Sample records for designated ground water

  1. Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    Bear Snow Vegetation RhinoWater Vegetation Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Rhino Water Rhino Water Ground Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Vegetation Rhino Vegetation Ground Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky

  2. Ground and Water Source Heat Pump Performance and Design for Southern Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavanaugh, S.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground and water source heat pump systems have very attractive performance characteristics when properly designed and installed. These systems typically consist of a water-to-air or water-to-water heat pump linked to a closed loop vertical...

  3. Ground and Water Source Heat Pump Performance and Design for Southern Climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavanaugh, S.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground and water source heat pump systems have very attractive performance characteristics when properly designed and installed. These systems typically consist of a water-to-air or water-to-water heat pump linked to a closed loop vertical...

  4. Designated Ground Water Basin Map | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision hasda62829c05bGabbs ValleyWind Power JumpDesignated

  5. Ground Water Management Act (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under the Ground Water Management Act of 1992, Virginia manages ground water through a program regulating the withdrawals in certain areas called Ground Water Management Areas (GWMA). Currently,...

  6. GROUND WATER CONTAMINATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As required by the terms of the above referenced grant, the following summary serves as the Final Report for that grant. The grant relates to work performed at two separate sites, the Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Site south of Gillette, Wyoming, and the Rock Springs In-Situ Oil Shale Retort Site near Rock Springs, Wyoming. The primary concern to the State of Wyoming at each site is ground water contamination (the primary contaminants of concern are benzene and related compounds), and the purpose of the grant has been to provide tiding for a Geohydrologist at the appropriate State agency, specifically the Land Quality Division (LQD) of the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality. The LQD Geohydrologist has been responsible for providing technical and regulatory support to DOE for ground water remediation and subsequent surface reclamation. Substantial progress has been made toward remediation of the sites, and continuation of LQD involvement in the remediation and reclamation efforts is addressed.

  7. Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for crops and water for indus- tries. It is also connected to surface waters, and maintains the flow of rivers and streams and the level of wetlands- tion of those along Lake Michigan, most communi- ties, farms and industries still rely on ground water

  8. Hanford site ground water protection management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground water protection at the Hanford Site consists of preventative and remedial measures that are implemented in compliance with a variety of environmental regulations at local, state, and federal levels. These measures seek to ensure that the resource can sustain a broad range of beneficial uses. To effectively coordinate and ensure compliance with applicable regulations, the U.S. Department of Energy has issued DOE Order 5400.1 (DOE 1988a). This order requires all U.S. Department of Energy facilities to prepare separate ground water protection program descriptions and plans. This document describes the Ground Water Protection Management Plan (GPMP) for the Hanford Site located in the state of Washington. DOE Order 5400.1 specifies that the GPMP covers the following general topical areas: (1) documentation of the ground water regime; (2) design and implementation of a ground water monitoring program to support resource management and comply with applicable laws and regulations; (3) a management program for ground water protection and remediation; (4) a summary and identification of areas that may be contaminated with hazardous waste; (5) strategies for controlling hazardous waste sources; (6) a remedial action program; and (7) decontamination, decommissioning, and related remedial action requirements. Many of the above elements are currently covered by existing programs at the Hanford Site; thus, one of the primary purposes of this document is to provide a framework for coordination of existing ground water protection activities. The GPMP provides the ground water protection policy and strategies for ground water protection/management at the Hanford Site, as well as an implementation plan to improve coordination of site ground water activities.

  9. Ground water protection management program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 requires the establishment of a ground water protection management program to ensure compliance with DOE requirements and applicable federal, state, and local laws and regulations. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office was prepared this Ground Water Protection Management Program Plan (ground water protection plan) whose scope and detail reflect the program`s significance and address the seven activities required in DOE Order 5400.1, Chapter III, for special program planning. This ground water protection plan highlights the methods designed to preserve, protect, and monitor ground water resources at UMTRA Project processing and disposal sites. The plan includes an overview of the remedial action status at the 24 designated processing sites and identifies technical guidance documents and site-specific documents for the UMTRA Project ground water protection management program. In addition, the plan addresses the general information required to develop a water resources protection strategy at the permanent disposal sites. Finally, the plan describes ongoing activities that are in various stages of development at UMTRA Project sites.

  10. Ground Water Management Regulations (Louisiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The rules and regulations apply to the management of the state's ground water resources. In addition, the Commissioner of Conservation has recommended that oil and gas operators with an interest...

  11. Water Rights: Ground Water (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the policy of the state to provide for the conservation of groundwater resources and limit groundwater waste. The Indiana Department of Natural Resources may designate restricted use areas...

  12. Case Study/ Ground Water Sustainability: Methodology and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Chunmiao

    , or the lack thereof, of ground water flow systems driven by similar hydrogeologic and economic conditionsCase Study/ Ground Water Sustainability: Methodology and Application to the North China Plain of a ground water flow system in the North China Plain (NCP) subject to severe overexploitation and rapid

  13. Montana Ground Water Assessment Act (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute establishes a program to systematically assess and monitor the state's ground water and to disseminate the information to interested persons in order to improve the quality of ground...

  14. Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dresel, P.E.; Thorne, P.D.; Luttrell, S.P. [and others

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1994 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiologic and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1994 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1993 and June 1994. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal.

  15. Natural restoration of ground water in UCG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humenick, M.J.; Britton, L.N.; Mattox, C.F.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground water contamination from underground coal gasification (UCG) has been documented at several field tests in Texas and Wyoming. However, monitoring data following the termination of gasification operations has shown that contaminant concentrations decrease with time, apparently because of natural processes. This research evaluates the probable natural mechanisms for the reduction of organic contaminant concentrations in ground water. Results indicated that biological degradation and adsorption could be a significant mechanism for removal of organics from ground waters. 12 refs.

  16. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado. Attachment 3, Ground water hydrology report: Preliminary final

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established health and environmental protection regulations to correct and prevent ground water contamination resulting from processing activities at inactive uranium milling sites (52 FR 36000 (1987)). According to the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, 42 USC {section}7901 et seq., the US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for assessing the inactive uranium processing sites. The DOE has determined that for Slick Rock, this assessment shall include hydrogeologic site characterization for two separate uranium processing sites, the Union Carbide (UC) site and the North Continent (NC) site, and for the proposed Burro Canyon disposal site. The water resources protection strategy that describes how the proposed action will comply with the EPA ground water protection standards is presented in Attachment 4. The following site characterization activities are discussed in this attachment: Characterization of the hydrogeologic environment, including hydrostratigraphy, ground water occurrence, aquifer parameters, and areas of recharge and discharge. Characterization of existing ground water quality by comparison with background water quality and the maximum concentration limits (MCL) of the proposed EPA ground water protection standards. Definition of physical and chemical characteristics of the potential contaminant source, including concentration and leachability of the source in relation to migration in ground water and hydraulically connected surface water. Description of local water resources, including current and future use, availability, and alternative supplies.

  17. Special Section on Ground Water Research in China Featured in This Issue of Ground Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    of Ground Water by Xun Zhou1, Jiu J. Jiao2, and Mary P. Anderson3 Contained in this issue of Ground Water, Groundwater Resources and the Related Environ- Hydrogeologic Problems in China, Beijing: Seismological Press

  18. Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dresel, P.E.; Luttrell, S.P.; Evans, J.C. [and others

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1993 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiological and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1993 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1992 and June 1993. The greatest declines occurred in the 200-West Area. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal. Water levels remained nearly constant in the vicinity of B Pond, as a result of continued disposal to the pond. Water levels measured from wells in the unconfined aquifer north and east of the Columbia River indicate that the primary source of recharge is irrigation practices.

  19. Proceedings of the National Groundwater National Ground Water Association Southwest focused ground water conference: Discussing the issue of MTBE and perchlorate in the ground water, Anaheim, CA, June 3-4, pp:87-90.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ground water conference: Discussing the issue of MTBE and perchlorate in the ground water, Anaheim, CA

  20. Ground Water Protection Act (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the Ground Water Protection Act is to provide substantive provisions and funding mechanisms to the extent that funds are available to enable the state to take corrective action at...

  1. International Borders, Ground Water Flow, and Hydroschizophrenia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, Aaron

    International Borders, Ground Water Flow, and Hydroschizophrenia by Todd Jarvis1,2, Mark Giordano3 of Geosciences, 104 Wilkinson Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331 2Corresponding author: todd.jarvis@oregonstate.edu 3

  2. Integrated Water Management Options in the Nebraska Ground Water Management &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    ag chemical best management practices 7. soil testing 8. voluntary or mandatory educational programs regulate ground water development (well spacing regulations, well drilling prohibitions) and ground water by implementing the above GMA regulations, well drilling may be halted or conditioned. NRD permits are required

  3. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive Uranium Mill Tailing site Maybell, Colorado. Attachment 3, ground water hydrology report, Attachment 4, water resources protection strategy. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established health and environmental regulations to correct and prevent ground water contamination resulting from former uranium processing activities at inactive uranium processing sites (40 CFR Part 192 (1993)) (52 FR 36000 (1978)). According to the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978 (42 USC {section} 7901 et seq.), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for assessing the inactive uranium processing sites. The DOE has decided that each assessment will include information on hydrogeologic site characterization. The water resources protection strategy that describes the proposed action compliance with the EPA ground water protection standards is presented in Attachment 4, Water Resources Protection Strategy. Site characterization activities discussed in this section include the following: (1) Definition of the hydrogeologic characteristics of the environment, including hydrostratigraphy, aquifer parameters, areas of aquifer recharge and discharge, potentiometric surfaces, and ground water velocities. (2) Definition of background ground water quality and comparison with proposed EPA ground water protection standards. (3) Evaluation of the physical and chemical characteristics of the contaminant source and/or residual radioactive materials. (4) Definition of existing ground water contamination by comparison with the EPA ground water protection standards. (5) Description of the geochemical processes that affect the migration of the source contaminants at the processing site. (6) Description of water resource use, including availability, current and future use and value, and alternate water supplies.

  4. Selenium in Oklahoma ground water and soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atalay, A.; Vir Maggon, D.

    1991-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Selenium with a consumption of 2 liters per day (5). The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine the concentrations of Se in Oklahoma ground water and soil samples. (2) to map the geographical distribution of Se species in Oklahoma. (3) to relate groundwater depth, pH and geology with concentration of Se.

  5. Factors controlling tungsten concentrations in ground water, Carson Desert, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Factors controlling tungsten concentrations in ground water, Carson Desert, Nevada Ralph L. Seiler sources. Tungsten concentrations in 100 ground water samples from all aquifers used as drinking water indicates that W exhibits Tungsten con- centrations are strongly and positively correlated

  6. african ground water: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    has Rossi, Vivien 10 Integrated Water Management Options in the Nebraska Ground Water Management & Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Integrated Water...

  7. DEVELOPMENTS IN GROUND WATER HYDROLOGY : AN OVERVIEW C. P. Kumar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, C.P.

    . Surface water storage and ground water withdrawal are traditional engineering approaches which of storage and circulation as ground water. The large alluvial tract extending over 2000 km in length from which allows ground water storage in the weathered residium and its circulation in the underlying

  8. Basic Ground-Water Hydrology By RALPH C. HEATH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    #12;Basic Ground-Water Hydrology By RALPH C. HEATH Prepared in cooperation with the North Carolina., 1983, Basic ground-water hydrology: U .S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 2220, 86 p. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publications Data Heath, Ralph C . Basic ground-water hydrology (Geological Survey

  9. Regional Estimation of Total Recharge to Ground Water in Nebraska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szilagyi, Jozsef

    )over long periods of time when the potential change in ground water storage becomes negligible compared storage other than discharge to streams. One such loss term is evapotranspiration (ET) from ground waterRegional Estimation of Total Recharge to Ground Water in Nebraska by Jozsef Szilagyi1m2,F. Edwin

  10. Hanford Site ground-water surveillance for 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, J.C.; Bryce, R.W.; Bates, D.J.; Kemner, M.L.

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report of ground-water surveillance activities provides discussions and listings of results for ground-water monitoring at the Hanford Site during 1989. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) assesses the impacts of Hanford operations on the environment for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The impact Hanford operations has on ground water is evaluated through the Hanford Site Ground-Water Surveillance program. Five hundred and sixty-seven wells were sampled during 1989 for Hanford ground-water monitoring activities. This report contains a listing of analytical results for calendar year (CY) 1989 for species of importance as potential contaminants. 30 refs., 29 figs,. 4 tabs.

  11. Talking In Circles: Designing A Spatially-Grounded Audioconferencing Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to become a popular medium for social interaction. Traditional chat environments, however, are limitedTalking In Circles: Designing A Spatially-Grounded Audioconferencing Environment Roy Rodenstein, a multimodal audioconferencing environment whose novel design emphasizes spatial grounding with the aim

  12. Remedial Action Plan and Site Design for Stabilization of the Inactive Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Maybell, Colorado. Appendixes to Attachment 3: Appendix A, Hydrological services calculations: Appendix B, Ground water quality by location, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains chemical analysis data for ground water for the following: elements; cyanides; chlorides; dissolved organic carbon; fluorides; silica; sulfates; sulfides; dissolved solids; nitrates; and nitrites.

  13. DESIGN OF AN EXPERIMENTAL FACILITY FOR HYBRID GROUND SOURCE HEAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DESIGN OF AN EXPERIMENTAL FACILITY FOR HYBRID GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS By SHAWN ALEX HERN.1 HYBRID GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEM DESIGN........................................2-3 2.1.1 Design...............................................................................2-5 2.2 HYBRID GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEM SIMULATION................................2-9 3

  14. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Household Wastewater Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Household wastewater treatment systems (septic systems) can contaminate ground water unless they are properly designed, constructed and maintained. This publication describes various kinds of systems and guides the homeowner in assessing...

  15. DC WRRC Report No. 126 GROUND WATER RESOURCE ASSESSMENT STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District of Columbia, University of the

    DRILLING AND FIELD OPERATIONS REPORT FOR THE GROUP A WELLS D.C. WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH CENTER University No. 126 GROUND WATER RESOURCE ASSESSMENT STUDY FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA WELL DRILLING AND FIELDDC WRRC Report No. 126 GROUND WATER RESOURCE ASSESSMENT STUDY FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA WELL

  16. Montana Ground Water Pollution Control System Permit Application...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Montana Ground Water Pollution Control System Permit Application Forms Webpage Abstract Provides a list of permit...

  17. EPA - Ground Water Discharges (EPA's Underground Injection Control...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Discharges (EPA's Underground Injection Control Program) webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: EPA - Ground Water Discharges (EPA's...

  18. alkaline ground waters: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hydraulic Rhode Island, University of 28 Factors influencing biological treatment of MTBE contaminated ground water University of California eScholarship Repository Summary:...

  19. Optimal Design for a Hybrid Ground-Source Heat Pump 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Z.; Yuan, X.; Wang, B.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    extraction from the ground. The paper presented has shown that the heat rejection of the GLHEs and the system energy consumption are approached to discuss the ground heat balance with different design procedures and control strategies though the system...

  20. Designing Teams of Unattended Ground Sensors Using Genetic Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Annie S.

    Designing Teams of Unattended Ground Sensors Using Genetic Algorithms Ayse S. Yilmaz 1 and Brian N the sensing capabilities of a sensor suite. This work focuses on unattended ground sensor networks consisting

  1. Designing Teams of Unattended Ground Sensors Using Genetic Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Annie S.

    Designing Teams of Unattended Ground Sensors Using Genetic Algorithms Ayse S. Yilmaz1 and Brian N of a sensor suite. This work focuses on unattended ground sensor networks consisting of teams of small

  2. Ground-based measurements of soil water storage in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Ground-based measurements of soil water storage in Texas Todd Caldwell Bridget Scanlon Di Long Michael Young Texas drought and beyond 22-23 October 2012 #12;Ground-based soil moisture Why do we need-limited TRANSPIRATION Water-limited Carbon storage ECOHYDROLOGY Stress, mortality, fire Oxygen limitations MICROBIAL

  3. Ground water protection strategy for the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Green River, Utah. Final, Revision 2, Version 5: Appendix E to the remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Green River, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this appendix is to provide a ground water protection strategy for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site at Green River, Utah. Compliance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water protection standards will be achieved by applying supplemental standards (40 CFR {section} 192.22(a); 60 FR 2854) based on the limited use ground water present in the uppermost aquifer that is associated with widespread natural ambient contamination (40 CFR {section} 192.11(e); 60 FR 2854). The strategy is based on new information, including ground water quality data collected after remedial action was completed, and on a revised assessment of disposal cell design features, surface conditions, and site hydrogeology. The strategy will result in compliance with Subparts A and C of the EPA final ground water protection standards (60 FR 2854). The document contains sufficient information to support the proposed ground water protection strategy, with monitor well information and ground water quality data included as a supplement. Additional information is available in the final remedial action plan (RAP) (DOE, 1991a), the final completion report (DOE, 1991b), and the long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) (DOE, 1994a).

  4. Simplifying Ground Water Transfers in Integrated Management Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    -714 need new high-capacity wells in FA basins for e.g. ethanol plants so ethanol plant buys water and/or ground water rights from local irrigators buying water: use on-site former irrigation well for ethanol plant or else pipe water from existing from irrigation well to ethanol plant buying rights: cap

  5. Water Network Design by MINLP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a solution method for a water-network optimization problem using a ... The optimal design of a WDN (Water Distribution Network) consists, in its ...

  6. Optimal Ground-Source Heat Pump System Design

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Ground-Source Heat Pump System Design May 19, 2010 Geothermal Technologies Program 2010 Peer Review ENVIRON International PI : Metin Ozbek Track : GSHP Demonstration Projects This...

  7. Ground-water contribution to dose from past Hanford Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freshley, M.D.; Thorne, P.D.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is being conducted to estimate radiation doses that populations and individuals could have received from Hanford Site operations from 1944 to the present. Four possible pathways by which radionuclides migrating in ground water on the Hanford Site could have reached the public have been identified: (1) through contaminated ground water migrating to the Columbia River; (2) through wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site; (3) through wells next to the Columbia River downstream of Hanford that draw some or all of their water from the river (riparian wells); and (4) through atmospheric deposition resulting in contamination of a small watershed that, in turn, results in contamination of a shallow well or spring by transport in the ground water. These four pathways make up the ground-water pathway,'' which is the subject of this study. Assessment of the ground-water pathway was performed by (1) reviewing the existing extensive literature on ground water and ground-water monitoring at Hanford and (2) performing calculations to estimate radionuclide concentrations where no monitoring data were collected. Radiation doses that would result from exposure to these radionuclides were calculated.

  8. Appendixes 159 160 Simulation of Ground-Water/Surface-Water Flow in the Santa ClaraCalleguas Ground-Water Basin, Ventura County, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­Calleguas Ground-Water Basin, Ventura County, California APPENDIX 1: DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION OF THE DIGITAL-Water/Surface-Water Flow in the Santa Clara­Calleguas Ground-Water Basin, Ventura County, California Figure A.1.2. Location-Water Basin, Ventura County, California Figure A1.4. Location of USGS_GWMODEL coverage. PacificOcean VENTURACO

  9. GROUND-WATER CONTRIBUTION TO DOSE FROM PAST HANFORD OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freshley, M. D.; Thorne, P. D.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEOR) Project is being conducted to estimate radiation doses that populations and individuals could have received from Hanford Site operations from 1944 to the present. Four possible pathways by which radionuclides originating in ground water on the Hanford Site could have reached the public have been identified: 1) through contaminated ground water migrating to the Columbia River; 2) through wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site; 3) through wells that draw some or all of their water from the Columbia River (riparian wells); and 4) through atmospheric deposition resulting in the contamination of a small watershed that, in turn, results in contamination of a shallow well or spring. These four pathways make up the "ground-water pathway ," which is the subject of this study. The objective of the study was to assess the extent to which the groundwater pathway contributed to radiation doses that populations or individuals may have received from past operations at Hanford. The assessment presented in this report was performed by 1) reviewing the extensive ?literature on ground water and ground-water monitoring at Hanford and 2) performing simple calculations to estimate radionuclide concentrations in ground water and the Columbia River resulting from ground-water discharge. Radiation doses that would result from exposure to this ground water and surface water were calculated. The study conclusion is that the ground-water pathways did not contribute significantly to dose. Compared with background radiation in the TriCities {300 mrem/yr), estimated doses are small: 0.02 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from discharge of contaminated ground water to the Columbia River; 1 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from Hanford Site wells; 11 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from riparian wells; and 1 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from the watershed. Because the estimated doses are so small, the recommendation is that further work on the ground-water pathway be limited to tracking ongoing ground-water studies at the Hanford Site.

  10. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Maybell, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, building foundations, and materials associated with the former processing of uranium ore at UMTRA sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further contamination of ground water. One UMTRA Project site is near Maybell, Colorado. Surface cleanup at this site is under way and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The tailings are being stabilized in-place at this site. The disposal area has been withdrawn from public use by the DOE and is referred to as the permanent withdrawal area. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from past uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project at this site is in its beginning stages. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future potential impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment. Currently, no points of exposure (e.g. a drinking water well); and no receptors of contaminated ground water have been identified at the Maybell site. Therefore, there are no current human health and ecological risks associated with exposure to contaminated ground water. Furthermore, if current site conditions and land- and water-use patterns do not change, it is unlikely that contaminated ground water would reach people or the ecological communities in the future.

  11. Ground and Surface Water Protection (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This regulation implements the New Mexico Water Quality Act. Any person intending to make a new water contaminant discharge or to alter the character or location of an existing water contaminant...

  12. EPA Final Ground Water Rule Available Online, 3/07

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On November 8, 2006, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a final Ground Water Rule (GWR) to promote increased protection against microbial pathogens that may be present in...

  13. Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dresel, P.E.; Newcomer, D.R.; Evans, J.C.; Webber, W.D.; Spane, F.A. Jr.; Raymond, R.G.; Opitz, B.E.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monitoring activities were conducted to determine the distribution of radionuclides and hazardous chemicals present in ground water as a result of Hanford Site operations and, whenever possible, relate the distribution of these constituents to Site operations. A total of 720 wells were sampled during 1992 by all Hanford ground-water monitoring activities. The Ground-Water Surveillance Project prepared water-table maps of DOE`s Hanford Site for June 1992 from water-level elevations measured in 287 wells across the Hanford Site and outlying areas. These maps are used to infer ground-water flow directions and gradients for the interpretation of contaminant transport. Water levels beneath the 200 Areas decreased as much as 0.75 m (2.5 ft) between December 1991 and December 1992. Water levels in the Cold Creek Valley decreased approximately 0.5 m in that same period. The water table adjacent to the Columbia River along the Hanford Reach continues to respond significantly to fluctuations in river stage. These responses were observed in the 100 and 300 areas. The elevation of the ground-water mound beneath B Pond did not change significantly between December 1991 and December 1992. However, water levels from one well located at the center of the mound indicate a water-level rise of approximately 0.3 m (1 ft) during the last quarter of 1992. Water levels measured from unconfined aquifer wells north and east of the Columbia River in 1992 indicate that the primary source of recharge is from irrigation practices.

  14. Tritium Ground Water Issues | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2Uranium Transferon theTedRegion | Department of Energy TribesNorthernGround

  15. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Maybell, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, contaminated soil, building foundations, and materials associated with the former processing of uranium ore at UMTRA Project sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further contamination of ground water. One UMTRA Project site is near Maybell, Colorado. Surface cleanup at this site began in 1995 and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The tailings are being stabilized in place at this site. The disposal area has been withdrawn from public use by the DOE and is referred to as the permanent withdrawal area. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from past uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project at this site is in its beginning stages. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future potential impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results presented in this document and other evaluations will determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

  16. Ground-water monitoring at the Hanford Site, January-December 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cline, C.S.; Rieger, J.T.; Raymond, J.R.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This program is designed to evaluate existing and potential pathways of exposure to radioactivity and hazardous chemicals from site operations. This document contains an evaluation of data collected during CY 1984. During 1984, 339 monitoring wells were sampled at various times for radioactive and nonradioactive constituents. Two of these constituents, specifically, tritium and nitrate, have been selected for detailed discussion in this report. Tritium and nitrate in the primary plumes originating from the 200 Areas continue to move generally eastward toward the Columbia River in the direction of ground-water flow. The movement within these plumes is indicated by changes in trends within the analytical data from the monitoring wells. No discernible impact on ground water has yet been observed from the start-up of the PUREX plant in December 1983. The shape of the present tritium plume is similar to those described in previous ground-water monitoring reports, although slight changes on the outer edges have been noted. Radiological impacts from two potential pathways for radionuclide transport in ground water to the environment are discussed in this report. The pathways are: (1) human consumption of ground water from onsite wells, and (2) seepage of ground water into the Columbia River. Concentrations of tritium in spring samples that were collected and analyzed in 1983, and in wells sampled adjacent to the Columbia River in 1984 confirmed that constituents in the ground water are entering the river via springs and subsurface flow. The primary areas where radionuclides enter the Columbia River via ground-water flow are the 100-N and 300 Areas and the shoreline adjacent to the Hanford Townsite. 44 refs., 25 figs., 11 tabs.

  17. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uraniferous lignite ashing site near Bowman, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uraniferous lignite ashing site near Bowman, North Dakota, evaluates the potential impacts to public health or the environment from contaminated ground water at this site. This contamination is a result of the uraniferous lignite ashing process, when coal containing uranium was burned to produce uranium. Potential risk is quantified only for constituents introduced by the processing activities and not for the constituents naturally occurring in background ground water in the site vicinity. Background ground water, separate from any site-related contamination, imposes a percentage of the overall risk from ground water ingestion in the Bowman site vicinity. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is developing plans to address soil and ground water contamination at the site. The UMTRA Surface Project involves the determination of the extent of soil contamination and design of an engineered disposal cell for long-term storage of contaminated materials. The UMTRA Ground Water Project evaluates ground water contamination. Based on results from future site monitoring activities as defined in the site observational work plan and results from this risk assessment, the DOE will propose an approach for managing contaminated ground water at the Bowman site.

  18. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Green River, Utah. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (phase 1) and the Ground Water Project (phase 2). For the UMTRA Project site located near Green River, Utah, the Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1988 to 1989. The tailings and radioactively contaminated soils and materials were removed from their original locations and placed into a disposal cell on the site. The disposal cell is designed to minimize radiation emissions and minimize further contamination of ground water beneath the site. The UMTRA Project`s second phase, the Ground Water Project, evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and determines a strategy for ground water compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. For the Green River site, the risk assessment helps determine whether human health risks result from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium processing. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project at the Green River site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine what is necessary, if anything, to protect human health and the environment while complying with EPA standards.

  19. Designing Water Smart Landscapes Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Designing Water Smart Landscapes Activity Objective: Create a water smart home landscape. Materials://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/plantanswers/publications/publications.html Draw the plants, using tracing paper. Citizenship Activity Develop a water smart plan for a non generations. Reference For additional assistance with planning your home landscape, refer to "Planning

  20. GROUND WATER RESOURCE ASSESSMENT STUDY FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District of Columbia, University of the

    , leaking underground storage tanks, and chemical application to golf courses, gardens and landscapes report presents the findings of the background and field investigations as a comprehensive ground water of the project: Dr. Kobina Atobrah of Geomatrix, Inc., Mr. Michael Arbaugh of the Gascoyne Laboratories Field

  1. Uranium in US surface, ground, and domestic waters. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drury, J.S.; Reynolds, S.; Owen, P.T.; Ross, R.H.; Ensminger, J.T.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report Uranium in US Surface, Ground, and Domestic Waters comprises four volumes. Volumes 2, 3, and 4 contain data characterizing the location, sampling date, type, use, and uranium conentrations of 89,994 individual samples presented in tabular form. The tabular data in volumes 2, 3, and 4 are summarized in volume 1 in narrative form and with maps and histograms.

  2. Bordering on Water Management: Ground and Wastewater in the United States - Mexico Transboundary Santa Cruz Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milman, Anita Dale

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    change and global water resources. Global Environmentalin Managing International Water Resources (No. WPS 1303):Darcy Lecture Tour. Ground Water, 45(4), 390-391. Sadoff,

  3. A Guide for Using the Transient Ground-Water Flow Model of the Death Valley Regional Ground-Water Flow System, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joan B. Blainey; Claudia C. Faunt, and Mary C. Hill

    2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a guide for executing numerical simulations with the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California using the U.S. Geological Survey modular finite-difference ground-water flow model, MODFLOW-2000. Model inputs, including observations of hydraulic head, discharge, and boundary flows, are summarized. Modification of the DVRFS transient ground-water model is discussed for two common uses of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system model: predictive pumping scenarios that extend beyond the end of the model simulation period (1998), and model simulations with only steady-state conditions.

  4. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Monument Valley uranium mill tailings site Cane Valley, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing at UMTRA Project sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to minimize further contamination of ground water. Surface cleanup at the Monument Valley UMTRA Project site near Cane Valley, Arizona, was completed in 1994. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination that resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. Human health may be at risk from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur by drinking water pumped out of a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated areas. Adverse ecological and agricultural effects may also result from exposure to contaminated ground water. For example, livestock should not be watered with contaminated ground water. A risk assessment describes a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the ecological environment may be exposed, and the health or ecological effects that could result from that exposure. This risk assessment is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and potential future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site investigations will be used to determine a compliance strategy to comply with the UMTRA ground water standards.

  5. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Livestock Manure Storage and Treatment Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    -tight design, stalled according to according to accepted medium-textured soils coarse-textured above ground) accepted engineering engineering standards (silt loam, loam). soils (sands, sandy standards and specifi- and specifications. Not Water table deeper... loam). Water table cations. Properly maintained. than 20 feet. or fractured bed- maintained. rock shallower than 20 feet. Concrete (liquid- Designed and in- Designed and installed Concrete cracked, Concrete cracked, tight design) stalled according...

  6. Factors influencing methane distribution in Texas ground water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, C.; Grossman, E.L.; Ammerman, J.W. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To determine the factors that influence the distribution of methane in Texas ground water, water samples were collected from 40 wells in east-central and central Texas aquifers. Among the chemical parameters examined, sulfate is most important in controlling methane distribution. Methane occurs in high concentration in east-central Texas only where sulfate concentration is low, supporting the hypothesis that abundant microbial methane production does not begin until sulfate is depleted. Because water samples from central Texas are high in either oxygen or sulfate, methane concentrations are low in these waters. A positive correlation between methane and sulfate in these waters indicates a different, perhaps thermogenic, origin for the trace methane. The {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratios of dissolved methane ranged from {minus}80{per_thousand} to {minus}21{per_thousand} in east-central Texas and {minus}41.2{per_thousand} to {minus}8.5{per_thousand} in central Texas. Low values of < {minus}50{per_thousand} in the east-central Texas ground water indicate a microbial origin for methane and are consistent with the observed sulfate-methane relationship; high {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratios of > {minus}31{per_thousand} likely result from bacterial methane oxidation. Similarly, methane with high {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratios in central Texas may reflect partial oxidation of the methane pool. Overall, water samples from both regions show a positive correlation between sulfate concentration and the {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio of methane, suggesting that methane oxidation may be associated with sulfate reduction in Texas ground water.

  7. UMTRA Ground Water Project management action process document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A critical U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) mission is to plan, implement, and complete DOE Environmental Restoration (ER) programs at facilities that were operated by or in support of the former Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). These facilities include the 24 inactive processing sites the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) (42 USC Section 7901 et seq.) identified as Title I sites, which had operated from the late 1940s through the 1970s. In UMTRCA, Congress acknowledged the potentially harmful health effects associated with uranium mill tailings and directed the DOE to stabilize, dispose of, and control the tailings in a safe and environmentally sound manner. The UMTRA Surface Project deals with buildings, tailings, and contaminated soils at the processing sites and any associated vicinity properties (VP). Surface remediation at the processing sites will be completed in 1997 when the Naturita, Colorado, site is scheduled to be finished. The UMTRA Ground Water Project was authorized in an amendment to the UMTRCA (42 USC Section 7922(a)), when Congress directed DOE to comply with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards. The UMTRA Ground Water Project addresses any contamination derived from the milling operation that is determined to be present at levels above the EPA standards.

  8. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Lakeview, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Lake view, Oregon evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site.

  9. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the UMTRA Project site located near Canonsburg, Pennsylvania (the Canonsburg site), the Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1983 to 1985, and involved removing the uranium processing mill tailings and radioactively contaminated soils and materials from their original locations and placing them in a disposal cell located on the former Canonsburg uranium mill site. This disposal cell is designed to minimize radiation emissions and further contamination of ground water beneath the site. The Ground Water Project will evaluate the nature and the extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing at the former Canonsburg uranium mill site, and will determine a ground water strategy for complying with the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. For the Canonsburg site, an evaluation was made to determine whether exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium processing could affect people`s health. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project at the Canonsburg site. The results of this report and further site characterization of the Canonsburg site will be used to determine how to protect public health and the environment, and how to comply with the EPA standards.

  10. Proposed ground water protection strategy for the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Green River, Utah. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the US DOE water resources protection strategy for the Green River, Utah mill tailings disposal site. The modifications in the original plan are based on new information, including ground water quality data collected after remedial action was completed, and on a revised assessment of disposal cell design features, surface conditions, and site hydrogeology. All aspects are discussed in this report.

  11. Field evaluation of ground water sampling devices for volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muska, C F; Colven, W P; Jones, V D; Scogin, J T; Looney, B B; Price, V Jr

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous studies conducted under laboratory conditions demonstrated that the type of device used to sample ground water contaminated with volatile organic compounds can significantly influence and analytical results. The purpose of this study was to evaluate, under field conditions, both commercial and developmental ground water sampling devices as part of an ongoing ground water contamination investigation and remediation program at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). Ground water samples were collected using six types of sampling devices in monitoring wells of different depths and concentrations of volatile organic contaminants (primarily trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene). The study matrix was designed to statistically compare the reuslts of each sampling device under the test conditions. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation criteria were used to determine the relative performance of each device. Two categories of sampling devices were evaluated in this field study, positive displacement pumps and grab samplers. The positive displacement pumps consisted of a centrifugal (mechanical) pump and a bladder pump. The grab samples tested were a syringe sampler, a dual-check valve bailer, a surface bomb sampler, and a pressurized bailer. Preliminary studies were conducted to establish the analytical and sampling variability associated with each device. All six devices were then used to collect ground water samples in water table (unconfined), semi-confined aquifer, and confined aquifer monitoring wells. Results were evaluated against a set of criteria that included intrasampling device variability (precision), volatile organic concentration (accuracy), sampling and analytical logistics, and cost. The study showed that, by using careful and reproducible procedures, overall sampling variability is low regardless of sampling device.

  12. Ground-water protection standards for inactive uranium tailings sites (40 CFR 192): Background information for final rule. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Final Background Information Document summarizes the information and data considered by the Agency in developing the ground-water protection standards. The report presents a brief description of the Title II ground water standard and how it can be used to develop the Title I rulemaking. A description of the 24 designated uranium-tailings sites and their current status in the DOE remedial-action program is included as well as a detailed analysis of the available data on the ground water in the vicinity of 14 of the 24 sites. It also describes different methods that can be used for the restoration of ground water and the costs of using these restoration methods.

  13. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Sites near Rifle, Colorado. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further ground water contamination. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. Two UMTRA Project sites are near Rifle, Colorado: the Old Rifle site and the New Rifle site. Surface cleanup at the two sites is under way and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. A risk assessment identifies a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the environment may be exposed, and the health or environmental effects that could result from that exposure. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. This evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine if action is needed to protect human health or the environment. Human health risk may result from exposure to ground water contaminated from uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur from drinking water obtained from a well placed in the areas of contamination. Furthermore, environmental risk may result from plant or animal exposure to surface water and sediment that have received contaminated ground water.

  14. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Lakeview, Oregon. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing at UMTRA Project sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to minimize further contamination of ground water. Surface cleanup at the UMTRA Project site near Lakeview, Oregon, was completed in 1989. The mill operated from February 1958 to November 1960. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination that resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. Human health may be at risk from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur by drinking water pumped out of a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated areas. Ecological risks to plants or animals may result from exposure to surface water and sediment that have received contaminated ground water. A risk assessment describes a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the ecological environment may be exposed, and the health or ecological effects that could result from that exposure. This risk assessment is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and potential future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the ecological environment.

  15. HANFORD SITE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA FOR CALENDAR YEAR 1989 - GROUND WATER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryce, R. W.; Gorst, W. R.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a continuing effort for the U.S. Department of Energy, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is conducting ground-water monitoring at the Hanford Site, near Richland, Washington. This document contains the data listing of monitoring results obtained by PNL and Westinghouse Hanford Company during the period January through December 1989. Samples taken during 1989 were analyzed and reported by United States Testing Company, Inc., Richland, Washington. The data listing contains all chemical results (above contractual reporting limits) and radiochemical results (for which the result is larger than two times the total error).

  16. Water Quality Surface and Ground | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to: navigation, search ContentsWater Power ForumGround Jump

  17. Factors influencing biological treatment of MTBE contaminated ground water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stringfellow, William T.; Hines Jr., Robert D.; Cockrum, Dirk K.; Kilkenny, Scott T.

    2001-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) contamination has complicated the remediation of gasoline contaminated sites. Many sites are using biological processes for ground water treatment and would like to apply the same technology to MTBE. However, the efficiency and reliability of MTBE biological treatment is not well documented. The objective of this study was to examine the operational and environmental variables influencing MTBE biotreatment. A fluidized bed reactor was installed at a fuel transfer station and used to treat ground water contaminated with MTBE and gasoline hydrocarbons. A complete set of chemical and operational data was collected during this study and a statistical approach was used to determine what variables were influencing MTBE treatment efficiency. It was found that MTBE treatment was more sensitive to up-set than gasoline hydrocarbon treatment. Events, such as excess iron accumulation, inhibited MTBE treatment, but not hydrocarbon treatment. Multiple regression analysis identified biomass accumulation and temperature as the most important variables controlling the efficiency of MTBE treatment. The influent concentration and loading of hydrocarbons, but not MTBE, also impacted MTBE treatment efficiency. The results of this study suggest guidelines for improving MTBE treatment. Long cell retention times in the reactor are necessary for maintaining MTBE treatment. The onset of nitrification only occurs when long cell retention times have been reached and can be used as an indicator in fixed film reactors that conditions favorable to MTBE treatment exist. Conversely, if the reactor can not nitrify, it is unlikely to have stable MTBE treatment.

