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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desired end-use services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Energy End-Use Patterns in Full-Service Hotels: A Case Study  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently initiated a program -- Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) -- to work with private-sector companies in the design of highly-efficient retrofit and new construction projects. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is conducting a project with a major hotel company to retrofit a full-service, large hotel with the goal of reducing energy consumption by at least 30%. The first step of the project was an intensive metering and monitoring effort aimed at understanding energy end use patterns in the hotel. About 10% of the guest rooms (32), as well as circuits for most of the end uses in public spaces (lighting, elevators, air handlers and other HVAC system components, and various equipment), were equipped with meters. Data are being collected at 1- or 5-minute intervals and downloaded on a monthly basis for analysis. This paper presents results from the first four months of the monitoring effort, which revealed energy end-use consumption patterns, variability of guest room energy use, daily load curves, monthly variations, and other aspects of hotel energy use. Metered end-use data for hotels at this level of detail are not available from any currently-available public sources. This study presents unique information and insight into energy end-use patterns in the lodging sector of commercial buildings and can also serve as a case study of a complex sub-metering project.

Placet, Marylynn; Katipamula, Srinivas; Liu, Bing; Dirks, James A.; Xie, YuLong; Sullivan, Greg; Walent, Jim; Williamson, Rebecca

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

2

Service Report Enwgy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Enwgy Information Administration Enwgy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U;S. Department of Energy Washington, O.C. 20585 ^ ± SR-EEUD--84-I leather izat ion Program Evaluation §]*: b? .. Gerald E. Pealjody of Energy Markets and End Use Energy End Use Division August 20, 1984 This raport has not received a complete technical review by the Energy In formation Administration (E1A) and, therefore, should not be represented as an official EIA product. |||lsS|; program in 198 l^^lRia; study is based -on a scatii;f|^ipiiii|', national samp 1* Of : - households chac aarcicipscac in the pr; 3 §S||tMi-lfc|Sis2?ia covers ;he ^tiecrr^n: of conditions under vhich the p This ,s«;;5^H:«lil-lSi|iuGcaG ac che requesic of :rva

3

Service Report Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Information Administration Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D C 20585 SR/EEUD/86/01 Residential Conservation Measures Energy End Use Division Office of Energy Markets and End Use Energy Information Administration July 1986 This report has not received a complete technical review by the Energy In formation Administration (EIA) and, therefore, should not be represented as an official EIA product. PREFACE This study was undertaken at the request of Senator James A. McClure, Chairman, Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, United States Senate. The purpose of the study is to examine the potential for achieving energy savings in the residential sector through conservation measures. The report is to be submitted

4

Integrated estimation of commercial sector end-use load shapes and energy use intensities in the PG&E service area  

SciTech Connect

This project represents a unique research effort to address the commercial sector end-use energy forecasting data needs of the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) and the California Energy Commission (CEC). The object of the project was to develop an updated set of commercial sector end-use energy use intensity (EUI) data that has been fully reconciled with measured data. The research was conducted in two stages. First, we developed reconciled electricity end-use EUIs and load shapes for each of the 11 building types in the inland and coastal regions of the PG&E service territory using information collected in 1986. Second, we developed procedures to translate these results into a consistent set of commercial sector forecasting model inputs recognizing the separate modeling conventions used by PG&E and CEC. EUIs have been developed for: II commercial building types; up to 10 end uses; up to 3 fuel types; 2 and 5 subservice territory forecasting regions (as specified by the PG&E and CEC forecasting models, respectively); and up to 2 distinct vintages corresponding to the period prior to and immediately following the adoption of the first generation of California building and equipment standards. For the electricity end uses, 36 sets of daily load shapes have been developed representing average weekday, average weekend, and peak weekday electricity use for each month of the year by building type for both the inland and coastal climate zones.

Akbari, H.; Eto, J.; Konopacki, S.; Afzal, A.; Heinemeier, K.; Rainer, L.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Monitoring of Electrical End-Use Loads in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Southern California Edison is currently conducting a program to collect end-use metered data from commercial buildings in its service area. The data will provide actual measurements of end-use loads and will be used in research and in designing energy management programs oriented toward end-use applications. The focus of the program is on five major types of commercial buildings: offices, grocery stores, restaurants, retail stores, and warehouses. End-use metering equipment is installed at about 50 buildings, distributed among these five types. The buildings selected have average demands of 100 to 300 kW. The metered end-uses vary among building types and include HVAC, lighting, refrigeration. plug loads, and cooking. Procedures have been custom-designed to facilitate collection and validation of the end-use load data. For example, the Load Profile Viewer is a PC-based software program for reviewing and validating the end-use load data.

Martinez, M.; Alereza, T.; Mort, D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Monitoring of electrical end-use loads in commercial buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A California utility is currently conducting a program to collect end-use metered data from commercial buildings in its service area. The data will provide actual measurements of end-use loads and will be used in research and in designing energy management programs oriented toward end-use applications. The focus of the program is on five major types of commercial buildings: offices, grocery stores, restaurants, retail stores, and warehouses. End-use metering equipment is installed at about 50 buildings selected have average demands of 100kW to 300 kW. The metered end-uses vary among building types and include HVAC, lighting, refrigeration, plug loads, and cooking. Procedures have been custom-designed to facilitate collection and validation of the end-use load data. PC-based software programs have been developed for reviewing and validating the end-sue load data and for generating reports.

Martinez, M. (Southern California Edison, CA (US)); Alereza, T.; Mort, D. (ADM Associates, Sacramento, CA (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal","RSE" " ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal","Row" "End Use","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Factors"

8

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 3. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " ","Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)","RSE" " ","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Row"

9

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,"Distillate" ,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" ,"Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "End Use","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)" ,"Total United States" "TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION",2886,79,130,5211,69,868

10

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,"Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" ,"for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million" "End Use","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)"

11

End-use taxes: Current EIA practices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are inconsistencies in the EIA published end-use price data with respect to Federal, state, and local government sales and excise taxes; some publications include end-use taxes and others do not. The reason for including these taxes in end-use energy prices is to provide consistent and accurate information on the total cost of energy purchased by the final consumer. Preliminary estimates are made of the effect on prices (bias) reported in SEPER (State Energy Price and Expenditure Report) resulting from the inconsistent treatment of taxes. EIA has undertaken several actions to enhance the reporting of end-use energy prices.

Not Available

1994-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

12

,"Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

13

,"California Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural...

14

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Tennessee Natural...

15

,"Colorado Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Natural...

16

,"Washington Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Washington Natural...

17

,"Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Virginia Natural...

18

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nebraska Natural...

19

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania...

20

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Natural...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desired end-use services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Natural...

22

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Natural...

23

,"Michigan Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Natural...

24

,"Delaware Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Delaware Natural...

25

,"Maryland Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Maryland Natural...

26

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana Natural...

27

,"Missouri Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Missouri Natural...

28

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma Natural...

29

,"Idaho Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Idaho Natural Gas Consumption by End Use",6,"Monthly","102013","1151989" ,"Release...

30

Commercial building end-use energy metering inventory  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a comprehensive inventory of end-use metered data. The inventory did not discover many sources of metered end-use data; however, research into existing data bases and extensive discussions with professionals associated with building energy conservation have enabled a clear characterization to be developed of the types of metered data that are required to further energy conservation in commercial buildings. Based on the results of the inventory and this clarification of data requirements, the adequacy of existing data bases has been assessed, and recommendations have been developed for future federal data collection efforts. A summary of sources of existing metered end-use data is provided in Section 2.1 and its adequacy has been summarized. Collection of further end-use metered data is both desirable and valuable for many areas of building energy conservation research. Empirical data are needed to address many issues which to date have been addressed using only simulation techniques. The adequacy of using simulation techniques for various purposes needs to be assessed through comparison with measured data. While these data are expensive to acquire, it is cost-effective to do so in the long run, and the need is not being served by the private market. The preceding conclusion based on results from the inventory of existing data highlights two important facts: First, although the data are widely desired in the private sector, they are not widely available. Second, where suitable data are publicly available and contain the desired supporting information, their collection has generally been funded by government-sponsored research.

Heidell, J.A.; Mazzucchi, R.P.; Reilly, R.W.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings1992 -- Overview/End-Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

> Overview > Overview 1992 Energy End-Use Intensities Overview Energy Consumption by End Use, 1992 Figure on Energy Consumption By End Use, 1992 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. End-Use Estimation Methodology The end-use estimates had two main sources: (1) survey data collected by the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) and (2) building energy simulations provided by the Facility Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system. The CBECS provided data on building characteristics and total energy consumption (i.e., for all end uses) for a national sample of commercial buildings. Using data collected by the CBECS, the FEDS engineering modules were used to produce estimates of energy consumption by end use. The FEDS engineering estimates were then statistically adjusted to match the CBECS total energy consumption.

32

,"Idaho Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Idaho Natural Gas...

33

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Natural Gas...

34

,"Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska Natural Gas...

35

,"Oregon Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oregon Natural Gas...

36

,"Alabama Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Natural Gas...

37

,"Florida Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Florida Natural Gas...

38

,"Arizona Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arizona Natural Gas...

39

,"Kansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Natural Gas...

40

,"Montana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Natural Gas...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desired end-use services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

,"Nevada Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nevada Natural Gas...

42

,"Utah Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Natural Gas...

43

,"Indiana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Indiana Natural Gas...

44

,"Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas...

45

,"Ohio Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Natural Gas...

46

End-Use Taxes: Current EIA Practices  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Addresses the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) current practices in treating taxes in the calculation of end use prices in the State Energy Price and Expenditure Report 1990 (SEPER), and other EIA data publications.

Information Center

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Flywheel Energy Storage for End-Use Power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power quality represents both a challenge and an opportunity for utilities to provide quality and service to their customers. Flywheel systems are becoming commercially available for solving short-term power quality problems, specifically voltage sags and momentary interruptions, and a variety of products appears particularly attractive for this market. This report provides information on the subject of flywheel energy storage systems to utility personnel responsible for end-use power quality.

1998-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Biomass Resource Allocation among Competing End Uses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Resource Allocation Biomass Resource Allocation among Competing End Uses Emily Newes, Brian Bush, Daniel Inman, Yolanda Lin, Trieu Mai, Andrew Martinez, David Mulcahy, Walter Short, Travis Simpkins, and Caroline Uriarte National Renewable Energy Laboratory Corey Peck Lexidyne, LLC Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-54217 May 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Biomass Resource Allocation among Competing End Uses Emily Newes, Brian Bush, Daniel Inman,

49

China End-Use Energy Demand Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

China End-Use Energy Demand Modeling China End-Use Energy Demand Modeling Speaker(s): Nan Zhou Date: October 8, 2009 (All day) Location: 90-3122 As a consequence of soaring energy demand due to the staggering pace of its economic growth, China overtook the United States in 2007 to become the world's biggest contributor to CO2 emissions (IEA, 2007). Since China is still in an early stage of industrialization and urbanization, economic development promises to keep China's energy demand growing strongly. Furthermore, China's reliance on fossil fuel is unlikely to change in the long term, and increased needs will only heighten concerns about energy security and climate change. In response, the Chinese government has developed a series of policies and targets aimed at improving energy efficiency, including both short-term targets and long-term strategic

50

Biomass Resource Allocation among Competing End Uses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Biomass Scenario Model (BSM) is a system dynamics model developed by the U.S. Department of Energy as a tool to better understand the interaction of complex policies and their potential effects on the biofuels industry in the United States. However, it does not currently have the capability to account for allocation of biomass resources among the various end uses, which limits its utilization in analysis of policies that target biomass uses outside the biofuels industry. This report provides a more holistic understanding of the dynamics surrounding the allocation of biomass among uses that include traditional use, wood pellet exports, bio-based products and bioproducts, biopower, and biofuels by (1) highlighting the methods used in existing models' treatments of competition for biomass resources; (2) identifying coverage and gaps in industry data regarding the competing end uses; and (3) exploring options for developing models of biomass allocation that could be integrated with the BSM to actively exchange and incorporate relevant information.

Newes, E.; Bush, B.; Inman, D.; Lin, Y.; Mai, T.; Martinez, A.; Mulcahy, D.; Short, W.; Simpkins, T.; Uriarte, C.; Peck, C.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Office Buildings - End-Use Equipment  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End-Use Equipment End-Use Equipment The types of space heating equipment used in office buildings were similar to those of the commercial buildings sector as a whole (Table 8 and Figure 5). Furnaces were most used followed by packaged heating systems. Individual space heaters were third-most used but were primarily used to supplement the building's main heating system. Boilers and district heat systems were more often used in larger buildings. Table 8. Types of Heating Equipment Used in Office Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings* All Office Buildings All Buildings* All Office Buildings All Buildings 4,645 824 64,783 12,208 All Buildings with Space Heating 3,982 802 60,028 11,929 Heating Equipment (more than one may apply)

52

Industrial Steam Power Cycles Final End-Use Classification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Final end uses of steam include two major classifications: those uses that condense the steam against heat transfer surfaces to provide heat to an item of process or service equipment; and those that require a mass flow of steam for stripping, dilution, a reaction ingredient, etc. These classifications are termed 'Btu' loads or 'Pound' loads. Some final end uses of steam are actually a combination of the two. The classification of steam loads is extremely important to the overall economics of the industrial plant steam system. These economic effects are explained in detail as they impact on both the thermal efficiency and the heat power cycle efficiency of an industrial system. The use of a powerful steam system mass and energy modeling program called MESA (Modular Energy System Analyzer, The MESA Company) in identifying and accurately evaluating these effects is described.

Waterland, A. F.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1992 - Index...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Energy End-Use Intensities 1992 Energy End-Use Intensities Overview Tables National estimates of energy consumption by fuel (electricity and natural gas) and end use (heating,...

54

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1995 - Index...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1995 End-Use Data 1995 End-Use Data Overview Tables National estimates of energy consumption by fuel (electricity and natural gas) and end use (heating, cooling, lighting, etc.)...

55

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1989  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Energy End-Use Intensities 1989 Energy End-Use Intensities Overview Full Report Tables National estimates and analysis of energy consumption by fuel (electricity, natural gas,...

56

Realizing Building End-Use Efficiency with Ermerging Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Information about the implementation of emerging technologies to maximize end-use efficiency in buildings.

57

Survey of End-Use Metering Equipment, Sensors, and Designers/Installers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

End-use data metering technology has come of age in the last several years, with many new specialized products becoming available. This report represents the first survey of end-use metering and monitoring equipment and of sensors typically used with such equipment. It also surveys organizations that provide design and/or installation services for demand-side management metering and monitoring systems.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1992  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Overview > Tables Overview > Tables 1992 Energy End-Use Intensities Tables Energy Consumption by End Use, 1992 Figure on Energy Consumption By End Use, 1992 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. divider line To View and/or Print Reports (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader) - Download Adobe Acrobat Reader If you experience any difficulties, visit our Technical Frequently Asked Questions. divider line Tables - (file size 31,655 bytes), pages 6. - requires Adobe Acrobat Reader Consumption of All Major Fuels by End Uses, 1992 Energy End-Use Intensities for All Major Fuels, 1992 Consumption of Electricity by End Uses, 1992 Energy End-Use Intensities for Electricity, 1992

59

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS",,,"Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States"

60

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)","Factors"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desired end-use services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)"

62

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)"

63

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)","Factors"

64

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal","RSE" "NAICS"," ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Factors"

65

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS",,,"Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States"

66

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," ","RSE"

67

A new approach to estimate commercial sector end-use load shapes and energy use intensities  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the application of an end-use load shape estimation technique to develop annual energy use intensities (EUIs) and hourly end-use load shapes (LSs) for commercial buildings in the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) service territory. Results will update inputs for the commercial sector energy and peak demand forecasting models used by PG&E and the California Energy Commission (CEC). EUIs were estimated for 11 building types, up to 10 end uses, 3 fuel types, 2 building vintages, and up to 5 climate regions. The integrated methodology consists of two major parts. The first part is the reconciliation of initial end-use load-shape estimates with measured whole-building load data to produce intermediate EUIs and load shapes, using LBL`s End-use Disaggregation Algorithm, EDA. EDA is a deterministic hourly algorithm that relies on the observed characteristics of the measured hourly whole-building electricity use and disaggregates it into major end-use components. The end-use EUIs developed through the EDA procedure represent a snap-shot of electricity use by building type and end-use for two regions of the PG&E service territory, for the year that disaggregation is performed. In the second part of the methodology, we adjust the EUIs for direct application to forecasting models based on factors such as climatic impacts on space-conditioning EUIs, fuel saturation effects, building and equipment vintage, and price impacts. Core data for the project are detailed on-site surveys for about 800 buildings, mail surveys ({approximately}6000), load research data for over 1000 accounts, and hourly weather data for five climate regions.

Akbari, H.; Eto, J.; Konopacki, S.; Afzal, A.; Heinemeier, K.; Rainer, L.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Energy Sources and End Uses  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Sources and End Uses Energy Sources and End Uses Topics: Energy Sources and End Uses End-Use Equipment Conservation Features and Practices Energy Sources and End Uses CBECS collects information that is used to answer questions about the use of energy in the commercial buildings sector. Questions such as: What kind of energy sources are used? What is energy used for? and What kinds of equipment use energy? Energy Sources Nearly all commercial buildings used at least one source of energy for some end use (Figure 1). Electricity was the most commonly used energy source in commercial buildings (94 percent of buildings comprising 98 percent of commercial floorspace). More than half of commercial buildings (57 percent) and two-thirds of commercial floorspace (68 percent) were served by natural gas. Three sources-fuel oil, district heat, and district chilled water-when used, were used more often in larger buildings.

69

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1989 -- Executive  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Energy End-Use Intensities > Executive Summary 9 Energy End-Use Intensities > Executive Summary Executive Summary Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. divider line The demand for energy in U.S. stores, offices, schools, hospitals, and other commercial buildings has been increasing. This report examines energy intensities in commercial buildings for nine end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, water heating, cooking, refrigeration, office equipment, and "other." The objective of this analysis was to increase understanding of how energy is used in commercial buildings and to identify targets for greater energy efficiency which could moderate future growth in demand.

70

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal" " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS"," ","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million"

71

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)","Row"

72

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 3. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)","RSE" "NAICS"," ","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","Row"

73

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal" " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS"," ","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million"

74

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Row"

75

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,,,"Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","End Use","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

76

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,,,"Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","End Use","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

77

Figure 60. Energy intensity of selected commercial end uses ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Refrigeration Lighting Heating, cooling, and ventilation Other 2040.00 2011.00 ... Energy intensity of selected commercial end uses, 2011 and 2040 ...

78

Table H2: Fuels and End Uses in Large Hospitals  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

District Chilled Water ..... Propane ..... Space-Heating ... Cooling Energy Sources Water-Heating Energy Sources Cooking Energy Sources Energy End Uses (more than

79

Solid-State Lighting: Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting End-Use Consumption Study aims to improve the understanding of lighting energy usage in U.S. residential dwellings using a regional estimation framework. The...

80

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0555(94)/2 Distribution Category UC-950 Energy Consumption Series Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings September 1994 Energy Information ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desired end-use services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2 Distribution Category UC-950 Energy Consumption Series Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings September 1994 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy...

82

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Consumption by End Use",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10...

83

Table 5.2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 27 46 19 2,134 10 572 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 27 20 4 733 3 72 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 26 15 1,401 7 500 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 1,912 26 54 2,623 29 289 -- Process Heating -- 297 25 14 2,362 24 280

84

Table 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 714,166 13 22 5,064 18 39 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 7,788 7 3 2,074 3 26 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 7,788 3 1 712 1 3 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

85

Table 5.7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 845,727 13 22 5,064 18 39 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 12,979 7 3 2,074 3 26 Conventional Boiler Use 12,979 3 1 712 1 3 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 4 3 1,362 2 23 Direct Uses-Total Process 675,152 4 9 2,549 7 13 Process Heating

86

Table 5.5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 714,166 13 22 5,064 18 39 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 7,788 7 3 2,074 3 26 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 7,788 3 1 712 1 3 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 4 3 1,362 2 23 -- Direct Uses-Total Process

87

Table 5.6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 27 46 19 2,134 10 572 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 27 20 4 733 3 72 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 26 15 1,401 7 500 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 1,912 26 54 2,623 29 289 -- Process Heating -- 297 25 14 2,362 24 280 -- Process Cooling and Refrigeration -- 182 * Q 25

88

Table 5.4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 2,886 79 130 5,211 69 868 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 44 46 19 2,134 10 572 Conventional Boiler Use 44 20 4 733 3 72 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 26 15 1,401 7 500 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,304 26 54 2,623 29 289 Process Heating 318 25 14 2,362 24 280 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

89

Realizing Building End-Use Efficiency with Ermerging Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Realizing Building End-Use Efficiency Realizing Building End-Use Efficiency with Emerging Technologies Jonathan Livingston Livingston Energy Innovations, LLC What is End-Use Efficiency (EE)? * EE is an energy resource * Broadly accepted in the U.S. as the single most effective step toward reducing pollution, power costs and price volatility * Treated as equivalent to supply-side resources * Recognized by states and regions as first priority when costs are comparable (CA, MO, NM, Pacific Northwest) The Northwest Power Act 839b(e)(1). The plan shall, as provided in this paragraph, give priority to resources which the Council determines to be cost-effective. Priority shall be given: first, to conservation; second, to renewable resources; third, to generating resources utilizing waste heat or generating resources of high fuel conversion

90

End-Use Load-Shape Estimation: Methods and Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In developing effective demand-side management plans and load forecasts, utilities need information on customer hourly load patterns over a range of end-uses. Such information may be obtained using the two methods described in this report for disaggregating whole-building load data. Both methods have been validated using end-use metered data. This report is available only to funders of Program 101A or 101.001. Funders may download this report at http://my.primen.com/Applications/DE/Community/index.asp .

