Sample records for designated critical habitat

  1. Title 50 CFR 226 Designated Critical Habitat | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThePty LtdOpenHabitat Jump to: navigation,

  2. Criticality & Recovery Preparedness: ePHI Systems Criticality Designation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Criticality & Recovery Preparedness: ePHI Systems 5100 EX.A Criticality Designation 1. Primary source of PHI for pre-research; or secondary source of PHI for research/pre-research; secondary source of PHI for treatment, payment or healthcare operations; or teaching Criticality mapped to Recovery

  3. Demonstration Dock Designed to Benefit Eelgrass Habitat Restoration (Washington)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Sargeant, Susan L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Gayaldo, Perry F.; Curtis, Craig A.; Court, Brian L.; Pierce, David M.; Robison, David S.

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The derelict Thomas Oil Dock on state tidelands in Port Townsend, Washington, was redesigned for the Northwest Maritime Center by a committee including marine scientists, architects, engineers, educators, regulators, and user groups. The committee's objectives were to create a ''demonstration dock'' using the best-available technologies and design features to restore nearshore habitat functions, particularly for threatened fisheries resources, while accommodating the unique requirements of the educational facility to house vessels ranging from historic tall ships to sea kayaks. A key nearshore habitat restoration goal was to reduce fragmentation of eelgrass where shade from the existing dock inhibited growth, by improving conditions with a new dock design and transplanting eelgrass to connect existing patches. Ecological conditions were evaluated through diver surveys; mapping existing eelgrass, macroalgae, and substrates; and review of controlling factors. Data on the attenuation an d diffusion of photosynthetically-active radiation (PAR) was collected and evaluated relative to eelgrass light requirements. Potential shade impacts of existing and alternative dock designs and materials were modeled. Key design features to improve habitat functions included the installation of reflective material under the dock to increase the incidence of PAR at the substrate level, reduction in the number of piles and associated shade impacts through the use of steel piles instead of wood, increase in the length of the trestle to 286 to move the greatest area of overwater structure beyond the range of eelgrass, and the use of grating in strategic locations to reduce the potential of a light/dark barrier to fish passage.

  4. Secure & Restore Critical Fisheries Habitat, Flathead Subbasin, FY2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuCharme, Lynn [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes; Tohtz, Joel [Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

    2008-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The construction of Hungry Horse Dam inundated 125 km of adfluvial trout habitat in the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries, impacting natural fish reproduction and rearing. Rapid residential and commercial growth in the Flathead Watershed now threaten the best remaining habitats and restrict our opportunities to offset natural resource losses. Hydropower development and other land disturbances caused severe declines in the range and abundance of our focal resident fish species, bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. Bull trout were listed as threatened in 1998 under the Endangered Species Act and westslope cutthroat were petitioned for listing under ESA. Westslope cutthroat are a species of special concern in Montana and a species of special consideration by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. The Secure & Protect Fisheries Habitat project follows the logical progression towards habitat restoration outlined in the Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan approved by the NWPPC in 1993. This project is also consistent with the 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program and the Flathead River Subbasin Plan that identifies the protection of habitats for these populations as one of the most critical needs in the subbasin and directs actions to offset habitat losses. The Flathead basin is one of the fastest growing human population centers in Montana. Riparian habitats are being rapidly developed and subdivided, causing habitat degradation and altering ecosystem functions. Remaining critical habitats in the Flathead Watershed need to be purchased or protected with conservation easements if westslope cutthroat and bull trout are to persist and expand within the subbasin. In addition, habitats degraded by past land uses need to be restored to maximize the value of remaining habitats and offset losses caused by the construction of Hungry Horse Dam. Securing and restoring remaining riparian habitat will benefit fish by shading and moderating water temperatures, stabilizing banks and protecting the integrity of channel dimension, improving woody debris recruitment for in-channel habitat features, producing terrestrial insects and leaf litter for recruitment to the stream, and helping to accommodate and attenuate flood flows. The purpose of this project is to work with willing landowners to protect the best remaining habitats in the Flathead subbasin as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan. The target areas for land protection activities follow the priorities established in the Flathead subbasin plan and include: (1) Class 1 waters as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; (2) Class 2 watersheds as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; and (3) 'Offsite mitigation' defined as those Class 1 and Class 2 watersheds that lack connectivity to the mainstem Flathead River or Flathead Lake. This program focuses on conserving the highest quality or most important riparian or fisheries habitat areas consistent with program criteria. The success of our efforts is subject to a property's actual availability and individual landowner negotiations. The program is guided using biological and project-based criteria that reflect not only the priority needs established in the Flathead subbasin plan, but also such factors as cost, credits, threats, and partners. The implementation of this project requires both an expense and a capital budget to allow work to be completed. This report addresses accomplishments under both budgets during FY08 as the two budgets are interrelated. The expense budget provided pre-acquisition funding to conduct activities such as surveys, appraisals, staff support, etc. The capital budget was used to purchase the interest in each parcel including closing costs. Both the pre-acquisition contract funds and the capital funds used to purchase fee title or conservation easements were spent in accordance with the terms negotiated within the FY08 through FY09 MOA between the Tribes, State, and BPA. In FY08, the focus of this project was to pursue all possible properties

  5. Northwest Montana Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Protection : Advance Design : Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Marilyn A.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the habitat protection process developed to mitigate for certain wildlife and wildlife habitat losses due to construction of Hungry Horse and Libby dams in northwestern Montana.

  6. Designing A Critical LinkDesigning A Critical Link PSU Transportation Seminar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Designing A Critical LinkDesigning A Critical Link PSU Transportation Seminar May 19, 2006 #12;2PSU Transportation Seminar ­ May 19, 2006 Presentation Outline · Project History · Function and Role of the I-5 · Process and Schedule #12;Project HistoryProject History #12;4PSU Transportation Seminar ­ May 19, 2006 I-5

  7. Autonomous Following RObot Critical Design Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liebling, Michael

    , tennis, football, soccer Repainting fading street lines Perimeter security Warehouse item retrieval/storage user input. Navigating to specific coordinates of a grid. #12;Critical Design Review: Project - schematic/PCB, digital compass Travis - mechanical - servo, reflective sensor, power Peter - mechanical

  8. Analysis of Panthera leo Habitat Design and Construction at The Wild Animal Sanctuary in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanatous, Shane

    1 Analysis of Panthera leo Habitat Design and Construction at The Wild Animal Sanctuary valuable knowledge to encourage the best animal welfare. Originally this sanctuary went by a different name welfare challenges even though most of the animals love to romp in the snow. Design and construction

  9. Using dynamic simulations and automated decision tools to design lunar habitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kortenkamp, David

    be useful for systems analyses much earlier in the system development life cycle than has previously been-time integrated control in designing and sizing habitat life support systems. The integration of these three implications for general systems analyses and for life support systems. It is likely that transient models

  10. Corrosion mitigation--a critical facet of well completion design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradburn, J.B.; Kalra, S.K.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The successful completion and production of deep hot corrosive wells can be accomplished by the development of a corrosion mitigation program during the initial stages of the drilling and completion phases. The mitigation programs that have proven themselves to be safe, reliable and effective address three critical areas: tubing selection, corrosion treatment method, and completion design. These three areas when properly studied and evaluated result in a successful corrosion mitigation program and a well with a low workover frequency.

  11. Corrosion mitigation-A critical facet of well completion design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradburn, J.B.; Karla, S.K.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Successful completion and production of deep hot corrosive wells can be accomplished by the development of a corrosion mitigation program during the initial stages of the drilling and completion phases. The mitigation programs that have proved safe, reliable, and effective address three critical areas: tubing selection, corrosion treatment method, and completion design. These three areas when properly studied and evaluated result in a successful corrosion mitigation program and a well with a low workover frequency. The development of an effective well completion program in a corrosive well requires input from the drilling, completion, and corrosion engineers. Completion design, tubing selection, and the corrosion treatment method are all critical facets in the economical production of deep hot wells that contain CO/sub 2/ and/or H/sub 2/S in the produced gas. A completion design that limits the application of a corrosion inhibitor could reduce its effectiveness to less than 50%. Industry surveys and field results suggest that the use of low-alloy carbon steels in conjunction with a continuous corrosion inhibitor injection system can effectively and economically control the rate of the corrosion attack. Also evident are the potential problems that can arise if a corrosion mitigation program is designed to rely entirely on the corrosion resistance qualities of an activepassive metal alloy such as stainless steels.

