 47% of the total costs of the process. This is explained by the significant demand of steam for regeneration of the wash oil, the cost of which exceeds 30% of the total operating costs. The boiling point of the saturated wash oil under vacuum does not exceed 70/sup 0/C, thus the wash oil entering the regenerator can be heated either by the direct coke-oven gas or by the tar supernatant from the gas collection cycle. Utilizing the secondary heat of the direct coke-oven gas and the tar supernatant liquor (the thermal effect is approximately the same) to heat the wash oil from the gas desulfurization shops significantly improves the industrial economic indices. Heating the wash oil from gas desulfurization shops using the vacuum-carbonate method by the heat of the tar supernatant liquor may be adopted at a number of coking plants which have a scarcity of thermal resources and which have primary coolers with vertical tubes.

  18. Thermostabilization of desulfurization enzymes from Rhodococcos sp. IGTS8. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John J. Kilbane II

    2000-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to develop thermophilic cultures capable of expressing the desulfurization (dsz) operon of Rhodococcus sp. IGTS8. The approaches taken in this project included the development of plasmid and integrative expression vectors that function well in Thermus thermophilus, the cloning of Rhodococcus dsz genes in Thermus expression vectors, and the isolation of bacterial cultures that express the dsz operon at thermophilic temperatures. This project has resulted in the development of plasmid and integrative expression vectors for use in T. thermophilus. The dsz genes have been expressed at moderately thermophilic temperatures (52 C) in Mycobacterium phlei and at temperatures as high as 72 C in T. thermophilus. The tools and methods developed in this project will be generally useful for the expression of heterologous genes in Thermus. Key developments in the project have been the isolation of a Mycobacterium phlei culture capable of expressing the desulfurization operon at 52 C, development of plasmid and integrative expression vectors for Thermus thermophilus, and the development of a host-vector system based on the malate dehydrogenase gene that allows plasmids to be stably maintained in T. thermophilus and provides a convenient reporter gene for the accurate quantification of gene expression. Publications have been prepared regarding each of these topics; these preprints are included.

  19. Hot coal gas desulfurization with manganese-based sorbents. Final report, September 1992--December 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hepworth, M.T.; Slimane, R.B.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of much current work being performed by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the Department of Energy on hot coal-derived fuel gas desulfurization is in the use of zinc-based sorbents. METC has shown interest in formulating and testing manganese-based pellets as alternative effective sulfur sorbents in the 700 to 1200{degree}C temperature range. To substantiate the potential superiority of Mn-based pellets, a systematic approach toward the evaluation of the desulfurizing power of single-metal sorbents is developed based on thermodynamic considerations. This novel procedure considered several metal-based sorbents and singled out manganese oxide as a prime candidate sorbent capable of being utilized under a wide temperature range, irrespective of the reducing power (determined by CO{sub 2}/CO ratio) of the fuel gas. Then, the thermodynamic feasibility of using Mn-based pellets for the removal of H{sub 2}S from hot-coal derived fuel gases, and the subsequent oxidative regeneration of loaded (sulfided) pellets was established. It was concluded that MnO is the stable form of manganese for virtually all commercially available coal-derived fuel gases. In addition, the objective of reducing the H{sub 2}S concentration below 150 ppMv to satisfy the integrated gasification combined cycle system requirement was shown to be thermodynamically feasible. A novel process is developed for the manufacture of Mn-based spherical pellets which have the desired physical and chemical characteristics required.

  20. The use of gypsum and a coal desulfurization by-product to ameliorate subsoil acidity for alfalfa growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chessman, Dennis John

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    the effectiveness of surface-applied gypsum and a flue gas desulfurization by-product for reducing the toxic effects of acid subsoils on alfalfa. The materials were applied at rates of 0, 5, 10, and 15 Mg ha-1. In addition, a glasshouse experiment was conducted...

  1. Equipment Operational Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenwalt, B; Henderer, B; Hibbard, W; Mercer, M

    2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Iraq Department of Border Enforcement is rich in personnel, but poor in equipment. An effective border control system must include detection, discrimination, decision, tracking and interdiction, capture, identification, and disposition. An equipment solution that addresses only a part of this will not succeed, likewise equipment by itself is not the answer without considering the personnel and how they would employ the equipment. The solution should take advantage of the existing in-place system and address all of the critical functions. The solutions are envisioned as being implemented in a phased manner, where Solution 1 is followed by Solution 2 and eventually by Solution 3. This allows adequate time for training and gaining operational experience for successively more complex equipment. Detailed descriptions of the components follow the solution descriptions. Solution 1 - This solution is based on changes to CONOPs, and does not have a technology component. It consists of observers at the forts and annexes, forward patrols along the swamp edge, in depth patrols approximately 10 kilometers inland from the swamp, and checkpoints on major roads. Solution 2 - This solution adds a ground sensor array to the Solution 1 system. Solution 3 - This solution is based around installing a radar/video camera system on each fort. It employs the CONOPS from Solution 1, but uses minimal ground sensors deployed only in areas with poor radar/video camera coverage (such as canals and streams shielded by vegetation), or by roads covered by radar but outside the range of the radar associated cameras. This document provides broad operational requirements for major equipment components along with sufficient operational details to allow the technical community to identify potential hardware candidates. Continuing analysis will develop quantities required and more detailed tactics, techniques, and procedures.

  2. Early Equipment Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlie, Michelle

    2007-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    the quality, flexibility, reliability, safety, and life-time cost of equipment. This paper will give an introduction to the basics of TPM, discuss the major parts of EEM, and evaluate the lessons learned from the team’s first effort to execute the structured...

  3. Emergency Facilities and Equipment

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume clarifies requirements of DOE O 151.1 to ensure that emergency facilities and equipment are considered as part of emergency management program and that activities conducted at these emergency facilities are fully integrated. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-4.

  4. Hot gas desulfurization with sorbents containing oxides of zinc, iron, vanadium and copper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akyurtlu, A.; Akyurtlu, J.F.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this research is to evaluate the desulfurization performance of novel sorbents consisting of different combinations of zinc, iron, vanadium and copper oxides; and to develop a sorbent which can reduce H{sub 2}S levels to less than 1 ppmv, which can stabilize zinc, making operations above 650{degrees}C possible, and which can produce economically recoverable amounts of elemental sulfur during regeneration. This objective will be accomplished by evaluating the sorbent performance using fixed-bed and TGA experiments supported by sorbent characterization at various reaction extents. In the seventh quarter, the screening of the promoted sorbents in the packed bed reactor was continued. The results of this work were presented at the 1992 University Coal Research Contractors, Review Conference at Pittsburgh, PA.

  5. KVB coal desulfurization process development. Quarterly technical progress report for May-September 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the initial technical progress report for the KVB Coal Desulfurization Process Development. The project is a joint effort between Research-Cottrell, Inc. and the College of Engineering of Rutgers University. The process involves oxidation of the sulfur in coal (both organic and pyritic) to soluble forms using nitrogen oxide gas mixtures and subsequent extractive removal. Key features of the process are mild reaction conditions and the use of regenerable reagents. A description of the process chemistry is given, as well as a brief summary of previous experimental studies. The experimental and analytical procedures being used in the current investigation, which is just getting underway, are described in detail. A brief outline of process modelling and commercial evaluation studies which will be a part of the project is also given.

  6. Method for reducing sulfate formation during regeneration of hot-gas desulfurization sorbents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bissett, Larry A. (Morgantown, WV); Strickland, Larry D. (Morgantown, WV); Rockey, John M. (Westover, WV)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The regeneration of sulfur sorbents having sulfate forming tendencies and used for desulfurizing hot product gas streams such as provided by coal gasification is provided by employing a two-stage regeneration method. Air containing a sub-stoichiometric quantity of oxygen is used in the first stage for substantially fully regenerating the sorbent without sulfate formation and then regeneration of the resulting partially regenerated sorbent is completed in the second stage with air containing a quantity of oxygen slightly greater than the stoichiometric amount adequate to essentially fully regenerate the sorbent. Sulfate formation occurs in only the second stage with the extent of sulfate formation being limited only to the portion of the sulfur species contained by the sorbent after substantially all of the sulfur species have been removed therefrom in the first stage.

  7. Method for the desulfurization of hot product gases from coal gasifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grindley, Thomas (Morgantown, WV)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The gasification of sulfur-bearing coal produces a synthesis gas which contains a considerable concentration of sulfur compounds especially hydrogen sulfide that renders the synthesis gas environmentally unacceptable unless the concentration of the sulfur compounds is significantly reduced. To provide for such a reduction in the sulfur compounds a calcium compound is added to the gasifier with the coal to provide some sulfur absorption. The synthesis gas from the gasifier contains sulfur compounds and is passed through an external bed of a regenerable solid absorbent, preferably zinc ferrite, for essentially completed desulfurizing the hot synthesis gas. This absorbent is, in turn, periodically or continuously regenerated by passing a mixture of steam and air or oxygen through the bed for converting absorbed hydrogen sulfide to sulfur dioxide. The resulting tail gas containing sulfur dioxide and steam is injected into the gasifier where the sulfur dioxide is converted by the calcium compound into a stable form of sulfur such as calcium sulfate.

  8. Desulfurization of coal: Enhanced selectivity using phase transfer catalysts. Final technical report, September 1, 1995--August 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, S.R.; Hippo, E.J.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to environmental problems related to the combustion of high sulfur Illinois coal, there continues to be interest in the development of viable pre-combustion desulfurization processes. Recent studies by the authors have obtained very good sulfur removals but the reagents that are used are too expensive. Use of cheaper reagents leads to a loss of desired coal properties. This study investigated the application of phase transfer catalysts to the selective oxidation of sulfur in coal using air and oxygen as oxidants. The phase transfer catalyst was expected to function as a selectivity moderator by permitting the use of milder reaction conditions than otherwise necessary. This would enhance the sulfur selectivity and help retain the heating value of the coal. The use of certain coal combustion wastes for desulfurization, and the application of cerium (IV) catalyzed air oxidations for selective sulfur oxidation were also studied. If successful this project would have lead to the rapid development of a commercially viable desulfurization process. This would have significantly improved the marketability of Illinois coal. However, the phase transfer catalysts, the cerium and the scrubber sledge did not catalize the sulfur removal significantly.

  9. Equipment | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1, 13 DE@Energy Innovation EquipmentHydrogen

  10. Equipment | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1, 13 DE@Energy Innovation EquipmentHydrogenPhilips

  11. UNIRIB: Equipment Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulence may bedieselsummer gasoline price0 - 194Equipment

  12. Maersk Line Equipment guide

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby/%2AOU1a ComplexMaersk Line Equipment

  13. Logging Equipment and Loren Kellogg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and the control is passed on Automatic inhaul starts and the control is transferred again Photo Credit: KollerLogging Equipment and Systems Loren Kellogg Forest Engineering Resources and Management Oregon Equipment and Systems Presentation Outline · Overview of equipment and systems for thinning · Costs

  14. Electrical Equipment Inventory and Inspection Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electrical Equipment Inventory and Inspection Information APS Non-NRTL Electrical Equipment Inventory Spreadsheet ANL Recognized Reputable Electrical Equipment Manufacturer List as...

  15. SOLOX coke-oven gas desulfurization ppm levels -- No toxic waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platts, M. (Thyssen Still Otto Technical Services, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Tippmer, K. (Thyssen Still Otto Anlagentechnik GmbH, Bochum (Germany))

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For sulfur removal from coke-oven gas, the reduction/oxidation processes such as Stretford are the most effective, capable of removing the H[sub 2]S down to ppm levels. However, these processes have, in the past, suffered from ecological problems with secondary pollutant formation resulting from side reactions with HCN and O[sub 2]. The SOLOX gas desulfurization system is a development of the Stretford process in which the toxic effluent problems are eliminated by installing a salt decomposition process operating according to the liquid-phase hydrolysis principle. In this process, the gaseous hydrolysis products H[sub 2]S, NH[sub 3] and CO[sub 2] are returned to the untreated gas, and the regenerated solution is recycled to the absorption process. The blowdown from the absorption circuit is fed into a tube reactor where the hydrolysis process takes place. The toxic salts react with water, producing as reaction products the gases H[sub 2]S, NH[sub 3] and CO[sub 2], and the nontoxic salt Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4]. From the hydrolysis reactor the liquid stream flows into a fractionating crystallization plant. This plant produces a recycle stream of regenerated absorption solution and a second stream containing most of the Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4]. This second stream comprises the net plant waste and can be disposed of with the excess ammonia liquor or sprayed onto the coal.

  16. KVB coal desulfurization process development. Quarterly technical progress report, October-December 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the second technical progress report for the KVB Coal Desulfurization Process Development. The project is a joint venture between Research-Cottrell, Inc. and the College of Engineering of Rutgers University. The process involves oxidation of the sulfur in coal (both organic and pyritic) to soluble forms using nitrogen oxide gas mixtures and subsequent extractive removal. Key features of the process are mild reaction conditions and the use of a regenerable oxidant. Construction of a bench scale oxidation reactor system was completed and a short experimental program was carried out using Illinois No. 6 coal. An investigation of extraction reagents was also conducted. The emphasis to date has been on development and demonstration of procedures rather than on data generation. However preliminary data do indicate reaction of both organic and pyritic sulfur. Preliminary coal characterization work using x-ray fluorescence is also reported. A brief discussion of project plans in the areas of process modelling and commercial evaluation is also given.

  17. INL '@work' heavy equipment mechanic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, Cad

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INL's Cad Christensen is a heavy equipment mechanic. For more information about INL careers, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  18. Information technology equipment cooling system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, Mark D.

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    According to one embodiment, a system for removing heat from a rack of information technology equipment may include a sidecar indoor air to liquid heat exchanger that cools warm air generated by the rack of information technology equipment. The system may also include a liquid to liquid heat exchanger and an outdoor heat exchanger. The system may further include configurable pathways to connect and control fluid flow through the sidecar heat exchanger, the liquid to liquid heat exchanger, the rack of information technology equipment, and the outdoor heat exchanger based upon ambient temperature and/or ambient humidity to remove heat from the rack of information technology equipment.

  19. INL '@work' heavy equipment mechanic

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Christensen, Cad

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    INL's Cad Christensen is a heavy equipment mechanic. For more information about INL careers, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  20. Reduction of spalling in mixed metal oxide desulfurization sorbents by addition of a large promoter metal oxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poston, J.A.

    1997-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixed metal oxide pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from fuel gas mixes derived from coal are stabilized for operation over repeated cycles of desulfurization and regeneration reactions by addition of a large promoter metal oxide such as lanthanum trioxide. The pellets, which may be principally made up of a mixed metal oxide such as zinc titanate, exhibit physical stability and lack of spalling or decrepitation over repeated cycles without loss of reactivity. The lanthanum oxide is mixed with pellet-forming components in an amount of 1 to 10 weight percent.

  1. Reduction of spalling in mixed metal oxide desulfurization sorbents by addition of a large promoter metal oxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poston, James A. (Star City, WV)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixed metal oxide pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from fuel gas mixes derived from coal are stabilized for operation over repeated cycles of desulfurization and regeneration reactions by addition of a large promoter metal oxide such as lanthanum trioxide. The pellets, which may be principally made up of a mixed metal oxide such as zinc titanate, exhibit physical stability and lack of spalling or decrepitation over repeated cycles without loss of reactivity. The lanthanum oxide is mixed with pellet-forming components in an amount of 1 to 10 weight percent.

  2. COLD STORAGE DESIGN REFRIGERATION EQUIPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COLD STORAGE DESIGN AND REFRIGERATION EQUIPMENT REFRIGERATION OF FISH - PART 1 \\ "..\\- ,,, T I Fishery Leaflet 427 Washington 25, D. C. June 1956 REFRIGERATION OF FISH - PART em; COlD STORAGE DESIGN AND REFRIGERATION EQUIPMENT By Charles Butler (Section 1), Joseph W. Slavin (Sections 1, 2, and 3), Max Patashnik

  3. EECBG Direct Equipment Purchase Air Conditioner Guide Equipment Type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EECBG Direct Equipment Purchase Air Conditioner Guide Equipment Type Size Category (Btu/h) Size.ahridirectory.org/ceedirectory/pages/ac/cee/defaultSearch.aspx 12,000 Btu/h = 1 ton Less than 65,000 Btu/h Air Conditioners, Air Cooled Air Conditioners, Water completed by the California Energy Commission at a rate of 12,000 Btu/h per ton of air conditioning Source

  4. Commonwealth's Master Equipment Leasing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The [http://www.trs.virginia.gov/debt/MELP%20Guides.aspx Master Equipment Leasing Program] (MELP) ensures that all Commonwealth agencies, authorities and institutions obtain consistent and...

  5. Wind Measurement Equipment: Registration (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All wind measurement equipment associated with the development or study of wind-powered electric generation, whether owned or leased, shall be registered with the Department of Aeronautics if the...

  6. VEHICLES, MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT Table Of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    of a license/permit for each piece of equipment, an Operator Equipment Qualification Record (DA Form 348EM 385-1-1 XX Sep 13 i Section 18 VEHICLES, MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT Table Of Contents Section: Page...................................................................18-16 18.G Machinery And Mechanized Equipment.........................18-16 18.H Drilling Equipment

  7. AEC Lowman Station - coal switching and magnesium-enhanced lime scrubbing to lower operating costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inkenhaus, W.; Babu, M.; Smith, K. [Dravo Lime Co., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Loper, L. [Alabama Electric Coopreative, Leroy, AL (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    AEC`s Lowman Station is located in Leroy, Alabama. There are three coal-fired boilers at this station. Unit 1 is capable of generating 85 MW without a flue gas desulfurization, FGD, system. Units 2 and 3, with a total of 516 MW output capacity, are equipped with FGD systems. The FGD plant was designed for wet limestone FGD with natural oxidation. Lowman Station burned low sulfur, 1.3 to 1.8% sulfur, coal. In January of 1996 AEC switched Units 2 and 3 from limestone to magnesium-enhanced lime FGD operation. It was determined that the plant could take advantage of the higher SO{sub 2} removal efficiency of the magnesium-enhanced lime system. Major benefits resulting from this conversion were AEC`s ability to switch to a lower cost high sulfur coal while meeting the stringent SO{sub 2} emission requirements. Power cost savings resulted from the lower liquid to gas ratio required by the magnesium-enhanced lime process. Three recirculation pumps per module were reduced to a single operating pump per module, lowering the scrubber pressure drop. Significant cost reduction in the operating costs of the ball mill was realized due to modifications made to slake lime instead of grinding limestone. Prior to switching, personnel from AEC and Dravo Lime Company ran a four week test on magnesium-enhanced lime to obtain scrubber performance data including SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies on the modules while burning a 1.8% sulfur coal. This paper discusses the plant modifications that were needed to make the switch, cost justifications due to coal switching, and AEC`s operating experiences to date. AEC and Dravo Lime Company working together as a team conducted detailed cost studies, followed by extensive field tests and implemented the plant modifications. This plant continues to operate burning higher sulfur coal with the magnesium-enhanced lime FGD system.

  8. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of innovative applications of technology for cost reductions to the CT-121 FGD process. Quarterly report No. 6, July--September 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The project`s objective is to demonstrate innovative applications of technology for cost reduction for the Chiyoda Thoroughbred-121 (CT-121) process. The CT-121 process is a wet FGD process that removes SO{sub 2}, can achieve simultaneous particulate control, and can produce a salable by-product gypsum thereby reducing or even eliminating solid waste disposal problems. Figure 1 shows a flow schematic of the process. CT-121 removes SO{sub 2} and particulate matter in a unique limestone-based scrubber called the Jet Bubbling Reactor (JBR). IN the JBR, flue gas bubbles beneath the slurry, SO{sub 2} is absorbed, and particulate matter is removed from the gas. The agitator circulates limestone slurry to ensure that fresh reactant is always available in the bubbling or froth zone sot that SO{sub 2} removal can proceed at a rapid rate. Air is introduced into the bottom of the JBR to oxidize the absorbed SO{sub 2} to sulfate, and limestone is added continuously to neutralize the acid slurry and form gypsum. The JBR is designed to allow ample time for complete oxidation of the SO{sub 2}, for complete reaction of the limestone, and for growth of large gypsum crystals. The gypsum slurry is continuously withdrawn from the JBR and is to be dewatered in a gypsum stack. The stacking technique involves filing a diked area with gypsum slurry, allowing the gypsum solids to settle, and removing clear liquid from the top of the stack for recycle back to the process.

  9. Studies involving high temperature desulfurization/regeneration reactions of metal oxides for fuel cell development. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jalan, V.

    1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research conducted at Giner, Inc. during 1981 to 1983 under the present contract has been a continuation of the investigation of a high temperature regenerable desulfurization process capable of reducing the sulfur content in coal gases from 200 ppM to 1 ppM. The overall objective has been the integration of a coal gasifier with a molten carbonate fuel cell, which requires that the sulfur content be below 1 ppM. Commercially available low temperature processes incur an excessive energy penalty. Results obtained with packed-bed and fluidized bed reactors have demonstrated that a CuO/ZnO mixed oxide sorbent is regenerable and capable of lowering the sulfur content (as H/sub 2/S and COS) from 200 ppM in simulated hot coal-derived gases to below 1 ppM level at 600 to 650/sup 0/C. Four potential sorbents (copper, tungsten oxide, vanadium oxide and zinc oxide) were initially selected for experimental use in hot regenerable desulfurization in the temperature range 500 to 650/sup 0/C. Based on engineering considerations, such as desulfurization capacity in per weight or volume of sorbents, a coprecipitated CuO/ZnO was selected for further study. A structural reorganization mechanism, unique to mixed oxides, was identified: the creation of relatively fine crystallites of the sulfided components (Cu/sub 2/S and ZnS) to counteract the loss of surface area due to sintering during regeneration. Studies with 9 to 26% water vapor in simulated coal gases show that sulfur levels below 1 ppM can be achieved in the temperature range of 500/sup 0/ to 650/sup 0/C. The ability of CuO/ZnO to remove COS, CS/sub 2/ and CH/sub 3/SH at these conditions has been demonstrated in this study. Also a previously proposed pore-plugging model was further developed with good success for data treatment of both packed bed and fluidized-bed reactors. 96 references, 42 figures, 21 tables.

  10. Summary of Construction Equipment Tests and Activities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Construction Equipment Tests and Activities Bruce Glagola - Sept 2013 Construction Equipment Tests A series of tests were conducted by the APS Construction Vibration...

  11. Advanced Battery Manufacturing Facilities and Equipment Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Equipment Program Advanced Battery Manufacturing Facilities and Equipment Program AVTA: 2010 Honda Civic HEV with Experimental Ultra Lead Acid Battery Testing Results...

  12. Materials Selection Considerations for Thermal Process Equipment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Materials Selection Considerations for Thermal Process Equipment: A BestPractices Process Heating Technical Brief Materials Selection Considerations for Thermal Process Equipment:...

  13. A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant utilizing an ESP/Wet FGD system. Volume 1, Sampling, results, and special topics: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This was one of a group of assessments of toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants, conducted for DOE-PETC in 1993 as mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act. It is organized into 2 volumes; Volume 1 describes the sampling effort, presents the concentration data on toxic chemicals in several power plant streams, and reports the results of evaluations and calculations. The study involved solid, liquid, and gaseous samples from input, output, and process streams at Coal Creek Station Unit No. 1, Underwood, North Dakota (1100 MW mine-mouth plant burning lignite from the Falkirk mine located adjacent to the plant). This plant had an electrostatic precipitator and a wet scrubber flue gas desulfurization unit. Measurements were conducted on June 21--24, 26, and 27, 1993; chemicals measured were 6 major and 16 trace elements (including Hg, Cr, Cd, Pb, Se, As, Be, Ni), acids and corresponding anions (HCl, HF, chloride, fluoride, phosphate, sulfate), ammonia and cyanide, elemental C, radionuclides, VOCs, semivolatiles (incl. PAH, polychlorinated dioxins, furans), and aldehydes. Volume 2: Appendices includes process data log sheets, field sampling data sheets, uncertainty calculations, and quality assurance results.

  14. Corrosion indicating equipment UK-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerasimenko, Y.S.; Abrosimov, V.S.; Rudenko, A.K.; Sorokin, V.I.

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UK-1, developed and introduced into oil industry corrosion-indicating equipment, has been developed on the basis of the principle of measurements of polarization resistance. It is designed for determining the corrosion activity of effluents of oil fields. The technical data and design of the equipment is discussed. The investigations were carried out on 08kp steel in simulation effluents of oil fields in the presence of corrosion inhibitors used in the oil industry at various temperatures (25-50 C) and liquid flow rate.

  15. Hot gas desulfurization with sorbents containing oxides of zinc, iron, vanadium and copper. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akyurtlu, A.; Akyurtlu, J.F.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this research is to evaluate the desulfurization performance of novel sorbents consisting of different combinations of zinc, iron, vanadium and copper oxides; and to develop a sorbent which can reduce H{sub 2}S levels to less than 1 ppmv, which can stabilize zinc, making operations above 650{degrees}C possible, and which can produce economically recoverable amounts of elemental sulfur during regeneration. This objective will be accomplished by evaluating the sorbent performance using fixed-bed and TGA experiments supported by sorbent characterization at various reaction extents. In the seventh quarter, the screening of the promoted sorbents in the packed bed reactor was continued. The results of this work were presented at the 1992 University Coal Research Contractors, Review Conference at Pittsburgh, PA.

  16. Summary and assessment of METC zinc ferrite hot coal gas desulfurization test program, final report: Volume 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Underkoffler, V.S.