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

End-use matching of solar energy systems  

SciTech Connect

The choice among available energy sources for a given task requires technical and economic tradeoffs on the part of the individual investor. From the national perspective, however, the effectiveness with which available energy sources are utilized may well become an overriding consideration. End-use matching is a procedure for introducing solar energy into the national energy infrastructure. The result of end-use matching is an identification of the most cost-effective combination of process energy needs, solar collector technology, geographic location, and economics by matching currently available solar system hardware with particular industrial processes and their locations. End-use matching is not intended to be a design tool for a specific plant, but rather a planning tool for determining where and for what general applications solar systems appear economically viable in the near- to immediate-term. This paper discusses the end-use matching methodology and illustrates first and second law thermodynamics analyses applied to a solar system producing process steam.

Kreith, F.; Kearney, D.; Bejan, A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

,"U.S. Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10312013 3:05:49 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Consumption by End Use" "Sourcekey","N9140US2","N9160US2","NA1840NUS2","NA18...

93

,"U.S. Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10312013 3:05:50 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Consumption by End Use" "Sourcekey","N9140US2","N9160US2","N9170US2","N3060US2...

94

Energy End-Use Flow Maps for the Buildings Sector  

SciTech Connect

Graphical presentations of energy flows are widely used within the industrial sector to depict energy production and use. PNNL developed two energy flow maps, one each for the residential and commercial buildings sectors, in response to a need for a clear, concise, graphical depiction of the flows of energy from source to end-use in the building sector.

Belzer, David B.

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

95

Refining and End Use Study of Coal Liquids  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes revisions to the design basis for the linear programing refining model that is being used in the Refining and End Use Study of Coal Liquids. This revision primarily reflects the addition of data for the upgrading of direct coal liquids.

None

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Energy end-use intensities in commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

This report examines energy intensities in commercial buildings for nine end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, water heating, cooking, refrigeration, office equipment, and other. The objective of this analysis was to increase understanding of how energy is used in commercial buildings and to identify targets for greater energy efficiency which could moderate future growth in demand. The source of data for the analysis is the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption survey (CBECS), which collected detailed data on energy-related characteristics and energy consumption for a nationally representative sample of approximately 6,000 commercial buildings. The analysis used 1989 CBECS data because the 1992 CBECS data were not yet available at the time the study was initiated. The CBECS data were fed into the Facility Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system, a building energy simulation program developed by the US Department of Energy`s Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to derive engineering estimates of end-use consumption for each building in the sample. The FEDS estimates were then statistically adjusted to match the total energy consumption for each building. This is the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) first report on energy end-use consumption in commercial buildings. This report is part of an effort to address customer requests for more information on how energy is used in buildings, which was an overall theme of the 1992 user needs study. The end-use data presented in this report were not available for publication in Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1989 (DOE/EIA-0318(89), Washington, DC, April 1992). However, subsequent reports on end-use energy consumption will be part of the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures series, beginning with a 1992 data report to be published in early 1995.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Ris Energy Report 4 Interaction between supply and end-use 4 8 Interaction between supply and end-use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risø Energy Report 4 Interaction between supply and end-use 4 8 Interaction between supply and end vary, so we need to find a pricing mechanism that is broadly applicable. The issue of short-term supply balance take place. DR and the security of supply problem thus take different forms depending

98

REFINING AND END USE STUDY OF COAL LIQUIDS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document summarizes all of the work conducted as part of the Refining and End Use Study of Coal Liquids. There were several distinct objectives set, as the study developed over time: (1) Demonstration of a Refinery Accepting Coal Liquids; (2) Emissions Screening of Indirect Diesel; (3) Biomass Gasification F-T Modeling; and (4) Updated Gas to Liquids (GTL) Baseline Design/Economic Study.

Unknown

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Energy End-Use Technologies for the 21st Century  

SciTech Connect

The World Energy Council's recent study examined the potential of energy end-use technologies and of research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) into these technologies on a global scale. Surprises are likely, but nevertheless, current research and development offer a picture of what might happen in the future as new technologies face the competition of the marketplace. Given the breadth of energy end-use technologies and the differences between regions and economic conditions, the study focused on technologies that appear most important from today's vantage point. Globally, robust research and development followed by demonstrations of new end-use technologies can potentially save at least 110 EJ/year by 2020 and over 300 EJ/year by 2050. If achieved, this translates to worldwide energy savings of as much as 25% by 2020 and over 40% by 2050, over what may be required without these technologies. It is almost certain that no single technology, or even a small set of technologies, will dominate in meeting the needs of the globe in any foreseeable timeframe. Absent a significant joint government-industry effort on end-use technology RD&D, the technologies needed will not be ready for the marketplace in the timeframes required with even the most pessimistic scenarios. Based on previous detailed analyses for the United States, an international expenditure of $4 billion per year seems more than justified. The success of new energy end-use technologies depends on new RD&D investments and policy decisions made today. Governments, in close cooperation with industry, must carefully consider RD&D incentives that can help get technologies from the laboratory or test-bed to market. Any short-term impact areas are likely to benefit from focused RD&D. These include electricity transmission and distribution, distributed electricity production, transportation, the production of paper and pulp, iron and steel, aluminum, cement and chemicals, and information and communication technologies. For long-term impact, significant areas include fuel cells, hydrogen fuel, and integrated multi-task energy systems.

Gehl, S; Haegermark, H; Larsen, H; Morishita, M; Nakicenovic, N; Schock, R N; Suntola, T

2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

100

Measured commercial load shapes and energy-use intensities and validation of the LBL end-use disaggregation algorithm  

SciTech Connect

The Southern California Edison Company (SCE) has conducted an extensive metering project in which electricity end use in 53 commercial buildings in Southern California has been measured. The building types monitored include offices, retail stores, groceries, restaurants, and warehouses. One year (June 1989 through May 1990) of the SCE measured hourly end-use data are reviewed in this report. Annual whole-building and end-use energy use intensities (EUIs) and monthly load shapes (LSs) have been calculated for the different building types based on the monitored data. This report compares the monitored buildings' EUIs and LSs to EUIs and LSs determined using whole-building load data and the End-Use Disaggregation Algorithm (EDA). Two sets of EDA determined EUIs and LSs are compared to the monitored data values. The data sets represent: (1) average buildings in the SCE service territory and (2) specific buildings that were monitored.

Akbari, H.; Rainer, L.; Heinemeier, K.; Huang, J.; Franconi, E.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desired end-use services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Refining and End Use Study of Coal Liquids.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study of the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g., year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) standards. This report is the 12th quarterly progress report in the series covering January 1, 1997 to March 31, 1997.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

102

Energy Information Administration - Table 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Page Last Modified: June 2010 Table 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS1 331111) 1998 2002 2006 Total 2 1,672 1,455 1,147 Net Electricity 3 158 184 175 Natural Gas 456 388 326 Coal 48 36 14 Boiler Fuel -- -- -- Coal 8 W 1 Residual Fuel Oil 10 * 4 Natural Gas 52 39 27 Process Heating -- -- -- Net Electricity 74 79 76 Residual Fuel Oil 19 * 11 Natural Gas 369 329 272 Machine Drive -- -- -- Net Electricity 68 86 77 Notes 1. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills. 2. 'Total' is the sum of all energy sources listed below, including net steam (the sum of purchases, generation from renewable resources, and net transfers), and other energy that respondents indicated was used to produce heat and power. It is the fuel quantities across all end-uses.

103

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS),7 Figure 3. Energy Consumption in the Agriculture Sector (13 Figure 6. Energy Consumption in the Service

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Estimates of Energy Consumption by Building Type and End Use at U.S. Army Installations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5-5. 1993 Electricity Consumption Estimates by End Use forft ) 1993 Electricity Consumption Estimates by End Use forTotal) 1993 Electricity Consumption Estimates by End Use for

Konopacki, S.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

If this is an emergency, dial 911 or 459-2345 for Emergency Medical Service Response This form is to be completed whenever an employee desires to seek medical treatment for work related incidents (please type or print clearly)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If this is an emergency, dial 911 or 459-2345 for Emergency Medical Service Response This form map on page 2 Dominican Hospital, Emergency Department (Nights, Holidays and Weekends) 1555 Soquel Dr

California at Santa Cruz, University of

106

Energy Demand: Limits on the Response to Higher Energy Prices in the End-Use Sectors (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Energy consumption in the end-use demand sectorsresidential, commercial, industrial, and transportationgenerally shows only limited change when energy prices increase. Several factors that limit the sensitivity of end-use energy demand to price signals are common across the end-use sectors. For example, because energy generally is consumed in long-lived capital equipment, short-run consumer responses to changes in energy prices are limited to reductions in the use of energy services or, in a few cases, fuel switching; and because energy services affect such critical lifestyle areas as personal comfort, medical services, and travel, end-use consumers often are willing to absorb price increases rather than cut back on energy use, especially when they are uncertain whether price increases will be long-lasting. Manufacturers, on the other hand, often are able to pass along higher energy costs, especially in cases where energy inputs are a relatively minor component of production costs. In economic terms, short-run energy demand typically is inelastic, and long-run energy demand is less inelastic or moderately elastic at best.

Information Center

2007-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

107

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

SciTech Connect

Integrated economic models have been used to project both baseline and mitigation greenhouse gas emissions scenarios at the country and the global level. Results of these scenarios are typically presented at the sectoral level such as industry, transport, and buildings without further disaggregation. Recently, a keen interest has emerged on constructing bottom up scenarios where technical energy saving potentials can be displayed in detail (IEA, 2006b; IPCC, 2007; McKinsey, 2007). Analysts interested in particular technologies and policies, require detailed information to understand specific mitigation options in relation to business-as-usual trends. However, the limit of information available for developing countries often poses a problem. In this report, we have focus on analyzing energy use in India in greater detail. Results shown for the residential and transport sectors are taken from a previous report (de la Rue du Can, 2008). A complete picture of energy use with disaggregated levels is drawn to understand how energy is used in India and to offer the possibility to put in perspective the different sources of end use energy consumption. For each sector, drivers of energy and technology are indentified. Trends are then analyzed and used to project future growth. Results of this report provide valuable inputs to the elaboration of realistic energy efficiency scenarios.

de la Rue du Can, Stephane; McNeil, Michael; Sathaye, Jayant

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

108

End use energy consumption data base: transportation sector  

SciTech Connect

The transportation fuel and energy use estimates developed a Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the End Use Energy Consumption Data Base are documented. The total data base contains estimates of energy use in the United States broken down into many categories within all sectors of the economy: agriculture, mining, construction, manufacturing, commerce, the household, electric utilities, and transportation. The transportation data provided by ORNL generally cover each of the 10 years from 1967 through 1976 (occasionally 1977 and 1978), with omissions in some models. The estimtes are broken down by mode of transport, fuel, region and State, sector of the economy providing transportation, and by the use to which it is put, and, in the case of automobile and bus travel, by the income of the traveler. Fuel types include natural gas, motor and aviation gasoline, residual and diesel oil, liuqefied propane, liquefied butane, and naphtha- and kerosene-type jet engine fuels. Electricity use is also estimated. The mode, fuel, sector, and use categories themselves subsume one, two, or three levels of subcategories, resulting in a very detailed categorization and definitive accounting.

Hooker, J.N.; Rose, A.B.; Greene, D.L.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Residential end-use energy planning system (REEPS). Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Residential End-Use Energy Planning System (REEPS) is described. REEPS is a forecasting model of residential energy patterns that is capable of evaluating the impacts of a broad range of energy conservation measures. REEPS forecasts appliance installations, operating efficiencies, and utilization patterns for space heating, water heating, air conditioning, and cooking. Each of these decisions is sensitive to energy prices, mandatory policies, and household/dwelling and geographical characteristics. The parameters of these choice models have been estimated statistically from national household survey data. The structure of the choice models and the results of the statistical analysis are reported in detail. REEPS forecasts energy choices for a large number of market segments representing households with different socioeconomic, dwelling, and geographical characteristics. These segments reflect the joint distribution of characteristics in the population. Aggregate forecasts are generated by summing up the decisions for all population segments. This technique provides a consistent method of obtaining aggregate forecasts from disaggregate, nonlinear choice models. Moreover, it permits evaluation of the distributional impacts of prospective conservation policies. The results of simulation of REEPS are described. REEPS forecasts a moderate rise in electricity consumption per household and significant drops in other fuels. These are caused in part by high market penetrations of electric appliances which themselves reflect major shifts in relative energy prices.

Goett, A.; McFadden, D.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Project on Restaurant Energy Performance: end-use monitoring and analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although energy bills for restaurants throughout the United States exceed 5 billion dollars annually, very little has been documented with respect to when and how restaurants use energy, or how such use can be reduced cost-effectively. This report summarizes the results of a multiyear collaborative research effort, designed to collect information on end-use energy consumption. Objective is to reveal the quantities and profiles of energy consumption of typical food service operations by time of day and end use. This information, when examined in conjunction with building characteristics, allows detailed study of energy use cause and effect and energy conservation potential. Seven representative monitoring sites were selected, a computerized data acquisition network was designed and implemented, and detailed energy performance was compiled for a 1 year period (July 1983 through June 1984). Each of the seven facilities monitored was selected to represent the seven most common restaurant types and to provide information on a wide variety of commonly used restaurant equipment. Preliminary findings are presented.

Claar, C.N.; Mazzucchi, R.P.; Heidell, J.A.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

REFINING AND END USE STUDY OF COAL LIQUIDS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two direct coal liquids were evaluated by linear programming analysis to determine their value as petroleum refinery feedstock. The first liquid, DL1, was produced from bitiuminous coal using the Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc.(HTI) two-stage hydrogenation process in Proof of Concept Run No.1, POC-1. The second liquid, DL2,was produced from sub-bituminous coal using a three-stage HTI process in Proof of Concept Run No. 2, POC-2; the third stage being a severe hydrogenation process. A linear programming (LP) model was developed which simulates a generic 150,000 barrel per day refinery in the Midwest U.S. Data from upgrading tests conducted on the coal liquids and related petroleum fractions in the pilot plant testing phase of the Refining and End Use Study was inputed into the model. The coal liquids were compared against a generic petroleum crude feedstock. under two scenarios. In the first scenario, it was assumed that the refinery capacity and product slate/volumes were fixed. The coal liquids would be used to replace a portion of the generic crude. The LP results showed that the DL1 material had essentially the same value as the generic crude. Due to its higher quality, the DL2 material had a value of approximately 0.60 $/barrel higher than the petroleum crude. In the second scenario, it was assumed that a market opportunity exists to increase production by one-third. This requires a refinery expansion. The feedstock for this scenario could be either 100% petroleum crude or a combination of petroleum crude and the direct coal liquids. Linear programming analysis showed that the capital cost of the refinery expansion was significantly less when coal liquids are utilized. In addition, the pilot plant testing showed that both of the direct coal liquids demonstrated superior catalytic cracking and naphtha reforming yields. Depending on the coal liquid flow rate, the value of the DL1 material was 2.5-4.0 $/barrel greater than the base petroleum crude, while the DL2 material was 3.0-4.0 /barrel higher than the crude. Co-processing the coal liquids with lower quality, less expensive petroleum crudes that have higher sulfur, resid and metals contents was also examined. The coal liquids have higher values under this scenario, but the values are dependent on the prices of the alternative crudes.

NONE

1998-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

112

Project on restaurant energy performance end-use monitoring and analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the results of a research program intended to build an understanding of restaurant energy performance upon an empirical foundation. This discussion provides some background for this effort, brief descriptions of the facilities selected for study, the measurement methods, the empirical findings, an overview of conservation opportunities revealed, and general conclusions. Seven monitoring sites were carefully selected to represent the most common categories of food service by the National Restaurant Association. A microcomputer based data acquisition was designed and implemented to acquire 15-minute interval data on end-use energy consumption, interior temperatures, and external climate conditions for a one year monitoring period. The project archived over 87% of the available data, which has been converted into several formats for dissemination. Restaurants are found to be very intensive users of energy due largely to the frequent usage of food preparation equipment and the high ventilation requirements.

Mazzucchi, R.P.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

The project on restaurant energy performance end-use monitoring and analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the results of a research program intended to build an understanding of restaurant energy performance upon an empirical foundation. This discussion provides some background for the effort, brief descriptions of the facilities selected for study, the methods of measurement, the empirical findings, an overview of conservation opportunities revealed, and general conclusions. Seven monitoring sites were carefully selected to represent the most common categories of food service by the National Restaurant Association. A microcomputer-based data acquisition was designed and implemented to acquire data at 15-minute intervals on end-use energy consumption, interior temperatures, and external climatic conditions for a one-year monitoring period. The project archived over 87% of the available data, which have been converted into several formats for dissemination.

Mazzucchi, R.P.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Demand Response-Ready End-Use Devices: Guiding Principles for Defining Criteria to Support Grid Needs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes technology capabilities that support more automated and ubiquitous demand response. It reviews the Demand ResponseReady (DR-Ready) concept and related industry activities that support realization of the concept. In the DR-Ready vision, consumers receive DR-Ready end-use products at the point of purchase, thus eliminating the need for utility truck service visits to retrofit equipment, and thereby significantly reducing the cost of deploying DR-enabling ...

2013-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

115

Technology data characterizing refrigeration in commercial buildings: Application to end-use forecasting with COMMEND 4.0  

SciTech Connect

In the United States, energy consumption is increasing most rapidly in the commercial sector. Consequently, the commercial sector is becoming an increasingly important target for state and federal energy policies and also for utility-sponsored demand side management (DSM) programs. The rapid growth in commercial-sector energy consumption also makes it important for analysts working on energy policy and DSM issues to have access to energy end-use forecasting models that include more detailed representations of energy-using technologies in the commercial sector. These new forecasting models disaggregate energy consumption not only by fuel type, end use, and building type, but also by specific technology. The disaggregation of the refrigeration end use in terms of specific technologies, however, is complicated by several factors. First, the number of configurations of refrigeration cases and systems is quite large. Also, energy use is a complex function of the refrigeration-case properties and the refrigeration-system properties. The Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Commercial End-Use Planning System (COMMEND 4.0) and the associated data development presented in this report attempt to address the above complications and create a consistent forecasting framework. Expanding end-use forecasting models so that they address individual technology options requires characterization of the present floorstock in terms of service requirements, energy technologies used, and cost-efficiency attributes of the energy technologies that consumers may choose for new buildings and retrofits. This report describes the process by which we collected refrigeration technology data. The data were generated for COMMEND 4.0 but are also generally applicable to other end-use forecasting frameworks for the commercial sector.

Sezgen, O.; Koomey, J.G.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

CBECS 1989 - Energy End-use Intensities in Commercial Buildings -- Detailed  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Publication > Detailed Tables Publication > Detailed Tables 1989 Energy End-Use Intensities Detailed Tables Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. Table Organization The following 13 tables present detailed energy end-use consumption data from the 1989 CBECS. Summary tables for all major fuels (electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat) appear first, followed by separate tables for each of the four major fuels. Within each energy source’s group of tables, there is a table showing end-use consumption, a table showing end-use intensities (consumption per square foot), and a table (except for fuel oil and district heat) showing the end-use shares of total consumption.

117

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)"

118

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Factors"

119

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)"

120

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Factors"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desired end-use services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The Value of End-Use Energy Efficiency in Mitigation of U.S. Carbon Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents a scenario analysis exploring the value of advanced technologies in the U.S. buildings, industrial, and transportation sectors in stabilizing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. The analysis was conducted by staff members of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), working at the Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI) in support of the strategic planning process of the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The conceptual framework for the analysis is an integration of detailed buildings, industrial, and transportation modules into MiniCAM, a global integrated assessment model. The analysis is based on three technology scenarios, which differ in their assumed rates of deployment of new or presently available energy-saving technologies in the end-use sectors. These technology scenarios are explored with no carbon policy, and under two CO2 stabilization policies, in which an economic price on carbon is applied such that emissions follow prescribed trajectories leading to long-term stabilization of CO2 at roughly 450 and 550 parts per million by volume (ppmv). The costs of meeting the emissions targets prescribed by these policies are examined, and compared between technology scenarios. Relative to the reference technology scenario, advanced technologies in all three sectors reduce costs by 50% and 85% for the 450 and 550 ppmv policies, respectively. The 450 ppmv policy is more stringent and imposes higher costs than the 550 ppmv policy; as a result, the magnitude of the economic value of energy efficiency is four times greater for the 450 ppmv policy than the 550 ppmv policy. While they substantially reduce the costs of meeting emissions requirements, advanced end-use technologies do not lead to greenhouse gas stabilization without a carbon policy. This is due mostly to the effects of increasing service demands over time, the high consumption of fossil fuels in the electricity sector, and the use of unconventional feedstocks in the liquid fuel refining sector. Of the three end-use sectors, advanced transportation technologies have the greatest potential to reduce costs of meeting carbon policy requirements. Services in the buildings and industrial sectors can often be supplied by technologies that consume low-emissions fuels such as biomass or, in policy cases, electricity. Passenger transportation, in contrast, is especially unresponsive to climate policies, as the fuel costs are small compared to the time value of transportation and vehicle capital and operating costs. Delaying the transition from reference to advanced technologies by 15 years increases the costs of meeting 450 ppmv stabilization emissions requirements by 21%, but the costs are still 39% lower than the costs assuming reference technology. The report provides a detailed description of the end-use technology scenarios and provides a thorough analysis of the results. Assumptions are documented in the Appendix.