  18. UMTRA project technical assistance contractor quality assurance implementation plan for surface and ground water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) Quality Assurance Implementation Plan (QAIP) outlines the primary requirements for integrating quality functions for TAC technical activities applied to the surface and ground water phases of the UMTRA Project. The QAIP is subordinate to the latest issue of the UMTRA Project TAC Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP). The QAIP addresses technical aspects of the TAC UMTRA Project surface and ground water programs. The QAIP is authorized and approved by the TAC Project Manager and QA manager. The QA program is designed to use monitoring, audit, and surveillance functions as management tools to ensure that all Project organization activities are carried out in a manner that will protect public health and safety, promote the success of the UMTRA Project and meet or exceed contract requirements.

  19. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings sites near Rifle, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase 1) and the Ground Water Project (Phase 2). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further ground water contamination. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. Two UMTRA Project sites are near Rifle, Colorado: the Old Rifle site and the New Rifle site. Surface cleanup at the two sites is under way and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. A risk assessment identifies a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the environment may be exposed, and the health or environmental effects that could result from that exposure. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. This evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine if action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

  20. Environmental assessment of ground-water compliance activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report assesses the environmental impacts of the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Spook, Wyoming on ground water. DOE previously characterized the site and monitoring data were collected during the surface remediation. The ground water compliance strategy is to perform no further remediation at the site since the ground water in the aquifer is neither a current nor potential source of drinking water. Under the no-action alternative, certain regulatory requirements would not be met.

  1. Copyright 2009 The Author(s) Journal compilation 2009 National Ground Water Association.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    Copyright © 2009 The Author(s) Journal compilation © 2009 National Ground Water Association. NGWA.org Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation 29, no. 3/ Summer 2009/pages 93­104 93 Pore Water Characteristics/day. This model aquifer system contained a residual nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) that extended from

  2. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Canonsburg, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This baseline risk assessment evaluates potential impacts to public health and the environment resulting from ground water contamination from past activities at the former uranium processing site in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. The US Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has placed contaminated material from this site in an on-site disposal cell. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the UMTRA Ground Water Project. Currently, no domestic or drinking water well tap into contaminated ground water of the two distinct ground water units: the unconsolidated materials and the bedrock. Because there is no access, no current health or environmental risks are associated with the direct use of the contaminated ground water. However, humans and ecological organisms could be exposed to contaminated ground water if a domestic well were to be installed in the unconsolidated materials in that part of the site being considered for public use (Area C). The first step is evaluating ground water data collected from monitor wells at the site. For the Canonsburg site, this evaluation showed the contaminants in ground water exceeding background in the unconsolidated materials in Area C are ammonia, boron, calcium, manganese, molybdenum, potassium, strontium, and uranium.

  3. Non-Lawyers' Guide to Hearings before the Colorado Ground Water...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lawyers' Guide to Hearings before the Colorado Ground Water Commission Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - Guide...

  4. Pattern Of Shallow Ground Water Flow At Mount Princeton Hot Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Methods Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Pattern Of Shallow Ground Water Flow At Mount Princeton Hot Springs,...

  5. Pattern of shallow ground water flow at Mount Princeton Hot Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    methods Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Pattern of shallow ground water flow at Mount Princeton Hot Springs,...

  6. Dolomitization by ground-water flow systems in carbonate platforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simms, M.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dolomite occurs throughout the subsurface of modern carbonate platforms such as the Bahamas. Groundwater flow systems must be responsible for delivery of reactants needed for dolomitization. Reflux, freshwater lens flows, and thermal convection are large-scale flow systems that may be widespread in active platforms. The author has evaluated some aspects of the dynamics and characteristics of these processes with ground-water flow theory and by scaled sandbox experiments. Reflux is not restricted to hypersaline brines, but can occur with bankwaters of only slightly elevated salinity such as those found on the Bahama Banks today (42%). The lack of evaporites in a stratigraphic section, therefore, does not rule out the possibility that reflux may have operated. Flows associated with freshwater lenses include flow in the lens, in the mixing zone, and in the seawater beneath and offshore of the lens. Upward transfer of seawater through the platform margins occurs when surrounding cold ocean water migrates into the platform and is heated. This type of thermal convection (Kohout convection) has been studied by Francis Kohout in south Florida. The ranges of mass flux of magnesium in these processes are all comparable and are all sufficient to account for young dolomites beneath modern platforms. Each process yields dolomitized zones of characteristic shape and location and perhaps may be distinguishable in ancient rocks. The concepts presented here may have application to exploration for dolomite reservoirs in the Gulf Coast and elsewhere.

  7. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Sites near Rifle, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ground water project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. This report is a site specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. Currently, no one is using the ground water and therefore, no one is at risk. However, the land will probably be developed in the future and so the possibility of people using the ground water does exist. This report examines the future possibility of health hazards resulting from the ingestion of contaminated drinking water, skin contact, fish ingestion, or contact with surface waters and sediments.

  8. UMTRA project technical assistance contractor quality assurance implementation plan for surface and ground water, Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) Quality Assurance Implementation Plan (QAIP) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The QAIP outlines the primary requirements for integrating quality functions for TAC technical activities applied to the surface and ground water phases of the UMTRA Project. The QA program is designed to use monitoring, audit, and surveillance activities as management tools to ensure that UMTRA Project activities are carried out in amanner to protect public health and safety, promote the success of the UMTRA Project, and meet or exceed contract requirements.

  9. The Design of Ground-Coupled Heat Pump Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, J. D.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground-coupled heat pumps are being installed in increasing numbers due to proven performance and economy. The overall thermal resistance between the ground coupling fluid and a given type of surrounding soil is affected by pipe material, wall...

  10. The Design of Ground-Coupled Heat Pump Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, J. D.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground-coupled heat pumps are being installed in increasing numbers due to proven performance and economy. The overall thermal resistance between the ground coupling fluid and a given type of surrounding soil is affected by pipe material, wall...

  11. GROUND WATER CONTAMINATION POTENTIAL FROM STORMWATER INFILTRATION Robert Pitt, Shirley Clark, and Richard Field1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    GROUND WATER CONTAMINATION POTENTIAL FROM STORMWATER INFILTRATION Robert Pitt, Shirley Clark, pathogens, metals, and salts and other dissolved minerals. The intention of this paper is to identify known stormwater contaminants as to their potential to contaminant ground water and to provide guidance

  12. "Hot Water" in Lassen Volcanic National Park--Fumaroles, Steaming Ground, and Boiling Mudpots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    "Hot Water" in Lassen Volcanic National Park-- Fumaroles, Steaming Ground, and Boiling Mudpots U, ydrothermal (hot water) and steaming ground. These features are re- lated to active volcanism, the largest fumarole (steam and volcanic-gas vent) in the park. The temperature of the high-velocity steam

  13. Analytical Studies on the Impact of Land Reclamation on Ground Water Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    Analytical Studies on the Impact of Land Reclamation on Ground Water Flow by Jiu J, Jiaol, Subhas Nandy2, and Hailong LP Abstract Land reclamation has been a common practice to produce valuable land of the ground water system caused by reclamation. Introduction Land reclamation has played a significant role

  14. Improved estimates of the total correlation energy in the ground state of the water molecule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, James B.

    Improved estimates of the total correlation energy in the ground state of the water molecule Arne National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 Received 1 October 1996; accepted 5 February 1997 Two new calculations of the electronic energy of the ground state of the water molecule yield energies lower than those

  15. Characterizing Hydraulic Properties and Ground-Water Chemistry in Fractured-Rock Aquifers: A User's Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Characterizing Hydraulic Properties and Ground-Water Chemistry in Fractured-Rock Aquifers: A User source for science about the Earth, its natural and living resources, natural hazards., 2007, Characterizing hydraulic properties and ground-water chemistry in fractured-rock aquifers: A user

  16. Hanford Site ground-water model: Geographic information system linkages and model enhancements, FY 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wurstner, S.K.; Devary, J.L.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Models of the unconfined aquifer are important tools that are used to (1) identify and quantify existing, emerging, or potential ground-water quality problems, (2) predict changes in ground-water flow and contaminant transport as waste-water discharge operations change, and (3) assess the potential for contaminants to migrate from the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site through the ground water. Formerly, most of the numerical models developed at the Hanford Site were two-dimensional. However, contaminant concentrations cannot be accurately predicted with a two-dimensional model, which assumes a constant vertical distribution of contaminants in the aquifer. Development of two- and three-dimensional models of ground-water flow based on the Coupled Fluid, Energy, and Solute Transport (CFEST) code began in the mid- 1980s. The CFEST code was selected because of its ability to simulate both ground-water flow and contaminant transport. Physical processes that can be modeled by CFEST include aquifer geometry, heterogeneity, boundary conditions, and initial conditions. The CFEST ground-water modeling library has been integrated with the commercially available geographic information system (GIS) ARC/INFO. The display and analysis capabilities of a GIS are well suited to the size and diversity of databases being generated at the Hanford Site. The ability to visually inspect large databases through a graphical analysis tool provides a stable foundation for site assessments and ground-water modeling studies. Any ground-water flow model being used by an ongoing project should be continually updated and refined to reflect the most current knowledge of the system. The two-dimensional ground-water flow model being used in support of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project has recently been updated and enhanced. One major enhancement was the extension of the model area to include North Richland.

  17. Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the uranium mill tailings remedial action ground water project. Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This programmatic environmental impact statement (PElS) was prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). This PElS provides an analysis of the potential impacts of the alternatives and ground water compliance strategies as well as potential cumulative impacts. On November 8, 1978, Congress enacted the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law, codified at 42 USC §7901 et seq. Congress found that uranium mill tailings " ... may pose a potential and significant radiation health hazard to the public, and that every reasonable effort should be made to provide for stabilization, disposal, and control in a safe, and environmentally sound manner of such tailings in order to prevent or minimize other environmental hazards from such tailings." Congress authorized the Secretary of Energy to designate inactive uranium processing sites for remedial action by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Congress also directed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to set the standards to be followed by the DOE for this process of stabilization, disposal, and control. On January 5, 1983, EPA published standards (40 CFR Part 192) for the disposal and cleanup of residual radioactive materials. On September 3, 1985, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit set aside and remanded to EPA the ground water provisions of the standards. The EPA proposed new standards to replace remanded sections and changed other sections of 40 CFR Part 192. These proposed standards were published in the Federal Register on September 24, 1987 (52 FR 36000). Section 108 of the UMTRCA requires that DOE comply with EPA's proposed standards in the absence of final standards. The Ground Water Project was planned under the proposed standards. On January 11, 1995, EPA published the final rule, with which the DOE must now comply. The PElS and the Ground Water Project are in accordance with the final standards. The EPA reserves the right to modify the ground water standards, if necessary, based on changes in EPA drinking water standards. Appendix A contains a copy of the 1983 EPA ground water compliance standards, the 1987 proposed changes to the standards, and the 1995 final rule. Under UMTRA, DOE is responsible for bringing the designated processing sites into compliance with the EPA ground water standards and complying with all other applicable standards and requirements. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) must concur with DOE's actions. States are full participants in the process. The DOE also must consult with any affected Indian tribes and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Uranium processing activities at most of the inactive mill sites resulted in the contamination of ground water beneath and, in some cases, downgradient of the sites. This contaminated ground water often has elevated levels of constituents such as but not limited to uranium and nitrates. The purpose of the UMTRA Ground Water Project is to eliminate or reduce to acceptable levels the potential health and environmental consequences of milling activities by meeting the EPA ground water standards.

  18. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Naturita, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (phase I), and the Ground Water Project (phase II). For the UMTRA Project site located near Naturita, Colorado (the Naturita site), phase I involves the removal of radioactively contaminated soils and materials and their transportation to a disposal site at Union Carbide Corporation`s Upper Burbank Repository at Uravan, Colorado, about 13 road miles (mi) (21 kilometers [km]) to the northwest. No uranium mill tailings are involved because the tailings were removed from the Naturita site and placed at Coke Oven, Colorado, during 1977 to 1979. Phase II of the project will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and its effect on human health or the environment; and will determine site-specific ground water compliance strategies in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. Human health risks could occur from drinking water pumped from a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated ground water area. Environmental risks may result if plants or animals are exposed to contaminated ground water, or surface water that has received contaminated ground water. Therefore, a risk assessment is conducted for the Naturita site. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the Ground Water Project at the Naturita site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

  19. Remedial Action Plan and Site design for stabilization of the inactive Uranium Mill Tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado: Revision 1. Remedial action selection report, Attachment 2, geology report, Attachment 3, ground water hydrology report, Attachment 4, water resources protection strategy. Final

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites are located near the small community of Slick Rock, in San Miguel County, Colorado. There are two designated Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites at Slick Rock: the Union Carbide site and the North Continent site. Both sites are adjacent to the Dolores River. The sites contain former mill building concrete foundations, tailings piles, demolition debris, and areas contaminated by windblown and waterborne radioactive materials. The total estimated volume of contaminated materials is approximately 621,000 cubic yards (475,000 cubic meters). In addition to the contamination at the two processing site areas, 13 vicinity properties were contaminated. Contamination associated with the UC and NC sites has leached into ground water. Pursuant to the requirements of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) (42 USC {section}7901 et seq.), the proposed remedial action plan (RAP) will satisfy the final US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards in 40 CFR Part 192 (60 FR 2854) for cleanup, stabilization, and control of the residual radioactive material (RRM) (tailings and other contaminated materials) at the disposal site at Burro Canyon. The requirements for control of the RRM (Subpart A) will be satisfied by the construction of an engineered disposal cell. The proposed remedial action will consist of relocating the uranium mill tailings, contaminated vicinity property materials, demolition debris, and windblown/weaterborne materials to a permanent repository at the Burro Canyon disposal site. The site is approximately 5 road mi (8 km) northeast of the mill sites on land recently transferred to the DOE by the Bureau of Land Management.

  20. Ground-water contribution to dose from past Hanford Operations. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freshley, M.D.; Thorne, P.D.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is being conducted to estimate radiation doses that populations and individuals could have received from Hanford Site operations from 1944 to the present. Four possible pathways by which radionuclides migrating in ground water on the Hanford Site could have reached the public have been identified: (1) through contaminated ground water migrating to the Columbia River; (2) through wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site; (3) through wells next to the Columbia River downstream of Hanford that draw some or all of their water from the river (riparian wells); and (4) through atmospheric deposition resulting in contamination of a small watershed that, in turn, results in contamination of a shallow well or spring by transport in the ground water. These four pathways make up the ``ground-water pathway,`` which is the subject of this study. Assessment of the ground-water pathway was performed by (1) reviewing the existing extensive literature on ground water and ground-water monitoring at Hanford and (2) performing calculations to estimate radionuclide concentrations where no monitoring data were collected. Radiation doses that would result from exposure to these radionuclides were calculated.

  1. Water Network Design by MINLP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 13, 2008 ... ... on the internet at http://domino.watson.ibm.com/library/CyberDig.nsf/home . .... The hydraulic head is the total energy per unit of weight of the water, and it is ..... used to model the hydraulic and water quality behavior of water ...

  2. EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) activities related to sources of ground-water contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black-Coleman, W.

    1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report contains a listing of EPA programs and activities, as of October 1986, that address 33 sources of potential ground-water contamination. The information on each activity is presented in a matrix format that is organized by type of contamination source. The following information is presented for each program and activity listed: title, lead office, contact person, type of activity (study, regulation, guidance, strategy, etc.) status, and a summary of the activity. The 33 sources of ground-water contamination are discussed in the 1984 EPA Office of Technology report: Protecting the Nations Ground Water from Contamination.

  3. In Situ Chemical Oxidation of Contaminated Ground Water: Permanganate Reactive Barrier Systems for the Long-Term Treatment of Contaminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, X. David; Schwartz, Frank W.

    2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxidation of chlorinated solvents by permanganate has proven to be effective in destroying these compounds in the aqueous phase. A semi-passive, well-based permanganate reactive barrier system (PRBS) was designed in order for the long-term treatment of dissolved contaminant in the ground water. Results from laboratory experiments indicate the PRBS could deliver permanganate at a stable, constant and controllable rate. In this paper, different field designs of the PRBS are discussed. Numerical simulation was conducted to elucidate the parameters that will influence the field implementation of a PRBS. We investigated issues such as permanganate consumption by aquifer materials, variable density flow effect, as well as lateral spreading under different geological settings. Results from this study continue to point to the promise of an in situ chemical oxidation scheme. PRBS provides a potential treatment of the contaminated ground water at relatively low management cost as compared with other alternatives.

  4. Optimal Design for a Hybrid Ground-Source Heat Pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Z.; Yuan, X.; Wang, B.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the advantages of ground-source heat pumps over their conventional alternatives make these systems a very attractive choice for air conditioning, not only for residential buildings but increasingly also for institutional and commercial...

  5. Design for manufacturing analysis on the Small Unmanned Ground Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Ada (Ada Cheuk Ying)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    iRobot is responsible for delivering the Small Unmanned Ground Vehicle (SUGV) as part of the U.S. Army's Future Combat Systems (FCS) initiative. With increasing external competition and pressures, iRobot must deliver an ...

  6. DESIGNER WATER Dr. Torleiv Bilstad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Norway #12;Drilling Production of oil and gas #12;Flow of crude oil from well #12;WETTABILITY Tendency.17 million m3/year New Mexico 55.65 million m3/year 30.21 million m3/year 85.86 million m3/year Texas 842 on trucking produced water across the major shale plays in the US #12;Separation Technology Produced Water

  7. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Shiprock, New Mexico. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This baseline risk assessment at the former uranium mill tailings site near Shiprock, New Mexico, evaluates the potential impact to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in an on-site disposal cell in 1986 through the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project. There are no domestic or drinking water wells in the contaminated ground water of the two distinct ground water units: the contaminated ground water in the San Juan River floodplain alluvium below the site and the contaminated ground water in the terrace alluvium area where the disposal cell is located. Because no one is drinking the affected ground water, there are currently no health or environmental risks directly associated with the contaminated ground water. However, there is a potential for humans, domestic animals, and wildlife to the exposed to surface expressions of ground water in the seeps and pools in the area of the San Juan River floodplain below the site. For these reasons, this risk assessment evaluates potential exposure to contaminated surface water and seeps as well as potential future use of contaminated ground water.

  8. Streamflow, Infiltration, and Ground-Water Recharge at Abo Arroyo, New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Streamflow, Infiltration, and Ground-Water Recharge at Abo Arroyo, New Mexico USGS Professional, California (amystew@gmail.com). 2 Present address D.B. Stephens and Associates, Albuquerque, New Mexico

  9. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Hazardous Waste Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.; Kantor, A. S.

    1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Products such as paints, solvents, adhesives, oils, cleaners, batteries, pesticides and wood preservatives are commonly used in households and on farms, but they can be hazardous to ground water if handled improperly. This publication explains...

  10. Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2002-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of selecting a ground water compliance strategy for the Gunnison, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. This Environmental Assessment (EA) discusses two alternatives and the effects associated with each. The two alternatives are (1) natural flushing coupled with institutional controls and continued monitoring and (2) no action. The compliance strategy must meet U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards defined in Title 40 ''Code of Federal Regulations'' Part 192, Subpart B, in areas where ground water beneath and around the site is contaminated as a result of past milling operations. It has been determined that contamination in the ground water at the Gunnison site consists of soluble residual radioactive material (RRM) as defined in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA).

  11. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Riverton, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Risk Assessment evaluated potential impacts to public health or the environment caused by ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. In the first phase of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, the tailing and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell near the Gas Hills Plant in 1990. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first site-specific document to evaluate potential health and environmental risks for the Riverton site under the Ground Water Project; it will help determine whether remedial actions are needed for contaminated ground water at the site.

  12. EA-1155: Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to comply with the Environmental Protection Agency's ground-water standards set forth in 40 CFR 192 at the Spook, Wyoming Uranium Mill...

  13. Ground penetrating radar characterization of wood piles and the water table in Back Bay, Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LeFrançois, Suzanne O'Neil, 1980-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys are performed to determine the depth to the water table and the tops of wood piles beneath a residential structure at 122 Beacon Street in Back Bay, Boston. The area of Boston known ...

  14. Ground-water hydrogeology and geochemistry of a reclaimed lignite surface mine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollock, Clifford Ralph

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GROUND-WATER HYDROGEOLOGY AND GEOCHEMISTRY OF A RECLAIMED LIGNITE SURFACE MINE A Thesis by CLIFFORD RALPH POLLOCK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1982 Major Subject: Geology GROUND-WATER HYDROGEOLOGY AND GEOCHEMISTRY OF A RECLAIMED LIGNITE SURFACE MINE A Thesis by CLIFFORD RALPH POLLOCK Approved as to sty1e and content by: (Chairman of Committee) ember) (Member (Member) F...

  15. Ground-water effects of the UCG experiments at the Hoe Creek site in northeastern Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mead, S.W.; Wang, F.T.; Stuermer, D.H.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground-water changes and subsidence effects associated with three underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments have been monitored at the Hoe Creek site in northeastern Wyoming. Ground-water quality measurements have extended over a period of four years and have been supplemented by laboratory studies of contaminant sorption by coal. It was found that a broad range of residual gasification products are introduced into the ground-water system. These contaminants may be of environmental significance if they find their way, in sufficient concentrations, into surface waters, or into aquifers from which water is extracted for drinking or agricultural purposes. Fortunately, the concentrations of these contaminants are substantially reduced by sorption on the surrounding coal. However, recent field measurements indicate that there may be significant limitations on this natural cleansing process. The contaminants of potential concern, and the mechanisms that affect their deposition and persistence have been identified.

  16. PUBLISHED VERSION Design, performance, and grounding aspects of the International Thermonuclear Experimental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PUBLISHED VERSION Design, performance, and grounding aspects of the International Thermonuclear, performance, and grounding aspects of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor ion cyclotron range Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor ion cyclotron range of frequencies antenna F. Durodie,1,a) P. Dumortier,1 M

  17. The Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating: Design, Fabrication, Ground Calibration and Five Years in Flight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canizares, Claude R.

    Details of the design, fabrication, and ground and flight calibration of the High Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) on the Chandra X?Ray Observatory are presented after 5 years of flight experience. Specifics include the ...

  18. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Sites near Slick Rock, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two UMTRA (Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action) Project sites are near Slick Rock, Colorado: the North Continent site and the Union Carbide site. Currently, no one uses the contaminated ground water at either site for domestic or agricultural purposes. However, there may be future land development. This risk assessment evaluates possible future health problems associated with exposure to contaminated ground water. Since some health problems could occur, it is recommended that the contaminated ground water not be used as drinking water.

  19. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Well-Head Management and Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The condition of a water well and its proximity to contamination sources determine the risk it poses to ground water. Topics covered include well location, well construction, well age and type, well depth, well maintenance, water testing...

  20. Optimal Ground-Source Heat Pump System Design

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Develop a least-cost design tool (OptGSHP) that will enable GSHP developers to analyze system cost and performance in a variety of building applications to support both design, operational and purchase decisions. Integrate groundwater flow and heat transport into OptGSHP. Demonstrate the usefulness of OptGSHP and the significance of a systems approach to the design of GSHP systems.

  1. GTA (ground test accelerator) Phase 1: Baseline design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The national Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) program has two objectives: to provide the necessary basis for a discriminator/weapon decision by 1992, and to develop the technology in stages that lead ultimately to a neutral particle beam weapon. The ground test accelerator (GTA) is the test bed that permits the advancement of the state-of-the-art under experimental conditions in an integrated automated system mode. An intermediate goal of the GTA program is to support the Integrated Space Experiments, while the ultimate goal is to support the 1992 decision. The GTA system and each of its major subsystems are described, and project schedules and resource requirements are provided. (LEW)

  2. Results of ground-water monitoring for radionuclides in the Separations Area, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serkowski, J.A.; Law, A.G.; Ammerman, J.J.; Schatz, A.L.

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to present a summary of the results for calendar year 1987 of the Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) ground-water monitoring program for radiological constituents in the Separations Area of the Hanford Site. This monitoring program is implemented to partially fulfill the US Department of Energy (DOE) requirement that radioactivity in the environment be monitored. The program is also used to monitor operating disposal facilities for compliance with DOE requirements. The Separations Area radionuclide ground-water monitoring program is coordinated with other ground-water monitoring activities on the Hanford Site conducted by Westinghouse Hanford and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The PNL program includes sampling for both radioactive and nonradioactive chemicals throughout the Site (including 100 and 300 Areas) and is responsible for estimating and evaluating the impact on ground water to the general public from all operations at the Hanford Site. Ground water characterization and monitoring for compliance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) is also being conducted at facilities on the Hanford Site.

  3. Bioremediation of ground water contaminants at a uranium mill tailings site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barton, L.L.; Nuttall, H.E.; Thomson, B.M.; Lutze, W. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground water contaminated with uranium from milling operations must be remediated to reduce the migration of soluble toxic compounds. At the mill tailings site near Tuba City, Arizona (USA) the approach is to employ bioremediation for in situ immobilization of uranium by bacterial reduction of uranyl, U(VI), compounds to uraninite, U(IV). In this initial phase of remediation, details are provided to indicate the magnitude of the contamination problem and to present preliminary evidence supporting the proposition that bacterial immobilization of uranium is possible. Additionally, consideration is given to contaminating cations and anions that may be at toxic levels in ground water at this uranium mill tailing site and detoxification strategies using bacteria are addressed. A model concept is employed so that results obtained at the Tuba City site could contribute to bioremediation of ground water at other uranium mill tailings sites.

  4. Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Ground Water Compliance at the Slick Rock, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This environmental assessment addresses the environmental effects of a proposed action and the no action alternative to comply with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards at the Slick Rock, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project sites. The sites consist of two areas designated as the North Continent (NC) site and the Union Carbide (UC) site. In 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) completed surface cleanup at both sites and encapsulated the tailings in a disposal cell 5 miles east of the original sites. Maximum concentration limits (MCLs) referred to in this environmental assessment are the standards established in Title 40 ''Code of Federal Regulations'' Part 192 (40 CFR 192) unless noted otherwise. Ground water contaminants of potential concern at the NC site are uranium and selenium. Uranium is more prevalent, and concentrations in the majority of alluvial wells at the NC site exceed the MCL of 0.044 milligram per liter (mg/L). Selenium contamination is less prevalent; samples from only one well had concentrations exceeding the MCL of 0.01 mg/L. To achieve compliance with Subpart B of 40 CFR 192 at the NC site, DOE is proposing the strategy of natural flushing in conjunction with institutional controls and continued monitoring. Ground water flow and transport modeling has predicted that concentrations of uranium and selenium in the alluvial aquifer will decrease to levels below their respective MCLs within 50 years.

  5. Hydrogeologic controls on ground-water and contaminant discharge to the Columbia River near the Hanford Townsite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luttrell, S.P.; Newcomer, D.R.; Teel, S.S.; Vermeul, V.R.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to quantify ground-water and contaminant discharge to the Columbia River in the Hanford Townsite vicinity. The primary objectives of the work are to: describe the hydrogeologic setting and controls on ground-water movement and contaminant discharge to the Columbia River; understand the river/aquifer relationship and its effects on contaminant discharge to the Columbia River; quantify the ground-water and contaminant mass discharge to the Columbia River; and provide data that may be useful for a three-dimensional model of ground-water flow and contaminant transport in the Hanford Townsite study area. The majority of ground-water contamination occurs within the unconfined aquifer; therefore, ground-water and contaminant discharge from the unconfined aquifer is the emphasis of this study. The period of study is primarily from June 1990 through March 1992.

  6. Predicted impacts of future water level decline on monitoring wells using a ground-water model of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wurstner, S.K.; Freshley, M.D.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A ground-water flow model was used to predict water level decline in selected wells in the operating areas (100, 200, 300, and 400 Areas) and the 600 Area. To predict future water levels, the unconfined aquifer system was stimulated with the two-dimensional version of a ground-water model of the Hanford Site, which is based on the Coupled Fluid, Energy, and Solute Transport (CFEST) Code in conjunction with the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) software package. The model was developed using the assumption that artificial recharge to the unconfined aquifer system from Site operations was much greater than any natural recharge from precipitation or from the basalt aquifers below. However, artificial recharge is presently decreasing and projected to decrease even more in the future. Wells currently used for monitoring at the Hanford Site are beginning to go dry or are difficult to sample, and as the water table declines over the next 5 to 10 years, a larger number of wells is expected to be impacted. The water levels predicted by the ground-water model were compared with monitoring well completion intervals to determine which wells will become dry in the future. Predictions of wells that will go dry within the next 5 years have less uncertainty than predictions for wells that will become dry within 5 to 10 years. Each prediction is an estimate based on assumed future Hanford Site operating conditions and model assumptions.

  7. The recovery of crude oil spilled on a ground water aquifer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malter, Paul Lawrence

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE RECOVERY OF CRUDE OIL SPILLED ON A GROUND WATER AQUIFER A Thesis by PAUL LAWRENCE MALTER Approved as to style and content by: oy W, ann, J (Ch irman of Committee) / Dona McDona (Head of Department) as (Me ) 0 s Le a . ~e e (Member...) May 1983 ABSTRACT The Recovery of Crude Oil Spilled on a Ground Water Aquifer. (Nay 1983) Paul Lawrence Malter, B. S. , Texas A6K University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Roy W. Bann, Jr. Case histories of previous petroleum spill cleanups...

  8. Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Naturita, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2003-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This Environmental Assessment addresses the environmental effects of a proposed action and the no action alternative to comply with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards at the Naturita, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project site. In 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) completed surface cleanup at the site and encapsulated the tailings in a disposal cell 15 miles northwest near the former town of Uravan, Colorado. Ground water contaminants of potential concern at the Naturita site are uranium and vanadium. Uranium concentrations exceed the maximum concentration limit (MCL) of 0.044 milligram per liter (mg/L). Vanadium has no MCL; however, vanadium concentrations exceed the EPA Region III residential risk-based concentration of 0.33 mg/L (EPA 2002). The proposed compliance strategy for uranium and vanadium at the Naturita site is no further remediation in conjunction with the application of alternate concentration limits. Institutional controls with ground water and surface water monitoring will be implemented for these constituents as part of the compliance strategy. This compliance strategy will be protective of human health and the environment. The proposed monitoring program will begin upon regulatory concurrence with the Ground Water Compliance Action Plan (DOE 2002a). Monitoring will consist of verifying that institutional controls remain in place, collecting ground water samples to verify that concentrations of uranium and vanadium are decreasing, and collecting surface water samples to verify that contaminant concentrations do not exceed a regulatory limit or risk-based concentration. If these criteria are not met, DOE would reevaluate the proposed action and determine the need for further National Environmental Policy Act documentation. No comments were received from the public during the public comment period. Two public meetings were held during this period. Minutes of these meetings are included as Attachment 1.

  9. Environmental controls for underground coal gasification: ground-water effects and control technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mead, W.; Raber, E.

    1980-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Underground coal gasfication (UCG) promises to provide economic access to an enormous deep-coal resource. It is, therefore, of considerable importance to develop appropriate environmental controls for use in conjunction with the UCG process. The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory has conducted three UCG experiments at its Hoe Creek site in northeastern Wyoming. Environmental studies are being conducted in conjunction with these UCG experiments, including an investigation of changes in local ground-water quality and subsidence effects. Ground-water monitoring and geotechnical measurements have helped to clarify the environmental significance of reaction-product contaminants that remain underground following gasification, and the implications of cavity roof collapse and aquifer interconnection. These investigations have led to the development of preliminary plans for a specific method of ground water quality restoration utilizing activated carbon adsorption. Unconventional technologies are also being investigated that may be appropriate for restoring ground water that has been contaminated as a result of UCG operations. These water treatment technologies are being explored as possible supplements to natural controls and process restrictions.

  10. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Tuba City, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document evaluates potential public health or environmental impacts resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell on the site in 1990 by the US Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first site-specific document under the Ground Water Project. It will help determine what remedial actions are necessary for contaminated ground water at the site.

  11. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Grounds Maintenance: Best Management Practice Case Studies #4 and #5 - Water Efficient Landscape and Irrigation (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FEMP Water Efficiency Best Management Practices #4 and #5 Case Study: Overview of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory grounds maintenance program and results.

  12. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Durango, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the UMTRA Project site located near Durango, Colorado (the Durango site), the Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1986 to 1991. An evaluation was made to determine whether exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium processing could affect people`s health. Exposure could occur from drinking water pumped from a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated ground water area. In addition, environmental risks may result if plants or animals are exposed to contaminated ground water, or surface water that has mixed with contaminated ground water. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project at the Durango site. The results of this report and further site characterization of the Durango site will be used to determine what is necessary to protect public health and the environment, and to comply with the EPA standards.

  13. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uriniferous lignite ashing site near Belfield, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Inactive Uraniferous Lignite Ashing Site Near Belfield, North Dakota, evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the site where coal containing uranium was burned to produce uranium. The US Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is evaluating plans to remedy soil and ground water contamination at the site. Phase I of the UMTRA Project consists of determining the extent of soil contamination. Phase II of the UMTRA Project consists of evaluating ground water contamination. Under Phase II, results of this risk assessment will help determine what remedial actions may be necessary for contaminated ground water at the site. This risk assessment evaluates the potential risks to human health and the environment resulting from exposure to contaminated ground water as it relates to historic processing activities at the site. Potential risk is quantified for constituents introduced from the processing activities, and not for those constituents naturally occurring in water quality in the site vicinity. Background ground water quality has the potential to cause adverse health effects from exposure through drinking. Any risks associated with contaminants attributable to site activities are incremental to these risks from background ground water quality. This incremental risk from site-related contaminants is quantified in this risk assessment. The baseline risk from background water quality is incorporated only into the assessment of potential chemical interactions and the definition of the overall site condition.

  14. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Riverton, Wyoming. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of two phases: the Surface Project and the Ground Water Project. At the UMTRA Project site near Riverton, Wyoming, Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1988 to 1990. Tailings and radioactively contaminated soils and materials were taken from the Riverton site to a disposal cell in the Gas Hills area, about 60 road miles (100 kilometers) to the east. The surface cleanup reduces radon and other radiation emissions and minimizes further ground water contamination. The UMTRA Project`s second phase, the Ground Water Project, will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination at the Riverton site that has resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. Such evaluations are used at each site to determine a strategy for complying with UMTRA ground water standards established by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and if human health risks could result from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could hypothetically occur if drinking water were pumped from a well drilled in an area where ground water contamination might have occurred. Human health and environmental risks may also result if people, plants, or animals are exposed to surface water that has mixed with contaminated ground water.

  15. Ground-water maps of the Hanford Site Separations Area, December 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schatz, A.L.; Ammerman, J.J.

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ground-water maps of the Separations Area are prepared by the Environmental Technology Section of the Defense Waste Management Division of Westinghouse Hanford Company. The Separations Area consists of the 200 East and 200 West Areas, where chemical processing activities are carried out. This set of ground-water maps consists of a water-table map of the unconfined aquifer, a depth-to-water map of the unconfined aquifer, and a potentiometric map of the uppermost confined aquifer (the Rattlesnake Ridge sedimentary interbed) in the area where West Lake, the deactivated Gable Mountain Pond, and the B Pond system are located. The Separations Area water-table map is prepared from water-level measurements made in June and December. For the December 1987 map approximately 200 wells were used for contouring the water table. The water-table mound beneath the deactivated U Pond has decreased in size since the June 1987 measurements were taken, reflecting the impact of shutting off flow to the pond in the fall of 1984. This mound has declined approximately 8 ft. since 1984. The water-table map also shows the locations of wells where the December 1987 measurements were made, and the data for these measurements are listed.

  16. Relation of soil-, surface-, and ground-water distributions of inorganic nitrogen with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macdonald, Ellen

    Relation of soil-, surface-, and ground-water distributions of inorganic nitrogen with topographic position in harvested and unharvested portions of an aspen-dominated catchment in the Boreal Plain M.L. Macrae, K.J. Devito, I.F. Creed, and S.E. Macdonald Abstract: Spatial distributions of soil extractable

  17. Ground-Water Recharge in the Arid and Semiarid Southwestern United States --

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ground-Water Recharge in the Arid and Semiarid Southwestern United States -- Climatic and Geologic and semiarid southwest- ern United States results from the complex interplay of climate, geology and Range subregions. Introduction The arid and semiarid southwestern United States is among the fastest

  18. Status of the ground water flow model for the UMTRA Project, Shiprock, New Mexico, site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-dimensional numerical model was constructed for the alluvial aquifer in the area of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Shiprock, New Mexico, site. This model was used to investigate the effects of various hydrologic parameters on the evolution of the ground water flow field. Results of the model are useful for defining uncertainties in the site conceptual model and suggesting data collection efforts to reduce these uncertainties. The computer code MODFLOW was used to simulate the two-dimensional flow of ground water in the alluvium. The escarpment was represented as a no-flow boundary. The San Juan River was represented with the MODFLOW river package. A uniform hydraulic conductivity distribution with the value estimated by the UMTRA Project Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) and a uniform recharge distribution was used. Infiltration from the flowing artesian well was represented using the well package. The ground water flow model was calibrated to ground water levels observed in April 1993. Inspection of hydrographs shows that these levels are representative of typical conditions at the site.

  19. Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Durango, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2002-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing a ground water compliance strategy for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site near Durango, Colorado. DOE has prepared this environmental assessment to provide the public with information concerning the potential effects of this proposed strategy.

  20. ReproducedfromJournalofEnvironmentalQuality.PublishedbyASA,CSSA,andSSSA.Allcopyrightsreserved. Ground Water Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simpkins, William W.

    for an unfractured till (Freeze als that preclude vertical and horizontal transport of and Cherry, 1979; JournalofEnvironmentalQuality.PublishedbyASA,CSSA,andSSSA.Allcopyrightsreserved. Ground Water Quality Fracture-Controlled Nitrate and Atrazine Transport in Four Iowa Till Units Martin F-quantify the influence of fractures on solute fate and transport using three conservative and two nonconservative tracers

  1. Selenium in Oklahoma ground water and soil. Quarterly report No. 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atalay, A.; Vir Maggon, D.