  12. Tornado vs. Hurricane Which is More Critical for Design of U...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tornado vs. Hurricane Which is More Critical for Design of U.S. Nuclear Power Plants? Tornado vs. Hurricane Which is More Critical for Design of U.S. Nuclear Power Plants? Tornado...

  13. Design and Criticality Considerations for 9977 and 9978 Shipping Packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, R; Biswas, D; Abramczyk, G

    2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed two new, Type B, state-of-the-art, general purpose, fissile material Shipping Packages, designated 9977 and 9978, as replacements for the U.S. DOT specification 6M container, phased out in September 30, 2008 due to non-compliance with current requirements 10CFR71 regulation. The packages accommodate plutonium, uranium and other special nuclear materials in bulk quantities and in many forms with capabilities exceeding those of the 6M. These packages provide a high degree of single containment and comply with 10CFR71, Department of Energy (DOE) Order 460.1B, DOE Order 460.2, and 10CFR20 (As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA)). Allowed package contents were determined accounting for nuclear criticality, radiation shielding, and decay heat rate. The Criticality Safety Index (CSI) for the package is 1.0. The package utilizes passive cooling to maintain internal temperatures within limits. Radiation shielding analyses have established the contents for which the packages can be shipped under non-exclusive use in the Safe-Secure Trailer or under exclusive use. The packages are designed to ship radioactive contents in several configurations; Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs), nested food-pack cans, site specific containers, and DOE-STD-3013 containers. Each shipping package includes a 35-gallon stainless steel outer drum, insulation, a drum liner, and a single containment vessel (CV). The 9977 includes a 6-inch ID CV while the 9978 includes a 5-inch ID CV. One inch of Fiberfrax{reg_sign} insulation is wrapped around and attached to the sides and bottom of the liner. The volume between the Fiberfrax{reg_sign} and the drum wall is filled with polyurethane foam. Top and bottom aluminum Load Distribution Fixtures (LDFs) within the drum liner cavity, above and below the CV, center the CV in the liner, stiffen the package radially, and distribute loads away from the CV. The 6CV fits directly into the LDFs while honeycomb spacers position the 5CV in the LDFs.

  14. Critical review of water based radiant cooling system design methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jingjuan Dove; Bauman, Fred; Schiavon, Stefano

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Embedded Radiant Heating and Cooling Systems, InternationalWATER BASED RADIANT COOLING SYSTEM DESIGN METHODS Jingjuan (Keywords: Radiant Cooling System, Design Approach,

  15. Hot-and-Cold: Using Criticality in the Design of Energy-Efficient Caches Rajeev Balasubramonian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dwarkadas, Sandhya

    Hot-and-Cold: Using Criticality in the Design of Energy-Efficient Caches Rajeev Balasubramonian is designed to be highly energy-efficient (consuming 20% of the dynamic and leakage energy of the hot cache not in the critical path are serviced by a lower energy (and lower performance (cold)) cache bank. The resulting

  16. Formal Methods for the Specification and Design of RealTime Safety Critical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostroff, Jonathan S.

    Formal Methods for the Specification and Design of RealTime Safety Critical Systems \\Lambda Jonathan S. Ostroff April, 1992 Abstract Safety critical computers increasingly affect nearly every aspect, designing and verifying realtime sys tems, so as to improve their safety and reliability. \\Lambda

  17. The health of Great Lakes habitats and wildlife depends upon the protection and restoration of ecosystems. A multitude of threats affect the health of Great Lakes habitats and wildlife, and many

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the engineering and design of additional in-stream and bank restoration, and the treatment of invasive speciesThe health of Great Lakes habitats and wildlife depends upon the protection and restoration opportunities exist to protect and restore critical elements of the Great Lakes ecosystem. Habitat and Wildlife

  18. A SET OF CRITICAL HEURISTICS FOR VALUE SENSITIVE DESIGNERS AND USERS OF PERSUASIVE SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , fahri.yetim@uni-siegen.de Abstract This paper proposes a set of critical questions to guide reflections on persuasive systems. The questions are mainly based on value-based practical reasoning as suggested the purposiveness, goodness or rightness of system actions to be designed. In this approach, the critical questions

  19. Title 43 CFR 1610.7-2 Designation of Areas of Critical Environmental...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Federal RegulationFederal Regulation: Title 43 CFR 1610.7-2 Designation of Areas of Critical Environmental ConcernLegal...

  20. Task 8 -- Design and test of critical components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chance, T.F.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers tasks 8.1, 8.1.1, and 8.2. The primary objective of Task 8.1, Particulates Flow Deposition, is to characterize the particulate generated in an operating gas turbine combined cycle (GTCC) power plant whose configuration approximates that proposed for an ATS power plant. In addition, the task is to evaluate the use of full-flow filtering to reduce the steam particulate loads. Before the start of this task, GE had already negotiated an agreement with the candidate power plant, piping and a filter unit had already been installed at the power plant site, and major elements of the data acquisition system had been purchased. The objective of Task 8.1.1, Coolant Purity, is to expose typical ATS gas turbine airfoil cooling channel geometries to real steam flow to determine whether there are any unexpected deposit formations. The task is a static analog of the centrifugal deposition rig trials of Task 8.2, in which a bucket channel return bend is exposed to steam flow. Two cooling channel geometries are of primary interest in this static exposure. The primary objective of Task 8.2, Particle Centrifugal Sedimentation, is to determine the settling characteristics of particles in a cooling stream from an operating gas turbine combined cycle (GTCC) power plant when that stream is ducted through a passage experiencing the G-loads expected in a simulated bucket channel specimen representative of designs proposed for an ATS gas turbine.

  1. Designs for critical secondary control layouts for vehicles for the physically challenged

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lostetter, Michael F

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    obtained through interviews, conducted by the author, with qualified experts in the automotive adaptive equipment field from industry and academia. This compilation of expert opinions and ideas helped to contribute to the design approaches discussed... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1995 Major Subject: Industrial Engineering DESIGNS FOR CRITICAL SECONDARY CONTROL LAYOUTS FORVEHICLES FOR THE PHYSICALLY CHALLENGED A Thesis by MICHAEL F. LOSTETTER Submitted to Texas A&M University...

  2. A Software Tool for the Design of Critical Robot Missions with Performance Guarantees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    \\ A Software Tool for the Design of Critical Robot Missions with Performance Guarantees D M. Lyonsa* , R.C. Arkinb , P. Nirmala , S. Jiangb , T-M. Liua a Fordham University, Bronx NY b Georgia Institute. Published by Elsevier B.V. Selection and/or peer-review under responsibility of Georgia Institute

  3. Validation of FSP Reactor Design with Sensitivity Studies of Beryllium-Reflected Critical Assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess; Margaret A. Marshall

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The baseline design for space nuclear power is a fission surface power (FSP) system: sodium-potassium (NaK) cooled, fast spectrum reactor with highly-enriched-uranium (HEU)-O2 fuel, stainless steel (SS) cladding, and beryllium reflectors with B4C control drums. Previous studies were performed to evaluate modeling capabilities and quantify uncertainties and biases associated with analysis methods and nuclear data. Comparison of Zero Power Plutonium Reactor (ZPPR)-20 benchmark experiments with the FSP design indicated that further reduction of the total design model uncertainty requires the reduction in uncertainties pertaining to beryllium and uranium cross-section data. Further comparison with three beryllium-reflected HEU-metal benchmark experiments performed at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) concluded the requirement that experimental validation data have similar cross section sensitivities to those found in the FSP design. A series of critical experiments was performed at ORCEF in the 1960s to support the Medium Power Reactor Experiment (MPRE) space reactor design. The small, compact critical assembly (SCCA) experiments were graphite- or beryllium-reflected assemblies of SS-clad, HEU-O2 fuel on a vertical lift machine. All five configurations were evaluated as benchmarks. Two of the five configurations were beryllium reflected, and further evaluated using the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis capabilities of SCALE 6.1. Validation of the example FSP design model was successful in reducing the primary uncertainty constituent, the Be(n,n) reaction, from 0.28 %dk/k to 0.0004 %dk/k. Further assessment of additional reactor physics measurements performed on the SCCA experiments may serve to further validate FSP design and operation.