Kyle, G. Page; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

122

Analysis of PG&E`s residential end-use metered data to improve electricity demand forecasts -- final report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes findings from a unique project to improve the end-use electricity load shape and peak demand forecasts made by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) and the California Energy Commission (CEC). First, the direct incorporation of end-use metered data into electricity demand forecasting models is a new approach that has only been made possible by recent end-use metering projects. Second, and perhaps more importantly, the joint-sponsorship of this analysis has led to the development of consistent sets of forecasting model inputs. That is, the ability to use a common data base and similar data treatment conventions for some of the forecasting inputs frees forecasters to concentrate on those differences (between their competing forecasts) that stem from real differences of opinion, rather than differences that can be readily resolved with better data. The focus of the analysis is residential space cooling, which represents a large and growing demand in the PG&E service territory. Using five years of end-use metered, central air conditioner data collected by PG&E from over 300 residences, we developed consistent sets of new inputs for both PG&E`s and CEC`s end-use load shape forecasting models. We compared the performance of the new inputs both to the inputs previously used by PG&E and CEC, and to a second set of new inputs developed to take advantage of a recently added modeling option to the forecasting model. The testing criteria included ability to forecast total daily energy use, daily peak demand, and demand at 4 P.M. (the most frequent hour of PG&E`s system peak demand). We also tested the new inputs with the weather data used by PG&E and CEC in preparing their forecasts.

Eto, J.H.; Moezzi, M.M.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Survey-guided load research: An end-use analysis methodology test  

SciTech Connect

Energy use by end-use equipment is a function of the rated capacity of the equipment, frequency of use, and duration of each use. Many end used include multiple states, each with a different capacity, frequency, and duration. Some equipment provides benefits that are related to other uses, resulting in an indirect linkage between the primary energy-using equipment and the end use. Water heaters are one example. End-use metering of energy-using equipment provides the most accurate measure of energy use. Nevertheless, this energy-use ``signal`` is buried in background ``noise`` due to variations in the capacity, frequency, and duration of each end use and end user. Reliable estimates of energy use depend on a variety of methods to increase the ``signal-to-noise`` ratio (i.e., reduce the variance). Research of the energy consumption of household end-uses contains some inherent sampling problems: intrusiveness, cost, extensive data generated, analyses are time and computationally intensive. The goal of the methodology test described in this paper was to address these problems through a method that focused end-use analyses on a limited set of issues and data for program evaluation purposes. The approach tested used a detailed survey of end-use metered subjects to identify the pattern of end-use behavior as an alternative to estimating the frequency and duration of each use from the end-use data itself.

Warwick, W.M.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Measured commercial load shapes and energy-use intensities and validation of the LBL end-use disaggregation algorithm. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Southern California Edison Company (SCE) has conducted an extensive metering project in which electricity end use in 53 commercial buildings in Southern California has been measured. The building types monitored include offices, retail stores, groceries, restaurants, and warehouses. One year (June 1989 through May 1990) of the SCE measured hourly end-use data are reviewed in this report. Annual whole-building and end-use energy use intensities (EUIs) and monthly load shapes (LSs) have been calculated for the different building types based on the monitored data. This report compares the monitored buildings` EUIs and LSs to EUIs and LSs determined using whole-building load data and the End-Use Disaggregation Algorithm (EDA). Two sets of EDA determined EUIs and LSs are compared to the monitored data values. The data sets represent: (1) average buildings in the SCE service territory and (2) specific buildings that were monitored.

Akbari, H.; Rainer, L.; Heinemeier, K.; Huang, J.; Franconi, E.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

EIA - Appendix F-Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Country  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Country Grouping Data Tables (2005-2030) Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Country Grouping Data Tables (2005-2030) International Energy Outlook 2008 Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Country Grouping Data Tables (2005-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 19 complete) Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Country Gruping Data Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Projections of Nuclear Generating Capacity Data Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. F1 Total World Delivered Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector and Fuel Table F1. Total World Delivered Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector and Fuel. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

126

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1989 data -- Publication  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End-Use Intensities Executive Summary > Publication and Tables End-Use Intensities Executive Summary > Publication and Tables Publication and Tables Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Figure on Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. Divider Bar To View and/or Print Reports (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader) - Download Adobe Acrobat Reader If you experience any difficulties, visit our Technical Frequently Asked Questions. Divider Bar You have the option of downloading the entire report or selected sections of the report. Full Report - Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings (1989 data) (file size .89 MB) pages: 140

127

Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Services Services Services Overview ECS Audio/Video Conferencing Fasterdata IPv6 Network Network Performance Tools (perfSONAR) ESnet OID Registry PGP Key Service Virtual Circuits (OSCARS) DOE Grids Service Transition Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside the US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside the US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net Services ESnet provides interoperable, effective, reliable, and high performance network communications infrastructure, and certain collaboration services, in support of the Office of Science (SC)'s large-scale, collaborative science programs. ESnet provides users with high bandwidth access to DOE sites and DOE's primary science collaborators including Research and

128

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)","Row"

129

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," " " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)"

130

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Row"

131

The Potential to Reduce CO2 Emissions by Expanding End-Use Applications of Electricity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Depending on the sources of electricity production, the use of electricity can be a contributing factor to net CO2 emissions. What is less obvious is that using efficient end-use electric technologies has the potential save energy and decrease overall CO2 emissions substantially. The two main mechanisms for saving energy and reducing CO2 emissions with electric end-use technologies are (1) upgrading existing electric technologies, processes, and building energy systems; and (2) expanding end-use applica...

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

132

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," " " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)"

133

Table 4. Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil by End Use, 1999 and 2000 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration 13 Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales 2000 Table 4. Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil by End Use, 1999 and 2000 (Thousand Gallons)

134

Table F4. Delivered energy consumption in Canada by end-use sector ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

228 U.S. Energy Information Administration International Energy Outloo 2013 Appendix F Table F4. Delivered energy consumption in Canada by end-use sector and fuel ...

135

Services  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Human Capital Office offers benefit, new employee orientation and some learning & development related services to all DOE employees. Additionally the Office supplies employee and labor...

136

ANN-based residential water end-use demand forecasting model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bottom-up urban water demand forecasting based on empirical data for individual water end uses or micro-components (e.g., toilet, shower, etc.) for different households of varying characteristics is undoubtedly superior to top-down estimates originating ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, Residential water demand forecasting, Water demand management, Water end use, Water micro-component

Christopher Bennett; Rodney A. Stewart; Cara D. Beal

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Residential energy consumption and expenditures by end use for 1978, 1980, and 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The end-use estimates of the average household consumption and expenditures are statistical estimates based on the 1978, 1980, and 1981 Residential Enery Consumption Surveys (RECS) conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) rather than on metered observations. The end-use estimates were obtained by developing a set of equations that predict the percentage of energy used for each broad end-use category. The equations were applied separately to each household and to each fuel. The resulting household end-use estimates were averaged to produce estimates of the average end-use consumption and expenditures on a national and regional basis. The accuracy and potential biases of these end-use estimates vary depending on the fuel type, on the year of the survey, and on the type of end use. The figures and tables presented show the amount and the type of energy cosumed, plus the cost of this energy. National averages are given as well as averages for various categories including region, size and age of dwelling, number of heating degree-days, and income. Some of the significant findings; energy trends by end use for all fuels used in the home for 1978, 1980, and 1981; and electricity consumption and expenditures and natural gas consumption and expenditures are discussed.

Johnson, M.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - Energy Consumption by End-Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector International Energy Outlook 2007 Chapter 2 - Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector In the IEO2007 projections, end-use energy consumption depends on resource endowment, economic growth, and other political, social, and demographic factors.. One way of looking at the future of world energy markets is to consider trends in energy consumption at the end-use sector level. With the exception of the transportation sector, which is dominated by petroleum-based liquids products at present, the mix of energy use in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors varies widely by region, depending on a combination of regional factors, such as the availability of energy resources, the level of economic development, and political, social,

139

EIA - Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 > Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Tables (2003-2030) 6 > Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Tables (2003-2030) International Energy Outlook 2006 Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Tables (2003-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 19 complete) Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Data Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Data Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table D1 Total World Delivered Energy Consumption Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Data Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Reference Case Projections by End-Use Sector and Region Data Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

140

,"U.S. Total Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residual Fuel Oil by End Use" Residual Fuel Oil by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Total Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use",8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1984" ,"Release Date:","11/15/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","10/31/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_821rsd_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_821rsd_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desired end-use services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Leveraging Limited Data Resources: Developing Commercial End-Use Information: B.C. Hydro Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using an innovative strategy, EPRI has combined model-based sampling, building total load research data, audits, DOE-2 models, and borrowed end-use data to produce statistically reliable end-use information for the commercial office sector. This project demonstrates that end-use data can be developed in shorter time, at less expense, with more statistically reliable results than conventionally thought. This report is available only to funders of Program 101A or 101.001. Funders may download this report a...

1996-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

142

,"U.S. Adjusted Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residual Fuel Oil by End Use" Residual Fuel Oil by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Adjusted Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use",8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1984" ,"Release Date:","11/15/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","10/31/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_821rsda_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_821rsda_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

143

Workshop Goals, Objectives, and Desired Outcomes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Desired outcomes Steve Chalk, DOE 1 OctOber 2011 | ArgOnne nAtiOnAl lAbOrAtOry NG Workshop summary report - appeNDIX D 2 OctOber 2011 | ArgOnne nAtiOnAl lAbOrAtOry NG...

144

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fue -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use 41 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process -- 2,244 62 52 2,788 39 412 -- Process Heating -- 346 59 19 2,487 32 345 -- Process Cooling and Refrigeration -- 206 * 1 32 * * -- Machine Drive

145

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 41 71 17 1,281 8 129 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- -- 62 6 838 1 417 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 2,244 62 52 2,788 39 412 -- Process Heating -- 346 59 19 2,487

146

Distribution Category UC-98 Consumption End-Use A Comparison of Measures  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Distribution Category UC-98 Distribution Category UC-98 Consumption End-Use A Comparison of Measures by Consumption and Supply Surveys Energy information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585 General information concerning the contents of the report may be obtained from Lynda T. Carlson, Director of the Energy End Use Division (202/586-1112). Specific information regarding the contents or preparation of the publication may be obtained from Nancy L. Leach, Chief of the Residential and Commercial Branch (202/586-1114). The Residential Energy Consumption Survey manager and a major contributor to this report is Wendel Thompson (202/586-1119). The report was written by Gerald Peabody (202/586-6160). Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector

147

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process 773,574 10 9 2,709 10 19 Process Heating

148

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process

149

,"U.S. Total Distillate Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales by End Use...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Distillate Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

150

"Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f...

151

"End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke...

152

Program on Technology Innovation: Opportunities for Advancing End-Use Energy Efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Strategic Science and Technology project identified promising opportunities to develop technologies that improve end-use energy efficiency and gauged interest within the utility industry and other stakeholders in funding research and development initiatives to develop these opportunities.

2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

153

"End Use","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil",,,"Coal" ,"Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "End Use","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze...

154

"Code(a)","End Use","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

","Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze...

155

,"U.S. Total Adjusted Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil by End Use...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Total Adjusted Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil by End Use",13,"Annual",2012,"6301984"...

156
157
158

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

159

2012 End-Use Energy Efficiency and Demand Response, EPRI Program 170: Summary of Deliverables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI research program on End-Use Energy Efficiency and Demand Response (Program 170) is focused on the assessment, testing, and demonstration of energy-efficient and intelligent end-use devices, as well as analytical studies of the economic, environmental, and behavioral aspects of energy efficiency and demand response. The 2012 reports, tools and resources produced in this program are available to employees of funding companies, and can be accessed by clicking on the product number link listed after ..

2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

160

An intelligent pattern recognition model to automate the categorisation of residential water end-use events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rapid dissemination of residential water end-use (e.g. shower, clothes washer, etc.) consumption data to the customer via a web-enabled portal interface is becoming feasible through the advent of high resolution smart metering technologies. However, ... Keywords: Dynamic time warping algorithm, Gradient vector filtering, Hidden Markov model, Residential water flow trace disaggregation, Water demand management, Water end-use event, Water micro-component

K. A. Nguyen, R. A. Stewart, H. Zhang

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desired end-use services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Commercial equipment loads: End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP)  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Energy Resources of the Bonneville Power Administration is generally responsible for the agency's power and conservation resource planning. As associated responsibility which supports a variety of office functions is the analysis of historical trends in and determinants of energy consumption. The Office of Energy Resources' End-Use Research Section operates a comprehensive data collection program to provide pertinent information to support demand-side planning, load forecasting, and demand-side program development and delivery. Part of this on-going program is known as the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP), an effort designed to collect electricity usage data through direct monitoring of end-use loads in buildings. This program is conducted for Bonneville by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This report provides detailed information on electricity consumption of miscellaneous equipment from the commercial portion of ELCAP. Miscellaneous equipment includes all commercial end-uses except heating, ventilating, air conditioning, and central lighting systems. Some examples of end-uses covered in this report are office equipment, computers, task lighting, refrigeration, and food preparation. Electricity consumption estimates, in kilowatt-hours per square food per year, are provided for each end-use by building type. The following types of buildings are covered: office, retail, restaurant, grocery, warehouse, school, university, and hotel/motel. 6 refs., 35 figs., 12 tabs.

Pratt, R.G.; Williamson, M.A.; Richman, E.E.; Miller, N.E.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Development of an End-Use Sector- Based Low-Carbon Indicator System for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of an End-Use Sector- Based Low-Carbon Indicator System for Development of an End-Use Sector- Based Low-Carbon Indicator System for Cities in China Title Development of an End-Use Sector- Based Low-Carbon Indicator System for Cities in China Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2012 Authors Price, Lynn K., Nan Zhou, David Fridley, Hongyou Lu, Nina Zheng, Cecilia Fino-Chen, and Stephanie Ohshita Conference Name the ACEEE's 2012 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Date Published 08/2012 Publisher the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy Conference Location Pacific Grove, California, U.S.A. Keywords 12th five year plan, buildings, china, china energy, china energy group, co2 emissions, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, low carbon indicator, policy studies

163

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547 Conventional Boiler Use 84 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,639 62 52 2,788 39 412 Process Heating 379 59 19 2,487 32 345 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

164

AEO2011: Natural Gas Delivered Prices by End-Use Sector and Census Division  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Delivered Prices by End-Use Sector and Census Division Delivered Prices by End-Use Sector and Census Division Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 137, and contains only the reference case. This dataset is in trillion cubic feet. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, electric power and transportation. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Natural Gas Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Natural Gas Delivered Prices by End-Use Sector and Census Division- Reference Case (xls, 140.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

165

AEO2011: Natural Gas Consumption by End-Use Sector and Census Division |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption by End-Use Sector and Census Division Consumption by End-Use Sector and Census Division Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 136, and contains only the reference case. This dataset is in trillion cubic feet. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, electric power and transportation. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Natural gas consumption Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Natural Gas Consumption by End-Use Sector and Census Division- Reference Case (xls, 138.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

166

GridLAB-D Technical Support Document: Residential End-Use Module Version 1.0  

SciTech Connect

1.0 Introduction The residential module implements the following end uses and characteristics to simulate the power demand in a single family home: Water heater Lights Dishwasher Range Microwave Refrigerator Internal gains (plug loads) House (heating/cooling loads) The house model considers the following four major heat gains/losses that contribute to the building heating/cooling load: 1. Conduction through exterior walls, roof and fenestration (based on envelope UA) 2. Air infiltration (based on specified air change rate) 3. Solar radiation (based on CLTD model and using tmy data) 4. Internal gains from lighting, people, equipment and other end use objects. The Equivalent Thermal Parameter (ETP) approach is used to model the residential loads and energy consumption. The following sections describe the modeling assumptions for each of the above end uses and the details of power demand calculations in the residential module.

Taylor, Zachary T.; Gowri, Krishnan; Katipamula, Srinivas

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

167

End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program: Analysis of residential refrigerator/freezer performance  

SciTech Connect

The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) is conducting a large end-use data acquisition program in an effort to understand how energy is utilized in buildings with permanent electric space heating equipment in the Pacific Northwest. The initial portion of effort, known as the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP), was conducted for Bonneville by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The collection of detailed end-use data provided an opportunity to analyze the amount of energy consumed by both refrigerators and separate freezers units located in residential buildings. By obtaining this information, the uncertainty of long- term regional end-use forecasting can be improved and potential utility marketing programs for new appliances with a reduced overall energy demand can be identified. It was found that standby loads derived from hourly averages between 4 a.m. and 5 a.m. reflected the minimum consumption needed to maintain interior refrigerator temperatures at a steady-state condition. Next, an average 24-hour consumption that included cooling loads from door openings and cooling food items was also determined. Later, analyses were conducted to develop a model capable of predicting refrigerator standby loads and 24-hour consumption for comparison with national refrigerator label ratings. Data for 140 residential sites with a refrigeration end-use were screened to develop a sample of 119 residences with pure refrigeration for use in this analysis. To identify those refrigerators that were considered to be pure (having no other devices present on the circuit) in terms of their end-use classification, the screening procedure used a statistical clustering technique that was based on standby loads with 24-hour consumption. 5 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

Ross, B.A.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Residential Sector End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1: Summary Input Assumptions and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development of a Residential Forecasting Database. Lawrenceand Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1.and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1.

Koomey, Jonathan G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy policy initiatives (EIA 1990). Utilities rely on end-use forecasting models in order to assess market trends

Johnson, F.X.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Electricity end-use efficiency: Experience with technologies, markets, and policies throughout the world  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In its August meeting in Geneva, the Energy and Industry Subcommittee (EIS) of the Policy Response Panel of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) identified a series of reports to be produced. One of these reports was to be a synthesis of available information on global electricity end-use efficiency, with emphasis on developing nations. The report will be reviewed by the IPCC and approved prior to the UN Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED), Brazil, June 1992. A draft outline for the report was submitted for review at the November 1991 meeting of the EIS. This outline, which was accepted by the EIS, identified three main topics to be addressed in the report: status of available technologies for increasing electricity end-use efficiency; review of factors currently limiting application of end-use efficiency technologies; and review of policies available to increase electricity end-use efficiency. The United States delegation to the EIS agreed to make arrangements for the writing of the report.

Levine, M.D.; Koomey, J.; Price, L. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Geller, H.; Nadel, S. [American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, Washington, DC (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Residential Appliance Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBL-34046 UC-350 Residential Appliance Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting. DE-AC03-76SF00098 #12;i ABSTRACT This report details the data, assumptions and methodology for end-use provided by the Appliance Model in the Residential End-Use Energy Planning System (REEPS), which

172

Evaluation of consumer demand for selected end-use markets for cotton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. cotton industry is facing a rapidly diminishing share of the domestic and foreign textile markets. To become more competitive in these markets, the textile industry should know where consumer demand is being directed. The objectives of this study were to quantitatively examine the demand for cotton in twelve selected end-uses from 1973 to 1997. Four structural models were developed to explain demand, two of which were built using the results from directed graphs. Changes in fashion and governmental policy were also assessed during this time period. Economic theory and prior literature suggested that the following factors influence demand at the end-use level: Disposable Personal Income, the Consumer Price Index for Apparel and Upkeep, cotton fiber prices lagged one year, polyester fiber prices lagged one year, and population segmented by age and gender. Regression results indicate that the Consumer Price Index, the lagged polyester prices, and the population variables most significantly contribute to the demand for cotton. A negative polyester coefficient was associated in all cases of significance, characterizing cotton and polyester fiber as complements in end-uses. Out-of-sample forecasts were generated for the years 1993 to 1997, and then evaluated using the Theil's U statistic, the Root Mean Square Error, and the Mean Absolute Percentage Error. The forecasts from the full models, those with all variables, outperformed the directed graph models in terms of predictive power. Differences in significant variables and variability in forecasting accuracy among the different end-uses suggests that there is an inherent difficulty in modeling the demand for a fiber in its end-use. A common saying in the fashion industry is that "the only constant is change." A constantly changing industry thus presents difficulty in quantifying, modeling, and forecasting.