    1991-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Selenium with a consumption of 2 liters per day (5). The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine the concentrations of Se in Oklahoma ground water and soil samples. (2) to map the geographical distribution of Se species in Oklahoma. (3) to relate groundwater depth, pH and geology with concentration of Se.

  2. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings sites near Slick Rock, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, evaluates potential public health and environmental impacts resulting from ground water contamination at the former North Continent (NC) and Union Carbide (UC) uranium mill processing sites. The tailings at these sites will be placed in a disposal cell at the proposed Burro Canyon, Colorado, site. The US Department of Energy (DOE) anticipates the start of the first phase remedial action by the spring of 1995 under the direction of the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The second phase of the UMTRA Project will evaluate ground water contamination. This baseline risk assessment is the first site-specific document for these sites under the Ground Water Project. It will help determine the compliance strategy for contaminated ground water at the site. In addition, surface water and sediment are qualitatively evaluated in this report.

  3. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uriniferous lignite ashing site near Belfield, North Dakota. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This risk assessment evaluates the potential for impacts to public health or the environment from contaminated ground water at this site caused by the burning of coal containing uranium to produce uranium. Potential risk is quantified for constituents introduced from the processing activities and not for those constituents naturally occurring in background ground water in the site vicinity. Because background ground water quality has the potential to cause adverse health effects from exposure through drinking, any risks associated with contaminants attributable to site activities are incremental to these risks from background. The incremental risk from site-related contaminants is quantified in this risk assessment. The baseline risk from background water quality is incorporated only into the assessment of potential chemical interactions and the definition of the overall site condition. The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is developing plans to remedy soil and ground water contamination at the site. The UMTRA Surface Project consists of determining the extent of soil contamination and disposing of the contaminated soils in an engineered disposal cell. The UMTRA Ground Water Project consists of evaluating ground water contamination. Under the UMTRA Ground Water Project, results of this risk assessment will help determine what ground water compliance strategy may be applied at the site.

  4. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Naturita, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project, and the Ground Water Project. For the UMTRA Project site located near Naturita, Colorado, phase I involves the removal of radioactively contaminated soils and materials and their transportation to a disposal site at Union Carbide Corporation`s Upper Burbank Repository at Uravan, Colorado. The surface cleanup will reduce radon and other radiation emissions from the former uranium processing site and prevent further site-related contamination of ground water. Phase II of the project will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and its effect on human health and the environment, and will determine site-specific ground water compliance strategies in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. Human health risks could occur from drinking water pumped from a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated ground water area. Environmental risks may result if plants or animals are exposed to contaminated ground water or surface water that has mixed with contaminated ground water. Therefore, a risk assessment was conducted for the Naturita site. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the Ground Water Project at the Naturita site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

  5. Ground Water Surveillance Monitoring Implementation Guide for Use with DOE O 450.1, Environmental Protection Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide assists DOE sites in establishing and maintaining surveillance monitoring programs to detect future impacts on ground water resources from site operations, to track existing ground water contamination, and to assess the potential for exposing the general public to site releases. Canceled by DOE N 251.82.

  6. Ground-water temperature fluctuations at Lyons Ferry Fish Hatchery, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberlander, P.L.; Myers, D.A.

    1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The well field serving the Lyons Ferry Fish Hatchery has experienced reduced water temperatures following continued, periodic withdrawal of large volumes of water. In January 1985, the well field temperature was 49/sup 0/F, which is less than the optimal 52/sup 0/F for raising salmon and steelhead trout. The aquifer supplying the hatchery is in hydraulic and thermal connection with the Snake River and a flooded embayment of the Palouse River. Ground-water temperatures in the well field cycle on an annual basis in response to changes in surface water temperature and pumping rate. Numerical simulation of the well field, using a simplified mixing cell model, demonstrates the coupling of well field hydraulics and aquifer thermal response. Alternative pumping schedules indicate that it is feasible to adjust ground-water pumping to effectively store heat in the aquifer during the summer months when surface water temperatures are elevated. Sensitivity analysis of this model indicated that the primary controls of the system's thermal response are the volume of the aquifer assumed to contribute to the well field and temperature of the overlying surface water body.

  7. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Durango, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This risk assessment evaluates the possibility of health and environmental risks from contaminated ground water at the uranium mill tailings site near Durango, Colorado. The former uranium processing site`s contaminated soil and material were removed and placed at a disposal site located in Body Canyon, Colorado, during 1986--1991 by the US Departments of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating the nature and extent of ground water contamination at the site. This risk assessment follows an approach similar to that used by the US Environmental Protection Agency. The first step is to determine what site-related contaminants are found in ground water samples. The next step in the risk assessment is to determine how much of these contaminants people might ingest if they got their drinking water from a well on the site. In accordance with standard practice for this type of risk assessment, the highest contaminant concentrations from the most contaminated wells are used. The risk assessment then explains the possible health problems that could result from this amount of contamination.

  8. Critical review of water based radiant cooling system design methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jingjuan Dove; Bauman, Fred; Schiavon, Stefano

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Embedded Radiant Heating and Cooling Systems, InternationalWATER BASED RADIANT COOLING SYSTEM DESIGN METHODS Jingjuan (Keywords: Radiant Cooling System, Design Approach,

  9. Above Ground Geothermal and Allied Technologies Masters Scholarship in Energy & Materials: design of a rig

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    Above Ground Geothermal and Allied Technologies Masters Scholarship in Energy & Materials: design into the largest green energy resources; industrial waste heat, biomass combustion and geothermal energy. Research of geothermal energy after completing the degree. Proficiency in English is essential. Contact: mark

  10. An innovative concept for deep water oil production platform design 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Racine, Florian

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As more oil and gas are discovered in deep water, the offshore industry has become increasingly interested in the design of deep water offshore production facilities. A new design concept tentatively called FPSOT (Floating ...

  11. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Guidelines for determining design basis ground motions. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report develops and applies a methodology for estimating strong earthquake ground motion. The motivation was to develop a much needed tool for use in developing the seismic requirements for structural designs. An earthquake`s ground motion is a function of the earthquake`s magnitude, and the physical properties of the earth through which the seismic waves travel from the earthquake fault to the site of interest. The emphasis of this study is on ground motion estimation in Eastern North America (east of the Rocky Mountains), with particular emphasis on the Eastern United States and southeastern Canada. Eastern North America is a stable continental region, having sparse earthquake activity with rare occurrences of large earthquakes. While large earthquakes are of interest for assessing seismic hazard, little data exists from the region to empirically quantify their effects. Therefore, empirically based approaches that are used for other regions, such as Western North America, are not appropriate for Eastern North America. Moreover, recent advances in science and technology have now made it possible to combine theoretical and empirical methods to develop new procedures and models for estimating ground motion. The focus of the report is on the attributes of ground motion in Eastern North America that are of interest for the design of facilities such as nuclear power plants. Specifically considered are magnitudes M from 5 to 8, distances from 0 to 500 km, and frequencies from 1 to 35 Hz.

  12. Introduction of Heat Recovery Chiller Control and Water System Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The styles, feature and main concerns of heat recovery water system are discussed, and the entering condenser water temperature control is recommended for higher chiller efficiency and reliable operation. Three optimized water system designs...

  13. Introduction of Heat Recovery Chiller Control and Water System Design 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The styles, feature and main concerns of heat recovery water system are discussed, and the entering condenser water temperature control is recommended for higher chiller efficiency and reliable operation. Three optimized water system designs...

  14. The detection and modelling of surface thermal structures and ground water discharges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, Douglas Vincent

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . , Southern Illinois University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Earl R. Hoskins On March 29, 1973, data were collected by a thermal infrared scanner mounted in a twin-engine aircraft over a 55-mile stretch of the Clark Fork River in northwestern... on a VAX Il/750 interfaced with an I'S Model 70 processing system. Both qualitative and quantitative processing techniques were employed to identify and describe the surface temperature patterns and ground water discharges into the river. Computer...

  15. TECHNICAL EVALUATION REPORT TUBA CITY FINAL PHASE I GROUND-WATER COMPLIANCE ACTION PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    remediation at the site, and is expected to last approximately 3 years. Phase I includes installation of additional recovery wells and Phase II will include expansion of remediation capacity and monitoring to ensure the aquifer restoration standards are met. Phases I and II of ground-water remediation are expected to last approximately 12 years. DESCRIPTION OF THE REQUEST: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has requested concurrence from the U.S. Nuclear

  16. Analysis design and performance of non-coplanar concentric ring grounding electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cofie, Penrose Sackey

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3g 58 LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE PAGE Basic Ground Gr1d. Leakage Current Distribution for a Wire-ring Leakage Current Distribut1on for Fin1te Wire Electrode, Leakage Current Distr1bution for a Crossed Conductor. Leakage Current Distribution... and design of grounding systems. However, def1cienc1es ex1st 1n the application of its procedures. The guide is based on the use of an infinitely long conductor whose leakage current density function is linea r. In practice such infin1tely long conductor...

  17. U.S. Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water Project: Project plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The scope of the Project is to develop and implement a ground water compliance strategy for all 24 UMTRA Project processing sites. The compliance strategy for the processing sites must satisfy the proposed EPA ground water cleanup standards in 40 CFR Part 192, Subparts B and C (1987). This scope of work will entail the following activities on a site-specific basis: Develop a compliance strategy based on modification of the UMTRA Surface Project RAPs or develop Ground Water Project RAPs with NRC concurrence on the RAP and full participation of the affected states and tribes. Implement the RAP to include institutional controls, where appropriate, as an interim measure until compliance with the standards is achieved. Institute long-term verification monitoring for transfer to a separate long-term surveillance program on or before the Project end date. Prepare certification or confirmation reports and modify the long-term surveillance plan (LTSP), where needed, on those sites completed prior to the Project end date.

  18. Use of Mini-Sprinklers to Strip Trichloroethylene and Tetrachloroethylene from Contaminated Ground Water.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brerisford, Yvette, C.; Bush, Parshall, B.; Blake, John, I.; Bayer, Cassandra L.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Berisford, Y.C., P.B. Bush, J.I. Blake, and C.L. Bayer. 2003. Use of mini-sprinklers to strip trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene from contaminated ground water. J. Env. Qual. 32:801-815. Three low-volume mini-sprinklers were tested for their efficacy to strip trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) from water. Deionized water spiked with TCE and PCE was pumped through a mini-sprinkler supported on top of a 1.8-m-tall. Water was collected in collection vessels at 0.61 and 1.22 m above the ground on support columns that were spaced at 0.61-m intervals from the riser base, and samples were composited per height and distance from the riser. Overall, air-stripping reduced dissolved concentrations of TCE and PCE by 99.1 to 100 and 96.9 to 100%, respectively. Mini-sprinklers offer the advantages of (i) easy setup in series that can be used on practically any terrain; (ii) operation over a long period of time that does not threaten aquifer depletion; (iii) use in small or confined aquifers in which the capacity is too low to support large irrigation or pumping systems; and (iv) use in forests in which the small, low-impact droplets of the mini-sprinklers do not damage bark and in which trees can help manage (via evapotransporation) excess waste water.

  19. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Grand Junction, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site Near Grand Junction, Colorado evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The remedial activities at the site were conducted from 1989 to 1993. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated ground water that flows beneath the processing site toward the Colorado River. The monitor wells that have consistently shown the highest concentrations of most contaminants are used to assess risk. This risk assessment will be used in conjunction with additional activities and documents to determine what remedial action may be needed for contaminated ground water at the site. This risk assessment follows an approach outlined by the EPA. the first step is to evaluate ground water data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the contaminants of potential concern in the ground water are arsenic, cadmium, cobalt, fluoride, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, sulfate, uranium, vanadium, zinc, and radium-226. The next step in the risk assessment is to estimate how much of these contaminants people would be exposed to if they drank from a well installed in the contaminated ground water at the former processing site.

  20. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Guidelines for determining design basis ground motions. Volume 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report develops and applies a methodology for estimating strong earthquake ground motion. The motivation was to develop a much needed tool for use in developing the seismic requirements for structural designs. An earthquake`s ground motion is a function of the earthquake`s magnitude, and the physical properties of the earth through which the seismic waves travel from the earthquake fault to the site of interest. The emphasis of this study is on ground motion estimation in Eastern North America (east of the Rocky Mountains), with particular emphasis on the Eastern United States and southeastern Canada. Eastern North America is a stable continental region, having sparse earthquake activity with rare occurrences of large earthquakes. While large earthquakes are of interest for assessing seismic hazard, little data exists from the region to empirically quantify their effects. The focus of the report is on the attributes of ground motion in Eastern North America that are of interest for the design of facilities such as nuclear power plants. This document, Volume II, contains Appendices 2, 3, 5, 6, and 7 covering the following topics: Eastern North American Empirical Ground Motion Data; Examination of Variance of Seismographic Network Data; Soil Amplification and Vertical-to-Horizontal Ratios from Analysis of Strong Motion Data From Active Tectonic Regions; Revision and Calibration of Ou and Herrmann Method; Generalized Ray Procedure for Modeling Ground Motion Attenuation; Crustal Models for Velocity Regionalization; Depth Distribution Models; Development of Generic Site Effects Model; Validation and Comparison of One-Dimensional Site Response Methodologies; Plots of Amplification Factors; Assessment of Coupling Between Vertical & Horizontal Motions in Nonlinear Site Response Analysis; and Modeling of Dynamic Soil Properties.

  1. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Lakeview, Oregon. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface cleanup at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site near Lakeview, Oregon was completed in 1989. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination that resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. Human health may be at risk from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur by drinking water pumped out of a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated areas. Ecological risks to plants or animals may result from exposure to surface water and sediment that have received contaminated ground water. A risk assessment describes a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the ecological environment may be exposed, and the health or ecological effects that could result from that exposure. This risk assessment is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and potential future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the ecological environment.

  2. Ground water elevation monitoring at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Salt Lake City, Utah, Vitro processing site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In February 1994, a ground water level monitoring program was begun at the Vitro processing site. The purpose of the program was to evaluate how irrigating the new golf driving range affected ground water elevations in the unconfined aquifer. The program also evaluated potential impacts of a 9-hole golf course planned as an expansion of the driving range. The planned golf course expansion would increase the area to be irrigated and, thus, the water that could infiltrate the processing site soil to recharge the unconfined aquifer. Increased water levels in the aquifer could alter the ground water flow regime; contaminants in ground water could migrate off the site or could discharge to bodies of surface water in the area. The potential effects of expanding the golf course have been evaluated, and a report is being prepared. Water level data obtained during this monitoring program indicate that minor seasonal mounding may be occurring in response to irrigation of the driving range. However, the effects of irrigation appear small in comparison to the effects of precipitation. There are no monitor wells in the area that irrigation would affect most; that data limitation makes interpretations of water levels and the possibility of ground water mounding uncertain. Limitations of available data are discussed in the conclusion.

  3. Selected ground-water data for Yucca Mountain region, southern Nevada and eastern California, through December 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaCamera, R.J.; Locke, G.L.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Geological Survey, in support of the US Department of Energy, Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, collects, compiles, and summarizes hydrologic data in the Yucca Mountain region. The data are collected to allow assessments of ground-water resources during studies to determine the potential suitability of Yucca Mountain for storing high-level nuclear waste. Data on ground-water levels at 36 sites, ground-water discharge at 6 sites, and ground-water withdrawals within Crater Flat, Jackass Flats, Mercury Valley, and the Amargosa Desert are presented for calendar year 1996. Data collected prior to 1996 are graphically presented and data collected by other agencies (or as part of other programs) are included to further indicate variations of ground-water levels, discharges, and withdrawals through time. A statistical summary of ground-water levels at seven wells in Jackass Flats is presented to indicate potential effects of ground-water withdrawals in support of US Department of Energy activities near Yucca Mountain. The statistical summary includes the number of measurements, the maximum, minimum, and median water-level altitudes, and the average deviation of measured water-level altitudes for selected baseline periods and for calendar years 1992--96. At two water-supply wells and a nearby observation well, median water levels for calendar year 1996 were slightly lower (0.3 to 0.4 foot) than for the respective baseline periods. At four other wells in Jackass Flats, median water levels for 1996 were unchanged, slightly lower (0.2 foot), and slightly higher (0.2 and 0.7 foot) than for the respective baseline periods.

  4. Guidelines for selecting codes for ground-water transport modeling of low-level waste burial sites. Volume 2. Special test cases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, C.S.; Cole, C.R.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document was written for the National Low-Level Waste Management Program to provide guidance for managers and site operators who need to select ground-water transport codes for assessing shallow-land burial site performance. The guidance given in this report also serves the needs of applications-oriented users who work under the direction of a manager or site operator. The guidelines are published in two volumes designed to support the needs of users having different technical backgrounds. An executive summary, published separately, gives managers and site operators an overview of the main guideline report. Volume 1, titled ''Guideline Approach,'' consists of Chapters 1 through 5 and a glossary. Chapters 2 through 5 provide the more detailed discussions about the code selection approach. This volume, Volume 2, consists of four appendices reporting on the technical evaluation test cases designed to help verify the accuracy of ground-water transport codes. 20 refs.

  5. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Pesticide Storage and Handling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Proper pesticide management is important to preventing ground water contamination. This publication contains helpful information about pesticide storage facilities, mixing and loading practices, and spill cleanup. A chart lists pesticides according...

  6. Ground Water Protection Programs Implementation Guide for Use with DOE O 450.1, Environmental Protection Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide provides a description of the elements of an integrated site-wide ground water protection program that can be adapted to unique physical conditions and programmatic needs at each DOE site. Canceled by DOE N 251.82.

  7. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Fertilizer Storage and Handling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.; Kantor, A. S.

    1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Fertilizer is a major source of ground water contamination. This publication emphasizes the best management practices for storing fertilizers, whether you are building a new facility or modifying an existing one. It also includes information on safe...

  8. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Grand Junction, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This risk assessment evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The remedial activities at the site were conducted from 1989 to 1993. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated ground water that flows beneath the processing site toward the Colorado River. The monitor wells that have consistently shown the highest concentrations of most contaminants are used to assess risk. This risk assessment will be used in conjunction with additional activities and documents to determine what remedial action may be needed for contaminated ground water at the site.

  9. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Monument Valley Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Cane Valley, Arizona. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This baseline risk assessment evaluates potential impact to public health or the environment from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site in Cane Valley near Monument Valley, Arizona. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has relocated and stabilized this site`s tailings and other contaminated material in a disposal cell at Mexican Hat, Utah. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project that evaluates potential health and environmental risks. It will help determine the approach required to address contaminated ground water at the site.

  10. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site Salt Lake City, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Salt Lake City, Utah, evaluates potential public health or environmental impacts resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium ore processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell located at Clive, Utah, in 1987 by the US Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate residual ground water contamination at the former uranium processing site, known as the Vitro processing site. This risk assessment is the first site-specific document under the Ground Water Project. It will help determine the appropriate remedial action for contaminated ground water at the site.

  11. Environmental assessment of ground water compliance activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming. Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is an environmental assessment of the Spook, Wyoming, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. It analyzes the impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposed action for ground water compliance. The proposed action is to comply with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards for the UMTRA Project sites (40 CFR Part 192) by meeting supplemental standards based on the limited use ground water at the Spook site. This proposed action would not require site activities, including ground water monitoring, characterization, or institutional controls. Ground water in the uppermost aquifer was contaminated by uranium processing activities at the Spook site, which is in Converse County, approximately 48 miles (mi) (77 kilometers [km]) northeast of Casper, Wyoming. Constituents from the site infiltrated and migrated into the uppermost aquifer, forming a plume that extends approximately 2500 feet (ft) (800 meters [m]) downgradient from the site. The principal site-related hazardous constituents in this plume are uranium, selenium, and nitrate. Background ground water in the uppermost aquifer at the site is considered limited use. It is neither a current nor a potential source of drinking water because of widespread, ambient contamination that cannot be cleaned up using treatment methods reasonably employed in public water supply systems (40 CFR {section} 192.11 (e)). Background ground water quality also is poor due to first, naturally occurring conditions (natural uranium mineralization associated with an alteration front), and second, the effects of widespread human activity not related to uranium milling operations (uranium exploration and mining activities). There are no known exposure pathways to humans, animals, or plants from the contaminated ground water in the uppermost aquifer because it does not discharge to lower aquifers, to the surface, or to surface water.

  12. The prediction of the effectiveness of interceptor trenches in the remediation of ground-water contamination by petroleum hydrocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mast, Mary Katherine

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    means of ground-water remediation. Ground water at all three sites is contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons. Sites B and C are service stations in which the source of contamination has been leaky underground storage tanks. Site C was chosen based... pumping from the interceptor trench on the surrounding observation wells. Slug tests were also performed at Site A previously by others to calculate transmissivity. Data from Site C was obtained by a consulting firm hired to provide remedial action...

  13. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Green River, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document evaluates potential impacts to public health and the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell on the site in 1989 by the US DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, UMTRA Project is evaluating ground water contamination in this risk assessment.

  14. The passage of LB962 accelerated efforts to conjunctively manage ground water and surface water in Nebraska. The drought across the High Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    -fill. With more water, irrigation began earlier and was extended through pod-fill. For dry bean we couldBACKGROUND The passage of LB962 accelerated efforts to conjunctively manage ground water and surface water in Nebraska. The drought across the High Plains from 1999 to 2008 magnified the seriousness

  15. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Salt Lake City, Utah. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of two phases: the first is the Surface Project, and the second is the Ground Water Project. For the UMTRA Project site known as the Vitro site, near Salt Lake City, Utah, Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1985 to 1987. The UMTRA Project`s second phase, the Ground Water Project, evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and determines a strategy for ground water compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. A risk assessment is the process of describing a source of contamination and showing how that contamination may reach people and the environment. The amount of contamination people or the environment may be exposed to is calculated and used to characterize the possible health or environmental effects that may result from this exposure. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project at the Vitro site. The results of this report and further site characterization of the Vitro site will be used to determine what is necessary, if anything, to protect human health and the environment while complying with EPA standards.

  16. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Falls City, Texas: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination of the uranium mill tailings site near Falls City, Texas, evaluates potential impact to public health and the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former Susquehanna Western, Inc. (SWI), uranium mill processing site. This document fulfills the following objectives: determine if the site presents immediate or potential future health risks, determine the need for interim institutional controls, serve as a key input to project planning and prioritization, and recommend future data collection efforts to more fully characterize risk. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has begun its evaluation of ground water contamination at the Falls City site. This risk assessment is one of the first documents specific to this site for the Ground Water Project. The first step is to evaluate ground water data collected from monitor wells at or near the site. Evaluation of these data show the main contaminants in the Dilworth ground water are cadmium, cobalt, fluoride, iron, nickel, sulfate, and uranium. The data also show high levels of arsenic and manganese occur naturally in some areas.

  17. Locating Ground-Water Discharge in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, D.R.; Geist, D.R.; Saldi, K.; Hartwig, D.; Cooper, T.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bottom-contacting probe for measuring electrical conductivity at the sediment-water interface was used to scan the bed of the Columbia River adjacent to the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State during a 10-day investigation. Four river-sections, each about a kilometer in length, were scanned for variations in electrical conductivity. The probe was towed along the riverbed at a speed of 1 m/s and is position was recorded using a Global Positioning System. The bottom tows revealed several areas of elevated electrical conductivity. Where these anomalies were relatively easy to access, piezometers were driven into the riverbed and porewater electrical conductivity ranged from 111 to 150 uS/cm. The piezometers, placed in electrical conductivity “hotspots,” yielded chemical or isotopic data consistent with previous analyses of water taken from monitoring wells and visible shoreline seeps. Tritium, nitrate, and chromium exceeded water quality standards in some porewaters. The highest tritium and nitrate levels were found near the Old Hanford Townsite at 120,000 pCi/L (+ 5,880 pCi/L total propagated analytical uncertainty) and ug/L (+ 5,880 ug/L), respectively. The maximum chromium (total and hexavalent) levels were found near 100-H reactor area where unfiltered porewater total chromium was 1,900 ug/L (+ 798 ug/L) and hexavalent chromium was 20 ug/L. The electrical conductivity probe provided rapid, cost-effective reconnaissance for ground-water discharge areas when used in combination with conventional piezometers. It may be possible to obtain quantitative estimates of both natural and contaminated ground-water discharge in the Hanford Reach with more extensive surveys of river bottom.

  18. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright- Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Health and Safety Plan (HSP) was developed for the Environmental Investigation of Ground-water Contamination Investigation at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton, Ohio, based on the projected scope of work for the Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation. The HSP describes hazards that may be encountered during the investigation, assesses the hazards, and indicates what type of personal protective equipment is to be used for each task performed. The HSP also addresses the medical monitoring program, decontamination procedures, air monitoring, training, site control, accident prevention, and emergency response.

  19. A preliminary study of the significance of flourides in Texas ground waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixon, Robert Melton

    1939-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of fluorine an4 the oomyocads Ln whLoh it is ecnhined~ Tho yayere have been fairlF wall y~, an4 represent a widslF distributed sffox't on ths part of Luvastigatoce in their effcxrte to cncyla1n xscny of the yhsncnnaua that were held to be related... to be inoxeased bf the realisation that thoxe is a widespread ooouxrenee of flnorMss in ground cscters that serve as dcniestio water suyylies end that there Ls an Lnoreasing tsndcnop to utilise ftuoxide oomyounds in th? ~eture of Lnseotioides, Whccre fluorine...

  20. Ground-water hydrology of the Panther Junction area of Big Bend National Park, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibson, John Lawrence

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -made discharge in the Panther Junction area is 52 acre-ft/yr. The possible ground-water deficit from total discharge is calculated at nine acre-ft/ yr. Therefore, recharge and discharge may be in balance. Transmissivity coefficients for six wells penetrating... the Aguja aquifer are 600 gpd/ft or less. The transmissi- vity at well 47-201, which also penetrates the Aguja aqui- fer, is 30, 000 gpd/ft. The transmissivity is 5500 gpd/ft at one of two production wells penetrating the Chisos aquifer in the K-Bar area...

  1. File:04NVBTemporaryUseOfGroundWaterForExploration.pdf | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealandORCEncroachment.pdf Jump to: navigation,Information 4NVBTemporaryUseOfGroundWaterForExploration.pdf

  2. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Well-Head Management and Conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    the risk it poses to your ground water. For example, a cracked well casing may allow fertilizer, nitrates, oil or pesticides to enter the well if these materials are spilled near the well. Feedlots, animal yards, septic systems and waste storage areas also... can release large amounts of bacteria, nitrates and other contam- inants that could pollute well water. The Texas Water Well Drillers Act (1985), the Water Well Pump Installer Act (1991) and vari- ous other legislative actions have guided devel- opment...

  3. Design of water-splitting photocatalysts by first principles computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yabi

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focuses on the design of novel inorganic water-splitting photocatalysts for solar applications using first principles computations. Water-splitting photocatalysts are materials that can photo-catalyze the ...

  4. Water protection in coke-plant design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.I. Alekseev [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Wastewater generation, water consumption, and water management at coke plants are considered. Measures to create runoff-free water-supply and sewer systems are discussed. Filters for water purification, corrosion inhibitors, and biocides are described. An integrated single-phase technology for the removal of phenols, thiocyanides, and ammoniacal nitrogen is outlined.

  5. A review and assessment of variable density ground water flow effects on plume formation at UMTRA project sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A standard assumption when evaluating the migration of plumes in ground water is that the impacted ground water has the same density as the native ground water. Thus density is assumed to be constant, and does not influence plume migration. This assumption is valid only for water with relatively low total dissolved solids (TDS) or a low difference in TDS between water introduced from milling processes and native ground water. Analyses in the literature suggest that relatively minor density differences can significantly affect plume migration. Density differences as small as 0.3 percent are known to cause noticeable effects on the plume migration path. The primary effect of density on plume migration is deeper migration than would be expected in the arid environments typically present at Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites, where little or no natural recharge is available to drive the plume into the aquifer. It is also possible that at some UMTRA Project sites, a synergistic affect occurred during milling operations, where the mounding created by tailings drainage (which created a downward vertical gradient) and the density contrast between the process water and native ground water acted together, driving constituents deeper into the aquifer than either process would alone. Numerical experiments were performed with the U.S. Geological Survey saturated unsaturated transport (SUTRA) model. This is a finite-element model capable of simulating the effects of variable fluid density on ground water flow and solute transport. The simulated aquifer parameters generally are representative of the Shiprock, New Mexico, UMTRA Project site where some of the highest TDS water from processing has been observed.

  6. Evaluation of chemical sensors for in situ ground-water monitoring at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, E.M.; Hostetler, D.D.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a preliminary review and evaluation of instrument systems and sensors that may be used to detect ground-water contaminants in situ at the Hanford Site. Three topics are covered in this report: (1) identification of a group of priority contaminants at Hanford that could be monitored in situ, (2) a review of current instrument systems and sensors for environmental monitoring, and (3) an evaluation of instrument systems that could be used to monitor Hanford contaminants. Thirteen priority contaminants were identified in Hanford ground water, including carbon tetrachloride and six related chlorinated hydrocarbons, cyanide, methyl ethyl ketone, chromium (VI), fluoride, nitrate, and uranium. Based on transduction principles, chemical sensors were divided into four classes, ten specific types of instrument systems were considered: fluorescence spectroscopy, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), spark excitation-fiber optic spectrochemical emission sensor (FOSES), chemical optrodes, stripping voltammetry, catalytic surface-modified ion electrode immunoassay sensors, resistance/capacitance, quartz piezobalance and surface acoustic wave devices. Because the flow of heat is difficult to control, there are currently no environmental chemical sensors based on thermal transduction. The ability of these ten instrument systems to detect the thirteen priority contaminants at the Hanford Site at the required sensitivity was evaluated. In addition, all ten instrument systems were qualitatively evaluated for general selectivity, response time, reliability, and field operability. 45 refs., 23 figs., 7 tabs.

  7. Implications of ground-water measurements at the Hoe Creek UCG site in northeastern Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mead, S.W.; Wang, F.T.; Stuermer, D.H.; Raber, E.; Ganow, H.C.; Stone, R.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Underground coal gasification (UCG) promises to become an important source of synthetic fuels. In an effort to provide timely information concerning the environmental implications of the UCG process, we are conducting investigations in conjunction with the UCG experiments carried out in northeastern Wyoming by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Our ground-water quality measurements have extended over a period of four years and have been supplemented by laboratory studies of contaminant sorption by coal. Cavity roof collapse and aquifer interconnection were also investigated, using surface and subsurface geotechnical instruments, post-burn coring, and hydraulic head measurements. We have found that a broad range of residual gasification products are introduced into the ground-water system. Fortunately, the concentrations of many of these contaminants are substantially reduced by sorption on the surrounding coal. However, some of these materials seem likely to remain in the local groundwater, at low concentrations, for several years. We have attempted to interpret our results in terms of concepts that will assist in the development of effective and practicable control technologies.

  8. Complete characterization of the water dimer vibrational ground state and testing the VRT(ASP-W)III,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    Complete characterization of the water dimer vibrational ground state and testing the VRT(ASP-W)III, SAPT-5st, and VRT(MCY-5f) surfaces FRANK N. KEUTSCH1 , NIR GOLDMAN2 , HEATHER A. HARKER3 , CLAUDE of the water dimer very well. The VRT(MCY-5f) and especially the VRT(ASP-W)III potentials show larger

  9. What is Nonpoint Source Pollution? Nonpoint Source Pollution, or people pollution, is a contamination of our ground water,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainforth, Emma C.

    , recreational water activities, the fishing industry, tourism and our precious drinking water resources, humans and fish. Do not dump used motor oil down storm drains or on the ground. Recycle all used motor such as fertilizing the lawn, walking pets, changing motor oil and littering. With each rainfall, pollutants generated

  10. Optimal design of ground source heat pump system integrated with phase change cooling storage tank in an office building 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, N.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optimal design of ground source heat pump system integrated with phase change cooling storage tank in an office building Na Zhu*, Yu Lei, Pingfang Hu, Linghong Xu, Zhangning Jiang Department of Building Environment and Equipment Engineering... heat pump system integrated with phase change cooling storage technology could save energy and shift peak load. This paper studied the optimal design of a ground source heat pump system integrated with phase change thermal storage tank in an office...

  11. Exergy and Energy analysis of a ground-source heat pump for domestic water heating under simulated occupancy conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents detailed analysis of a water to water ground source heat pump (WW-GSHP) to provide all the hot water needs in a 345 m2 house located in DOE climate zone 4 (mixed-humid). The protocol for hot water use is based on the Building America Research Benchmark Definition (Hendron 2008; Hendron and Engebrecht 2010) which aims to capture the living habits of the average American household and its impact on energy consumption. The entire house was operated under simulated occupancy conditions. Detailed energy and exergy analysis provides a complete set of information on system efficiency and sources of irreversibility, the main cause of wasted energy. The WW-GSHP was sized at 5.275 kW (1.5-ton) for this house and supplied hot water to a 303 L (80 gal) water storage tank. The WW-GSHP shared the same ground loop with a 7.56 kW (2.1-ton) water to air ground source heat pump (WA-GSHP) which provided space conditioning needs to the entire house. Data, analyses, and measures of performance for the WW-GSHP in this paper complements the results of the WA-GSHP published in this journal (Ally, Munk et al. 2012). Understanding the performance of GSHPs is vital if the ground is to be used as a viable renewable energy resource.

  12. Development of a three-dimensional ground-water model of the Hanford Site unconfined aquifer system: FY 1995 status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wurstner, S.K.; Thorne, P.D.; Chamness, M.A.; Freshley, M.D.; Williams, M.D.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A three-dimensional numerical model of ground-water flow was developed for the uppermost unconfined aquifer at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington. Development of the model is supported by the Hanford Site Ground-Water Surveillance Project, managed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, which is responsible for monitoring the sitewide movement of contaminants in ground water beneath the Hanford Site. Two objectives of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project are to (1) identify and quantify existing, emerging, or potential ground-water quality problems, and (2) assess the potential for contaminants to migrate from the Hanford Site through the ground-water pathway. Numerical models of the ground-water flow system are important tools for estimating future aquifer conditions and predicting the movement of contaminants through ground water. The Ground-Water Surveillance Project has supported development and maintenance of a two-dimensional model of the unconfined aquifer. This report describes upgrade of the two-dimensional model to a three-dimensional model. The numerical model is based on a three-dimensional conceptual model that will be continually refined and updated as additional information becomes available. This report presents a description of the three-dimensional conceptual model of ground-water flow in the unconfined aquifer system and then discusses the cur-rent state of the three-dimensional numerical model.

  13. Improved Design Tools for Surface Water and Standing Column Well Heat Pump Systems (DE-EE0002961)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spitler, J.D.; Culling, J.R.; Conjeevaram, K.; Ramesh, M.; Selvakumar, M.

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground-source heat pump (GSHP) systems are perhaps the most widely used “sustainable” heating and cooling systems, with an estimated 1.7 million installed units with total installed heating capacity on the order of 18 GW. They are widely used in residential, commercial, and institutional buildings. Standing column wells (SCW) are one form of ground heat exchanger that, under the right geological conditions, can provide excellent energy efficiency at a relatively low capital cost. Closed-loop surface water heat pump (SWHP) systems utilize surface water heat exchangers (SWHE) to reject or extract heat from nearby surface water bodies. For building near surface water bodies, these systems also offer a high degree of energy efficiency at a low capital cost. However, there have been few design tools available for properly sizing standing column wells or surface water heat exchangers. Nor have tools for analyzing the energy consumption and supporting economics-based design decisions been available. The main contributions of this project lie in providing new tools that support design and energy analysis. These include a design tool for sizing surface water heat exchangers, a design tool for sizing standing column wells, a new model of surface water heat pump systems implemented in EnergyPlus and a new model of standing column wells implemented in EnergyPlus. These tools will better help engineers design these systems and determine the economic and technical feasibility.

  14. Simulated effects of climate change on the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D`Agnese, F.A.; O`Brien, G.M.; Faunt, C.C.; San Juan, C.A.

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, is evaluating the geologic and hydrologic characteristics of the Death Valley regional flow system as part of the Yucca Mountain Project. As part of the hydrologic investigation, regional, three-dimensional conceptual and numerical ground-water-flow models have been developed to assess the potential effects of past and future climates on the regional flow system. A simulation that is based on climatic conditions 21,000 years ago was evaluated by comparing the simulated results to observation of paleodischarge sites. Following acceptable simulation of a past climate, a possible future ground-water-flow system, with climatic conditions that represent a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide, was simulated. The steady-state simulations were based on the present-day, steady-state, regional ground-water-flow model. The finite-difference model consisted of 163 rows, 153 columns, and 3 layers and was simulated using MODFLOWP. Climate changes were implemented in the regional ground-water-flow model by changing the distribution of ground-water recharge. Global-scale, average-annual, simulated precipitation for both past- and future-climate conditions developed elsewhere were resampled to the model-grid resolution. A polynomial function that represents the Maxey-Eakin method for estimating recharge from precipitation was used to develop recharge distributions for simulation.

  15. Hydrogeologic evaluation and numerical simulation of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D`Agnese, F.A.; Faunt, C.C.; Turner, A.K.; Hill, M.C.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Yucca Mountain is being studied as a potential site for a high-level radioactive waste repository. In cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Geological Survey is evaluating the geologic and hydrologic characteristics of the ground-water system. The study area covers approximately 100,000 square kilometers between lat 35{degrees}N., long 115{degrees}W and lat 38{degrees}N., long 118{degrees}W and encompasses the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system. Hydrology in the region is a result of both the and climatic conditions and the complex described as dominated by interbasinal flow and may be conceptualized as having two main components: a series of relatively shallow and localized flow paths that are superimposed on deeper regional flow paths. A significant component of the regional ground-water flow is through a thick Paleozoic carbonate rock sequence. Throughout the regional flow system, ground-water flow is probably controlled by extensive and prevalent structural features that result from regional faulting and fracturing. Hydrogeologic investigations over a large and hydrogeologically complex area impose severe demands on data management. This study utilized geographic information systems and geoscientific information systems to develop, store, manipulate, and analyze regional hydrogeologic data sets describing various components of the ground-water flow system.