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has conducted a test program to develop a zinc ferrite-based high temperature desulfurization process which could be applied to fuel gas entering downstream components such as molten carbonate fuel cells or gas turbines. As a result of prior METC work with iron oxide and zinc oxide sorbents, zinc ferrite evolved as a candidate with the potential for high capacity, low equilibrium levels of H/sub 2/S, and structural stability after multiple regenerations. The program consisted of laboratory-scale testing with a two-inch diameter reactor and simulated fixed-bed gasifier gas; bench-scale testing with a six-inch diameter reactor and actual gas from the METC 42-inch fixed bed gasifier; as well as laboratory-scale testing of zinc ferrite with simulated fluidized bed gasifier gas. Data from sidestream testing are presented. 18 refs.

  17. Wisconsin Research with Dick Wolkowski, Birl Lowery, Ana Tapsieva

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Teri C.

    , UW-Madison Meghan Buckley UW-Stevens Point #12;What is FGD Gypsum Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum application to crops · Avoid landfilling #12;Land Application Considerations Source: Ohio State Univ. Pub. ANR

  18. Advanced sulfur control concepts for hot-gas desulfurization technology. Quarterly report, July 1 - September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective is to determine the feasibility of an alternate concept for the regeneration of high temperature desulfurization sorbents in which elemental sulfur, instead of SO{sub 2} is produced. Iron and cerium-based sorbents were chosen on the basis of thermodynamic analysis to determine the feasibility of elemental sulfur production. Experimental effort on the regeneration of FeS using the partial oxidation concept was completed during the quarter, and attention returned to the sulfidation of CeO{sub 2} and regeneration of Ce{sub 2}O{sub 2}2S. Progress was made in the process simulation effort involving two-step desulfurization using CeO{sub 2} to remove the bulk of the H{sub 2}S followed by a zinc-titanate polishing step. The simulation effort includes regeneration of Ce{sub 2}O{sub 2}S using two concepts - reaction with SO{sub 2} reaction with H{sub 2}O. Elemental sulfur is formed directly in the reaction with SO{sub 2} while H{sub 2}S is the product of the regeneration reaction with steam. Steam regeneration is followed by a Claus process to convert the H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur. The last test involving partial oxidation regeneration of FeS was completed in early July. Experimental problems were encountered throughout this phase of the program, primarily associated with erratic readings from the total sulfur analyzer. The problems are attributed to variable flow rates through the capillary restrictor, and, in some cases, to steam concentrations which exceeded the capacity of the membrane dryer. Nevertheless, sufficient data was collected to confirm that large fractions of the sulfur in FeS could be liberated in elemental form. Low regeneration temperature ({approximately}600{degrees}C), large steam-to-oxygen ratios, and low space velocities were found to favor elemental sulfur production.

  19. Equipment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facility: Building 382 Rev. 1, 021100 Training: (1) ESH114 LockoutTagout ASD125 APS LOTO ESH371 Electrical Safety - General ESH195 PPE ESH141 Hand and Power Tools (2) ESH707...

  20. Covered Product Category: Imaging Equipment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including imaging equipment, which is covered by the ENERGY STAR® program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  1. Heating and Cooling Equipment Selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is one of a series of technology fact sheets created to help housing designers and builders adopt a whole-house design approach and energy efficient design practices. The fact sheet helps people choose the correct equipment for heating and cooling to reduce initial costs, increase homeowner comfort, increase operating efficiency, and greatly reduce utility costs.

  2. Oxidation kinetics of by-product calcium sulfite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Othman, Hasliza

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Department) May 1992 ABSTRACT Oxidation Kinetics of By-product Calcium Sulfite. (May 1992) Hasliza Othman, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Ahmed M. Gadalla The by-products obtained from the flue gas desulfurization (FGD..., suggestions and encouragement. TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER Page I INTRODUCTION I I LITERATURE REVIEW A. Limestone Flue Gas Desulfurization Process . . . . . . . . . . . . B. Scaling Problem in the FGD Process...

  3. Inorganic hazardous air pollutants before and after a limestone flue gas desulfurization system as a function of <10 micrometer particle sizes and unit load

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, D.P.; Williams, W.A.; Flora, H.B. II [Radian Corp., Austin, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Radian Corporation collected size-fractionated particulate samples from stack gas at a unit burning high sulfur coal with a venturi scrubber FGD system. Independent sample fractions were collected under high-load and low-load operating conditions and subjected to various techniques designed to measure the total composition and surface-extractable concentrations of selected trace elements. The relationships between unit load, particle-size distribution, total composition, and surface-extractable inorganic species are reported and compared to show the availability of trace elements relevant to potential health risks from flue gas particulate emissions.

  4. Used energy-related laboratory equipment grant program for institutions of higher learning. Eligible equipment catalog

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a listing of energy related equipment available through the Energy-Related Laboratory Equipment Grant Program which grants used equipment to institutions of higher education for energy-related research. Information included is an overview of the program, how to apply for a grant of equipment, eligibility requirements, types of equipment available, and the costs for the institution.

  5. Assessment of HYGAS mechanical equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albrecht, P.R.; Kramberger, F.E.; Recupero, R.M.; Verden, M.L.; Rees, K.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The HYGAS process, which converts coal to substitute natural gas, is being developed by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) using an 80 ton per day pilot plant located in Chicago, Illinois. Plant design started in 1967 and testing began in October 1971. Since then, 18,000 tons of both Eastern and Western coal have been gasified. Assessment of the mechanical equipment was made by Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) in collaboration with a DOE on-site representative and a representative from IGT, the operating contractor. Data for the assessment were obtained by reviewing all available maintenance records, by interviewing key personnel from maintenance and operations, and by observing repairs and maintenance procedures where possible. While operating the plant, a variety of equipment problems were addressed, many of which are generic to HYGAS as well as other coal conversion processes. Some problems were solved completely while others were solved to suit the limited needs of the pilot plant. Accordingly, the emphasis of this study is on the degree of success in dealing with equipment failures, the unresolved problems and the implication to future coal conversion plants.

  6. Strategy Guideline: HVAC Equipment Sizing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdick, A.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system is arguably the most complex system installed in a house and is a substantial component of the total house energy use. A right-sized HVAC system will provide the desired occupant comfort and will run efficiently. This Strategy Guideline discusses the information needed to initially select the equipment for a properly designed HVAC system. Right-sizing of an HVAC system involves the selection of equipment and the design of the air distribution system to meet the accurate predicted heating and cooling loads of the house. Right-sizing the HVAC system begins with an accurate understanding of the heating and cooling loads on a space; however, a full HVAC design involves more than just the load estimate calculation - the load calculation is the first step of the iterative HVAC design procedure. This guide describes the equipment selection of a split system air conditioner and furnace for an example house in Chicago, IL as well as a heat pump system for an example house in Orlando, Florida. The required heating and cooling load information for the two example houses was developed in the Department of Energy Building America Strategy Guideline: Accurate Heating and Cooling Load Calculations.

  7. Abatement of Air Pollution: Air Pollution Control Equipment and Monitoring Equipment Operation (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations contain instructions for the operation and monitoring of air pollution control equipment, as well as comments on procedures in the event of equipment breakdown, failure, and...

  8. Machinery and Equipment Expensing Deduction (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Machinery and Equipment Expensing Deduction allows Kansas taxpayers to claim an expense deduction for business machinery and equipment, placed in service in Kansas during the tax year. The one-time...

  9. Asset Management Equipment Disposal Form -Refrigerant Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sin, Peter

    Asset Management Equipment Disposal Form - Refrigerant Recovery Safe Disposal Requirements Under refrigeration, cold storage warehouse refrigeration, chillers, and industrial process refrigeration) has to have the refrigerant recovered in accordance with EPA's requirements for servicing. However, equipment that typically

  10. Operations and Maintenance for Major Equipment Types

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Equipment lies at the heart of all operations and maintenance (O&M) activities. This equipment varies greatly across the Federal sector in age, size, type, model, condition, etc.

  11. Equipment Listing | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1, 13 DE@Energy Innovation Equipment Listing

  12. Equipment Loans | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1, 13 DE@Energy Innovation Equipment ListingLoans

  13. Equipment Pool | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1, 13 DE@Energy Innovation Equipment

  14. Equipment Certification | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazel Crest,EnergySerranopolisEnviroMissionEquipment

  15. MPC Equipment | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your Home and It'll Love YouTokamak |MPC Equipment The MPC

  16. anaerobic solid-liquid system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    economic and effective method to reduce the biogas desulfurization cost by removing hydrogen sulfide more than 90 % without external desulfurization equipments. KeywordsBiogas,...

  17. Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Annual report, October 1993--September 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chugh, Y.P.; Dutta, D.; Esling, S.; Ghafoori, N.; Paul, B.; Sevim, H.; Thomasson, E.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary environmental risk assessment on the FGD by-products to be placed underground is virtually complete. The initial mixes for pneumatic and hydraulic placement have been selected and are being subject to TCLP, ASTM, and modified SLP shake tests as well as ASTM column leaching. Results of these analyses show that the individual coal combustion residues, and the residues mixes, are non-hazardous in character. Based on available information, including well logs obtained from Peabody Coal Company, a detailed study of the geology of the placement site was completed. The study shows that the disposal site in the abandoned underground mine workings at depths of between 325 and 375 feet are well below potable groundwater resources. This, coupled with the benign nature of the residues and residues mixtures, should alleviate any concern that the underground placement will have adverse effects on groundwater resources. Seven convergence stations were installed in the proposed underground placement area of the Peabody Coal Company No. 10 mine. Several sets of convergence data were obtained from the stations. A study of materials handling and transportation of coal combustion residues from the electric power plant to the injection site has been made. The study evaluated the economics of the transportation of coal combustion residues by pneumatic trucks, by pressure differential rail cars, and by SEEC, Inc. collapsible intermodal containers (CICs) for different annual handling rates and transport distances. The preliminary physico-chemical characteristics and engineering properties of various FBC fly ash-spent bed mixes have been determined, and long-term studies of these properties are continuing.

  18. Proceedings: Tenth EPRI Substation Equipment Diagnostics Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced monitoring and diagnostic sensors and systems are needed to provide reliable and accurate information for determining the condition of major transmission substation equipment. The tenth EPRI Substation Equipment Diagnostics Conference highlighted the work of researchers, universities, manufacturers, and utilities in producing advanced monitoring and diagnostic equipment for substations.

  19. Proceedings: Substation Equipment Diagnostics Conference IX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced monitoring and diagnostic sensors and systems are needed to provide reliable and accurate information for determining the condition of major transmission substation equipment. The ninth EPRI Substation Equipment Diagnostics Conference highlighted the work of researchers, universities, manufacturers, and utilities in producing advanced monitoring and diagnostic equipment for substations.

  20. Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Topical report, April 1, 1996--April 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chugh, Y.P.; Brackebusch, F.; Carpenter, J. [and others

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report represents the Final Technical Progress Report for Phase II of the overall program for a cooperative research agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy - MORGANTOWN Energy Technology Center (DOE-METC) and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC). Under the agreement, SIUC will develop and demonstrate technologies for the handling, transport, and placement in abandoned underground coal mines of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products, such as fly ash, scrubber sludge, fluidized bed combustion by-products, and will assess the environmental impact of such underground placement. The overall program is divided into three (3) phases. Phase II of the program is primarily concerned with developing and testing the hardware for the actual underground placement demonstrations. Two technologies have been identified and hardware procured for full-scale demonstrations: (1) hydraulic placement, where coal combustion by-products (CCBs) will be placed underground as a past-like mixture containing about 70 to 75 percent solids; and (2) pneumatic placement, where CCBs will be placed underground as a relatively dry material using compressed air. 42 refs., 36 figs., 36 tabs.

  1. Hot-gas desulfurization. II. Use of gasifier ash in a fluidized-bed process. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schrodt, J.T.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three gasifier coal ashes were used as reactant/sorbents in batch fluidized-beds to remove hydrogen sulfide from hot, made-up fuel gases. It is predominantly the iron oxide in the ash that reacts with and removes the hydrogen sulfide; the sulfur reappears in ferrous sulfide. Sulfided ashes were regenerated by hot, fluidizing streams of oxygen in air; the sulfur is recovered as sulfur dioxide, exclusively. Ash sorption efficiency and sulfur capacity increase and stabilize after several cycles of use. These two parameters vary directly with the iron oxide content of the ash and process temperature, but are independent of particle size in the range 0.01 - 0.02 cm. A western Kentucky No. 9 ash containing 22 weight percent iron as iron oxide sorbed 4.3 weight percent sulfur at 1200/sup 0/F with an ash sorption efficiency of 0.83 at ten percent breakthrough. A global, fluidized-bed, reaction rate model was fitted to the data and it was concluded that chemical kinetics is the controlling mechanism with a predicted activation energy of 19,600 Btu/lb mol. Iron oxide reduction and the water-gas-shift reaction were two side reactions that occurred during desulfurization. The regeneration reaction occurred very rapidly in the fluid-bed regime, and it is suspected that mass transfer is the controlling phenomenon.

  2. Summary and assessment of METC zinc ferrite hot coal gas desulfurization test program, final report: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Underkoffler, V.S.

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has conducted a test program to develop a zinc ferrite-based high temperature desulfurization process which could be applied to fuel gas entering downstream components such as molten carbonate fuel cells or gas turbines. As a result of prior METC work with iron oxide and zinc oxide sorbents, zinc ferrite evolved as a candidate with the potential for high capacity, low equilibrium levels of H/sub 2/S, and structural stability after multiple regenerations. The program consisted of laboratory-scale testing with a two-inch diameter reactor and simulated fixed-bed gasifier gas; bench-scale testing with a six-inch diameter reactor and actual gas from the METC 42-inch fixed bed gasifier; as well as laboratory-scale testing of zinc ferrite with simulated fluidized bed gasifier gas. Optimum operating parameters for zinc ferrite such as temperatures, gas compositions, and space velocities are discussed. From the test results, salient features of zinc ferrite were derived and discussed in regard to system implications, issues raised, and technical requirements. 47 refs., 53 figs., 41 tabs.

  3. Changing nature of equipment and parts qualification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bucci, R.M.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ideally, the original supplier of a piece of nuclear safety-related equipment has performed a qualification program and will continue to support that equipment throughout the lifetime of the nuclear power plants in which in equipment is installed. The supplier's nuclear quality assurance program will be maintained and he will continue to offer all necessary replacement parts. These parts will be identical to the original parts, certified to the original purchase order requirements, and the parts will be offered at competitive prices. Due to the changing nature of the nuclear plant equipment market, however, one or more of those ideal features are frequently unavailable when safety-related replacement equipment or parts are required. Thus, the process of equipment and parts qualification has had to adjust in order to ensure obtaining qualified replacements when needed. This paper presents some new directions taken in the qualification of replacement equipment and parts to meet changes in the marketplace.

  4. Environ. Scl. Technol. 1994, 28, 277-283 Effects of Salts on Preparation and Use of Calcium Silicates for Flue Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rochelle, Gary T.

    Silicates for Flue Gas Desulfurization Kurt K. Klnd, Phlllp D. Wasserman, and Gary 1.Rochelle' Department is a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technology developed for existingcoal to remove sulfur dioxide. High surface area calcium silicate hydrates are made by slurrying Ca(0H

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: Earth Science: Facilities and Equipment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ManagementEarth ScienceEarth Science: Facilities and Equipment Earth Science: Facilities and Equipment Geoscience Facilities and Equipment High-pressure thermalmechanical...

  6. Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, January--March 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chugh, Y.; Dutta, D.; Esling, S. [and others

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On September 30, 1993, the U.S. Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC) entered into a cooperative research agreement entitled {open_quotes}Management of Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products in Underground Mines{close_quotes} (DE-FC21-93MC 30252). Under the agreement Southern Illinois University at Carbondale will develop and demonstrate several technologies for the placement of coal combustion residues in abandoned coal mines, and will assess the environmental impact of such underground residues placement. Previous quarterly Technical Progress Reports have set forth the specific objectives of the program, as well as the management plan and the test plan for the overall program, and a discussion of these will not be repeated here. Rather, this report, will set forth the technical progress made during the period January 1 through March 31, 1995. The demonstration of the SEEC, Inc. technology for the transporting of coal combustion residues was completed with the unloading and final disposition of the three Collapsible Intermodal Containers (CIC). The loading and transport by rail of the three CIC`s was quire successful; however some difficulties were encountered in the unloading of the containers. A full topical report on the entire SEEC demonstration is being prepared. As a result of the demonstration some modifications of the SEEC concept may be undertaken. Also during the quarter the location of the injection wells at the Peabody No. 10 mine demonstration site were selected. Peabody Coal Company has developed the specifications for the wells and sought bids for the actual drilling. It is expected that the wells will be drilled early in May.

  7. Scrubber strategy: the how and why of flue gas desulfurization. [Analysis of 20 US scrubbing systems in 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baviello, M.A.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, INFORM provides facts that will help the non-technical decisionmakers in the US understand a technology that can significantly reduce the polluting effects of burning coal. Those decisionmakers include legislators, regulators and utility executives, public interest groups, concerned community organizations and environmentalists who have been involved in the debate over the broader use of our most abundant fossil fuel - coal. The use of this resource, especially in large industrial and utility plants, has created widespread and intense public controversy. For the past four years INFORM has turned its research capabilities to defining cleaner and more economical ways of using US coal supplies. We have focused on finding out what cleaning coal and using flue gas desulfurization systems (called scrubbers) can contribute to reducing the polluting effects of burning coal in utility plants. All in all, both scrubbers and coal cleaning offer exciting and important possibilities for putting more coal to work in generating power in this country more economically and still meeting critical air quality standards that have been set to protect public health. The need for accurate and clear information concerning these technologies is evident: 80% of the sulfur dioxide emissions in the US now come from utility power plant operations, and over 140 existing oil-fired power plants are candidates for conversion to coal use. We hope that this documentation of the technologies of scrubber systems along with INFORM's companion study of coal cleaning, may help government and business planners and concerned citizens chart intelligent future courses and set realistic goals for meeting our energy needs in an environmentally sound manner.

  8. Pollution Control Equipment Tax Deduction (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Pollution Control Equipment Tax Deduction allows businesses to deduct from their Alabama net worth the net amount invested in all devices, facilities, or structures, and all identifiable...

  9. Commercial and Industrial Kitchen Equipment Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE: All equipment must be installed on or after January 1, 2015 through December 31, 2015. The documentation must be received no later than March 31, 2016. 

  10. Reduce Radiation Losses from Heating Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This DOE Industrial Technologies Program tip sheet describes how to save energy and costs by reducing expensive heat losses from industrial heating equipment, such as furnaces.

  11. Electrical Equipment Inspection Program Electrical Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    recognized hazards and meets code requirements Labeled. A nationally recognized testing laboratory (NRTL equipment as listed unless it is also labeled. Nationally recognized testing laboratory (NRTL

  12. assemblies equipment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    capital equipment manufacturing plant : component level and assembly level inventory management MIT - DSpace Summary: Semiconductor capital equipment is manufactured in...

  13. Tier 2 Useful Life (120,000 miles) Exhaust Emission Results for a NOx Adsorber and Diesel Particle Filter Equipped Light-Duty Diesel Vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tatur, M.; Tomazic, D.; Thornton, M.; Orban, J.; Slone, E.

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigates the emission control system performance and system desulfurization effects on regulated and unregulated emissions in a light-duty diesel engine.

  14. University of California Policy Personal Protective Equipment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluwihare, Lihini

    /technical area is a location where the use or storage of hazardous materials occurs or where equipment may hazardous materials, adjacent to or in proximity to a hazard or in areas where there is a reasonable risk performs work functions with hazardous materials or equipment in a laboratory/technical area. A "worker

  15. Universal null DTE (data terminal equipment)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    George, M.; Pierson, L.G.; Wilkins, M.E.

    1987-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A communication device in the form of data terminal equipment permits two data communication equipments, each having its own master clock and operating at substantially the same nominal clock rate, to communicate with each other in a multi-segment circuit configuration of a general communication network even when phase or frequency errors exist between the two clocks. Data transmitted between communication equipments of two segments of the communication network is buffered. A variable buffer fill circuit is provided to fill the buffer to a selectable extent prior to initiation of data output clocking. Selection switches are provided to select the degree of buffer preload. A dynamic buffer fill circuit may be incorporated for automatically selecting the buffer fill level as a function of the difference in clock frequencies of the two equipments. Controllable alarm circuitry is provided for selectively generating an underflow or an overflow alarm to one or both of the communicating equipments. 5 figs.

  16. Automatic monitoring of vibration welding equipment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spicer, John Patrick; Chakraborty, Debejyo; Wincek, Michael Anthony; Wang, Hui; Abell, Jeffrey A; Bracey, Jennifer; Cai, Wayne W

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A vibration welding system includes vibration welding equipment having a welding horn and anvil, a host device, a check station, and a robot. The robot moves the horn and anvil via an arm to the check station. Sensors, e.g., temperature sensors, are positioned with respect to the welding equipment. Additional sensors are positioned with respect to the check station, including a pressure-sensitive array. The host device, which monitors a condition of the welding equipment, measures signals via the sensors positioned with respect to the welding equipment when the horn is actively forming a weld. The robot moves the horn and anvil to the check station, activates the check station sensors at the check station, and determines a condition of the welding equipment by processing the received signals. Acoustic, force, temperature, displacement, amplitude, and/or attitude/gyroscopic sensors may be used.

  17. Generic seismic ruggedness of power plant equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merz, K.L. (Anco Engineers, Inc., Culver City, CA (United States))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report updates the results of a program with the overall objective of demonstrating the generic seismic adequacy of as much nuclear power plant equipment as possible by means of collecting and evaluating existing seismic qualification test data. These data are then used to construct ruggedness'' spectra below which equipment in operating plants designed to earlier earthquake criteria would be generically adequate. This document is an EPRI Tier 1 Report. The report gives the methodology for the collection and evaluation of data which are used to construct a Generic Equipment Ruggedness Spectrum (GERs) for each equipment class considered. The GERS for each equipment class are included in an EPRI Tier 2 Report with the same title. Associated with each GERS are inclusion rules, cautions, and checklists for field screening of in-place equipment for GERS applicability. A GERS provides a measure of equipment seismic resistance based on available test data. As such, a GERS may also be used to judge the seismic adequacy of similar new or replacement equipment or to estimate the seismic margin of equipment re-evaluated with respect to earthquake levels greater than considered to date, resulting in fifteen finalized GERS. GERS for relays (included in the original version of this report) are now covered in a separate report (NP-7147). In addition to the presentation of GERS, the Tier 2 report addresses the applicability of GERS to equipment of older vintage, methods for estimating amplification factors for evaluating devices installed in cabinets and enclosures, and how seismic test data from related studies relate to the GERS approach. 28 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Incidents of chemical reactions in cell equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, N.M.; Barlow, C.R. [Uranium Enrichment Organization, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Strongly exothermic reactions can occur between equipment structural components and process gases under certain accident conditions in the diffusion enrichment cascades. This paper describes the conditions required for initiation of these reactions, and describes the range of such reactions experienced over nearly 50 years of equipment operation in the US uranium enrichment program. Factors are cited which can promote or limit the destructive extent of these reactions, and process operations are described which are designed to control the reactions to minimize equipment damage, downtime, and the possibility of material releases.

  19. Solar and Wind Energy Equipment Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In Wisconsin, any value added by a solar-energy system or a wind-energy system is exempt from general property taxes. A solar-energy system is defined as "equipment which directly converts and then...

  20. Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic (One Mechanic Shop)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The position is a Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic (One Mechanic Shop) located in Kent, Washington, and will be responsible for the safe and efficient operation of a field garage performing...

  1. Biomass Equipment & Materials Compensating Tax Deduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2005, New Mexico adopted a policy to allow businesses to deduct the value of biomass equipment and biomass materials used for the processing of biopower, biofuels, or biobased products in...

  2. Clark Public Utilities- Solar Energy Equipment Loan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Clark Public Utilities offers financing available to its customers for the purchase and installation of residential solar equipment. Loans up to $10,000 are available for solar pool heaters and...

  3. Hot conditioning equipment conceptual design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradshaw, F.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the conceptual design of the Hot Conditioning System Equipment. The Hot conditioning System will consist of two separate designs: the Hot Conditioning System Equipment; and the Hot Conditioning System Annex. The Hot Conditioning System Equipment Design includes the equipment such as ovens, vacuum pumps, inert gas delivery systems, etc.necessary to condition spent nuclear fuel currently in storage in the K Basins of the Hanford Site. The Hot Conditioning System Annex consists of the facility of house the Hot Conditioning System. The Hot Conditioning System will be housed in an annex to the Canister Storage Building. The Hot Conditioning System will consist of pits in the floor which contain ovens in which the spent nuclear will be conditioned prior to interim storage.

  4. Industrial Equipment Demand and Duty Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dooley, E. S.; Heffington, W. M.

    Demand and duty factors have been measured for selected equipment (air compressors, electric furnaces, injection molding machines, centrifugal loads, and others) in industrial plants. Demand factors for heavily loaded air compressors were near 100...

  5. Biomass Equipment and Materials Compensating Tax Deduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2005 New Mexico adopted a policy to allow businesses to deduct the value of biomass equipment and biomass materials used for the processing of biopower, biofuels or biobased products in...

  6. Tax Credit for Renewable Energy Equipment Manufacturers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tax Credit for Renewable Energy Resource Equipment Manufacturing Facilities was enacted as a part of Oregon's Business Energy Tax Credit (BETC) in July 2007, with the passage of HB 3201. The ...

  7. Property Tax Assessment for Renewable Energy Equipment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    HB 2403 of 2014 clarified that depreciation should be determined using straight-line depreciation over the useful life of the equipment. The taxable original cost equals the original cost of the...