Viator, Catherine Longman

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007-Energy Consumption by End-Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by End Use Sector Energy Consumption by End Use Sector International Energy Outlook 2007 Figure 25. OECD and Non-OECD Transportation Sector Delivered Energy Consumption, 2004-2030 Figure 25 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 26. OECD and Non-OECD Residential Sector Delivered Energy Consumption, 2004-2030 Figure 26 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 27. Growth in OECD and Non-OECD Residential Sector Delivered Energy Consumption by Fuel, 2004 and 2030 Figure 27 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 28. OECD and Non-OECD Commercial Sector Delivered Energy Consumption, 2004-2030 Figure 28 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

174

Microsoft Word - US Industrial Sector Energy End Use Analysis_051812.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

United States Industrial Sector Energy End Use Analysis United States Industrial Sector Energy End Use Analysis Arman Shehabi, William R. Morrow, Eric Masanet This work was supported by the Advanced Manufacturing Office of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program through the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. 2 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process

175

"Table B25. Energy End Uses, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Energy End Uses, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 5. Energy End Uses, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Energy Used For (more than one may apply)" ,,"Space Heating","Cooling","Water Heating","Cooking","Manu- facturing" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,60028,56940,56478,22237,3138 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,5668,5007,4759,997,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,5786,5408,5348,1136,214 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,10387,9922,9562,1954,472 "25,001 to 50,000 .............",8668,8060,7776,7734,2511,"Q"

176

Project on restaurant energy performance: end-use monitoring and analysis. Appendixes I and II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the second volume of the report, ''The Porject on Restaurant Energy Performance - End-Use Monitoring and Analysis''. The first volume (PNL-5462) contains a summary and analysis of the metered energy performance data collected by the Project on Restaurant Energy Performance (PREP). Appendix I, presented here, contains monitoring site descriptions, measurement plans, and data summaries for the seven restaurants metered for PREP. Appendix II, also in this volume, is a description of the PREP computer system.

Claar, C.N.; Mazzucchi, R.P.; Heidell, J.A.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Evaluation of Embedded Solutions for Decreasing Sensitivity of End-Use Equipment to Power Quality Variations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides a conceptual overview of embedded solutions for sensitivity to power quality variations, assesses its benefits, and describes its potential in four end-use equipment categories. The report focuses on the technical and market issues associated with equipment modification provided by original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) to improve equipment tolerance to various power quality phenomena. The report describes approaches and technologies for improving performance, discusses specific i...

1999-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

178

End-use energy consumption estimates for US commercial buildings, 1989  

SciTech Connect

An accurate picture of how energy is used in the nation`s stock of commercial buildings can serve a variety of program planning and policy needs within the Department of Energy, by utilities, and other groups seeking to improve the efficiency of energy use in the building sector. This report describes an estimation of energy consumption by end use based upon data from the 1989 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). The methodology used in the study combines elements of engineering simulations and statistical analysis to estimate end-use intensities for heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, refrigeration, hot water, cooking, and miscellaneous equipment. Billing data for electricity and natural gas were first decomposed into weather and nonweather dependent loads. Subsequently, Statistical Adjusted Engineering (SAE) models were estimated by building type with annual data. The SAE models used variables such as building size, vintage, climate region, weekly operating hours, and employee density to adjust the engineering model predicted loads to the observed consumption. End-use consumption by fuel was estimated for each of the 5,876 buildings in the 1989 CBECS. The report displays the summary results for eleven separate building types as well as for the total US commercial building stock.

Belzer, D.B.; Wrench, L.E.; Marsh, T.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

End-use energy consumption estimates for U.S. commercial buildings, 1992  

SciTech Connect

An accurate picture of how energy is used in the nation`s stock of commercial buildings can serve a variety of program planning and policy needs of the US Department of Energy, utilities, and other groups seeking to improve the efficiency of energy use in the building sector. This report describes an estimation of energy consumption by end use based upon data from the 1992 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). The methodology used in the study combines elements of engineering simulations and statistical analysis to estimate end-use intensities for heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, refrigeration, hot water, cooking, and miscellaneous equipment. Statistical Adjusted Engineering (SAE) models were estimated by building type. The nonlinear SAE models used variables such as building size, vintage, climate region, weekly operating hours, and employee density to adjust the engineering model predicted loads to the observed consumption (based upon utility billing information). End-use consumption by fuel was estimated for each of the 6,751 buildings in the 1992 CBECS. The report displays the summary results for 11 separate building types as well as for the total US commercial building stock. 4 figs., 15 tabs.

Belzer, D.B.; Wrench, L.E.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Table A19. Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by end use ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

vehicles, laboratory fume hoods, laundry equipment, coffee brewers, water services, pumps, emergency generators, combined heat and power in commercial ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desired end-use services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Ethical Desire: Betrayal in Contemporary British Fiction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation investigates representations of betrayal in works by Hanif Kureishi, Salman Rushdie, Irvine Welsh, and Alan Hollinghurst. In rethinking "bad" acts of betrayal as embodying an ethical desire not for the good but for "the better," this dissertation challenges the simplistic good/bad binary as mandated by neo-imperialist, late capitalist, and heteronormative society. In doing so, my project intervenes in the current paradigm of ethical literary criticism, whose focus on the canon and the universal Good gained from it runs a risk of underwriting moral majoritarianism and judgmentalism. I argue that some contemporary narratives of betrayal open up onto a new ethic, insofar as they reveal the unethical totalization assumed in ethical literary criticism's pursuit of the normative Good. The first full chapter analyzes how Kureishi's Intimacy portrays an ethical adultery as it breaks away from the tenacious authority of monogamy in portraying adult intimacy in literature, what I call the narrative of "coupledom." Instead, Intimacy imagines a new narrative of "singledom" unconstrained by the marriage/adultery dyad. In the next chapter on Fury, a novel about Manhattan's celebrity culture, I interrogate the current discourse of cosmopolitanism and propose that Rushdie's novel exposes how both cosmopolitanism and nationalism are turned into political commodities by mediafrenzied and celebrity-obsessed metropolitan cultural politics. In a world where an ethical choice between cosmopolitanism and nationalism is impossible to make, Fury achieves an ethical act of treason against both. The next chapter scrutinizes Mark Renton's "ripping off" of his best mates and his critique of capitalism in Trainspotting and Porno. If Renton betrays his friends in order to leave the plan(e) of capitalism in the original novel, he satirizes the trustworthiness of trust in Porno by crushing his best mate's blind trust in business "ethics" and by ripping him off again. The last full chapter updates the link between aesthetics and ethics in post-AIDS contexts in Hollinghurst's The Line of Beauty. In portraying without judgment beautiful, dark-skinned, dying homosexual bodies, Hollinghurst's novel "fleshes out" the traditional sphere of aesthetics that denies the low and impure pleasures frequently paired with gay sex.

Kim, Soo Yeon

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Residential Sector End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1: Summary Input Assumptions and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Homes End-Use Equipment Type Equipment Market Shares Index Heating ElecFurnace Gas Furnace LPG Furnace OilHomes (millions) End-Use Equipment Type Appliance stock in millions of units Index Heating FJec Furnace Gas Furnace L P G Furnace OilHomes End-Use Equipment Type Units Efficiency for Stock Equipment Index Heating Elec Furnace Btu.out/Wh.in Gas Furnace AFUE LPG Furnace AFUE Oil

Koomey, Jonathan G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eighth Electric Utility Forecasting Symposium in Baltimore,Development of a Residential Forecasting Database. Lawrenceand Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1.

Johnson, F.X.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

How many people actually see the price signal? Quantifying marketfailures in the end use of energy  

SciTech Connect

"Getting the price right" is a goal of many market-orientedenergy policies. However, there are situations where the consumer payingfor the energy is separate from the owner of the energy-using device.Economists call this a "principal agent problem". A team organised by theInternational Energy Agency examined seven end uses and one sector whereprincipal agent problems existed: refrigerators, water heating, spaceheating, vending machines, commercial HVAC, company cars, lighting, andfirms. These investigations took place in Australia, Japan, theNetherlands, Norway, and the United States. About 2 100 percent of theenergy consumed in the end uses examined was affected by principal agentproblems. The size (and sometimes even the existence) varied greatly fromone country to another but all countries had significant amounts ofenergy affected by principal agent problems. The presence of a marketfailure does not mean that energy use would fall substantially if thefailure were eliminated; however it does suggest that raising energyprices such as in the form of carbon taxes will not necessarily increaseefficiency investments.

Meier, Alan; Eide, Anita

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Analysis of end-use electricity consumption during two Pacific Northwest cold snaps  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest has experienced unusually cold weather during two recent heating seasons. Hourly end-use load data was collected from a sample of residential and commercial buildings during both cold snaps. Earlier work documented the changes in end-use load shapes as outdoor temperature became colder. This paper extends analysis of cold snap load shapes by comparing results from both cold snaps, exploring the variability of electricity consumption between sites, and describing the use of load shapes in simulating system load. Load shapes from the first cold snap showed that hot water use shifted to later in the morning during extremely cold weather. This shift in load also occurred during the second cold snap and is similar to the shift observed on a typical weekend. Electricity consumption averaged across many sites can mask widely varying behavior at individual sites. For example, electricity consumption for space heat varies greatly between homes, especially when many homes are able to burn wood. Electricity consumption for space heat is compared between a group of energy-efficient homes and a group of older homes.

Sands, R.D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Analysis of end-use electricity consumption during two Pacific Northwest cold snaps  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest has experienced unusually cold weather during two recent heating seasons. Hourly end-use load data was collected from a sample of residential and commercial buildings during both cold snaps. Earlier work documented the changes in end-use load shapes as outdoor temperature became colder. This paper extends analysis of cold snap load shapes by comparing results from both cold snaps, exploring the variability of electricity consumption between sites, and describing the use of load shapes in simulating system load. Load shapes from the first cold snap showed that hot water use shifted to later in the morning during extremely cold weather. This shift in load also occurred during the second cold snap and is similar to the shift observed on a typical weekend. Electricity consumption averaged across many sites can mask widely varying behavior at individual sites. For example, electricity consumption for space heat varies greatly between homes, especially when many homes are able to burn wood. Electricity consumption for space heat is compared between a group of energy-efficient homes and a group of older homes.

Sands, R.D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PEPCO Energy Services","Other Provider",4523378,2999,4520379,"-","-" "5. The Potomac Edison Co","Investor-Owned",4383248,3303277,796849,283122,"-" "Total Sales, Top Five...

188

Residential Sector End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1: Summary Input Assumptions and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas Oil Lighting 0-1 hrs 1-2 his 2-3 hrs Usage levelgas Oil Dishwasher End-Use Lighting 0-1 hrs 1-2 hrs Usagegas Oil Dishwasher End-Use Lighting 0-1 hrs 1-2 hrs Usage

Koomey, Jonathan G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBL-34045 UC-1600 Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting-uses include Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC). Our analysis uses the modeling framework provided by the HVAC module in the Residential End-Use Energy Planning System (REEPS), which was developed

190

Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency, Table 6b-End Uses of  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and 2002 > Table 6b and 2002 > Table 6b Table 6b. End Uses of Energy per Ton of Steel, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (thousand Btu per ton) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS1 331111) 19982 20022 20062 Total3 16,957 15,884 17,796 Net Electricity 4 1,602 2,009 4,673 Natural Gas 4,625 4,236 5,969 Coal 487 393 214 Boiler Fuel -- -- -- Coal 81 W 10 Residual Fuel Oil 101 W 266 Natural Gas 527 426 276 Process Heating -- -- -- Net Electricity 751 862 830 Residual Fuel Oil 193 W 112 Natural Gas 3,742 3,592 2,776 Machine Drive -- -- -- Net Electricity 690 939 786 Notes: 1. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills.

191

Average regional end-use energy price projections to the year 2030  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy prices shown in this report cover the period from 1991 through 2030. These prices reflect sector/fuel price projections from the Annual Energy Outlook 1991 (AEO) base case, developed using the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Intermediate Future Forecasting System (IFFS) forecasting model. Projections through 2010 are AEO base case forecasts. Projections for the period from 2011 through 2030 were developed separately from the AEO for this report, and the basis for these projections is described in Chapter 3. Projections in this report include average energy prices for each of four Census Regions for the residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation end-use sectors. Energy sources include electricity, distillate fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gas, motor gasoline, residual fuel oil, natural gas, and steam coal. (VC)

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Average regional end-use energy price projections to the year 2030  

SciTech Connect

The energy prices shown in this report cover the period from 1991 through 2030. These prices reflect sector/fuel price projections from the Annual Energy Outlook 1991 (AEO) base case, developed using the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Intermediate Future Forecasting System (IFFS) forecasting model. Projections through 2010 are AEO base case forecasts. Projections for the period from 2011 through 2030 were developed separately from the AEO for this report, and the basis for these projections is described in Chapter 3. Projections in this report include average energy prices for each of four Census Regions for the residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation end-use sectors. Energy sources include electricity, distillate fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gas, motor gasoline, residual fuel oil, natural gas, and steam coal. (VC)

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

193

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Colorado" "1. Public Service Co of Colorado","Investor-Owned",28298643,9086992,12837188,6328128,46335 "2. Colorado Springs City of","Public",4508375,1476921,1102215,1929239,"-" "3....

194

Sets of desirable gambles: Conditioning, representation, and precise probabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The theory of sets of desirable gambles is a very general model which covers most of the existing theories for imprecise probability as special cases; it has a clear and simple axiomatic justification; and mathematical definitions are natural and intuitive. ... Keywords: Desirable gambles, Regular extension, Sets of probability measures, Zero probabilities

InS Couso; SerafN Moral

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547 Conventional Boiler Use 84 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,639 62 52 2,788 39 412 Process Heating 379 59 19 2,487 32 345 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

196

Residential Sector End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1: Summary Input Assumptions and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Richard E. Brown, James W. Hanford, Alan H . Sanstad, andFrancis X . , James W. Hanford, Richard E. Brown, Alan H.place for these end-uses (Hanford et al. 1994, Hwang et al.

Koomey, Jonathan G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency-Table 6a- End uses of  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6a 6a Page Last Modified: June 2010 Table 6a. End Uses of Fuel Consumption per Value of Production, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (thousand Btu per constant 2000 dollar 1) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS2 331111) 1998 3 2002 3 2006 3 Total 4 32.0 30.2 18.7 Net Electricity 5 3.0 3.8 2.8 Natural Gas 8.7 8.1 5.3 Coal 0.9 0.7 0.2 Boiler Fuel -- -- -- Coal 0.2 W 0.02 Residual Fuel Oil 0.2 * 0.1 Natural Gas 1.0 0.8 0.4 Process Heating -- -- -- Net Electricity 1.4 1.6 1.2 Residual Fuel Oil 0.4 * 0.2 Natural Gas 7.1 6.8 4.4 Machine Drive -- -- -- Net Electricity 1.3 1.8 1.3 Notes:1. Value of production is deflated by the chain-type price indices for iron and steel mills shipments. 2. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills.

198

Global warming and end-use efficiency implications of replacing CFCs  

SciTech Connect

The direct contribution of CFCs to calculated global warming has been recognized for some time. As a result of the international agreement to phase out CFCs due to stratospheric ozone and the ensuing search for suitable alternatives, there has recently been increased attention on the DIRECT global warming potential (GWP) of the fluorocarbon alternatives as greenhouse gases. However, to date there has been little focus on the INDIRECT global warming effect arising from end-use efficiency changes and associated CO{sub 2} emissions. A study being conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) addresses this combined or total global warming impact of viable options to replace CFCs in their major energy-related applications. This paper reviews selected results for air-conditioning, refrigeration, and heat pump applications. The analysis indicates that the CFC user industries have made substantial progress in approaching near-equal energy efficiency with the HCFC/HFC alternative refrigerants. The findings also bring into question the relative importance of the DIRECT (chemical-related) effect in many applications. Replacing CFCs is an important step in reducing the total global warming impact, and at present the HCFC and HFCS appear to offer the best efficiency and lowest total impact of options available in the relatively short time period required for the transition away from CFCs.

Fairchild, P.D.; Fischer, S.K.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

199

Development of an Energy Savings Benchmark for All Residential End-Uses: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To track progress toward aggressive multi-year whole-house energy savings goals of 40-70% and onsite power production of up to 30%, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Residential Buildings Program and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed the Building America Research Benchmark in 2003. The Benchmark is generally consistent with mid-1990s standard practice, as reflected in the Home Energy Rating System (HERS) Technical Guidelines, with additional definitions that allow the analyst to evaluate all residential end-uses, an extension of the traditional HERS rating approach that focuses on space conditioning and hot water. A series of user profiles, intended to represent the behavior of a''standard'' set of occupants, was created for use in conjunction with the Benchmark. Finally, a set of tools was developed by NREL and other Building America partners to help analysts compare whole-house energy use for a Prototype house to the Benchmark in a fair and consistent manner.

Hendron, R.; Anderson, R.; Christensen, C.; Eastment, M.; Reeves, P.

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Residential applliance data, assumptions and methodology for end-use forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details the data, assumptions and methodology for end-use forecasting of appliance energy use in the US residential sector. Our analysis uses the modeling framework provided by the Appliance Model in the Residential End-Use Energy Planning System (REEPS), which was developed by the Electric Power Research Institute. In this modeling framework, appliances include essentially all residential end-uses other than space conditioning end-uses. We have defined a distinct appliance model for each end-use based on a common modeling framework provided in the REEPS software. This report details our development of the following appliance models: refrigerator, freezer, dryer, water heater, clothes washer, dishwasher, lighting, cooking and miscellaneous. Taken together, appliances account for approximately 70% of electricity consumption and 30% of natural gas consumption in the US residential sector. Appliances are thus important to those residential sector policies or programs aimed at improving the efficiency of electricity and natural gas consumption. This report is primarily methodological in nature, taking the reader through the entire process of developing the baseline for residential appliance end-uses. Analysis steps documented in this report include: gathering technology and market data for each appliance end-use and specific technologies within those end-uses, developing cost data for the various technologies, and specifying decision models to forecast future purchase decisions by households. Our implementation of the REEPS 2.1 modeling framework draws on the extensive technology, cost and market data assembled by LBL for the purpose of analyzing federal energy conservation standards. The resulting residential appliance forecasting model offers a flexible and accurate tool for analyzing the effect of policies at the national level.

Hwang, R.J,; Johnson, F.X.; Brown, R.E.; Hanford, J.W.; Kommey, J.G.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desired end-use services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

District of Columbia" District of Columbia" "1. Potomac Electric Power Co","Investor-Owned",3388490,2014044,1374446,"-","-" "2. Constellation NewEnergy, Inc","Other Provider",2427380,"-",2369901,12091,45388 "3. PEPCO Energy Services","Other Provider",2099946,1012,2098934,"-","-" "4. Washington Gas Energy Services","Other Provider",1759773,39513,1720260,"-","-" "5. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg.","Other Provider",801256,"-",536225,265031,"-" "Total Sales, Top Five Providers",,10476845,2054569,8099766,277122,45388 "Percent of Total State Sales",,88,97,88,100,14

202

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study assesses for California how increasing end-use electrical energy efficiency from installing residential insulation impacts exposures and disease burden from power-plant pollutant emissions. Installation of fiberglass attic insulation in the nearly 3 million electricity-heated homes throughout California is used as a case study. The pollutants nitrous oxides (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), fine particulate matter (PM2.5), benzo(a)pyrene, benzene, and naphthalene are selected for the assessment. Exposure is characterized separately for rural and urban environments using the CalTOX model, which is a key input to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemicals and other environmental Impacts (TRACI). The output of CalTOX provides for urban and rural populations emissions-to-intake factors, which are expressed as an individual intake fraction (iFi). The typical iFi from power plant emissions are on the order of 10{sup -13} (g intake per g emitted) in urban and rural regions. The cumulative (rural and urban) product of emissions, population, and iFi is combined with toxic effects factors to determine human damage factors (HDFs). HDF are expressed as disability adjusted life years (DALYs) per kilogram pollutant emitted. The HDF approach is applied to the insulation case study. Upgrading existing residential insulation to US Department of Energy (DOE) recommended levels eliminates over the assmned 50-year lifetime of the insulation an estimated 1000 DALYs from power-plant emissions per million tonne (Mt) of insulation installed, mostly from the elimination of PM2.5 emissions. In comparison, the estimated burden from the manufacture of this insulation in DALYs per Mt is roughly four orders of magnitude lower than that avoided.

McKone, Thomas E.; Lobscheid, A.B.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Energy end-use metering in two modular office buildings at Fort Irwin, California  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the application of the Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) at Fort Irwin for the period 21 December 1989 to 27 January 1992. The purpose of the test was to monitor electrical demands in Buildings 567 and 571 by end use and to monitor the response of the HVAC systems to internal and external loads. Results of two years of monitoring are summarized below. The observed energy-use intensities (EUIs) were 13.7 kWh/ft{sup 2}-yr for Building 567 and 10.4 kWh/ft{sup 2}-yr for Building 571. The corresponding numbers for HVAC energy were 5.9 and 5.3 kWh/ft{sup 2}-yr. Lighting used about 35%, primary HVAC 40% (heating 8%, cooling 32%), supply fans 3% and other equipment (mostly plug loads) about 20% of the total. Over 10% of the primary HVAC energy used in Building 567 was the result of simultaneous heating and cooling. Six energy conservation measures were evaluated: (1) delamping and retrofit of T-12 fluorescent fixtures with T-8 systems; (2) installation of two-speed fans with operation at the lower speed (67% of rated airflow) during occupied periods whenever a unit is not heating or cooling; (3) retrofit of heat pump compressors with two-speed compressors; (4) installation of controls that eliminate non-productive simultaneous heating and cooling and provide improved night and weekend setback; (5) coating the existing black roof material with a white reflective material; and (6) adding an economizer system to provide outside air cooling. The estimated energy savings as a percent of whole-building energy use are: Lighting HVAC Savings -- 26%; Two-Speed Fans -- 2%; Two-Speed Compressors -- 11%; Improved HVAC Controls -- 5%; White Roof Coating -- 5%; Economizer Cooling -- 5 %. The total energy savings that can be achieved through the measures is 49%.