  16. Design of Hard Water Stable Emulsifier Systems for Petroleum-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarens, Andres

    Design of Hard Water Stable Emulsifier Systems for Petroleum- and Bio-based Semi for petroleum and bio-based MWFs that improve fluid lifetime by providing emulsion stability under hard water. The newly developed petroleum and bio-based formulations with improved hard water stability are competitive

  17. Design package for solar domestic hot water system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information used to evaluate the initial design of the Elcam, Inc., Solar Domestic Hot Water System is presented. Included are such items as the system performance specification, detailed design drawings and other information. Elcam, Inc., has developed two solar heated prototype hot water systems and two heat exchangers. The hot water systems consist of the following subsystems: collector, storage, control, transport, auxiliary energy, and government-furnished Site Data Acquisition. The two systems are installed at Tempe, Arizona, and San Diego, California.

  18. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado: Attachment 4, water resources protection strategy; Preliminary final

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This attachment contains a summary of the proposed water resources protection strategy developed to achieve compliance with US EPA ground water protection standards for the remedial action plan at the Slick Rock, CO uranium mill tailings sites. Included are the conceptual design considerations such as climate and infiltration, surface and subsurface drainage, and features for water resources protection such as disposal cell cover components, transient drainage and control of construction water, subsidence and disposal cell longevity. The disposal and control of radioactive materials and nonradioactive contaminants as it relates to ground water protection standards is discussed, and the plan for cleanup and control of existing contamination is outlined.

  19. Comment and response document for the ground water protection strategy for the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Green River, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) responses to comments from both the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the state of Utah are provided in this document. The Proposed Ground Water Protection Strategy for the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Green River, Utah, presents the proposed (modified) ground water protection strategy for the disposal cell at the Green River disposal site for compliance with Subpart A of 40 CFR Part 192. Before the disposal cell was constructed, site characterization was conducted at the Green River Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site to determine an acceptable compliance strategy. Results of the investigation are reported in detail in the final remedial action plan (RAP) (DOE, 1991a). The NRC and the state of Utah have accepted the final RAP. The changes in this document relate only to a modification of the compliance strategy for ground water protection.

  20. US Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action ground water Project. Revision 1, Version 1: Final project plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The scope of the Project is to develop and implement a ground water compliance strategy for all 24 UMTRA processing sites. The compliance strategy for the processing sites must satisfy requirements of the proposed EPA ground water cleanup standards in 40 CFR Part 192, Subparts B and C (1988). This scope of work will entail the following activities, on a site-specific basis: Development of a compliance strategy based upon modification of the UMTRA Surface Project remedial action plans (RAP) or development of Ground Water Project RAPs with NRC and state or tribal concurrence on the RAP; implementation of the RAP to include establishment of institutional controls, where appropriate; institution of long-term verification monitoring for transfer to a separate DOE program on or before the Project end date; and preparation of completion reports and final licensing on those sites that will be completed prior to the Project end date.

  1. Fundamental Studies of the Removal of Contaminants from Ground and Waste Waters via Reduction by Zero-Valent Metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yarmoff, Jory A.; Amrhein, Christopher

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contaminated groundwater and surface waters are a problem throughout the United States and the world. In many instances, the types of contamination can be directly attributed to man's actions. For instance, the burial of chemical wastes, casual disposal of solvents in unlined pits, and the development of irrigated agriculture have all contributed to groundwater and surface water contamination. The kinds of contaminants include chlorinated solvents and toxic trace elements (including radioisotopes) that are soluble and mobile in soils and aquifers. Oxyanions of uranium, selenium, chromium, arsenic, technetium, and chlorine (as perchlorate) are frequently found as contaminants on many DOE sites. Uranium is a particularly widespread contaminant at most DOE sites including Oak Ridge, Rocky Flats, Hanford, Idaho (INEEL), and Fernald. The uranium contamination is associated with mining and milling of uranium ore (UMTRA sites), isotope separation and enrichment, and mixed waste and TRU waste burial. In addition, the careless disposal of halogenated solvents, such as carbon tetrachloride and trichloroethylene, has further contaminated many groundwaters at these sites. A potential remediation method for many of these oxyanions and chlorinated-solvents is to react the contaminated water with zero-valent iron. In this reaction, the iron serves as both an electron source and as a catalyst. Elemental iron is already being used on an experimental basis at many DOE sites. Both in situ reactive barriers and above-ground reactors are being developed for this purpose. However, the design and operation of these treatment systems requires a detailed process-level understanding of the interactions between the contaminants and the iron surfaces. We are performing fundamental investigations of the interactions of the relevant chlorinated solvents and trace element-containing compounds with single- and poly-crystalline Fe surfaces. The aim of this work is to develop th e fundamental physical and chemical understanding that is necessary for the development of cleanup techniques and procedures.

  2. Evaluation of health risks associated with proposed ground water standards at selected inactive uranium mill-tailings sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Medeiros, W.H.; Meinhold, A.; Morris, S.C.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Nagy, J.; Lackey, K.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed ground water standards applicable to all inactive uranium mill-tailings sites. The proposed standards include maximum concentration limits (MCL) for currently regulated drinking water contaminants, as well as the addition of standards for molybdenum, uranium, nitrate, and radium-226 plus radium-228. The proposed standards define the point of compliance to be everywhere downgradient of the tailings pile, and require ground water remediation to drinking water standards if MCLs are exceeded. This document presents a preliminary description of the Phase 2 efforts. The potential risks and hazards at Gunnison, Colorado and Lakeview, Oregon were estimated to demonstrate the need for a risk assessment and the usefulness of a cost-benefit approach in setting supplemental standards and determining the need for and level of restoration at UMTRA sites. 8 refs., 12 tabs.

  3. Brine contamination of ground water and streams in the Baxterville Oil Field Area, Lamar and Marion Counties, Mississippi. Water resources investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalkhoff, S.J.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The report defines the extent of oil-field-brine contamination in ground water and streams in the Baxterville oil field area. The report is based largely on data collected during the period October 1984 through November 1985. Water samples were collected from streams and wells in the study area. Data from a previous study conducted in the vicinity of the nearby Tatum Salt Dome were used for background water-quality information. Natural surface-water quality was determined by sampling streamflow from a nearby basin having no oil field activities and from samples collected in an adjacent basin during a previous study.

  4. Measured Performance and Analysis of Ground Source Heat Pumps for Space Conditioning and for Water Heating in a Low-Energy Test House Operated under Simulated Occupancy Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL] [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL] [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL] [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present measured performance and efficiency metrics of Ground Source Heat Pumps (GSHPs) for space conditioning and for water heating connected to a horizontal ground heat exchanger (GHX) loop. The units were installed in a 345m2 (3700ft2) high-efficiency test house built with structural insulated panels (SIPs), operated under simulated occupancy conditions, and located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (USA) in US Climate Zone 4 . The paper describes distinctive features of the building envelope, ground loop, and equipment, and provides detailed monthly performance of the GSHP system. Space conditioning needs of the house were completely satisfied by a nominal 2-ton (7.0 kW) water-to-air GSHP (WA-GSHP) unit with almost no auxiliary heat usage. Recommendations for further improvement through engineering design changes are identified. The comprehensive set of data and analyses demonstrate the feasibility and practicality of GSHPs in residential applications and their potential to help achieve source energy and greenhouse gas emission reduction targets set under the IECC 2012 Standard.

  5. Acoustically enhanced remediation of contaminated soils and ground water. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Phase 1 laboratory bench-scale investigation results have shown that acoustically enhanced remediation (AER) technology can significantly accelerate the ground water remediation of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in unconsolidated soils. The testing also determined some of the acoustic parameters which maximize fluid and contaminant extraction rates. A technology merit and trade analysis identified the conditions under which AER could be successfully deployed in the field, and an analysis of existing acoustical sources and varying methods for their deployment found that AER technology can be successfully deployed in-situ. Current estimates of deployability indicate that a NAPL plume 150 ft in diameter can be readily remediated. This program focused on unconsolidated soils because of the large number of remediation sites located in this type of hydrogeologic setting throughout the nation. It also focused on NAPLs and low permeability soil because of the inherent difficult in the remediation of NAPLs and the significant time and cost impact caused by contaminated low permeability soils. This overall program is recommended for Phase 2 which will address the technology scaling requirements for a field scale test.

  6. Design of a high temperature hot water central heating system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beaumont, E.L.; Johnson, R.C.; Weaver, J.M.

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper reviews the conceptual design of a central heating system at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. The resource considered for this heating system design was hot dry rock geothermal energy. Design criteria were developed to ensure reliability of energy supply, to provide flexibility for adaptation to multiple energy resources, to make optimum use of existing equipment and to minimize reinvestment cost. A variable temperature peaking high temperature water system was selected for this purpose.

  7. Selecting the Design Entering Water Temperature for Vertical Geothermal Heat Pumps in Cooling-Dominated Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonder, John A [ORNL; Thornton, Jeff W. [Thermal Energy Systems Specialists, Inc.; Hughes, Patrick [ORNL

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At a military base in the Southeastern United States, an energy services company (ESCO) has proposed to retrofit more than 1,000 family residences with geothermal heat pumps as part of an energy savings performance contract (ESPC). Each residence is to have one heat pump with its own ground heat exchanger consisting of two or more vertical bores. A design firm hired by the ESCO sized the heat pumps to meet peak cooling loads, and sized the borefields to limit the maximum entering water temperature (EWT) to the heat pumps to 95 F (35 C). Because there is some disagreement in the geothermal heat pump industry over the peak temperature to be used for design (some designers and design manuals recommend temperatures as low as 85 F [29 C], while equipment manufacturers and others specify temperatures of 100 F [38 C] or higher) the authors were requested to examine the designs in detail to determine whether the 95 F (35 C) limit was adequate to ensure occupant comfort, efficient operation, and low capital and operating costs. It was found that three of the designer's assumptions made the borefield designs more conservative (i.e., longer) than the 95 F (35 C) limit would indicate. In fact, the analysis indicates that with more realistic assumptions about system operation, the maximum entering water temperature at the modeled residence will be about 89 F (32 C). Given the implications of a borefield that is shorter than required, it is likely that other designers are using similarly conservative assumptions to size vertical borefields for geothermal heat pumps. This implies that unless all of the design assumptions are examined, blanket recommendations to limit the entering water temperature to a specific value (such as 90 F [32 C]) may result in borefields that are significantly oversized.

  8. Selecting the Design Entering Water Temperature for Vertical Geothermal Heat Pumps in Cooling-Dominated Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonder, J.A.

    2001-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    At a military base in the Southeastern US, an energy services company (ESCO) has proposed to retrofit more than 1,000 family residences with geothermal heat pumps as part of an energy savings performance contract (ESPC). Each residence is to have one heat pump with its own ground heat exchanger consisting of two or more vertical bores. A design firm hired by the ESCO sized the heat pumps to meet peak cooling loads, and sized the borefields to limit the maximum entering water temperature (EWT) to the heat pumps to 95 F (35 C). Because there is some disagreement in the geothermal heat pump industry over the peak temperature to be used for design (some designers and design manuals recommend temperatures as low as 85 F [29 C], while equipment manufacturers and others specify temperatures of 100 F [38 C] or higher) the authors were requested to examine the designs in detail to determine whether the 95 F (35 C) limit was adequate to ensure occupant comfort, efficient operation, and low capital and operating costs. It was found that three of the designer's assumptions made the borefield designs more conservative (i.e., longer) than the 95 F (35 C) limit would indicate. In fact, the analysis indicates that with more realistic assumptions about system operation, the maximum entering water temperature at the modeled residence will be about 89 F (32 C). Given the implications of a borefield that is shorter than required, it is likely that other designers are using similarly conservative assumptions to size vertical borefields for geothermal heat pumps. This implies that unless all of the design assumptions are examined, blanket recommendations to limit the entering water temperature to a specific value (such as 90 F [32 C]) may result in borefields that are significantly oversized.

  9. Mitigative techniques and analysis of generic site conditions for ground-water contamination associated with severe accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafer, J.M.; Oberlander, P.L.; Skaggs, R.L.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using ground-water contaminant mitigation techniques to control radionuclide migration following a severe commercial nuclear power reactor accident. The two types of severe commercial reactor accidents investigated are: (1) containment basemat penetration of core melt debris which slowly cools and leaches radionuclides to the subsurface environment, and (2) containment basemat penetration of sump water without full penetration of the core mass. Six generic hydrogeologic site classifications are developed from an evaluation of reported data pertaining to the hydrogeologic properties of all existing and proposed commercial reactor sites. One-dimensional radionuclide transport analyses are conducted on each of the individual reactor sites to determine the generic characteristics of a radionuclide discharge to an accessible environment. Ground-water contaminant mitigation techniques that may be suitable, depending on specific site and accident conditions, for severe power plant accidents are identified and evaluated. Feasible mitigative techniques and associated constraints on feasibility are determined for each of the six hydrogeologic site classifications. The first of three case studies is conducted on a site located on the Texas Gulf Coastal Plain. Mitigative strategies are evaluated for their impact on contaminant transport and results show that the techniques evaluated significantly increased ground-water travel times. 31 references, 118 figures, 62 tables.

  10. Design for an invertible water bottle to facilitate cleaning and promote sustainable water bottle usage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metlitz, Matthew S

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this thesis is to explore the design of a reusable water bottle that can be inverted to expose the inside. Being able to directly touch the entire inside of the product could facilitate cleaning and consequently ...

  11. Measured Space Conditioning and Water Heating Performance of a Ground-Source Integrated Heat Pump in a Residential Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL] [ORNL; Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL] [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL] [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an effort to reduce residential building energy consumption, a ground-source integrated heat pump was developed to meet a home s entire space conditioning and water heating needs, while providing 50% energy savings relative to a baseline suite of minimum efficiency equipment. A prototype 7.0 kW system was installed in a 344 m2 research house with simulated occupancy in Oak Ridge, TN. The equipment was monitored from June 2012 through January 2013.

  12. Bordering on Water Management: Ground and Wastewater in the United States - Mexico Transboundary Santa Cruz Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milman, Anita Dale

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    have been caused to a lack of water; rather it is believedconsider how, given a lack of clear water management goals,incomplete due to a lack of surface water measurements. Not

  13. Development and chemical quality of a ground-water system in cast overburden as the Gibbons Creek Lignite Mine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borbely, Evelyn Susanna

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -water conditions which develop in response to surface mining. TMPA has supported research at the Gibbons Creek Lignite Mine in order to meet the needs of mine develop- ment and permitting, Most of the data on ground-water conditions 1n reclaimed spoil has been... on the west by the Navasota River, on the south by Gibbons Creek, and on the north by State Highway 30 (Figure 1). This area includes the Gibbons Creek Steam Electric Station. Lignite is extracted from two pits within the permit boundary, termed the A...

  14. Design and Operation of Fan-Coil Units in Using River Water as Chilled Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, A.; Chen, H.; Ma, W.; Zhu, H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) in the system. An approximate formula is proposed for computing the cooling capacity of FCUs when the temperature of water supply is a little higher than designed temperature. Finally, recommendations are given for the design of the FCUs to follow dry operating...

  15. Ground-water flow and recharge in the Mahomet Bedrock Valley Aquifer, east-central Illinois: A conceptual model based on hydrochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panno, S.V.; Hackley, K.C.; Cartwright, K.; Liu, C.L. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Major-ion and isotopic analyses of ground water have been used to develop a conceptual model of flow and recharge to the Mahomet Bedrock Valley Aquifer (MVA). The MVA is composed of clean, permeable sands and gravels and forms a basal'' fill up to 60 m thick in a buried, west-trending bedrock valley. A thick succession of glacial tills, some containing interbedded lenses of sand and gravel, covers the MVA. Three regions within the MVA have hydrochemically distinct ground-water types. A fourth ground-water type was found at the confluence of the MVA and the Mackinaw Bedrock Valley Aquifer (MAK) to the west.

  16. Minimalist design of water-soluble cross-[beta] architecture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biancalana, Matthew; Makabe, Koki; Koide, Shohei (UC)

    2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Demonstrated successes of protein design and engineering suggest significant potential to produce diverse protein architectures and assemblies beyond those found in nature. Here, we describe a new class of synthetic protein architecture through the successful design and atomic structures of water-soluble cross-{beta} proteins. The cross-{beta} motif is formed from the lamination of successive {beta}-sheet layers, and it is abundantly observed in the core of insoluble amyloid fibrils associated with protein-misfolding diseases. Despite its prominence, cross-{beta} has been designed only in the context of insoluble aggregates of peptides or proteins. Cross-{beta}'s recalcitrance to protein engineering and conspicuous absence among the known atomic structures of natural proteins thus makes it a challenging target for design in a water-soluble form. Through comparative analysis of the cross-{beta} structures of fibril-forming peptides, we identified rows of hydrophobic residues ('ladders') running across {beta}-strands of each {beta}-sheet layer as a minimal component of the cross-{beta} motif. Grafting a single ladder of hydrophobic residues designed from the Alzheimer's amyloid-{beta} peptide onto a large {beta}-sheet protein formed a dimeric protein with a cross-{beta} architecture that remained water-soluble, as revealed by solution analysis and x-ray crystal structures. These results demonstrate that the cross-{beta} motif is a stable architecture in water-soluble polypeptides and can be readily designed. Our results provide a new route for accessing the cross-{beta} structure and expanding the scope of protein design.

  17. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Progress report for the period October 1 to December 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E. (eds.)

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is Volume 1 of a two-volume document that describes the progress of 15 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period October 1 to December 31, 1989. This volume discusses the projects. The work described in this document is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the management of Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy. Concentrations of ground-water constituents are compared to federal drinking water standards throughout this document for reference purposes. All drinking water supplied from the samples aquifer meets regulatory standards for drinking water quality. 51 refs., 35 figs., 86 tabs.

  18. Summary of ground water and surface water flow and contaminant transport computer codes used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandy, P.J.; Hall, L.F.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents information on computer codes for numerical and analytical models that have been used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to model ground water and surface water flow and contaminant transport. Organizations conducting modeling at the INEL include: EG&G Idaho, Inc., US Geological Survey, and Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company. Information concerning computer codes included in this report are: agency responsible for the modeling effort, name of the computer code, proprietor of the code (copyright holder or original author), validation and verification studies, applications of the model at INEL, the prime user of the model, computer code description, computing environment requirements, and documentation and references for the computer code.

  19. Summary of ground water and surface water flow and contaminant transport computer codes used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). [Contaminant transport computer codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandy, P.J.; Hall, L.F.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents information on computer codes for numerical and analytical models that have been used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to model ground water and surface water flow and contaminant transport. Organizations conducting modeling at the INEL include: EG G Idaho, Inc., US Geological Survey, and Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company. Information concerning computer codes included in this report are: agency responsible for the modeling effort, name of the computer code, proprietor of the code (copyright holder or original author), validation and verification studies, applications of the model at INEL, the prime user of the model, computer code description, computing environment requirements, and documentation and references for the computer code.

  20. Ground-water heat pumps: an examination of hydrogeologic, environmental, legal, and economic factors affecting their use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armitage, D.M.; Bacon, D.J.; Massey-Norton, J.T.; Miller, J.D.

    1980-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Groundwater is attractive as a potential low-temperature energy source in residential space-conditioning applications. When used in conjuncton with a heat pump, ground water can serve as both a heat source (for heating) and a heat sink (for cooling). Major hydrogeologic aspects that affect system use include groundwater temperature and availability at shallow depths as these factors influence operational efficiency. Ground-water quality is considered as it affects the performance and life-expectancy of the water-side heat exchanger. Environmental impacts related to groundwater heat pump system use are most influenced by water use and disposal methods. In general, recharge to the subsurface (usually via injection wells) is recommended. Legal restrictions on system use are often stricter at the municipal and county levels than at state and Federal levels. Although Federal regulations currently exist, the agencies are not equipped to regulate individual, domestic installations. Computer smulations indicate that under a variety of climatologic conditions, groundwater heat pumps use less energy than conventional heating and cooling equipment. Life-cycle cost comparisons with conventional equipment depend on alternative system choices and well cost options included in the groundwater heat pump system.

  1. PII S0016-7037(00)00369-0 Ra isotopes and Rn in brines and ground waters of the Jordan-Dead Sea Rift Valley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yehoshua, Kolodny

    PII S0016-7037(00)00369-0 Ra isotopes and Rn in brines and ground waters of the Jordan-Dead Sea Valley waters being mixtures of fresh water with saline brines. Ra is efficiently extracted from surrounding rocks into the brine end member. 228 Ra/226 Ra ratios are exceptionally low 0.07 to 0.9, mostly

  2. Chlorofluorocarbons, Sulfur Hexafluoride, and Dissolved Permanent Gases in Ground Water from Selected Sites In and Near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1994 - 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busenberg, E.; Plummer, L.N.; Bartholomay, R.C.; Wayland, J.E.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From July 1994 through May 1997, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperations with the Department of Energy, sampled 86 wells completed in the Snake River Plain aquifer at and near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The wells were sampled for a variety of constituents including one- and two-carbon halocarbons. Concentrations of dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC-12), trichlorofluoromethane (CFC-11), and trichlorotrifluororoethane (CFC-113) were determined. The data will be used to evaluate the ages of ground waters at INEEL. The ages of the ground water will be used to determine recharge rates, residence time, and travel time of water in the Snake River Plain aquifer in and near INEEL. The chromatograms of 139 ground waters are presented showing a large number of halomethanes, haloethanes, and haloethenes present in the ground waters underlying the INEEL. The chromatograms can be used to qualitatively evaluate a large number of contaminants at parts per trillion to parts per billion concentrations. The data can be used to study temporal and spatial distribution of contaminants in the Snake River Plain aquifer. Representative compressed chromatograms for all ground waters sampled in this study are available on two 3.5-inch high density computer disks. The data and the program required to decompress the data can be obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey office at Idaho Falls, Idaho. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) concentrations were measured in selected wells to determine the feasibility of using this environmental tracer as an age dating tool of ground water. Concentrations of dissolved nitrogen, argon, carbon dioxide, oxygen, and methane were measured in 79 ground waters. Concentrations of dissolved permanent gases are tabulated and will be used to evaluate the temperature of recharge of ground water in and near the INEEL.

  3. VARIATIONS IN RADON-222 IN SOIL AND GROUND WATER AT THE NEVADA TEST SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wollenberg, H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    water 222Rn by gamma-ray spectrometry. There was no clearlyradioelement content by gamma-ray spectrometry. Results are

  4. Rev. 02/15/10 Construction: Any construction project regardless of size that disturbs soil, ground cover, or uses water (including pressure washing) that

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rev. 02/15/10 Construction: Any construction project regardless of size that disturbs soil, ground/proposed construction project: EHS Office Use Only Recommendations: ______________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________ _____________________ Approval Date Storm Water Management Program The University of Texas at Austin Notification of Construction

  5. Tennessee Water Resources Information Act (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tennessee Water Resources Information Act is designed to prevent the lowering of the ground water table by requiring that adequate information is obtained to document current demand for water...

  6. Evaluation of two solid waste landfills, a Superfund site, and strip mining on ground water quality in Portage County, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, D.L. (OH/EPA, Logan, OH (United States)); Moody, J.B. (J.B. Moody and Associates, Athens, OH (United States)); Smith, G.W. (Ohio Univ., Athens, OH (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Willow Creek Landfill, the Jones Landfill, the Summit National Superfund Site, and Peterson Strip Mine are located in a 2 mi[sup 2] area in the SE portion of Portage County, OH. This study evaluated these potential sources of environmental pollution on ground water resources in 2 townships in Portage County, OH. The study area, comprising 15 mi[sup 2], is located in the glaciated portion of NE Ohio. The geology consists of alternating sandstones, siltstones, shales, and coal of the Pottsville Group of Pennsylvanian Age, overlain with glacial drift of the Wisconsin Glaciation of the Pleistocene Epoch. The Pottsville Formation was divided into 3 aquifers: shallow, intermediate, and deep for this study. 55 domestic wells in the study area and 13 monitoring wells at Willow Creek landfill were samples and analyzed for 23 inorganic chemical parameters. High concentrations of total dissolved solids, hardness, Cl, SO[sub 4], Ca, Fe, Mg, Mn, and Na were found in wells located to the SE and W of the potential contamination sources, from water in the shallow aquifer. The other two aquifers are inorganically uncontaminated at this time. The presence of a buried glacial valley is influencing the ground water flow patterns locally, which results in an increase in total dissolved solids with other inorganic geochemical parameters to the west of the four contamination sources.

  7. Integrated Heat Pump (IHP) System Development - Air-Source IHP Control Strategy and Specifications and Ground-Source IHP Conceptual Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Richard W [ORNL; Rice, C Keith [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The integrated heat pump (IHP), as one appliance, can provide space cooling, heating, ventilation, and dehumidification while maintaining comfort and meeting domestic water heating needs in near-zero-energy home (NZEH) applications. In FY 2006 Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) completed development of a control strategy and system specification for an air-source IHP. The conceptual design of a ground-source IHP was also completed. Testing and analysis confirm the potential of both IHP concepts to meet NZEH energy services needs while consuming 50% less energy than a suite of equipment that meets current minimum efficiency requirements. This report is in fulfillment of an FY06 DOE Building Technologies (BT) Joule Milestone.

  8. Electrosorption on carbon aerogel electrodes as a means of treating low-level radioactive wastes and remediating contaminated ground water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tran, Tri Duc; Farmer, Joseph C.; DePruneda, Jean H.; Richardson, Jeffery H.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel separation process based upon carbon aerogel electrodes has been recently developed for the efficient removal of ionic impurities from aqueous streams. This process can be used as an electrical y- regenerated alternative to ion exchange, thereby reducing-the need for large quantities of chemical regenerants. Once spent (contaminated), these regenerants contribute to the waste that must be disposed of in landfills. The elimination of such wastes is especially beneficial in situations involving radioactive contaminants, and pump and treat processing of massive volumes of ground water. A review and analysis of potential applications will be presented.

  9. An Ontology Design Pattern for Surface Water Features

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinha, Gaurav [Ohio University, Athens; Mark, David [University at Buffalo, NY; Kolas, Dave [Raytheon BBN Technologies; Varanka, Dalia [U.S. Geological Survey, Rolla, MO; Romero, Boleslo E [University of California, Santa Barbara; Feng, Chen-Chieh [National University of Singapore; Usery, Lynn [U.S. Geological Survey, Rolla, MO; Liebermann, Joshua [Tumbling Walls, LLC; Sorokine, Alexandre [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface water is a primary concept of human experience but concepts are captured in cultures and languages in many different ways. Still, many commonalities can be found due to the physical basis of many of the properties and categories. An abstract ontology of surface water features based only on those physical properties of landscape features has the best potential for serving as a foundational domain ontology. It can then be used to systematically incor-porate concepts that are specific to a culture, language, or scientific domain. The Surface Water ontology design pattern was developed both for domain knowledge distillation and to serve as a conceptual building-block for more complex surface water ontologies. A fundamental distinction is made in this on-tology between landscape features that act as containers (e.g., stream channels, basins) and the bodies of water (e.g., rivers, lakes) that occupy those containers. Concave (container) landforms semantics are specified in a Dry module and the semantics of contained bodies of water in a Wet module. The pattern is imple-mented in OWL, but Description Logic axioms and a detailed explanation is provided. The OWL ontology will be an important contribution to Semantic Web vocabulary for annotating surface water feature datasets. A discussion about why there is a need to complement the pattern with other ontologies, es-pecially the previously developed Surface Network pattern is also provided. Fi-nally, the practical value of the pattern in semantic querying of surface water datasets is illustrated through a few queries and annotated geospatial datasets.

  10. Ground water of Yucca Mountain: How high can it rise?; Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the geology, hydrology, and possible rise of the water tables at Yucca Mountain. The possibilities of rainfall and earthquakes causing flooding is discussed.

  11. In Situ Production of Chlorine-36 in the Eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer, Idaho: Implications for Describing Ground-Water Contamination Near a Nuclear Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. D. Cecil; L. L. Knobel; J. R. Green (USGS); S. K. Frape (University of Waterloo)

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to describe the calculated contribution to ground water of natural, in situ produced 36Cl in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer and to compare these concentrations in ground water with measured concentrations near a nuclear facility in southeastern Idaho. The scope focused on isotopic and chemical analyses and associated 36Cl in situ production calculations on 25 whole-rock samples from 6 major water-bearing rock types present in the eastern Snake River Plain. The rock types investigated were basalt, rhyolite, limestone, dolomite, shale, and quartzite. Determining the contribution of in situ production to 36Cl inventories in ground water facilitated the identification of the source for this radionuclide in environmental samples. On the basis of calculations reported here, in situ production of 36Cl was determined to be insignificant compared to concentrations measured in ground water near buried and injected nuclear waste at the INEEL. Maximum estimated 36Cl concentrations in ground water from in situ production are on the same order of magnitude as natural concentrations in meteoric water.

  12. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Petroleum Product Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.; Kantor, A. S.

    1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Texas AgriLife Extension Service Petroleum Products Overview Storing liquid petroleum products, such as motor fuel and heating fuel, above ground or underground presents a potential threat to pub- lic health and the environment. Nearly one out... with Varying Permeability Land Surface Figure 1. Petroleum product seepage into soils. Source: Underground Tank Corrective Action Technologies, EPA/625/6-87-015, January 1987. filled. Overfill protection is either a warning device, such as, a buzzer or a...

  13. User`s Guide: Database of literature pertaining to the unsaturated zone and surface water-ground water interactions at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, L.F.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since its beginnings in 1949, hydrogeologic investigations at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) have resulted in an extensive collection of technical publications providing information concerning ground water hydraulics and contaminant transport within the unsaturated zone. Funding has been provided by the Department of Energy through the Department of Energy Idaho Field Office in a grant to compile an INEL-wide summary of unsaturated zone studies based on a literature search. University of Idaho researchers are conducting a review of technical documents produced at or pertaining to the INEL, which present or discuss processes in the unsaturated zone and surface water-ground water interactions. Results of this review are being compiled as an electronic database. Fields are available in this database for document title and associated identification number, author, source, abstract, and summary of information (including types of data and parameters). AskSam{reg_sign}, a text-based database system, was chosen. WordPerfect 5.1{copyright} is being used as a text-editor to input data records into askSam.

  14. FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heaters, hot water supply boilers, and unfired hot water storage tanks.heaters, hot water supply boilers, and unfired hot water storage tanks.

  15. Factor water treatment up-front in IPP plant design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levine, J.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes how independent power producers profit from drawing on the expertise of a water-treatment supplier at the inception of a project. Concepts presented here apply to other major subsystems. The nature of independent power project development, both domestic and international, has resulted in many innovative approaches to client service. The highly competitive, fast-track nature of project development requires that financial pro forma plans remain fluid, with periodic updates made as the project races from conceptual design through financial closing. Suppliers are continually called upon to provide insight and expertise to facilitate the project. Their expertise is also sought by organizations considering the purchase of an existing independent power producer (IPP) facility. Many foundation steps'' occur during early commercial development. Among these are: response to a request for proposals, power slates agreements, feasibility studies, site qualification, contract negotiation, host development, and steam sales agreements. As the project moves forward, development of comprehensive design and equipment specifications, equipment selection, and financial analysis are required. One aspect frequently overlooked because of the multitude of business and technical issues involved is the water supply. With public water supplies often inaccessible, it may be necessary to make use of a poor-quality source--such as effluent from publicly owned treatment works (POTWs), acid mine drainage, host-facility process discharge, landfill leachate, and produced water from oil fields. Even if surface water or groundwater is available, the quality and often the quantity may be unknown, or there may be no provisions for discharge of wastewater.

  16. RELATIONS BETWEEN THE DETECTION OF METHYL TERT-BUTYL ETHER (MTBE) IN SURFACE AND GROUND WATER AND ITS CONTENT IN GASOLINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RELATIONS BETWEEN THE DETECTION OF METHYL TERT-BUTYL ETHER (MTBE) IN SURFACE AND GROUND WATER.S. Geological Survey 1608 Mt. View Rapid City, SD 57702 Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is commonly used today, the one used most commonly is MTBE. To meet the oxygen requirements of the CAA Amendments, gasoline

  17. Ground-Based and Airborne (PMS 2-D Probe Canister-Mounted) 183 GHz Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.NewofGeothermal Heaton Armed ServicesGround-Based MicrowaveVapor

  18. Robot design for leak detection in water-pipe systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Changrak

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Leaks are major problem that occur in the water pipelines all around the world. Several reports indicate loss of around 20 to 30 percent of water in the distribution of water through water pipe systems. Such loss of water ...

  19. A Farm-Level Evaluation of Agricultural Profit and Ground Water Quality: Texas Seymour Aquifer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chowdhury, Manzoor; Lacewell, Ronald D.; McCarl, Bruce A.; Ozuna, Teofilo Jr.; Benson, Verel W.; Harris, Billy L.; Dyke, Paul T.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Seymour Aquifer of north-central Texas is known to have elevated levels of nitrates. The design of economically sound policies for reducing agriculture's nitrate contribution to the aquifer suggests a need to evaluate alternative management...

  20. USGS Professional Paper 1703--Ground-Water Recharge in the Arid and Semiarid Southwestern United States--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    water at the land surface can occur at discreet locations, such as in stream channels, or be distributed on temperature include viscosity, density, and surface tension, all of which affect hydraulic conductivity the sun, radiant cooling into space, and evapotranspi- ration, in addition to the advective and conductive

  1. Prediction of postmine ground-water quality at a Texas surface lignite mine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wise, Clifton Farrell

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The predominant factors which affect spoil water quality have not been completely identified to date. Therefore, the Gibbons Creek Lignite Mine in Grimes County, Texas was chosen as a test site to evaluate the potential factors that can affect the geochemical...

  2. Prediction of postmine ground-water quality at a Texas surface lignite mine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wise, Clifton Farrell

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The predominant factors which affect spoil water quality have not been completely identified to date. Therefore, the Gibbons Creek Lignite Mine in Grimes County, Texas was chosen as a test site to evaluate the potential factors that can affect the geochemical...

  3. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford Site facilities: Volume 2, Appendices A and B: Progress report, January 1, 1987 to March 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report convers recent progress on ground-water monitoring programs for four Hanford Site facilities: the 300 Area Process Trenches, the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins, the 200 Area Low-Level Burial Grounds, and the Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill. The time period covered by this covered by this report is January 1 to March 31, 1987. Volume 2 contains Appendices A and B.

  4. Applicability of Related Data, Algorithms, and Models to the Simulation of Ground-Coupled Residential Hot Water Piping in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warner, J.L.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the temperature of the residual water encountered by theof hot water and the residual water might occur: (1) thehot water might drive the residual water through the piping

  5. Development of Earthquake Ground Motion Input for Preclosure Seismic Design and Postclosure Performance Assessment of a Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, NV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    I. Wong

    2004-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a site-response model and its implementation for developing earthquake ground motion input for preclosure seismic design and postclosure assessment of the proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The model implements a random-vibration theory (RVT), one-dimensional (1D) equivalent-linear approach to calculate site response effects on ground motions. The model provides results in terms of spectral acceleration including peak ground acceleration, peak ground velocity, and dynamically-induced strains as a function of depth. In addition to documenting and validating this model for use in the Yucca Mountain Project, this report also describes the development of model inputs, implementation of the model, its results, and the development of earthquake time history inputs based on the model results. The purpose of the site-response ground motion model is to incorporate the effects on earthquake ground motions of (1) the approximately 300 m of rock above the emplacement levels beneath Yucca Mountain and (2) soil and rock beneath the site of the Surface Facilities Area. A previously performed probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) (CRWMS M&O 1998a [DIRS 103731]) estimated ground motions at a reference rock outcrop for the Yucca Mountain site (Point A), but those results do not include these site response effects. Thus, the additional step of applying the site-response ground motion model is required to develop ground motion inputs that are used for preclosure and postclosure purposes.

  6. IMPLEMENTING GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP AND GROUND LOOP HEAT EXCHANGER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IMPLEMENTING GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP AND GROUND LOOP HEAT EXCHANGER MODELS IN THE ENERGYPLUS #12;ii IMPLEMENTING GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP AND GROUND LOOP HEAT EXCHANGER MODELS IN THE ENERGYPLUS............................................................... 2 1.3. Overview of the Parameter Estimation Water-to-Water Heat Pump Model ........... 5 1

  7. A three-dimensional numerical model of predevelopment conditions in the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Agnese, F.A.; O'Brien, G.M.; Faunt, C.C.; Belcher, W.R.; San Juan, Carma

    2002-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In the early 1990's, two numerical models of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system were developed by the U.S. Department of Energy. In general, the two models were based on the same basic hydrogeologic data set. In 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy requested that the U.S. Geological Survey develop and maintain a ground-water flow model of the Death Valley region in support of U.S. Department of Energy programs at the Nevada Test Site. The purpose of developing this ''second-generation'' regional model was to enhance the knowledge and understanding of the ground-water flow system as new information and tools are developed. The U.S. Geological Survey also was encouraged by the U.S. Department of Energy to cooperate to the fullest extent with other Federal, State, and local entities in the region to take advantage of the benefits of their knowledge and expertise. The short-term objective of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system project was to develop a steady-stat e representation of the predevelopment conditions of the ground-water flow system utilizing the two geologic interpretations used to develop the previous numerical models. The long-term objective of this project was to construct and calibrate a transient model that simulates the ground-water conditions of the study area over the historical record that utilizes a newly interpreted hydrogeologic conceptual model. This report describes the result of the predevelopment steady-state model construction and calibration.

  8. UMTRA ground water sampling techniques: Comparison of the traditional and low flow methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the potential changes in water quality data that may occur with the conversion from MBV (multiple bore volume) to LF (low flow) sampling and provides two examples of how such a change might impact Project decisions. The existing scientific literature on LF sampling is reviewed and the new LF data from three UMTRA Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project sites are evaluated seeking answers to the questions posed above. Several possible approaches, that the UMTRA Project may take to address issues unanswered by the literature are presented and compared, and a recommendation is offered for the future direction of the LF conversion effort.