  4. Evaluation of critical materials in five additional advance design photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, S.A.; Watts, R.L.; Martin, P.; Gurwell, W.E.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to identify potential material supply constraints due to the large-scale deployment of five advanced photovoltaic (PV) cell designs, and to suggest strategies to reduce the impacts of these production capacity limitations and potential future material shortages. The Critical Materials Assessment Program (CMAP) screens the designs and their supply chains and identifies potential shortages which might preclude large-scale use of the technologies. The results of the screening of five advanced PV cell designs are presented: (1) indium phosphide/cadmium sulfide, (2) zinc phosphide, (3) cadmium telluride/cadmium sulfide, (4) copper indium selenium, and (5) cadmium selenide photoelectrochemical. Each of these five cells is screened individually assuming that they first come online in 1991, and that 25 Gwe of peak capacity is online by the year 2000. A second computer screening assumes that each cell first comes online in 1991 and that each cell has a 5 GWe of peak capacity by the year 2000, so that the total online capacity for the five cells is 25 GWe. Based on a review of the preliminary baseline screening results, suggestions were made for varying such parameters as the layer thickness, cell production processes, etc. The resulting PV cell characterizations were then screened again by the CMAP computer code. The CMAP methodology used to identify critical materials is described; and detailed characterizations of the advanced photovoltaic cell designs under investigation, descriptions of additional cell production processes, and the results are presented. (WHK)

  5. An Analysis of Hybrid Life Support Systems for Sustainable Habitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Margaret Miller

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of sustainable habitats on Earth, on other planetary surfaces, and in space, has motivated strategic planning with respect to life support (LS) system technology development and habitat design. Such planning ...

  6. Critical Simulation Based Evaluation of Thermally Activated Building Systems (TABS) Design Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basu, Chandrayee

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of discomfort. Full- factorial design, defined later in thedesign model. Full-factorial design The design scenariosformulated into a full factorial design. In statistics, a

  7. Masters Thesis- Criticality Alarm System Design Guide with Accompanying Alarm System Development for the Radioisotope Production Laboratory in Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenfield, Bryce A.

    2009-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed instructional manual was created to guide criticality safety engineers through the process of designing a criticality alarm system (CAS) for Department of Energy (DOE) hazard class 1 and 2 facilities. Regulatory and technical requirements were both addressed. A list of design tasks and technical subtasks are thoroughly analyzed to provide concise direction for how to complete the analysis. An example of the application of the design methodology, the Criticality Alarm System developed for the Radioisotope Production Laboratory (RPL) of Richland, Washington is also included. The analysis for RPL utilizes the Monte Carlo code MCNP5 for establishing detector coverage in the facility. Significant improvements to the existing CAS were made that increase the reliability, transparency, and coverage of the system.

  8. Habitats keep commercial and recreational fisheries strong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and sea level rise. So what can we do? Protect and restore habitat Investments by private groups not only for our fisheries but for the communities--and economies--that rely on them. San Francisco Bay Bay gone, but the dam or poorly designed culvert remains, still preventing fish from getting to habitat

  9. Towards Component-Based Design of Safety-Critical Cyber-Physical Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for real-time behavior which is essential in many safety-critical applications. To overcome this problem-physical systems (CPS) can be found in many different domains such as smart traffic and transporta- tion, intelligent buildings, smart grid, etc. A common aspect of such CPS is that they rely on a large number

  10. eNetworks in an Increasingly Volatile World: Design for Resilience of Networked Critical Infrastructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulieru, Mihaela

    pervaded in all traditional infrastructures, rendering them more intelligent but more vulnerable Infrastructures Mihaela Ulieru Canada Research Chair Faculty of Computer Science The University of New Brunswick CANADA Ulieru@unb.ca http://www.cs.unb.ca/~ulieru/ Abstract. Any critical infrastructure is controlled

  11. Critical Simulation Based Evaluation of Thermally Activated Building Systems (TABS) Design Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basu, Chandrayee

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    results of water supply temperature, cooling capacity andcooling energy 34 Water supplyThe cooling generation source will be designed to supply the

  12. Criticality assessment of basket designs for use in the MH-1A shipping cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, J.T.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytical study is made of a proposed stainless steel basket to be used in the MH-1A cask for the shipment of National Bureau of Standards reactor fuel elements. The use of B/sub 4/C in the basket as a primary control for the prevention of criticality is shown to be effective but not necessary. A basket fabricated of 0.635-cm-thick stainless steel provides a sufficient margin of subcriticality.

  13. Incident and Accident Investigation techniques to Inform Model Based Design of Safety Critical Interactive Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basnyat, S.; Chozos, N.; Johnson, C.W.

    Basnyat,S. Chozos,N. Johnson,C.W. Palanque,P. M. Harrison (ed.), Design, Specification and Verification of Interactive Systems 2005, Springer Verlag, Berlin, Germany, Lecture Notes in Computing Science 3941. pp 51-66 Springer Verlag

  14. Designs for critical secondary control layouts for vehicles for the physically challenged

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lostetter, Michael F

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the TALK system between able-bodied and physically challenged persons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Comparison of the accuracy for the TALK and TONE systems. 25 26 INTRODUCTION In the area of automotive adaptive equipment, safety is even inore... obtained through interviews, conducted by the author, with qualified experts in the automotive adaptive equipment field from industry and academia. This compilation of expert opinions and ideas helped to contribute to the design approaches discussed...

  15. The Development, Content, Design, and Conduct of the 2011 Piloted US DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program Criticality Safety Engineering Training and Education Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopper, Calvin Mitchell [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In May 1973 the University of New Mexico conducted the first nationwide criticality safety training and education week-long short course for nuclear criticality safety engineers. Subsequent to that course, the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility (LACEF) developed very successful 'hands-on' subcritical and critical training programs for operators, supervisors, and engineering staff. Since the inception of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety Project (NCT&SP) in 1983, the DOE has stimulated contractor facilities and laboratories to collaborate in the furthering of nuclear criticality as a discipline. That effort included the education and training of nuclear criticality safety engineers (NCSEs). In 1985 a textbook was written that established a path toward formalizing education and training for NCSEs. Though the NCT&SP went through a brief hiatus from 1990 to 1992, other DOE-supported programs were evolving to the benefit of NCSE training and education. In 1993 the DOE established a Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) and undertook a comprehensive development effort to expand the extant LACEF 'hands-on' course specifically for the education and training of NCSEs. That successful education and training was interrupted in 2006 for the closing of the LACEF and the accompanying movement of materials and critical experiment machines to the Nevada Test Site. Prior to that closing, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was commissioned by the US DOE NCSP to establish an independent hands-on NCSE subcritical education and training course. The course provided an interim transition for the establishment of a reinvigorated and expanded two-week NCSE education and training program in 2011. The 2011 piloted two-week course was coordinated by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and jointly conducted by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) classroom education and facility training, the Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) hands-on criticality experiments training, and the US DOE National Criticality Experiment Research Center (NCERC) hands-on criticality experiments training that is jointly supported by LLNL and LANL and located at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) This paper provides the description of the bases, content, and conduct of the piloted, and future US DOE NCSP Criticality Safety Engineer Training and Education Project.

  16. Hanford Waste Treatment Plant completes critical system design for High-Level Waste Vitrification Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpgHanford LEED&soil Hanford Traffic DepartmentDesign in21,

  17. Hanford Waste Treatment Plant completes critical system design for High-Level Waste Vitrification Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpgHanford LEED&soil Hanford Traffic DepartmentDesign

  18. Criticality Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Alsaed

    2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003) presents the methodology for evaluating potential criticality situations in the monitored geologic repository. As stated in the referenced Topical Report, the detailed methodology for performing the disposal criticality analyses will be documented in model reports. Many of the models developed in support of the Topical Report differ from the definition of models as given in the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management procedure AP-SIII.10Q, ''Models'', in that they are procedural, rather than mathematical. These model reports document the detailed methodology necessary to implement the approach presented in the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report and provide calculations utilizing the methodology. Thus, the governing procedure for this type of report is AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses''. The ''Criticality Model'' is of this latter type, providing a process evaluating the criticality potential of in-package and external configurations. The purpose of this analysis is to layout the process for calculating the criticality potential for various in-package and external configurations and to calculate lower-bound tolerance limit (LBTL) values and determine range of applicability (ROA) parameters. The LBTL calculations and the ROA determinations are performed using selected benchmark experiments that are applicable to various waste forms and various in-package and external configurations. The waste forms considered in this calculation are pressurized water reactor (PWR), boiling water reactor (BWR), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Training Research Isotope General Atomic (TRIGA), Enrico Fermi, Shippingport pressurized water reactor, Shippingport light water breeder reactor (LWBR), N-Reactor, Melt and Dilute, and Fort Saint Vrain Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The scope of this analysis is to document the criticality computational method. The criticality computational method will be used for evaluating the criticality potential of configurations of fissionable materials (in-package and external to the waste package) within the repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada for all waste packages/waste forms. The criticality computational method is also applicable to preclosure configurations. The criticality computational method is a component of the methodology presented in ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003). How the criticality computational method fits in the overall disposal criticality analysis methodology is illustrated in Figure 1 (YMP 2003, Figure 3). This calculation will not provide direct input to the total system performance assessment for license application. It is to be used as necessary to determine the criticality potential of configuration classes as determined by the configuration probability analysis of the configuration generator model (BSC 2003a).