  8. Equipment Energy Models Using Spreadsheet Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, J. S.

    EQUIPMENT ENERGY MODELS USING SPREADSHEET PROGRAMS Joel S. Gilbert, Dames & Moore, Bethesda, Maryland Engineering calculations on PC's are undergoing a revolution with the advent of spreadsheet programs. The author has found that virtually all...

  9. Consider Steam Turbine Drives for Rotating Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This revised ITP tip sheet on steam turbine drives for rotating equipment provides how-to advice for improving the system using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  10. Dairy Manure Handling Systems and Equipment.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweeten, John M.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Texas A&M University System ? Texas Agricultural Extension Service Zerle L. Carpenter, Director College Station 8?1446 DAIRY MANURE HANDLING SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT DAIRY MANURE HANDLING SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT John M. Sweeten, Ph....D., P.E.* A manure management system for a modern dairy should be capable of controlling solid or liquid manure and wastewater from the open corrals (manure and rainfall runoff), free stall barn , feeding barn , holding lot or holding shed , milking...

  11. Experience gained from equipment qualification inspections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobus, M.J.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes issues which have been identified during equipment qualification inspections. Generic qualification information is discussed first, such as qualification bases, utility/supplier interfaces, file auditability, and generic environmental qualification. Next, technical strategies with specific examples are discussed. Issues covered include functional performance requirements, post accident qualification, similarity, installation and interfaces, maintenance, aging, and testing. Finally, additions and deletions to equipment qualification master lists and environmental enveloping are discussed.

  12. Electricity Used by Office Equipment and Network Equipment in the U.S.: Detailed Report and Appendices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-45917 Electricity Used by Office Equipment and Network Equipment in the U.S.: Detailed Report..............................................................................................46 #12;#12;1 Electricity Used by Office Equipment and Network Equipment in the U.S. Kaoru Kawamoto and network equipment, there has been no recent study that estimates in detail how much electricity

  13. michael smith ornlradioactive beams: equipment & techniques recoil separators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    michael smith ornlradioactive beams: equipment & techniques recoil separators approach! · directly Smith, Rolfs, Barnes NIMA306 (1991) 233 #12;michael smith ornlradioactive beams: equipment & techniques;michael smith ornlradioactive beams: equipment & techniques recoil separators proof of concept with 12C

  14. Cold-Start Emissions Control in Hybrid Vehicles Equipped with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emissions Control in Hybrid Vehicles Equipped with a Passive Adsorber for Hydrocarbons and NOx Cold-Start Emissions Control in Hybrid Vehicles Equipped with a Passive Adsorber for...

  15. Abatement of Air Pollution: Air Pollution Control Equipment and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    These regulations contain instructions for the operation and monitoring of air pollution control equipment, as well as comments on procedures in the event of equipment breakdown,...

  16. Dispensing Equipment Testing With Mid-Level Ethanol/Gasoline...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Dispensing Equipment Testing With Mid-Level EthanolGasoline Test Fluid Dispensing Equipment Testing With Mid-Level EthanolGasoline Test Fluid The National Renewable Energy...

  17. advanced electronic equipment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    common equipment through predetermined global ... Chouinard, Natalie, 1979- 2009-01-01 85 Logging Equipment and Loren Kellogg Renewable Energy Websites Summary: and the control is...

  18. Southwest Gas Corporation- Commercial Energy Efficient Equipment Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southwest Gas Corporation (SWG) offers rebates to commercial customers in Nevada who purchase energy efficient natural gas equipment. Eligible equipment includes clothes washers, storage water...

  19. Southwest Gas Corporation- Commercial High-Efficiency Equipment Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southwest Gas Corporation (SWG) offers rebates to commercial customers in Arizona who purchase energy efficient natural gas equipment. Eligible equipment includes natural gas storage and tankless...

  20. Modular Process Equipment for Low Cost Manufacturing of High...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Process Equipment for Low Cost Manufacturing of High Capacity Prismatic Li-Ion Cell Alloy Anodes Modular Process Equipment for Low Cost Manufacturing of High Capacity Prismatic...

  1. Master equipment list -- Phase 1. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jech, J.B.

    1995-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to define the system requirements for the Master Equipment List (MEL) Phase 1 project. The intended audience for this document includes Data Automation Engineering (DAE), Configuration Management Improvement and Control Engineering (CMI and CE), Data Administration Council (DAC), and Tank Waste Remedial System (TWRS) personnel. The intent of Phase 1 is to develop a user-friendly system to support the immediate needs of the TWRS labeling program. Phase 1 will provide CMI and CE the ability to administrate, distribute, and maintain key information generated by the labeling program. CMI and CE is assigning new Equipment Identification Numbers (EINs) to selected equipment in Tank Farms per the TWRS Data Standard ``Tank Farm Equipment Identification Number``. The MEL Phase 1 system will be a multi-user system available through the HLAN network. It will provide basic functions such as view, query, and report, edit, data entry, password access control, administration and change control. The scope of Phase 1 data will encompass all Tank Farm Equipment identified by the labeling program. The data will consist of fields from the labeling program`s working database, relational key references and pointers, safety class information, and field verification data.

  2. Hydrocarbon desulfurization process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plummer, M.A.; Zimmerman, C.C. Jr.

    1986-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for converting a sour hydrocarbon feedstock having a relatively high sulfur content to a hydrocarbon product having a relatively low sulfur content comprising the steps of: (a) hydrodesulfurizing the feedstock having a relatively high sulfur contact with hydrogen to produce the hydrocarbon product having a relatively low sulfur content and hydrogen sulfide gas; (b) contacting the hydrogen sulfide gas with an anthraquinone dissolved in a polar organic solvent having a polarity greater than about 3 Debye units to produce sulfur and an anthrahydroquinone in the solvent; (c) regenerating the anthraquinone from the anthrahydroquinone upon contact with air to produce the anthraquinone and hydrogen peroxide; (d) recycling the anthraquinone to step (b); (e) reducing the hydrogen peroxide to oxygen and water; (f) partially oxidizing a hydrocarbon fuel with the oxygen to produce carbon dioxide and hydrogen; and (g) recycling the hydrogen to step (a).

  3. Flue gas desulfurization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Im, K.H.; Ahluwalia, R.K.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention involves a combustion process in which combustion gas containing sulfur oxide is directed past a series of heat exchangers to a stack and in which a sodium compound is added to the combustion gas in a temparature zone of above about 1400 K to form Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. Preferably, the temperature is above about 1800 K and the sodium compound is present as a vapor to provide a gas-gas reaction to form Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ as a liquid. Since liquid Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ may cause fouling of heat exchanger surfaces downstream from the combustion zone, the process advantageously includes the step of injecting a cooling gas downstream of the injection of the sodium compound yet upstream of one or more heat exchangers to cool the combustion gas to below about 1150 K and form solid Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. The cooling gas is preferably a portion of the combustion gas downstream which may be recycled for cooling. It is further advantageous to utilize an electrostatic precipitator downstream of the heat exchangers to recover the Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. It is also advantageous in the process to remove a portion of the combustion gas cleaned in the electrostatic precipitator and recycle that portion upstream to use as the cooling gas. 3 figures.

  4. Desulfurization sorbent regeneration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jalan, V.M.; Frost, D.G.

    1982-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A spent solid sorbent resulting from the removal of hydrogen sulfide from a fuel gas flow is regenerated with a steam-air mixture. The mixture of steam and air may also include additional nitrogen or carbon dioxide. The gas mixture contacts the spent sorbent containing metal sulfide at a temperature above 500/sup 0/C to regenerate the sulfide to metal oxide or carbonate. Various metal species including the period four transition metals and the lanthanides are suitable sorbents that may be regenerated by this method. In addition, the introduction of carbon dioxide gas permits carbonates such as those of strontium, barium and calcium to be regenerated. The steam permits regeneration of spent sorbent without formation of metal sulfate. Moreover, the regeneration will proceed with low oxygen concentrations and will occur without the increase in temperature to minimize the risk of sintering and densification of the sorbent. This method may be used for high-temperature fuel cells.

  5. Security Equipment and Systems Certification Program (SESCP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steele, B.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Papier, I.I. [Underwriters Labs., Inc., Northbrook, IL (United States)

    1996-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Underwriters Laboratories, Inc., (UL) have jointly established the Security Equipment and Systems Certification Program (SESCP). The goal of this program is to enhance industrial and national security by providing a nationally recognized method for making informed selection and use decisions when buying security equipment and systems. The SESCP will provide a coordinated structure for private and governmental security standardization review. Members will participate in meetings to identify security problems, develop ad-hoc subcommittees (as needed) to address these identified problems, and to maintain a communications network that encourages a meaningful exchange of ideas. This program will enhance national security by providing improved security equipment and security systems based on consistent, reliable standards and certification programs.

  6. dieSel/heAvy equipMent College of Rural and Community Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Chris

    907-455-2809 www.ctc.uaf.edu/programs/diesel/ certificate Minimum Requirements for Certificate: 36 credits The diesel and heavy equipment mechanics program offers the student training in the maintenance and equipment overhauls. Students work on large truck fuel, electrical and air systems, diesel engines

  7. Conceptual design report, CEBAF basic experimental equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1990-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) will be dedicated to basic research in Nuclear Physics using electrons and photons as projectiles. The accelerator configuration allows three nearly continuous beams to be delivered simultaneously in three experimental halls, which will be equipped with complementary sets of instruments: Hall A--two high resolution magnetic spectrometers; Hall B--a large acceptance magnetic spectrometer; Hall C--a high-momentum, moderate resolution, magnetic spectrometer and a variety of more dedicated instruments. This report contains a short description of the initial complement of experimental equipment to be installed in each of the three halls.

  8. Can combining economizers with improved filtration save energy and protect equipment in data centers?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shehabi, Arman

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by potential equipment reliability concerns associated withblack carbon; equipment reliability; energy efficiency 1.potential equipment reliability concerns associated with

  9. Can combining economizers with improved filtration save energy and protect equipment in data centers?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shehabi, Arman

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by potential equipment reliability concerns associated withblack carbon; equipment reliability; energy efficiency 1.potential equipment reliability concerns associated with

  10. Microbial reduction of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} as a means of by-product recovery/disposal from regenerable processes for the desulfurization of flue gas. Technical progress report, March 11, 1993--June 11, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sublette, K.L.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are two basic approaches to addressing the problem of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions: (1) desulfurize (and denitrogenate) the feedstock prior to or during combustion; or (2) scrub the resultant SO{sub 2} and oxides of nitrogen from the boiler flue gases. The flue gas processing alternative has been addressed in this project via microbial reduction of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} by sulfate-reducing bacteria

  11. Microbial reduction of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} as a means of by-product recovery/disposal from regenerable processes for the desulfurization of flue gas. Technical progress report, December 11, 1992--March 11, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sublette, K.L.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the potential of sulfate reducing bacteria to fix sulfur derived from flue gas desulfurization. The first section reviews the problem, the second section reviews progress of this study to use desulfovibrio desulfuricans for this purpose. The final section related progress during the current reporting period. This latter section describes studies to immobilize the bacteria in co-culture with floc-forming anaerobes, use of sewage sludges in the culture media, and sulfate production from sulfur dioxide.

  12. On Storage Operators LAMA -Equipe de Logique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nour, Karim

    On Storage Operators Karim NOUR LAMA - Equipe de Logique Universit´e de Savoie 73376 Le Bourget du Lac e-mail nour@univ-savoie.fr Abstract In 1990 Krivine (1990b) introduced the notion of storage shown that there is a very simple type in the AF2 type system for storage operators using Godel

  13. Test and Test Equipment Joshua Lottich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Chintan

    Test and Test Equipment Joshua Lottich CMPE 640 11/23/05 #12;Testing Verifies that manufactured chip meets design specifications. Cannot test for every potential defect. Modeling defects as faults allows for passing and failing of chips. Ideal test would capture all defects and pass only chips

  14. Right-Size Heating and Cooling Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is one of a series of technology fact sheets created to help housing designers and builders adopt a whole-house design approach and energy efficient design practices. The fact sheet helps people choose the correct equipment size for heating and cooling to improve comfort and reduce costs, maintenance, and energy use.

  15. Right-Sizing Laboratory Equipment Loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frenze, David; Greenberg, Steve; Mathew, Paul; Sartor, Dale; Starr, William

    2005-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory equipment such as autoclaves, glass washers, refrigerators, and computers account for a significant portion of the energy use in laboratories. However, because of the general lack of measured equipment load data for laboratories, designers often use estimates based on 'nameplate' rated data, or design assumptions from prior projects. Consequently, peak equipment loads are frequently overestimated. This results in oversized HVAC systems, increased initial construction costs, and increased energy use due to inefficiencies at low part-load operation. This best-practice guide first presents the problem of over-sizing in typical practice, and then describes how best-practice strategies obtain better estimates of equipment loads and right-size HVAC systems, saving initial construction costs as well as life-cycle energy costs. This guide is one in a series created by the Laboratories for the 21st Century ('Labs21') program, a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Department of Energy. Geared towards architects, engineers, and facilities managers, these guides provide information about technologies and practices to use in designing, constructing, and operating safe, sustainable, high-performance laboratories.

  16. An Approach to Evaluating Equipment Efficiency Policies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newsom, D. E.; Evans, A. R.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of several types of industr~al equipment to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of labeling rules and minimum energy effic~ency standards. An approach to the evaluation of these and related policy options is under development. Th~ approach...

  17. APOLLO PROGRAM LUNAR SURFACE EQUIPMENT STATUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    APOLLO PROGRAM LUNAR SURFACE EQUIPMENT STATUS 3 JUNE 1974 NOTE: Discussions of closed problems COMPOSITION EXPERIMENT ZERO OFFSET . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.6 APOLLO 14 ALSEP COLD CATHODE ION GAUGE EXPERIMENT INTERMITTENT SCIENCE DATA. 3.7 APOLLO 15 ALSEP COLD CATHODE ION GAUGE EXPERIMENT NOISY DATA

  18. APOLLO PROGRAM LUNAR SURFACE EQUIPMENT STATUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    APOLLO PROGRAM LUNAR SURFACE EQUIPMENT STATUS 18 SEPTEMBER 1973 NOTE: Discussions of closed-14 4-18 4-19 ZERO OFFSET. . . · . . . . . . . · . . . . . . . 4-20 4. 6 APOLLO 14 ALSEP COLD CATHODE ION GAUGE EXPERIMENT INTERMITTENT SCIENCE DATA 4. ? APOLLO 15 ALSEP COLD CATHODE ION GAUGE EXPERIMENT

  19. APOLLO PROGRAM LUNAR SURFACE EQUIPMENT STATUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    APOLLO PROGRAM LUNAR SURFACE EQUIPMENT STATUS 1 DECEMBER 1973 NOTE: Discussions of closed problems. · · · . · · . · · . · . . · . . CLOSED 4.6 APOLLO 14 ALSEP COLD CATHODE ION GAUGE EXPERIMENT INTERMITTENT SCIENCE DATA · . · CLOSED 4.7 APOLLO 15 ALSEP COLD CATHODE ION GAUGE EXPERIMENT NOISY DATA AND INTERMITTENT AUTOMATIC ZERO

  20. APOLLO PROGRAM LUNAR SURFACE EQUIPMENT STATUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    APOLLO PROGRAM LUNAR SURFACE EQUIPMENT STATUS 1 MARCH 1974 NOTE: Discussions of closed problems. . . . . . . . . . · . . . APOLLO 14 ALSEP COLD CATHODE ION GAUGE EXPERIMENT INTERMITTENT SCIENCE DATA · . APOLLO 15 ALSEP COLD . . . . 0 . . . . . APOLLO 15 LUNAR SURFACE MAGNETOMETER LOSS OF SCIENTIFIC AND ENGINEERING DATA. APOLLO 14

  1. Equipment Policy for Federal Sponsored Effective Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Property Manager I. Background Division of Research Florida Atlantic University is required to comply. Equipment shall be defined as an article of nonexpendable tangible personal property. Florida Atlantic and a useful life of more than one year. III. General Statement Research Accounting and Property Management

  2. Electrical Equipment Replacement: Energy Efficiency versus System Compatibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massey, G. W.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    upgrading electrical equipment to energy efficient models, including conductor sizing, overcurrent protective devices, grounding, and harmonics. The pages that follow provide guidance in the decision-making process when replacing electrical equipment... equipment. Several areas of compatibility must be addressed for equipment to work properly. Critical areas of concern are conductor sizing, overcurrent protection devices, grounding, and harmonics. Conductor Sizing Conductors are sized...

  3. THE GAME, FIELD, PLAYERS AND EQUIPMENT General Rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltisberger, Jay H.

    metal cleats are permitted. (See illegal player equipment) Game and Player Equipment (Illegal) 1. A player wearing illegal equipment shall not be permitted to play. This applies to any equipment, which be declared illegal include: A. Headgear containing any hard, unyielding, or stiff material, including billed

  4. THE EFFECT OF MERCURY CONTROLS ON WALLBOARD MANUFACTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandra Meischen

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pending EPA regulations may mandate 70 to 90% mercury removal efficiency from utility flue gas. A mercury control option is the trapping of oxidized mercury in wet flue gas desulfurization systems (FGD). The potential doubling of mercury in the FGD material and its effect on mercury volatility at temperatures common to wallboard manufacture is a concern that could limit the growing byproduct use of FGD material. Prediction of mercury fate is limited by lack of information on the mercury form in the FGD material. The parts per billion mercury concentrations prevent the identification of mercury compounds by common analytical methods. A sensitive analytical method, cold vapor atomic fluorescence, coupled with leaching and thermodecomposition methods were evaluated for their potential to identify mercury compounds in FGD material. The results of the study suggest that the mercury form is dominated by the calcium sulfate matrix and is probably associated with the sulfate form in the FGD material. Additionally, to determine the effect of high mercury concentration FGD material on wallboard manufacture, a laboratory FGD unit was built to trap the oxidized mercury generated in a simulated flue gas. Although the laboratory prepared FGD material did not contain the mercury concentrations anticipated, further thermal tests determined that mercury begins to evolve from FGD material at 380 to 390 F, consequently dropping the drying temperature should mitigate mercury evolution if necessary. Mercury evolution is also diminished as the weight of the wallboard sample increased. Consequently, mercury evolution may not be a significant problem in wallboard manufacture.

  5. Importance of energy efficiency in office equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blatt, M.H.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy-Efficient Office Technology 1994: An International Seminar has been organized and funded by the Office Technology Efficiency Consortium, a group of utilities, government agencies, and other energy efficiency advocates that has been aggressively championing the need for more efficient computers, displays, printers, faxes, and copiers. The Consortium, organized in late 1992, currently consists of 10 cofunders and numerous other participants. The cofunders are: The Electric Power Research Institute, New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, Consolidated Edison Company of New York, the Swedish National Board for Industrial and Technical Development (NUTEK), Ontario Hydro, Pacific Gas and Electric Company, U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the Wisconsin Center for Demand-Side Research. The Consortium has been striving to achieve multiple objectives. These objectives are to: (1) Improve office technology user energy efficiency end operating cost (2) Improve end-use equipment`s power quality characteristics (3) Increase equipment immunity to power line disturbances (4) Avoid the need for wiring overloads and upgrades (5) Reduce utility`s peak demand (6) Improve utility load factor. The growth in electricity use in the United States and the need for additional utility capacity has been driven to a great extent by the U.S. shift to a service economy and the coincident increase in the use of office equipment in these service establishments. The initial efforts of the Consortium, which consisted of the cofunders, included holding a workshop in June 1992 to heighten awareness of the importance of the need for more efficient office equipment. The workshop was documented in {open_quotes}Proceedings: Energy-Efficient Office Technologies,{close_quotes} TR-101945, in December 1992.

  6. Indoor Pollutants Emitted by Electronic Office Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maddalena, Randy L.; Destaillats, Hugo; Russell, Marion L.; Hodgson, Alfred T.; McKone, Thomas E.

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The last few decades have seen major changes in how people collect and process information at work and in their homes. More people are spending significant amounts of time in close proximity to computers, video display units, printers, fax machines and photocopiers. At the same time, efforts to improve energy efficiency in buildings by reducing leaks in building envelopes are resulting in tighter (i.e., less ventilated) indoor environments. Therefore, it is critical to understand pollutant emission rates for office equipment because even low emissions in areas that are under-ventilated or where individuals are in close proximity to the pollutant source can result in important indoor exposures. We reviewed existing literature reports on pollutant emission by office equipment, and measured emission factors of equipment with significant market share in California. We determined emission factors for a range of chemical classes including volatile and semivolatile organic compounds (VOCs and SVOCs), ozone and particulates. The measured SVOCs include phthalate esters, brominated and organophosphate flame retardants and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Measurements were carried out in large and small exposure chambers for several different categories of office equipment. Screening experiments using specific duty cycles in a large test chamber ({approx}20 m{sup 3}) allowed for the assessment of emissions for a range of pollutants. Results from the screening experiments identified pollutants and conditions that were relevant for each category of office equipment. In the second phase of the study, we used a smaller test chamber ({approx}1 m{sup 3}) to measure pollutant specific emission factors for individual devices and explored the influence of a range of environmental and operational factors on emission rates. The measured emission factors provide a data set for estimating indoor pollutant concentrations and for exploring the importance of user proximity when estimating exposure concentrations.

  7. Healy clean coal project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Healy Clean Coal Project is to demonstrate the integration of an advanced combustor and a heat recovery system with both high and low temperature emission control processes. Resulting emission levels of SO[sub 2], NO[sub x], and particulates are expected to be significantly better than the federal New source Performance standards. During this past quarter, engineering and design continued on the boiler, combustion flue gas desulfurization (FGD), and turbine/generator systems. Balance of plant equipment procurement specifications continue to be prepared. Construction activities commenced as the access road construction got under way. Temporary ash pond construction and drilling of the supply well will be completed during the next quarter.

  8. Healy clean coal project. Technical quarterly progress report no. 6, April--June 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Healy Clean Coal Project is to demonstrate the integration of an advanced combustor and a heat recovery system with both high and low temperature emission control processes. Resulting emission levels of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and particulates are expected to be significantly better than the federal New source Performance standards. During this past quarter, engineering and design continued on the boiler, combustion flue gas desulfurization (FGD), and turbine/generator systems. Balance of plant equipment procurement specifications continue to be prepared. Construction activities commenced as the access road construction got under way. Temporary ash pond construction and drilling of the supply well will be completed during the next quarter.

  9. A 12-MW-scale pilot study of in-duct scrubbing (IDS) using a rotary atomizer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samuel, E.A.; Murphy, K.R.; Demian, A.

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-cost, moderate-removal efficiency, flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technology was selected by the US Department of Energy for pilot demonstration in its Acid Rain Precursor Control Technology Initiative. The process, identified as In-Duct Scrubbing (IDS), applies rotary atomizer techniques developed for lime-based spray dryer FGD while utilizing existing flue gas ductwork and particulate collectors. IDS technology is anticipated to result in a dry desulfurization process with a moderate removal efficiency (50% or greater) for high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. The critical elements for successful application are: (1) adequate mixing of sorbent droplets with flue gas for efficient reaction contact, (2) sufficient residence time to produce a non-wetting product, and (3) appropriate ductwork cross-sectional area to prevent deposition of wet reaction products before particle drying is comple. The ductwork in many older plants, previously modified to meet 1970 Clean Air Act requirements for particulate control, usually meet these criteria. A 12 MW-scale IDS pilot plant was constructed at the Muskingum River Plant of the American Electric Power System. The pilot plant, which operates from a slipstrem attached to the air-preheater outlet duct from the Unit 5 boiler at the Muskingum River Plant (which burns about 4% sulfur coal), is equipped with three atomizer stations to test the IDS concept in vertical and horizontal configurations. In addition, the pilot plant is equipped to test the effect of injecting IDS off- product upstream of the atomizer, on SO{sub 2}and NO{sub x} removals.

  10. Viewing device for electron-beam equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nasyrov, R.S.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Viewing devices are used to observe melting, welding, and so on in vacuum systems, an it is necessary to protect the windows from droplets and vapor. A viewing device for electron-beam equipment is described in which the viewing tube and mounting flange are made as a tubular ball joint enclosed in a steel bellows, which render the viewing device flexible. Bending the viewing tube in the intervals between observations protects the viewing window from sputtering and from drops of molten metal.

  11. A lessee's guide to leasing industrial equipment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Jones Eugene

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is included in the agree- ment, the lessee is treading on dangerous ground, The Internal Reve- nue Service will examine such agreements closely and may decide the original transaction was a sale and not a lease. Regardless, whether the lessee actually...A LESSEE'S GUIDE TO LEASING INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT A Thesis Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in Partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Business Administration...

  12. Measured Peak Equipment Loads in Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathew, Paul A.

    2007-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical bulletin documents measured peak equipment load data from 39 laboratory spaces in nine buildings across five institutions. The purpose of these measurements was to obtain data on the actual peak loads in laboratories, which can be used to rightsize the design of HVAC systems in new laboratories. While any given laboratory may have unique loads and other design considerations, these results may be used as a 'sanity check' for design assumptions.