  9. U.A.C. R317-6: Ground Water Quality Protection | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtle Airships JumpType B:7-15: Water

  10. Ground Testing a Nuclear Thermal Rocket: Design of a sub-scale demonstration experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Bedsun; Debra Lee; Margaret Townsend; Clay A. Cooper; Jennifer Chapman; Ronald Samborsky; Mel Bulman; Daniel Brasuell; Stanley K. Borowski

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2008, the NASA Mars Architecture Team found that the Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) was the preferred propulsion system out of all the combinations of chemical propulsion, solar electric, nuclear electric, aerobrake, and NTR studied. Recently, the National Research Council committee reviewing the NASA Technology Roadmaps recommended the NTR as one of the top 16 technologies that should be pursued by NASA. One of the main issues with developing a NTR for future missions is the ability to economically test the full system on the ground. In the late 1990s, the Sub-surface Active Filtering of Exhaust (SAFE) concept was first proposed by Howe as a method to test NTRs at full power and full duration. The concept relied on firing the NTR into one of the test holes at the Nevada Test Site which had been constructed to test nuclear weapons. In 2011, the cost of testing a NTR and the cost of performing a proof of concept experiment were evaluated.

  11. Geothermal assessment of the lower Bear River drainage and northern East Shore ground-water areas, Box Elder County, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klauk, R.H.; Budding, K.E.

    1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Utah Geological and Mineral Survey (UGMS) has been researching the low-temperature geothermal resource potential in Utah. This report, part of an area-wide geothermal research program along the Wasatch Front, concerns the study conducted in the lower Bear River drainage and northern East Shore ground-water areas in Box Elder County, Utah. The primary purpose of the study is to identify new areas of geothermal resource potential. There are seven known low-temperature geothermal areas in this part of Box Elder County. Geothermal reconnaissance techniques used in the study include a temperature survey, chemical analysis of well and spring waters, and temperature-depth measurements in accessible wells. The geothermal reconnaissance techniques identified three areas which need further evaluation of their low-temperature geothermal resource potential. Area 1 is located in the area surrounding Little Mountain, area 2 is west and southwest of Plymouth, and area 3 is west and south of the Cutler Dam. 5 figures, 4 tables.

  12. Ground water and snow sensor based on directional detection of cosmogenic neutrons.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, Robert Lee; Marleau, Peter; Griffin, Patrick J.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fast neutron detector is being developed to measure the cosmic ray neutron flux in order to measure soil moisture. Soil that is saturated with water has an enhanced ability to moderate fast neutrons, removing them from the backscatter spectrum. The detector is a two-element, liquid scintillator detector. The choice of liquid scintillator allows rejection of gamma background contamination from the desired neutron signal. This enhances the ability to reconstruct the energy and direction of a coincident neutron event. The ability to image on an event-by-event basis allows the detector to selectively scan the neutron flux as a function of distance from the detector. Calibrations, simulations, and optimization have been completed to understand the detector response to neutron sources at variable distances and directions. This has been applied to laboratory background measurements in preparation for outdoor field tests.

  13. DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT TESTING OF AN IMPROVED (1 HIGH-EFFICIENCY WATER HEATER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    #12;DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT TESTING OF AN IMPROVED (1 HIGH-EFFICIENCY WATER HEATER (2} (3) (21 icense in and to any copyright covering the drticle. This paper describes a high-efficiency water heater which uses a design approach quite different from the conventional center-flue water heater. While high

  14. FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    price for a condensing commercial water heater is $1,579.For condensing commercial water heaters with a thermalFound products for water heater in any product field and gas

  15. An ecological study examining the correlation of end-stage renal disease and ground water heavy metal content in Texas counties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop, Scott Alan

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ecological study was conducted to examine the correlation of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and the ground water heavy metal level of lead, arsenic, cadmium, mercury and the cumulative level of all four metals in Texas counties. The heavy meal...

  16. FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    resistance and heat pump water heaters are not covered.other than commercial heat pump water heaters). 10CFR431.110

  17. Design and Evaluation of a Low-Cost Point-of-Use Ultraviolet Water Disinfection Device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    receive chlorinated water while another receives contaminated water with no residual level of chlorineDesign and Evaluation of a Low-Cost Point-of-Use Ultraviolet Water Disinfection Device Alicia Cohn around the world to supply safe drinking water. We have developed a device for disinfecting drinking

  18. Wind load design methods for ground-based heliostats and parabolic dish collectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterka, J A; Derickson, R G [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Fluid Dynamics and Diffusion Lab.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this design method is to define wind loads on flat heliostat and parabolic dish collectors in a simplified form. Wind loads are defined for both mean and peak loads accounting for the protective influence of upwind collectors, wind protective fences, or other wind-blockage elements. The method used to define wind loads was to generalize wind load data obtained during tests on model collectors, heliostats or parabolic dishes, placed in a modeled atmospheric wind in a boundary-layer wind-tunnel at Colorado State University. For both heliostats and parabolic dishes, loads are reported for solitary collectors and for collectors as elements of a field. All collectors were solid with negligible porosity; thus the effects of porosity in the collectors is not addressed.

  19. Assessment of innovative fuel designs for high performance light water reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carpenter, David Michael

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To increase the power density and maximum allowable fuel burnup in light water reactors, new fuel rod designs are investigated. Such fuel is desirable for improving the economic performance light water reactors loaded with ...

  20. Designing a low cost XY stage for abrasive water jet cutting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abu Ibrahim, Fadi, 1980-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis guides the reader through the design of an inexpensive XY stage for abrasive water jet cutting machine starting with a set of functional requirements and ending with a product. Abrasive water jet cutting allows ...

  1. This topical lunch aims to initiate an exchange of insights around the design of a sustainable community from the "ground up." Specifically we want to elicit interest and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    and quantified. A sustainable community should embody the characteristics of: · Renewable energy · High level.g. renewable energy, transportation, "green" buildings, recycling, waste management, water management community from the "ground up." Specifically we want to elicit interest and identify participation from

  2. Procedure for developing biological input for the design, location, or modification of water-intake structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, D.A.; McKenzie, D.H.

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To minimize adverse impact on aquatic ecosystems resulting from the operation of water intake structures, design engineers must have relevant information on the behavior, physiology and ecology of local fish and shellfish. Identification of stimulus/response relationships and the environmental factors that influence them is the first step in incorporating biological information in the design, location or modification of water intake structures. A procedure is presented in this document for providing biological input to engineers who are designing, locating or modifying a water intake structure. The authors discuss sources of stimuli at water intakes, historical approaches in assessing potential/actual impact and review biological information needed for intake design.

  3. Improved Design Tools for Surface Water and Standing Column Well Heat Pump Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This project will improve the capability of engineers to design heat pump systems that utilize surface water or standing column wells (SCW) as their heat sources and sinks.

  4. Experiment study on FLOATING JACKET: a new concept for deep water platform design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Yufeng

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As more oil and gas are discovered in deeper water than ever before, the offshore industry has become increasingly interested in the design of advanced offshore production platforms. A new design concept called FLOATING JACKET (FJ) is studied...

  5. Conceptual design of an annular-fueled superheat boiling water reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Yu-Chih, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The conceptual design of an annular-fueled superheat boiling water reactor (ASBWR) is outlined. The proposed design, ASBWR, combines the boiler and superheater regions into one fuel assembly. This ensures good neutron ...

  6. Conceptual Design of a Large, Passive Pressure-Tube Light Water Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hejzlar, P.

    A design for a large, passive, light water reactor has been developed. The proposed concept is a pressure tube reactor of similar design to CANDU reactors, but differing in three key aspects. First, a solid SiC-coated ...

  7. A significant number of Iowa water treatment systems are dependent upon well-based water sources. Because of this, CIRAS efforts have been focused on the "Ground Water Levels" as reported by Iowa DNR. Currently, DNR officials are indicating that restricti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhiqun

    A significant number of Iowa water treatment systems are dependent upon well-based water sources. Because of this, CIRAS efforts have been focused on the "Ground Water Levels" as reported by Iowa DNR. Currently, DNR officials are indicating that restrictions or loss of the water supply is not likely

  8. Storm water quantity control has long been a challenge for highway designers. Traditionally, centralized best management practice designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiedler, Fritz R.

    on centralized detention-based best man- agement practices (BMPs) that reduce the amount of storm water released and environmentally sound storm water management practice (1, 6). Numerous studies and other research efforts have, centralized best management practice designs are often cost prohibitive and inefficient in many rural highway

  9. Ground Water Cooling System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greaves, K.; Chave, G. H.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on a thorough study of products and anticipated growth, the Turbine and Generator Division of Westinghouse Canada Inc. concluded that a component feeder plant for fabrication and machining of turbine components was required. This facility now...

  10. UMTRA Ground Water Project

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona,Site Operations Guide Doc.5 R A D ISaltVerification

  11. UMTRA Ground Water Project

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona,Site Operations Guide Doc.5 R A D

  12. Stormwater BMPs for Trout Waters Coldwater Stream Design Guidance for Stormwater Wetlands,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, William F.

    . To reduce these negative impacts, a variety of stormwater best management practices (BMPs) have been have on the temperature of storm- water runoff. With the wide implementation of storm- water BMPs Stormwater BMPs for Trout Waters Coldwater Stream Design Guidance for Stormwater Wetlands, Wet

  13. On the ground state calculation of a many-body system using a self-consistent basis and quasi-Monte Carlo: An application to water hexamer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Georgescu, Ionu?, E-mail: ionutg@gmail.com; Mandelshtam, Vladimir A. [Chemistry Department, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)] [Chemistry Department, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Jitomirskaya, Svetlana [Department of Mathematics, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)] [Department of Mathematics, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Given a quantum many-body system, the Self-Consistent Phonons (SCP) method provides an optimal harmonic approximation by minimizing the free energy. In particular, the SCP estimate for the vibrational ground state (zero temperature) appears to be surprisingly accurate. We explore the possibility of going beyond the SCP approximation by considering the system Hamiltonian evaluated in the harmonic eigenbasis of the SCP Hamiltonian. It appears that the SCP ground state is already uncoupled to all singly- and doubly-excited basis functions. So, in order to improve the SCP result at least triply-excited states must be included, which then reduces the error in the ground state estimate substantially. For a multidimensional system two numerical challenges arise, namely, evaluation of the potential energy matrix elements in the harmonic basis, and handling and diagonalizing the resulting Hamiltonian matrix, whose size grows rapidly with the dimensionality of the system. Using the example of water hexamer we demonstrate that such calculation is feasible, i.e., constructing and diagonalizing the Hamiltonian matrix in a triply-excited SCP basis, without any additional assumptions or approximations. Our results indicate particularly that the ground state energy differences between different isomers (e.g., cage and prism) of water hexamer are already quite accurate within the SCP approximation.

  14. Boiling water neutronic reactor incorporating a process inherent safety design

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1985-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A boiling-water reactor core is positioned within a prestressed concrete reactor vessel of a size which will hold a supply of coolant water sufficient to submerge and cool the reactor core by boiling for a period of at least one week after shutdown. Separate volumes of hot, clean (nonborated) water for cooling during normal operation and cool highly borated water for emergency cooling and reactor shutdown are separated by an insulated wall during normal reactor operation with contact between the two water volumes being maintained at interfaces near the top and bottom ends of the reactor vessel. Means are provided for balancing the pressure of the two water volumes at the lower interface zone during normal operation to prevent entry of the cool borated water into the reactor core region, for detecting the onset of excessive power to coolant flow conditions in the reactor core and for detecting low water levels of reactor coolant. Cool borated water is permitted to flow into the reactor core when low reactor coolant levels or excessive power to coolant flow conditions are encountered.

  15. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Analysis and Concept Design for grey water heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Design for grey water heat recovery to preheat domestic water supply for multi-unit residential high rise of a project/report". #12;2 Analysis and Concept Design for grey water heat recovery to preheat domestic water) for effective capture of heat from waste grey water. Calculations for energy, dollar and GHG savings were made

  16. Study of the design Method of an Efficient Ground Source Heat Pump Thermal Source System in a Cold Area 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shu, H.; Duanmu, L.; Hua, R.; Zou, Y.; Du, G.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ground source heat pump (GSHP) system-an energy efficiency and environment friendly system-is becoming popular in many parts of China. However, an imbalance usually exists between the annual heat extracted from and rejected to the ground due...

  17. Analysis of dissolved benzene plumes and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) plumes in ground water at leaking underground fuel tank (LUFT) sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Happel, A.M.; Rice, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Beckenbach, E. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States); Savalin, L.; Temko, H.; Rempel, R. [California State Water Resources Control Board, Sacramento, CA (United States); Dooher, B. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments mandate the addition of oxygenates to gasoline products to abate air pollution. Currently, many areas of the country utilize oxygenated or reformulated fuel containing 15- percent and I I-percent MTBE by volume, respectively. This increased use of MTBE in gasoline products has resulted in accidental point source releases of MTBE containing gasoline products to ground water. Recent studies have shown MTBE to be frequently detected in samples of shallow ground water from urban areas throughout the United States (Squillace et al., 1995). Knowledge of the subsurface fate and transport of MTBE in ground water at leaking underground fuel tank (LUFT) sites and the spatial extent of MTBE plumes is needed to address these releases. The goal of this research is to utilize data from a large number of LUFT sites to gain insights into the fate, transport, and spatial extent of MTBE plumes. Specific goals include defining the spatial configuration of dissolved MTBE plumes, evaluating plume stability or degradation over time, evaluating the impact of point source releases of MTBE to ground water, and attempting to identify the controlling factors influencing the magnitude and extent of the MTBE plumes. We are examining the relationships between dissolved TPH, BTEX, and MTBE plumes at LUFT sites using parallel approaches of best professional judgment and a computer-aided plume model fitting procedure to determine plume parameters. Here we present our initial results comparing dissolved benzene and MTBE plumes lengths, the statistical significance of these results, and configuration of benzene and MTBE plumes at individual LUFT sites.

  18. Boiling water neutronic reactor incorporating a process inherent safety design

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, Charles W. (Kingston, TN)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A boiling-water reactor core is positioned within a prestressed concrete reactor vessel of a size which will hold a supply of coolant water sufficient to submerge and cool the reactor core by boiling for a period of at least one week after shutdown. Separate volumes of hot, clean (non-borated) water for cooling during normal operation and cool highly borated water for emergency cooling and reactor shutdown are separated by an insulated wall during normal reactor operation with contact between the two water volumes being maintained at interfaces near the top and bottom ends of the reactor vessel. Means are provided for balancing the pressure of the two volumes at the lower interface zone during normal operation to prevent entry of the cool borated water into the reactor core region, for detecting the onset of excessive power to coolant flow conditions in the reactor core and for detecting low water levels of reactor coolant. Cool borated water is permitted to flow into the reactor core when low reactor coolant levels or excessive power to coolant flow conditions are encountered.

  19. Ground-water hydrologic effects resulting from underground coal gasification experiments at the Hoe Creek Site near Gillette, Wyoming. Interim report, October 1979-March 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raber, E.; Stone, R.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical note summarizes our activities, to date, on the research project: Ground-Water Hydrologic Effects Resulting from Underground Coal Gasification Experiments (EPA-IAG-79-D-X0795). The gasified coal seam (Felix No. 2 coal) and two overlying aquifers (Felix No. 1 coal and overlying sand) appear to have become interconnected as a result of roof collapse and subsidence at both Hoe Creek Sites II and III near Gillette, Wyoming. To evaluate changes in the ground-water flow regime at the two sites, completion of supplementary wells was necessary to define the distance versus head drawdown relationships in each of the three aquifers. Hydraulic head potentials have been measured at Site III since gasification ended on October 10, 1979. These data are presented in graphic format. Although hydraulic head measurements at Site II seemed to be approaching a steady-state condition 1.5 years after gasification, the subsequent gasification at Site III temporarily altered the ground-water flow patterns. These changes will have a definite effect on contaminant dispersal and will need to be taken into consideration.

  20. Spent nuclear fuel project cold vacuum drying facility tempered water and tempered water cooling system design description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the System Design Description (SDD) for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) Tempered Water (TW) and Tempered Water Cooling (TWC) System . The SDD was developed in conjunction with HNF-SD-SNF-SAR-002, Safety Analysis Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Phase 2, Supporting Installation of Processing Systems (Garvin 1998), The HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-O02, 1998, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements, and the CVDF Design Summary Report. The SDD contains general descriptions of the TW and TWC equipment, the system functions, requirements and interfaces. The SDD provides references for design and fabrication details, operation sequences and maintenance. This SOD has been developed for the SNFP Operations Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved.

  1. Statement of work for definitive design of the K basins integrated water treatment system project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pauly, T.R., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This Statement of Work (SOW) identifies the scope of work and schedule requirements for completing definitive design of the K Basins Integrated Water Treatment Systems (IWTS) Subproject. This SOW shall form the contractual basis between WHC and the Design Agent for the Definitive Design.

  2. 152 / JOURNAL OF HYDROLOGIC ENGINEERING / APRIL 1999 UNCERTAINTY OF ONE-DIMENSIONAL GROUND-WATER FLOW IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    -WATER FLOW IN STRONGLY HETEROGENEOUS FORMATIONS By Hongbin Zhan1 and Stephen W. Wheatcraft2 ABSTRACT

  3. Site design for urban water management in Mexico City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivera, José Pablo (Rivera De la Mora), 1967-

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the world becomes aware of the scarcity of water resources and cities struggle to meet a growing demand, we face the challenge of finding more efficient ways to manage this vital resource. Cities in developing countries ...

  4. The design and evaluation of a water delivery system for evaporative cooling of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Asad, Dawood Khaled Abdullah

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation was performed to demonstrate system design for the delivery of water required for evaporative cooling of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The water delivery system uses spray nozzles capable of injecting water directly...

  5. The design and evaluation of a water delivery system for evaporative cooling of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Asad, Dawood Khaled Abdullah

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation was performed to demonstrate system design for the delivery of water required for evaporative cooling of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The water delivery system uses spray nozzles capable of injecting water directly...

  6. Innovative fuel designs for high power density pressurized water reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Dandong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the ways to lower the cost of nuclear energy is to increase the power density of the reactor core. Features of fuel design that enhance the potential for high power density are derived based on characteristics of ...

  7. Energy Efficiency Design Options for Residential Water Heaters: Economic Impacts on Consumers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lekov, Alex; Franco, Victor; Meyers, Steve; Thompson, Lisa; Letschert, Virginie

    2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently completed a rulemaking process in which it amended the existing energy efficiency standards for residential water heaters. A key factor in DOE?s consideration of new standards is the economic impacts on consumers. Determining such impacts requires a comparison of the additional first cost of energy efficiency design options with the savings in operating costs. This paper describes the method used to conduct the life-cycle cost (LCC) and payback period analysis for gas and electric storage water heaters. It presents the estimated change in LCC associated with more energy-efficient equipment, including heat pump electric water heaters and condensing gas water heaters, for a representative sample of U.S. homes. The study included a detailed accounting of installation costs for the considered design options, with a focus on approaches for accommodating the larger dimensions of more efficient water heaters. For heat pump water heaters, the study also considered airflow requirements, venting issues, and the impact of these products on the indoor environment. The results indicate that efficiency improvement relative to the baseline design reduces the LCC in the majority of homes for both gas and electric storage water heaters, and heat pump electric water heaters and condensing gas water heaters provide a lower LCC for homes with large rated volume water heaters.

  8. Flexible design : an innovative approach for planning water infrastructure systems under uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Melanie Kathleen

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis develops a framework for a flexible design approach to support decision-making in water supply infrastructure planning. It contrasts with a conventional, deterministic planning approach that uses past data or ...

  9. A Cold Water Pipe for an OTEC Pilot Plant: Design Considerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    A Cold Water Pipe for an OTEC Pilot Plant: Design Considerations Kara Silver Abstract Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) is a baseload renewable technology for tropical countries and islands. In order

  10. Designing a 'Near Optimum' Cooling-Water System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crozier, R. A., Jr.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cooling water is expensive to circulate. Reducing its flow - i.e., hiking exchanger outlet temperatures - can cut tower, pump and piping investment as much as one-third and operating cost almost in half. Heat-exchanger-network optimization has been...

  11. Computational design of a water-soluble analog of phospholamban

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Summa, Christopher M.

    membranes (Stevens and Arkin 2000). To date, roughly 13,000 X-ray or NMR derived structures of water. Such a technique would allow us to bypass the membrane to study membrane protein structures, while addressing These authors contributed equally to this work. Article and publication are at http

  12. Linear Parameter-Varying versus Linear Time-Invariant Control Design for a Pressurized Water Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodenheimer, Bobby

    -dependent control to a nuclear pressurized water reactor is investigated and is compared to that of using an H1Linear Parameter-Varying versus Linear Time-Invariant Control Design for a Pressurized Water Reactor Pascale Bendotti y Electricit e de France Direction des Etudes et Recherches 6 Quai Watier, 78401

  13. The Battle of the Water Sensor Networks ,,BWSN...: A Design Challenge for Engineers and Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    The Battle of the Water Sensor Networks ,,BWSN...: A Design Challenge for Engineers and Algorithms. Ghimire16 ; Brian D. Barkdoll17 ; Roberto Gueli18 ; Jinhui J. Huang19 ; Edward A. McBean20 ; William James of September 11, 2001, in the United States, world public awareness for possible terrorist attacks on water

  14. The Project The Southern Region Water Quality Regional Coordination Project is designed to promote regional collaboration,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Project The Southern Region Water Quality Regional Coordination Project is designed to promote to protect and restore water resources. Effective approaches for watershed management, pollution prevention to the research, extension and education resources available through the Land Grant University System

  15. INTEC CPP-603 Basin Water Treatment System Closure: Process Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimmitt, Raymond Rodney; Faultersack, Wendell Gale; Foster, Jonathan Kay; Berry, Stephen Michael

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the engineering activities that have been completed in support of the closure plan for the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) CPP-603 Basin Water Treatment System. This effort includes detailed assessments of methods and equipment for performing work in four areas: 1. A cold (nonradioactive) mockup system for testing equipment and procedures for vessel cleanout and vessel demolition. 2. Cleanout of process vessels to meet standards identified in the closure plan. 3. Dismantlement and removal of vessels, should it not be possible to clean them to required standards in the closure plan. 4. Cleanout or removal of pipelines and pumps associated with the CPP-603 basin water treatment system. Cleanout standards for the pipes will be the same as those used for the process vessels.

  16. Design manual for high temperature hot water and steam systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cofield, R.E. Jr.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The author presents aspects of high temperature hot water and steam generating systems. It covers all the calculations that must be made for sizing and then selecting the equipment that will make up an energy system. The author provides essential information on loan analysis, types of fuel, storage requirements, handling facilities, waste disposal, HVAC needs, and back-up systems. Also included are the calculations needed for determining the size of compressors, air pollution devices, fans, filters, and other supplementary equipment.

  17. Study Design And Realization Of Solar Water Heater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lounis, M. [LAAR Laboratory-Physics Department-USTOMB 31000 Oran (Algeria); Boudjemaa, F.; Akil, S. Kouider [Genie Climatic Department-CUKM 44000-Khemis Miliana (Algeria)

    2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar is one of the most easily exploitable energy, it is moreover inexhaustible. His applications are many and are varied. The heating of the domestic water is one of the most immediate, simplest and also of most widespread exploitation of the solar energy. Algeria, from its geographical situation, it deposits one of the largest high sun surface expositions in the world. The exposition duration of the almost territory exceeds 2000 hours annually and can reach the 3900 hours (high plateaus and Sahara). By knowing the daily energy received by 1 m{sup 2} of a horizontal surface of the solar thermal panel is nearly around 1700 KWh/m{sup 2} a year in the north and 2263 KWh/m{sup 2} a year in the south of the country, we release the most important and strategic place of the solar technologies in the present and in the future for Algeria. This work consists to study, conceive and manufacture solar water heating with the available local materials so, this type of the energy will be profitable for all, particularly the poor countries. If we consider the illumination duration of the panel around 6 hours a day, the water heat panel manufactured in our laboratory produce an equivalent energy of 11.615 KWh a day so, 4239 KWh a year. These values of energy can be easily increased with performing the panel manufacture.

  18. Preliminary design report for the K basins integrated water treatment system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pauly, T.R., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This Preliminary Design Report (PDR) provides a revised concept for the K Basins Integrated Water Treatment Systems (IWTS). This PDR incorporates the 11 recommendations made in a May 1996 Value Engineering session into the Conceptual Design, and provides new flow diagrams, hazard category assessment, cost estimate, and schedule for the IWTS Subproject.

  19. DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF COST EFFECTIVE SURFACE MOUNTED WATER TURBINES FOR RURAL ELECTRICITY PRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    for further hydro development. Optimization of existing recourses for power harnessing has made application/low head hydro power generation. This project intends to design and develop cost effective design of engineered low head hydro turbines capable of utilizing 2-10 meter of water head and power output 2 to 15 k

  20. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright- Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 4, Health and Safety Plan (HSP); Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation report: Draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Health and Safety Plan (HSP) was developed for the Environmental Investigation of Ground-water Contamination Investigation at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton, Ohio, based on the projected scope of work for the Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation. The HSP describes hazards that may be encountered during the investigation, assesses the hazards, and indicates what type of personal protective equipment is to be used for each task performed. The HSP also addresses the medical monitoring program, decontamination procedures, air monitoring, training, site control, accident prevention, and emergency response.

  1. Study of the design Method of an Efficient Ground Source Heat Pump Thermal Source System in a Cold Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shu, H.; Duanmu, L.; Hua, R.; Zou, Y.; Du, G.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energiae Solaris Sinica, 2005, 6(2):162-165.(In Chinese) [4] Sun Jianping, Wang Jinggang, etc. Operating performance analysis of the ground source heat pump [J]. Journal of North China electric Power University, 2004,31(5):52-55.(In Chinese) [5] Wang...

  2. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Livestock Manure Storage and Treatment Facilities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    , accumulating manure in a con- centrated area can be risky to the environment and to human and animal health unless done properly. Federal and state drinking water standards state that nitrate levels in drinking water should not exceed 10 milligrams per liter... (equivalent to parts per million for water mea- sure). Nitrate nitrogen levels higher than this can pose health problems for infants under 6 months of age, including the condition known as methemoglobinemia (blue baby syndrome). Nitrate also can affect adults...

  3. Water as a lubricant for Stirling air engines: design considerations and operating experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fauvel, O.R.; van Benthem, J.; Walker, G.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Air is favoured as the working fluid for large, slow-running Stirling engines. Lubricating oil entering the working space could combine with compressed, heated air to form a mixture capable of spontaneous combustion. To preclude this possibility, water may be used as the lubricant in Stirling air engines. This paper reviews the lubrication requirements of Stirling air engines and the potential of water to fulfil these requirements. Some bearing and seal materials suitable for water-lubricated Stirling engines are reviewed in terms of a design case study for a 20 kW water lubricated Ringbom-Stirling air engine. Early operating experience with this engine is reported.

  4. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium processing site at Naturita, Colorado. Appendix A of Attachment 3, Calculations: Preliminary final

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report consists primarily of calculations for ground water flow and hydraulic conductivity as part of the Remedial Action Plan and Site Design for Stabilization program.

  5. MODELING OF VERTICAL GROUND LOOP HEAT EXCHANGERS FOR GROUND SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODELING OF VERTICAL GROUND LOOP HEAT EXCHANGERS FOR GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS By CENK SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS Thesis Approved: ___________________________________________ Thesis Adviser scale test data. The short-term behavior of ground-coupled heat pump systems is important for the design

  6. Cogeneration of Electricity and Potable Water Using The International Reactor Innovative And Secure (IRIS) Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ingersoll, D.T.; Binder, J.L.; Kostin, V.I.; Panov, Y.K.; Polunichev, V.; Ricotti, M.E.; Conti, D.; Alonso, G.

    2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The worldwide demand for potable water has been steadily growing and is projected to accelerate, driven by a continued population growth and industrialization of emerging countries. This growth is reflected in a recent market survey by the World Resources Institute, which shows a doubling in the installed capacity of seawater desalination plants every ten years. The production of desalinated water is energy intensive, requiring approximately 3-6 kWh/m3 of produced desalted water. At current U.S. water use rates, a dedicated 1000 MW power plant for every one million people would be required to meet our water needs with desalted water. Nuclear energy plants are attractive for large scale desalination application. The thermal energy produced in a nuclear plant can provide both electricity and desalted water without the production of greenhouse gases. A particularly attractive option for nuclear desalination is to couple a desalination plant with an advanced, modular, passively safe reactor design. The use of small-to-medium sized nuclear power plants allows for countries with smaller electrical grid needs and infrastructure to add new electrical and water capacity in more appropriate increments and allows countries to consider siting plants at a broader number of distributed locations. To meet these needs, a modified version of the International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS) nuclear power plant design has been developed for the cogeneration of electricity and desalted water. The modular, passively safe features of IRIS make it especially well adapted for this application. Furthermore, several design features of the IRIS reactor will ensure a safe and reliable source of energy and water even for countries with limited nuclear power experience and infrastructure. The IRIS-D design utilizes low-quality steam extracted from the low-pressure turbine to boil seawater in a multi-effect distillation desalination plant. The desalination plant is based on the horizontal tube film evaporation design used successfully with the BN-350 nuclear plant in Aktau, Kazakhstan. Parametric studies have been performed to optimize the balance of plant design. Also, an economic analysis has been performed, which shows that IRIS-D should be able to provide electricity and clean water at highly competitive costs.

  7. Energy and Water Use in Irrigated Agriculture During Drought Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritschard, R.L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is overdrafted from ground water storage basins. 3 In 1976supply, pumping from ground water storage reservoirs mayIn of ground formation which reduces the water storage

  8. Conceptual design of a pressure tube light water reactor with variable moderator control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rachamin, R.; Fridman, E. [Reactor Safety Div., Inst. of Resource Ecology, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, POB 51 01 19, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Galperin, A. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, POB 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the development of innovative pressure tube light water reactor with variable moderator control. The core layout is derived from a CANDU line of reactors in general, and advanced ACR-1000 design in particular. It should be stressed however, that while some of the ACR-1000 mechanical design features are adopted, the core design basics of the reactor proposed here are completely different. First, the inter fuel channels spacing, surrounded by the calandria tank, contains a low pressure gas instead of heavy water moderator. Second, the fuel channel design features an additional/external tube (designated as moderator tube) connected to a separate moderator management system. The moderator management system is design to vary the moderator tube content from 'dry' (gas) to 'flooded' (light water filled). The dynamic variation of the moderator is a unique and very important feature of the proposed design. The moderator variation allows an implementation of the 'breed and burn' mode of operation. The 'breed and burn' mode of operation is implemented by keeping the moderator tube empty ('dry' filled with gas) during the breed part of the fuel depletion and subsequently introducing the moderator by 'flooding' the moderator tube for the 'burn' part. This paper assesses the conceptual feasibility of the proposed concept from a neutronics point of view. (authors)

  9. Optimized design of a heat exchanger for an air-to-water reversible heat pump working with propane (R290)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernández de Córdoba, Pedro

    Optimized design of a heat exchanger for an air-to-water reversible heat pump working with propane-to-water reversible heat pump unit was carried out using two different fin-and-tube heat exchanger ``coil'' designs concepts. The performance of the heat pump was evaluated for each coil design at different superheat

  10. DOE/NNSA perspective safeguard by design: GEN III/III+ light water reactors and beyond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Paul Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of key issues relevant to safeguards by design (SBD) for GEN III/IV nuclear reactors is provided. Lessons learned from construction of typical GEN III+ water reactors with respect to SBD are highlighted. Details of SBD for safeguards guidance development for GEN III/III+ light water reactors are developed and reported. This paper also identifies technical challenges to extend SBD including proliferation resistance methodologies to other GEN III/III+ reactors (except HWRs) and GEN IV reactors because of their immaturity in designs.

  11. Gravel admix, vegetation, and soil water interactions in protective barriers: Experimental design, construction, and initial conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waugh, W.J.

    1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to measure the interactive effects of gravel admix and greater precipitation on soil water storage and plant abundance. The study is one of many tasks in the Protective Barrier Development Program for the disposal of Hanford defense waste. A factorial field-plot experiment was set up at the site selected as the borrow area for barrier topsoil. Gravel admix, vegetation, and enhanced precipitation treatments were randomly assigned to the plots using a split-split plot design structure. Changes in soil water storage and plant cover were monitored using neutron probe and point intercept methods, respectively. The first-year results suggest that water extraction by plants will offset gravel-caused increases in soil water storage. Near-surface soil water contents were much lower in graveled plots with plants than in nongraveled plots without plants. Large inherent variability in deep soil water storage masked any effects gravel may have had on water content below the root zone. In the future, this source of variation will be removed by differencing monthly data series and testing for changes in soil water storage. Tests of the effects of greater precipitation on soil water storage were inconclusive. A telling test will be possible in the spring of 1988, following the first wet season during which normal precipitation is doubled. 26 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs.

  12. NGWA.org Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation 31, no. 3/ Summer 2011/pages 4754 47 2011, The Author(s)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    contaminated with fuel ethanol blends. Introduction Ethanol is increasingly being used as a blending agent of an Ethanol Blend by Jie Ma, Zongming Xiu, Amy L. Monier, Irina Mamonkina, Yi Zhang, Yongzhi He, Brent P release of 10% v:v ethanol solution in water mixed with benzene and toluene (50 mg/L each

  13. Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE)Conceptual Design ReportThe LBNE Water Cherenkov DetectorApril 13 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kettell S. H.; Bishai, M.; Brown, R.; Chen, H.; Diwan, M.; Dolph, J., Geronimo, G.; Gill, R.; Hackenburg, R.; Hahn, R.; Hans, S.; Isvan, Z.; Jaffe, D.; Junnarkar, S.; Kettell, S.H.; Lanni,F.; Li, Y.; Ling, J.; Littenberg, L.; Makowiecki, D.; Marciano, W.; Morse, W.; Parsa, Z.; Radeka, V.; Rescia, S.; Samios, N.; Sharma, R.; Simos, N.; Sondericker, J.; Stewart, J.; Tanaka, H.; Themann, H.; Thorn, C.; Viren, B., White, S.; Worcester, E.; Yeh, M.; Yu, B.; Zhang, C.

    2012-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Conceptual Design Report (CDR) developed for the Water Cherekov Detector (WCD) option for the far detector of the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE)

  14. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford Site facilities: Progress report for the period January 1--March 31, 1988: Volume 1, Text

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the progress of eight Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period January 1 to March 31, 1988. The facilities represented by the eight projects are the 300 Area Process trenches, 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins, 200 Areas Low-Level Burial Grounds, Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill, 216-A-36B Crib, 1301-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facility, 1325-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facility, and 1324-N/NA Surface Impoundment and Percolation Ponds. The latter four projects are included in this series of quarterly reports for the first time. This report is the seventh in a series of periodic status reports; the first six cover the period from May 1, 1986, through December 31, 1987 (PNL 1986; 1987a, b, c, d; 1988a). This report satisfies the requirements of Section 17B(3) of the Consent Agreement and Compliance Order issued by the Washington State Department of Ecology (1986a) to the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office. 13 refs., 19 figs., 24 tabs.

  15. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Livestock Holding Pen Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    of yard surface 7) Manure storage and utilization 8) Abandoned livestock yards 9) Evaluation table A glossary in the back of this publication will clarify the terminology used. Separation Distance From Well Wells should be located in an elevated area..., so it remains relatively dry except during and immediately after rainfall. Manure typically accumulates on the surface, and decaying or decomposing manure is mixed into the soil by animal traffic, sealing the sur- face and reducing infiltration. Water...

  16. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Milking Center Wastewater Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    be affected by manure, milk solids, ammonia, phosphorus, and detergents. Wastewater from the dairy milking center is made up of waste from the milking parlor (manure, feed solids, hoof dirt, bulk tank rinse water and detergent used in cleaning), and should... topics: 1. Combining wastes 2. Application methods 3. Slow surface infiltration Combining Wastes When milking center wastes are combined with manure a common disposal system can be used for both types of waste. A liquid manure storage facility, properly...

  17. Designing a Collaborative Problem Solving Environment for Integrated Water Resource Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thurman, David A.; Cowell, Andrew J.; Taira, Randal Y.; Frodge, Jonathan

    2004-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on our approach for designing a collaborative problem solving environment for hydrologists, water quality planners and natural resource managers, all roles within a natural resource management agency and stakeholders in an integrated water resource management process. We describe our approach in context of the Integrated Water Resource Modeling System (IWRMS), under development by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Department of Natural Resources and Parks in King County, Washington. This system will integrate a collection of water resource models (watersheds, rivers, lakes, estuaries) to provide the ability to address water, land use, and other natural resource management decisions and scenarios, with the goal of developing an integrated modeling capability to address future land use and resource management scenarios and provide scientific support to decision makers. Here, we discuss the five-step process used to ascertain the (potentially opposing) needs and interests of stakeholders and provide results and summaries from our experiences. The results of this process guide user interface design efforts to create a collaborative problems solving environment supporting multiple users with differing scientific backgrounds and modeling needs. We conclude with a discussion of participatory interface design methods used to encourage stakeholder involvement and acceptance of the system as well as the lessons learned to date.

  18. Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2012 Space Vehicle Water Drop Test and Vehicle Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    PENNSTATE Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2012 Space Vehicle Water Drop Test and Vehicle Design Overview The team was tasked with modelling the accelerations and pressures of an impact of the scaled landing vehicle to reduce the accelerations and pressures of the vehicle. Objectives Provide

  19. A photonic nano-architecture is designed to enhance solar water splitting effi-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steiner, Ullrich

    energy into hydrogen. However, the solar- to-H2 conversion efficiency is still very low due to rapid bulk artificial photosynthesis routes using solar energy to produce H2 or other fuels is an attractive scientificA photonic nano-architecture is designed to enhance solar water splitting effi- ciency

  20. Design and installation of continuous flow and water qualitymonitoring stations to improve water quality forecasting in the lower SanJoaquin River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2007-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This project deliverable describes a number ofstate-of-the-art, telemetered, flow and water quality monitoring stationsthat were designed, instrumented and installed in cooperation with localirrigation water districts to improve water quality simulation models ofthe lower San Joaquin River, California. This work supports amulti-disciplinary, multi-agency research endeavor to develop ascience-based Total Maximum Daily Load for dissolved oxygen in the SanJoaquin River and Stockton Deep Water Ship Channel.