  19. LAKE MICHIGAN'S TRIBUTARY AND NEARSHORE FISH HABITATS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    7 LAKE MICHIGAN'S TRIBUTARY AND NEARSHORE FISH HABITATS Edward S. Rutherford1 Background, the Lake Michigan LaMP was developed to comply with provisions in the GLWQA and to guide management-ranging, cooperative effort to design and implement a strategy for the 1 E.S. Rutherford. University of Michigan School

  20. Waterfowl habitats on reclaimed surface mined lands in southwestern Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, W.G.; Klimstra, W.D.; Nawrot, J.R.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Loss of quality wetland habitat is probably the most important factor affecting populations of waterfowl in the United States. To counteract this problem programs for protecting critical habitats have been established and research for innovative methods to create wetlands are being pursued. Recently, attention has been given to evaluation of wetland habitats on lands surface-mined and to methods of reclamation to enhance their development as part of future planning. These data indicate quality wetland habitats can be a legitimate aspect of reclaimed surface-mined lands; and selective overburden handling, grading so as to maximize biologically productive zones and selective plantings contribute importantly to their value. Currently bond release criteria by the Illinois regulatory authority for wildlife habitat and developed water resources discourages reclamation that would maximize quality wetland habitats. Suggested changes in these criteria include alternative vegetation requirements for wetland habitats, more leniency on seasonally inundated shallow water areas, and variation from topsoil requirements when adequate unconsolidated substitute material is available. It is believed that such allowances would result in incentives for the industry to develop wetland habitats so vital to continued enjoyment of waterfowl resources.

  1. Habitat for Humanity of Metro Denver Zero Energy Demonstration Home

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure describes the 2005 demonstration home designed by NREL and the Habitat for Humanity of Metro Denver. The completed home produced 24% more energy than it consumed over 12 months.

  2. POTENTAIL HABITAT MOUNTAIN PLOVERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that is bordered by I-25 to the east, property boundaries to the north and west, and the power plant to the south cover of yucca and cholla on hills characterize the area bordered by the solar evaporation ponds by the guard shack to the south, the plant to the west, and I-25 to the east is potential habitat. This town

  3. Northwest Habitat Institute Integrated Habitat and Biodiversity Information SystemIntegrated Habitat and Biodiversity Information System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on Geospatial Information Technologies at the National Academy of Sciences; Lead for the Spatial ApplicationNorthwest Habitat Institute Integrated Habitat and Biodiversity Information SystemIntegrated Habitat and Biodiversity Information System (IBIS) for the Columbia River Basin(IBIS) for the Columbia

  4. A Multiple Watershed Approach to Assessing the Effects of Habitat Restoration Actions on Anadromous and Resident Fish Populations, Technical Report 2003-2004.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marmorek, David

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Habitat protection and restoration is a cornerstone of current strategies to restore ecosystems, recover endangered fish species, and rebuild fish stocks within the Columbia River Basin. Strategies featuring habitat restoration include the 2000 Biological Opinion on operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS BiOp) developed by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the 2000 Biological Opinion on Bull Trout developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Sub-Basin Plans developed under the Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NWPCC). There is however little quantitative information about the effectiveness of different habitat restoration techniques. Such information is crucial for helping scientists and program managers allocate limited funds towards the greatest benefits for fish populations. Therefore, it is critical to systematically test the hypotheses underlying habitat restoration actions for both anadromous and resident fish populations. This pilot project was developed through a proposal to the Innovative Projects fund of the NWPCC (ESSA 2002). It was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) following reviews by the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP 2002), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA 2002), the NWPCC and BPA. The study was designed to respond directly to the above described needs for information on the effectiveness of habitat restoration actions, including legal measures specified in the 2000 FCRPS BiOp (RPA 183, pg. 9-133, NMFS 2000). Due to the urgency of addressing these measures, the timeline of the project was accelerated from a duration of 18 months to 14 months. The purpose of this pilot project was to explore methods for evaluating past habitat restoration actions and their effects on fish populations. By doing so, the project will provide a foundation of retrospective analyses, on which to build prospective, multi-watershed designs for future habitat restoration actions. Such designs are being developed concurrently with this project by several other groups in the Columbia Basin (RME Workgroup 2003, NMFS 2003, Hillman and Paulsen 2002, Hillman 2003). By addressing questions about habitat restoration and monitoring (in coordination with other related efforts), we hope that this project will catalyze a shift in the Basin's paradigm of habitat restoration, moving from implementation of individual watershed projects towards rigorously designed and monitored, multiwatershed, adaptive management experiments. The project involved three phases of work, which were closely integrated with various related and ongoing efforts in the region: (1) Scoping - We met with a Core Group of habitat experts and managers to scope out a set of testable habitat restoration hypotheses, identify candidate watersheds and recommend participants for a data evaluation workshop. (2) Data Assembly - We contacted over 80 scientists and managers to help evaluate the suitability of each candidate watershed's historical data for assessing the effectiveness of past restoration actions. We eventually settled on the Yakima, Wenatchee, Clearwater, and Salmon subbasins, and began gathering relevant data for these watersheds at a workshop with habitat experts and managers. Data assembly continued for several months after the workshop. (3) Data Analysis and Synthesis - We explored statistical approaches towards retrospectively analyzing the effects of restoration 'treatments' at nested spatial scales across multiple watersheds (Chapters 2-5 of this report). These analyses provided a foundation for identifying existing constraints to testing restoration hypotheses, and opportunities to overcome these constraints through improved experimental designs, monitoring protocols and project selection strategies (Chapters 6 and 7 of this report). Finally, we developed a set of recommendations to improve the design, implementation, and monitoring of prospective habitat restoration programs in the Columbia River Basin (Chapter 8).

  5. Measuring-up in timber: A critical perspective on mid- and high-rise timber building design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleming, Patrick; Smith, Simon; Ramage, Michael

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    timber elements in high-rise buildings is still in its infancy. This paper offers a new perspective on building with wood at this scale, beyond carbon sequestration and construction. Criticism of existing projects and proposals, including the authors own...

  6. Habitat types on the Hanford Site: Wildlife and plant species of concern

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downs, J.L.; Rickard, W.H.; Brandt, C.A. [and others

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to provide a comprehensive source of the best available information on Hanford Site sensitive and critical habitats and plants and animals of importance or special status. In this report, sensitive habitats include areas known to be used by threatened, endangered, or sensitive plant or animal species, wetlands, preserves and refuges, and other sensitive habitats outlined in the Hanford Site Baseline Risk Assessment Methodology. Potentially important species for risk assessment and species of special concern with regard to their status as threatened, endangered, or sensitive are described, and potential habitats for these species identified.

  7. Hydraulic and Habitat Suitability Analyses Technical Memorandum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix D Hydraulic and Habitat Suitability Analyses Technical Memorandum #12;COPYRIGHT DECEMBER Series 2 and Pond Series 3 Hydraulic and Habitat Suitability Analyses Prepared for Bureau of Reclamation HILL, INC. III Hydraulic and Habitat Suitability Analyses

  8. Omak Creek acquisition protects endangered salmonid habitat ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to protect habitat for endangered salmon and steelhead along Omak Creek in Okano- gan County. This acquisition would protect spawning, rearing and migratory habitat of...

  9. Design of a Probe for Strain Sensitivity Studies of Critical Current Densities in SC Wires and Tapes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dhanaraj, N.; Barzi, E.; Turrioni, D.; Rusy, A.; Lombardo, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of a variable-temperature probe used to perform strain sensitivity measurements on LTS wires and HTS wires and tapes is described. The measurements are intended to be performed at liquid helium temperatures (4.2 K). The wire or tape to be measured is wound and soldered on to a helical spring device, which is fixed at one end and subjected to a torque at the free end. The design goal is to be able to achieve {+-} 0.8 % strain in the wire and tape. The probe is designed to carry a current of 2000A.