Armstrong, P.R.; Keller, J.M.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Distribution of particles which produces a desired radiation pattern  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A method is given for calculation of a distribution of small particles, embedded in a medium, so that the resulting medium would have a desired radiation pattern for the plane wave scattering by this medium.

A. G. Ramm

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Exploring Sexuality, Religiousity, and Desire in Colonial Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Religiosity in Colonial Mexico in Journal of the Historyand Desire in Colonial Mexico by Zeb Tortorici CSW FEB08three years in a convent in Mexico City. This is merely the

Tortorici, Zeb

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, July-- September 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M.W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products. The cost analyses is for the incremental processing cost; in other words, the feed is priced at zero dollars. The study reflects costs for operations using state of the art refinery technology; no capital costs for building new refineries is considered. Some modifications to the existing refinery may be required. Economy of scale dictates the minimum amount of feedstock that should be processed.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

207

Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, April--June 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M.W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. This 47-month study, with an approved budget of $4.4 million dollars, is being performed under DOE Contract Number DE-AC22-93PC91029. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

208

Method for preparing salt solutions having desired properties  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The specification discloses a method for preparing salt solutions which exhibit desired thermodynamic properties. The method enables prediction of the value of the thermodynamic properties for single and multiple salt solutions over a wide range of conditions from activity data and constants which are independent of concentration and temperature. A particular application of the invention is in the control of salt solutions in a process to provide a salt solution which exhibits the desired properties.

Ally, Moonis R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Braunstein, Jerry (Clinton, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Composition and evaluation of trustworthy web services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Web service technology seamlessly enables integration of different software to fulfil dynamic business demands in a platform-neutral fashion. By means of standard interfaces, service requesters can obtain their desired functionalities through certain ... Keywords: Petri nets, composite web services, ontology, trust, trustworthy web services, web service composition, web service evaluation

Stephen J. H. Yang; James S. F. Hsieh; Blue C. W. Lan; Jen-Yao Chung

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin" Wisconsin" "1. Wisconsin Electric Power Co","Investor-Owned",24533047,8260048,8827660,7445339,"-" "2. Wisconsin Public Service Corp","Investor-Owned",10517120,2780951,3863501,3872668,"-" "3. Wisconsin Power & Light Co","Investor-Owned",10130310,3541703,2336594,4252013,"-" "4. Northern States Power Co - Wisconsin","Investor-Owned",6177480,1907315,2699730,1570435,"-" "5. Madison Gas & Electric Co","Investor-Owned",3331795,826021,2243141,262633,"-" "Total Sales, Top Five Providers",,54689752,17316038,19970626,17403088,"-" "Percent of Total State Sales",,80,78,87,74

211

Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, January--March 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M. W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products. The cost analyses is for the incremental processing cost; in other words, the feed is priced at zero dollars. The study reflects costs for operations using state of the art refinery technology; no capital costs for building new refineries is considered. Some modifications to the existing refinery may be required. Economy of scale dictates the minimum amount of feedstock that should be processed. The major efforts conducted during the first quarter of 1996 were in the areas of: DL2 light distillate hydrotreating; and DL2 heave distillate catalytic cracking.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Refining and end use of coal liquids. Quarterly report, April--June 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M.W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initialed a study on November 1, 1993, for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. This 47-month study, with an approved budget of $4.4 million dollars, is being performed under DOE Contract Number DE-AC22-93PC91029. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An intregral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products. The cost analyses is for the incremental processing cost; in other words, the feed is priced at zero dollars. The study reflects costs for operations using state of the art refinery technology; no capital costs for building new refineries is considered. Some modifications to the existing refinery may be required. Economy of scale dictates the minimum amount of feedstock that should be processed.

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, October--December 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bechtel, with South west research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M. W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the US Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. To enhance management of the study, the work has been divided into two parts, the Basic Program and Option 1. The objectives of the Basic Program are to: characterize the coal liquids; develop an optimized refinery configuration for processing indirect and direct coal liquids; and develop a LP refinery model with Process Industry Modeling System software. The objective of Option 1 are to: confirm the validity of the optimization work of the Basic Program; produce large quantities of liquid transportation fuel blending stocks; conduct engine emission tests; and determine the value and the processing costs of the coal liquids. The major effort conducted during the fourth quarter of 1995 were in the areas of: IL catalytic cracking--microactivity tests were conducted on various wax blends; IL wax hydrocracking--a pilot plant run was conducted on a wax/petroleum blend; and DL2 characterization and fractionation.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

214

Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, October 1994--December 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M.W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. This 47-month study, with an approved budget of $4.4 million dollars, is being performed under DOE Contract Number DE-AC22-93PC91029. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products. The cost analyses is for the incremental processing cost; in other words, the feed is priced at zero dollars. The study reflects costs for operations using state of the art refinery technology; no capital costs for building new refineries is considered. Some modifications to the existing refinery may be required. Economy of scale dictates the minimum amount of feedstock that should be processed. To enhance management of the study, the work has been divided into two parts, the Basic Program and Option 1.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, July - September 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M. W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. This 47-month study, with an approved budget of $4.4 million dollars, is being performed under DOE Contract Number DE-AC22-93PC91029. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products. The cost analyses is for the incremental processing cost; in other words, the feed is priced at zero dollars. The study reflects costs for operations using state of the art refinery technology; no capital costs for building new refineries is considered. Some modifications to the existing refinery may be required. Economy of scale dictates the minimum amount of feedstock that should be processed. The major efforts conducted during the third quarter of 1996 were in the areas of hydrotreating production runs and FCC production run. 3 figs., 8 tabs.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

Refining and end use of coal liquids. Quarterly report, January--March 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An intregral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products. The cost analyses is for the incremental processing cost; in other words, the feed is priced at zero dollars. The study reflects costs for operations using state of the art refinery technology; no capital costs for building new refineries is considered. Some modifications to the existing refinery may be required. Economy of scale dictates the minimum amount of feedstock that should be processed. To enhance management of the study, the work has been divided into two parts, the Basic Program and Option 1. The objectives of the Basic Program are to: characterize the coal liquids; develop, an optimized refinery configuration for processing indirect and direct coal liquids; and develop a LP refinery model with the Process Industry Modeling System (PICS) software. The objectives of Option 1 are to: confirm the validity of the optimization work of the Basic Program; produce large quantities of liquid transportation fuel blending stocks; conduct engine emission tests; and determine the value and the processing costs of the coal liquids. The major efforts conducted during the first quarter of 1994 were in the areas of: subcontract preparation and negotiation; and linear programming modeling.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Code(a) End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3

218

,"U.S. Total Adjusted Distillate Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Distillate Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales by End Use" Distillate Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Residential",4,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1984" ,"Data 2","Commercial",10,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1984" ,"Data 3","Industrial",9,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1984" ,"Data 4","Farm",4,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1984" ,"Data 5","Electric Power",2,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1984" ,"Data 6","Oil Company",2,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1984"

219

A Study of Achievable Potential for Transmission and Disitribution Loss Reduction and End-Use Energy Efficiency for Eskom  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the results of a study undertaken to assess the "end-to-end" achievable efficiency potential for Eskoms electrical system. The assessment includes potential energy and demand savings estimates due to transmission and distribution loss reduction measures and implementation of end-use energy-efficiency measures over the period of 20122030.

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

220

Technology data characterizing lighting in commercial buildings: Application to end-use forecasting with commend 4.0  

SciTech Connect

End-use forecasting models typically utilize technology tradeoff curves to represent technology options available to consumers. A tradeoff curve, in general terms, is a functional form which relates efficiency to capital cost. Each end-use is modeled by a single tradeoff curve. This type of representation is satisfactory in the analysis of many policy options. On the other hand, for policies addressing individual technology options or groups of technology options, because individual technology options are accessible to the analyst, representation in such reduced form is not satisfactory. To address this and other analysis needs, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has enhanced its Commercial End-Use Planning System (COMMEND) to allow modeling of specific lighting and space conditioning (HVAC) technology options. This report characterizes the present commercial floorstock in terms of lighting technologies and develops cost-efficiency data for these lighting technologies. This report also characterizes the interactions between the lighting and space conditioning end uses in commercial buildings in the US In general, lighting energy reductions increase the heating and decrease the cooling requirements. The net change in a building`s energy requirements, however, depends on the building characteristics, operating conditions, and the climate. Lighting/HVAC interactions data were generated through computer simulations using the DOE-2 building energy analysis program.

Sezgen, A.O.; Huang, Y.J.; Atkinson, B.A.; Eto, J.H.; Koomey, J.G.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desired end-use services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Technology data characterizing space conditioning in commercial buildings: Application to end-use forecasting with COMMEND 4.0  

SciTech Connect

In the US, energy consumption is increasing most rapidly in the commercial sector. Consequently, the commercial sector is becoming an increasingly important target for state and federal energy policies and also for utility-sponsored demand side management (DSM) programs. The rapid growth in commercial-sector energy consumption also makes it important for analysts working on energy policy and DSM issues to have access to energy end-use forecasting models that include more detailed representations of energy-using technologies in the commercial sector. These new forecasting models disaggregate energy consumption not only by fuel type, end use, and building type, but also by specific technology. The disaggregation of space conditioning end uses in terms of specific technologies is complicated by several factors. First, the number of configurations of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems and heating and cooling plants is very large. Second, the properties of the building envelope are an integral part of a building`s HVAC energy consumption characteristics. Third, the characteristics of commercial buildings vary greatly by building type. The Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Commercial End-Use Planning System (COMMEND 4.0) and the associated data development presented in this report attempt to address the above complications and create a consistent forecasting framework. This report describes the process by which the authors collected space-conditioning technology data and then mapped it into the COMMEND 4.0 input format. The data are also generally applicable to other end-use forecasting frameworks for the commercial sector.

Sezgen, O.; Franconi, E.M.; Koomey, J.G.; Greenberg, S.E.; Afzal, A.; Shown, L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Understanding Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) technology, applications, and economics, for end-use workshop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project was to determine the state-of-the-art and to what extent existing SMES is a viable option in meeting the needs of utilities and their customers for improving electric service power quality. By defining and analyzing SMES electrical/mechanical performance characteristics, and comparing SMES application benefits with competitive stored energy systems, industry will be able to determine SMES unique applications and potential market penetration. Building on this information base, it would also be possible to evaluate the impact of high temperature superconductors (77 K and 20-35 K) on SMES technology applications. The authors of this report constructed a network of industry contacts and research consultants that were used to collect, update, and analyze ongoing SMES R&D and marketing activities in industries, utilities, and equipment manufacturers. These key resources were utilized to assemble performance characteristics on existing SMES, battery, capacitor, flywheel, and high temperature superconductor (HTS) stored energy technologies. From this information, preliminary stored energy system comparisons were accomplished. In this way, the electric load needs would be readily comparable to the potential solutions and applications offered by each aforementioned energy storage technology.

Ferraro, R.J. [Ferraro, Oliver, and Associates, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); McConnell, B.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Non-Intrusive Load Monitoring (NILM)Technologies for End-Use Load Disaggregation: Laboratory Evaluation I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a laboratory evaluation to assess the cost versus accuracy performance of residential non-intrusive load monitoring (NILM) technology. NILM is an evolving technology that can be deployed for utility and customer applications, such as end-use load disaggregation, energy audits, real-time customer information and appliance or load diagnostics. Commercial NILM products for utility and customer applications continue to emerge, although most products available today ...

2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

224

Residential sector end-use forecasting with EPRI-Reeps 2.1: Summary input assumptions and results  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes current and projected future energy use by end-use and fuel for the U.S. residential sector, and assesses which end-uses are growing most rapidly over time. The inputs to this forecast are based on a multi-year data compilation effort funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. We use the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) REEPS model, as reconfigured to reflect the latest end-use technology data. Residential primary energy use is expected to grow 0.3% per year between 1995 and 2010, while electricity demand is projected to grow at about 0.7% per year over this period. The number of households is expected to grow at about 0.8% per year, which implies that the overall primary energy intensity per household of the residential sector is declining, and the electricity intensity per household is remaining roughly constant over the forecast period. These relatively low growth rates are dependent on the assumed growth rate for miscellaneous electricity, which is the single largest contributor to demand growth in many recent forecasts.

Koomey, J.G.; Brown, R.E.; Richey, R. [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

The quality of the ELCAP (End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program) engineering data set: Background issues  

SciTech Connect

The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) began the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP) in 1983. Prior to beginning ELCAP, there was an abundance of information regarding total power consumption for residential structures in the Pacific Northwest, through billing records for example, and limited information regarding power consumption by various end uses (such as hot water, heating and cooling). This program, conducted for Bonneville by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, involves collecting and analyzing hourly end-use data in commercial and residential buildings in the Pacific Northwest. The purpose of this document is to provide background information to analyses that may use ELCAP data. In general, the ELCAP data set is extremely high in quality, but analysts should be aware of potential problems that could exist with a data set of this size. This report describes the quality of the ELCAP data and emphasizes the guidelines for data review along with limitations and suggestions regarding engineering and characteristics data including missing data values, procedures for time-stamp assignments, and incomplete integration periods. 3 figs.

Crowder, R.S. III; Miller, N.E.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Maple Heights-Lake Desire, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heights-Lake Desire, Washington: Energy Resources Heights-Lake Desire, Washington: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 47.4521975°, -122.0984885° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.4521975,"lon":-122.0984885,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

227

Michalis Nikiforos On the Desired Rate of Capacity Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines the endogeneity (or lack thereof) of the rate of capacity utilization in the long run within the context of the controversy surrounding the Kaleckian model of growth and distribution. We argue that the proposed long-run dynamic adjustment, proposed by Kaleckian scholars, lacks a coherent economic rationale. We provide economic justification for the adjustment of the desired rate of utilization towards the actual rate on behalf of a cost-minimizing firm, after examining the factors that determine the utilization of resources. The cost minimizing firm has an incentive to increase the utilization of its capital if the rate of the returns to scale decreases as its production increases. We show that there are evidence in the theory and the empirical research that justify this behavior of returns to scale. In that way the desired rate of utilization becomes endogenous.

Michalis Nikiforos; Laura Barbosa De Carvalho; Christian Schoder; Jonathan Cogliano For Useful

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Public Policies, Private Choices: Consumer Desire and the Practice of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Public Policies, Private Choices: Consumer Desire and the Practice of Public Policies, Private Choices: Consumer Desire and the Practice of Energy Efficiency Speaker(s): Reuben Deumling Date: May 27, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Galen Barbose This talk explores refrigerator energy efficiency as a technical concept, a political framework, and a marketing strategy. Refrigerator energy consumption has been the subject of regulatory attention in the US for some thirty years. The results are celebrated as a successful model for how to combine regulatory objectives and consumer preferences in pursuit of environmental outcomes, with no losers. However, the per capita refrigerator energy consumption today remains (much) higher in the US than in virtually all other countries. In this talk I examine priorities shaping

229

Data on energy end-use patterns and energy efficiencies in major CO sub 2 emitting countries  

SciTech Connect

This is a report of the basic data regarding energy end-uses and efficiencies in major CO{sub 2} emitting countries. The task is part of the multi-lab carbon dioxide energy system research program. Fossil energy production and use are the largest anthropogenic source of CO{sub 2} emissions. To gain an insight into the relationship between CO{sub 2} emission and energy use, the global energy consumption patterns and the changing energy efficiencies must be better analyzed and understood. This work attempts to collect and organize the data on energy use and energy efficiency for the ten major CO{sub 2} emitting countries: USA, USSR, the People's Republic of China, Japan, the Federal Republic of Germany, the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Italy, and Australia. A wide variety of information sources have been examined. The data base is presented in tabular format. It is documented by three main parts, the first shows the total final energy consumption by fuel type and end-use sector for each nation. The second shows the detailed energy use by fuel type and function for each end-use sector: residential, commercial, transportation and industrial. The third part shows the country-specific energy balances for electricity generation and use. The data base is a living document and will be updated as additional information becomes available. The data base is to be used to accomplish the ultimate objective of improving the reliability of future CO{sub 2}-emissions estimates. 7 refs., 12 tabs.

Cheng, Hsing C.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Data on energy end-use patterns and energy efficiencies in major CO sub 2 emitting countries  

SciTech Connect

This is a report of the basic data regarding energy end-uses and efficiencies in major CO{sub 2} emitting countries. The task is part of the multi-lab carbon dioxide energy system research program. Fossil energy production and use are the largest anthropogenic source of CO{sub 2} emissions. To gain an insight into the relationship between CO{sub 2} emission and energy use, the global energy consumption patterns and the changing energy efficiencies must be better analyzed and understood. This work attempts to collect and organize the data on energy use and energy efficiency for the ten major CO{sub 2} emitting countries: USA, USSR, the People's Republic of China, Japan, the Federal Republic of Germany, the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Italy, and Australia. A wide variety of information sources have been examined. The data base is presented in tabular format. It is documented by three main parts, the first shows the total final energy consumption by fuel type and end-use sector for each nation. The second shows the detailed energy use by fuel type and function for each end-use sector: residential, commercial, transportation and industrial. The third part shows the country-specific energy balances for electricity generation and use. The data base is a living document and will be updated as additional information becomes available. The data base is to be used to accomplish the ultimate objective of improving the reliability of future CO{sub 2}-emissions estimates. 7 refs., 12 tabs.

Cheng, Hsing C.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

" Conventional Boiler Use",3199,12,4,1271,2,11,5.6 " CHP andor Cogeneration Process",3515,8,2,834,"*",23,3.8 "Direct Uses-Total Process",768929,10,7,2907,16,17...

232

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel",12979,7,3,2074,3,26 " Conventional Boiler Use",12979,3,1,712,1,3 " CHP andor Cogeneration Process","--",4,3,1362,2,23 "Direct Uses-Total Process",675152,4,9,2549,7,13 "...

233

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

l",84,133,23,2119,8,547 " Conventional Boiler Use",84,71,17,1281,8,129 " CHP andor Cogeneration Process",0,62,6,838,1,417 "Direct Uses-Total Process",2639,62,52,2788,39,412 "...

234

How many people actually see the price signal? Quantifying market failures in the end use of energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1991) The Issue of Domestic Energy Market Failure. Canberra,information in energy service markets leading to problemsis a goal of many market-oriented energy policies. However,

Meier, Alan; Eide, Anita

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Dreamhome: A Personal Space of Core Human Desire and Ambition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dreamhome is a creative exploration of a prototype house designed with creative freedom using possible future technologies that may not be currently feasible. New and forthcoming technology in various scientific branches that could be applicable to architecture will be presented, and the applications discussed. Limitations of application to architecture of the reviewed technologies will be discussed. Prior works by architects and engineers who push boundaries to innovatively overcome technological limitations will be explored, as will examples in which advanced technology is applied to create unique architectural designs. Together these references will evoke inspirations to be translated into an architectural design and a virtual home. The house is desired to boast of a unique design with various aesthetic and functional features that are not usually seen in present day architecture. This visualization could be a glimpse of possible home design of the future.

Tanna, Hemali 1980-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Measured electric hot water standby and demand loads from Pacific Northwest homes. End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program  

SciTech Connect

The Bonneville Power Administration began the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP) in 1983 to obtain metered hourly end-use consumption data for a large sample of new and existing residential and commercial buildings in the Pacific Northwest. Loads and load shapes from the first 3 years of data fro each of several ELCAP residential studies representing various segments of the housing population have been summarized by Pratt et al. The analysis reported here uses the ELCAP data to investigate in much greater detail the relationship of key occupant and tank characteristics to the consumption of electricity for water heating. The hourly data collected provides opportunities to understand electricity consumption for heating water and to examine assumptions about water heating that are critical to load forecasting and conservation resource assessments. Specific objectives of this analysis are to: (A) determine the current baseline for standby heat losses by determining the standby heat loss of each hot water tank in the sample, (B) examine key assumptions affecting standby heat losses such as hot water temperatures and tank sizes and locations, (C) estimate, where possible, impacts on standby heat losses by conservation measures such as insulating tank wraps, pipe wraps, anticonvection valves or traps, and insulating bottom boards, (D) estimate the EF-factors used by the federal efficiency standards and the nominal R-values of the tanks in the sample, (E) develop estimates of demand for hot water for each home in the sample by subtracting the standby load from the total hot water load, (F) examine the relationship between the ages and number of occupants and the hot water demand, (G) place the standby and demand components of water heating electricity consumption in perspective with the total hot water load and load shape.