  13. Direct Liquid Cooling for Electronic Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, Henry; Greenberg, Steve

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a demonstration of an electronic--equipment cooling system in the engineering prototype development stage that can be applied in data centers. The technology provides cooling by bringing a water--based cooling fluid into direct contact with high--heat--generating electronic components. This direct cooling system improves overall data center energy efficiency in three ways: High--heat--generating electronic components are more efficiently cooled directly using water, capturing a large portion of the total electronic equipment heat generated. This captured heat reduces the load on the less--efficient air--based data center room cooling systems. The combination contributes to the overall savings. The power consumption of the electronic equipment internal fans is significantly reduced when equipped with this cooling system. The temperature of the cooling water supplied to the direct cooling system can be much higher than that commonly provided by facility chilled water loops, and therefore can be produced with lower cooling infrastructure energy consumption and possibly compressor-free cooling. Providing opportunities for heat reuse is an additional benefit of this technology. The cooling system can be controlled to produce high return water temperatures while providing adequate component cooling. The demonstration was conducted in a data center located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California. Thirty--eight servers equipped with the liquid cooling system and instrumented for energy measurements were placed in a single rack. Two unmodified servers of the same configuration, located in an adjacent rack, were used to provide a baseline. The demonstration characterized the fraction of heat removed by the direct cooling technology, quantified the energy savings for a number of cooling infrastructure scenarios, and provided information that could be used to investigate heat reuse opportunities. Thermal measurement data were used with data center energy use modeling software to estimate overall site energy use. These estimates show that an overall data center energy savings of approximately 20 percent can be expected if a center is retrofitted as specified in the models used. Increasing the portion of heat captured by this technology is an area suggested for further development.

  14. Confined zone dispersion flue gas desulfurization demonstration. Volume 1, Quarterly report No. 5, November 1, 1991--January 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the fifth quarterly report for this project. This project is divided into three phases. Phase 1, which has been completed, involved design, engineering, and procurement for the CZD system, duct and facility modifications, and supporting equipment. Phase 2, also completed, included equipment acquisition and installation, facility construction, startup, and operator training for parametric testing. Phase 3 broadly covers testing, operation and disposition, but only a portion of Phase 3 was included in Budget Period 1. That portion was concerned with parametric testing of the CZD system to establish the optimum conditions for an extended, one-year, continuous demonstration. As of December 31, 1991, the following goals have been achieved. (1) Nozzle Selection - A modified Spraying Systems Company (SSC) atomizing nozzle has been selected for the one-year continuous CZD demonstration. (2) SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} Reduction - Preliminary confirmation of 50% SO{sub 2} reduction has been achieved, but the NO{sub x} reduction target cannot be confirmed at this time. (3) Lime Selection - Testing indicated an injection rate of 40 to 50 gallons per minute with a lime slurry concentration of 8 to 10% to achieve 50% SO{sub 2} reduction. There has been no selection of the lime to be used in the one year demonstration. (4) ESP Optimization - Tests conducted to date have shown that lime injection has a very beneficial effect on ESP performance, and little adjustment may be necessary. (5) SO{sub 2} Removal Costs - Testing has not revealed any significant departure from the bases on which Bechtel`s original cost estimates (capital and operating) were prepared. Therefore, SO{sub 2} removal costs are still expected to be in the range of $300/ton or less.

  15. After-hours Power Status of Office Equipment and Inventory of Miscellaneous Plug-load Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberson, Judy A.; Webber, Carrie A.; McWhinney, Marla C.; Brown, Richard E.; Pinckard, Margaret J.; Busch, John F.

    2004-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This research was conducted in support of two branches of the EPA ENERGY STAR program, whose overall goal is to reduce, through voluntary market-based means, the amount of carbon dioxide emitted in the U.S. The primary objective was to collect data for the ENERGY STAR Office Equipment program on the after-hours power state of computers, monitors, printers, copiers, scanners, fax machines, and multi-function devices. We also collected data for the ENERGY STAR Commercial Buildings branch on the types and amounts of ''miscellaneous'' plug-load equipment, a significant and growing end use that is not usually accounted for by building energy managers. This data set is the first of its kind that we know of, and is an important first step in characterizing miscellaneous plug loads in commercial buildings. The main purpose of this study is to supplement and update previous data we collected on the extent to which electronic office equipment is turned off or automatically enters a low power state when not in active use. In addition, it provides data on numbers and types of office equipment, and helps identify trends in office equipment usage patterns. These data improve our estimates of typical unit energy consumption and savings for each equipment type, and enables the ENERGY STAR Office Equipment program to focus future effort on products with the highest energy savings potential. This study expands our previous sample of office buildings in California and Washington DC to include education and health care facilities, and buildings in other states. We report data from twelve commercial buildings in California, Georgia, and Pennsylvania: two health care buildings, two large offices (> 500 employees each), three medium offices (50-500 employees), four education buildings, and one ''small office'' that is actually an aggregate of five small businesses. Two buildings are in the San Francisco Bay area of California, five are in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and five are in Atlanta, Georgia.

  16. Anne Arundel County- Solar and Geothermal Equipment Property Tax Credits

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Anne Arundel County offers a one-time credit from county property taxes on residential dwellings that use solar and geothermal energy equipment for heating and cooling, and solar energy equipment...

  17. Anne Arundel County- Solar and Geothermal Equipment Property Tax Credit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a one-time credit from county property taxes on residential structures that use solar and geothermal energy equipment for heating and cooling and solar energy equipment for water heating...

  18. Training Room Equipment Instructions Projector and TV Display

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Training Room Equipment Instructions Projector and TV Display The control panel on the wall are connected to a training room computer and room is equipped with a keyboard, mouse and clicker. Connect USB

  19. Property Tax Exemption for Machinery, Equipment, Materials, and Supplies (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Property Tax Exemption for Machinery, Equipment, Materials, and Supplies exists for low-dollar items of machinery, equipment, materials and supplies used for business purposes, or in activities...

  20. New web page lists excess equipment | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New web page lists excess equipment If you need a piece of equipment or office furniture, you can now go online to see if there's something at the Ames Laboratory warehouse that...

  1. Difficulty of Measuring Emissions from Heavy-Duty Engines Equipped...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Difficulty of Measuring Emissions from Heavy-Duty Engines Equipped with SCR and DPF Difficulty of Measuring Emissions from Heavy-Duty Engines Equipped with SCR and DPF In reference...

  2. Reducing variability in equipment availability at Intel using systems optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwong, William W. M

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Equipment management is an important driver behind operational efficiency, since capital equipment makes up about 40% of the average semiconductor manufacturer's total assets. The main goal of this project is to reduce ...

  3. Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Electrical Generating Equipment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Indiana does not have a specific sales and use tax exemption for equipment used in the production of renewable electricity. Therefore, such equipment is presumed to be subject to sales and use tax....

  4. Home and Farm Security Machinery and Equipment Identification. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Gary S.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    73 Fibme and Farm Security -m Machinery and Equipment identification Home and Farm Security chinery and Equipment Identification *Gary S. Nelson is no longer just an urban problem. d burglaries in rural communities have to an alarming...

  5. Optimal Sequencing of Central Refrigeration Equipment in an Industrial Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiorino, D. P.; Priest, J. W.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model was developed to find a viable solution to the problem of selecting the optimal sequence of refrigeration equipment (chillers, cooling towers, pumps) to operate in a Central Utility Plant. The optimal equipment sequence is that sequence...

  6. An Approach to Evaluating Equipment Efficiency Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newsom, D. E.; Evans, A. R.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN APPROACH TO EVALUATING EQUIPMENT EFFICIENCY POLICIES Donald E. Newsom, Ph.D. and Allan R. Evans, Ph.D., P.E. Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois ABSTRACT The National Energy Conservation Policy Act of 1978 authorized studies... odology to be used in performing the studies. i In response to the requirements of NECPA, 4r gonne National Laboratory has been engaged in t~e development of an approach to the evaluation of!pos i sible governmental policy options that would en~our- I...

  7. Transportation Equipment (2010 MECS) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2, 2003ToolsearchTransportation Equipment (2010 MECS)

  8. Smart Buildings Equipment Initiative | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartment of Energy Ready, Set,Buildings Equipment Initiative Smart

  9. Zhongneng Windpower Equipments | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCaliforniaWeifang SwisselectronicXianEquipments Jump to: navigation,

  10. Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards: Guidance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative FuelsSanta3Appliance and Equipment Standards Fact

  11. Equipment-Resources-PHaSe-EFRC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1, 13 DE@Energy Innovation100 tonEquipment

  12. Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - Application Process

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found TheHot electron dynamics in807 DE89 002669 RF and^Equipment

  13. Equipment Certification Requirements | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazel Crest,EnergySerranopolisEnviroMissionEquipment Certification

  14. INL Equipment to Aid Regional Response Team

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogen andHypernuclei in HallLeo282INL Equipment to

  15. Commercial Cooking Equipment | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png ElColumbia, North Carolina:Cooking Equipment Incentives

  16. Commercial Refrigeration Equipment | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png ElColumbia, North Carolina:Cooking Equipment

  17. Equips Nucleares SA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision|LLCInsulation Incentives Retrieved fromEquips

  18. Safe Operating Procedure LOCKOUT/TAGOUT FOR MACHINES & EQUIPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Safe Operating Procedure (5/11) LOCKOUT/TAGOUT FOR MACHINES & EQUIPMENT: SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES://ehs.unl.edu/) Introduction This SOP is intended to work in tandem with other EHS SOPs related to Lockout/Tagout (LO/TO): · Lockout/Tagout for Machines & Equipment: Program Overview · Lockout/Tagout for Machines & Equipment

  19. Mixed Oxide Fresh Fuel Package Auxiliary Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yapuncich, F.; Ross, A. [AREVA Federal Services (AFS), Tacoma WA (United States); Clark, R.H. [Shaw AREVA MOX Services, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC (United States); Ammerman, D. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is overseeing the construction the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) on the Savannah River Site. The new facility, being constructed by NNSA's contractor Shaw AREVA MOX Services, will fabricate fuel assemblies utilizing surplus plutonium as feedstock. The fuel will be used in designated commercial nuclear reactors. The MOX Fresh Fuel Package (MFFP), which has recently been licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as a type B package (USA/9295/B(U)F-96), will be utilized to transport the fabricated fuel assemblies from the MFFF to the nuclear reactors. It was necessary to develop auxiliary equipment that would be able to efficiently handle the high precision fuel assemblies. Also, the physical constraints of the MFFF and the nuclear power plants require that the equipment be capable of loading and unloading the fuel assemblies both vertically and horizontally. The ability to reconfigure the load/unload evolution builds in a large degree of flexibility for the MFFP for the handling of many types of both fuel and non fuel payloads. The design and analysis met various technical specifications including dynamic and static seismic criteria. The fabrication was completed by three major fabrication facilities within the United States. The testing was conducted by Sandia National Laboratories. The unique design specifications and successful testing sequences will be discussed. (authors)

  20. Space and Movable Equipment Inventory Revision: July 31, 2014 CERTIFICATION OF SPACE AND MOVABLE EQUIPMENT INVENTORY -FISCAL YEAR 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Space and Movable Equipment Inventory Revision: July 31, 2014 CERTIFICATION OF SPACE AND MOVABLE EQUIPMENT INVENTORY - FISCAL YEAR 2014 TO BE USED FOR IBB PLANNING FOR FISCAL YEAR 2016 I acknowledge that the space and movable equipment inventory results conducted for this fiscal year will be used for IBB

  1. Emergency sacrificial sealing method in filters, equipment, or systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Erik P

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A system seals a filter or equipment component to a base and will continue to seal the filter or equipment component to the base in the event of hot air or fire. The system includes a first sealing material between the filter or equipment component and the base; and a second sealing material between the filter or equipment component and the base and proximate the first sealing material. The first sealing material and the second seal material are positioned relative to each other and relative to the filter or equipment component and the base to seal the filter or equipment component to the base and upon the event of fire the second sealing material will be activated and expand to continue to seal the filter or equipment component to the base in the event of hot air or fire.

  2. Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, August 1--October 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chugh, Y.P.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate two technologies for the placement of coal combustion by-products in abandoned underground coal mines, and to assess the environmental impact of these technologies for the management of CCB materials. The two technologies for the underground placement that were to be developed and demonstrated are: (1) pneumatic placement using virtually dry CCB products, and (2) hydraulic placement using a paste mixture of CCB products with about 70% solids. The period covered by this report is the second quarter of Phase 3 of the overall program. During this period over 8,000 tons of CCB mixtures was injected using the hydraulic paste technology. This amount of material virtually filled the underground opening around the injection well, and was deemed sufficient to demonstrate fully the hydraulic injection technology. By the end of this quarter about 2,000 tons of fly ash had been placed underground using the pneumatic placement technology. While the rate of injection of about 50 tons per hour met design criteria, problems were experienced in the delivery of fly ash to the pneumatic demonstration site. The source of the fly ash, the Archer Daniels Midland Company power plant at Decatur, Illinois is some distance from the demonstration site, and often sufficient tanker trucks are not available to haul enough fly ash to fully load the injection equipment. Further, on some occasions fly ash from the plant was not available. The injection well was plugged three times during the demonstration. This typically occurred due to cementation of the FBC ash in contact with water. After considerable deliberations and in consultation with the technical project officer, it was decided to stop further injection of CCB`s underground using the developed pneumatic technology.

  3. Tenneco upgrades system with equipment conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, K. [Ariel Corp., Mt. Vernon, OH (United States)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tenneco Gas, Inc., Houston, recently completed the successful conversion of over 14,300 horsepower compression equipment at its transmission in Catlettsburg, KY. The system consists of three identical Ariel JGC/6 compressors, driven by three matching Ansaldo electric motors, capable of running between 450 and 900 rpm. These variable speed, synchronous electric motors allow for greater flexibility, without the use of traditional cylinder unloaders. If desired Eureka Energy Systems, Richardson, TX designed the compressor package. One of Tenneco`s objectives when selecting a package to upgrade existing compression capabilities was to ensure compliance with future regulations promulgated pursuant to the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Initially, Tenneco considered separable compressors because of the availability of the newer, clean burning, gas ignited drivers in the 5,000 horsepower range, such as the Caterpillar 3612 and 3616. This paper reviews the design, performance and comparative operating cost of these compressor units.

  4. Positive materials identification of existing equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, H.A. [Exxon Research and Engineering Co., Florham Park, NJ (United States)

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Considerable engineering effort and expertise are expended for materials selection at refining and petrochemical facilities. However, the benefits of this effort are undermined if there is an inadvertent material substitution during construction. Although procedures have always been in place to reduce the chance of such substitutions, it is known that these errors have occurred. Accordingly, over the years the industry has periodically reviewed and improved quality control in this effort. However, many older facilities that did not benefit from today`s procedures are still in operation. As a consequence, some companies have conducted positive material identification (PMI) verification of existing equipment. This process is further complicated by the fact that the most susceptible components are typically insulated and must be located. Once located, accessibility and operating temperatures are complicating issues. This paper describes prioritization issues and hardware tradeoffs for conducting a PMI verification program.

  5. Use of ferric sulfate: acid media for the desulfurization of model compounds of coal. [Dibenzothiophene, diphenyl sulfide, di-n-butyl sulfide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clary, L.R.; Vermeulen, T.; Lynn, S.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this work has been to investigate the ability of ferric sulfate-acid leach systems to oxidize the sulfur in model compounds of coal. Ferric iron-acid leach systems have been shown to be quite effective at removal of inorganic sulfur in coal. In this study, the oxidative effect of ferric iron in acid-leach systems was studied using dibenzothiophene, diphenyl sulfide, and di-n-butyl sulfide as models of organic sulfur groups in coal. Nitrogen and oxygen, as well as various transition metal catalysts and oxidants, were utilized in this investigation. Dibenzothiophene was found to be quite refractory to oxidation, except in the case where metavanadate was added, where it appears that 40% oxidation to sulfone could have occurred per hour at 150/sup 0/C and mild oxygen pressure. Diphenyl sulfide was selectively oxidized to sulfoxide and sulfone in an iron and oxygen system. Approximately 15% conversion to sulfone occurred per hour under these conditions. Some of the di-n-butyl sulfide was cracked to 1-butene and 1-butanethiol under similar conditions. Zinc chloride and ferric iron were used at 200/sup 0/C in an attempt to desulfonate dibenzothiophene sulfone, diphenyl sulfone, and di-n-butyl sulfone. Di-n-butyl sulfone was completely desulfurized on one hour and fragmented to oxidized parafins, while dibenzothiophene sulfone and diphenyl sulfone were unaffected. These results suggest that an iron-acid leach process could only selectively oxidize aryl sulfides under mild conditions, representing only 20% of the organic sulfur in coal (8% of the total sulfur). Removal through desulfonation once selective sulfur oxidation had occurred was only demonstrated for alkyl sulfones, with severe oxidation of the fragmented paraffins also occurring in one hour.

  6. Brief scales to assess physical activity and sedentary equipment in the home

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    assess test- retest reliability of equipment counts for eachhigher test-retest reliability for all equipment scales thanreliability of report- ing portable electronic equipment and

  7. Fate of Mercury in Synthetic Gypsum Used for Wallboard Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jessica Sanderson; Gary M. Blythe; Mandi Richardson

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents and discusses results from Task 6 of the study 'Fate of Mercury in Synthetic Gypsum Used for Wallboard Production,' performed at a full-scale commercial wallboard plant. Synthetic gypsum produced by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems on coal-fired power plants is commonly used in the manufacture of wallboard. This practice has long benefited the environment by recycling the FGD gypsum byproduct, which is becoming available in increasing quantities, decreasing the need to landfill this material, and increasing the sustainable design of the wallboard product. However, new concerns have arisen as recent mercury control strategies involve the capture of mercury in FGD systems. The objective of this study is to determine whether any mercury is released into the atmosphere when the synthetic gypsum material is used as a feedstock for wallboard production. The project is being co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42080), USG Corporation, and EPRI. USG Corporation is the prime contractor, and URS Group is a subcontractor. The project scope now includes six discrete tasks, each conducted at various USG wallboard plants using synthetic gypsum from different FGD systems. The project was originally composed of five tasks, which were to include (1) a baseline test, then variations representing differing power plant: (2) emissions control configurations, (3) treatment of fine gypsum particles, (4) coal types, and (5) FGD reagent types. However, Task 5, which was to include testing with an alternate FGD reagent, could not be conducted as planned. Instead, Task 5 was conducted at conditions similar to Task 3, although with gypsum from an alternate FGD system. Subsequent to conducting Task 5 under these revised conditions, an opportunity arose to test gypsum produced at the same FGD system, but with an additive (Degussa Corporation's TMT-15) being used in the FGD system. TMT-15 was expected to impact the stability of mercury in synthetic gypsum used to produce wallboard, so Task 6 was added to the project to test this theory. In this project, process stacks in the wallboard plant have been sampled using the Ontario Hydro method. For every task, the stack locations sampled have included a dryer for the wet gypsum as it enters the plant and a gypsum calciner. For Tasks 1, 4, 5 and 6, the stack of the dryer for the wet wallboard product was also tested. Also at each site, in-stream process samples were collected and analyzed for mercury concentration before and after each significant step in wallboard production. The Ontario Hydro results, process sample mercury concentration data, and process data were used to construct mercury mass balances across the wallboard plants. Task 6 was conducted at a wallboard plant processing synthetic gypsum from a power plant that fires Eastern bituminous coal. The power plant has a single-loop, open spray tower limestone forced oxidation FGD system, with the forced oxidation conducted in the reaction tank integral with the FGD absorber. The FGD system has gypsum fines blow down as part of the dewatering step. The power plant is equipped with a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system for NOX emissions control, and the SCR was in service during the time period the gypsum tested was produced. Also, as mentioned above, Degussa additive TMT-15 was being added to the FGD system when this gypsum was produced. The results of the Task 6 stack testing, as measured by the Ontario Hydro method, detected that an average of 55% of the incoming mercury was emitted during wallboard production. These losses were distributed as about 4% across the dryer mill, 6% across the board dryer kiln, and 45% across the kettle calciner. Emissions were similar to what Task 5 results showed on a percentage basis, but about 30% lower on a mass basis. The same power plant FGD system produced the synthetic gypsum used in Task 5 (with no use of TMT-15) and in Task 6 (with TMT-15 added to the FGD system). The lower emissions on a mass basis appeared

  8. Tools and Equipment Modeling for Automobile Interactive Assembling Operating Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu Dianliang; Zhu Hongmin [Shanghai Jiao Tong University (China); Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advance Manufacturing Environment (China)

    2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Tools and equipment play an important role in the simulation of virtual assembly, especially in the assembly process simulation and plan. Because of variety in function and complexity in structure and manipulation, the simulation of tools and equipments remains to be a challenge for interactive assembly operation. Based on analysis of details and characteristics of interactive operations for automobile assembly, the functional requirement for tools and equipments of automobile assembly is given. Then, a unified modeling method for information expression and function realization of general tools and equipments is represented, and the handling methods of manual, semi-automatic, automatic tools and equipments are discussed. Finally, the application in assembly simulation of rear suspension and front suspension of Roewe 750 automobile is given. The result shows that the modeling and handling methods are applicable in the interactive simulation of various tools and equipments, and can also be used for supporting assembly process planning in virtual environment.

  9. Process for the elimination of waste water produced upon the desulfurization of coking oven gas by means of wash solution containing organic oxygen-carrier, with simultaneous recovery of elemental sulfur

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diemer, P.; Brake, W.; Dittmer, R.

    1985-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for the elimination of waste water falling out with the desulfurization of coking oven gas by means of an organic oxygen carrier-containing washing solution with simultaneous recovery of elemental sulfur. The waste water is decomposed in a combustion chamber in a reducing atmosphere at temperatures between about 1000/sup 0/ and 1100/sup 0/ C. under such conditions that the mole ratio of H/sub 2/S:SO/sub 2/ in the exhaust gas of the combustion chamber amounts to at least 2:1. Sulfur falling out is separated and the sensible heat of the exhaust gas is utilized for steam generation. The cooled and desulfurized exhaust gas is added to the coking oven gas before the pre-cooling. Sulfur falling out from the washing solution in the oxidizer is separated out and lead into the combustion chamber together with the part of the washing solution discharged as waste water from the washing solution circulation. Preferred embodiments include that the sulfur loading of the waste water can amount to up to about 370 kg sulfur per m/sup 3/ waste water; having the cooling of sulfur-containing exhaust gas leaving the combustion chamber follow in a waste heat boiler and a sulfur condenser heated by pre-heated boiler feed water, from which condenser sulfur is discharged in liquid state.

  10. Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Commercial Lawn Equipment (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program produced this guide to help inform the commercial mowing industry about product options and potential benefits. This guide provides information about equipment powered by propane, ethanol, compressed natural gas, biodiesel, and electricity, as well as advanced engine technology. In addition to providing an overview for organizations considering alternative fuel lawn equipment, this guide may also be helpful for organizations that want to consider using additional alternative fueled equipment.

  11. Home and Farm Security Machinery and Equipment Identification.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Gary S.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    73 Fibme and Farm Security -m Machinery and Equipment identification Home and Farm Security chinery and Equipment Identification *Gary S. Nelson is no longer just an urban problem. d burglaries in rural communities have to an alarming... insurance y equipment replacement, lost work urs and so forth. mers can discourage and minimize y theft from their farms is by providing a law enforcement officers to easily identify Mark all machinery and tools with a tification number (ID). Use...

  12. Workshop on environmental qualification of electric equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lofaro, R.; Gunther, W.; Villaran, M.; Lee, B.S.; Taylor, J. [comps.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Questions concerning the Environmental Qualification (EQ) of electrical equipment used in commercial nuclear power plants have recently become the subject of significant interest to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Initial questions centered on whether compliance with the EQ requirements for older plants were adequate to support plant operation beyond 40 years. After subsequent investigation, the NRC Staff concluded that questions related to the differences in EQ requirements between older and newer plants constitute a potential generic issue which should be evaluated for backfit, independent of license renewal activities. EQ testing of electric cables was performed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) under contract to the NRC in support of license renewal activities. Results showed that some of the environmentally qualified cables either failed or exhibited marginal insulation resistance after a simulated plant life of 20 years during accident simulation. This indicated that the EQ process for some electric cables may be non-conservative. These results raised questions regarding the EQ process including the bases for conclusions about the qualified life of components based upon artificial aging prior to testing.

  13. Surveillance Guide - OSS 19.1 Personal Protective Equipment

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Date: Facility Representative RL Facility Representative Program May 23, 1995 Surveillance Guide OSS 19.1 Revision 0 Personal Protective Equipment Page 5 of 5...

  14. Research Study - Global Enterprise VoIP Equipment Market Forecasts...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    policy and plan, Enterprise VoIP Equipment product specification, manufacturing process, cost structure etc. Then we deeply analyzed the world's main region market conditions that...

  15. Equipment and capabilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alamos instruments Equipment and capabilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Lujan Neutron Scattering Center enabled a geologist to determine that a dazzling 217.78-gram...

  16. Novel Energy Conversion Equipment for Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications Novel Energy Conversion Equipment for Low Temperatures Geothermal Resources City of Eagan Civic Ice Arena Renovation Hybrid and Advanced Air Cooling...

  17. Novel Energy Conversion Equipment for Low Temperatures Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Novel Energy Conversion Equipment for Low Temperature Geothermal Resources City of Eagan Civic Ice Arena Renovation Canby Cascaded Geothermal Project Phase 1 Feasibility...

  18. Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Test Report: AeroVironment

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    pROGRAM Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Test Report: AeroVironment EVSE Features LED status light EVSE Specifications Grid connection Hardwired Connector type J1772 Test...

  19. Applications of Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) to Rotating Equipment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sainudiin, Raazesh

    , engines), driven equipment (compressors, pumps, mixers, fans, extruders), transmission devices (gears diagnosis, trouble shooting, maintenance, sensor validation, and control. Artificial Neural Network (ANN

  20. automated accounting equipment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the renewal of two blanket purchase contracts with SCHNEIDER ELECTRIC (FR) and SIEMENS SUISSE (CH) for the supply of automation systems and fieldbus equipment for a...