  10. Yakima Habitat Improvement Project Master Plan, Technical Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golder Associates, Inc.

    2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yakima Urban Growth Area (UGA) is a developing and growing urban area in south-central Washington. Despite increased development, the Yakima River and its tributaries within the UGA continue to support threatened populations of summer steelhead and bull trout as well as a variety of non-listed salmonid species. In order to provide for the maintenance and recovery of these species, while successfully planning for the continued growth and development within the UGA, the City of Yakima has undertaken the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project. The overall goal of the project is to maintain, preserve, and restore functioning fish and wildlife habitat within and immediately surrounding the Yakima UGA over the long term. Acquisition and protection of the fish and wildlife habitat associated with key properties in the UGA will prevent future subdivision along riparian corridors, reduce further degradation or removal of riparian habitat, and maintain or enhance the long term condition of aquatic habitat. By placing these properties in long-term protection, the threat of development from continued growth in the urban area will be removed. To most effectively implement the multi-year habitat acquisition and protection effort, the City has developed this Master Plan. The Master Plan provides the structure and guidance for future habitat acquisition and restoration activities to be performed within the Yakima Urban Area. The development of this Master Plan also supports several Reasonable and Prudent Alternatives (RPAs) of the NOAA Fisheries 2000 Biological Opinion (BiOp), as well as the Water Investment Action Agenda for the Yakima Basin, local planning efforts, and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program. This Master Plan also provides the framework for coordination of the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project with other fish and wildlife habitat acquisition and protection activities currently being implemented in the area. As a result of the planning effort leading to this Master Plan, a Technical Working Group (TWG) was established that represents most, if not all, fish and wildlife agencies/interests in the subbasin. This TWG met regularly throughout the planning process to provide input and review and was instrumental in the development of this plan. Preparation of this plan included the development of a quantitative prioritization process to rank 40,000 parcels within the Urban Growth Area based on the value of fish and wildlife habitat each parcel provided. Biological and physical criteria were developed and applied to all parcels through a GIS-based prioritization model. In the second-phase of the prioritization process, the TWG provided local expert knowledge and review of the properties. In selecting the most critical areas within the Urban Growth Area for protection, this project assessed the value of fish and wildlife habitat on the Yakima River. Well-developed habitat acquisition efforts (e.g., Yakima River Basin Water Enhancement Project by the Bureau of Reclamation and Yakama Nation acquisition projects) are already underway on the Yakima River mainstem. These efforts, however, face several limitations in protection of floodplain function that could be addressed through the support of the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project. This Master Plan integrates tributary habitat acquisition efforts with those ongoing on the Yakima River to best benefit fish and wildlife in the Urban Growth Area. The parcel ranking process identified 25 properties with the highest fish and wildlife value for habitat acquisition in the Yakima Urban Area. These parcels contain important fish and wildlife corridors on Ahtanum and Wide Hollow Creeks and the Naches River. The fifteen highest-ranking parcels of the 25 parcels identified were considered very high priority for protection of fish and wildlife habitat. These 15 parcels were subsequently grouped into four priority acquisition areas. This Master Plan outlines a four-year schedule for acquisition, protection, and restoration of the 25 highest ranked prop

  11. The need to perform early design studies that combine architectural simulation with power estimation has become critical as power has

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mudge, Trevor

    ABSTRACT The need to perform early design studies that combine architectural simulation with power. We also propose a more realistic power modeling technique for external I/O. In general, our approach includes more detailed microarchitectural and circuit modeling than has been the case in earlier simulators

  12. Cooperator Report: Habitat Requirements of Steelhead in the Upper Salinas River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Lisa C.

    Cooperator Report: Habitat Requirements of Steelhead in the Upper Salinas River Watershed Jenna L the abundance, distribution, and habitat requirements of steelhead in the upper Salinas River watershed. We, and reproduce (Thompson & Larsen 2004). The Salinas River and its tributaries have been designated

  13. Geopressured habitat: A literature review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negus-de Wys, Jane

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A literature review of the geopressured-geothermal habitat is summarized. Findings are presented and discussed with respect to the principal topics: Casual agents are both geological and geochemical; they include disequilibrium compaction of sediments, clay diagenesis, aquathermal pressuring, hydrocarbon generation, and lateral tectonic compression. The overall physical and chemical characteristics of the habitats are dictated by varying combinations of sedimentation rates, alteration mineralogy, permeability, porosity and pressure, temperature, fluid content and chemistry, and hydrodynamic flow. Habitat pressure seals are considered in terms of their formation processes, geologic characteristics, and physical behavior, including pressure release and reservoir pressure recharge on a geologic time scale. World-wide occurrence of geopressured-geothermal habitats is noted. The main thrust of this topic concerns the U.S.A. and Canada; in addition, reference is made to occurrences in China and indications from deep-sea vents, as well as the contribution of paleo-overpressure to habitat initiation and maintenance. Identification and assessment of the habitat is addressed in relation to use of hydrogeologic, geophysical, geochemical, and geothermic techniques, as well as well-logging and drill-stem-test data. Conclusions concerning the adequacy of the current state of knowledge and its applicability to resource exploration and development are set forth, together with recommendations for the thrust of future work.

  14. CRITICAL WATERFOWL HABITATS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA Patricia Hayes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , 189,842 ha (88%) has no formal protection. Knowledge of the location and status of these vital areas is essential for effective conservation and management of waterfowl populations. R12SUW En supplement au'emplacement et le statut de ces regions vitales pour une preservation et un arm+mgement eflicaces des populations

  15. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study 2013: Manatee County Habitat...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    with an architect and a home energy rater, the affiliate set out to design a low-cost home that met three BUILDER PROFILE Manatee County Habitat for Humanity Bradenton, FL...

  16. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN OF INTEGRATED CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS, VOL. 20, NO. 5, MAY 2001 583 Critical Area Computation for Missing Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papadopoulou, Evanthia

    2001 583 Critical Area Computation for Missing Material Defects in VLSI Circuits Evanthia Papadopoulou Abstract--We address the problem of computing critical area for missing material defects in a circuit for rectilinear layouts. Index Terms--Breaks, critical area, missing material defects, opens, via blocks, Voronoi

  17. Critical Design Review Omar Gonzalez

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liebling, Michael

    battery-backed memory UART (1 Mbps host data rate) and SPI slave (2 Mbps host data rate) hardware Controller peripheral in the LPC2478 16 data I/O pins, 12 bank address pins #12;#12; Light Sensor Module

  18. Critical Materials:

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    lighting. 14 (bottom) Criticality ratings of shortlisted raw 76 materials. 15 77 2. Technology Assessment and Potential 78 This section reviews the major trends within...

  19. The health of Great Lakes habitats and wildlife depends upon the protection and restoration of ecosystems. A multitude of threats affect the health of Great Lakes habitats and wildlife, and many

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dams and barriers, construct fish passage, clean up marine debris, restore coastal wetlands, and remove including design and engineering of habitat restoration projects, on-the-ground restoration work, project. Acquiring damaged habitat is the first step in establishing a pipeline of GLRI-supported restoration

  20. Abundance, Behavior, and Habitat Utilization by Coho Salmon and Steelhead Trout in Fish Creek, Oregon, as Influenced by Habitat Enhancement, 1985 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolfe, John (Mount Hood National Forest, Clackamas River Ranger District, Estacada, OR); Everest, Fred H. (Oregon State University, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Corvallis, OR); Heller, David A. (Mount Hood National Forest, Gresham, OR)

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Construction and evaluation of salmonid habitat improvements on Fish Creek, a tributary of the upper Clackamas River, was continued in fiscal year 1985 by the Estacada Ranger District, Mt. Hood National Forest, and the Anadromous Fish Habitat Research Unit of the Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (PNW), USDA Forest Service. The study began in 1982 when PNW entered into an agreement with the Mt. Hood National Forest to evaluate fish habitat improvements in the Fish Creek basin on the Estacada Ranger District. The project was initially conceived as a 5-year effort (19824986) to be financed by Forest Service funds. Several factors limiting production of salmonids in the basin were identified during the first year of the study, and the scope of the habitat improvement effort was subsequently enlarged. The habitat improvement program and the evaluation of improvements were both expanded in mid-1983 when the Bonneville Power Administration entered into an agreement with the Mt. Hood National Forest to provide additional funding for work on Fish Creek. Habitat improvement work in the basin is designed to increase the annual number of chinook and coho salmon, and steelhead trout smolt outmigrants. The primary objectives of the evaluation include the: (1) Evaluation and quantification of changes in salmonid spawning and rearing habitat resulting from a variety of habitat Improvements. (2) Evaluation and quantification of changes in fish populations and biomass resulting from habitat improvements. (3) Evaluation of the cost-effectiveness of habitat improvements developed with BPA and Forest Service funds on Fish Creek. Several prototype enhancement projects were constructed and tested during the first three years of the study. The Intention was to identify successful techniques that could then be broadly applied within the bash. This stepwise procedure has been largely successful in identifying the most promising enhancement techniques for the Fish Creek basin. To date, 7-10 percent of the habitat area in the basin has been treated. When work on Fish Creek is completed, it is estimated that 50-60 percent of the total habitat area used by anadromous salmonids will have received some form of treatment. This annual progress report will focus on the projects completed in the basin In 1983, 1984, and 1985, and their evaluation. Winter habitat use and coho salmon and steelhead trout smolt production will also be emphasized.