  1. Spent nuclear fuel project cold vacuum drying facility process water conditioning system design description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the System Design Description (SDD) for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) Process Water Conditioning (PWC) System. The SDD was developed in conjunction with HNF-SD-SNF-SAR-002, Safety Analysis Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Phase 2, Supporting Installation of Processing Systems (Garvin 1998), the HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-O02, 1998, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements, and the CVDF Design Summary Report. The SDD contains general descriptions of the PWC equipment, the system functions, requirements and interfaces. The SDD provides references for design and fabrication details, operation sequences and maintenance. This SDD has been developed for the SNFP Operations Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved.

  2. Fundamental Studies of The Removal of Contaminants from Ground and Waste Waters Via Reduction By Zero-Valent metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jory A. Yarmoff; Christopher Amrhein

    2002-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxyanions of uranium, selenium, chromium, arsenic, technetium, and chlorine (as perchlorate) are frequently found as contaminants on many DOE sites, and in other areas of the U.S.. A potential remediation method is to react the contaminated water with zero-valent iron (ZVI). We are performing fundamental investigations of the interactions of the relevant compounds with Fe filings and single- and poly-crystalline surfaces. The aim of this work is to develop the physical and chemical understanding that is necessary for the development of cleanup techniques and procedures.

  3. Conceptual design of a regional water quality screening model. [RFF; Reach; HANFORD; ARQUAL; SEAS; NASQUAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M J

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This water quality assessment methodology is intended to predict concentrations at future times and to estimate the impacts on water quality of energy-related activities (including industrial boilers). Estimates of impacts on water quality at future times are based on incremental changes in pollutant inputs to the body water. Important features of the model are: use of measured concentrations to account for existing conditions; consideration of incremental changes in pollutant loads; emphasis on the energy sector and industrial boilers; analysis restricted to streams only; no attempt to fully account for pollutant behavior; and flexible design, so that future improvements can be incorporated. The basic approach is very similar to the one used by Argonne's ARQUAL model but will allow more complex pollutant behavior and more flexibility in use. (PSB)

  4. Ground-source Heat Pumps Applied to Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Steven A.; Hadley, Donald L.

    2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground-source heat pumps can provide an energy-efficient, cost-effective way to heat and cool commercial facilities. While ground-source heat pumps are well established in the residential sector, their application in larger, commercial-style, facilities is lagging, in part because of a lack of experience with the technology by those in decision-making positions. Through the use of a ground-coupling system, a conventional water-source heat pump design is transformed to a unique means of utilizing thermodynamic properties of earth and groundwater for efficient operation throughout the year in most climates. In essence, the ground (or groundwater) serves as a heat source during winter operation and a heat sink for summer cooling. Many varieties in design are available, so the technology can be adapted to almost any site. Ground-source heat pump systems can be used widely in commercial-building applications and, with proper installation, offer great potential for the commercial sector, where increased efficiency and reduced heating and cooling costs are important. Ground-source heat pump systems require less refrigerant than conventional air-source heat pumps or air-conditioning systems, with the exception of direct-expansion-type ground-source heat pump systems. This chapter provides information and procedures that an energy manager can use to evaluate most ground-source heat pump applications. Ground-source heat pump operation, system types, design variations, energy savings, and other benefits are explained. Guidelines are provided for appropriate application and installation. Two case studies are presented to give the reader a sense of the actual costs and energy savings. A list of manufacturers and references for further reading are included for prospective users who have specific or highly technical questions not fully addressed in this chapter. Sample case spreadsheets are provided in Appendix A. Additional appendixes provide other information on the ground-source heat pump technology.

  5. {sup 222}Rn in water: A comparison of two sample collection methods and two sample transport methods, and the determination of temporal variation in North Carolina ground water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hightower, J.H. III [North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences and Engineering] [North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences and Engineering

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Objectives of this field experiment were: (1) determine whether there was a statistically significant difference between the radon concentrations of samples collected by EPA`s standard method, using a syringe, and an alternative, slow-flow method; (2) determine whether there was a statistically significant difference between the measured radon concentrations of samples mailed vs samples not mailed; and (3) determine whether there was a temporal variation of water radon concentration over a 7-month period. The field experiment was conducted at 9 sites, 5 private wells, and 4 public wells, at various locations in North Carolina. Results showed that a syringe is not necessary for sample collection, there was generally no significant radon loss due to mailing samples, and there was statistically significant evidence of temporal variations in water radon concentrations.

  6. Designing a water leasing market for the Mimbres River, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reno-Trujillo, Marissa Devan; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Broadbent, Craig [Illinois Wesleyan University; Brookshire, David [University of New Mexico; Coursey, Don [University of Chicago; Jackson, Charles. [New Mexico Office of the State Engineer; Polley, Adam [New Mexico Office of the State Engineer; Stevenson, Bryan [New Mexico Office of the State Engineer

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to develop a conceptual framework for establishing water leasing markets in New Mexico using the Mimbres River as a test case. Given the past and growing stress over water in New Mexico and the Mimbres River in particular, this work will develop a mechanism for the short term, efficient, temporary transfer of water from one user to another while avoiding adverse effects on any user not directly involved in the transaction (i.e., third party effects). Toward establishing a water leasing market, five basic tasks were performed, (1) a series of stakeholder meetings were conducted to identify and address concerns and interests of basin residents, (2) several gauges were installed on irrigation ditches to aid in the monitoring and management of water resources in the basin, (3) the hydrologic/market model and decision support interface was extended to include the Middle and Lower reaches of the Mimbres River, (4) experiments were conducted to aid in design of the water leasing market, and (5) a set of rules governing a water leasing market was drafted for future adoption by basin residents and the New Mexico Office of the State Engineer.

  7. Economic-impact study for proposed Ground-water-Quality Standards 35 IL Admin. Code 260. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, R.; Buss, D.F.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The state passed the Illinois Groundwater Protection Act (IGPA) in September 1987, which among other things, directed the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA) to develop groundwater classification system and nondegradation procedures. The IGPA also mandated that the Illinois Department of Energy and Natural Resources conduct an Economic Impact Study of the IEPA's proposed regulations. The report also analyzed alternatives considered during the development of the Code 620 regulations in addition to the final outcome. The proposed regulations would establish a groundwater classification which would be partially use-based and partially water quality-based. Numeric groundwater quality standards are also established which apply to General Resource and Potable Resource Groundwater. Cleanup criteria are identified for sites of contamination. As determined by this investigation, the most significant costs of the IEPA's proposed regulations could be expected to be groundwater remediation costs, which are those costs associated with returning contaminated groundwater to compliance with the standards.

  8. Seismicity and seismic response of the Soviet-designed VVER (Water-cooled, Water moderated Energy Reactor) reactor plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, D.C.; Gvildys, J.; Wang, C.Y.; Spencer, B.W.; Sienicki, J.J.; Seidensticker, R.W.; Purvis, E.E. III

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On March 4, 1977, a strong earthquake occurred at Vrancea, Romania, about 350 km from the Kozloduy plant in Bulgaria. Subsequent to this event, construction of the unit 2 of the Armenia plant was delayed over two years while seismic features were added. On December 7, 1988, another strong earthquake struck northwest Armenia about 90 km north of the Armenia plant. Extensive damage of residential and industrial facilities occurred in the vicinity of the epicenter. The earthquake did not damage the Armenia plant. Following this event, the Soviet government announced that the plant would be shutdown permanently by March 18, 1989, and the station converted to a fossil-fired plant. This paper presents the results of the seismic analyses of the Soviet-designed VVER (Water-cooled, Water moderated Energy Reactor) plants. Also presented is the information concerning seismicity in the regions where VVERs are located and information on seismic design of VVERs. The reference units are the VVER-440 model V230 (similar to the two units of the Armenia plant) and the VVER-1000 model V320 units at Kozloduy in Bulgaria. This document provides an initial basis for understanding the seismicity and seismic response of VVERs under seismic events. 1 ref., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Field Test Design Simulations of Pore-Water Extraction for the SX Tank Farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A proof of principle test of pore water extraction is being performed by Washington River Protection Solutions for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection. This test is being conducted to meet the requirements of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (HFFACO) (Ecology et al. 1989) Milestone M 045-20, and is described in RPP-PLAN-53808, 200 West Area Tank Farms Interim Measures Investigation Work Plan. To support design of this test, numerical simulations were conducted to help define equipment and operational parameters. The modeling effort builds from information collected in laboratory studies and from field characterization information collected at the test site near the Hanford Site 241-SX Tank Farm. Numerical simulations were used to evaluate pore-water extraction performance as a function of the test site properties and for the type of extraction well configuration that can be constructed using the direct-push installation technique. Output of simulations included rates of water and soil-gas production as a function of operational conditions for use in supporting field equipment design. The simulations also investigated the impact of subsurface heterogeneities in sediment properties and moisture distribution on pore-water extraction performance. Phenomena near the extraction well were also investigated because of their importance for pore-water extraction performance.

  10. RAMI Analysis for Designing and Optimizing Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS) for the ITER's Fusion Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrada, Juan J [ORNL] [ORNL; Reiersen, Wayne T [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S.-ITER is responsible for the design, engineering, and procurement of the Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS). TCWS is designed to provide cooling and baking for client systems that include the first wall/blanket, vacuum vessel, divertor, and neutral beam injector. Additional operations that support these primary functions include chemical control of water provided to client systems, draining and drying for maintenance, and leak detection/localization. TCWS interfaces with 27 systems including the secondary cooling system, which rejects this heat to the environment. TCWS transfers heat generated in the Tokamak during nominal pulsed operation - 850 MW at up to 150 C and 4.2 MPa water pressure. Impurities are diffused from in-vessel components and the vacuum vessel by water baking at 200-240 C at up to 4.4 MPa. TCWS is complex because it serves vital functions for four primary clients whose performance is critical to ITER's success and interfaces with more than 20 additional ITER systems. Conceptual design of this one-of-a-kind cooling system has been completed; however, several issues remain that must be resolved before moving to the next stage of the design process. The 2004 baseline design indicated cooling loops that have no fault tolerance for component failures. During plasma operation, each cooling loop relies on a single pump, a single pressurizer, and one heat exchanger. Consequently, failure of any of these would render TCWS inoperable, resulting in plasma shutdown. The application of reliability, availability, maintainability, and inspectability (RAMI) tools during the different stages of TCWS design is crucial for optimization purposes and for maintaining compliance with project requirements. RAMI analysis will indicate appropriate equipment redundancy that provides graceful degradation in the event of an equipment failure. This analysis helps demonstrate that using proven, commercially available equipment is better than using custom-designed equipment with no field experience and lowers specific costs while providing higher reliability. This paper presents a brief description of the TCWS conceptual design and the application of RAMI tools to optimize the design at different stages during the project.

  11. The Design and Evaluation of Prototype Eco-Feedback Displays for Fixture-Level Water Usage Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Richard

    to the design of future water eco-feedback systems but also for other types of consumption (e.g., electricity ABSTRACT Few means currently exist for home occupants to learn about their water consumption: e.g., where to extract, water suppliers and governments are shifting their focus from finding new supplies to using

  12. Light Water Breeder Reactor fuel rod design and performance characteristics (LWBR Development Program)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, W.R.; Giovengo, J.F.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) fuel rods were designed to provide a reliable fuel system utilizing thorium/uranium-233 mixed-oxide fuel while simultaneously minimizing structural material to enhance fuel breeding. The fuel system was designed to be capable of operating successfully under both load follow and base load conditions. The breeding objective required thin-walled, low hafnium content Zircaloy cladding, tightly spaced fuel rods with a minimum number of support grid levels, and movable fuel rod bundles to supplant control rods. Specific fuel rod design considerations and their effects on performance capability are described. Successful completion of power operations to over 160 percent of design lifetime including over 200 daily load follow cycles has proven the performance capability of the fuel system. 68 refs., 19 figs., 44 tabs.

  13. WaterTransport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing and Design Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Vernon Cole; Abhra Roy; Ashok Damle; Hari Dahr; Sanjiv Kumar; Kunal Jain; Ned Djilai

    2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Water management in Proton Exchange Membrane, PEM, Fuel Cells is challenging because of the inherent conflicts between the requirements for efficient low and high power operation. Particularly at low powers, adequate water must be supplied to sufficiently humidify the membrane or protons will not move through it adequately and resistance losses will decrease the cell efficiency. At high power density operation, more water is produced at the cathode than is necessary for membrane hydration. This excess water must be removed effectively or it will accumulate in the Gas Diffusion Layers, GDLs, between the gas channels and catalysts, blocking diffusion paths for reactants to reach the catalysts and potentially flooding the electrode. As power density of the cells is increased, the challenges arising from water management are expected to become more difficult to overcome simply due to the increased rate of liquid water generation relative to fuel cell volume. Thus, effectively addressing water management based issues is a key challenge in successful application of PEMFC systems. In this project, CFDRC and our partners used a combination of experimental characterization, controlled experimental studies of important processes governing how water moves through the fuel cell materials, and detailed models and simulations to improve understanding of water management in operating hydrogen PEM fuel cells. The characterization studies provided key data that is used as inputs to all state-of-the-art models for commercially important GDL materials. Experimental studies and microscopic scale models of how water moves through the GDLs showed that the water follows preferential paths, not branching like a river, as it moves toward the surface of the material. Experimental studies and detailed models of water and airflow in fuel cells channels demonstrated that such models can be used as an effective design tool to reduce operating pressure drop in the channels and the associated costs and weight of blowers and pumps to force air and hydrogen gas through the fuel cell. Promising improvements to materials structure and surface treatments that can potentially aid in managing the distribution and removal of liquid water were developed; and improved steady-state and freeze-thaw performance was demonstrated for a fuel cell stack under the self-humidified operating conditions that are promising for stationary power generation with reduced operating costs.

  14. Abstracts and parameter index database for reports pertaining to the unsaturated zone and surface water-ground water interactions at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloomsburg, G.; Finnie, J.; Horn, D.; King, B.; Liou, J. [Idaho Univ., Moscow, ID (United States)

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a product generated by faculty at the University of Idaho in support of research and development projects on Unsaturated Zone Contamination and Transport Processes, and on Surface Water-Groundwater Interactions and Regional Groundwater Flow at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. These projects are managed by the State of Idaho`s INEL Oversight Program under a grant from the US Department of Energy. In particular, this report meets project objectives to produce a site-wide summary of hydrological information based on a literature search and review of field, laboratory and modeling studies at INEL, including a cross-referenced index to site-specific physical, chemical, mineralogic, geologic and hydrologic parameters determined from these studies. This report includes abstracts of 149 reports with hydrological information. For reports which focus on hydrological issues, the abstracts are taken directly from those reports; for reports dealing with a variety of issues beside hydrology, the abstracts were generated by the University of Idaho authors concentrating on hydrology-related issues. Each abstract is followed by a ``Data`` section which identifies types of technical information included in a given report, such as information on parameters or chemistry, mineralogy, stream flows, water levels. The ``Data`` section does not include actual values or data.

  15. Rules and Regulations for the Management and Control of Designated...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Management and Control of Designated Ground Water Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Reference: Rules and Regulations for the Management and...

  16. LWRS Fuels Pathway: Engineering Design and Fuels Pathway Initial Testing of the Hot Water Corrosion System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. John Garnier; Dr. Kevin McHugh

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Development R&D pathway performs strategic research focused on cladding designs leading to improved reactor core economics and safety margins. The research performed is to demonstrate the nuclear fuel technology advancements while satisfying safety and regulatory limits. These goals are met through rigorous testing and analysis. The nuclear fuel technology developed will assist in moving existing nuclear fuel technology to an improved level that would not be practical by industry acting independently. Strategic mission goals are to improve the scientific knowledge basis for understanding and predicting fundamental nuclear fuel and cladding performance in nuclear power plants, and to apply this information in the development of high-performance, high burn-up fuels. These will result in improved safety, cladding, integrity, and nuclear fuel cycle economics. To achieve these goals various methods for non-irradiated characterization testing of advanced cladding systems are needed. One such new test system is the Hot Water Corrosion System (HWCS) designed to develop new data for cladding performance assessment and material behavior under simulated off-normal reactor conditions. The HWCS is capable of exposing prototype rodlets to heated, high velocity water at elevated pressure for long periods of time (days, weeks, months). Water chemistry (dissolved oxygen, conductivity and pH) is continuously monitored. In addition, internal rodlet heaters inserted into cladding tubes are used to evaluate repeated thermal stressing and heat transfer characteristics of the prototype rodlets. In summary, the HWCS provides rapid ex-reactor evaluation of cladding designs in normal (flowing hot water) and off-normal (induced cladding stress), enabling engineering and manufacturing improvements to cladding designs before initiation of the more expensive and time consuming in-reactor irradiation testing.

  17. Core design study of a supercritical light water reactor with double row fuel rods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, C.; Wu, H.; Cao, L.; Zheng, Y. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi'an Jiaotong Univ., No. 28, Xianning West Road, Xi'an, ShannXi, 710049 (China); Yang, J.; Zhang, Y. [China Nuclear Power Technology Research Inst., Yitian Road, ShenZhen, GuangDong, 518026 (China)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An equilibrium core for supercritical light water reactor has been designed. A novel type of fuel assembly with dual rows of fuel rods between water rods is chosen and optimized to get more uniform assembly power distributions. Stainless steel is used for fuel rod cladding and structural material. Honeycomb structure filled with thermal isolation is introduced to reduce the usage of stainless steel and to keep moderator temperature below the pseudo critical temperature. Water flow scheme with ascending coolant flow in inner regions is carried out to achieve high outlet temperature. In order to enhance coolant outlet temperature, the radial power distributions needs to be as flat as possible through operation cycle. Fuel loading pattern and control rod pattern are optimized to flatten power distribution at inner regions. Axial fuel enrichment is divided into three parts to control axial power peak, which affects maximum cladding surface temperature. (authors)

  18. THE DESIGN AND APPLICATION OF NETWORK OF GROUND-BASED GPS WATER VAPOR MONITORING STATIONS TO IMPROVE PRECIPITATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    it is the means by which moisture and latent heat are transported to produce mesoscale weather events. And remote a a Institute of Urban Meteorology, China Meteorological Administration, No.55 Bei Wa Xi Li, Haidian District. Dr. Chao-Lin Zhang, IUM, CMA, Beijing, clzhang@ium.cn, c_lzhang@yahoo.com. 1. INTRODUCTION Remote

  19. OTEC cold water pipe design for problems caused by vortex-excited oscillations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, O. M.

    1980-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Vortex-excited oscillations of marine structures result in reduced fatigue life, large hydrodynamic forces and induced stresses, and sometimes lead to structural damage and to diestructive failures. The cold water pipe of an OTEC plant is nominally a bluff, flexible cylinder with a large aspect ratio (L/D = length/diameter), and is likely to be susceptible to resonant vortex-excited oscillations. The objective of this report is to survey recent results pertaining to the vortex-excited oscillations of structures in general and to consider the application of these findings to the design of the OTEC cold water pipe. Practical design calculations are given as examples throughout the various sections of the report. This report is limited in scope to the problems of vortex shedding from bluff, flexible structures in steady currents and the resulting vortex-excited oscillations. The effects of flow non-uniformities, surface roughness of the cylinder, and inclination to the incident flow are considered in addition to the case of a smooth cyliner in a uniform stream. Emphasis is placed upon design procedures, hydrodynamic coefficients applicable in practice, and the specification of structural response parameters relevant to the OTEC cold water pipe. There are important problems associated with in shedding of vortices from cylinders in waves and from the combined action of waves and currents, but these complex fluid/structure interactions are not considered in this report.

  20. Design of a rural water provision system to decrease arsenic exposure in Bangladesh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathieu, Johanna

    2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have invented ARUBA (Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash) a material that effectively and affordably removes high concentrations of arsenic from contaminated groundwater. The technology is cost-effective because the substrate?bottom ash from coal fired power plants?is a waste material readily available in South Asia. During fieldwork in four sub-districts ofBangladesh, ARUBA reduced groundwater arsenic concentrations as high as 680 ppb to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. Key results from three trips in Bangladesh and one trip to Cambodia include (1) ARUBA removes more than half of the arsenic from contaminated water within the first five minutes of contact, andcontinues removing arsenic for 2-3 days; (2) ARUBA?s arsenic removal efficiency can be improved through fractionated dosing (adding a given amount of ARUBA in fractions versus all at once); (3) allowing water to first stand for two to three days followed by treatment with ARUBA produced final arsenic concentrations ten times lower than treating water directly out of the well; and (4) the amount of arsenic removed per gram of ARUBA is linearly related to the initial arsenic concentrationof the water. Through analysis of existing studies, observations, and informal interviews in Bangladesh, eight design strategies have been developed and used in the design of a low-cost, community-scale water treatment system that uses ARUBA to remove arsenic from drinking water. We have constructed, tested, and analyzed a scale version of the system. Experiments have shown that the system is capable of reducing high levels of arsenic (nearly 600 ppb) to below 50 ppb, while remaining affordable to people living on less than $2 per day. The system could be sustainably implemented as a public-private partnership in rural Bangladesh.

  1. Ground Loops for Heat Pumps and Refrigeration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braud, H. J.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground loops are used for water source heat pumps. Refrigeration can be put on a ground loop. Water-cooled condensing units are more efficient than air-cooled, and they can be put indoors. Indoor location makes piping for desuperheater hot water...

  2. Ground Loops for Heat Pumps and Refrigeration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braud, H. J.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground loops are used for water source heat pumps. Refrigeration can be put on a ground loop. Water-cooled condensing units are more efficient than air-cooled, and they can be put indoors. Indoor location makes piping for desuperheater hot water...

  3. Standard Practice for Design of Surveillance Programs for Light-Water Moderated Nuclear Power Reactor Vessels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for designing a surveillance program for monitoring the radiation-induced changes in the mechanical properties of ferritic materials in light-water moderated nuclear power reactor vessels. This practice includes the minimum requirements for the design of a surveillance program, selection of vessel material to be included, and the initial schedule for evaluation of materials. 1.2 This practice was developed for all light-water moderated nuclear power reactor vessels for which the predicted maximum fast neutron fluence (E > 1 MeV) at the end of license (EOL) exceeds 1 × 1021 neutrons/m2 (1 × 1017 n/cm2) at the inside surface of the reactor vessel. 1.3 This practice applies only to the planning and design of surveillance programs for reactor vessels designed and built after the effective date of this practice. Previous versions of Practice E185 apply to earlier reactor vessels. 1.4 This practice does not provide specific procedures for monitoring the radiation induced cha...

  4. Designer organisms for photosynthetic production of ethanol from carbon dioxide and water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, James Weifu (Knoxville, TN)

    2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a revolutionary photosynthetic ethanol production technology based on designer transgenic plants, algae, or plant cells. The designer plants, designer algae, and designer plant cells are created such that the endogenous photosynthesis regulation mechanism is tamed, and the reducing power (NADPH) and energy (ATP) acquired from the photosynthetic water splitting and proton gradient-coupled electron transport process are used for immediate synthesis of ethanol (CH.sub.3CH.sub.2OH) directly from carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) and water (H.sub.2O). The ethanol production methods of the present invention completely eliminate the problem of recalcitrant lignocellulosics by bypassing the bottleneck problem of the biomass technology. The photosynthetic ethanol-production technology of the present invention is expected to have a much higher solar-to-ethanol energy-conversion efficiency than the current technology and could also help protect the Earth's environment from the dangerous accumulation of CO.sub.2 in the atmosphere.

  5. A Water Balance Study of Four Landfill Cover Designs at Material Disposal Area B in Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David D. Breshears; Fairley J. Barnes; John W. Nyhan; Johnny A. Salazar

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of disposing of low-level radioactive and hazardous waste in shallow landfills is to reduce risk to human health and the environment by isolating contaminants until they no longer pose an unacceptable hazard. In order to achieve this, the Department of Energy Environmental Restoration Program is comparing the performance of several different surface covers at Material Disposal Area (MDA) B in Los Alamos. Two conventional landfill were compared with an improved cover designed to minimize plant and animal intrusion and to minimize water infiltration into the underlying wastes. The conventional covers varied in depth and both conventional and improved designs had different combinations of vegetation (grass verses shrub) and gravel mulch (no mulch verses mulch). These treatments were applied to each of 12 plots and water balance parameters were measured from March1987 through June 1995. Adding a gravel mulch significantly influenced the plant covered field plots receiving no gravel mulch averaged 21.2% shrub cover, while plots with gravel had a 20% larger percent cover of shrubs. However, the influence of gravel mulch on the grass cover was even larger than the influence on shrub cover, average grass cover on the plots with no gravel was 16.3%, compared with a 42% increase in grass cover due to gravel mulch. These cover relationships are important to reduce runoff on the landfill cover, as shown by a regression model that predicts that as ground cover is increased from 30 to 90%,annual runoff is reduced from 8.8 to 0.98 cm-a nine-fold increase. We also found that decreasing the slope of the landfill cover from 6 to 2% reduced runoff from the landfill cover by 2.7-fold. To minimize the risk of hazardous waste from landfills to humans, runoff and seepage need to be minimized and evapotranspiration maximized on the landfill cover. This has to be accomplished for dry and wet years at MDA B. Seepage consisted of 1.9% and 6.2% of the precipitation in the average and once in ten year events, respectively, whereas corresponding values for runoff were 13% and 16%; these changes were accompanied by corresponding decreases in evapotranspiration, which accounted for 86% and only 78% of the precipitation occurring on the average and once in ten year even~ respectively.

  6. MODULAR AND FULL SIZE SIMPLIFIED BOILING WATER REACTOR DESIGN WITH FULLY PASSIVE SAFETY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Ishii; S. T. Revankar; T. Downar; Y. Xu, H. J. Yoon; D. Tinkler; U. S. Rohatgi

    2003-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK B204 The overall goal of this three-year research project was to develop a new scientific design of a compact modular 200 MWe and a full size 1200 MWe simplified boiling water reactors (SBWR). Specific objectives of this research were: (1) to perform scientific designs of the core neutronics and core thermal-hydraulics for a small capacity and full size simplified boiling water reactor, (2) to develop a passive safety system design, (3) improve and validate safety analysis code, (4) demonstrate experimentally and analytically all design functions of the safety systems for the design basis accidents (DBA) and (5) to develop the final scientific design of both SBWR systems, 200 MWe (SBWR-200) and 1200 MWe (SBWR-1200). The SBWR combines the advantages of design simplicity and completely passive safety systems. These advantages fit well within the objectives of NERI and the Department of Energy's focus on the development of Generation III and IV nuclear power. The 3-year research program was structured around seven tasks. Task 1 was to perform the preliminary thermal-hydraulic design. Task 2 was to perform the core neutronic design analysis. Task 3 was to perform a detailed scaling study and obtain corresponding PUMA conditions from an integral test. Task 4 was to perform integral tests and code evaluation for the DBA. Task 5 was to perform a safety analysis for the DBA. Task 6 was to perform a BWR stability analysis. Task 7 was to perform a final scientific design of the compact modular SBWR-200 and the full size SBWR-1200. A no cost extension for the third year was requested and the request was granted and all the project tasks were completed by April 2003. The design activities in tasks 1, 2, and 3 were completed as planned. The existing thermal-hydraulic information, core physics, and fuel lattice information was collected on the existing design of the simplified boiling water reactor. The thermal-hydraulic design were developed. Based on a detailed integral system scaling analysis, design parameters were obtained and designs of the compact modular 200 MWe SBWR and the full size 1200 MWe SBWR were developed. These reactors are provided with passive safety systems. A new passive vacuum breaker check valve was designed to replace the mechanical vacuum beaker check valve. The new vacuum breaker check valve was based on a hydrostatic head, and was fail safe. The performance of this new valve was evaluated both by the thermal-hydraulic code RELAP5 and by the experiments in a scaled SBWR facility, PUMA. In the core neutronic design a core depletion model was implemented to PARCS code. A lattice design for the SBWR fuel assemblies was performed. Design improvements were made to the neutronics/thermal-hydraulics models of SBWR-200 and SBWR-1200, and design analyses of these reactors were performed. The design base accident analysis and evaluation of all the passive safety systems were completed as scheduled in tasks 4 and 5. Initial conditions for the small break loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) and large break LOCA using REALP5 code were obtained. Small and large break LOCA tests were performed and the data was analyzed. An anticipated transient with scram was simulated using the RELAP5 code for SBWR-200. The transient considered was an accidental closure of the main steam isolation valve (MSIV), which was considered to be the most significant transient. The evaluation of the RELAP5 code against experimental data for SBWR-1200 was completed. In task 6, the instability analysis for the three SBWR designs (SBWR-1200, SBWR-600 and SBWR-200) were simulated for start-up transients and the results were similar. Neither the geysering instability, nor the loop type instability was predicted by RAMONA-4B in the startup simulation following the recommended procedure by GE. The density wave oscillation was not observed at all because the power level used in the simulation was not high enough. A study was made of the potential instabilities by imposing an unrealistically high power ramp in a short time period, as suggested by GE. RAMON

  7. Selenium speciation in ground water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atalay, A.

    1990-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Selenium toxicity diseases in animals may occur when the intake exceeds 4 mg/kg and selenium deficiency symptoms may occur when dietary intake is less than 0.04 mg/kg. Since the selenium dietary requirement is very close to toxic concentration, it is important to understand the distribution of selenium in the environment. Selenium occurs in four oxidation states (-II, 0, +IV, and +VI) as selenide, elemental selenium, selenite and selenate. Selenate is reported as more soluble and less adsorbed than selenite. Selenate is more easily leached from soils and is the most available form for plants. Increased mobility of Se into the environment via anthropogenic activities, and the potential oxidation-reduction behavior of the element have made it imperative to study the aquatic chemistry of Se. For this purpose, Se species are divided into two different categories: dissolved Se (in material that passes through filters with 0.45 u openings) and particulate Se (in material of particle size > 0.45 mm) typically suspended sediment and other suspended solids. Element and colloidal phase, not truly dissolved, but passing through the filter is deemed to consist of selenium (-2,0). In dissolved state selenium may exist in three of its four oxidation states; Se(-II), Se(+IV), and Se(+VI). Particulate Se may exist in the same oxidation states as dissolved Se and can be found in different phases of the particulate matter. In sediments, Se may be within the organic material, iron and manganese oxides, carbonates or other mineral phases. The actual chemical forms of Se may be adsorbed to or coprecipitated with these phases (primarily selenite, SeO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}) and selenate, SeO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}. Selenide, Se(-II), can be covalently bound in the organic portion of a sediment. In addition, Se may be found in anoxic sediments as insoluble metal selenide precipitates, an insoluble elemental Se or as ferroselite (FeSe{sub 2}) and Se containing pyrite.

  8. Ground Water Protection (North Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    North Dakota has a degradation prevention program for groundwater protection, with standards established by the Department of Health. This section addresses groundwater standards, quality...

  9. Ground-Coupled Heat Pump Applications and Case Studies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braud, H. J.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents an overview of ground loops for space-conditioning heat pumps, hot water, ice machines, and water-cooled refrigeration in residential and commercial applications. In Louisiana, a chain of hamburger drive-ins uses total ground...

  10. Development of an ArcGIS interface and design of a geodatabase for the soil and water assessment tool 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valenzuela Zapata, Milver Alfredo

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project presents the development and design of a comprehensive interface coupled with a geodatabase (ArcGISwat 2003), for the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). SWAT is a hydrologically distributed, lumped parameter ...

  11. Energy distribution and computer modeled nozzle design in high pressure water jet coating removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blades, B. [Hobart Tafa Technologies Inc., Concord, NH (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Wider acceptance of water jet coating removal as an industrial process has created a demand to better understand the physical phenomena occurring during coating removal. This demand stems from both technical and process control concerns. Research on behavior of coating removal nozzles and high pressure jets in general provide the basis for the development of a mathematical model of rotating nozzle. The model finds uses in both process development and new equipment design. Data confirming the validity of the model has been generated and the need for further refinement of the model has been noted.

  12. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    which can lead to public health problems. * MtBE (Methyl tert Butyl Ether), a gasoline additive, has begun to contaminate ground water supplies. * Similarly, perchlorate has...

  13. Design of 95 GHz gyrotron based on continuous operation copper solenoid with water cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borodin, Dmitri; Ben-Moshe, Roey; Einat, Moshe [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Ariel University, Ariel 40700 (Israel)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The design work for 2nd harmonic 95 GHz, 50 kW gyrotron based on continuous operation copper solenoid is presented. Thermionic magnetron injection gun specifications were calculated according to the linear trade off equation, and simulated with CST program. Numerical code is used for cavity design using the non-uniform string equation as well as particle motion in the “cold” cavity field. The mode TE02 with low Ohmic losses in the cavity walls was chosen as the operating mode. The Solenoid is designed to induce magnetic field of 1.8 T over a length of 40 mm in the interaction region with homogeneity of ±0.34%. The solenoid has six concentric cylindrical segments (and two correction segments) of copper foil windings separated by water channels for cooling. The predicted temperature in continuous operation is below 93?°C. The parameters of the design together with simulation results of the electromagnetic cavity field, magnetic field, electron trajectories, and thermal analyses are presented.

  14. The Neutronics Design and Analysis of a 200-MW(electric) Simplified Boiling Water Reactor Core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tinkler, Daniel R.; Downar, Thomas J. [Purdue University (United States)

    2003-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A 200-MW(electric) simplified boiling water reactor (SBWR) was designed and analyzed under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Energy Research Initiative program. The compact size of a 200-MW(electric) reactor makes it attractive for countries with a less well developed engineering infrastructure, as well as for developed countries seeking to tailor generation capacity more closely to the growth of their electricity demand. The 200-MW(electric) core design reported here is based on the 600-MW(electric) General Electric SBWR core, which was first analyzed in the work performed here in order to qualify the computer codes used in the analysis. Cross sections for the 8 x 8 fuel assembly design were generated with the HELIOS lattice physics code, and core simulation was performed with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission codes RELAP5/PARCS. In order to predict the critical heat flux, the Hench-Gillis correlation was implemented in the RELAP5 code. An equilibrium cycle was designed for the 200-MW(electric) core, which provided a cycle length of more than 2 yr and satisfied the minimum critical power ratio throughout the core life.

  15. Surprise Valley water geochmical data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Nicolas Spycher

    Chemical analyses of thermal and cold ground waters from Surprise Valley, compiled from publicly available sources.

  16. Design of a boiling water reactor equilibrium core using thorium-uranium fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francois, J-L.; Nunez-Carrera, A.; Espinosa-Paredes, G.; Martin-del-Campo, C.

    2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the design of a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) equilibrium core using thorium is presented; a heterogeneous blanket-seed core arrangement concept was adopted. The design was developed in three steps: in the first step two different assemblies were designed based on the integrated blanket-seed concept, they are the blanket-dummy assembly and the blanket-seed assembly. The integrated blanketseed concept comes from the fact that the blanket and the seed rods are located in the same assembly, and are burned-out in a once-through cycle. In the second step, a core design was developed to achieve an equilibrium cycle of 365 effective full power days in a standard BWR with a reload of 104 fuel assemblies designed with an average 235U enrichment of 7.5 w/o in the seed sub-lattice. The main operating parameters, like power, linear heat generation rate and void distributions were obtained as well as the shutdown margin. It was observed that the analyzed parameters behave like those obtained in a standard BWR. The shutdown margin design criterion was fulfilled by addition of a burnable poison region in the assembly. In the third step an in-house code was developed to evaluate the thorium equilibrium core under transient conditions. A stability analysis was also performed. Regarding the stability analysis, five operational states were analyzed; four of them define the traditional instability region corner of the power-flow map and the fifth one is the operational state for the full power condition. The frequency and the boiling length were calculated for each operational state. The frequency of the analyzed operational states was similar to that reported for BWRs; these are close to the unstable region that occurs due to the density wave oscillation phenomena in some nuclear power plants. Four transient analyses were also performed: manual SCRAM, recirculation pumps trip, main steam isolation valves closure and loss of feed water. The results of these transients are similar to those obtained with the traditional UO2 nuclear fuel.

  17. organized in cooperation with TU Vienna, (Institute for Water Quality, Resource and Waste Management) Analysis, Evaluation and Design of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szmolyan, Peter

    Management) Analysis, Evaluation and Design of Sustainable Waste Management Systems Goal The objective such as Material Flow Analysis, case studies for design of waste management systems) with special emphasisorganized in cooperation with TU Vienna, (Institute for Water Quality, Resource and Waste

  18. Energy Efficiency Design Options for Residential Water Heaters: Economic Impacts on Consumers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of a Drop-In Heat Pump Water Heater, Oak Ridge National Lab.CA. Maxwell, J. 2004. Heat Pump Water Heater Economic Model.water heaters. For heat pump water heaters, the study also

  19. Energy Efficiency Design Options for Residential Water Heaters: Economic Impacts on Consumers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    common water heating products on the market and determinedof advanced water heating technology into the U.S. market.

  20. Energy Efficiency Design Options for Residential Water Heaters: Economic Impacts on Consumers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    resistance storage water heater with tank and controls;tank size and thermostat set point of the water heater, and

  1. Detection of 6 November 1997 Ground Level Event by for Milagro collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    collaboration 1 Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 USA Abstract Solar Energetic Particles from the 6 November 1997 solar flare/CME(coronal mass ejection) with energies exceeding 10 GeV. The Milagro observatory, a ground based water Cherenkov detector designed for observing very high energy gamma

  2. Application of Genetic Algorithm to Optimal Design of Central Air-Conditioning Water System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, X.; Zou, Y.; Long, W.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .25 150 121.86 0.1182 1.92 200 131.55 0.0218 376.9729 1.0864 19 19 20 4.5 150 99.58 0.1013 1.57 150 107.18 0.1013 1163.561 1.6857 20 20 21 1.8 80 22.29 0.965 1.17 65 24.28 2.3884 1408.019 1.8046 21 22 23 1 80 22.29 0.5361 1.17 80 24.24 0.5361 315.0493... Wuxi, P. R. China, 214122 Shanghai? P. R. China, 200070 fxp_99@126.com Zouyun_22@126.com WeidingLong@163.com Abstract: The optimal design of air-conditioning water system is an optimization problem of functions that depend on a series...