  1. ID BUC$ EQUIPMENT REQUEST FORM CAMPUS EVENT PAYMENT OPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsai, Istvan

    ID BUC$ EQUIPMENT REQUEST FORM CAMPUS EVENT PAYMENT OPTION FOR ETSU ORGANIZATIONS Name ID BUC$. ETSU account transfer or a check requested? o ETSU Account

  2. Workshop on Condensing Heating and Water Heating Equipment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Workshop on Condensing Heating and Water Heating Equipment Thursday, October 9, 2014 List of Attendees OrganizationAttendees DOE - John Cymbalsky - Ashley Armstrong - Johanna...

  3. Microsoft Word - CX-SnohomishPUD Equipment Purchase_140521

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    data acquisition equipment (including kilowatt hour quantity) Bay 15: three current transformers Bay 15: three voltage transformers Bay 2: SCADA 5 systems, plus Snohomish data...

  4. FACT SHEET: SUPER-EFFICIENT EQUIPMENT AND APPLICANCE DEPLOYMENT...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and other energy-using equipment - cutting energy waste, creating jobs, reducing pollution, and saving money for consumers around the world. The ministers launched the...

  5. Analysis Procedure And Equipment For Deep Geoelectrical Soundings...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Soundings In Noisy Areas Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Analysis Procedure And Equipment For Deep Geoelectrical Soundings...

  6. Technical Meeting: Physical Characterization of Connected Buildings Equipment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On January 28-29, 2015, BTO hosted a technical meeting on the Physical Characterization of Connected Buildings Equipment at the Chicago, IL Courtyard Downtown Hotel.

  7. Jefferson Lab Tech Associate Invents Lockout Device for Equipment...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tech Associate Invents Lockout Device for Equipment with Removable Power Cords April 22, 2002 It was the early 1990s and building Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam...

  8. Collecting Construction Equipment Activity Data from Caltrans Project Records

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kable, Justin M

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Niemeier, D. , (2002). Construction Emissions Review Memo.Documents/June_2002_TO8_construction_memo_for_mjb.pdf Pope,s Fleet Remains Strong. Construction Equipment Magazine,

  9. Best Management Practice #9: Single-Pass Cooling Equipment |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Find another use for the single-pass effluent in boiler make-up supply or landscape irrigation and implement. Some equipment effluent, such as degreasers and hydraulic...

  10. Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Renewable Energy Equipment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The statute defines the components of a system eligible for the exemption; these include trackers, generating equipment, supporting structures or racks, inverters, towers and foundations, balance...

  11. Philadelphia Gas Works- Commercial and Industrial Equipment Rebate Program (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Philadelphia Gas Works' (PGW) Commercial and Industrial Equipment rebates are available to all PGW commercial and industrial customers installing high efficiency boilers or eligible commercial food...

  12. Puget Sound Energy- Commercial Energy Efficient Equipment Rebate Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Puget Sound Energy's (PSE) Energy Efficient Equipment Rebate Programs offer a variety of incentives to non-residential customers. Eligible technologies include lighting measures, air conditioners,...

  13. Condensing Heating and Water Heating Equipment Workshop Location...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Condensing Heating and Water Heating Equipment Workshop Location: Washington Gas Light Appliance Training Facility 6801 Industrial Road Springfield, VA Date: October 9, 2014 Time:...

  14. Cold test data for equipment acceptance into 105-KE Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Packer, M.J.

    1994-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides acceptance testing of equipment to be installed in the 105-KE Basin for pumping sludge to support the discharge chute barrier doors installation.

  15. Appendix D: Facility Process Data and Appendix E: Equipment Calibratio...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    D: Facility Process Data and Appendix E: Equipment Calibration Data Sheets from Final Report: Particulate Emissions Testing, Unit 1, Potomac River Generating Station, Alexandria,...

  16. Philadelphia Gas Works- Residential and Small Business Equipment Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Philadelphia Gas Works' (PGW) Residential Heating Equipment rebates are available to all PGW residential or small business customers installing high efficiency boilers and furnaces, and...

  17. Uncertainty in Experience CurvesUncertainty in Experience Curves for Climate Policy Analysis:for Climate Policy Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Presentation to the NAS Workshop on Modeling the Economics of Greenhouse Gas converters installed on automobiles · No "natural" markets for these technologies; rather, major markets in Service CumulativeGWe Japan Germany Others U.S. FGD = Flue Gas Desulfurization system (typical SO2 removal

  18. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    of coal in conventional and/ or advanced clean coal technology combustors. These include fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products from advanced clean coal technology clean coal technology combustors. Over 60% of the CCBs are generated as fly ash. An estimate

  19. automatic test equipment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    automatic test equipment First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Test and Test Equipment Joshua...

  20. Safe Operating Procedure LOCKOUT/TAGOUT FOR MACHINES & EQUIPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Safe Operating Procedure (5/11) LOCKOUT/TAGOUT FOR MACHINES & EQUIPMENT: TRAINING AND INSPECTIONS during maintenance and repair operations. In these situations, a Lockout/Tagout (LO/TO) program must "Control of Hazardous Energy: Lockout/Tagout (LO/TO) for Machines and Equipment." This course is available

  1. Radio-telemetry equipment and applications for carnivores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    7 Radio-telemetry equipment and applications for carnivores Mark R. Fuller and Todd K. Fuller Radio goals for this chapter are to provide basic information about radio-telemetry equipment and procedures's (2001) comprehensive book, A manual of wildlife radio tagging for persons who are unfamiliar with radio

  2. SANTA CRUZ: EQUIPMENT ADMINISTRATION UCSC PHYSICAL INVENTORY PROCEDURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    SANTA CRUZ: EQUIPMENT ADMINISTRATION UCSC PHYSICAL INVENTORY PROCEDURE Rev. 03/01/07 1 DUE: APRIL 1, 2014 Attached is a copy of the 2013 EQ920 report of physical inventory of equipment in your care of steps in completing the physical inventory. It is recommended that you begin the process as early

  3. NEW CHARACTERISATION METHOD OF ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT WASTES (WEEE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    NEW CHARACTERISATION METHOD OF ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT WASTES (WEEE) N. Menad*, , S encountered in Electrical and Electronic Equipment Wastes (WEEE) is a major improvement for its recycling. Mechanical separation-oriented characterization of WEEE was conducted in an attempt to evaluate

  4. 2006 Haulage & Loading Conference: big equipment, big crowd

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The theme of this year's Haulage and Loading Conference was 'Is better still better?' Most of the presenters either considered the effectiveness of bigger equipment or examined other strategies from various perspectives, based on their experiences. Papers were presented on trucks, shovels, loaders, excavators, haul road design and maintenance, and incorporating IT equipment. 5 photos.

  5. Data Network Equipment Energy Use and Savings Potential in Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lanzisera, Steven; Nordman, Bruce; Brown, Richard E.

    2010-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Network connectivity has become nearly ubiquitous, and the energy use of the equipment required for this connectivity is growing. Network equipment consists of devices that primarily switch and route Internet Protocol (IP) packets from a source to a destination, and this category specifically excludes edge devices like PCs, servers and other sources and sinks of IP traffic. This paper presents the results of a study of network equipment energy use and includes case studies of networks in a campus, a medium commercial building, and a typical home. The total energy use of network equipment is the product of the stock of equipment in use, the power of each device, and their usage patterns. This information was gathered from market research reports, broadband market penetration studies, field metering, and interviews with network administrators and service providers. We estimate that network equipment in the USA used 18 TWh, or about 1percent of building electricity, in 2008 and that consumption is expected to grow at roughly 6percent per year to 23 TWh in 2012; world usage in 2008 was 51 TWh. This study shows that office building network switches and residential equipment are the two largest categories of energy use consuming 40percent and 30percent of the total respectively. We estimate potential energy savings for different scenarios using forecasts of equipment stock and energy use, and savings estimates range from 20percent to 50percent based on full market penetration of efficient technologies.

  6. Space and Movable Equipment On-line Inventory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Space and Movable Equipment On-line Inventory FY14 (July 2013 - June 2014) CAS ­ Cost Accounting and Michael Richards #12;Learning Objectives · Gain understanding of the Importance of Space & Equipment Inventory. · Understand the entire Inventory Process. · How to classify functional space. · How to inventory

  7. A rubber mount model. Application to automotive equipment suspension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A rubber mount model. Application to automotive equipment suspension B. Thomas1, 2 , L. Manin1.manin@insa-lyon.fr Abstract In order to predict the nonlinear dynamic response of automotive equipment supported by rubber identification of the model. The application concerns the suspension of an automotive engine cooling module. 1

  8. Equipment specifications for an electrochemical fuel reprocessing plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemphill, Kevin P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrochemical reprocessing is a technique used to chemically separate and dissolve the components of spent nuclear fuel, in order to produce new metal fuel. There are several different variations to electrochemical reprocessing. These variations are accounted for by both the production of different types of spent nuclear fuel, as well as different states and organizations doing research in the field. For this electrochemical reprocessing plant, the spent fuel will be in the metallurgical form, a product of fast breeder reactors, which are used in many nuclear power plants. The equipment line for this process is divided into two main categories, the fuel refining equipment and the fuel fabrication equipment. The fuel refining equipment is responsible for separating out the plutonium and uranium together, while getting rid of the minor transuranic elements and fission products. The fuel fabrication equipment will then convert this plutonium and uranium mixture into readily usable metal fuel.

  9. Attachment 2 UC Berkeley EI-LOTO "Equipment Specific" Procedure Equip. Name: _______________________________ Building: __________________________________ Location/Room Number: _____________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    Attachment 2 ­ UC Berkeley ­ EI-LOTO "Equipment Specific" Procedure Equip. Name BARRICADES CHAINS PRESSURE: BLEEDERS LOCKED OPEN & TAGGED SHIELDS: ARC CURTAIN HEAT BLANKET STEAM: LINES piping or tanks must be bled, drained, and/or brought to atmospheric pressure and locked "open" to assure

  10. Unwanted Materials and Equipment All unwanted materials and equipment must go through Salvage (x2329) for disposal or reuse.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    Unwanted Materials and Equipment All unwanted materials and equipment must go through Salvage (x.stanford.edu/main/propertyforms.asp) Some items may require a Radiation Survey or handling by Waste Management. Follow the directions with collecting empty moving boxes, and taking materials to trash or recycling containers. Submit a Service

  11. Confined zone dispersion project. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the performance of the confined zone dispersion (CZD) flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system in removing sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) from flue gas in the coal-fired boiler. The CZD-FGD system, installed at Pennsylvania Electric Company`s (Penelec`s) Seward Power Station, was designed to remove 50% of the SO{sub 2} from one-half of Unit No. 5`s flue gas when the boiler is fired with 1.5% sulfur coal. Section 1 discusses the significance of CZD, the purpose of this report, the history of the project, and the role of DOE in the project, describes the project organization, and lists the six design areas involving proprietary information. Section 2 presents project location, objectives, and phases, and discusses the test program. Section 3 explains the process flow diagram, piping and instrumentation diagrams and operating controls, site plan, equipment layouts, and process equipment. Section 4 provides an integrated discussion of all the test results obtained during the test program, backed by tabulations and graphics. Section 5 describes the testing failures and corrective actions taken. Section 6, reliability/availability/maintainability analysis data of major equipment, covers the following systems: atomizing, sootblowing, lime, flue gas, and controls and instrumentation. Section 7 summarizes the capital cost requirements for the Seward CZD demonstration unit and discusses the capital and operating costs of installing the process at plants with various unit capacities. Section 8 discusses plans to continue the CZD demonstration to achieve longer term continuous operation at SO{sub 2} removals of 50%. Section 9 presents the principal findings of the CZD demonstration and recommends additional testing.

  12. Microbial reduction of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} as a means of by-product recovery/disposal from regenerable processes for the desulfurization of flue gas. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sublette, K.L.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this research was to investigate microorganisms capable of fossil fuel flue gas desulfurization and denitrification. The study used municipal sewage sludge as a carbon and energy source for SO{sub 2}-reducing cultures. The individual tasks developed a consortium of sulfate-reducing bacteria, investigated the design parameters for a continuous process, preformed a cost analysis, and screened sulfate-reducing bacteria. In the investigation of microbial reduction of NO{sub x} to nitrogen, tasks included screening denitrifying bacteria for NO and NO{sub 2} activity, developing optimum NO-reducing cultures, and investigating design parameters for a continuous system. This final report reviews the work previous to the current project, describes project objectives and the specific work plan, and reports results from the work completed during the previous reporting periods.

  13. FINANCE PROCEDURES MANUAL PROPERTY, PLANT, EQUIPMENT AND INTANGIBLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Technology, Sydney

    .2 Capitalisation Policy 10 6.3 Capital Expenditure types (Capex) 11 6.4 Acquisitions ­ process and account coding Verification Report Capex Capital expenditure and includes major refurbishments. Capitalised equipment Items

  14. Fact #708: January 2, 2012 Amenities, Safety and Emissions Equipment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2, 2012 Amenities, Safety and Emissions Equipment Make Up an Increasing Share of the Cost of a Car While the overall price of a new car has not increased greatly from 1967 to...

  15. Our August Sale of Equipment and Materials is Underway

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sale runs for two weeks to Friday, August 29th. The August sale includes hundreds of oilfield equipment and materials, being sold in 60+ sale lots. Sale information and details on...

  16. Best Management Practice #12: Laboratory and Medical Equipment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Equipment used in hospitals and laboratories can use significant amounts of water, but also offer the opportunity for substantial water savings by making a few small changes to how and when the...

  17. Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Test Report: Voltec...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    VEhICLE TEChNOLOgIES pROgRAm Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Test Report: Voltec 240V EVSE Features Integrated Flashlight 25ft of coiled cable Auto-reset EVSE...

  18. Improving reuse of semiconductor equipment through benchmarking, standardization, and automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silber, Jacob B. (Jacob Bradley)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 6D program at Intel® Corporation was set up to improve operations around capital equipment reuse, primarily in their semiconductor manufacturing facilities. The company was faced with a number of challenges, including ...

  19. Best Management Practice #12: Laboratory and Medical Equipment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    designed to recirculate water or that allows the flow to be turned off when the unit is not in use, or both. If purchasing new equipment is not feasible, consider...

  20. Identify Petroleum Reduction Strategies for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As defined by the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction strategies for Federal vehicles and equipment are based on the three driving principles of petroleum reduction: Reduce vehicle miles traveled Improve fuel efficiency Use alternative fuels.

  1. Design of an underwater vertical glider for subsea equipment delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ambler, Charles Kirby

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Delivery of subsea equipment and sensors is generally accomplished with unguided sinking platforms or powered autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs). An alternative would be to augment existing platforms with navigation and ...

  2. Field Labeling to Ensure the Electrical Safety of Production Equipment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Todd

    2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires that all equipment that uses electrical power be certified as electrically safe by a Nationally Recognized Testing Lab (NRTL) or Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ) prior to being...

  3. 1997 Housing Characteristics Tables Home Office Equipment Tables

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    1997 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total 1997 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than 10,000...

  4. Analysis and Evaluation For Equipment Performance by Surface Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishizuka, K.; Aizawa, N.; Shibata, K.; Yonezawa, H.; Yamada, S.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and performance assessment of chiller (turbo type) after installation of new facility (industrial plant applica- tions) was completed. 3.1 Need for Finding the Actual Performance Recently built facilities include many en- ergy-saving devices such as high...-efficiency chiller [4]. These were incorporated at the planning design stage as an investment giving priority to effects on the equipment life cycle. The correct type of opera- tion and sophisticated management is needed to make this type of equipment exhibit its...

  5. Security officer tactical training issues involving ESS equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rountree, S.L.K.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Security officer tactical training issues are discussed in relation to the possible implementation of the Tactical Improvement Package (TIP), utilizing the Engagement Simulation System (ESS) equipment, by nuclear power plant licensees for security officer tactical training. The ESS equipment provides the capability to simulate engagement conditions between adversaries armed with weapons which have harmless laser transmitters. A brief discussion of the TIP is presented, along with some concerns and considerations in the use of the TIP.

  6. Development of unique ISI equipment for an RPV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokunaga, Katsumi; Aoki, Takayuki (Japan Atomic Power Co., Tsuruga-shi, Fukui (Japan)); Sasaki, Tsukasa (Hitachi Works, Ibaraki (Japan))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cooperative effort involving the Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPC) and Hitachi Ltd. has provided unique automated ultrasonic testing equipment for the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) of JAPC's Tsuruga unit 1, which is a 357-MW (electric) non-jet-pumped boiling water reactor. Using this equipment package at the 20th scheduled outage of Tsuruga unit 1, the in-service inspection (ISI) performed in accordance with Japanese ISI standard JEAC 4205 (similar to ASME Sec. XI) was successfully completed. Through this field application, the capability and reliability of this equipment have been verified. Tsuruga unit 1 has an RPV that cannot be reached from the outside because of the limited space between the RPV and a biological shield. Therefore, it must be inspected with ID inspection equipment such as that for pressurized water reactors. A major consideration in the design of this new equipment was that it pass an ultrasonic testing head and arm through a very narrow gap between reactor internals and allow precise control from a great distance below the RPV flange (the maximum is {approximately}12m below). The design philosophy focused on how to avoid interference between any reactor internals and the equipment during the operation.

  7. Deep desulfurization of hydrocarbon fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Song, Chunshan (State College, PA); Ma, Xiaoliang (State College, PA); Sprague, Michael J. (Calgary, CA); Subramani, Velu (State College, PA)

    2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to processes for reducing the sulfur content in hydrocarbon fuels such as gasoline, diesel fuel and jet fuel. The invention provides a method and materials for producing ultra low sulfur content transportation fuels for motor vehicles as well as for applications such as fuel cells. The materials and method of the invention may be used at ambient or elevated temperatures and at ambient or elevated pressures without the need for hydrogen.

  8. Process for desulfurizing petroleum feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, John Howard; Alvare, Javier

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for upgrading an oil feedstock includes reacting the oil feedstock with a quantity of an alkali metal, wherein the reaction produces solid materials and liquid materials. The solid materials are separated from the liquid materials. The solid materials may be washed and heat treated by heating the materials to a temperature above 400.degree. C. The heat treating occurs in an atmosphere that has low oxygen and water content. Once heat treated, the solid materials are added to a solution comprising a polar solvent, where sulfide, hydrogen sulfide or polysulfide anions dissolve. The solution comprising polar solvent is then added to an electrolytic cell, which during operation, produces alkali metal and sulfur.

  9. Fate of Mercury in Synthetic Gypsum Used for Wallboard Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jessica Marshall Sanderson

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents and discusses results from Task 5 of the study ''Fate of Mercury in Synthetic Gypsum Used for Wallboard Production,'' performed at a full-scale commercial wallboard plant. Synthetic gypsum produced by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems on coal-fired power plants is commonly used in the manufacture of wallboard. The FGD process is used to control the sulfur dioxide emissions which would result in acid rain if not controlled. This practice has long benefited the environment by recycling the FGD gypsum byproduct, which is becoming available in increasing quantities, decreasing the need to landfill this material, and increasing the sustainable design of the wallboard product. However, new concerns have arisen as recent mercury control strategies developed for power plants involve the capture of mercury in FGD systems. The objective of this study is to determine whether any mercury is released into the atmosphere when the synthetic gypsum material is used as a feedstock for wallboard production. The project is being co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42080), USG Corporation, and EPRI. USG Corporation is the prime contractor, and URS Group is a subcontractor. The project scope includes five discrete tasks, each conducted at various USG wallboard plants using synthetic gypsum from different FGD systems. The five tasks were to include (1) a baseline test, then variations representing differing power plant (2) emissions control configurations, (3) treatment of fine gypsum particles, (4) coal types, and (5) FGD reagent types. However, Task 5, which was to evaluate gypsum produced from an alternate FGD reagent, could not be conducted as planned. Instead, Task 5 was conducted at conditions similar to a previous task, Task 3, although with gypsum from an alternate FGD system. In this project, process stacks in the wallboard plant have been sampled using the Ontario Hydro method. The stack locations sampled for each task include a dryer for the wet gypsum as it enters the plant and a gypsum calciner. The stack of the dryer for the wet wallboard product was also tested as part of this task, and was tested as part of Tasks 1 and 4. Also at each site, in-stream process samples were collected and analyzed for mercury concentration before and after each significant step in wallboard production. The Ontario Hydro results, process sample mercury concentration data, and process data were used to construct mercury mass balances across the wallboard plants. Task 5 was conducted at a wallboard plant processing synthetic gypsum from a power plant that fires Eastern bituminous coal. The power plant is equipped with a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system for NOX emissions control, but the SCR was bypassed during the time period the gypsum tested was produced. The power plant has a single-loop, open spray tower, limestone reagent FGD system, with forced oxidation conducted in a reaction tank integral with the FGD absorber. The FGD system has gypsum fines blow down as part of the dewatering step. Gypsum fines blow down is believed to be an important variable that impacts the amount of mercury in the gypsum byproduct and possibly its stability during the wallboard process. The results of the Task 5 stack testing, as measured by the Ontario Hydro method, detected that an average of 51% of the incoming mercury in the FGD gypsum was emitted during wallboard production. These losses were distributed as 2% or less each across the wet gypsum dryer and product wallboard dryer, and about 50% across the gypsum calciner. Emissions were similar to what Task 3 results showed, on both a percentage and a mass basis, for gypsum produced by a power plant firing bituminous coal and also having gypsum fines blow down as part of the FGD dewatering scheme. As was seen in the Task 1 through 4 results, most of the mercury detected in the stack testing on the wet gypsum dryer and kettle calciner was in the form of elemental mercury. In the wallboard dryer kiln, a more signific

  10. Tensiometer, drive probe for use with environmental testing equipment, and methods of inserting environmental testing equipment into a sample

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

    2005-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of inserting a tensiometer into a sample, comprises providing a drive probe configured to be engaged by direct push equipment; supporting a porous member from the drive probe; and driving the drive probe into the sample using a cone penetrometer. A tensiometer comprises a drive probe configured to be engaged by direct push equipment or a cone penetrometer; a porous member supported by the drive probe; and a pressure sensor in pressure sensing relation to the porous member.

  11. UC SANTA BARBARA POLICY AND PROCEDURE Reporting the Loss or Theft of Inventorial Equipment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    UC SANTA BARBARA POLICY AND PROCEDURE Reporting the Loss or Theft of Inventorial Equipment Contact OF INVENTORIAL EQUIPMENT Table of Contents Sections Page I Scope....................................................................................... ..3 V. Procedure for Reporting Theft of Inventorial Equipment ............................. ..3 VI

  12. A STUDY OF AGGREGATION BIAS IN ESTIMATING THE MARKET FOR HOME HEATING AND COOLING EQUIPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, D.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimating the Market for Home Heating and Cooling EquipmentBIAS IN ESTIMATING THE MARKET FOR HOME HEATING AND COOLINGESTIMATING THE MARKET FOR HOME HEATING AND COOLING EQUIPMENT

  13. An MILP approach to Multi-location, Multi-Period Equipment ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 24, 2013 ... to consider both the purchase and salvage of the equipment, since equipment ..... Since A comes from the power set of E ? , the compatibility ...

  14. Puerto Rico- Property Tax Exemption for Solar and Renewable Energy Equipment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Puerto Rico provides a property tax exemption for all "solar powered material, equipment or accessory and renewable energy collection, storage, generation, distribution, and application equipment."...

  15. Interstate Power and Light (Alliant Energy)- Farm Equipment Energy Efficiency Incentives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alliant Energy offers prescriptive rebates for a variety of energy efficient products for agricultural customers. These include irrigation equipment, dairy equipment, ventilation systems,...

  16. A STUDY OF AGGREGATION BIAS IN ESTIMATING THE MARKET FOR HOME HEATING AND COOLING EQUIPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, D.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimating the Market for Home Heating and Cooling EquipmentFuel and Technology Choice in Home Heating and Cooling," LBLTHE MARKET FOR HOME HEATING AND COOLING EQUIPMENT* David

  17. Defect Prevention and Detection in Software for Automated Test Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Bean

    2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Software for automated test equipment can be tedious and monotonous making it just as error-prone as other software. Active defect prevention and detection are also important for test applications. Incomplete or unclear requirements, a cryptic syntax used for some test applications—especially script-based test sets, variability in syntax or structure, and changing requirements are among the problems encountered in one tester. Such problems are common to all software but can be particularly problematic in test equipment software intended to test another product. Each of these issues increases the probability of error injection during test application development. This report describes a test application development tool designed to address these issues and others for a particular piece of test equipment. By addressing these problems in the development environment, the tool has powerful built-in defect prevention and detection capabilities. Regular expressions are widely used in the development tool as a means of formally defining test equipment requirements for the test application and verifying conformance to those requirements. A novel means of using regular expressions to perform range checking was developed. A reduction in rework and increased productivity are the results. These capabilities are described along with lessons learned and their applicability to other test equipment software. The test application development tool, or “application builder”, is known as the PT3800 AM Creation, Revision and Archiving Tool (PACRAT).

  18. Load Component Database of Household Appliances and Small Office Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Ning; Xie, YuLong; Huang, Zhenyu; Puyleart, Francis; Yang, Steve

    2008-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the development of a load component database for household appliances and office equipment. To develop more accurate load models at both transmission and distribution level, a better understanding on the individual behaviors of home appliances and office equipment under power system voltage and frequency variations becomes more and more critical. Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has begun a series of voltage and frequency tests against home appliances and office equipments since 2005. Since 2006, Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has collaborated with BPA personnel and developed a load component database based on these appliance testing results to facilitate the load model validation work for the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC). In this paper, the testing procedure and testing results are first presented. The load model parameters are then derived and grouped. Recommendations are given for aggregating the individual appliance models to feeder level, the models of which are used for distribution and transmission level studies.