  1. Research Article Habitat Use and Survival of Preflight Wild Turkey Broods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Mark C.

    Research Article Habitat Use and Survival of Preflight Wild Turkey Broods BRIAN L. SPEARS,1 Leasure Hall, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA ABSTRACT Wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo. This is a critical period of wild turkey life history, with poult survival ranging from 12% to 52%. We measured

  2. The Sandhills HabitatThe Sandhills HabitatThe Sandhills HabitatThe Sandhills HabitatThe Sandhills Habitat DescriptionDescriptionDescriptionDescriptionDescription

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgia, University of

    by ancient oceans that rose and then receded in response to melting and freezing of polar ice caps. Beaches, characterized by rolling hills capped by deep coarse sands. They are wedged between the Coastal Plain, gopher tortoises are keystone species -- other animals and plants in the habitat are affected by tortoise

  3. Monitoring and mapping selected riparian habitat along the lower Snake River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downs, J. L; Tiller, B. L [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Witter, M. [Shannon and Wilson, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States). Geotechnical and Environmental Consultants, Seattle, Washington (United States); Mazaika, R. [Corps of Engineers, Portland, OR (United States)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies in this document were initiated to establish baseline information on riparian and wetland habitat conditions at the areas studied under the current reservoir operations on the lower Snake River. Two approaches were used to assess habitat at 28 study sites selected on the four pools on the lower Snake River. These areas all contribute significant riparian habitat along the river, and several of these areas are designated habitat management units. At 14 of the 28 sites, we monitored riparian habitat on three dates during the growing season to quantify vegetation abundance and composition along three transects: soil nutrients, moisture, and pH and water level and pH. A second approach involved identifying any differences in the extent and amount of riparian/wetland habitat currently found at the study areas from that previously documented. We used both ground and boat surveys to map and classify the changes in vegetative cover along the shoreline at the 14 monitoring sites and at 14 additional sites along the lower Snake selected to represent various riparian/wetland habitat conditions. Results of these mapping efforts are compared with maps of cover types previously generated using aerial photography taken in 1987.

  4. Striped Bass Habitat Selection Rules in Reservoirs without Suitable Summer Habitat Offer Insight into

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .--The traditional view of habitat requirements for inland striped bass Morone saxatilis suggests that these fish 2 mg/L. Once hypoxia forced striped bass into warmer water, the fish concentrated at the top to provide suitable habitat for adult fish. In severe cases, suitable habitat for adult striped bass may

  5. Focal Species and Representative Habitats Chuck Peven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) recruitment, and flood control efforts that include LWD removal, berm construction, and stream channelization extensively at habitat use and conditions within the Wenatchee River Basin. They used the Habitat Quality any of the variation for bull trout, while the total salmonid density and biomass varied significantly

  6. A Critical Point for Science?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Josephson, B D

    2008-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    , taboo ideas become arespectable part of science? Occult Sciences Tripos? CU Institute of Astrology? Telepathy, memory of water, cold fusion?Scientific theology, intelligent design? Mar. 5, 2008/CUPS A Critical Point for Science / Brian Josephson 32...

  7. Wind Turbine Interactions with Birds, Bats, and their Habitats...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Birds, Bats, and their Habitats: A Summary of Research Results and Priority Questions Wind Turbine Interactions with Birds, Bats, and their Habitats: A Summary of Research...

  8. Habitat Evaluation: Guidance for the Review of Environmental...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Habitat Evaluation: Guidance for the Review of Environmental Impact Assessment Documents Habitat Evaluation: Guidance for the Review of Environmental Impact Assessment Documents...

  9. arabiensis aquatic habitat: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    habitat Hofmann, Hans A. 13 Aquatic Habitat Modifications in La Plata River Basin, Patagonia and Associated Marine Areas CiteSeer Summary: This paper describes the environmental...

  10. aquatic habitat covariates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    habitat Hofmann, Hans A. 15 Aquatic Habitat Modifications in La Plata River Basin, Patagonia and Associated Marine Areas CiteSeer Summary: This paper describes the environmental...

  11. anaerobic aquatic habitats: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    habitat Hofmann, Hans A. 13 Aquatic Habitat Modifications in La Plata River Basin, Patagonia and Associated Marine Areas CiteSeer Summary: This paper describes the environmental...

  12. Jocko River Watershed conservation easement protects trout habitat...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6.25 acre habitat acquisition in Montana's Jocko River Watershed for fish habitat mitigation (see map). Located in Lake County in northwestern Montana, this property was selected...

  13. Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, 1984 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konopacky, Richard C.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report has four volumes: a Tribal project annual report (Part 1) and three reports (Parts 2, 3, and 4) prepared for the Tribes by their engineering subcontractor. The Tribal project annual report contains reports for four subprojects within Project 83-359. Subproject I involved habitat and fish inventories in Bear Valley Creek, Valley County, Idaho that will be used to evaluate responses to ongoing habitat enhancement. Subproject II is the coordination/planning activities of the Project Leader in relation to other BPA-funded habitat enhancement projects that have or will occur within the traditional Treaty (Fort Bridger Treaty of 1868) fishing areas of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, Fort Hall Reservation, Idaho. Subproject III involved habitat and fish inventories (pretreatment) and habitat problem identification on the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River (including Jordan Creek). Subproject IV during 1985 involved habitat problem identification in the East Fork of the Salmon River and habitat and fish inventories (pretreatment) in Herd Creek, a tributary to the East Fork.

  14. Evaluation of Macroinvertebrate Communities and Habitat for Selected Stream Reaches at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.J. Henne; K.J. Buckley

    2005-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the second aquatic biological monitoring report generated by Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL's) Water Quality and Hydrology Group. The study has been conducted to generate impact-based assessments of habitat and water quality for LANL waterways. The monitoring program was designed to allow for the detection of spatial and temporal trends in water and habitat quality through ongoing, biannual monitoring of habitat characteristics and benthic aquatic macroinvertebrate communities at six key sites in Los Alamos, Sandia, Water, Pajarito, and Starmer's Gulch Canyons. Data were collected on aquatic habitat characteristics, channel substrate, and macroinvertebrate communities during 2001 and 2002. Aquatic habitat scores were stable between 2001 and 2002 at all locations except Starmer's Gulch and Pajarito Canyon, which had lower scores in 2002 due to low flow conditions. Channel substrate changes were most evident at the upper Los Alamos and Pajarito study reaches. The macroinvertebrate Stream Condition Index (SCI) indicated moderate to severe impairment at upper Los Alamos Canyon, slight to moderate impairment at upper Sandia Canyon, and little or no impairment at lower Sandia Canyon, Starmer's Gulch, and Pajarito Canyon. Habitat, substrate, and macroinvertebrate data from the site in upper Los Alamos Canyon indicated severe impacts from the Cerro Grande Fire of 2000. Impairment in the macroinvertebrate community at upper Sandia Canyon was probably due to effluent-dominated flow at that site. The minimal impairment SCI scores for the lower Sandia site indicated that water quality improved with distance downstream from the outfall at upper Sandia Canyon.

  15. Critical Materials:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1.SpaceFluorControlsEnergy ReaffirmedCriticalApril

  16. Critical Subcriticals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution4 Department of Energy CarlsbadWinterAnyone » Critical

  17. Aquatic Habitat Protection Permit (Saskatchewan, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Environmental Management and Protection Act, 2002 (EMPA) provides for the protection of aquatic habitat and states that a permit is required: to alter the bed, bank or boundary of any water...