Pratt, R.G.; Ross, B.A.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

LBL-34046 UC-350 Residential Appliance Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report details the data, assumptions and methodology for end-use forecasting of appliance energy use in the U.S. residential sector. Our analysis uses the modeling framework provided by the Appliance Model in the Residential End-Use Energy Planning System (REEPS), which was developed by the Electric Power Research Institute (McMenamin et al. 1992). In this modeling framework, appliances include essentially all residential end-uses other than space conditioning end-uses. We have defined a distinct appliance model for each end-use based on a common modeling framework provided in the REEPS software. This report details our development of the following appliance models: refrigerator, freezer, dryer, water heater, clothes washer, dishwasher, lighting, cooking and miscellaneous. Taken together, appliances account for approximately 70 % of electricity consumption and 30 % of natural gas consumption in the U.S. residential sector (EIA 1993). Appliances are thus important to those residential sector policies or programs aimed at improving the efficiency of electricity and natural gas consumption. This report is primarily methodological in nature, taking the reader through the entire process of developing the baseline for residential appliance end-uses. Analysis steps documented in this report include: gathering technology and market data for each appliance end-use and specific

J. Hwang; Francis X. Johnson; Richard E. Brown; James W. Hanford; Jonathan G. Koomey

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

NSLS Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Services NSLS Services Computing Services Lab Space Libraries Postal Services Procurement Repair & Equipment Services Shipping Procedures Storage User Accounts Workshop Procedures...

239

Financing end-use solar technologies in a restructured electricity industry: Comparing the cost of public policies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Renewable energy technologies are capital intensive. Successful public policies for promoting renewable energy must address the significant resources needed to finance them. Public policies to support financing for renewable energy technologies must pay special attention to interactions with federal, state, and local taxes. These interactions are important because they can dramatically increase or decrease the effectiveness of a policy, and they determine the total cost of a policy to society as a whole. This report describes a comparative analysis of the cost of public policies to support financing for two end-use solar technologies: residential solar domestic hot water heating (SDHW) and residential rooftop photovoltaic (PV) systems. The analysis focuses on the cost of the technologies under five different ownership and financing scenarios. Four scenarios involve leasing the technologies to homeowners in return for a payment that is determined by the financing requirements of each form of ownership. For each scenario, the authors examine nine public policies that might be used to lower the cost of these technologies: investment tax credits (federal and state), production tax credits (federal and state), production incentives, low-interest loans, grants (taxable and two types of nontaxable), direct customer payments, property and sales tax reductions, and accelerated depreciation.

Jones, E.; Eto, J.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Policy Drivers for Improving Electricity End-Use Efficiency in the U.S.: An Economic-Engineering Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper estimates the economically achievable potential for improving electricity end-use efficiency in the U.S. The approach involves identifying a series of energy-efficiency policies aimed at tackling market failures, and then examining their impacts and cost-effectiveness using Georgia Techs version of the National Energy Modeling System (GT-NEMS). By estimating the policy-driven electricity savings and the associated levelized costs, a policy supply curve for electricity efficiency is produced. Each policy is evaluated individually and in an Integrated Policy scenario to examine policy dynamics. The Integrated Policy scenario demonstrates significant achievable potential: 261 TWh (6.5%) of electricity savings in 2020, and 457 TWh (10.2%) in 2035. All eleven policies examined were estimated to have lower levelized costs than average electricity retail prices. Levelized costs range from 0.5 8.0 cent/kWh, with the regulatory and information policies tending to be most cost-effective. Policy impacts on the power sector, carbon dioxide emissions, and energy intensity are also estimated to be significant. *Corresponding author:

Yu Wang; Marilyn A. Brown; Yu Wang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desired end-use services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Hot Water Electric Energy Use in Single-Family Residences in the Pacific Northwest : Regional End-Use Metering Project (REMP).  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Energy Resources of the Bonneville Power Administration carriers out generation and conservation resource planning. The analysis of historical trends in and determinants of energy consumption is carried out by the office's End-Use Research Section. The End-Use Research Section operates a comprehensive data collection program to provide pertinent information to support demand-side conservation planning, load forecasting, and conservation program development and delivery. Part of this on-going program, commonly known as the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP), was recently renamed the Regional End-Use Metering Project (REMP) to reflect an emphasis on metering rather than analytical activities. REMP is designed to collect electricity usage data through direct monitoring of end-use loads in buildings in the residential and commercial sectors and is conducted for Bonneville by Pacific Northwest Laboratories (Battelle). The detailed summary information in this report is on energy used for water heaters in the residential sector and is based on data collected from September 1985 through December 1990 for 336 of the 499 REMP metered homes. Specific information is provided on annual loads averaged over the years and their variation across residences. Descriptions are given of use as associated with demographic and energy-related characteristics. Summaries are also provided for electricity use by each year, month, and daytype, as well as at peak hot water load and peak system times. This is the second residential report. This report focuses on a specific end use and adds detail to the first report. Subsequent reports are planned on other individual end uses or sets of end uses. 15 refs., 29 figs., 10 tabs.

Taylor, Megan E., Ritland, Keith G., Pratt, R.G.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Second quarter 1995 technical progress report, April--June 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M.W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. This 47-month study, with an approved budget of $4.4 million dollars, is being performed under DOE Contract Number DE-AC22-93PC91029. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Sixth quarterly technical progress report, December 19, 1994--March 26, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M.W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. This 47-month study, with an approved budget of $4.4 million dollars, is being performed under DOE Contract Number DE-AC22-93PC91029. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products. The cost analyses is for the incremental processing cost; in other words, the feed is priced at zero dollars. The study reflects costs for operations using state of the art refinery technology; no capital costs for building new refineries is considered. Some modifications to the existing refinery may be required. Economy of scale dictates the minimum amount of feedstock that should be processed.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Paraho environmental data. Part IV. Land reclamation and revegetation. Part V. Biological effects. Part VI. Occupational health and safety. Part VII. End use  

SciTech Connect

Characteristics of the environment and ecosystems at Anvil Points, reclamation of retorted shale, revegetation of retorted shale, and ecological effects of retorted shale are reported in the first section of this report. Methods used in screening shale oil and retort water for mutagens and carcinogens as well as toxicity studies are reported in the second section of this report. The third section contains information concerning the industrial hygiene and medical studies made at Anvil Points during Paraho research operations. The last section discusses the end uses of shale crude oil and possible health effects associated with end use. (DMC)

Limbach, L.K.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

NSLS Services | Postal Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Postal Services Postal Services U.S. Postal Service BNL has a full-service U.S. Postal Service Office (Upton branch) located in Staff Services, Building 179, x2539. BNL Mail Service Mail is delivered and picked up twice a day from each building on site. Users should leave internal lab mail (brown envelopes, no stamps needed) and U.S. Mail (regular envelopes, stamps required) in the outgoing mail boxes at NSLS mail stop 725A, located in the lobby by the elevator. Receiving Mail During regular working hours, packages and other special deliveries are brought to the Stockroom while regular mail is taken to the mailstops around the building. Each beam port is assigned a mail slot at NSLS mail stop 725A near the elevator in the lobby. The beamline number should be on all mail addressed to users. Mail to users should be addressed as follows

246

The effect of efficiency standards on water use and water heating energy use in the US: A detailed end-use treatment  

SciTech Connect

Water heating is an important end-use, accounting for roughly 16% of total primary energy consumption in the US residential sector. Recently enacted efficiency standards on water heaters and hot water-using equipment (e.g., dishwashers, clothes washers, showerheads, and faucets) will substantially affect the energy use of water heaters in the future. Assessment of current and future utility programs and government policies requires that regulators, resource planners, and forecasters understand the effects of these regulations. In order to quantify these impacts, this paper presents a detailed end-use breakdown of household hot and cold water use developed for the US Department of Energy. This breakdown is based on both previous studies and new data and analysis. It is implemented in a spreadsheet forecasting framework, which allows significant flexibility in specifying end-use demands and linkages between water heaters and hot water-using appliances. We disaggregate total hot and cold water use (gallons per day) into their component parts: showers, baths, faucets (flow dominated and volume dominated), toilets, landscaping/other, dishwashers, and clotheswashers. We then use the end-use breakdown and data on equipment characteristics to assess the impacts of current efficiency standards on hot water use and water heater energy consumption.

Koomey, J.G.; Dunham, C.; Lutz, J.D.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Collaborative assignment using belief-desire-intention agent modeling and negotiation with speedup strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a distributed agent model that applies belief-desire-intention (BDI) reasoning and negotiation for addressing the linear assignment problem (LAP) collaboratively. In resource allocation, LAP is viewed as seeking a concurrent ... Keywords: Belief-desire-intention (BDI) negotiation model, Collaborative linear assignment, Distributed problem solving, Reasoning control

Kiam Tian Seow; Kwang Mong Sim

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Optimization of bead geometry of submerged arc weld using fuzzy based desirability function approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present study highlights application of Taguchi's robust design coupled with fuzzy based desirability function approach for optimizing multiple bead geometry parameters of submerged arc weldment. Fuzzy inference system has been adapted to avoid uncertainly, ... Keywords: Desirability function, Fuzzy logic, SAW, Taguchi's robust design

Ankita Singh; Saurav Datta; Siba Sankar Mahapatra; Tapan Singha; Gautam Majumdar

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Remote information service access system based on a client-server-service model  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A local host computing system, a remote host computing system as connected by a network, and service functionalities: a human interface service functionality, a starter service functionality, and a desired utility service functionality, and a Client-Server-Service (CSS) model is imposed on each service functionality. In one embodiment, this results in nine logical components and three physical components (a local host, a remote host, and an intervening network), where two of the logical components are integrated into one Remote Object Client component, and that Remote Object Client component and the other seven logical components are deployed among the local host and remote host in a manner which eases compatibility and upgrade problems, and provides an illusion to a user that a desired utility service supported on a remote host resides locally on the user`s local host, thereby providing ease of use and minimal software maintenance for users of that remote service. 16 figs.

Konrad, A.M.

1996-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

250

Remote information service access system based on a client-server-service model  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A local host computing system, a remote host computing system as connected by a network, and service functionalities: a human interface service functionality, a starter service functionality, and a desired utility service functionality, and a Client-Server-Service (CSS) model is imposed on each service functionality. In one embodiment, this results in nine logical components and three physical components (a local host, a remote host, and an intervening network), where two of the logical components are integrated into one Remote Object Client component, and that Remote Object Client component and the other seven logical components are deployed among the local host and remote host in a manner which eases compatibility and upgrade problems, and provides an illusion to a user that a desired utility service supported on a remote host resides locally on the user`s local host, thereby providing ease of use and minimal software maintenance for users of that remote service. 16 figs.

Konrad, A.M.

1997-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

251

Industrial sector end use. Energy Consumption Data Base (ECDB) for 1975 and 1976. Volume I. Summary of 1976 results. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report is the summary document of a three-volume report. It contains an introduction followed by tables of data containing the following information: 1976 national energy consumption by industry fuel type, and end use; 1976 regional energy consumption by industry fuel type, and census division; 1976 regional energy consumption by industry fuel type, and federal regions; 1976 regional energy consumption by industry fuel type, and PAD district; 1976 state energy consumption by industry fuel type, and by state. (PLG)

1980-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

The End-Use Technology Assessment Project: A Load-Shape Analysis of Ground Source Heat Pumps and Good Cents Homes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interest is growing in end-use technology applications that promote overall energy efficiency through increased electricity use. This study will help utilities understand the impacts of such applications by providing load-shape information on ground source heat pumps as well as energy-efficient appliances promoted through Good Cents Homes programs. This report is available only to funders of Program 101A or 101.001. Funders may download this report at http://my.primen.com/Applications/DE/Community/index...

1995-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

253

The impact of passive safety systems on desirability of advanced light water reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work investigates whether the advanced light water reactor designs with passive safety systems are more desirable than advanced reactor designs with active safety systems from the point of view of uncertainty in the ...

Eul, Ryan C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Partner (dis)agreement on moving desires and the subsequent moving behaviour of couples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that although families with children are fairly immobile, it is common for one or both partners to still desire to move. There is also some evidence that tenure commitments are linked to desire disagreements. Highly committed homeowning couples disagree in 18... .55% of cases, whereas disagreements are slightly more common amongst renting couples (just over 21%). Given that selection into home ownership is facilitated by wealth accumulation with age, it may be that the older average age of homeowners is driving...

Coulter, Rory; van Ham, Maarten; Feijten, Peteke

255

Transportation Services | Staff Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Services Transportation Services The BNL Transportation Office, located at 20 Brookhaven Avenue, Building 400A, is available to assist BNL employees, guests and visitors with transportation needs in support of Laboratory programs. The hours of operation are 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM Monday through Friday. To contact the Transportation Office call (631) 344-2535. Stony Brook Parking Passes The Transportation Office has a limited number of parking passes for the three (3) parking garages at Stony Brook University. The passes are available to and are intended for use by BNL employees/scientific staff on official business only. Passes may be used at the Administration, University Hospital and Health Services Center garages on the Stony Brook campus when visiting SBU on official business.

256

1980 survey and evaluation of utility conservation, load management, and solar end-use projects. Volume 3: utility load management projects. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of the 1980 survey of electric utility-sponsored energy conservation, load management, and end-use solar energy conversion projects are described. The work is an expansion of a previous survey and evaluation and has been jointly sponsored by EPRI and DOE through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. There are three volumes and a summary document. Each volume presents the results of an extensive survey to determine electric utility involvement in customer-side projects related to the particular technology (i.e., conservation, solar, or load management), selected descriptions of utility projects and results, and first-level technical and economic evaluations.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Current and future industrial energy service characterizations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Current and future energy demands, end uses, and cost used to characterize typical applications and resultant services in the industrial sector of the United States and 15 selected states are examined. A review and evaluation of existing industrial energy data bases was undertaken to assess their potential for supporting SERI research on: (1) market suitability analysis, (2) market development, (3) end-use matching, (3) industrial applications case studies, and (4) identification of cost and performance goals for solar systems and typical information requirements for industrial energy end use. In reviewing existing industrial energy data bases, the level of detail, disaggregation, and primary sources of information were examined. The focus was on fuels and electric energy used for heat and power purchased by the manufacturing subsector and listed by 2-, 3-, and 4-digit SIC, primary fuel, and end use. Projections of state level energy prices to 1990 are developed using the energy intensity approach. The effects of federal and state industrial energy conservation programs on future industrial sector demands were assessed. Future end-use energy requirements were developed for each 4-digit SIC industry and were grouped as follows: (1) hot water, (2) steam (212 to 300/sup 0/F, each 100/sup 0/F interval from 300 to 1000/sup 0/F, and greater than 1000/sup 0/F), and (3) hot air (100/sup 0/F intervals). Volume I details the activities performed in this effort.

Krawiec, F.; Thomas, T.; Jackson, F.; Limaye, D.R.; Isser, S.; Karnofsky, K.; Davis, T.D.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Recruitment Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IAEA Recruitment Services Personal History Form (PHF) and Job Opportunities IAEA Employment Benefits Relevant Publications and Brochures Interview Process This service is provided...

259

Copy Service, Production Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Copy Service Copy Service Copying in color or black-and-white from hard copy or electronic files. Paper size up to 13" x 19" in a variety of stocks and colors. Larger Documents (up to 36" wide and 100" long) can be reproduced in Black & White from prints or files and can be saved in a variety of electronic format Variable Data Printing - personalized document production Tab Printing Forms CD/DVD Duplication CD/DVD direct printing Binding Collate documents, insert tab dividers, punch holes for binding Stapling documents up to 1 inch thick Spiral, adhesive and perfect binding. Hard covers also available upon request Folding & Mailing Print and apply mailing addresses and labels Machine fold documents and insert into envelopes for mailing Laminate printed items up to 35" wide.

260

Service Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Service Service Characteristics by Activity... Service Service buildings are those in which some type of service is provided, other than food service or retail sales of goods. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Service Buildings... Most service buildings were small, with almost ninety percent between 1,001 and 10,000 square feet. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics Number of Service Buildings by Predominant Building Size Category Figure showing number of service buildings by size. If you need assistance viewing this page, please contact 202-586-8800. Equipment Table: Buildings, Size, and Age Data by Equipment Types Predominant Heating Equipment Types in Service Buildings

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desired end-use services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

From Theory to Reality: Visit to NREL Heightens Student's Desire to Become  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

From Theory to Reality: Visit to NREL Heightens Student's Desire to From Theory to Reality: Visit to NREL Heightens Student's Desire to Become an Engineer From Theory to Reality: Visit to NREL Heightens Student's Desire to Become an Engineer November 21, 2013 - 3:21pm Addthis Jeremy Laselute Jeremy Laselute New Mexico State University Electrical Engineering Technology Student and Member of the Zuni Pueblo Tribe Hello, my name is Jeremy Laselute. I am 22 years old, a Zuni Pueblo Indian, and live on the Zuni Reservation in New Mexico. I am a student at New Mexico State University in Las Cruces, New Mexico, majoring in electrical engineering technology (EET) with a minor in renewable energy technology. With an EET degree I want to help my community by incorporating renewable energy technology so power will be distributed to every home, business, or

262

DESIRED MOBILE APPLICATION FEATURES IN AGRICULTURAL COMMUNICATIONS AND JOURNALISM STUDENTS AT TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Desired Mobile Application Features In Agricultural Communications And Journalism Students At Texas A&M University. (March 2013) Casey Meadows Department of Agriculture Texas A&M University Research Advisor: Dr. Billy McKim Department of Agricultural Leadership, Education and Communications As an institution charged with the responsibility of educating those whom attend, the Department of Agriculture at Texas A&M University examines the desire of students to incorporate technology alongside traditional classroom instruction. The study sought to see what students find useful or difficult to utilize in current popular mobile applications on smart devices, such as the Blackberry, iPad, iPhone, Android devices, and even the iPod Touch in some instances. The study was conducted through a mixed methods approach consisting of a small focus group of Agricultural Communications and Journalism students at Texas A&M University to collect qualitative data and preferences. The focus group was later followed up by an extensive online questionnaire distributed to all Agricultural Communications and Journalism majors and minors at Texas A&M University in order to collect quantitative data concerning smart device ownership percentages, usage ratios, and personal preferences and expectations. Students had an overwhelmingly positive desire for a mobile application to be used alongside courses. Students expressed a desire for the app to mimic Twitters newsfeed design, while also having convenient access to course materials, announcements from course instructors, and interactive messaging with other classmates hosted through the app.

Meadows, Casey

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Mailing Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mailing Services Mailing Services Use the form below to add your name to the Depleted UF6 Mailing List. First Name: Last Name: Organization: Address: City: State: Postal Code:...

264

Calibration Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of these applications, the Optoelectronics Division provides measurement services at laser power levels from nanowatts to kilowatts and pulse ...

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

265

Method of manipulating the chemical properties of water to improve the effectiveness of a desired process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The method of the present invention is adapted to manipulate the chemical properties of water in order to improve the effectiveness of a desired process. The method involves heating the water in the vessel to subcritical temperatures between 100.degree. to 374.degree. C. while maintaining sufficient pressure to the water to maintain the water in the liquid state. Various physiochemical properties of the water can be manipulated including polarity, solute solubility, surface tension, viscosity, and the disassociation constant. The method of the present invention has various uses including extracting organics from solids and semisolids such as soil, selectively extracting desired organics from liquids, selectively separating organics using sorbent phases, enhancing reactions by controlling the disassociation constant of water, cleaning waste water, removing organics from water using activated carbon or other suitable sorbents, and degrading various compounds.

Hawthorne, Steven B. (Grand Forks, ND); Miller, David J. (Grand Forks, ND); Lagadec, Arnaud Jean-Marie (Grand Forks, ND); Hammond, Peter James (York, GB); Clifford, Anthony Alan (Leeds, GB)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

U.S. Energy Service Company (ESCO) Industry and Market Trends  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Service Company (ESCO) Energy Service Company (ESCO) Industry and Market Trends Charles Goldman Deputy Dept Head Energy Analysis Department Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Definition of U.S. ESCO  Project developer in business of improving end-use energy efficiency: - Combine engineering expertise with financial services to extract untapped potential for energy efficiency - Integrates broad range of services: project identification, engineering & design, financing, construction, M&V of savings, maintenance, and billing  Performance contracting: ESCO's compensation is tied to project's performance  Product and Service Strategies - full range of energy efficiency services - energy and facility management services - build/own/operate major energy facilities (cogeneration, onsite

267

Desired Characteristics for Next Generation Integrated Nuclear Safety Analysis Methods and Software  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a result of economic, environmental, and policy imperatives, it is envisioned that operation of the current fleet of commercial nuclear power plants NPPs will extend significantly beyond their original licensing periods. This objective can be achieved only if these plants continue to operate in a safe and cost-effective manner. The capability to perform detailed technical safety analyses of operational events either actual or postulated and desired operational enhancements such as power uprates will c...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

268

Biometric Web Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biometric Web Services. The biometric web services project combines biometrics and web services to. ... What are Web services? ...