  19. Equipment decontamination: A brief survey of the DOE complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conner, C.; Chamberlain, D.B; Chen, L.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deactivation at DOE facilities has left a tremendous amount of contaminated equipment behind. In-situ methods are needed to decontaminate the interiors of the equipment sufficiently to allow either free release or land disposal. A brief survey was completed of the DOE complex on their needs for equipment decontamination with in-situ technology to determine (1) the types of contamination problems within the DOE complex, (2) decontamination processes that are being used or are being developed within the DOE, and (3) the methods that are available to dispose of spent decontamination solutions. In addition, potential sites for testing decontamination methods were located. Based on the information obtained from these surveys, the Rocky Flats Plant and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory appear to be best suited to complete the initial testing of the decontamination processes.

  20. Seismic analyses of equipment in 2736-Z complex. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ocoma, E.C.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the structural qualification for the existing equipment when subjected to seismic loading in the Plutonium Storage Complex. It replaces in entirety Revision 0 and reconciles the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) comments on Revision 0. The Complex consists of 2736-Z Building (plutonium storage vault), 2736-ZA Building (vault ventilation equipment building), and 2736-ZB Building (shipping/receiving, repackaging activities). The existing equipment structurally qualified in this report are the metal storage racks for 7 inch and lard cans in room 2 of Building 2736-Z; the cubicles, can holders and pedestals in rooms 1, 3, and 4 of Building 2736-Z; the ventilation duct including exhaust fans/motors, emergency diesel generator, and HEPA filter housing in Building 2736-ZA; the repackaging glovebox in Building 2736-ZB; and the interface duct between Buildings 2736-Z and 2736-ZA.

  1. Nuclear fuel post-irradiation examination equipment package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeCooman, W.J. [AREVA NP Inc., Lynchburg, VA (United States); Spellman, D.J. [UT-Battelle, LLC, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hot cell capabilities in the U.S. are being reviewed and revived to meet today's demand for fuel reliability, tomorrow's demands for higher burnup fuel and future demand for fuel recycling. Fuel reliability, zero tolerance for failure, is more than an industry buzz. It is becoming a requirement to meet the rapidly escalating demands for the impending renaissance of nuclear power generation, fuel development, and management of new waste forms that will need to be dealt with from programs such as the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). Fuel performance data is required to license fuel for higher burnup; to verify recycled fuel performance, such as MOX, for wide-scale use in commercial reactors; and, possibly, to license fuel for a new generation of fast reactors. Additionally, fuel isotopic analysis and recycling technologies will be critical factors in the goal to eventually close the fuel cycle. This focus on fuel reliability coupled with the renewed interest in recycling puts a major spotlight on existing hot cell capabilities in the U.S. and their ability to provide the baseline analysis to achieve a closed fuel cycle. Hot cell examination equipment is necessary to determine the characteristics and performance of irradiated materials that are subjected to nuclear reactor environments. The equipment within the hot cells is typically operated via master-slave manipulators and is typically manually operated. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory is modernizing their hot cell nuclear fuel examination equipment, installing automated examination equipment and data gathering capabilities. Currently, the equipment has the capability to perform fuel rod visual examinations, length and diametrical measurements, eddy current examination, profilometry, gamma scanning, fission gas collection and void fraction measurement, and fuel rod segmentation. The used fuel postirradiation examination equipment was designed to examine full-length fuel rods for both Boiling Water Reactors and Pressurized Water Reactors. (authors)

  2. Recovering the Heat Dissipated by the Digital Switching Equipment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karasseferian, V. V.; Desjardins, R.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    irrespective of its usage capa city. For example, a digital switcher dissipa tes heat at a rate of 25 to 35 watts per sq. ft. as compared to 3 or 4 watts per sq. ft. for the electro mechanical switching equipment. This type of equipment is being installed... to the atrrosphere by the cool ing plant servicing the digital switcher, to heat other parts of the building. Energy prices have not, in the past, diffe red considerably from the average inflation rate of the economy as a whole. This situation crea ted little...

  3. The SLAC Comparator for the Calibration of Digital Leveling Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gassner, G.L.; Ruland, R.E.; /SLAC

    2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    At SLAC digital levels are used for precise leveling, both for setting out and monitoring. A very high precision of 30 {micro}m is required, which can only be achieved by regularly calibrating the leveling equipment. The calibration facility is also used for detailed investigations to refine the SLAC leveling procedure. In this paper the setup of the SLAC vertical comparator is described. In order to also perform traditional staff calibration a CCD camera was integrated into the SLAC comparator. Finally an overview of further investigations of our leveling equipment is presented.

  4. Studies and research concerning BNFP: cask handling equipment standardization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCreery, Paul N.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the activities of one of the sub-tasks within the Spent LWR Fuel Transportation Receiving, Handling, and Storage program. The sub-task is identified as Cask Handling Equipment Standardization. The objective of the sub-task specifies: investigate and identify opportunities for standardization of cask interface equipment. This study will examine the potential benefits of standardized yokes, decontamination barriers and special tools, and, to the extent feasible, standardized methods and software for handling the variety of casks presently available in the US fleet. The result of the investigations is a compilation of reports that are related by their common goal of reducing cask turnaround time.

  5. Equipment qualification issues research and resolution: Status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonzon, L.L.; Wyant, F.J.; Bustard, L.D.; Gillen, K.T.

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since its inception in 1975, the Qualification Testing Evaluation (QTE) Program has produced numerous results pertinent to equipment qualification issues. Many have been incorporated into Regulatory Guides, Rules, and industry practices and standards. This report summarizes the numerous reports and findings to date. Thirty separate issues are discussed encompassing three generic areas: accident simulation methods, aging simulation methods, and special topics related to equipment qualification. Each issue-specific section contains (1) a brief description of the issue, (2) a summary of the applicable research effort, and (3) a summary of the findings to date.

  6. After-hours power status of office equipment and energy use of miscellaneous plug-load equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberson, Judy A.; Webber, Carrie A.; McWhinney, Marla C.; Brown, Richard E.; Pinckard, Marageret J.; Busch, John F.

    2004-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This research was conducted in support of two branches of the EPA ENERGY STAR program, whose overall goal is to reduce, through voluntary market-based means, the amount of carbon dioxide emitted in the U.S. The primary objective was to collect data for the ENERGY STAR Office Equipment program on the after-hours power state of computers, monitors, printers, copiers, scanners, fax machines, and multi-function devices. We also collected data for the ENERGY STAR Commercial Buildings branch on the types and amounts of miscellaneous plug-load equipment, a significant and growing end use that is not usually accounted for by building energy managers. For most types of miscellaneous equipment, we also estimated typical unit energy consumption in order to estimate total energy consumption of the miscellaneous devices within our sample. This data set is the first of its kind that we know of, and is an important first step in characterizing miscellaneous plug loads in commercial buildings. The main purpose of this study is to supplement and update previous data we collected on the extent to which electronic office equipment is turned off or automatically enters a low power state when not in active use. In addition, it provides data on numbers and types of office equipment, and helps identify trends in office equipment usage patterns. These data improve our estimates of typical unit energy consumption and savings for each equipment type, and enables the ENERGY STAR Office Equipment program to focus future effort on products with the highest energy savings potential. This study expands our previous sample of office buildings in California and Washington DC to include education and health care facilities, and buildings in other states. We report data from sixteen commercial buildings in California, Georgia, and Pennsylvania: four education buildings, two medical buildings, two large offices (> 500 employees each), three medium offices (50-500 employees each), and five small business offices (< 50 employees each). Two buildings are in the San Francisco Bay are a of California, nine (including the five small businesses) are in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and five are in Atlanta, Georgia.

  7. Can Computer Simulations Replace Real Equipment in Undergraduate Laboratories?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Can Computer Simulations Replace Real Equipment in Undergraduate Laboratories? N. D. Finkelstein, K, Boulder Abstract. This paper examines the effects of substituting computer simulations in place of real (DC) circuit laboratory was modified to compare the effects of using computer simulations

  8. automated test equipment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    test equipment First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Test Automation Test Automation Computer...

  9. PROVISION, USE, AND MAINTENANCE OF EMERGENCY DRENCH EQUIPMENT IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    to provide fluid to irrigate and flush the eyes, face and body areas. 6. Hazardous Material: A chemical the effects of personal exposures to hazardous materials and is integral to emergency response efforts where hazardous materials are used or stored. This policy ensures that emergency drench equipment is provided

  10. UF{sub 6} cylinder lifting equipment enhancements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hortel, J.M. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents numerous enhancements that have been made to the Portsmouth lifting equipment to ensure the safe handling of cylinders containing liquid uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}). The basic approach has been to provide redundancy to all components of the lift path so that any one component failure would not cause the load to drop or cause any undesirable movement.

  11. Predicting the Operational Effectiveness of Aircraft Survivability Equipment Suite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noh, Sanguk

    , and experiment with their autonomous decision-making against threats in various electronic warfare settings. We: Autonomous Decision-Making, Electronic Warfare Settings, Aircraft Survivability Equipment Suite, Operational Effectiveness 1. Introduction In order to counter threats in electronic warfare environments, a command

  12. Directional drilling and equipment for hot granite wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, R.E.; Neudecker, J.W.; Rowley, J.C.; Brittenham, T.L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following drilling equipment and experience gained in drilling to date are discussed: positive displacement motors, turbodrills, motor performance experience, rotary-build and rotary-hold results, steering devices and surveying tools, shock absorbers, drilling and fishing jars, drilling bits, control of drill string drag, and control of drill string degradation. (MHR)

  13. Informe de gesti de l'equip de govern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verschure, Paul

    Informe de gestió de l'equip de govern de la UPF Claustre 5 de juny del 2014 #12;2 Índex Presentació p.3 Eix I. Projecció de la UPF p.6 1. Rellevància i reconeixement dins la societat 2. La UPF i els promoció de la Universitat 7. L'estratègia de responsabilitat social de la UPF 8. Universitat i cultura Eix

  14. Energy spectra and dissipation Mikel Indurain, Equipe Planto

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste

    Energy spectra and dissipation Mikel Indurain, Equipe Planéto LMD LMDZ.EARTH LMDZ.GENERIC LMDZ.MARS #12;Dissipation : introduction Energy transfer from large scales to small scales. Problem : energy : introduction Energy transfer from large scales to small scales. Problem : energy accumulation if dissipative

  15. Long-length contaminated equipment burial containers fabrication process procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, W.A., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    These special process procedures cover the detailed step-by-step procedures required by the supplier who will manufacture the Long-Length Contaminated Equipment (LLCE) Burial Container design. Also included are detailed step-by-step procedures required by the disposal process for completion of the LLCE Burial Containers at Hanford.

  16. Qualification Testing Evaluation (QTE) program for safety-related equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonzon, L.L.; Gillen, K.T.; Clough, R.L.; Salazar, E.A.; Buckalew, W.H.; Thome, F.V.; Stuetzer, O.M.; Feit, R.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear power industry is required to demonstrate that certain safety-related equipment is ''qualified'' and will function even in the event of a severe reactor accident. Demonstration of qualification by testing is the preferred approach. International interest in equipment qualification, and its recognition as being paramount to safety, is rapidly increasing, with most major supplier-countries developing sophisticated qualification testing facilities. An aspect of the demonstration of qualification is to assure that the qualification testing applied to safety-related equipment is both realistic and conservative; that is, a program of qualification methodology assessment and improvement is imperative. In the United States, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is sponsoring the Qualification Testing Evaluation Program with the goal of obtaining data that will confirm or improve the technical bases for equipment qualification programs. This multi-task Program has long-term, continuing objectives, but recent new results have been obtained and these results are being incorporated into NRC regulations with attendant impact on the nuclear industry. 19 refs. (JDB)

  17. DIESEL/HEAVY The diesel/heavy equipment certificate offers training in maintenance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    DIESEL/HEAVY EQUIPMENT The diesel/heavy equipment certificate offers training in maintenance and repair of heavy equipment and trucks. Students will learn to work on electrical and air systems, diesel · Small Engines · Automotive Maintenance · Welding · Training for entry level heavy diesel equipment

  18. Environmental and Resource Studies Program Equipment Available For Use in ERS Courses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Michael

    (battery tester) power inverter solar panel and solar charge controller Audio-Visual Equipment camera

  19. Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves and Improved Stove Emission Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HATFIELD, MICHAEL; Still, Dean

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In developing countries, there is an urgent need for access to safe, efficient, and more affordable cooking technologies. Nearly 2.5 billion people currently use an open fire or traditional cookstove to prepare their meals, and recent models predict that use of biomass for cooking will continue to be the dominant energy use in rural, resource-poor households through 2030. For these families, cooking poses serious risks to health, safety, and income. An alarming 4 million people, primarily women and children, die prematurely each year from indoor and outdoor exposure to the harmful emissions released by solid fuel combustion. Use of traditional stoves can also have a significant impact on deforestation and climate change. This dire situation creates a critical need for cookstoves that significantly and verifiably reduce fuel use and emissions in order to reach protective levels for human health and the environment. Additionally, advances in the scientific equipment needed to measure and monitor stove fuel use and emissions have not kept pace with the significant need within the industry. While several testing centers in the developed world may have hundred thousand-dollar emissions testing systems, organizations in the field have had little more than a thermometer, a scale, and subjective observations to quantify the performance of stove designs. There is an urgent need for easy-to-use, inexpensive, accurate, and robust stove testing equipment for use by laboratory and field researchers around the world. ASAT and their research partner, Aprovecho Research Center (ARC), have over thirty years of experience addressing these two needs, improved cookstoves and emissions monitoring equipment, with expertise spanning the full spectrum of development from conceptual design to product manufacturing and dissemination. This includes: 1) research, design, and verification of clean biomass cookstove technology and emissions monitoring equipment; 2) mass production of quality-controlled stove and emissions equipment at levels scalable to meet global demand; and 3) global distribution through a variety of channels and partners. ARC has been instrumental in designing and improving more than 100 stove designs over the past thirty years. In the last four years, ASAT and ARC have played a key role in the production and sales of over 200,000 improved stoves in the developed and developing world. The ARC-designed emissions equipment is currently used by researchers in laboratories and field studies on five continents. During Phase I of the DOE STTR grant, ASAT and ARC worked together to apply their wealth of product development experience towards creating the next generation of improved cookstoves and emissions monitoring equipment. Highlights of Phase I for the biomass cookstove project include 1) the development of several new stove technologies that reached the DOE 50/90 benchmark; 2) fabrication of new stove prototypes by ASAT’s manufacturing partner, Shengzhou Stove Manufacturing (SSM); 3) field testing of prototype stoves with consumers in Puerto Rico and the US; and 4) the selection of three stove prototypes for further development and commercialization during Phase II. Highlights of Phase I for the emissions monitoring equipment project include: 1) creation of a new emissions monitoring equipment product, the Laboratory Emissions Monitoring System (LEMS 2) the addition of gravimetric PM measurements to the stove testing systems to meet International Standards Organization criteria; 3) the addition of a CO{sub 2} sensor and wireless 3G capability to the IAP Meter; and 4) and the improvement of sensors and signal quality on all systems. Twelve Regional Testing and Knowledge Centers purchased this equipment during the Phase I project period.

  20. Electricity Used by Office Equipment and Network Equipment in the U.S. Kaoru Kawamoto, Jonathan G. Koomey, Bruce Nordman,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, Asilomar, CA. http://enduse.lbl.gov/Projects/InfoTech.html August 2000 consumption for residential, commercial and industrial use by combining estimates of stock, power requirements than 70% of this energy use is dedicated to office equipment for commercial use. We also found

  1. anaerobically digested cattle: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Korean food waste with high water contents (>80%). The hydrogen sulfide in the biogas was removed by a biological desulfurization equipment integrated in the horizontal...

  2. anaerobic digesters treating: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Korean food waste with high water contents (>80%). The hydrogen sulfide in the biogas was removed by a biological desulfurization equipment integrated in the horizontal...

  3. anaerobic digestion final: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Korean food waste with high water contents (>80%). The hydrogen sulfide in the biogas was removed by a biological desulfurization equipment integrated in the horizontal...

  4. anaerobic digester gas: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Korean food waste with high water contents (>80%). The hydrogen sulfide in the biogas was removed by a biological desulfurization equipment integrated in the horizontal...

  5. anaerobic digestion held: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Korean food waste with high water contents (>80%). The hydrogen sulfide in the biogas was removed by a biological desulfurization equipment integrated in the horizontal...

  6. anaerobic digestion role: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Korean food waste with high water contents (>80%). The hydrogen sulfide in the biogas was removed by a biological desulfurization equipment integrated in the horizontal...

  7. anaerobic digestion model: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Korean food waste with high water contents (>80%). The hydrogen sulfide in the biogas was removed by a biological desulfurization equipment integrated in the horizontal...

  8. anaerobically digested municipal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Korean food waste with high water contents (>80%). The hydrogen sulfide in the biogas was removed by a biological desulfurization equipment integrated in the horizontal...

  9. anaerobic thermophilic biogas: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Korean food waste with high water contents (>80%). The hydrogen sulfide in the biogas was removed by a biological desulfurization equipment integrated in the horizontal...

  10. anaerobic closed digester: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Korean food waste with high water contents (>80%). The hydrogen sulfide in the biogas was removed by a biological desulfurization equipment integrated in the horizontal...

  11. anaerobic thermophilic digestion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Korean food waste with high water contents (>80%). The hydrogen sulfide in the biogas was removed by a biological desulfurization equipment integrated in the horizontal...

  12. anaerobic chelate bioegradation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Korean food waste with high water contents (>80%). The hydrogen sulfide in the biogas was removed by a biological desulfurization equipment integrated in the horizontal...

  13. anaerobic dechlorinating bacteria: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and tested in pilot scale for Korean food waste with high water contents (>80%). The hydrogen sulfide in the biogas was removed by a biological desulfurization equipment...

  14. anaerobic bacterium anaerocellum: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Korean food waste with high water contents (>80%). The hydrogen sulfide in the biogas was removed by a biological desulfurization equipment integrated in the horizontal...

  15. anaerobic digestion program: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Korean food waste with high water contents (>80%). The hydrogen sulfide in the biogas was removed by a biological desulfurization equipment integrated in the horizontal...

  16. anaerobic digester sludge: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Korean food waste with high water contents (>80%). The hydrogen sulfide in the biogas was removed by a biological desulfurization equipment integrated in the horizontal...

  17. anaerobic thermophilic bacteria: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and tested in pilot scale for Korean food waste with high water contents (>80%). The hydrogen sulfide in the biogas was removed by a biological desulfurization equipment...

  18. anaerobic biogas reactors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Korean food waste with high water contents (>80%). The hydrogen sulfide in the biogas was removed by a biological desulfurization equipment integrated in the horizontal...

  19. anaerobic digestion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Korean food waste with high water contents (>80%). The hydrogen sulfide in the biogas was removed by a biological desulfurization equipment integrated in the horizontal...

  20. anaerobic digestion processes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Korean food waste with high water contents (>80%). The hydrogen sulfide in the biogas was removed by a biological desulfurization equipment integrated in the horizontal...

  1. anaerobic sludge digestion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Korean food waste with high water contents (>80%). The hydrogen sulfide in the biogas was removed by a biological desulfurization equipment integrated in the horizontal...

  2. anaerobic digestion process: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Korean food waste with high water contents (>80%). The hydrogen sulfide in the biogas was removed by a biological desulfurization equipment integrated in the horizontal...

  3. anaerobic digestion systems: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Korean food waste with high water contents (>80%). The hydrogen sulfide in the biogas was removed by a biological desulfurization equipment integrated in the horizontal...

  4. anaerobic digester performance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Korean food waste with high water contents (>80%). The hydrogen sulfide in the biogas was removed by a biological desulfurization equipment integrated in the horizontal...

  5. anaerobic methanotrophic archaea: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Korean food waste with high water contents (>80%). The hydrogen sulfide in the biogas was removed by a biological desulfurization equipment integrated in the horizontal...

  6. anaerobic syntrophic long-chain: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Korean food waste with high water contents (>80%). The hydrogen sulfide in the biogas was removed by a biological desulfurization equipment integrated in the horizontal...

  7. anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Korean food waste with high water contents (>80%). The hydrogen sulfide in the biogas was removed by a biological desulfurization equipment integrated in the horizontal...

  8. anaerobic digestion system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Korean food waste with high water contents (>80%). The hydrogen sulfide in the biogas was removed by a biological desulfurization equipment integrated in the horizontal...

  9. anaerobic digestion performance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Korean food waste with high water contents (>80%). The hydrogen sulfide in the biogas was removed by a biological desulfurization equipment integrated in the horizontal...

  10. anaerobic digesters current: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Korean food waste with high water contents (>80%). The hydrogen sulfide in the biogas was removed by a biological desulfurization equipment integrated in the horizontal...

  11. anaerobically digested sludge: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Korean food waste with high water contents (>80%). The hydrogen sulfide in the biogas was removed by a biological desulfurization equipment integrated in the horizontal...

  12. anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing anammox: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Korean food waste with high water contents (>80%). The hydrogen sulfide in the biogas was removed by a biological desulfurization equipment integrated in the horizontal...

  13. anaerobic digester treating: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Korean food waste with high water contents (>80%). The hydrogen sulfide in the biogas was removed by a biological desulfurization equipment integrated in the horizontal...

  14. anaerobe clostridium acetobutylicum: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Korean food waste with high water contents (>80%). The hydrogen sulfide in the biogas was removed by a biological desulfurization equipment integrated in the horizontal...

  15. anaerobic digestion analysis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Korean food waste with high water contents (>80%). The hydrogen sulfide in the biogas was removed by a biological desulfurization equipment integrated in the horizontal...

  16. SHEAR STRENGTH MEASURING EQUIPMENT EVALUATION AT THE COLD TEST FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MEACHAM JE

    2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Retrievals under current criteria require that approximately 2,000,000 gallons of double-shell tank (DST) waste storage space not be used to prevent creating new tanks that might be susceptible to buoyant displacement gas release events (BDGRE). New criteria are being evaluated, based on actual sludge properties, to potentially show that sludge wastes do not exhibit the same BDGRE risk. Implementation of the new criteria requires measurement of in situ waste shear strength. Cone penetrometers were judged the best equipment for measuring in situ shear strength and an A.P. van den berg Hyson 100 kN Light Weight Cone Penetrometer (CPT) was selected for evaluation. The CPT was procured and then evaluated at the Hanford Site Cold Test Facility. Evaluation demonstrated that the equipment with minor modification was suitable for use in Tank Farms.

  17. Equipment compatibility and logistics assessment for containment foam deployment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McRoberts, Vincent M.; Martell, Mary-Alena; Jones, Joseph A.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The deployment of the Joint Technical Operations Team (JTOT) is evolving toward a lean and mobile response team. As a result, opportunities to support more rapid mobilization are being investigated. This study investigates three specific opportunities including: (1) the potential of using standard firefighting equipment to support deployment of the aqueous foam concentrate (AFC-380); (2) determining the feasibility and needs for regional staging of equipment to reduce the inventory currently mobilized during a JTOT response; and (3) determining the feasibility and needs for development of the next generation AFC-380 to reduce the volume of foam concentrate required for a response. This study supports the need to ensure that requirements for alternative deployment schemes are understood and in place to support improved response activities.

  18. Electromagnetic pulse (EMP), Part I: Effects on field medical equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vandre, R.H.; Klebers, J.; Tesche, F.M.; Blanchard, J.P. (Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States))

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electromagnetic pulse (EMP) from a high-altitude nuclear detonation has the potential to cover an area as large as the continental United States with damaging levels of EMP radiation. In this study, two of seven items of medical equipment were damaged by an EMP simulator. Computer circuit analysis of 17 different items showed that 11 of the 17 items would be damaged by current surges on the power cords, while two would be damaged by current surges on external leads. This research showed that a field commander can expect approximately 65% of his electronic medical equipment to be damaged by a single nuclear detonation as far as 2,200 km away.

  19. Directory of manufacturers of small hydropower equipment. Third edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inversin, A.R.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Basic information on manufacturers of hydraulic turbines in the 1-100 kW power range and on their product lines is provided in this two-section directory. An introduction makes general comments on cost trends in relation both to the magnitude of the operating head and to unit capacity, although no specific cost figures are given for equipment packages. The section also describes various cost-reduction techniques (the use of load control, the use of pumps as turbines, and the integration of turbine equipment with other functions). The second section comprises the bulk of the document and is composed of 28 entries on turbine manufacturers, 20 of them in the United States, the others in Nepal (2), the Philippines, Colombia, Indonesia, India, Canada, and Puerto Rico.

  20. Limited Personal Use of Government Office Equipment including Information Technology

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes requirements and assigns responsibilities for employees' limited personal use of Government resources (office equipment and other resources including information technology) within DOE, including NNSA. The Order is required to provide guidance on appropriate and inappropriate uses of Government resources. This Order was certified 04/23/2009 as accurate and continues to be relevant and appropriate for use by the Department. Certified 4-23-09. No cancellation.