  18. Classification of Seafloor Habitats using Genetic Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    habitats. The initial motivation to use GP for this task came from a work on diesel engine diagnosis [11 are not made or distributed for profit or commercial advantage and that copies bear this notice and the full

  19. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Iskuulpa Wildlife Mitigation and Watershed Project, Technical Report 1998-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quaempts, Eric

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to evaluate lands acquired and leased in Eskuulpa Watershed, a Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation watershed and wildlife mitigation project. The project is designed to partially credit habitat losses incurred by BPA for the construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grasslands cover types were included in the evaluation. Indicator species included downy woodpecker (Picuides puhescens), black-capped chickadee (Pams atricopillus), blue grouse (Beadragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petschia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnello neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 55,500 feet of transects, 678 m2 plots, and 243 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 123.9 and f 0,794.4 acres were evaluated for each indicator species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total habitat units credited to BPA for the Iskuulpa Watershed Project and its seven indicator species is 4,567.8 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest, which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing or implementation of restoration grazing schemes, road de-commissioning, reforestation, large woody debris additions to floodplains, control of competing and unwanted vegetation, reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, and the allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence. Implementation of these alternatives could generate an estimated minimum of 393 enhancement credits in 10 years. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and structural complexity in all cover types. While such benefits are not readily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they also provide dual benefits for fisheries resources. Implementation of the alternatives will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

  20. Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, 1989 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, Mike

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The annual report contains three individual subproject papers detailing tribal fisheries work completed during the summer and fall of 1989. Subproject 1 contains summaries of evaluation/monitoring efforts associated with the Bear Valley Creek, Idaho enhancement project. Subproject 2 contains an evaluation of the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River habitat enhancement project. This report has been sub-divided into two parts: Part 1; stream evaluation and Part 2; pond series evaluation. Subproject 3 concerns the East Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho. This report summarizes the evaluation of the project to date including the 1989 pre-construction evaluation conducted within the East Fork drainage. Dredge mining has degraded spawning and rearing habitat for chinook salmon and steelhead trout in the Yankee Fork drainage of the Salmon River and in Bear Valley Creek. Mining, agricultural, and grazing practices degraded habitat in the East Fork of the Salmon River. Biological monitoring of the success of habitat enhancement for Bear Valley Creek and Yankee Fork are presented in this report. Physical and biological inventories prior to habitat enhancement in East Fork were also conducted. Four series of off-channel ponds of the Yankee Fork are shown to provide effective rearing habitat for chinook salmon. 45 refs., 49 figs., 24 tabs.

  1. Affordable High-Performance Homes: The 2002 NREL Denver Habitat for Humanity House, A Cold-Climate Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norton, P.; Stafford, B.; Carpenter, B.; Hancock, C. E.; Barker, G.; Reeves, P.; Kriescher, P.

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A trend towards ''green'' building with a focus on energy efficiency is sweeping the United States homebuilding industry. An integrated systems-design approach leads to homes that are more efficient, more comfortable, more affordable, and more durable than homes built with standard practices. Habitat for Humanity affiliates throughout the country are taking the lead on this approach to home building for affordable housing. This approach supports Habitat's goals of supplying quality housing and reducing the energy cost burden on families in Habitat homes--goals that are especially important in these days of increasing energy costs.

  2. Wanaket Wildlife Area Management Plan : Five-Year Plan for Protecting, Enhancing, and Mitigating Wildlife Habitat Losses for the McNary Hydroelectric Facility.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to continue to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat at the Wanaket Wildlife Area. The Wanaket Wildlife Area was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1993. This management plan will provide an update of the original management plan approved by BPA in 1995. Wanaket will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the McNary Hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Wanaket Wildlife Area, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Wanaket Wildlife Area management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Wanaket Wildlife Area will be managed over the next five years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management. Specific project objectives are related to protection and enhancement of wildlife habitats and are expressed in terms of habitat units (HU's). Habitat units were developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service's Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP), and are designed to track habitat gains and/or losses associated with mitigation and/or development projects. Habitat Units for a given species are a product of habitat quantity (expressed in acres) and habitat quality estimates. Habitat quality estimates are developed using Habitat Suitability Indices (HSI). These indices are based on quantifiable habitat features such as vegetation height, shrub cover, or other parameters, which are known to provide life history requisites for mitigation species. Habitat Suitability Indices range from 0 to 1, with an HSI of 1 providing optimum habitat conditions for the selected species. One acre of optimum habitat provides one Habitat Unit. The objective of continued management of the Wanaket Wildlife Mitigation Area, including protection and enhancement of upland and wetland/wetland associated cover types, is to provide and maintain 2,334 HU's of protection credit and generate 2,495 HU's of enhancement credit by the year 2004.

  3. Utilization of submerged aquatic vegetation habitats by fishes and decapods in the Galvestion Bay Ecosystem, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Elizabeth A.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . MATERIALS AND METHODS. . . . . . Page tu Site Selection. . Sampling Design. . Sampling Procedures. Statistical Analysis. 4 5 6 7 RESULTS. . Fish and Decapod Abundance and Distribution... the importance of physical, environtnental and other biological variables for each habitat site in relation to faunal density. MATERIALS AND METHODS Site Selection Three areas (six sites) within the Galveston Bay complex (Figure 1) were selected based...

  4. Nowzari et al. Habitat Associations of Persian Wild Ass in Iran HABITAT ASSOCIATIONS OF PERSIAN WILD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubenstein, Daniel I.

    25 Nowzari et al. Habitat Associations of Persian Wild Ass in Iran HABITAT ASSOCIATIONS OF PERSIAN WILD ASS (EQUUS HEMIONUS ONAGER) IN QA- TROUYEH NATIONAL PARK, IRAN HANIYEH NOWZARI, Department of the IVth International Wildlife Management Congress: 25-30, 2013 Horses, zebras and asses, members

  5. Results of preconstruction surveys used as a management technique for conserving endangered species and their habitats on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills), Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kato, T.T.; O'Farrell, T.P.; Johnson, J.W.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1976 an intensive program of petroleum production at maximum efficient rate was initiated on the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills) in western Kern County, California. In a Biological Opinion required by the Endangered Species Act, the US Fish and Wildlife Service concluded that proposed construction and production activities may jeopardize the continued existence of the endangered San Joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica, and the blunt-nosed leopard lizard, Gambelia silus, inhabiting the Reserve. DOE committed itself to carrying out a compensation/mitigation plan to offset impacts of program activities on endangered species and their habitats. One compensation/mitigation strategy was to develop and implement preconstruction surveys to assess potential conflicts between proposed construction activities, and endangered species and their critical habitats, and to propose reasonable and prudent alternatives to avoid conflicts. Between 1980 and 1984, preconstruction surveys were completed for 296 of a total of 387 major construction projects encompassing 3590 acres. Fewer than 22% of the projects potentially conflicted with conservation of endangered species, and most conflicts were easily resolved by identifying sensitive areas that required protection. Only 8% of the projects received minor modification in their design or locations to satisfy conservation needs, and only three projects had to be completely relocated. No projects were cancelled or delayed because of conflicts with endangered species, and costs to conduct preconstruction surveys were minimal. 27 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Energy efficient low-income housing demonstration with Houston Habitat for Humanity. Final status report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Using DOE grant funds, the Alliance to Save Energy developed and managed an award-winning low-income housing demonstration in cooperation with Houston Habitat for Humanity at the 1996 and 1997 annual NAHB Builders Show in Houston, Texas. Using a unique group of over 30 national, state and local partners, the energy design of Houston Habitat houses was permanently upgraded to the Energy Star Homes Program threshold. Meeting Energy Star Homes Program criteria, the partner design team increased the level of efficiency approximately 30% over the 1992 Model Energy Code. This innovative design using commercially available materials added approximately $1,400 in cost-effective energy upgrades with an estimated payback of less than 8 years. The 30 public-private partners successfully demonstrated energy and resource efficient housing techniques to the 65,000 NAHB home show attendees and the over 3,000 Habitat affiliates. This project resulted in the Houston Habitat affiliate becoming the nation`s first low-income Energy Star Homes Program home builder. By the year 2000, Houston Habitat anticipates building over 500 homes to this new level of efficiency as well as set an example for other Habitat affiliates nationwide to follow. The 1997 demonstration house utilized an all-women volunteer builders team to construct a 3 bedroom home in Houston Habitat`s Woodglen Subdivision. Energy consumption was remotely metered by Texas A and M.