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

269

Production Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welcome Welcome The Production Services site contains links to each of the division's groups with descriptions of their services. Our goal is to update this website frequently to reflect ongoing service upgrades which, by planning and design, are added so that we can continue to meet your needs in a constantly changing work environment. Note: The Graphic Design Studio has been relocated to the second floor in the north wing of the Research Support Building 400. The telephone number remains the same, X7288. If you have any questions, please call supervisor, Rick Backofen, X6183. Photography Photography services are available at no charge to BNL and Guest users. See a list of the complete range of photography services available. Video Video services are available at no charge to BNL and Guest users. See a list of the complete range of video services available.

270

Torrefied wood pellets as an alternative fuel to coal: Climate benefits and social desirability of production and use.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this thesis is to study the climate impacts and the social returns and social desirability of torrefied wood pellet production and use (more)

Happonen, Kiira

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Definition: Regulation Service | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Service Service Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Regulation Service The process whereby one Balancing Authority contracts to provide corrective response to all or a portion of the ACE of another Balancing Authority. The Balancing Authority providing the response assumes the obligation of meeting all applicable control criteria as specified by NERC for itself and the Balancing Authority for which it is providing the Regulation Service.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition According to Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, Demand Response (DR) is defined as: "Changes in electric usage by end-use customers from their normal consumption patterns in response to changes in the price of electricity over time, or to incentive payments designed to induce lower

272

Translation Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... As a courtesy, the National Center for Standards ... companies may be located by entering the term ... translation services" in any Internet search engine. ...

273

Service Contracts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guidelines for Obtaining Guidelines for Obtaining Best-Practice Contracts for Commercial Buildings Operation and Maintenance Service Contracts Prepared with funding from the U.S. EPA December 1997 PECI Acknowledgements Special thanks to the following people for their ongoing contributions and careful review of the document: Byron Courts, Director of Engineering Services, and Dave Rabon, Chief Engineer, Melvin Mark Pete Degan, Director of Customer Marketing, Landis/Staefa David Fanning, HVAC Coordinator, EXPRESS Bil Pletz, Facility Manager, Intel Mike Sanislow, Service Channel Development Leader, Honeywell Home and Building Karl Stum, Director of Technical Services, PECI Tom Walton, President, United Service Alliance For additional copies of this guidebook, contact: Portland Energy Conservation Inc. (PECI)

274

Novell Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CIS Department CIS Department Novell Services If you don't see the answer to your question here, contact the help desk at 486-HELP or submit a Help Request. Novell Netware is the labs main method of providing file and print services for the PC and Macintosh platforms. Novell end user services are free and include a backed up home directory and access to all distributed printers at LBL. Request a Novell account Request a new Novell printer Request a Novell file restore (choose PC for platform and Backups/Restores for problem) Novell iPrint Accessing Novell File Services Download the LBL Netware client Novell Server Information Novell Departmental Administrative Contacts Novell FAQ: How do I login to the Novell network? 9x | NT4/2000/XP Do I have the Netware client installed? 9x | NT4/2000/XP

275

An Information Services Algorithm to Heuristically Summarize IP Addresses for a Distributed, Hierarchical Directory Service  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

information services algorithm to heuristically summarize IP addresses for a information services algorithm to heuristically summarize IP addresses for a distributed, hierarchical directory service Marcos Portnoi, Martin Swany Department of Computer and Information Sciences University of Delaware Newark, DE 19716, U.S.A. {portnoi, swany}@cis.udel.edu Jason Zurawski Internet2 Washington, DC 20036, U.S.A. zurawski@internet2.edu Abstract- A distributed, hierarchical information service for computer networks might use several service instances, located in different layers. A distributed directory service, for example, might be comprised of upper level listings, and local directories. The upper level listings contain a compact version of the local directories. Clients desiring to access the information contained in local directories might first access the

276

Restructuring local distribution services: Possibilities and limitations  

SciTech Connect

The restructuring of local distribution services is now the focus of the natural gas industry. It is the last major step in the ``reconstitution`` of the natural gas industry and a critical clement in realizing the full benefits of regulatory and market reforms that already have taken place in the wellhead and interstate markets. It could also be the most important regulatory initiative for most end-use customers because they are affected directly by the costs and reliability of distribution services. Several factors contribute to the current emphasis on distribution service restructuring. They include the unbundling and restructuring of upstream markets, a realization of the limitations of supply-side options (such as gas procurement oversight), and the increased diversity and volatility of gas demand facing local distribution companies. Local distribution service is not one but a series of activities that start with commodity gas procurement and extend to transportation, load balancing, storage, and metering and billing of services provided. There are also considerable differences in the economies of scale and scope associated with these various activities. Thus, a mixture of supply arrangements (such as a competitive market or a monopoly) is required for the most efficient delivery of local distribution services. A distinction must be made between the supply of commodity gas and the provision of a bundled distribution service. This distinction and identification of the best supply arrangements for various distribution service components are the most critical factors in developing appropriate restructuring policies. For most state public utility commissions the criteria for service restructuring should include pursuing the economies of scale and scope in gas distribution, differentiating and matching gas service reliability and quality with customer requirements, and controlling costs associated with the search, negotiation, and contracting of gas services.

Duann, D.J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

User Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts for Users Contacts for Users User Services Print The User Services Group is available to aid ALS users before they arrive, while they are here, and after they leave. User Office Experiment Coordination Section Sue Bailey This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it User Services Group Leader Prospective users Proprietary users Tel: 510-486-7727 ALS User Office The User Office is located on the mezzanine of Building 6 (the ALS), Room 2212. Contact Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Tel: 510-486-7745 Fax: 510-486-4773 Address: Advanced Light Source, Berkeley Lab, MS 6-2100, Berkeley, CA 94720 Hours User Office: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and 1.00 p.m. - 5.00 p.m.

278

User Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Contact Home Contact User Services Print The User Services Group is available to aid ALS users before they arrive, while they are here, and after they leave. User Office Experiment Coordination Section Sue Bailey This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it User Services Group Leader Prospective users Proprietary users Tel: 510-486-7727 ALS User Office The User Office is located on the mezzanine of Building 6 (the ALS), Room 2212. Contact Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Tel: 510-486-7745 Fax: 510-486-4773 Address: Advanced Light Source, Berkeley Lab, MS 6-2100, Berkeley, CA 94720 Hours User Office: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and 1.00 p.m. - 5.00 p.m.

279

User Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Services Print User Services Print The User Services Group is available to aid ALS users before they arrive, while they are here, and after they leave. User Office Experiment Coordination Section Sue Bailey This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it User Services Group Leader Prospective users Proprietary users Tel: 510-486-7727 ALS User Office The User Office is located on the mezzanine of Building 6 (the ALS), Room 2212. Contact Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Tel: 510-486-7745 Fax: 510-486-4773 Address: Advanced Light Source, Berkeley Lab, MS 6-2100, Berkeley, CA 94720 Hours User Office: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and 1.00 p.m. - 5.00 p.m. New user registration: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and

280

User Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Services Print User Services Print The User Services Group is available to aid ALS users before they arrive, while they are here, and after they leave. User Office Experiment Coordination Section Sue Bailey This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it User Services Group Leader Prospective users Proprietary users Tel: 510-486-7727 ALS User Office The User Office is located on the mezzanine of Building 6 (the ALS), Room 2212. Contact Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Tel: 510-486-7745 Fax: 510-486-4773 Address: Advanced Light Source, Berkeley Lab, MS 6-2100, Berkeley, CA 94720 Hours User Office: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and 1.00 p.m. - 5.00 p.m. New user registration: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desired end-use services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

User Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Services Print User Services Print The User Services Group is available to aid ALS users before they arrive, while they are here, and after they leave. User Office Experiment Coordination Section Sue Bailey This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it User Services Group Leader Prospective users Proprietary users Tel: 510-486-7727 ALS User Office The User Office is located on the mezzanine of Building 6 (the ALS), Room 2212. Contact Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Tel: 510-486-7745 Fax: 510-486-4773 Address: Advanced Light Source, Berkeley Lab, MS 6-2100, Berkeley, CA 94720 Hours User Office: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and 1.00 p.m. - 5.00 p.m. New user registration: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and

282

User Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Services Print Services Print The User Services Group is available to aid ALS users before they arrive, while they are here, and after they leave. User Office Experiment Coordination Section Sue Bailey This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it User Services Group Leader Prospective users Proprietary users Tel: 510-486-7727 ALS User Office The User Office is located on the mezzanine of Building 6 (the ALS), Room 2212. Contact Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Tel: 510-486-7745 Fax: 510-486-4773 Address: Advanced Light Source, Berkeley Lab, MS 6-2100, Berkeley, CA 94720 Hours User Office: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and 1.00 p.m. - 5.00 p.m. New user registration: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and

283

User Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Services Print Services Print The User Services Group is available to aid ALS users before they arrive, while they are here, and after they leave. User Office Experiment Coordination Section Sue Bailey This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it User Services Group Leader Prospective users Proprietary users Tel: 510-486-7727 ALS User Office The User Office is located on the mezzanine of Building 6 (the ALS), Room 2212. Contact Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Tel: 510-486-7745 Fax: 510-486-4773 Address: Advanced Light Source, Berkeley Lab, MS 6-2100, Berkeley, CA 94720 Hours User Office: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and 1.00 p.m. - 5.00 p.m. New user registration: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and

284

User Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Services Print User Services Print The User Services Group is available to aid ALS users before they arrive, while they are here, and after they leave. User Office Experiment Coordination Section Sue Bailey This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it User Services Group Leader Prospective users Proprietary users Tel: 510-486-7727 ALS User Office The User Office is located on the mezzanine of Building 6 (the ALS), Room 2212. Contact Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Tel: 510-486-7745 Fax: 510-486-4773 Address: Advanced Light Source, Berkeley Lab, MS 6-2100, Berkeley, CA 94720 Hours User Office: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and 1.00 p.m. - 5.00 p.m. New user registration: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and

285

Optical dynamic circuit services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IP service, leased-line service and POTS service have been the three long-standing communication service offerings of providers. Recently, both commercial and research-andeducation network providers have started offering optical dynamic circuit services. ...

Malathi Veeraraghavan; Mark Karol; George Clapp

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience In this study, we examine the arrangements for and experiences of end-use loads providing ancillary services (AS) in five electricity markets: Australia, the United Kingdom (UK), the Nordic market, and the ERCOT and PJM markets in the United States. Our objective in undertaking this review of international experience was to identify specific approaches or market designs that have enabled customer loads to effectively deliver various ancillary services (AS) products. We hope that this report will contribute to the ongoing discussion in the U.S. and elsewhere regarding what institutional and technical developments are needed to ensure that

287

Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience In this study, we examine the arrangements for and experiences of end-use loads providing ancillary services (AS) in five electricity markets: Australia, the United Kingdom (UK), the Nordic market, and the ERCOT and PJM markets in the United States. Our objective in undertaking this review of international experience was to identify specific approaches or market designs that have enabled customer loads to effectively deliver various ancillary services (AS) products. We hope that this report will contribute to the ongoing discussion in the U.S. and elsewhere regarding what institutional and technical developments are needed to ensure that

288

SERVICES Purpose  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Management Memo calls on all state agencies operating state motor vehicles to make every effort to Flex Your Power at the Pump, and lower fuel costs for the State of California through vigorous compliance with the preventative maintenance standards identified in this management memo and in the Automobile Record, Standard (STD.) 271. Background Public Resources Code 25722 mandates the state reduce petroleum consumption of its vehicle fleet to the maximum extent practicable including improved preventative maintenance. State Administrative Manual Section (SAM) 4101 establishes the need to comply with minimum preventative maintenance standards listed in the Automobile Maintenance Record, STD. 271. This includes prescribed services and mechanical inspections that promote state vehicle efficiency and achieve optimum fuel mileage. SAM Section 3687.1 prohibits the purchase of premium grade gasoline for state vehicles. And, directs state drivers to make fuel purchases at lower priced self-service pumps whenever possible.

Manual Sections

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

"Code(a)","End Use","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)"," Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.3;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","for ","Residual","and","Natural","LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)"," Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION",2,3,6,2,4,9

290

Identification, Screening, and Evaluation of New Products and Services: Kansas City Power & Light Company  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study was commissioned to assist Kansas City Power & Light Company (KCP&L) in the identification, screening, and evaluation of new products and services to promote or sell to its end-use customers across all market sectors (e.g., residential, commercial, industrial, and agricultural).

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

291

What's in a Service?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A proper understanding of the general nature, potential and obligations of electronic services may be achieved by examining existing commercial services in detail. The everyday services that surround us, and the ways in which we engage with them, are ... Keywords: electronic services, service description, service properties, service substitution

Justin O'Sullivan; David Edmond; Arthur Ter Hofstede

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience  

SciTech Connect

In this study, we examine the arrangements for and experiences of end-use loads providing ancillary services (AS) in five electricity markets: Australia, the United Kingdom (UK), the Nordic market, and the ERCOT and PJM markets in the United States. Our objective in undertaking this review of international experience was to identify specific approaches or market designs that have enabled customer loads to effectively deliver various ancillary services (AS) products. We hope that this report will contribute to the ongoing discussion in the U.S. and elsewhere regarding what institutional and technical developments are needed to ensure that customer loads can meaningfully participate in all wholesale electricity markets.

Heffner, Grayson; Goldman, Charles; Kintner-Meyer, Michael

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Adapting state and national electricity consumption forecasting methods to utility service areas. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the experiences of six utilities (Florida Power and Light Co., Municipal Electric Authority of Georgia, Philadelphia Electric Co., Public Service Co. of Colorado, Sacramento Municipal Utility District, and TVA) in adapting to their service territories models that were developed for forecasting loads on a national or regional basis. The models examined were of both end-use and econometric design and included the three major customer classes: residential, commercial, and industrial.

Swift, M.A.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Miscellaneous Electricity Services in the Buildings Sector (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Residential and commercial electricity consumption for miscellaneous services has grown significantly in recent years and currently accounts for more electricity use than any single major end-use service in either sector (including space heating, space cooling, water heating, and lighting). In the residential sector, a proliferation of consumer electronics and information technology equipment has driven much of the growth. In the commercial sector, telecommunications and network equipment and new advances in medical imaging have contributed to recent growth in miscellaneous electricity use

Information Center

2007-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

295

Services | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Services Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description Related Links List of Companies in Services Sector Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleServices&oldid...

296

Service Center  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ASSIGNMENTS ASSIGNMENTS Pamela Arias-Ortega - Administrative and judicial litigation; and personnel law and workforce discipline mailto:parias-ortega@doeal.gov Celina Baca - Research and special projects for litigation and general law group mailto:cbaca@doeal.gov Dick Blakely - Designated Agency Ethics Advisor - Administrative litigation and mediation services; and ethics mailto:rblakely@doeal.gov Jonathan Buckner - Administrative review hearings; and administrative hearings before EEOC and MSPB mailto:jbuckner@doeal.gov Sean Counce - Administrative review hearings; and administrative hearings before EEOC and MSPB mailto:scounce@doeal.gov Diana Cruz - Copyright program; intellectual property databases; support for IP issues; and time and attendance mailto:dcruz@doeal.gov

297

What Motivates People to Purchase Digital Items on Virtual Community Websites? The Desire for Online Self-Presentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sale of digital items, such as avatars and decorative objects, is becoming an important source of revenue for virtual community (VC) websites. However, some websites are unable to leverage this source of revenue, and there is a corresponding lack ... Keywords: VC involvement, VC norms, desire for online self-presentation, digital item purchase, online presentation self-efficacy, virtual community

Hee-Woong Kim; Hock Chuan Chan; Atreyi Kankanhalli

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Coverage preserved optimal routing protocol for improving the quality of service in wireless sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In wireless sensor network, there are many hurdles takes place in providing quality of service routing to a desired level. The majority of routing protocols in wireless sensor networks concentrates only on energy efficiency as a prime factor, and only ... Keywords: cluster-head, coverage, energy efficiency, lifetime, multi-path routing, quality of service, self-scheduling

B. Paramasivan; K. Mohaideen Pitchai; D. Usha; S. Radha Krishnan

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Achieving efficiency, quality of service and robustness in multi-organizational Grids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scalability, flexibility, quality of service provisioning, efficiency and robustness are the desired characteristics of most computing systems. Although the emerging Grid computing paradigm is scalable and flexible, achieving both efficiency and quality ... Keywords: Grid middleware, Grid resource management, Grid scheduling, Quality of service in distributed systems, Uncertain runtimes management

Umar Farooq; Shikharesh Majumdar; Eric W. Parsons

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

NIST Measurement Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Standard Reference Materials Laboratory accreditation services (NVLAP) ? DIY You can do it; we can help. ? Services for legal metrology labs ...

2013-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desired end-use services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Biometric Web Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Biometric Web Services. ... This page last updated Thursday, November 14, 2013. Join the Biometric Web Services Mailing List. ...

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

302

On-Site Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the Boulder Laboratories Employees Association ... a variety of health services including emergency ... emergency ambulance service; administration of ...

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

303

Services | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Services Services Diversity and Inclusion Supporting Small Businesses Minority Economic Impact Partnering with Minority Serving Institutions Protecting Civil Rights Integrating...

304

Delaware Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

305

Connecticut Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

306

Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

307

Colorado Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

308

Delaware Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

309

California Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

310

Connecticut Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

311

Mississippi Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

312

Minnesota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

313

Michigan Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

314

Minnesota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

315

Arizona Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

316

Nevada Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

317

Arizona Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

318

Ohio Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

319

Montana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

320

Minnesota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desired end-use services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Idaho Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

322

California Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

323

Arkansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

324

Indiana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

325

Oregon Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

326

Mississippi Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

327

Kentucky Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

328

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

329

Florida Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

330

Idaho Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

331

Massachusetts Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

332

Nebraska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

333

Maryland Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

334

Maryland Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

335

Missouri Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

336

Missouri Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

337

Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

338

Kansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

339

Wyoming Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

340

Oklahoma Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desired end-use services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Delaware Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

342

Ohio Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

343

Utah Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

344

Minnesota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

345

Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

346

Missouri Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

347

Delaware Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

348

Alabama Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

349

Missouri Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

350

Alabama Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

351

Kentucky Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

352

Nebraska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

353

Maine Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

354

California Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

355

Georgia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

356

Florida Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

357

Arkansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

358

Massachusetts Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

359

Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

360

Louisiana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desired end-use services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Maine Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

362

Maryland Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

363

Nebraska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

364

Colorado Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

365

Arkansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

366

Tennessee Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

367

Oregon Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

368

Michigan Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

369

Nebraska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

370

Utah Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

371

Washington Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

372

Montana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

373

Kentucky Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

374

Nevada Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

375

Kansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

376

Georgia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

377

Colorado Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

378

Montana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

379

Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

380

Florida Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desired end-use services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

California Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

382

Hawaii Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

383

Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

384

Kansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

385

Kansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

386

Michigan Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

387

Georgia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5,188 5,986 6,717 8,473 10,477 1997-2011 Volumes Delivered to Consumers 435,919 419,057 456,082 521,557 512,398 NA 1997-2012 Residential 111,895 119,375 118,589 138,671 113,335...

388

Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Use 89,666 109,488 117,219 79,817 85,909 1997-2011 Volumes Delivered to Consumers 3,133,456 3,128,339 2,947,542 3,185,011 3,257,956 3,376,525 1997-2012 Residential 199,802 192,750...

389

Wisconsin Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Mar-13 Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers...

390

Iowa Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption 293,274 325,772 315,186...

391

,"Iowa Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

35200,,4187,2734 35231,,2343,1664 35261,,1663,1212 35292,,1610,1080 35323,,1954,1926 35353,,3620,2101 35384,,9782,5896 35414,,14138,8510 35445,,17671,10143...

392

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

40283,15864,2749,3049,6944,1,3120 40313,16658,1033,2089,6364,1,7170 40344,21404,775,1954,6042,1,12631 40374,23271,638,1863,5968,1,14801 40405,25745,625,1962,6046,1,17112...

393

,"Washington Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

37057,18345,3025,2686,5621,,7013 37087,18349,2008,2089,5600,,8652 37118,16283,1656,1954,5436,,7236 37149,15107,1780,1949,5507,,5871 37179,23527,5692,4179,7892,,5763...

394

,"Wisconsin Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

33739,,6373,3632 33770,,3681,1986 33800,,2604,1759 33831,,2662,1615 33862,,3229,1954 33892,,7630,4108 33923,,13233,7918 33953,,19080,11087 33984,,23133,12658...

395

Illinois Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

396

Illinois Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Gas volumes ...

397

Colorado Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Gas volumes ...

398

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Gas volumes ...

399

Idaho Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan...

400

Ohio Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Gas volumes ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desired end-use services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Vermont Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Gas volumes ...

402

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning '(Facility HVAC)' excludes" "steam and hot water." " NFNo applicable RSE rowcolumn factor." " * Estimate less than 0.5." "...

403

Michigan Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Gas volumes ...

404

Hawaii Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

405

Louisiana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

406

Tennessee Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

407

Mississippi Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

408

Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

409

Michigan Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

410

Wisconsin Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Gas volumes ...

411

Washington Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

412

Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey...

413

Wisconsin Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey...

414

Maryland Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

415

Oklahoma Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey...

416

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

417

Massachusetts Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

418

Indiana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

419

Vermont Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

420

Utah Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Gas volumes ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desired end-use services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Kentucky Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5,238 2,181 1,275 1,115 NA 1989-2013 Industrial 10,024 10,520 9,243 8,662 8,083 7,801 2001-2013 Vehicle Fuel 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010-2013 Electric Power 837 2,060 1,486 1,717 950 2,873...