  1. Recovery Act: Training Program Development for Commercial Building Equipment Technicians

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leah Glameyer

    2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this project has been to develop curricula, certification requirements, and accreditation standards for training on energy efficient practices and technologies for commercial building technicians. These training products will advance industry expertise towards net-zero energy commercial building goals and will result in a substantial reduction in energy use. The ultimate objective is to develop a workforce that can bring existing commercial buildings up to their energy performance potential and ensure that new commercial buildings do not fall below their expected optimal level of performance. Commercial building equipment technicians participating in this training program will learn how to best operate commercial buildings to ensure they reach their expected energy performance level. The training is a combination of classroom, online and on-site lessons. The Texas Engineering Extension Service (TEEX) developed curricula using subject matter and adult learning experts to ensure the training meets certification requirements and accreditation standards for training these technicians. The training targets a specific climate zone to meets the needs, specialized expertise, and perspectives of the commercial building equipment technicians in that zone. The combination of efficient operations and advanced design will improve the internal built environment of a commercial building by increasing comfort and safety, while reducing energy use and environmental impact. Properly trained technicians will ensure equipment operates at design specifications. A second impact is a more highly trained workforce that is better equipped to obtain employment. Organizations that contributed to the development of the training program include TEEX and the Texas Engineering Experiment Station (TEES) (both members of The Texas A&M University System). TEES is also a member of the Building Commissioning Association. This report includes a description of the project accomplishments, including the course development phases, tasks associated with each phase, and detailed list of the course materials developed. A summary of each year's activities is also included.

  2. Explosion Clad for Upstream Oil and Gas Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banker, John G. [Dynamic Materials Corp., 5405 Spine Rd., Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Massarello, Jack [Global Metallix, Consultant to DMC, 5405 Spine Rd., Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Pauly, Stephane [DMC., Nobelclad Business Unit, 1 Allee Alfred NOBEL, 66600 Rivesaltes (France)

    2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Today's upstream oil and gas facilities frequently involve the combination of high pressures, high temperatures, and highly corrosive environments, requiring equipment that is thick wall, corrosion resistant, and cost effective. When significant concentrations of CO{sub 2} and/or H{sub 2}S and/or chlorides are present, corrosion resistant alloys (CRA) can become the material of choice for separator equipment, piping, related components, and line pipe. They can provide reliable resistance to both corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement. For these applications, the more commonly used CRA's are 316L, 317L and duplex stainless steels, alloy 825 and alloy 625, dependent upon the application and the severity of the environment. Titanium is also an exceptional choice from the technical perspective, but is less commonly used except for heat exchangers. Explosion clad offers significant savings by providing a relatively thin corrosion resistant alloy on the surface metallurgically bonded to a thick, lower cost, steel substrate for the pressure containment. Developed and industrialized in the 1960's the explosion cladding technology can be used for cladding the more commonly used nickel based and stainless steel CRA's as well as titanium. It has many years of proven experience as a reliable and highly robust clad manufacturing process. The unique cold welding characteristics of explosion cladding reduce problems of alloy sensitization and dissimilar metal incompatibility. Explosion clad materials have been used extensively in both upstream and downstream oil, gas and petrochemical facilities for well over 40 years. The explosion clad equipment has demonstrated excellent resistance to corrosion, embrittlement and disbonding. Factors critical to insure reliable clad manufacture and equipment design and fabrication are addressed.

  3. Page 1 DePaul/Cinespace Equipment Reservation Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaefer, Marcus

    head travel case 150.00$ 4 1x1 AB Gold Mount Adapter Plate 155.00$ 4 Anton Bauer Dionic 90 Battery 412.25$ 1 Anton Bauer TWQ 4-Battery Charger 1,156.00$ #12;Page 2 DePaul/Cinespace Equipment Reservation-D4-120 1,205.00$ 2 Diva-Lite 201 KIT-D2-120 881.00$ 6 Extra 25' 4 Bank Extensions 108.00$ 6 Extra 25

  4. Adaptive Optimization of Central Chiller Plant Equipment Sequencing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiorino, D. P.; Priest, J. W.

    and outside air conditions and it insures that the central refrigeration system operates with the lowest possible energy cost at all times. PROBLEM BACKGROUND The specific industrial plant for which the control algorithm was developed is the Texas... was developed to select the optimal sequence of central refrigeration equipment (chillers, cooling towers, pumps) to operate in an industrial plant. The control algorithm adapts the optimal equipaent sequence to reflect changes in the plant's cooling load...

  5. Thermal response of process equipment to hydrocarbon fires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solberg, D.M.; Borgnes, O.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Requirements for active fire-fighting equipment such as fixed and portable powder extinguishers, foam generators, water guns, and deluge systems, are given in various codes and standards. However, very little is to be found about fire design conditions and passive fire protection. For safety verification of process plants and for designing adequate passive fire protection it is necessary to know the total incident heat fluxes which can occur under realistic conditions and the effects that such heat fluxes may have on process equipment and structures. During the last few years, Det Norske Veritas has been invloved in investigations aimed at estimating realistic fire loads from different types of hydrocarbon fires and the thermal response of process equipment and structures exposed to such fires. These investigations are still in progress and are especially focused on the conditions on off-shore oil and gas production platforms. However, many fire problems will be the same in the land-based process industry. The present paper concentrates on the thermal response of pipes and vessels exposed to a severe hydrocarbon fire with a defined thermal load. (JMT)

  6. Advanced technology options for industrial heating equipment research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, R.C.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents a strategy for a comprehensive program plan that is applicable to the Combustion Equipment Program of the DOE Office of Industrial Technologies (the program). The program seeks to develop improved heating equipment and advanced control techniques which, by improvements in combustion and beat transfer, will increase energy-use efficiency and productivity in industrial processes and allow the preferred use of abundant, low grade and waste domestic fuels. While the plan development strategy endeavors to be consistent with the programmatic goals and policies of the office, it is primarily governed by the needs and concerns of the US heating equipment industry. The program, by nature, focuses on energy intensive industrial processes. According to the DOE Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), the industrial sector in the US consumed about 21 quads of energy in 1988 in the form of coal, petroleum, natural gas and electricity. This energy was used as fuels for industrial boilers and furnaces, for agricultural uses, for construction, as feedstocks for chemicals and plastics, and for steel, mining, motors, engines and other industrial use over 75 percent of this energy was consumed to provide heat and power for manufacturing industries. The largest consumers of fuel energy were the primary metals, chemical and allied products, paper and allied products, and stone, clay and glass industry groups which accounted for about 60% of the total fuel energy consumed by the US manufacturing sector.

  7. Technology transfer equipment qualification methodology for shelf life determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, J.W. [Wyle Labs., Huntsville, AL (United States)] [Wyle Labs., Huntsville, AL (United States)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discussions with a number of Nuclear Utilities revealed that equipment qualified for 10 to 40 years in the harsh environment of the plant was being assigned shelf lives of only 5 to 10 years in the benign environment of the warehouse, and then the materials were being trashed. One safety-related equipment supplier was assigning a 10-year qualified life, from date of shipment, with no recognition of the difference in the aging rate in the plant vs. that in the warehouse. Many suppliers assign shelf lives based on product warranty considerations rather than actual product degradation. An EPRI program was initiated to evaluate the methods used to assign shelf lives and to adapt the Arrhenius methodology, used in equipment qualification, to assign technically justifiable shelf lives. Temperature is the main factor controlling shelf life; however, atmospheric pressure, humidity, ultraviolet light, ozone and other atmospheric contaminants were also considered. A list of 70 representative materials was addressed in the program. All of these were found to have shelf lives of 14 years to greater than 60 years, except for 19 items. For 18 of these items, there was no data available except for the manufacturer`s recommendation.

  8. Appliances, Lighting, Electronics, and Miscellaneous Equipment Electricity Use in New Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Richard E.; Rittelman, William; Parker, Danny; Homan, Gregory

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    online: www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/electricity/esr/esr_sum.html.Miscellaneous Equipment Electricity Use in New Homes RichardMiscellaneous Equipment Electricity Use in New Homes Richard

  9. MAS 10.2 Control of Measuring and Test Equipment, 3/9/95 | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2 Control of Measuring and Test Equipment, 3995 MAS 10.2 Control of Measuring and Test Equipment, 3995 The objective of this surveillance is to verify that the contractor...

  10. Program management systems for the semiconductor processing capital equipment supply chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandler, Thomas B. (Thomas Brian), 1970-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Capital Equipment Procurement group of Intel Corporation is responsible for developing and procuring the semiconductor processing capital equipment that is used throughout all of the company's development and manufacturing ...

  11. GE Hydro Asia Co Ltd formerly Kvaerner Power Equipment Co Ltd...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GE Hydro Asia Co Ltd formerly Kvaerner Power Equipment Co Ltd Kvaerner Hangfa Jump to: navigation, search Name: GE Hydro Asia Co Ltd (formerly Kvaerner Power Equipment Co., Ltd...

  12. Valuation of procurement flexibility in the machinery and equipment industry using the real option approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Valuation of procurement flexibility in the machinery and equipment industry using the real option situation of production networks of machine tool and equipment manufacturers will be described. Secondly reliability, flexibility, procurement, real options. 1 Introduction Besides the general market fluctuations

  13. Permit Regulations for the Construction and, or Operation of Air Emissions Equipment (Mississippi)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Permit Board will issue two types of air pollution control permits, a permit to construct air emissions equipment and a State Permit to Operate such equipment. A State Permit to Operate is...

  14. MULTI-SENSOR MONITORING FOR REAL-TIME 3D VISUALIZATION OF CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    to workers and equipment operators due to their dynamic and unstructured nature. Narrow haul roads, crowded with the inherent poor visibility that operators of equipment such as dump trucks, loaders and excavators deal

  15. Analysis and sourcing of the mechanical equipment required for a ceramic pot filter production facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Getachew, Julian (Julian B.)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research was done into identifying and sourcing the mechanical equipment required for manufacturing ceramic pot filters, specifically for use in the Pure Home Water factory in Northern Ghana. The pieces of equipment ...

  16. Xi an Nordex Wind Turbine Co Ltd aka Xi an Weide Wind Power Equipment...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind Turbine Co Ltd aka Xi an Weide Wind Power Equipment Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Xi'an Nordex Wind Turbine Co Ltd (aka Xi'an Weide Wind Power Equipment Co Ltd)...

  17. DOE/EH-0545, Seismic Evaluation Procedure for Equipment in U...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOEEH-0545, Seismic Evaluation Procedure for Equipment in U.S. Department of Energy Facilities, 1997 DOEEH-0545, Seismic Evaluation Procedure for Equipment in U.S. Department of...

  18. Operations improvement in a semiconductor capital equipment manufacturing plant : component level and assembly level inventory management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yiming, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Semiconductor capital equipment is manufactured in a high-mix and low-volume environment at Varian Semiconductor Equipment business unit of Applied Materials. Due to the demand growth over the past years, Varian has been ...

  19. Equipment Availability in the Home and School Environment: Its Relationship on Physical Activity in Children

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montandon, Kristi

    2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    activity behavior of children; availability of equipment is one of these factors. The overall purpose of this dissertation was to examine availability of equipment as an environmental influence on a child’s physical activity behavior. The two environments...

  20. Feasibility of gas-phase decontamination of gaseous diffusion equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munday, E.B.; Simmons, D.W.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The five buildings at the K-25 Site formerly involved in the gaseous diffusion process contain 5000 gaseous diffusion stages as well as support facilities that are internally contaminated with uranium deposits. The gaseous diffusion facilities located at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant also contain similar equipment and will eventually close. The decontamination of these facilities will require the most cost-effective technology consistent with the criticality, health physics, industrial hygiene, and environmental concerns; the technology must keep exposures to hazardous substances to levels as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). This report documents recent laboratory experiments that were conducted to determine the feasibility of gas-phase decontamination of the internal surfaces of the gaseous diffusion equipment that is contaminated with uranium deposits. A gaseous fluorinating agent is used to fluorinate the solid uranium deposits to gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF[sub 6]), which can be recovered by chemical trapping or freezing. The lab results regarding the feasibility of the gas-phase process are encouraging. These results especially showed promise for a novel decontamination approach called the long-term, low-temperature (LTLT) process. In the LTLT process: The equipment is rendered leak tight, evacuated, leak tested, and pretreated, charged with chlorine trifluoride (ClF[sub 3]) to subatmospheric pressure, left for an extended period, possibly > 4 months, while processing other items. Then the UF[sub 6] and other gases are evacuated. The UF[sub 6] is recovered by chemical trapping. The lab results demonstrated that ClF[sub 3] gas at subatmospheric pressure and at [approx] 75[degree]F is capable of volatilizing heavy deposits of uranyl fluoride from copper metal surfaces sufficiently that the remaining radioactive emissions are below limits.

  1. Feasibility of gas-phase decontamination of gaseous diffusion equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munday, E.B.; Simmons, D.W.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The five buildings at the K-25 Site formerly involved in the gaseous diffusion process contain 5000 gaseous diffusion stages as well as support facilities that are internally contaminated with uranium deposits. The gaseous diffusion facilities located at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant also contain similar equipment and will eventually close. The decontamination of these facilities will require the most cost-effective technology consistent with the criticality, health physics, industrial hygiene, and environmental concerns; the technology must keep exposures to hazardous substances to levels as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). This report documents recent laboratory experiments that were conducted to determine the feasibility of gas-phase decontamination of the internal surfaces of the gaseous diffusion equipment that is contaminated with uranium deposits. A gaseous fluorinating agent is used to fluorinate the solid uranium deposits to gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}), which can be recovered by chemical trapping or freezing. The lab results regarding the feasibility of the gas-phase process are encouraging. These results especially showed promise for a novel decontamination approach called the long-term, low-temperature (LTLT) process. In the LTLT process: The equipment is rendered leak tight, evacuated, leak tested, and pretreated, charged with chlorine trifluoride (ClF{sub 3}) to subatmospheric pressure, left for an extended period, possibly > 4 months, while processing other items. Then the UF{sub 6} and other gases are evacuated. The UF{sub 6} is recovered by chemical trapping. The lab results demonstrated that ClF{sub 3} gas at subatmospheric pressure and at {approx} 75{degree}F is capable of volatilizing heavy deposits of uranyl fluoride from copper metal surfaces sufficiently that the remaining radioactive emissions are below limits.

  2. Remote control of off-shore oil field production equipment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sissom, Alton Wayne

    1949-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sion on the subJect. II OhIGII4AL IDEAS AND BECONlyiKA1'IOgS The problem ss outlined in parts A and 8 of Appendix h'o. 2 was received by the writer in June of 1948, The engineering division of the California Company asked that ocean cable... the manufacturers of control equipment, an oral report wss made to the engineering division of the California Company on September ~, 1948. This report included the following recommendations. l. Consideration of the original control system ss outlined...

  3. Vapor cooled current lead for cryogenic electrical equipment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vansant, James H. (Tracy, CA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method are provided for conducting electric current to cryogenic electrical equipment devices. A combination of inner and outer tubes together form a plurality of hollow composite tubes housed in a sheath. Top and bottom block mounting means are fitted to hold the composite tubes and are affixed to the ends of the sheath. This combination forms a current lead. The current lead is attached to a cryogenic device housing a fluid coolant which moves through the current lead, cooling the current lead as the fluid travels.

  4. Weather data handbook for HVAC and cooling equipment design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data included detailed tabulations of wet bulb temperature frequencies for the summer months, tabulations in multiple frequency for winter and summer conditions, various weather parameters useful in estimating performance for heat exchange equipment and other applications. Other data provided are: 12-month dry bulb temperatures and 12-month wet bulb temperatures vs relative humidity; combination of wet bulb temperatures, wind speed, and relative humidity; wind direction with high relative humidities; hourly observations for relative humidity 93% or greater; coincident high wet bulb and dry bulb temperature, seasonal cloud cover, and heat islands. (MHR)

  5. 1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--End-Use Equipment

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility PlantsEnd-Use Equipment

  6. Microsoft Word - Equipment Use Policy Oct2710.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC:8CO 2Dances done atReducedEquipment

  7. Geothermal-well completions: a survey and technical evaluation of existing equipment and needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicholson, J.E.; Snyder, R.E.

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geothermal environment and associated well completion problems are reviewed. Existing well completion equipment is surveyed and limitations are identified. A technical evaluation of selected completion equipment is presented. The technical evaluation concentrates on well cementing equipment and identifies potential failure mechanisms which limit the effectiveness of these tools. Equipment employed in sand control, perforating, and corrosion control are identified as potential subjects for future technical evaluation.

  8. Comment submitted by Hobart/ITW Food Equipment Group regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a comment submitted by Hobart/ITW Food Equipment Group regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

  9. Advancing Equipment Reliability via a Natural Disaster Opportunities for Thinking Outside the Box

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, R.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advancing Equipment Reliability via a Natural Disaster, Opportunities for Thinking Outside the Box Robert Stephens, Senior Electrical Engineer, ExxonMobil, Chalmette Abstract As the equipment assessments came in after hurricane Katrina... was driven by the desire to harden equipment against future hurricanes, not just replace the equipment in kind. Pre-Katrina reliability teams had defined the architecture of the future. The devastation provided an opportunity for the vision to become...

  10. Used Computer Equipment Sales Agreement By acknowledgement of this Sale Agreement, _____________________________________ (Purchaser) agrees to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Used Computer Equipment Sales Agreement By acknowledgement of this Sale Agreement be in the State of Wisconsin. _________________________________________ _________________ Acknowledged

  11. Reliability of Manufacturing Equipment in Complex Environments Jeffrey P. Kharoufeh1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kharoufeh, Jeffrey P.

    Reliability of Manufacturing Equipment in Complex Environments Jeffrey P. Kharoufeh1 Department stochastic failure models for the reliability evaluation of manufacturing equipment that degrades due to its environment of the manufacturing equipment can significantly impact the rate at which tools (or other critical

  12. Risk-based Maintenance Allocation and Scheduling for Bulk Electric Power Transmission System Equipment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    equipment, maintenance, reliability, risk, security, optimization 1.Introduction Maintenance of bulk Equipment Yong Jiang, Ming Ni, James D. McCalley, Tim Van Voorhis {jiangy for bulk transmission equipment that is based on the cumulative long-term risk caused by each piece

  13. GLOVEBOX DISMANTLEMENT AND EQUIPMENT PROTECTION IN CONTAMINATED ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kitamura, Akihiro; Stallings, Ellen; Wilburn, Dianne W.

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been revealed from the experiences of Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) activities that even a small improvement in performance can result in significant risk reduction and cost savings. For example, Race Scan Ear Mic System, which was originally developed for communications between racecar drivers and crews in loud environments, has been successfully applied to D&D work and proved to enhance worker safety and communications. Glovebox dismantlement is an important and costly process in D&D activities of nuclear facilities. Adequate decontamination and size reduction of the gloveboxes are especially important in this activity because they have the potential to reduce risks and costs significantly. This paper presents some simple approaches to support D&D tasks and discusses their potential advantages. Examples discussed include: Repeated shear wiping of large pipes and ducts; Application of thin layers on radiological counters for uninterrupted use; and Partial use of robotics for glovebox dismantling. The paper also discusses schematics for protecting equipment interiors and/or glovebox inner surfaces from contamination, which may result in significant savings and waste minimization upon future dismantlement. Examples discussed include: Smart coating for contamination prevention; and Protecting equipment by geometrically simple cover.

  14. Thermal analysis of the failed equipment storage vault system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerrell, J.; Lee, S.Y.; Shadday, A.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A storage facility for failed glass melters is required for radioactive operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). It is currently proposed that the failed melters be stored in the Failed Equipment Storage Vaults (FESV`s) in S area. The FESV`s are underground reinforced concrete structures constructed in pairs, with adjacent vaults sharing a common wall. A failed melter is to be placed in a steel Melter Storage Box (MSB), sealed, and lowered into the vault. A concrete lid is then placed over the top of the FESV. Two melters will be placed within the FESV/MSB system, separated by the common wall. There is no forced ventilation within the vault so that the melter is passively cooled. Temperature profiles in the Failed Equipment Storage Vault Structures have been generated using the FLOW3D software to model heat conduction and convection within the FESV/MSB system. Due to complexities in modeling radiation with FLOW3D, P/THERMAL software has been used to model radiation using the conduction/convection temperature results from FLOW3D. The final conjugate model includes heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation to predict steady-state temperatures. Also, the FLOW3D software has been validated as required by the technical task request.

  15. Compressor Selection and Equipment Sizing for Cold Climate Heat Pumps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Bo [ORNL] [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL] [ORNL; Rice, C Keith [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to limit heating capacity degradation at -25 C (-13 F) ambient to 25%, compared to the nominal rating point capacity at 8.3 C (47 F), an extensive array of design and sizing options were investigated, based on fundamental equipment system modeling and building energy simulation. Sixteen equipment design options were evaluated in one commercial building and one residential building, respectively in seven cities. The energy simulation results were compared to three baseline cases: 100% electric resistance heating, a 9.6 HSPF single-speed heat pump unit, and 90% AFUE gas heating system. The general recommendation is that variable-speed compressors and tandem compressors, sized such that their rated heating capacity at a low speed matching the building design cooling load, are able to achieve the capacity goal at low ambient temperatures by over-speeding, for example, a home with a 3.0 ton design cooling load, a tandem heat pump could meet this cooling load running a single compressor, while running both compressors to meet heating load at low ambient temperatures in a cold climate. Energy savings and electric resistance heat reductions vary with building types, energy codes and climate zones. Oversizing a heat pump can result in larger energy saving in a less energy efficient building and colder regions due to reducing electric resistance heating. However, in a more energy-efficient building or for buildings in warmer climates, one has to consider balance between reduction of resistance heat and addition of cyclic loss.

  16. Impacts of Water Quality on Residential Water Heating Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widder, Sarah H.; Baechler, Michael C.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water heating is a ubiquitous energy use in all residential housing, accounting for 17.7% of residential energy use (EIA 2012). Today, there are many efficient water heating options available for every fuel type, from electric and gas to more unconventional fuel types like propane, solar, and fuel oil. Which water heating option is the best choice for a given household will depend on a number of factors, including average daily hot water use (total gallons per day), hot water draw patterns (close together or spread out), the hot water distribution system (compact or distributed), installation constraints (such as space, electrical service, or venting accommodations) and fuel-type availability and cost. While in general more efficient water heaters are more expensive than conventional water heating technologies, the savings in energy use and, thus, utility bills can recoup the additional upfront investment and make an efficient water heater a good investment over time in most situations, although the specific payback period for a given installation will vary widely. However, the expected lifetime of a water heater in a given installation can dramatically influence the cost effectiveness and savings potential of a water heater and should be considered, along with water use characteristics, fuel availability and cost, and specific home characteristics when selecting the optimum water heating equipment for a particular installation. This report provides recommendations for selecting and maintaining water heating equipment based on local water quality characteristics.

  17. Markets for rice husk-to-energy systems and equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Velupillai, L. [LSU Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Mahin, D.B. [International Energy Projects, Charlotte, NC (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A worldwide study of markets for U.S. equipment and systems for the production of energy from rice husks was conducted in 1995-96 by a team based at the Louisiana State University (LSU) Agricultural Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The project was carried out in cooperation with Agrilectric Power Inc. and Riceland Foods, Inc., and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The study included: (a) a global overview of the rice industry, rice husk availability and utilization, and husk-to-energy technologies, and (b) case studies of husk utilization and potential markets for husk-to-energy systems and equipment in five countries - the United States, Italy, China, Thailand, and Sri Lanka. The case studies in Italy, China, and Thailand were based in each case on a field trip to the country by a member of the project team. The study covered the following husk-to-energy technologies: furnace and boiler systems, steam engine systems, steam turbine systems, and gasifier/engine systems.

  18. Seismic equipment qualification at Rocky Flats Plant: Lessons learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peregoy, W.; Herring, K.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic equipment qualification is being evaluated as a part of the Systematic Evaluation Program (SEP) at Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). Initially it was believed that the experience database developed by the Seismic Qualification Utility Group (SQUG) for commercial nuclear power plants, as outlined in their Generic Implementation Procedure (GIP), would provide a substantial benefit for the seismic adequacy verification of equipment at RFP. However, further review of the simplified guidelines contained in the GIP with respect to the specific RFP structures and components revealed substantial differences from the GIP criteria. Therefore, the number of ``outliers`` from the experience database defined in the GIP is greater than was initially anticipated. This paper presents details of the differences found between the RFP structures and components and those represented in the GIP, and the challenges presented for their evaluation at RFP. Approaches necessary to develop seismic verification data are also discussed. The discussions focus on experience with one of the nuclear facilities at RFP, Building 707. However, the conclusions are generally applicable to other similar facilities that typically comprise the RFP nuclear facilities.

  19. Correctly specify insulation for process equipment and piping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, C. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Insulation serves as a thermal barrier to resist the flow of heat. When insulation is installed over piping or equipment to minimize heat losses, the insulation is categorized as heat conservation. Software programs for determining heat losses are based on ASTM C 680. If heat conservation insulation is calculated to determine the most cost-effective thickness for piping or equipment, then the insulation is categorized as economic insulation. Methods for manually determining economic thicknesses using various graphs and precalculated charts are given in Turner and Malloy. However, modern software programs available from industrial associations calculate economic thicknesses based on after-tax annual costs. Costs associated with owning insulation are expressed on an equivalent uniform annual cost basis. The thickness with the lowest annual cost is reported as the economic thickness. Some of the economic data needed to calculate economic thicknesses are fuel cost, depreciation period, annual fuel inflation rate, annual hours of operation, return on investment, effective income tax rate, annual insulation maintenance costs, and installed costs. To obtain accurate economical thicknesses, it is best to solicit installed costs from a local contractor likely to bid on the work. This paper covers the most suitable insulation materials for certain applications, the most economic material and thickness to use, and how the total insulation system should be designed.