  3. Regional analysis of ground and above-ground climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The regional suitability of underground construction as a climate control technique is discussed with reference to (1) a bioclimatic analysis of long-term weather data for 29 locations in the United States to determine appropriate above ground climate control techniques, (2) a data base of synthesized ground temperatures for the coterminous United States, and (3) monthly dew point ground temperature comparisons for identifying the relative likelihood of condensation from one region to another. It is concluded that the suitability of earth tempering as a practice and of specific earth-sheltered design stereotypes varies geographically; while the subsurface almost always provides a thermal advantage on its own terms when compared to above ground climatic data, it can, nonetheless, compromise the effectiveness of other, regionally more important climate control techniques. Also contained in the report are reviews of above and below ground climate mapping schemes related to human comfort and architectural design, and detailed description of a theoretical model of ground temperature, heat flow, and heat storage in the ground. Strategies of passive climate control are presented in a discussion of the building bioclimatic analysis procedure which has been applied in a computer analysis of 30 years of weather data for each of 29 locations in the United States.

  4. Safe water storage in Kenya's modified clay pot : standardization, tap design, and cost recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Suzanne E

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the main components necessary for providing safe drinking water for users who lack piped water in the home is the ability to safely store it in the home. Users in the Nyanza Province of Kenya frequently carry water ...

  5. Energy Efficiency Design Options for Residential Water Heaters: Economic Impacts on Consumers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of a Drop-In Heat Pump Water Heater, Oak Ridge National Lab.Clear Seas Research. 2006. Water Heater Study. Plumbing andJ. 2003. Incorporating Water Heater Replacement into the

  6. Biosand filtration of high turbidity water : modified filter design and safe filtrate storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collin, Clair

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unsafe drinking water is a major cause of water-related diseases that predominantly affect people living in developing countries. The most prevalent water-related disease is diarrhea, estimated to kill 1.8 million children ...

  7. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the advanced boiling water reactor design. Volume 1: Main report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This safety evaluation report (SER) documents the technical review of the US Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard design by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. The application for the ABWR design was initially submitted by the General Electric Company, now GE Nuclear Energy (GE), in accordance with the procedures of Appendix O of Part 50 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 50). Later GE requested that its application be considered as an application for design approval and subsequent design certification pursuant to 10 CFR {section} 52.45. The ABWR is a single-cycle, forced-circulation, boiling water reactor (BWR) with a rated power of 3,926 megawatts thermal (MWt) and a design power of 4,005 MWt. To the extent feasible and appropriate, the staff relied on earlier reviews for those ABWR design features that are substantially the same as those previously considered. Unique features of the ABWR design include internal recirculation pumps, fine-motion control rod drives, microprocessor-based digital logic and control systems, and digital safety systems. On the basis of its evaluation and independent analyses, the NRC staff concludes that, subject to satisfactory resolution of the confirmatory items identified in Section 1.8 of this SER, GE`s application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B of 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the US ABWR standard design.

  8. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the advanced boiling water reactor design. Volume 2: Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This safety evaluation report (SER) documents the technical review of the US Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard design by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. The application for the ABWR design was initially submitted by the General Electric Company, now GE Nuclear Energy (GE), in accordance with the procedures of Appendix O of Part 50 of Title 10 of the code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 50). Later GE requested that its application be considered as an application for design approval and subsequent design certification pursuant to 10 CFR {section} 52.45. The ABWR is a single-cycle, forced-circulation, boiling water reactor (BWR) with a rated power of 3,926 megawatts thermal (MWt) and a design power of 4,005 MWt. To the extent feasible and appropriate, the staff relied on earlier reviews for those ABWR design features that are substantially the same as those previously considered. Unique features of the ABWR design include internal recirculation pumps, fine-motion control rod drives, microprocessor-based digital logic and control systems, and digital safety systems. On the basis of its evaluation and independent analyses, the NRC staff concludes that, subject to satisfactory resolution of the confirmatory items identified in Section 1.8 of this SER, GE`s application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B of 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the US ABWR standard design.

  9. Transmission line design manual. A guide for the investigation, development, and design of power transmission lines. Water resources technical pub

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farr, H.H.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the manual is to outline the various requirements for, and the procedures to be followed in the design of power transmission lines by the Bureau of Reclamation. U.S. Department of the Interior. Numerous design studies, which have been made on specific aspects of transmission line design, are included with explanations of their applications. Information is presented concerning such aspects as selection of type of construction, conductor sags and tensions, insulation, lightning protection, clearance patterns, galloping conductors, structure limitation and guying charts, and structure spotting. Structure design examples are limited to wood-pole construction. Interpretations of the National Electrical Safety Code and other codes are made as required.

  10. DESIGN OF A RURAL WATER PROVISION SYSTEM TO DECREASE ARSENIC EXPOSURE IN BANGLADESH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agogino, Alice M.

    in fractions versus all at once); (3) allowing water to first stand for two to three days followed by treatment with ARUBA produced final arsenic concentrations ten times lower than treating water directly out of the well-scale water treatment system that uses ARUBA to remove arsenic from drinking water. We have constructed

  11. Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of three backup water cooling stations for the LHC cryogenic plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of three backup water cooling stations for the LHC cryogenic plants

  12. Analysis of Ground-Water Levels and Associated Trends in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, 1951-2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.M. Fenelon

    2005-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Almost 4,000 water-level measurements in 216 wells in the Yucca Flat area from 1951 to 2003 were quality assured and analyzed. An interpretative database was developed that describes water-level conditions for each water level measured in Yucca Flat. Multiple attributes were assigned to each water-level measurement in the database to describe the hydrologic conditions at the time of measurement. General quality, temporal variability, regional significance, and hydrologic conditions are attributed for each water-level measurement. The database also includes narratives that discuss the water-level history of each well. Water levels in 34 wells were analyzed for variability and for statistically significant trends. An attempt was made to identify the cause of many of the water-level fluctuations or trends. Potential causes include equilibration following well construction or development, pumping in the monitoring well, withdrawals from a nearby supply well, recharge from precipitation, earthquakes, underground nuclear tests, land subsidence, barometric pressure, and Earth tides. Some of the naturally occurring fluctuations in water levels may result from variations in recharge. The magnitude of the overall water-level change for these fluctuations generally is less than 2 feet. Long-term steady-state hydrographs for most of the wells open to carbonate rock have a very similar pattern. Carbonate-rock wells without the characteristic pattern are directly west of the Yucca and Topgallant faults in the southwestern part of Yucca Flat. Long-term steady-state hydrographs from wells open to volcanic tuffs or the Eleana confining unit have a distinctly different pattern from the general water-level pattern of the carbonate-rock aquifers. Anthropogenic water-level fluctuations were caused primarily by water withdrawals and nuclear testing. Nuclear tests affected water levels in many wells. Trends in these wells are attributed to test-cavity infilling or the effects of depressurization following nuclear testing. The magnitude of the overall water-level change for wells with anthropogenic trends can be large, ranging from several feet to hundreds of feet. Vertical water-level differences at 27 sites in Yucca Flat with multiple open intervals were compared. Large vertical differences were noted in volcanic rocks and in boreholes where water levels were affected by nuclear tests. Small vertical differences were noted within the carbonate-rock and valley-fill aquifers. Vertical hydraulic gradients generally are downward in volcanic rocks and from pre-Tertiary clastic rocks toward volcanic- or carbonate-rock units.

  13. Water management studies in PEM fuel cells, Part I: Fuel cell design and in situ water distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kandlikar, Satish

    ; USDOE, United States Department of Energy. * Corresponding author. Tel.: þ1 585 624 6807; fax: þ1 585 a balance between the hydration level required for efficient proton transfer and excess liquid water been studied at relatively low operating temperatures under steady-state conditions and during

  14. Field and Laboratory Study of a Ground-Coupled Water Source Heat Pump with an Integral Enthalpy Exchange System for Classrooms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domitrovic, R.; Hayzen, G. J.; Johnson, W. S.; Chen, F. C.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    water-source heat pump, coupled with a geothermal water loop and incorporating a forced fresh-air enthalpy exchange system was installed in a typical middle school classroom in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This project is a joint effort among Oak Ridge School...

  15. Feasibility and design of blast mitigation systems for naval applications using water mist fire suppression systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kitchenka, Julie A

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent trend of using fine water mist systems to replace the legacy HALON- 1301 fire suppression systems warrants further study into other applications of the water mist systems. Preliminary research and investigation ...

  16. Design of fuel efficient brick kiln for ceramic water filter firing in Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adjorlolo, Eric (Eric James Kofi)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ceramic water filters are currently produced in Ghana in order to provide a household solution to contaminated water. These filters, locally branded with the name Kosim filter by originating from Potters for Peace-Nicaragua, ...

  17. Analysis and design of an in-pipe system for water leak detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatzigeorgiou, Dimitris M

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Leaks are a major factor for unaccounted water losses in almost every water distribution network. Pipeline leak may result, for example, from bad workmanship or from any destructive cause, due to sudden changes of pressure, ...

  18. Development of a Residential Ground-Source Integrated Heat Pump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, C Keith [ORNL] [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL] [ORNL; Hern, Shawn [ClimateMaster, Inc.] [ClimateMaster, Inc.; McDowell, Tim [Thermal Energy System Specialists, LLC] [Thermal Energy System Specialists, LLC; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL] [ORNL; Shen, Bo [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A residential-size ground-source integrated heat pump (GSIHP) system has been developed and is currently being field tested. The system is a nominal 2-ton (7 kW) cooling capacity, variable-speed unit, which is multi-functional, e.g. space cooling, space heating, dedicated water heating, and simultaneous space cooling and water heating. High-efficiency brushless permanent-magnet (BPM) motors are used for the compressor, indoor blower, and pumps to obtain the highest component performance and system control flexibility. Laboratory test data were used to calibrate a vapor-compression simulation model (HPDM) for each of the four primary modes of operation. The model was used to optimize the internal control options and to simulate the selected internal control strategies, such as controlling to a constant air supply temperature in the space heating mode and a fixed water temperature rise in water heating modes. Equipment performance maps were generated for each operation mode as functions of all independent variables for use in TRNSYS annual energy simulations. These were performed for the GSIHP installed in a well-insulated 2600 ft2(242 m2) house and connected to a vertical ground loop heat exchanger(GLHE). We selected a 13 SEER (3.8 CSPF )/7.7 HSPF (2.3 HSPF, W/W) ASHP unit with 0.90 Energy Factor (EF) resistance water heater as the baseline for energy savings comparisons. The annual energy simulations were conducted over five US climate zones. In addition, appropriate ground loop sizes were determined for each location to meet 10-year minimum and maximum design entering water temperatures (EWTs) to the equipment. The prototype GSIHP system was predicted to use 52 to 59% less energy than the baseline system while meeting total annual space conditioning and water heating loads.

  19. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the Advanced Boiling Water Reactor design. Supplement 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report supplements the final safety evaluation report (FSER) for the US Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard design. The FSER was issued by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff as NUREG-1503 in July 1994 to document the NRC staff`s review of the US ABWR design. The US ABWR design was submitted by GE Nuclear Energy (GE) in accordance with the procedures of Subpart B to Part 52 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations. This supplement documents the NRC staff`s review of the changes to the US ABWR design documentation since the issuance of the FSER. GE made these changes primarily as a result of first-of-a-kind-engineering (FOAKE) and as a result of the design certification rulemaking for the ABWR design. On the basis of its evaluations, the NRC staff concludes that the confirmatory issues in NUREG-1503 are resolved, that the changes to the ABWR design documentation are acceptable, and that GE`s application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B to 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the US ABWR design.

  20. Improvement design study on steam generator of MHR-50/100 aiming higher safety level after water ingress accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oyama, S. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., 1-1 Wadasaki-cho 1-Chome, Hyogo-ku, Kobe (Japan); Minatsuki, I.; Shimizu, K. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., 16-5, Konan 2-Chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI) has been studying on MHI original High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor (HTGR), namely MHR-50/100, for commercialization with supported by JAEA. In the heat transfer system, steam generator (SG) is one of the most important components because it should be imposed a function of heat transfer from reactor power to steam turbine system and maintaining a nuclear grade boundary. Then we especially focused an effort of a design study on the SG having robustness against water ingress accident based on our design experience of PWR, FBR and HTGR. In this study, we carried out a sensitivity analysis from the view point of economic and plant efficiency. As a result, the SG design parameter of helium inlet/outlet temperature of 750 deg. C/300 deg. C, a side-by-side layout and one unit of SG attached to a reactor were selected. In the next, a design improvement of SG was carried out from the view point of securing the level of inherent safety without reliance on active steam dump system during water ingress accident considering the situation of the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster on March 11, 2011. Finally, according to above basic design requirement to SG, we performed a conceptual design on adapting themes of SG structure improvement. (authors)

  1. Advanced light water reactor plants system 80+{trademark} design certification program. Annual progress report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a status of the progress that was made towards Design Certification of System 80{sup +}{trademark} during the U.S. government`s 1994 fiscal year. The System 80+ Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) is a 3931 MW (1350 MWe) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The design covers an essentially complete plant. It is based on EPRI ALWR Utility Requirements Document (URD) improvements to the Standardized System 80 Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) in operation at Palo Verde Units 1, 2 and 3. The NSSS is a traditional two-loop arrangement with two steam generators, two hot legs and four cold legs, each with a reactor coolant pump. The System 80+ standard design houses the NSSS in a spherical steel containment vessel which is enclosed in a concrete shield building, thus providing the safety advantages of a dual barrier to radioactivity release. Other major features include an all-digital, human-factors-engineered control room, an alternate electrical AC power source, an In-Containment Refueling Water Storage Tank (IRWST), and plant arrangements providing complete separation of redundant trains in safety systems. Some design enhancements incorporated in the System 80+ design are included in the four units currently under construction in the Republic of Korea. These units and the System 80+ design form the basis of the Korean standardization program. The Nuclear Island portion of the System 80+ standard design has also been offered to the Republic of China, in response to their bid specification for an ALWR. The ABB-CE Standard Safety Analysis Report (CESSAR-DC) was docketed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in May 1991 and a Draft Safety Evaluation Report (DSER) was issued in October 1992.

  2. Abstract. Harvesting condensed atmospheric vapour as dew water can be an alternative or complementary potable water resource in specific arid or insular areas. Such radiation-cooled condensing devices use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BUILDING - A USTAR INNOVATION CENTER Estimated New Space: USTAR - 200,000 NSF Estimated Completion Date, and coordination of site design with North Chilled Water Plant design. The 5,940 NSF Chilled Water Plant processes across all of campus. The existing distribution system is over 30 years old. Corrosion from ground

  3. The Expanding Dairy Industry: Impact on Ground Water Quality and Quantity with Emphasis on Waste Management System Evaluation for Open Lot Dairies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweeten, John M.; Wolfe, Mary Leigh

    of dairy waste management practices. The results of these studies will aid producers, engineers, planners, and regulatory officials in the refinement and adoption of appropriate practices for water quality protection....

  4. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soerens, Thomas

    for the training of scientists in water resources. Through the years, projects have included irrigation, ground water modeling, non-point source pollution, quality of ground water and surface water, efficient septic heavy metals from pasture soil amended with varying rates of poultry litter Basic Information Title

  5. Ground Control | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ground Control Ground Control Released: April 22, 2015 EMSL scientists develop new methods to dig deeper into soil organic matter International Year of the Soils Under our feet...

  6. Impact of Pacific and Atlantic sea surface temperatures on interannual and decadal variations of GRACE land water storage in tropical South America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Linage, Caroline; Kim, Hyungjun; Famiglietti, James S; Yu, Jin-Yi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    stress, i.e. , the ground water storage [Toomey et al. ,and longer time scales, as ground water storage multidecadal

  7. Design, Development, Pre-Testing and Preparation for Full Scale Cold Testing of a System for Field Remediation of Vertical Pipe Units at the Hanford Site 618-10 Burial Grounds -12495

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halliwell, Stephen [VJ Technologies Inc. 89 Carlough Road, Bohemia, New York, 11716 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Hanford site, in the 1950's and 60's, radioactive waste materials, including Transuranic (TRU) wastes from a number of laboratories were stored in vertical pipe units (VPUs) in what are now the 618-10 and 618-11 burial grounds. Although the current physical condition of the VPUs is unknown, initial R and D studies had shown that in-ground size reduction and stabilization of VPU contents was feasible. This paper describes the R and D work and testing activities to validate the concept of in-ground size reduction and stabilization of VPU contents, and the design and pre-testing of major plant items and augering systems on full size simulated VPUs. The paper also describes the full size prototype equipment which will be used in full size cold testing of simulated VPUs off the Hanford site, to prove the equipment, develop operating procedures, and train operators prior to deployment on site. Safe and effective field remediation, removal and disposal of the VPUs in the 600 area are critical to the success of the River Corridor Closure Contract at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Safe and effective field remediation, removal and disposal of the VPUs in the 600 area are critical to the success of the River Corridor Closure Contract at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. (authors)

  8. Energy Efficiency Design Options for Residential Water Heaters: Economic Impacts on Consumers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of advanced water heating technology into the U.S. market.heating products on the market and determined their corresponding efficiencies and the distinguishing technology

  9. Analysis of terrestrial water storage changes from GRACE and GLDAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Syed, Tajdarul H; Famiglietti, James S; Rodell, Matthew; Chen, Jianli; Wilson, Clark R

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2007), Estimating ground water storage changes in theand ground- water stores, so that we were unable to quantify their potentially considerable contributions to storage

  10. Summary Report on CO2 Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varadharajan, C.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO 2 Geological Storage and Ground Water Resources U.S.and Ground Water Protection Council (GWPC) State and Federal Statutes Storage,

  11. Phase I: the pipeline-gas demonstration plant. Demonstration plant engineering and design. Volume 18. Plant Section 2700 - Waste Water Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contract No. EF-77-C-01-2542 between Conoco Inc. and the US Department of Energy provides for the design, construction, and operation of a demonstration plant capable of processing bituminous caking coals into clean pipeline quality gas. The project is currently in the design phase (Phase I). This phase is scheduled to be completed in June 1981. One of the major efforts of Phase I is the process and project engineering design of the Demonstration Plant. The design has been completed and is being reported in 24 volumes. This is Volume 18 which reports the design of Plant Section 2700 - Waste Water Treatment. The objective of the Waste Water Treatment system is to collect and treat all plant liquid effluent streams. The system is designed to permit recycle and reuse of the treated waste water. Plant Section 2700 is composed of primary, secondary, and tertiary waste water treatment methods plus an evaporation system which eliminates liquid discharge from the plant. The Waste Water Treatment Section is designed to produce 130 pounds per hour of sludge that is buried in a landfill on the plant site. The evaporated water is condensed and provides a portion of the make-up water to Plant Section 2400 - Cooling Water.

  12. Guidelines for selecting a solar heating, cooling or hot water design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, C.J. Jr.

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Guidelines are presented for the professional who may have to choose between competing solar heating and cooling designs for buildings. The experience of the National Solar Data Network in monitoring over 100 solar installations are drawn upon. Three basic principles and a design selection checklist are developed which will aid in choosing the most cost effective design.

  13. Earth-Coupled Water-Source Heat Pump Research, Design and Applications in Louisiana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braud, H. J.; Klimkowski, H.; Baker, F. E.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An earth-coupled water-source heat pump uses the earth as the thermal source and sink for economical, energy efficient, space heating and cooling. Water exiting the heat pump passes through an earth heat exchanger, which is a closed loop of plastic...

  14. Earth-Coupled Water-Source Heat Pump Research, Design and Applications in Louisiana 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braud, H. J.; Klimkowski, H.; Baker, F. E.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An earth-coupled water-source heat pump uses the earth as the thermal source and sink for economical, energy efficient, space heating and cooling. Water exiting the heat pump passes through an earth heat exchanger, which is a closed loop of plastic...

  15. 2010 New Mexico Water Research Symposium August 3, 2010 C-1 Curb the Urge to Purge: Is Now the Time to Switch to No-Purge Ground

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    33965, 970-691-2241 #12;2010 New Mexico Water Research Symposium ­ August 3, 2010 C-3 Living Off-Grid family of three lives comfortably off-grid without a well in an arid region (~9 in/yr, average

  16. Groundwater and Terrestrial Water Storage, 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodell, M; Chambers, D P; Famiglietti, J S

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    T. E. Reilly, 2002: Flow and storage in groundwater systems.Estimating ground water storage changes in the Mississippistorage..

  17. Modifications to the remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Green River, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modifications to the water resources protection strategy detailed in the remedial action plan for the Green River, Utah, disposal site are presented. The modifications are based on new information, including ground water quality data collected after remedial action was completed and on a revised assessment of disposal cell design features, surface conditions, and site hydrogeology. The modifications will result in compliance with the U.S. EPA proposed ground water standards (52 FR 36000 (1987)).

  18. Design and Operation of Equipment to Detect and Remove Water within Used Nuclear Fuel Storage Bottles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.C. Baker; T.M. Pfeiffer; J.C. Price

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inspection and drying equipment has been implemented in a hot cell to address the inadvertent ingress of water into used nuclear fuel storage bottles. Operated with telemanipulators, the system holds up to two fuel bottles and allows their threaded openings to be connected to pressure transducers and a vacuum pump. A prescribed pressure rebound test is used to diagnose the presence of moisture. Bottles found to contain moisture are dried by vaporization. The drying process is accelerated by the application of heat and vacuum. These techniques detect and remove virtually all free water (even water contained in a debris bed) while leaving behind most, if not all, particulates. The extracted water vapour passes through a thermoelectric cooler where it is condensed back to the liquid phase for collection. Fuel bottles are verified to be dry by passing the pressure rebound test.

  19. Stability analysis of the boiling water reactor : methods and advanced designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Rui, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Density Wave Oscillations (DWOs) are known to be possible when a coolant undergoes considerable density reduction while passing through a heated channel. In the development of boiling water reactors (BWRs), there has been ...

  20. Design and Experiments of a Solar Low-temperature Hot Water Floor Radiant Heating System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Z.; Li, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solar low-temperature hot water floor radiant heating system combines solar energy heating with floor radiant heating. This kind of environmental heating way not only saves fossil resources and reduces pollution, but also makes people feel more...

  1. Design and Experiments of a Solar Low-temperature Hot Water Floor Radiant Heating System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Z.; Li, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solar low-temperature hot water floor radiant heating system combines solar energy heating with floor radiant heating. This kind of environmental heating way not only saves fossil resources and reduces pollution, but also makes people feel more...

  2. Design strategies for optimizing high burnup fuel in pressurized water reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Zhiwen, 1975-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is focused on the strategy for utilizing high-burnup fuel in pressurized water reactors (PWR) with special emphasis on the full array of neutronic considerations. The historical increase in batch-averaged discharge ...

  3. An inverted pressurized water reactor design with twisted-tape swirl promoters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Nghia T. (Nghia Tat)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An Inverted Fuel Pressurized Water Reactor (IPWR) concept was previously investigated and developed by Paolo Ferroni at MIT with the effort to improve the power density and capacity of current PWRs by modifying the core ...

  4. Energy Efficiency Design Options for Residential Water Heaters: Economic Impacts on Consumers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    this indirect increase in home heating (and the decrease inincrease the home’s heating load in the heating season (electricity (42% of homes) for water heating. (DOE EIA 2005)

  5. Pressure loadings of Soviet-designed VVER (Water-Cooled, Water-Moderated Energy Reactor) reactor release mitigation structures from large-break LOCAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sienicki, J.J.; Horak, W.C. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA); Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analyses have been carried out of the pressurization of the accident release mitigation structures of Soviet-designed VVER (Water-Cooled, Water-Moderated Energy Reactor) pressurized water reactors following large-break loss-of-coolant accidents. Specific VVER systems for which calculations were performed are the VVER-440 model V230, VVER-440 model V213, and VVER-1000 model V320. Descriptions of the designs of these and other VVER models are contained in the report DOE/NE-0084. The principal objective of the current analyses is to calculate the time dependent pressure loadings inside the accident localization or containment structures immediately following the double-ended guillotine rupture of a primary coolant pipe. In addition, the pressures are compared with the results of calculations of the response of the structures to overpressure. Primary coolant system thermal hydraulic conditions and the fluid conditions at the break location were calculated with the RETRAN-02 Mod2 computer code (Agee, 1984). Pressures and temperatures inside the building accident release mitigation structures were obtained from the PACER (Pressurization Accompanying Coolant Escape from Ruptures) multicompartment containment analysis code developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The analyses were carried out using best estimate models and conditions rather than conservative, bounding-type assumptions. In particular, condensation upon structure and equipment was calculated using correlations based upon analyses of the HDR, Marviken, and Battelle Frankfurt containment loading experiments. The intercompartment flow rates incorporate an effective discharge coefficient and liquid droplet carryover fraction given by expressions of Schwan determined from analyses of the Battelle Frankfurt and Marviken tests. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Earth resistivity measurement near substation ground grids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lodwig, S.G.; Mateja, S.A. [ComEd, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proper substation grounding grid design requires good, accurate soil resistivity measurements. This data is essential to model the substation ground grid to design a safe ground grid with a satisfactory ground grid resistance at minimum cost. For substations with several decades of service, there is some concern that a grid may have deteriorated, been damaged during equipment installation or excavation, or that initial soil resistivity measurements were lost or may not have been correctly performed. Ground grid conductors change the substation surface voltage distribution. Any voltage measurements taken at the complete substation will also vary from the tests made without conductors present. During testing, current was injected in the soil by probes placed near the ground grid. The current tends to follow the ground grid conductors since copper is a far better conductor than the soil it is placed in. Resistance readings near grids will be lower than readings in undisturbed soil. Since computer models were unavailable for many years, analyzing the effect of the grid conductors on soil resistivity measurements was very difficult. As a result, soil resistivity measurements made close to substations were of little use to the engineer unless some means of correcting the measured values could be developed. This paper will present results of soil resistivity measurements near a substation ground grid before and after a ground grid has been installed and describes a means of calculating the undisturbed soil model.

  7. Activation analysis and characteristics of the European community water cooled ceramic breeder blanket design proposal for ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrizzi, L.; Rado, V. [ENEA-ERG-FUS, Frascati (Italy); Cepraga, D.G. [ENEA-INN-FIS, Bologna (Italy)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The European Community (EC) Home Team has proposed various alternative blanket designs to the basic concept (essentially integrated first wall, cooled by liquid metal, with structures made by vanadium alloys). One of the EC proposal is the Water Cooled Ceramic Blanket developed on the basis of a common action between NET and ENEA. It is based on a more conservative approach, but involving well proven technologies and qualified materials: SS-316L as structural material, Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} as first breeder material choice (50% Li{sup 6} enrichment) and low temperature water coolant (160/200{degrees}C). Beryllium has been chosen as multiplying material. The nominal performance are: 1 MW/m{sup 2} as average neutron wall load, corresponding to 1.5 GW fusion power, 1 MW-y/m{sup 2} beneath it has been proved to withstand power excursion till 5 GW. The proposed blanket concept is based on a Breeder Inside Tube (BIT) type technology, with poloidal breeding elements, each one consisting of two concentric tubes. Breeder pebbles are filled into the inner tube, the water coolant flows in the annular channel between the two tubes. Beryllium pebbles fill the space of the blanket box outside the outer tube. A helium purge gas flows through the breeder pebbles bed for tritium recovery. Alternative operating water temperature and pressure are proposed, considering also batch tritium recovery.

  8. Scaling Considerations in Ground State Quantum Computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Mizel; M. W. Mitchell; Marvin L. Cohen

    2000-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We study design challenges associated with realizing a ground state quantum computer. In such a computer, the energy gap between the ground state and first excited state must be sufficiently large to prevent disruptive excitations. Here, an estimate is provided of this gap as a function of computer size. We then address the problem of detecting the output of a ground state quantum computer. It is shown that the exponential detection difficulties that appear to be present at first can be overcome in a straightforward manner by small design changes.

  9. On the Design of Oxide Films, Nanomaterials, and Heterostructures for Solar Water Oxidation Photoanodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kronawitter, Coleman

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to a series of dye-sensitized solar cells to achieve waterthe design of dye-sensitized solar cells, which require dyeevident in dye-sensitized solar cells when planar TiO 2 dye

  10. Preliminary structural design conceptualization for composite rotor for verdant power water current turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paquette, J. A.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Verdant Power Inc. (VPI) have partnered under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to develop a new kinetic hydropower rotor. The rotor features an improved hydrodynamic and structural design which features state-of-the-art technology developed for the wind industry. The new rotor will have higher energy capture, increased system reliability, and reduction of overall cost of energy. This project was divided into six tasks: (1) Composite Rotor Project Planning and Design Specification; (2) Baseline Fatigue Testing and Failure analysis; (3) Develop Blade/Rotor Performance Model; (4) Hydrofoil Survey and Selection; (5) FEM Structural Design; and (6) Develop Candidate Rotor Designs and Prepare Final Report.

  11. Design of a mobile community level water treatment system based on Humidification Dehumidification desalination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jeffrey H. (Jeffrey Heining)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to successfully deploy the mobile desalination technology being developed at the Rohsenhow Kendall Heat Transfer Laboratories, it is necessary to design a three dimensional, solid model of the technology. This ...

  12. Th/U-233 multi-recycle in pressurized water reactors : feasibility study of multiple homogeneous and heterogeneous assembly designs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yun, D.; Taiwo, T. A.; Kim, T. K.; Mohamed, A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of thorium in current or advanced light water reactors (LWRs) has been of interest in recent years. These interests have been associated with the need to increase nuclear fuel resources and the perceived non-proliferation advantages of the utilization of thorium in the fuel cycle. Various options have been considered for the use of thorium in the LWR fuel cycle. The possibility for thorium utilization in a multi-recycle system has also been considered in past literature, primarily because of the potential for near breeders with Th/U-233 in the thermal energy range. The objective of this study is to evaluate the potential of Th/U-233 fuel multi-recycle in current LWRs, focusing on pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Approaches for sustainable multi-recycle without the need for external fissile material makeup have been investigated. The intent is to obtain a design that allows existing PWRs to be used with minimal modifications.

  13. A comparison of terrestrial water storage variations from GRACE with in situ measurements from Illinois

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swenson, Sean; Yeh, Pat J.-F.; Wahr, John; Famiglietti, James

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. -F. Yeh et al. , Ground- water storage changes inferredstorage variations at these spatial scales, a GRACE ground-

  14. Sensitivity of Low Sloped Roofs Designs to Initial Water and Air Leakage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karagiozis, A.; Desjarlais, A.; Salonvaara, M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    moisture to the outside. Solar radiation raises the temperature of air in the grooves and on average, during a sunny summer day 0.5 L of water can be ventilated out of the roof per 1m width of the roof. In this paper, one climatic condition was investigated...

  15. TIME-FREQUENCY BASED WAVEFORM AND RECEIVER DESIGN FOR SHALLOW WATER COMMUNICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nehorai, Arye

    medium and time-varying (TV) changes of the ocean environment. Specif- ically, the shallow water acoustic environment is a linear TV dispersive system that shifts lower frequencies by larger amou- nts in time than-05-1-0443. d 0 Medium III: ocean bottom Medium II: ocean Medium I: air z0 Z Y X r Z0 ( ), ,r z Fig. 1

  16. Arain garden is a planted depression that is designed to absorb rainwater runoff from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Robert A.

    best management practices like pervious pavement, bioretention, and cisterns has become the standard by allowing stormwater to soak into the ground (as opposed to flowing into storm drains and surface waters which causes erosion, water pollution, flooding, and diminished groundwater). A raingarden is designed

  17. Ground Turkey Stroganoff Ingredients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Ground Turkey Stroganoff Ingredients: 8 ounces egg noodles, uncooked 1 pound ground turkey 1 onion. Meanwhile, brown ground turkey and onions in non stick skillet until meat is no longer pink and onions cup of egg noodles on plate, top with 1/2 cup of turkey mixture. Equipment: Knife Cutting board

  18. Remedial action plan for the inactive Uranium Processing Site at Naturita, Colorado. Remedial action plan: Attachment 2, Geology report, Attachment 3, Ground water hydrology report: Working draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado, is one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be cleaned up by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), 42 USC {section}7901 et seq. Part of the UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE`s remedial action plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This RAP serves two purposes. First, it describes the activities that are proposed by the DOE to accomplish remediation and long-term stabilization and control of the radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado. Second, this RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the state of Colorado, and the NRC, become Appendix B of the cooperative agreement between the DOE and the state of Colorado.

  19. Application-specific integrated circuit design for a typical pressurized water reactor pressure channel trip

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battle, R.E.; Manges, W.W.; Emery, M.S.; Vendermolen, R.I. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Bhatt, S. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article discusses the use of application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) in nuclear plant safety systems. ASICs have certain advantages over software-based systems because they can be simple enough to be thoroughly tested, and they can be tailored to replace existing equipment. An architecture to replace a pressurized water reactor pressure channel trip is presented. Methods of implementing digital algorithms are also discussed.

  20. Introduction Ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems are used

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to drilling of bore- holes for vertical ground heat exchangers (GHX), or excavation for horizontal GHX heating and cooling loads and their distribution over the year, as well as ground thermal properties, undisturbed ground temperature, and GHX design, as well as other factors. For low energy buildings the greatly

  1. Linear ParameterVarying versus Linear TimeInvariant Control Design for a Pressurized Water Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodenheimer, Bobby

    . The plant can thus have widely varying dynamics over the operating range. The controllers designed perform to a description of the problem statement. Section 4 describes the identification and modelling of the plant. Se the worst­case time variation of a measurable parameter which enters the plant in a linear fractional manner

  2. Cooking with Ground Pork

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    to thaw. Even when cooked, pork that has been thawed at room temperature can make you sick. Cooking ground pork safely For dishes that contain ground pork, cook the pork before mixing it with other ingredients. How to store cooked ground pork Leftover... dishes made with ground pork should be stored in a covered dish in the refrigerator right away to prevent spoilage. Use it within 3 days. Reheat foods with ground pork until they are steaming hot, bubbling, or at 165 degrees. Other uses Use cooked...

  3. Field Test of High Efficiency Residential Buildings with Ground-source and Air-source Heat Pump Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL] [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL] [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the field performance of space conditioning and water heating equipment in four single-family residential structures with advanced thermal envelopes. Each structure features a different, advanced thermal envelope design: structural insulated panel (SIP); optimum value framing (OVF); insulation with embedded phase change materials (PCM) for thermal storage; and exterior insulation finish system (EIFS). Three of the homes feature ground-source heat pumps (GSHPs) for space conditioning and water heating while the fourth has a two-capacity air-source heat pump (ASHP) and a heat pump water heater (HPWH). Two of the GCHP-equipped homes feature horizontal ground heat exchange (GHX) loops that utillize the existing foundation and utility service trenches while the third features a vertical borehole with vertical u-tube GHX. All of the houses were operated under the same simulated occupancy conditions. Operational data on the house HVAC/Water heating (WH) systems are presented and factors influencing overall performance are summarized.

  4. Improving parameter estimation and water table depth simulation in a land surface model using GRACE water storage and estimated base flow data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lo, Min-Hui; Famiglietti, James S; Yeh, P. J.-F.; Syed, T. H

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2007), Estimating ground water storage changes in thestorage (i.e. , all of the snow, ice, surface water, soil moisture, and ground-

  5. Mimicking Time Evolution within a Quantum Ground State: Ground-State Quantum Computation, Cloning, and Teleportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Mizel

    2003-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground-state quantum computers mimic quantum mechanical time evolution within the amplitudes of a time-independent quantum state. We explore the principles that constrain this mimicking. A no-cloning argument is found to impose strong restrictions. It is shown, however, that there is flexibility that can be exploited using quantum teleportation methods to improve ground-state quantum computer design.

  6. Hazard Evaluation for a Salt Well Centrifugal Pump Design Using Service Water for Lubrication and Cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GRAMS, W.H.

    2000-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the results of a preliminary hazard analysis (PHA) covering the new salt well pump design. The PHA identified ten hazardous conditions mapped to four analyzed accidents: flammable gas deflagrations, fire in contaminated area, tank failure due to excessive loads, and waste transfer leaks. This document also presents the results of the control decision/allocation process. A backflow preventer and associated limiting condition were assigned.

  7. OECD MCCI Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength tests (SSWICS) design report, Rev. 2 October 31, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D.; Aeschlimann, B.; Pfeiffer, P. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure and (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are planned to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium ({approx}{phi}30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. A description of the test apparatus, instrumentation, data reduction, and test matrix are the subject of the first portion of this report. The issue of crust strength will be addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus will measure the fracture strength of the crust while under a thermal load created by a heating element beneath the crust. The introduction of a thermal gradient across the crust is thought to be important for these tests because of uncertainty in the magnitude of the thermal stresses and thus their relative importance in the crust fracture mechanism at plant scale. The second half of this report describes the apparatus for measuring crust strength. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength).

  8. Ground Penetrating Radar in Hydrogeophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubbard, Susan; Lambot, S.; Binley, A.; Slob, E.; Hubbard, S.