422

Idaho Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,202 1,743 1,281 813 681 630 1989-2013 Industrial 2,480 2,496 2,294 2,297 2,177 1,930 2001-2013 Vehicle Fuel 6 7 7 7 7 7 2010-2013 Electric Power 1,246 1,645 801 1,155 1,628 2,945...

423

Maine Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,025 NA NA 411 290 288 1989-2013 Industrial 2,477 2,442 1,948 2,155 2,111 2,221 2001-2013 Vehicle Fuel 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010-2013 Electric Power 1,270 1,779 1,657 1,383 1,775 2,18...

424

Iowa Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7,141 4,376 2,454 1,770 1,735 1989-2013 Industrial 14,103 15,326 13,493 13,477 13,182 12,556 2001-2013 Vehicle Fuel 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010-2013 Electric Power 739 748 529 836 745 2,273...

425

Florida Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,424 4,002 4,172 1989-2013 Industrial 8,641 9,567 8,625 8,821 7,645 7,714 2001-2013 Vehicle Fuel 5 6 6 6 6 6 2010-2013 Electric Power 75,875 77,927 79,903 86,424 96,667...

426

Connecticut Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

NA 5,548 3,562 2,093 1,925 1,989 1989-2013 Industrial NA NA NA 2,170 1,910 2,045 2001-2013 Vehicle Fuel 4 4 4 4 4 4 2010-2013 Electric Power 8,519 9,143 8,518 9,607 8,698 11,622...

427

Illinois Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7,454 7,492 1989-2013 Industrial 26,585 27,944 23,016 20,312 20,031 19,639 2001-2013 Vehicle Fuel 26 29 28 29 28 29 2010-2013 Electric Power 2,838 5,507 4,738 4,315 3,534...

428

Hawaii Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

50 48 49 50 50 47 1989-2013 Commercial 151 143 151 164 159 160 1989-2013 Industrial 28 26 42 37 33 30 2001-2013 Vehicle Fuel 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010-2013 Electric Power -- -- -- -- -- --...

429

Wisconsin Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

430

Alabama Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

431

Connecticut Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

432

Vermont Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

433

Wyoming Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

434

Arizona Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

435

Montana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

436

Massachusetts Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

437

Maine Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

438

Indiana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

439

Arkansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

440

Mississippi Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desired end-use services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Indiana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

442

Job Interactivity Using A Steering Service In An  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grid computing has been dominated by the execution of batch jobs. Interactive data analysis is a new domain in the area of grid job execution. The Grid-Enabled Analysis Environment (GAE) [1] attempts to address this in HEP grids by the use of a Steering Service. This service will provide physicists with the continuous feedback of their jobs and will provide them with the ability to control and steer the execution of their submitted jobs. It will enable them to move their jobs to different grid nodes when desired. The Steering Service will also act autonomously to make steering decisions on behalf of the user, attempting to optimize the execution of the job . This service will also ensure the optimal consumption of the Grid user's resource quota. The Steering Service will provide a web service interface defined by standard WSDL .

Interactive Grid Analysis; Arshad Ali; Ashiq Anjum; Julian Bunn; Richard Cavanaugh; Frank Van Lingen; Richard Mcclatchey; Harvey Newman; Conrad Steenberg; Michael Thomas; Muhammad Adeel Zafar

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Confidentiality and the Desire for Open Communication in the Transport of Radioactive Material to a National Repository  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Confidentiality, Security and Confidentiality, Security and Confidentiality, Security and Confidentiality, Security and the Desire for Open the Desire for Open Communication in the Communication in the Transport of Radioactive Transport of Radioactive Material to a National Material to a National Repository Repository A presentation to the A presentation to the DOE Transportation External Coordination (TEC) DOE Transportation External Coordination (TEC) Working Group Meeting Working Group Meeting Albuquerque, NM Albuquerque, NM 21 21 - - 23 April 2004 23 April 2004 Ronald B. Pope Consultant April 2004 April 2004 Confidentiality Confidentiality - - TEC Working TEC Working Group Group - - Albuquerque Albuquerque 2 2 Objectives Objectives Address and prompt TEC discussion on issues Address and prompt TEC discussion on issues

444

Method of manipulating the chemical properties of water to improve the effectiveness of a desired chemical process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The method of the present invention is adapted to manipulate the chemical properties of water in order to improve the effectiveness of a desired chemical process. The method involves heating the water in the vessel to subcritical temperatures between 100.degree. to 374.degree. C. while maintaining sufficient pressure to the water to maintain the water in the liquid state. Various physiochemical properties of the water can be manipulated including polarity, solute solubility, surface tension, viscosity, and the disassociation constant. The method of the present invention has various uses including extracting organics from solids and semisolids such as soil, selectively extracting desired organics from nonaqueous liquids, selectively separating organics using sorbent phases, enhancing reactions by controlling the disassociation constant of water, cleaning waste water, and removing organics from water using activated carbon or other suitable sorbents.

Hawthorne, Steven B. (Grand Forks, ND); Miller, David J. (Grand Forks, ND); Yang, Yu (Greenville, NC); Lagadec, Arnaud Jean-Marie (Grand Forks, ND)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Career Services Pricing Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Job/Resume Posting and Prices Career Services Pricing Information Career Services Career Services chemistry jobs classifieds employment fats global help wanted job Jobs member membership network oils science jobs ...

446

Transportation fuels and engines for optimum energy utilization: An assessment of energy consumption from resources through end use: Final report, Volume 1, August 1985 for the project, Technical assessment of future engines and alternative fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was initiated to investigate the potential for improving the resource utilization efficiency in the manufacture and end-use of fuels for transportation. While emphasis is placed on the development of fuels from coal and oil shale and on the engine technologies most suitable for those fuels, petroleum-derived fuels are considered as well. A necessary part of this study was to develop information about the energy efficiency of various steps of fuel processing, both with synthetic fuels and petroleum. The configurations of synthetic fuel processes and petroleum refineries are, of course, seemingly endless in number, so, in order to keep the study at a manageable and affordable scope, only a very limited number of synthetic fuel processes were investigated in detail and only major upgrading process operations were included.

Thomas, R.L.; Cornell, J.J.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

A flexible service selection for executing virtual services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the adoption of a service-oriented paradigm on the Web, many software services are likely to fulfil similar functional needs for end-users. We propose to aggregate functionally equivalent software services within one single virtual service, that ... Keywords: marketplace, service aggregation, service discovery, service selection, service selector, virtual service

Nassim Laga; Emmanuel Bertin; Noel Crespi; Ivan Bedini; Benjamin Molina; Zhenzhen Zhao

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

NIST Internet Time Service  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... All services available. ntp-nist.ldsbc.edu, 198.60.73.8, LDSBC, Salt Lake City, Utah, All services available. nist1-lv.ustiming ...

449

Rates and Repayment Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rates Loveland Area Project Firm Power Rates Transmission and Ancillary Services Rates 2012 Rate Adjustment-Transmission and Ancillary Services 2010 Rate Adjustment-Firm Power 2009...

450

ORISE: Health physics services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health physics services Nuclear power plant The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) offers comprehensive health physics services in a number of technical areas...

451

Topic: Service Life Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topic: Service Life Prediction. Event. 24th NIST Computer Modeling Workshop. ... Service Life Prediction of Polymeric Materials: Vision for the Future. ...

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

452

ORNL Health Services Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Page ORNL Home | ESH&Q Home | Health Services Internal A division in the Environment, Safety, Health, and Quality Directorate The Health Services Division at Oak Ridge...

453

Improving thermocouple service life in slagging gasifiers  

SciTech Connect

The measurement of temperature within slagging gasifiers for long periods of time is difficult/impossible because of sensor failure or blockage of inputs used to monitor gasifier temperature. One of the most common means of temperature measurement in a gasifier is physically, through the use of thermocouples in a gasifier sidewall. These units can fail during startup, standby, or during the first 40-90 days of gasifier service. Failure can be caused by a number of issues; including thermocouple design, construction, placement in the gasifier, gasifier operation, and molten slag attack of the materials used in a thermocouple assembly. Lack of temperature control in a gasifier can lead to improper preheating, slag buildup on gasifier sidewalls, slag attack of gasifier refractories used to line a gasifier, or changes in desired gas output from a gasifier. A general outline of thermocouple failure issues and attempts by the Albany Research Center to improve the service life of thermocouples will be discussed.

Bennett, James P.; Kwong, Kyei-Sing; Powell, Cynthia A.; Thomas, Hugh; Krabbe, Rick

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Service Life Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prediction of Service Life of Reinforced Concrete Structure Exposed to Chlorides. Please supply the following parameters ...

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

455

Making Web services tradable  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In service-oriented architectures, applications are developed by incorporating services which are often provided by different organizations. Since a service might be offered under different configurations by various different organizations, sophisticated ... Keywords: Automated negotiations, Preferences for functional/non-functional properties, Web service policies

Sudhir Agarwal; Steffen Lamparter; Rudi Studer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

National and Racial Identity and the Desire for Expansion: A Study of American Travel Narratives, 1790-1850  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation aims to investigate the shaping of a national literature within travel narratives written by William Bartram, Washington Irving, George Catlin, Thomas L. McKenney, Thomas Jefferson Farnham, and Francis Parkman. I focus attention on two issues: (1) National and racial identity, and (2) Territorial, cultural, and capitalist expansionism. National and racial identity construction is examined by clarifying how the narratives underlying voicesthe National Symbolic and the Racial Symbolicencourage the reading public to embrace the values vital in forging American collective identity. Identity invention is also seen in romantic representations of the American landscape and Native Americans. Between 1790 and 1850, the widespread trope of the Noble Savage and distantiation working in the Burkean aesthetics of the sublime were used as ideological frames for viewing Others, crucial in defining the American self by making the white Americans shift of association/dissociation with their primitivized Others possible. In order to analyze the narratives representation of expansionism as a national desire, this study investigates how romantic rhetoric and the appeal to morality (or the Law) were employed as decisive ideological foundations for rationalizing expansionism. Chapter I establishes the legitimacy of evaluating travel narratives as a significant part of Americas national literature. Chapter II reveals that democracy, masculine robustness, and the myth that Americans are a chosen people of progress are featured aspects in the portrayals of American pathfinders. Chapter III shows that the racial identity of civilized whites is forged in accordance with a miscegenation taboo informing negative portrayals of half-breeds and racial boundary crossing. Chapter IV illustrates that American freedom, simplicity, wholesome civilization, and youthfulness are presented as national characteristics through adapting the romantic tropes of the Noble Savage and the aesthetics of the sublime. Chapter V investigates the perverse mode of desiring in the iterative triangular relationship between romanticism, morality, and expansionismthe nations civilizing project par excellence. Chapter VI appraises the travel narratives roles in defining American selfhood and reflecting (and promoting) an imperialistic desire for expansion.

Jeong, Jin Man

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Service Water Piping Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the years 1988 and 1989, EPRI organized the Service Water Working Group (SWWG) to identify and help resolve the many issues surrounding service water (SW) systems in nuclear power plants. One issue identified by the SWWG was corrosion in service water piping systems. Interest in this issue resulted in the development of several technical reports: Guidelines for the Repair/Replacement Welding of Nuclear Service Water Systems, TR-100386; Guide for the Examination of Service Water System Piping, TR-10206...

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

458

Food Service Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Service Service Characteristics by Activity... Food Service Food service buildings are those used for preparation and sale of food and beverages for consumption. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Food Service Buildings... An overwhelming majority (72 percent) of food service buildings were small buildings (1,001 to 5,000 square feet). Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics Number of Food Service Buildings by Predominant Building Size Categories Figure showing number of food service buildings by size. If you need assistance viewing this page, please contact 202-586-8800. Equipment Table: Buildings, Size, and Age Data by Equipment Types Predominant Heating Equipment Types in Food Service Buildings

459

End-Use Consumption of Electricity by End Use and Appliance  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Residential Home > Special Topics > Figure 1. Percent of Total Electricity Consumption in U.S. Housing Units, 2001 . Contact. Chip Berry

460

End-Use Consumption of Electricity by End Use and Appliance  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Furnace Fan: 76.3 . 500 g . 38.2. 3.3. Dishwasher: 56.7 . 512 l. 29.0. 2.5. Electric Range Top c: 59.7 . 536 g . 32.0. 2.8. Electric Oven d: 47.8 . 440 g . 21.0. 1.8 ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desired end-use services" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Computer Based Training (CBT) - American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) CBT for Service Water System Engineers v1.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) requirements for Service Water System Engineers, Version 1.0 is a computer-based training module that allows users to access training when desired and review it at their own pace.This computer-based training (CBT) course's objective is to introduce students to ASME requirements associated with service water systems, and in particular, service water piping systems. The student will first learn about the design criteria used to ...

2013-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

462

DOE Grids Service Transition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Grids Service Transition DOE Grids Service Transition Services Overview ECS Audio/Video Conferencing Fasterdata IPv6 Network Network Performance Tools (perfSONAR) ESnet OID Registry PGP Key Service Virtual Circuits (OSCARS) DOE Grids Service Transition Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside the US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside the US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net DOE Grids Service Transition Background ESnet has decided to transition support and management for the certificate services provided by the DOE Grids public key infrastructure (PKI) to the Open Sciences Grid (OSG). OSG and ESnet provide service to many of the same user communities, and have long been collaborators in the areas of identity

463

Processing Distinguished Service Award  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Award honoring outstanding, meritorious service to the oilseed processing industry. Processing Distinguished Service Award Processing agricultural algae algal analytical aocs articles biomass biotechnology By-product Utilization courses detergents divisi

464

Web services @ MIT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are several useful web services developed at MIT by students, faculty and researchers. However, they are scattered all over MIT. Most people at MIT are unaware of the availability of these web services and hence they ...

Tyagi, Sapna DevendraSingh, 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Grammatical framework web service  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a web service for natural language parsing, prediction, generation, and translation using grammars in Portable Grammar Format (PGF), the target format of the Grammatical Framework (GF) grammar compiler. The web service implementation is open ...

Bjrn Bringert; Krasimir Angelov; Aarne Ranta

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Towards Service Description Logics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Semantic service description and matchmaking are needed in embedded and disappearing computing, cooperative multiagent systems, and the semantic web. Standard program semantics formalizations are not suited to modeling service semantics, because they ... Keywords: description logics, semantic web

Piero A. Bonatti

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

ORNL DAAC User Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Services Ready to Answer Your Questions The ORNL DAAC's User Services Office is the first point of contact for answering your questions concerning data and information held by...

468

MSID Products, Tools, & Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SID Products, Tools, & Services. XML Testbed - collection of XML-Related Tools; Express Engine - STEP (ISO 10303) development ...

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

469

Legend Technical Services, Inc.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Legend Technical Services, Inc. NVLAP Lab Code: 102081-0. Address and Contact Information: 88 Empire Drive St. Paul ...

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

470

Accountability as a service  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose that accountability be a first-class network service, independent of addressing and routing. We design a scheme for allowing accountability services, rather than connectivity-providing ISPs, to vouch for traffic, allowing victims to report abuse, filter abusive traffic, and isolate malicious senders. We discuss how accountability services may evolve, how they may facilitate new applications, and the implications of shifting the burden of network policing to a dedicated service. 1

Adam Bender; Neil Spring; Dave Levin; Bobby Bhattacharjee

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

NSIT Computer Time Services: Internet Time Service (ITS) ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. NIST Special Publication 250-59 NIST Computer Time Services: Internet Time Service (ITS), Automated Computer Time Service (ACTS), ...

2012-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

472

Initial orientation effect and selecting desired events in 520AMeV/u U-U collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How to select out those collisions with the desired geometry such as tip-tip and/or body-body in experiment is one key point for performing high energy UU collisions. With a relativistic transport model, we performed a simulation for deformed UU collision with vast different orientations at CSR energy area corresponding to the high net-baryon density region in QCD phase diagram. By investigating the centrality and initial collision orientation dependence of the center baryon density, we found that the tip-tip like UU collisions with extended high density phase, which is very important for studying the nuclear EoS of high baryon density matter and the possible end-point of the phase boundary, are those events with small initial orientations ($\\leq20^{0}$) for bath projectile and target in reaction plane and small impact parameter ($\\leq2.6fm$). We pointed out quantificationally two observations -- multiplicity of forward neutron and nuclear stopping power that both allows us to select out those most interesting events (i.e. tip-tip like), which will be very helpful for the future experiments at performing UU collisions.

K. J. Wu; F. Liu; N. Xu

2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

473

Outstanding Service Award  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Outstanding Service Award is awarded in even-numbered years to recognize a career of outstanding service to ACM SIGGRAPH by a volunteer. It recognizes an individual who has given extraordinary service to ACM SIGGRAPH, both in the trenches and in ...

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Broadband and universal service  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Section 254(b)(3) of the 1996 Telecommunications Act established the objective that residents of rural areas should have access to advanced telecommunications and information services comparable to services in urban areas. Pursuant to the passage of ... Keywords: Broadband policy, Empirical analysis, Rural, Telecommunications policy, Universal service

David Gabel

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of InternationalExperience-- Technical Appendix: Market Descriptions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, we examine the arrangements for andexperiences of end-use loads providing ancillary services (AS) in fiveelectricity markets: Australia, the United Kingdom (UK), the Nordicmarket, and the ERCOT and PJM markets in the United States. Our objectivein undertaking this review of international experience was to identifyspecific approaches or market designs that have enabled customer loads toeffectively deliver various ancillary services (AS) products. We hopethat this report will contribute to the ongoing discussion in the U.S.and elsewhere regarding what institutional and technical developments areneeded to ensure that customer loads can meaningfully participate in allwholesale electricity markets.

Grayson Heffner, Charles Goldman, Kintner-Meyer, M; Kirby, Brendan

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Services | Central Fabrication Services | Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Services & Capabilities Services & Capabilities The Central Fabrication Services Division's capabilities range from an Electric Discharge Machining (EDM) capability, to a state of the art cleaning facility, to a large fabricating facility which includes CNC Machining, Automatic Tube Welding, CNC Punch Press capability, and 3-D printing. CNC Auto Feed Saw High Bay Area 3-D Printer Main Shop, Building 479 Maintenance Sheet Metal Area Water Jet Machine X-ray Generating Tube CR X-ray Processor with High Resolution Monitor Low Bay Area in Machine Shop Wire EDM Machine Wire EDM Machine Oil Recycling Facility, Building 495 UHV Cleaning Facility, Building 498 Material Storage and Stock Central Fabrication Services is proud of it's highly proficient technical staff all of which are available, at no cost to the customer, for

477

NSLS Services | Repair & Equipment Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Repair & Equipment Services Repair & Equipment Services Cleaning Facility (BNL Central Shops) Solvent cleaning of vacuum parts and leak checking service is also available. Work is billed to each user via a BNL ILR. Contact the NSLS Building Manager to arrange for any of these services. Electronics Repair Limited repairs for electronic equipment are available from an outside contractor through the Control Room. Contact Control Room Supervisor Randy Church (x2550 or x2736, pager 5310). Shipping memos are filled out on the web, and pick ups are on Fridays. Come to the Control Room for assistance. The user should call the contractor on the day before scheduled pickups to alert the contractor of the pickup. Items to be repaired should be left in the Control Room with the completed shipping memo. Costs are charged to the

478

Internal Audit Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Internal Audit Services Internal Audit Services Berkeley Lab Internal Audit Services Internal Audit Services Berkeley Lab Contacts Organizational Chart IAS Search Staff Only Lab Search Phone Book A-Z Index Privacy and Security Notice "Internal Auditing is an independent, objective assurance and consulting activity designed to add value and improve an organization's operations. It helps an organization accomplish its objectives by bringing a systematic, disciplined approach to evaluate and improve the effectiveness of risk management, control and governance processes." The Institute of Internal Auditors Standards for the Professional Practice of Internal Auditing About IAS | Audit Committee | Audit Planning | Ethics & Investigations | External Audit Coordination Advisory Services | Other Relevant Audit Links | Contacts | Organizational

479

China Information Service Offered  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

China Information Service Offered China Information Service Offered The Energy Analysis Program is proposing to launch a multiclient service, tentatively called the China Energy Information Service, that would draw upon EAP's extensive research on China's energy sector and its strong working relationships with Chinese policymakers and researchers. The service would provide private U.S. firms with the information they need to market their energy-related products, technologies, and services in China. For an annual fee of less than $15,000, participants would be entitled to: Annual updates of EAP's China Databook covering China's energy supply, use, investment, and other related statistics. Bimonthly topical reports on subjects to be chosen in consultation with advisory committees composed of the service's subscribers.

480

National Service Activation Checklist  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Service Activation Checklist Service Activation Checklist You have just received information that you are being activated for national service. Covered or Not Covered If you have received notice to report for active duty - Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, National Guard, Public Health Service, or Coast Guard and you are a Federal employee, you have employment and reemployment rights under the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Act of 1994 (USERRA). Basics - Telling People What is Happening 1. Have you told your spouse, family, best friend, or someone else who is important to you? Point of Contact for Department of Energy Use: Name: Telephone Number: E-mail: 2. Go to Employee Self-Service and make sure your personal information is up to date.