  20. Criticality safety concerns of uranium deposits in cascade equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plaster, M.J. [Lockheed Martin Utility Services, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants enrich uranium in the {sup 235}U isotope by diffusing gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) through a porous barrier. The UF{sub 6} gaseous diffusion cascade utilized several thousand {open_quotes}stages{close_quotes} of barrier to produce highly enriched uranium (HEU). Historically, Portsmouth has enriched the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant`s product (typically 1.8 wt% {sup 235}U) as well as natural enrichment feed stock up to 97 wt%. Due to the chemical reactivity of UF{sub 6}, particularly with water, the formation of solid uranium deposits occur at a gaseous diffusion plant. Much of the equipment operates below atmospheric pressure, and deposits are formed when atmospheric air enters the cascade. Deposits may also be formed from UF{sub 6} reactions with oil, UF{sub 6} reactions with the metallic surfaces of equipment, and desublimation of UF{sub 6}. The major deposits form as a result of moist air in leakage due to failure of compressor casing flanges, blow-off plates, seals, expansion joint convolutions, and instrument lines. This report describes criticality concerns and deposit disposition.

  1. Control of Computer Room Air Conditioning using IT Equipment Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, Geoffrey C.; Storey, Bill; Patterson, Michael K.

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this demonstration was to show how sensors in IT equipment could be accessed and used to directly control computer room air conditioning. The data provided from the sensors is available on the IT network and the challenge for this project was to connect this information to the computer room air handler's control system. A control strategy was developed to enable separate control of the chilled water flow and the fans in the computer room air handlers. By using these existing sensors in the IT equipment, an additional control system is eliminated (or could be redundant) and optimal cooling can be provided saving significant energy. Using onboard server temperature sensors will yield significant energy reductions in data centers. Intel hosted the demonstration in its Santa Clara, CA data center. Intel collaborated with IBM, HP, Emerson, Wunderlich-Malec Engineers, FieldServer Technologies, and LBNL to install the necessary components and develop the new control scheme. LBNL also validated the results of the demonstration.

  2. Electrical equipment performance under severe accident conditions (BWR/Mark 1 plant analysis): Summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, P.R.; Kolaczkowski, A.M.; Medford, G.T.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Performance Evaluation of Electrical Equipment during Severe Accident States Program is to determine the performance of electrical equipment, important to safety, under severe accident conditions. In FY85, a method was devised to identify important electrical equipment and the severe accident environments in which the equipment was likely to fail. This method was used to evaluate the equipment and severe accident environments for Browns Ferry Unit 1, a BWR/Mark I. Following this work, a test plan was written in FY86 to experimentally determine the performance of one selected component to two severe accident environments.

  3. hESC Equipment Certification Process The following process is to be followed before capital equipment can be used for human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Duck O.

    Management. 3. Materials Management will research the FRS account(s) used to purchase the equipment and distribute copies of the completed form to the PI, Materials Management, and Isolde Bates. If further review the disposition of the equipment and forward copies of the completed form to the PI, Materials Management

  4. Models, Calculation and Optimization of Gas Networks, Equipment and Contracts for Design, Operation, Booking and Accounting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostromuhov, Leonid A

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are proposed models of contracts, technological equipment and gas networks and methods of their optimization. The flow in network undergoes restrictions of contracts and equipment to be operated. The values of sources and sinks are provided by contracts. The contract models represent (sub-) networks. The simplest contracts represent either nodes or edges. Equipment is modeled by edges. More sophisticated equipment is represented by sub-networks. Examples of such equipment are multi-poles and compressor stations with many entries and exits. The edges can be of different types corresponding to equipment and contracts. On such edges, there are given systems of equation and inequalities simulating the contracts and equipment. On this base, the methods proposed that allow: calculation and control of contract values for booking on future days and for accounting of sales and purchases; simulation and optimization of design and of operation of gas networks. These models and methods are realized in software syst...

  5. Clean Cities Guide to Alternative Fuel Commercial Lawn Equipment (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Guide explains the different types of alternative fuel commercial mowers and lists the makes and models of the ones available on the market. Turf grass is a fixture of the American landscape and the American economy. It is the nation's largest irrigated crop, covering more than 40 million acres. Legions of lawnmowers care for this expanse during the growing season-up to year-round in the warmest climates. The annual economic impact of the U.S. turf grass industry has been estimated at more than $62 billion. Lawn mowing also contributes to the nation's petroleum consumption and pollutant emissions. Mowers consume 1.2 billion gallons of gasoline annually, about 1% of U.S. motor gasoline consumption. Commercial mowing accounts for about 35% of this total and is the highest-intensity use. Large property owners and mowing companies cut lawns, sports fields, golf courses, parks, roadsides, and other grassy areas for 7 hours per day and consume 900 to 2,000 gallons of fuel annually depending on climate and length of the growing season. In addition to gasoline, commercial mowing consumes more than 100 million gallons of diesel annually. Alternative fuel mowers are one way to reduce the energy and environmental impacts of commercial lawn mowing. They can reduce petroleum use and emissions compared with gasoline- and diesel-fueled mowers. They may also save on fuel and maintenance costs, extend mower life, reduce fuel spillage and fuel theft, and promote a 'green' image. And on ozone alert days, alternative fuel mowers may not be subject to the operational restrictions that gasoline mowers must abide by. To help inform the commercial mowing industry about product options and potential benefits, Clean Cities produced this guide to alternative fuel commercial lawn equipment. Although the guide's focus is on original equipment manufacturer (OEM) mowers, some mowers can be converted to run on alternative fuels. For more information about propane conversions. This guide may be particularly helpful for organizations that are already using alternative fuels in their vehicles and have an alternative fuel supply or electric charging in place (e.g., golf cart charging stations at most golf courses). On the flip side, experiencing the benefits of using alternative fuels in mowing equipment may encourage organizations to try them in on-road vehicles as well. Whatever the case, alternative fuel commercial lawnmowers are a powerful and cost-effective way to reduce U.S. petroleum dependence and help protect the environment.

  6. High Temperature Calcination - MACT Upgrade Equipment Pilot Plant Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard D. Boardman; B. H. O'Brien; N. R. Soelberg; S. O. Bates; R. A. Wood; C. St. Michel

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    About one million gallons of acidic, hazardous, and radioactive sodium-bearing waste are stored in stainless steel tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is a major operating facility of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Calcination at high-temperature conditions (600 C, with alumina nitrate and calcium nitrate chemical addition to the feed) is one of four options currently being considered by the Department of Energy for treatment of the remaining tank wastes. If calcination is selected for future processing of the sodium-bearing waste, it will be necessary to install new off-gas control equipment in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) to comply with the Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards for hazardous waste combustors and incinerators. This will require, as a minimum, installing a carbon bed to reduce mercury emissions from their current level of up to 7,500 to <45 {micro}g/dscm, and a staged combustor to reduce unburned kerosene fuel in the off-gas discharge to <100 ppm CO and <10 ppm hydrocarbons. The staged combustor will also reduce NOx concentrations of about 35,000 ppm by 90-95%. A pilot-plant calcination test was completed in a newly constructed 15-cm diameter calciner vessel. The pilot-plant facility was equipped with a prototype MACT off-gas control system, including a highly efficient cyclone separator and off-gas quench/venturi scrubber for particulate removal, a staged combustor for unburned hydrocarbon and NOx destruction, and a packed activated carbon bed for mercury removal and residual chloride capture. Pilot-plant testing was performed during a 50-hour system operability test January 14-16, followed by a 100-hour high-temperature calcination pilot-plant calcination run January 19-23. Two flowsheet blends were tested: a 50-hour test with an aluminum-to-alkali metal molar ratio (AAR) of 2.25, and a 50-hour test with an AAR of 1.75. Results of the testing indicate that sodium-bearing waste can be successfully calcined at 600 C with an AAR of 1.75. Unburned hydrocarbons are reduced to less than 10 ppm (7% O2, dry basis), with >90% reduction of NOx emissions. Mercury removal by the carbon bed reached 99.99%, surpassing the control efficiency needed to meet MACT emissions standards. No deleterious impacts on the carbon bed were observed during the tests. The test results imply that upgrading the NWCF calciner with a more efficient cyclone separator and the proposed MACT equipment can process the remaining tanks wastes in 3 years or less, and comply with the MACT standards.

  7. Directional Drilling and Equipment for Hot Granite Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, R. E.; Neudecker, J. W.; Rowley, J.C.; Brittenham, T. L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Directional drilling technology was extended and modified to drill the first well of a subsurface geothermal energy extraction system at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, hot dry rock (HDR) experimental site. Borehole geometries, extremely hard and abrasive granite rock, and high formation temperatures combined to provide a challenging environment for directional drilling tools and instrumentation. Completing the first of the two-wellbore HDR system resulted in the definition of operation limitations of -many conventional directional drilling tools, instrumentation, and techniques. The successful completion of the first wellbore, Energy Extraction Well No. 2 (EE-21), to a measured depth of 4.7 km (15,300 ft) in granite reservoir rock with a bottomhole temperature of 320 C (610 F) required the development of a new high-temperature downhole motor and modification of existing wireline-conveyed steering tool systems. Conventional rotary-driven directional assemblies were successfully modified to accommodate the very hard and abrasive rock encountered while drilling nearly 2.6 km (8,500 ft) of directional hole to a final inclination of 35{sup o} from the vertical at the controlled azimuthal orientation. Data were collected to optimize the drilling procedures far the programmed directional drilling of well EE-3 parallel to, and 370 metres (1,200 ft) above, Drilling equipment and techniques used in drilling wellbores for extraction of geothermal energy from hot granite were generally similar to those that are standard and common to hydrocarbon drilling practices. However, it was necessary to design some new equipment for this program: some equipment was modified especially for this program and some was operated beyond normal ratings. These tools and procedures met with various degrees of success. Two types of shock subs were developed and tested during this project. However, downhole time was limited, and formations were so varied that analysis of the capabilities of these items is not conclusive. Temperature limits of the tools were exceeded. EE-2. Commercial drilling and fishing jars were improved during the drilling program. Three-cone, tungsten-carbide insert bit performance with downhole motors was limited by rapid gauge wear. Rotary drilling was optimized for wells EE-2 and EE-3 using softer (IADS 635 code) bits and provided a balance between gauge,. cutting structure, and bearing life. Problems of extreme drill string drag, drill string twist-off, and corrosion control are discussed.

  8. Long-length contaminated equipment disposal process path document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, W.A.

    1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The first objective of the LLCE Process Path Document is to guide future users of this system on how to accomplish the cradle-to-grave process for the disposal of long-length equipment. Information will be provided describing the function and approach to each step in the process. Pertinent documentation, prerequisites, drawings, procedures, hardware, software, and key interfacing organizations will be identified. The second objective is related to the decision to lay up the program until funding is made available to complete it or until a need arises due to failure of an important component in a waste tank. To this end, the document will identify work remaining to be completed for each step of the process and open items or issues that remain to be resolved.

  9. New developments for high power electron beam equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melde, C.; Jaesch, G.; Maedler, E. [Von Ardenne Anlagentechnnik GmbH, Dresden (Germany)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    High power electron guns for industrial use work in the range of power of more than 10 kW up to 1200 kW. The only suitable principle for this purpose is that used in axial guns. Elements necessary for these EB guns and their design are described. The outstanding properties required for applications in production and R & D can only be achieved if the equipment is supplemented by a high voltage supply, beam guidance supply, vacuum generator and the various devices for observation, measurement and control. Standard rules for both the technical demands in application and dimensioning of some of the necessary components are explained. Special developments, such as high speed deflection, observation by BSE-camera and arc-free electron beam systems are also presented.

  10. Instrumentation and Equipment for Three Independent Research Labs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darlene Roth

    2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Completed in 2011, Albright's new Science Center includes three independent student and faculty research labs in Biology, Chemistry/Biochemistry, and Physics (separate from teaching labs). Providing independent research facilities, they eliminate disruptions in classrooms and teaching labs, encourage and accommodate increased student interest, and stimulate advanced research. The DOE grant of $369,943 enabled Albright to equip these advanced labs for 21st century science research, with much instrumentation shared among departments. The specialty labs will enable Albright to expand its student-faculty research program to meet growing interest, help attract superior science students, maximize faculty expertise, and continue exceeding its already high rates of acceptance for students applying for postgraduate education or pharmaceutical research positions. Biology instrumentation/equipment supports coursework and independent and collaborative research by students and faculty. The digital shaker, CO{sub 2} and water bath incubators (for controlled cell growth), balance, and micropipettes support cellular biology research in the advanced cell biology course and student-faculty research into heavy metal induction of heat shock proteins in cultured mammalian cells and the development of PCR markers from different populations of the native tree, Franklinia. The gravity convection oven and lyophilizer support research into physical and chemical analysis of floodplain sediments used in assessment of riparian restoration efforts. The Bio-Rad thermocycler permits fast and accurate DNA amplification as part of research into genetic diversity in small mammal populations and how those populations are affected by land-use practices and environmental management. The Millipore water deionizing system and glassware washer provide general support of the independent research lab and ensure quality control of coursework and interdisciplinary research at the intersection of biology, chemistry, and toxicology. Grant purchases support faculty and students working in the areas of plant cellular biology, landscape ecology and wildlife management, wetland restoration, and ecotoxicology of aquatic invertebrates. Chemistry/BioChemistry instrumentation supports a wide range of research and teaching needs. The Dell quad core Xeon processors and Gaussian 09 support computational research efforts of two of our faculty. The computational work of one of these groups is part of close collaboration with one organic chemist and provides support info for the synthetic work of this professor and his students. Computational chemistry studies were also introduced into the physical chemistry laboratory course for junior chemistry concentrators. The AKTA plus system and superdex columns, Thermoscientific Sorvall RC-6 plus superspeed centrifuge, Nanodrop spectrometer, Eppendorf microfuge, Homogenizer and Pipetman pipetters were incorporated into a research project involving purification and characterization of a construct of beta 2-microglobulin by one of our biochemists. The vacuum system (glove box, stand, and pump) makes a significant contribution to the research of our inorganic chemist, the newest department member, working on research projects with four students. The glove box provides the means to carry out their synthetic work in an oxygenless atmosphere. Supporting basic research pursued by faculty and students, the remaining items (refrigerator/freezer units for flammable storage, freezer, refrigerated water bath, rotary evaporator system, vacuum oven, analytical and top-loading balances) were distributed between our biochemistry and chemistry research labs. The Nanodrop spectrometer, Sorvall centrifuge, and rotary evaporator system are used in several junior/senior lab courses in both biochemistry and chemistry. To date, 14 undergraduate research students have been involved in projects using the new instrumentation and equipment provided by this grant. Physics equipment acquired is radically transforming Albright research and teaching capabilities. The tw

  11. Topsides equipment, operating flexibility key floating LNG design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yost, K.; Lopez, R.; Mok, J. [Mobil E and P Technology Co., Dallas, TX (United States)

    1998-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Use of a large-scale floating liquefied natural gas (LNG) plant is an economical alternative to an onshore plant for producing from an offshore field. Mobil Technology Co., Dallas, has advanced a design for such a plant that is technically feasible, economical, safe, and reliable. Presented were descriptions of the general design basis, hull modeling and testing, topsides and storage layouts, and LNG offloading. But such a design also presents challenges for designing topsides equipment in an offshore environment and for including flexibility and safety. These are covered in this second article. Mobil`s floating LNG plant design calls for a square concrete barge with a moon-pool in the center. It is designed to produce 6 million tons/year of LNG with up to 55,000 b/d of condensate from 1 bcfd of raw feed gas.

  12. Novel Carbon Films for Next Generation Rotating Equipment Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael McNallan; Ali Erdemir; Yury Gogotsi

    2006-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of research performed on a new generation of low friction, wear resistant carbon coatings for seals and bearings in high speed rotating equipment. The low friction coatings, Near Frictionless Carbon (NFC), a high hydrogen content diamondlike carbon, and Carbide Derived Carbon (CDC), a conversion coating produced on the surfaces of metal carbides by halogenation, can be applied together or separately to improve the performance of seals and bearings, with benefits to energy efficiency and environmental protection. Because hard carbide ceramics, such as silicon carbide, are widely used in the seals industry, this coating is particularly attractive as a low cost method to improve performance. The technology of CDC has been licensed to an Illinois company, Carbide Derivative Technologies, Inc. (CDTI) to implement the commercialization of this material.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this one-year investigation is to perform a technology integration/search, thereby ensuring that the safest and most cost-effective options are developed and subsequently used during the deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Management (DOE-EM) sites. Issues of worker health and safety are the main concern, followed by cost. Two lines of action were explored: innovative Personal Cooling Systems (PCS) and Personal Monitoring Equipment (PME). PME refers to sensors affixed to the worker that warn of an approaching heat stress condition, thereby preventing it. Three types of cooling systems were investigated: Pre-Chilled or Forced-Air System (PCFA), Umbilical Fluid-Chilled System (UFCS), and Passive Vest System (PVS). Of these, the UFCS leads the way. The PVS or Gel pack vest lagged due to a limited cooling duration. And the PCFA or chilled liquid air supply was cumbersome and required an expensive and complex recharge system. The UFCS in the form of the Personal Ice Cooling System (PICS) performed exceptionally. The technology uses a chilled liquid circulating undergarment and a Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) external pump and ice reservoir. The system is moderately expensive, but the recharge is low-tech and inexpensive enough to offset the cost. There are commercially available PME that can be augmented to meet the DOE's heat stress alleviation need. The technology is costly, in excess of $4,000 per unit. Workers easily ignore the alarm. The benefit to health & safety is indirect so can be overlooked. A PCS is a more justifiable expenditure.

  14. Characterization of fundamental catalytic properties of MoS2/WS2 nanotubes and nanoclusters for desulfurization catalysis - a surface temperature study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U. Burghaus

    2012-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The prior project consisted of two main project lines. First, characterization of novel nanomaterials for hydrodesulfurization (HDS) applications. Second, studying more traditional model systems for HDS such as vapor-deposited silica-supported Mo and MoSx clusters. In the first subproject, we studied WS2 and MoS2 fullerene-like nanoparticles as well as WS2 nanotubes. Thiophene (C4H4S) was used as the probe molecule. Interestingly, metallic and sulfur-like adsorption sites could be identified on the silica-supported fullerene-particles system. Similar structures are seen for the traditional system (vapor-deposited clusters). Thus, this may be a kinetics fingerprint feature of modern HDS model systems. In addition, kinetics data allowed characterization of the different adsorption sites for thiophene on and inside WS2 nanotube bundles. The latter is a unique feature of nanotubes that has not been reported before for any inorganic nanotube system; however, examples are known for carbon nanotubes, including prior work of the PI. Although HDS has been studied for decades, utilizing nanotubes as nanosized HDS reactors has never been tried before, as far as we know. This is of interest from a fundamental perspective. Unfortunately, the HDS activity of the nanocatalysts at ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions was close to the detection limit of our techniques. Therefore, we propose to run experiments at ambient pressure on related nanopowder samples as part of the renewal application utilizing a now-available GC (gas chromatograph) setup. In addition, Ni and Co doped nanocatalyts are proposed for study. These dopants will boost the catalytic activity. In the second subproject of the prior grant, we studied HDS-related chemistry on more traditional supported cluster catalysts. Mo clusters supported by physical vapor deposition (PVD) on silica have been characterized. Two reaction pathways are evident when adsorbing thiophene on Mo and MoSx clusters: molecular adsorption and dissociation. PVD Mo clusters turned out to be very reactive toward thiophene bond activation. Sulfur and carbon residuals form, which poison the catalyst and sulfide the Mo clusters. Sulfided silica-supported MoSx samples are not reactive toward thiophene bond activation. In addition to S and C deposits, H2, H2S, and small organic molecules were detected in the gas phase. Catalyst reactivation procedures, including O2 and atomic hydrogen treatments, have been tested. Cluster size effects have been seen: thiophene adsorbs molecularly with larger binding energies on smaller clusters. However, larger clusters have smaller activation energy for C4H4S bond activation than smaller clusters. The latter is consistent with early catalysis studies. Kinetics and dynamics parameters have been determined quantitatively. We spent a significant amount of time on upgrades of our equipment. A 2nd-hand refurbished X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS) has been integrated into the existing molecular beam scattering system and is already operational (supported by the DoE supplemental grant available in October 2009). We also added a time of flight (TOF) system to the beam scattering apparatus and improved on the accessible impact energy range (new nozzle heater and gas mixing manifold) for the beam scattering experiments. In addition, a GC-based powder atmospheric flow reactor for studies on powder samples is now operational. Furthermore, a 2nd UHV kinetics system has been upgraded as well. In summary, mostly single crystal systems have so far been considered in basic science studies about HDS. Industrial catalysts, however, can be better approximated with the supported cluster systems that we studied in this project. Furthermore, an entirely new class of HDS systems, namely fullerene-like particles and inorganic nanotubes, has been included. Studying new materials and systems has the potential to impact science and technology. The systems investigated are closely related to energy and environmental-related surface science/catalysis. This prior project, conducted at NDSU by a sma

  15. Predictable SCR co-benefits for mercury control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pritchard, S. [Cormtech Inc. (USA)

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A test program, performed in cooperation with Dominion Power and the Babcock and Wilcox Co., was executed at Dominion Power's Mount Storm power plant in Grant County, W. Va. The program was focused on both the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst capability to oxide mercury as well as the scrubber's capability to capture and retain the oxidized mercury. This article focuses on the SCR catalyst performance aspects. The Mount Storm site consists of three units totaling approximately 1,660 MW. All units are equipped with SCR systems for NOx control. A full-scale test to evaluate the effect of the SCR was performed on Unit 2, a 550 MWT-fired boiler firing a medium sulfur bituminous coal. This test program demonstrated that the presence of an SCR catalyst can significantly affect the mercury speciation profile. Observation showed that in the absence of an SCR catalyst, the extent of oxidation of element a mercury at the inlet of the flue gas desulfurization system was about 64%. The presence of a Cornertech SCR catalyst improved this oxidation to levels greater than 95% almost all of which was captured by the downstream wet FGD system. Cornertech's proprietary SCR Hg oxidation model was used to accurately predict the field results. 1 ref., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Safety equipment list for the light duty utility arm system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, G.A.

    1998-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial issue (Revision 0) of this Safety Equipment List (SEL) for the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) requires an explanation for both its existence and its being what it is. All LDUA documentation leading up to creation of this SEL, and the SEL itself, is predicated on the LDUA only being approved for use in waste tanks designated as Facility Group 3, i.e., it is not approved for use in Facility Group 1 or 2 waste tanks. Facility Group 3 tanks are those in which a spontaneous or induced hydrogen gas release would be small, localized, and would not exceed 25% of the LFL when mixed with the remaining air volume in the dome space; exceeding these parameters is considered unlikely. Thus, from a NFPA flammable gas environment perspective the waste tank interior is not classified as a hazardous location. Furthermore, a hazards identification and evaluation (HNF-SD-WM-HIE-010, REV 0) performed for the LDUA system concluded that the consequences of actual LDUA system postulated accidents in Flammable Gas Facility Group 3 waste tanks would have either NO IMPACT or LOW IMPACT on the offsite public and onsite worker. Therefore, from a flammable gas perspective, there is not a rationale for classifying any of SSCs associated with the LDUA as either Safety Class (SC) or Safety Significant (SS) SSCs, which, by default, categorizes them as General Service (GS) SSCs. It follows then, based on current PHMC procedures (HNF-PRO-704 and HNF-IP-0842, Vol IV, Section 5.2) for SEL creation and content, and from a flammable gas perspective, that an SEL is NOT REQ@D HOWEVER!!! There is both a precedent and a prudency to capture all SSCS, which although GS, contribute to a Defense-In-Depth (DID) approach to the design and use of equipment in potentially flammable gas environments. This Revision 0 of the LDUA SEL has been created to capture these SSCs and they are designated as GS-DID in this document. The specific reasons for doing this are listed.

  17. Analog Video Authentication and Seal Verification Equipment Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory Lancaster

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under contract to the US Department of Energy in support of arms control treaty verification activities, the Savannah River National Laboratory in conjunction with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Idaho National Laboratory and Milagro Consulting, LLC developed equipment for use within a chain of custody regime. This paper discussed two specific devices, the Authentication Through the Lens (ATL) analog video authentication system and a photographic multi-seal reader. Both of these devices have been demonstrated in a field trial, and the experience gained throughout will also be discussed. Typically, cryptographic methods are used to prove the authenticity of digital images and video used in arms control chain of custody applications. However, in some applications analog cameras are used. Since cryptographic authentication methods will not work on analog video streams, a simple method of authenticating analog video was developed and tested. A photographic multi-seal reader was developed to image different types of visual unique identifiers for use in chain of custody and authentication activities. This seal reader is unique in its ability to image various types of seals including the Cobra Seal, Reflective Particle Tags, and adhesive seals. Flicker comparison is used to compare before and after images collected with the seal reader in order to detect tampering and verify the integrity of the seal.

  18. An MILP approach to Multi-location, Multi-Period Equipment ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dec 1, 2014 ... case studies provided by our industry partner. We develop a mixed-integer linear programming model for heterogeneous equipment selection ...

  19. UGA Computer Equipment, Software or Services (CESS) Request Form Individual Responsible for CESS Resource and Location

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    UGA Computer Equipment, Software or Services (CESS) Request Form Individual Responsible for CESS to install and utilize these resources in a manner consistent with established University Computer Security

  20. michael smith ornlradioactive beams: equipment & techniques p-induced reaction measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    measurements · Measure low cross section reactions with low RIB intensities in fine energy steps! · Use each, 128 channels Commissioned ~ 1995 #12;michael smith ornlradioactive beams: equipment & techniques