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To meet the needs of a growing population and to provide us with a higher quality of life, increasing pressures are being placed on our environment through the development of agriculture, industry, and infrastructures. Soil erosion, groundwater depletion, salinization, and pollution have been recognized for decades as major threats to ecosystems and human health. More recently, the progressive substitution of fossil fuels by biofuels for energy production and climate change have been recognized as potential threats to our water resources and sustained agricultural productivity. The vadose zone mediates many of the processes that govern water resources and quality, such as the partition of precipitation into infiltration and runoff , groundwater recharge, contaminant transport, plant growth, evaporation, and energy exchanges between the Earth's surface and its atmosphere. It also determines soil organic carbon sequestration and carbon-cycle feedbacks, which could substantially impact climate change. The vadose zone's inherent spatial variability and inaccessibility precludes direct observation of the important subsurface processes. In a societal context where the development of sustainable and optimal environmental management strategies has become a priority, there is a strong prerequisite for the development of noninvasive characterization and monitoring techniques of the vadose zone. In particular, hydrogeophysical approaches applied at relevant scales are required to appraise dynamic subsurface phenomena and to develop optimal sustainability, exploitation, and remediation strategies. Among existing geophysical techniques, ground penetrating radar (GPR) technology is of particular interest for providing high-resolution subsurface images and specifically addressing water-related questions. Ground penetrating radar is based on the transmission and reception of VHF-UHF (30-3000 MHz) electromagnetic waves into the ground, whose propagation is determined by the soil electromagnetic properties and their spatial distribution. As the dielectric permittivity of water overwhelms the permittivity of other soil components, the presence of water in the soil principally governs GPR wave propagation. Therefore, GPR-derived dielectric permittivity is usually used as surrogate measure for soil water content. In the areas of unsaturated zone hydrology and water resources, GPR has been used to identify soil stratigraphy, to locate water tables, to follow wetting front movement, to estimate soil water content, to assist in subsurface hydraulic parameter identification, to assess soil salinity, and to support the monitoring of contaminants. The purpose of this special section of the Vadose Zone Journal is to present recent research advances and applications of GPR in hydrogeophysics, with a particular emphasis on vadose zone investigations. This special section includes contributions presented at the European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2006 (EGU 2006, Vienna, Austria) and the 11th International Conference on Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR 2006, Columbus, OH). The studies presented here deal with a wide range of surface and borehole GPR applications, including GPR sensitivity to contaminant plumes, new methods for soil water content determination, three-dimensional imaging of the subsurface, time-lapse monitoring of hydrodynamic events and inversion techniques for soil hydraulic properties estimation, and joint interpretation of GPR and electric resistivity tomography (ERT) data.

  9. The design and performance of a water cooling system for a prototype coupled cavity linear particle accelerator for the spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernardin, J. D. (John D.); Ammerman, C. N. (Curtt N.); Hopkins, S. M. (Steve M.)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a facility being designed for scientific and industrial research and development. The SNS will generate and employ neutrons as a research tool in a variety of disciplines including biology, material science, superconductivity, chemistry, etc. The neutrons will be produced by bombarding a heavy metal target with a high-energy beam of protons, generated and accelerated with a linear particle accelerator, or linac. The low energy end of the linac consists of, in part, a multi-cell copper structure termed a coupled cavity linac (CCL). The CCL is responsible for accelerating the protons from an energy of 87 MeV, to 185 MeV. Acceleration of the charged protons is achieved by the use of large electrical field gradients established within specially designed contoured cavities of the CCL. While a large amount of the electrical energy is used to accelerate the protons, approximately 60-80% of this electrical energy is dissipated in the CCL's copper structure. To maintain an acceptable operating temperature, as well as minimize thermal stresses and maintain desired contours of the accelerator cavities, the electrical waste heat must be removed from the CCL structure. This is done using specially designed water cooling passages within the linac's copper structure. Cooling water is supplied to these cooling passages by a complex water cooling and temperature control system. This paper discusses the design, analysis, and testing of a water cooling system for a prototype CCL. First, the design concept and method of water temperature control is discussed. Second, the layout of the prototype water cooling system, including the selection of plumbing components, instrumentation, as well as controller hardware and software is presented. Next, the development of a numerical network model used to size the pump, heat exchanger, and plumbing equipment, is discussed. Finally, empirical pressure, flow rate, and temperature data from the prototype CCL water cooling tests are used to assess water cooling system performance and numerical modeling accuracy.

  10. Cooking with Ground Beef

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the nutritional value and safe storage of ground beef, a commodity food. It also offers food preparation ideas....

  11. Predaceous Ground Beetles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sansone, Chris; Minzenmayer, Rick

    2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Predaceous ground beetles can be a nuisance to homeowners, especially when they are numerous. This publication describes the beetles and discusses ways to prevent and treat them....

  12. DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF THE SNS CCL HOT MODEL WATER COOLING SYSTEM USING THE SINDA/FLUINT NETWORK MODELING TOOL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. AMMERMAN; J. BERNARDIN

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents results for design and analysis of the hot model water cooling system for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) coupled-cavity linac (CCL). The hot model, when completed, will include segments for both the CCL and coupled-cavity drift-tube linac (CCDTL). The scope of this report encompasses the modeling effort for the CCL portion of the hot model. This modeling effort employed the SINDA/FLUINT network modeling tool. This report begins with an introduction of the SNS hot model and network modeling using SINDA/FLUINT. Next, the development and operation of the SINDA/FLUINT model are discussed. Finally, the results of the SINDA/FLUINT modeling effort are presented and discussed.

  13. Local Water Quality Districts (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute provides for the creation of local water quality districts to prevent and mitigate ground and surface water contamination. Each local water quality district may develop and implement a...

  14. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the page changes for Attachment 3, Ground Water Hydrology Report dated August, 1996 for the Remedial Action Plan and Site Design for Stabilization of the Inactive Uranium Mill Tailings at Slick Rock, Colorado. This portion of Attachment 3 contains the Table of Contents pages i and ii, and pages numbered 3-3 through 3-56 of the Ground Water Hydrology Report. Also included are the cover sheets for Appendix A, B, and C to Attachment 3.

  15. Finite Volume Based Computer Program for Ground Source Heat Pump Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objective: Create a new modeling decision? tool that will enable ground source heat pump (GSHP) designers and customers to make better design and purchasing decisions.

  16. Ground State Quantum Computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Mizel; M. W. Mitchell; Marvin L. Cohen

    1999-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We formulate a novel ground state quantum computation approach that requires no unitary evolution of qubits in time: the qubits are fixed in stationary states of the Hamiltonian. This formulation supplies a completely time-independent approach to realizing quantum computers. We give a concrete suggestion for a ground state quantum computer involving linked quantum dots.

  17. Preliminary design study of small long life boiling water reactor (BWR) with tight lattice thorium nitride fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trianti, Nuri, E-mail: nuri.trianti@gmail.com, E-mail: szaki@fi.itba.c.id; Su'ud, Zaki, E-mail: nuri.trianti@gmail.com, E-mail: szaki@fi.itba.c.id; Arif, Idam, E-mail: nuri.trianti@gmail.com, E-mail: szaki@fi.itba.c.id [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, Bandung Institute of Technology (Ganesha 10 Bandung, Indonesia) (Indonesia); Riyana, EkaSapta [Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN) (Indonesia)

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutronic performance of small long-life boiling water reactors (BWR) with thorium nitride based fuel has been performed. A recent study conducted on BWR in tight lattice environments (with a lower moderator percentage) produces small power reactor which has some specifications, i.e. 10 years operation time, power density of 19.1 watt/cc and maximum excess reactivity of about 4%. This excess reactivity value is smaller than standard reactivity of conventional BWR. The use of hexagonal geometry on the fuel cell of BWR provides a substantial effect on the criticality of the reactor to obtain a longer operating time. Supported by a tight concept lattice where the volume fraction of the fuel is greater than the moderator and fuel, Thorium Nitride give good results for fuel cell design on small long life BWR. The excess reactivity of the reactor can be reduced with the addition of gadolinium as burnable poisons. Therefore the hexagonal tight lattice fuel cell design of small long life BWR that has a criticality more than 20 years of operating time has been obtained.

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy and Water in the Western...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of surface water for in-stream ecological and environmental uses Uncertainty about the impact of climate variability on future water fresh surface and ground water resources...

  19. Selenium speciation in ground water. Quarterly report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atalay, A.

    1990-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Selenium toxicity diseases in animals may occur when the intake exceeds 4 mg/kg and selenium deficiency symptoms may occur when dietary intake is less than 0.04 mg/kg. Since the selenium dietary requirement is very close to toxic concentration, it is important to understand the distribution of selenium in the environment. Selenium occurs in four oxidation states (-II, 0, +IV, and +VI) as selenide, elemental selenium, selenite and selenate. Selenate is reported as more soluble and less adsorbed than selenite. Selenate is more easily leached from soils and is the most available form for plants. Increased mobility of Se into the environment via anthropogenic activities, and the potential oxidation-reduction behavior of the element have made it imperative to study the aquatic chemistry of Se. For this purpose, Se species are divided into two different categories: dissolved Se (in material that passes through filters with 0.45 u openings) and particulate Se (in material of particle size > 0.45 mm) typically suspended sediment and other suspended solids. Element and colloidal phase, not truly dissolved, but passing through the filter is deemed to consist of selenium (-2,0). In dissolved state selenium may exist in three of its four oxidation states; Se(-II), Se(+IV), and Se(+VI). Particulate Se may exist in the same oxidation states as dissolved Se and can be found in different phases of the particulate matter. In sediments, Se may be within the organic material, iron and manganese oxides, carbonates or other mineral phases. The actual chemical forms of Se may be adsorbed to or coprecipitated with these phases (primarily selenite, SeO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}) and selenate, SeO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}. Selenide, Se(-II), can be covalently bound in the organic portion of a sediment. In addition, Se may be found in anoxic sediments as insoluble metal selenide precipitates, an insoluble elemental Se or as ferroselite (FeSe{sub 2}) and Se containing pyrite.

  20. Practical probabilistic ground-water modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodbury, A. [Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Geological Engineering; Render, F. [Ministry of Natural Resources, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Ulrych, T. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada). Dept. of Geophysics and Astronomy

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current emphasis by the public and scientific communities on environmental risk suggests that methods of probabilistic analysis for subsurface flow and transport will become more heavily utilized. Moreover, a probabilistic framework forces the explicit acknowledgement and treatment of uncertainty. The major obstruction to the effective use of probabilistic models is the determination of the statistical properties of unknown model parameters. In this paper the authors use the principal of minimum relative entropy (MRE) to determine the prior pdf, p(m) of a set of model parameters, (m) based on limited information. The pdf is of the form of a multivariate truncated exponential distribution. In this paper the authors use p(m) in Monte Carlo simulations to provide expected values in field variables such as drawdowns, pumping rates, and confidence limits. The examples presented illustrate some dangers associated with the practice in probabilistic modeling of assigning Gaussian pdf`s as priors. First, such an assumption for the input parameters actually injects more information into the problem than may actually exist, whether consciously or unconsciously. This fact is born out by comparison with minimum relative entropy theory. Second, the output parameters as suggested from the Monte Carlo analysis cannot be assumed to be Gaussian distributed even when the prior pdf is in Gaussian form. In a practical setting, the significance of this result and the approximation of Gaussian form would depend on the cost, risk, and consequences of the decision being made.

  1. Remediation of Uranium-Contaminated Ground Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical s o Freiberge s 3 c/) Release for AnnouncementRick3

  2. Colorado Ground Water Commission | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png El CERCollier TechnologiesColorado Energy Office

  3. Appendix B Ground Water Management Policy

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthNrr-osams ADMIN RCD _WOMPOC: A-2

  4. Designing of a prototype heat-sealer to manufacture solar water sterilization pouches for use in developing nations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinlan, Saundra S

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water purification proves to be a difficult task in many developing nations. The SODIS (SOlar water DISinfection) process is a method which improves the microbiological quality of water making it safer for drinking and ...

  5. A Systems-Integration Approach to the Optimal Design and Operation of Macroscopic Water Desalination and Supply Networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atilhan, Selma

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    With the escalating levels of water demand, there is a need for expansion in the capacity of water desalination infrastructure and for better management and distribution of water resources. This dissertation introduces a systems approach...

  6. A Systems-Integration Approach to the Optimal Design and Operation of Macroscopic Water Desalination and Supply Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atilhan, Selma

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    With the escalating levels of water demand, there is a need for expansion in the capacity of water desalination infrastructure and for better management and distribution of water resources. This dissertation introduces a systems approach...

  7. Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and heavy metals to surface runoff following storm events. Evaluating runoff water quality response, innovative domestic wastewater disposal systems, ground water modeling and landuse mapping, erosionArkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2008 Arkansas Water Resources Center

  8. Gas Water Heater Energy Losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biermayer, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cold water to the water heater and hot water from the waterinduced draft water heaters, water heaters with flue designsInput Screens SCREEN D1: WATER HEATER SPECIFICATIONS 1. Tank

  9. Millimeter-wave Radiometer for High Sensitivity Water Vapor Profiling in Arid Regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pazmany, Andrew

    2006-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract - ProSensing Inc. has developed a G-band (183 GHz) water Vapor Radiometer (GVR) for long-term, unattended measurements of low concentrations of atmospheric water vapor and liquid water. Precipitable water vapor and liquid water path are estimated from zenith brightness temperatures measured from four double-sideband receiver channels, centered at 183.31 1, 3 and 7, and 14 GHz. A prototype ground-based version of the instrument was deployed at the DOE ARM program?s North Slope of Alaska site near Barrow AK in April 2005, where it collected data continuously for one year. A compact, airborne version of this instrument, packaged to operate from a standard 2-D PMS probe canister, has been tested on the ground and is scheduled for test flights in the summer of 2006. This paper presents design details, laboratory test results and examples of retrieved precipitable water vapor and liquid water path from measured brightness temperature data.

  10. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    table The water table itself may cross many layers. Extraction of water from confined and unconfinedTD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 5: Aquifer () August 16 above and below the ground, which affect the water balance. surface features affect infiltration

  11. Design and installation of continuous flow and water quality monitoring stations to improve water quality forecasting in the lower San Joaquin River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    district telemetry and/or SCADA systems. Water Districtsintegrated with the current District SCADA systems (TID andMID use different SCADA systems, requiring different system

  12. Ground potential rise monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, Zachery Warren; Zevenbergen, Gary Allen

    2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A device and method for detecting ground potential rise (GPR) comprising a first electrode, a second electrode, and a voltage attenuator. The first electrode and the second electrode are both electrically connected to the voltage attenuator. A means for determining the presence of a dangerous ground potential is connected to the voltage attenuator. The device and method further comprises a means for enabling one or more alarms upon the detection of the dangerous ground potential. Preferably, a first transmitter/receiver is connected to the means for enabling one or more alarms. Preferably, a second transmitter/receiver, comprising a button, is electromagnetically connected to the first transmitter/receiver. Preferably, the means for determining the presence of a dangerous ground potential comprises a means for determining the true RMS voltage at the output of the voltage attenuator, a transient detector connected to the output of the voltage attenuator, or a combination thereof.

  13. Ground-Coupled Heat Pump Applications and Case Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braud, H. J.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in all seasons. A loop sizing procedure for mul- tiple units on a common ground loop was given by Braud (1). See also Bose et al. (2) and Partin (3). APPLICATIONS OF GROUND-COUPLED HEAT PUMPS COLD SUPPLY +-fi- ;-"" WATER TANK A recent development...

  14. Marketing Ground Source Heat Pump Advanced Applications that

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marketing Ground Source Heat Pump Advanced Applications that Deliver Competitive Advantage Al is the fastest growing market with the available capital and need for the benefits of ground source heat pumps Heating ... and Cooling n Comfort & Indoor Air Quality n Homes have domestic hot water - DHW n Less

  15. Presented at 2012 IEEE Systems and Information Engineering Design Symposium, University of Virginia, April 27, 2012 Abstract--The water quality in the West and Rhode Rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Presented at 2012 IEEE Systems and Information Engineering Design Symposium, University of Virginia, April 27, 2012 Abstract-- The water quality in the West and Rhode Rivers (WRR), two mezohaline sub be the most cost-effective and sustainable alternative. I. INTRODUCTION HE West and Rhode rivers are two sub

  16. Ground Control for Emplacement Drifts for SR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y. Sun

    2000-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis demonstrates that a satisfactory ground control system can be designed for the Yucca Mountain site, and provides the technical basis for the design of ground support systems to be used in repository emplacement and non-emplacement drifts. The repository ground support design was based on analytical methods using acquired computer codes, and focused on the final support systems. A literature review of case histories, including the lessons learned from the design and construction of the ESF, the studies on the seismic damages of underground openings, and the use of rock mass classification systems in the ground support design, was conducted (Sections 6.3.4 and 6.4). This review provided some basis for determining the inputs and methodologies used in this analysis. Stability of the supported and unsupported emplacement and non-emplacement drifts was evaluated in this analysis. The excavation effects (i.e., state of the stress change due to excavation), thermal effects (i.e., due to heat output from waste packages), and seismic effects (i.e., from potential earthquake events) were evaluated, and stress controlled modes of failure were examined for two in situ stress conditions (k_0=0.3 and 1.0) using rock properties representing rock mass categories of 1 and 5. Variation of rock mass units such as the non-lithophysal (Tptpmn) and lithophysal (Tptpll) was considered in the analysis. The focus was on the non-lithophysal unit because this unit appears to be relatively weaker and has much smaller joint spacing. Therefore, the drift stability and ground support needs were considered to be controlled by the design for this rock unit. The ground support systems for both emplacement and non-emplacement drifts were incorporated into the models to assess their performance under in situ, thermal, and seismic loading conditions. Both continuum and discontinuum modeling approaches were employed in the analyses of the rock mass behavior and in the evaluation of the stability of the openings. No credit or account was given for the initial ground support in modeling the final ground support systems for both emplacement and non-emplacement drifts in this analysis.

  17. Sources of Water Surface water and groundwater are present throughout

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacAdam, Keith

    Sources of Water Surface water and groundwater are present throughout Kentucky's 39,486 square miles. Surface water occurs as rivers, streams, ponds, lakes, and wetlands. Ground- water occurs underlain by soluble carbonate rocks (for example, limestone). Water Supply · Approximately 49 inches

  18. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapter 1, project number 669

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume 1, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

  19. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapters 2-13, project number 669

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume I, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

  20. Disturbing the Water: The Rise of Ground Water in Wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    With Kathy Bailey Boomer, Kathy Crowley, Sam Simkin Photographs by F. Robert Wesley unless otherwise noted #12;Kathy Crowley F. Robert Wesley Sam Simkin #12;Seminar Road Map Caveats, biases, and blind spots

  1. Detection of 6 November 1997 Ground Level Event by Milagrito

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkins, R; Berley, D; Chen, M L; Coyne, D G; Delay, R S; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Evans, D; Falcone, A D; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gisler, G; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hoffman, C M; Hugenberger, S; Kelley, L A; Leonor, I; Macri, J R; McConnell, M; McCullough, J F; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Ryan, J M; Schneider, M; Shen, B; Shoup, A L; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Thompson, T N; Tümer, T O; Wang, K; Wascko, M O; Westerhoff, S; Williams, D A; Yang, T; Yodh, G B

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar Energetic Particles from the 6 November 1997 solar flare/CME(coronal mass ejection) with energies exceeding 10 GeV have been detected by Milagrito, a prototype of the Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory. While particle acceleration beyond 1 GeV at the Sun is well established, few data exist for protons or ions beyond 10 GeV. The Milagro observatory, a ground based water Cherenkov detector designed for observing very high energy gamma ray sources, can also be used to study the Sun. Milagrito, which operated for approximately one year in 1997/98, was sensitive to solar proton and neutron fluxes above ~5- 10 GeV. Milagrito operated in a scaler mode, which was primarily sensitive to muons, low energy photons, and electrons, and the detector operated in a mode sensitive to showers and high zenith angle muons. In its scaler mode, Milagrito registered a rate increase coincident with the 6 November 1997 ground level event observed by Climax and other neutron monitors. A preliminary analysis suggests the presence of >...

  2. Detection of 6 November 1997 Ground Level Event by Milagrito

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Atkins; W. Benbow; D. Berley; M. -L. Chen; D. G. Coyne; R. S. Delay; B. L. Dingus; D. E. Dorfan; R. W. Ellsworth; D. Evans; A. Falcone; L. Fleysher; R. Fleysher; G. Gisler; J. A. Goodman; T. J. Haines; C. M. Hoffman; S. Hugenberger; L. A. Kelley; I. Leonor; J. Macri; M. McConnell; J. F. McCullough; J. E. McEnery; R. S. Miller; A. I. Mincer; M. F. Morales; P. Nemethy; J. M. Ryan; M. Schneider; B. Shen; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; T. N. Thompson; O. T. Tumer; K. Wang; M. O. Wascko; S. Westerhoff; D. A. Williams; T. Yang; G. B. Yodh

    1999-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar Energetic Particles from the 6 November 1997 solar flare/CME(coronal mass ejection) with energies exceeding 10 GeV have been detected by Milagrito, a prototype of the Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory. While particle acceleration beyond 1 GeV at the Sun is well established, few data exist for protons or ions beyond 10 GeV. The Milagro observatory, a ground based water Cherenkov detector designed for observing very high energy gamma ray sources, can also be used to study the Sun. Milagrito, which operated for approximately one year in 1997/98, was sensitive to solar proton and neutron fluxes above ~5- 10 GeV. Milagrito operated in a scaler mode, which was primarily sensitive to muons, low energy photons, and electrons, and the detector operated in a mode sensitive to showers and high zenith angle muons. In its scaler mode, Milagrito registered a rate increase coincident with the 6 November 1997 ground level event observed by Climax and other neutron monitors. A preliminary analysis suggests the presence of >10 GeV particles.

  3. Water pollution control for underground coal gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humenick, M.J.

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water pollution arising from underground gasification of coal is one of the important considerations in the eventual commercialization of the process. Because many coal seams which are amenable to in situ gasification are also ground-water aquifers, contaminants may be released to these ground waters during and after gasification. Also, when product gas is processed above ground for use, wastewater streams are generated which are too polluted to be discharged. The purpose of this paper is to characterize the nature of the groundwater and above-ground pollutants, discuss the potential long and short-term effects on ground water, propose control and restoration strategies, and to identify potential wastewater treatment schemes.

  4. Feasibility Study of Using Ground Source Heat Pumps in Two Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    , it was assumed that natural gas-fired water heaters would replace the steam converters that presently provide hot water for the buildings. It would also be possible to use dedicated water-to-water ground source heat pumps to provide hot water. #12; 2 II. BACKGROUND AND BASE CASE A. Background on McCormick Center

  5. Control and waypoint navigation of an autonomous ground vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massey, James Patrick

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the initial development of the Texas A&M Autonomous Ground Vehicle test platform and waypoint following software, including the associated controller design. The original goal of the team responsible for the development...

  6. Control and waypoint navigation of an autonomous ground vehicle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massey, James Patrick

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the initial development of the Texas A&M Autonomous Ground Vehicle test platform and waypoint following software, including the associated controller design. The original goal of the team responsible for the development...

  7. Nanotechnology for Solar-hydrogen Production via Photoelectrochemical Water-splitting: Design, Synthesis, Characterization, and Application of Nanomaterials and Quantum Dots 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alenzi, Naser D.

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    NANOTECHNOLOGY FOR SOLAR-HYDROGEN PRODUCTION VIA PHOTOELECTROCHEMICAL WATER-SPLITTING: DESIGN, SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION, AND APPLICATION OF NANOMATERIALS AND QUANTUM DOTS A Dissertation by NASER D. ALENZI Submitted... to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2010 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering NANOTECHNOLOGY FOR SOLAR-HYDROGEN PRODUCTION VIA...

  8. Remedial Action Plan and Site Design for stabilization of the inactive Uranium Mill Tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado: Appendix A to Attachment 3, Tables. Final

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains tables of data on ground water quality for the study on ground water hydrology, which is attachment 3 of this series of reports.

  9. Economic and ecological implications of alternative brush management and restoration scenarios designed to improve water yield in two Texas watersheds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olenick, Keith Layne

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Costs of additional water are lower for sub-basins within the Edwards study area (ranging from $32 to $70 per acre-foot of water added) than in the Twin Buttes (ranging from $63 to $218 per acre-foot), meaning that brush management efforts are more...

  10. Th/U-233 Multi-recycle in Pressurized Water Reactors: Feasibility Study of Multiple Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Assembly Designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    Th/U-233 Multi-recycle in Pressurized Water Reactors: Feasibility Study of Multiple Homogeneous in the LWR fuel cycle. The possibility for thorium utilization in a multi-recycle system has also been fuel multi-recycle in current LWRs, focusing on pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Approaches

  11. WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    , display the results of management changes, and forecast the effects of waste management practices operations on the Hanford ground-water regime which moves through ancient sand and gravel channels deep under system for the .Atlantic Richfield Hanford Company which will accept models of ground-water conditions

  12. Improved Torsion Pendulum for Ground Testing of LISA Displacement Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Carbone; A. Cavalleri; R. Dolesi; C. D. Hoyle; M. Hueller; S. Vitale; W. J. Weber

    2004-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a new torsion pendulum design for ground testing of prototype LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) displacement sensors. This new design is directly sensitive to net forces and therefore provides a more representative test of the noisy forces and parasitic stiffnesses acting on the test mass as compared to previous ground-based experiments. We also discuss a specific application to the measurement of thermal gradient effects.

  13. Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Ground-water Flow and Transport Focus Category: Non Point Pollution, Surface Water, Toxic Substances Descriptors: Benthos, Bioindicators, Biomonitoring, Ecosystems, Heavy metals, Insects, Land use, PollutantsWater Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction Introduction - Research

  14. U.S. Department of Energy UMTRA Ground Water Project Ground Water Pumping and Monitoring Plan

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O'1repositoryShiprock,

  15. Document Number Q0029500 Ground Water Model 3.0 Ground Water Model

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthNrr-osams ADMIN RCDBaseline0419 1 JAGround

  16. The role of science, stakeholder engagement, and decision making process design in advancing innovation around water management in Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corson-Rikert, Tyler Andrew

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sustainable Water Management Initiative is a multi-stakeholder process that the Massachusetts Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs convened in early 2010 to seek advice on how to more sustainably manage ...

  17. Fresh Water Increased temperature means higher proportion of water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houston, Paul L.

    Fresh Water Increased temperature means higher proportion of water falling on surface higher evaporation higher rainfall greater intensity of floods and droughts. Water use has grown four on How much storage compared to average flow Demand as percentage of supply How much ground water is used

  18. Ground motion: An introduction for accelerator builders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, G.E.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this seminar we will review some of the characteristics of the major classes of ground motion in order to determine whether their effects must be considered or place fundamental limits on the sitting and/or design of modern storage rings and linear colliders. The classes discussed range in frequency content from tidal deformation and tectonic motions through earthquakes and microseisms. Countermeasures currently available are briefly discussed.

  19. Ground-Based Radar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.NewofGeothermal Heaton Armed ServicesGround-Based Microwave

  20. Ground Source Integrated Heat Pump (GS-IHP) Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, V. D. [ORNL; Rice, K. [ORNL; Murphy, R. [ORNL; Munk, J. [ORNL; Ally, Moonis [ORNL; Shen, Bo [ORNL; Craddick, William [ORNL; Hearn, Shawn A. [ClimateMaster, Inc.

    2013-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Between October 2008 and May 2013 ORNL and ClimateMaster, Inc. (CM) engaged in a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to develop a groundsource integrated heat pump (GS-IHP) system for the US residential market. A initial prototype was designed and fabricated, lab-tested, and modeled in TRNSYS (SOLAR Energy Laboratory, et al, 2010) to predict annual performance relative to 1) a baseline suite of equipment meeting minimum efficiency standards in effect in 2006 (combination of air-source heat pump (ASHP) and resistance water heater) and 2) a state-of-the-art (SOA) two-capacity ground-source heat pump with desuperheater water heater (WH) option (GSHPwDS). Predicted total annual energy savings, while providing space conditioning and water heating for a 2600 ft{sup 2} (242 m{sup 2}) house at 5 U.S. locations, ranged from 52 to 59%, averaging 55%, relative to the minimum efficiency suite. Predicted energy use for water heating was reduced 68 to 78% relative to resistance WH. Predicted total annual savings for the GSHPwDS relative to the same baseline averaged 22.6% with water heating energy use reduced by 10 to 30% from desuperheater contributions. The 1st generation (or alpha) prototype design for the GS-IHP was finalized in 2010 and field test samples were fabricated for testing by CM and by ORNL. Two of the alpha units were installed in 3700 ft{sup 2} (345 m{sup 2}) houses at the ZEBRAlliance site in Oak Ridge and field tested during 2011. Based on the steady-state performance demonstrated by the GS-IHPs it was projected that it would achieve >52% energy savings relative to the minimum efficiency suite at this specific site. A number of operational issues with the alpha units were identified indicating design changes needed to the system before market introduction could be accomplished. These were communicated to CM throughout the field test period. Based on the alpha unit test results and the diagnostic information coming from the field test experience, CM developed a 2nd generation (or beta) prototype in 2012. Field test verification units were fabricated and installed at the ZEBRAlliance site in Oak Ridge in May 2012 and at several sites near CM headquarters in Oklahoma. Field testing of the units continued through February 2013. Annual performance analyses of the beta unit (prototype 2) with vertical well ground heat exchangers (GHX) in 5 U.S. locations predict annual energy savings of 57% to 61%, averaging 59% relative to the minimum efficiency suite and 38% to 56%, averaging 46% relative to the SOA GSHPwDS. Based on the steady-state performance demonstrated by the test units it was projected that the 2nd generation units would achieve ~58% energy savings relative to the minimum efficiency suite at the Zebra Alliance site with horizontal GHX. A new product based on the beta unit design was announced by CM in 2012 – the Trilogy 40® Q-mode™ (http://cmdealernet.com/trilogy_40.html). The unit was formally introduced in a March 2012 press release (see Appendix A) and was available for order beginning in December 2012.

  1. Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    irrigation, ground water modeling, non-point source pollution, quality of ground water and surface water heavy metals from pasture soil amended with varying rates of poultry litter Basic Information Title: Vadose-zone losses of soluble heavy metals from pasture soil amended with varying rates of poultry litter

  2. Ground motion data for International Collider models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volk, J.T.; LeBrun, P.; Shiltsev, V.; Singatulin, S.; /Fermilab

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed location for the International Linear Collider (ILC) in the Americas region is Fermilab in Batavia Illinois. If built at this location the tunnels would be located in the Galena Platteville shale at a depth of 100 or more meters below the surface. Studies using hydro static water levels and seismometers have been conducted in the MINOS hall and the LaFrange Mine in North Aurora Illinois to determine the level of ground motion. Both these locations are in the Galena Platteville shale and indicate the typical ground motion to be expected for the ILC. The data contains both natural and cultural noise. Coefficients for the ALT law are determined. Seismic measurements at the surface and 100 meters below the surface are presented.

  3. Our Environment in Hot Water: Comparing Water Heaters, A Life Cycle Approach Comparing Tank and Tankless Water Heaters in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Alison

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Study on Eco-Design of Water Heaters, Van Holstein en Kemnaheater. Eco-design of Water Heaters and Methodology studyboth storage-type water heaters and tankless water heaters.

  4. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Operator Performance Metrics for Control Room Modernization: A Practical Guide for Early Design Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald Boring; Roger Lew; Thomas Ulrich; Jeffrey Joe

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As control rooms are modernized with new digital systems at nuclear power plants, it is necessary to evaluate the operator performance using these systems as part of a verification and validation process. There are no standard, predefined metrics available for assessing what is satisfactory operator interaction with new systems, especially during the early design stages of a new system. This report identifies the process and metrics for evaluating human system interfaces as part of control room modernization. The report includes background information on design and evaluation, a thorough discussion of human performance measures, and a practical example of how the process and metrics have been used as part of a turbine control system upgrade during the formative stages of design. The process and metrics are geared toward generalizability to other applications and serve as a template for utilities undertaking their own control room modernization activities.

  5. Ground potential rise monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, Zachery W. (Mandan, ND); Zevenbergen, Gary A. (Arvada, CO)

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A device and method for detecting ground potential rise (GPR) comprising positioning a first electrode and a second electrode at a distance from each other into the earth. The voltage of the first electrode and second electrode is attenuated by an attenuation factor creating an attenuated voltage. The true RMS voltage of the attenuated voltage is determined creating an attenuated true RMS voltage. The attenuated true RMS voltage is then multiplied by the attenuation factor creating a calculated true RMS voltage. If the calculated true RMS voltage is greater than a first predetermined voltage threshold, a first alarm is enabled at a local location. If user input is received at a remote location acknowledging the first alarm, a first alarm acknowledgment signal is transmitted. The first alarm acknowledgment signal is then received at which time the first alarm is disabled.

  6. Drinking Water Problems: MTBE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Methyl tertiary-butyl ether, a gasoline additive commonly known as MTBE, can contaminate ground water and cause health problems for those exposed to it for a long time. However, filtering devices can remove this and other additives from well water...

  7. Metal-Organic Frameworks with Precisely Designed Interior for Carbon Dioxide Capture in the Presence of Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.

    Metal-Organic Frameworks with Precisely Designed Interior for Carbon Dioxide Capture preservation of the IRMOF structure. Carbon dioxide capture from combustion sources such as flue gas in power this carbon capture challenge. The preferred method for measuring the efficiency of a given material

  8. Burial Ground Expansion Hydrogeologic Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaughan , T.F.

    1999-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Sirrine Environmental Consultants provided technical oversight of the installation of eighteen groundwater monitoring wells and six exploratory borings around the location of the Burial Ground Expansion.

  9. IMMEDIATE RELEASE April 28, 2006 CRUSHER UNMANNED GROUND COMBAT VEHICLE UNVEILED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Abhinav

    -steered, unmanned ground vehicle. The vehicle weighs 14,000 pounds fully fueled, and is designed to carry a 3 for an unmanned ground vehicle to perform military missions autonomously. Crusher will be equipped, "With the combination of a robust, highly mobile vehicle design and an innovative autonomous control

  10. Institute of Water Research Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and ground water protection. One project entitled "Decision Support System for Natural Resource Planning" (02 analysis, technology transfer, urban water systems, water quality, water quality management, watershed) was funded to address these problems and issues. In addition, support for the Institute of Water Research

  11. Our Environment in Hot Water: Comparing Water Heaters, A Life Cycle Approach Comparing Tank and Tankless Water Heaters in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Alison

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Study on Eco-Design of Water Heaters, Van Holstein en Kemnaand Assessment” in Water Heating Rulemaking TechnicalG. Smith, Tankless Gas Water Heaters: Oregon Market Status,

  12. Ground Turkey Stir Fry Ingredients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Ground Turkey Stir Fry Ingredients: 1 1/2 cups brown rice, medium- grain, making 3 cups cooked 1 pound ground turkey 4 zucchini 1 onion 1 green pepper 1/4 teaspoon pepper Directions 1. Cook brown rice turkey in skillet and use a spatula to break beef into small pieces as it browns. Keep on stirring

  13. Chapter 10 Water Quality Standards (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This administrative regulation establishes procedures to protect the surface waters of the Commonwealth, and thus protect water resources. It states the designated uses of surface water and...

  14. Conceptual design study of geothermal district heating of a thirty-house subdivision in Elko, Nevada, using existing water-distribution systems, Phase III. Final technical report, October 1, 1979-September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitts, D.R.

    1980-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A conceptual design study for district heating of a 30-home subdivision located near the southeast extremity of the city of Elko, Nevada is presented. While a specific residential community was used in the study, the overall approach and methodologies are believed to be generally applicable for a large number of communities where low temperature geothermal fluid is available. The proposed district heating system utilizes moderate temperature, clean domestic water and existing community culinary water supply lines. The culinary water supply is heated by a moderate temperature geothermal source using a single heat exchanger at entry to the subdivision. The heated culinary water is then pumped to the houses in the community where energy is extracted by means of a water supplied heat pump. The use of heat pumps at the individual houses allows economic heating to result from supply of relatively cool water to the community, and this precludes the necessity of supplying objectionably hot water for normal household consumption use. Each heat pump unit is isolated from the consumptive water flow such that contamination of the water supply is avoided. The community water delivery system is modified to allow recirculation within the community, and very little rework of existing water lines is required. The entire system coefficient of performance (COP) for a typical year of heating is 3.36, exclusive of well pumping energy.

  15. Variations of surface water extent and water storage in large river basins: A comparison of different global data sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of the spatio-temporal variations of total terrestrial water storage (the sum of ground water, soil water1 Variations of surface water extent and water storage in large river basins: A comparison mass variations monitored by GRACE, simulated surface and total water storage from WGHM, water levels

  16. Threats to the world's water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    la Riviere, J.W.M.

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water is in short supply in many regions; almost everywhere increasing amounts of organic waste and industrial pollutants threaten its quality. Only international cooperation in the integrated management of water resources can ameliorate the situation. Agriculture is usually the main drain on the water supply. Problems associated with overirrigation, increased population, and organic and industrial wastes are described. The paper explains the global water cycle; illustrates the uneven distribution of water among the oceans, ground water, ice caps, glaciers, lakes, and soil moisture; and gives data on the global water consumption from 1950 to 1980. Recommendations for water management are given.

  17. South Dakota Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    nutrients and bacteria in feedlot runoff, arsenic removal from drinking water, study of pharmaceuticals in surface water and uranium detoxification in ground water using bacteria. These projects were scheduled

  18. State of Washington Water Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Fifth Research Category: Ground-water Flow and Transport Focus Category: Non Point Pollution, Water Quality, Hydrogeochemistry Descriptors: Non-point pollutants, lindane, triallate, pesticides, water agricultural mass discharges using enviro

  19. NLS ground states on graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riccardo Adami; Enrico Serra; Paolo Tilli

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the existence of ground states for the subcritical NLS energy on metric graphs. In particular, we find out a topological assumption that guarantees the nonexistence of ground states, and give an example in which the assumption is not fulfilled and ground states actually exist. In order to obtain the result, we introduce a new rearrangement technique, adapted to the graph where it applies. Owing to such a technique, the energy level of the rearranged function is improved by conveniently mixing the symmetric and monotone rearrangement procedures.

  20. Impact of Climate Change on Irrigation Water Availability, Crop Water Requirements and Soil Salinity in the SJV, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopmans, Jan W; Maurer, Edwin P

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the Environmental and Water Resources Institute of thesimulation of ground-water flow in the central part of theU.S. Geological Survey water-supply paper ; 2396.