  7. Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Volume 2, Idaho, 1984 Final and Annual Reports.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hair, Don

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1984, and under the auspices of the Northwest Power Planning Council, the Clear-water National Forest and the Bonneville Power Administration entered into a contractual agreement to improve anadromous fish habitat in Lolo Creek. This was to be the second and final year of instream enhancement work in Lolo Creek, a major tributary to the Clearwater River. The project was again entitled Lolo Creek Habitat Improvement (No.84-6) which was scheduled from April 1, 1984, through March 31, 1985. Project costs were not to exceed $39,109. The following report is a description of the project objectives, methodology, results, and conclusions of this year's work, based on the knowledge and experience gained through 2 years of enhancement work. The primary objective was to partially mitigate the juvenile and adult anadromous fish losses accrued through hydroelectric development in the Columbia and Snake River systems by enhancing the spawning and rearing habitats of selected Clearwater River tributaries for spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead trout. The enhancement was designed to ameliorate the ''limiting production factors'' by the in-stream placement of habitat structures that would positively alter the pool-riffle structure and increase the quality of over-winter habitat.

  8. Area C borrow Site Habitat Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Downs, Janelle L.

    2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A habitat quality assessment was performed within selected portions of the proposed Area C Borrow Source. The previously identified Bitterbrush / Indian ricegrass stabilized dune element occurrence was determined to be better described as a sagebrush /needle-and-thread grass element occurrence of fair to good quality. A new habitat polygon is suggested adjacent to this element occurrence, which would also be sagebrush/needle-and-thread grass, but of poor quality. The proposed site of initial borrow site development was found to be a very low quality community dominated by cheatgrass.

  9. The Integration of On-Line Monitoring and Reconfiguration Functions using EDAA - European design and Automation Association1149.4 Into a Safety Critical Automotive Electronic Control Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeffrey, C; Prosser, S; Lickess, M; Richardson, A; Riches, S

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an innovative application of EDAA - European design and Automation Association 1149.4 and the Integrated Diagnostic Reconfiguration (IDR) as tools for the implementation of an embedded test solution for an Automotive Electronic Control Unit implemented as a fully integrated mixed signal system. The paper described how the test architecture can be used for fault avoidance with results from a hardware prototype presented. The paper concludes that fault avoidance can be integrated into mixed signal electronic systems to handle key failure modes.

  10. Walla Walla River Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volkman, Jed (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Pendleton, OR)

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2002 and 2003, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Fisheries Habitat Program implemented stream habitat restoration and protection efforts on private properties in the Walla Walla River Basin with funding from Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The objective of this effort is to protect and restore habitat critical to the recovery of weak or reintroduced populations of salmonid fish. The CTUIR has currently enrolled nine properties into this program: two on Couse Creek, two adjacent properties on Blue Creek, one on Patit Creek, and four properties on the mainstem Walla Walla River. Major accomplishments during the reporting period include the following: (1) Secured approximately $229,000 in project cost share; (2) Purchase of 46 acres on the mainstem Walla Walla River to be protected perpetually for native fish and wildlife; (3) Developed three new 15 year conservation easements with private landowners; (4) Installed 3000 feet of weed barrier tarp with new plantings within project area on the mainstem Walla Walla River; (5) Expanded easement area on Couse Creek to include an additional 0.5 miles of stream corridor and 32 acres of upland habitat; (6) Restored 12 acres on the mainstem Walla Walla River and 32 acres on Couse Creek to native perennial grasses; and (7) Installed 50,000+ new native plants/cuttings within project areas.

  11. Use of social information for habitat selection in songbirds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Shannon Leigh

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    that may result in improved fitness, resulting in positive behavioral responses to conspecifics as a habitat selection strategy. I conducted 3 replicated, manipulative experiments to investigate use of conspecific cues in habitat selection for the golden...

  12. NREL/Habitat for Humanity Zero Energy Home: A Cold-Climate Case Study for Affordable Zero Energy Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norton, P.; Christensen, C.; Hancock, E.; Barker, G.; Reeves, P.

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of this 1,280-square-foot, three-bedroom Habitat for Humanity of Metro Denver zero energy home carefully combines envelope efficiency, efficient equipment, appliances and lighting, and passive and active solar features to reach the zero energy goal. The home was designed with an early version (July 22, 2004) of the BEOpt building optimization software; DOE2 and TRNSYS were used to perform additional analysis. This engineering approach was tempered by regular discussions with Habitat construction staff and volunteers. These discussions weighed the applicability of the optimized solutions to the special needs and economics of a Habitat house--moving the design toward simple, easily maintained mechanical systems and volunteer-friendly construction techniques. A data acquisition system was installed in the completed home to monitor its performance.

  13. Seasonal structure of fish communities at three barrier island habitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitts, Donald Eugene

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    habitats with previously reported values from similar habitats. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page Map of Galveston Island showing sampling stations (JB = jettied beachfront, OB = open beachfront and SM = saltmarsh). Water... abundance in beach seine collections grouped by habitat and month (JB = jettied beachfront, OB = open beachfront and SN = saltmarsh) . 46 1B Cluster analysis dendrogram of mean species abundance in beach seine collections grouped by habitat and month...

  14. Management and Conservation Influence of Habitat Features and Hunter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laval, Universit

    the habitat characteristics (e.g., abundance of deer forage, visibility of the deer from the hunter's point

  15. alternative nursery habitat: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . Birds . Conservation Boyer, Edmond 12 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Assessing the Effects of Management Alternatives on Habitat Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites...

  16. Technical Report 20061 COASTAL HABITATS IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report 20061 COASTAL HABITATS IN PUGET SOUND: A Research Plan in Support of the Puget Sound Nearshore Partnership Prepared in support of the Puget Sound Nearshore Partnership November 2006 Logsdon, University of Washington Doug Myers, Puget Sound Action Team Jan Newton, University of Washington

  17. Estuary Restoration Act Estuary Habitat Restoration Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    stream restoration activities. Recommend NOOA fund. 11. Scaling-Up Native Oyster Will restore 4 acresEstuary Restoration Act Estuary Habitat Restoration Council Ranked Proposal Recommendation May 13, 2011 Project Name Description 1. Riverside Ranch Restoration Will restore 356 acres of estuarine

  18. Historical_Habitats File Geodatabase Feature Class

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Historical_Habitats File Geodatabase Feature Class Tags Historical ecology, Ventura, Oxnard View, Meiners Oaks, Camarillo, Somis, Ventura River, Santa Clara River, Calleguas Creek, Santa Paula Springs, Ormond Beach, Mandalay Beach, Pierpont Bay, McGrath Lake, Ventura County, Los Angeles County

  19. The Habitats Directive, Coastal Habitats and Climate Change -Case Studies from the South

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    and mudflat areas, which decline under all the sea-level rise scenarios considered. Compensation locations `managed realignment' is a response to the loss of saltmarsh and mudflat habitats (ENVIRONMENT

  20. Habitat destruction and extinction in competitive and mutualistic metacommunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    habitat loss is a leading cause of extinction, it is important to identify what kind of species is most competitive metapopulations. Metacommunities of mutualists can suffer the abrupt extinction of both species species coexist to predict their response to habitat loss. Keywords Habitat destruction, extinction

  1. Influence of grazing management on population attributes, habitats, and habitat selection of bobwhites in south Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkins, Robert Neal

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    accounting for the comparatively poorer quail survival and reproduction on the 2PDG. Discriminant analysis procedures were used to delineate differences between quail selected and available habitats. fusil on both areas selected sites which were best... RESULTS AND DISCUSSION Grazing Pressures Population Attributes Habitat Characteristics Discriminant Analysis CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS LITERATURE CITED 19 23 23 25 32 58 69 74 APPENDIX A APPENDIX B VITA 77 78 79 LIST OF TABLES...

  2. Autoclave nuclear criticality safety analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D`Aquila, D.M. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States); Tayloe, R.W. Jr. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Steam-heated autoclaves are used in gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment plants to heat large cylinders of UF{sub 6}. Nuclear criticality safety for these autoclaves is evaluated. To enhance criticality safety, systems are incorporated into the design of autoclaves to limit the amount of water present. These safety systems also increase the likelihood that any UF{sub 6} inadvertently released from a cylinder into an autoclave is not released to the environment. Up to 140 pounds of water can be held up in large autoclaves. This mass of water is sufficient to support a nuclear criticality when optimally combined with 125 pounds of UF{sub 6} enriched to 5 percent U{sup 235}. However, water in autoclaves is widely dispersed as condensed droplets and vapor, and is extremely unlikely to form a critical configuration with released UF{sub 6}.

  3. March 4, 16, and 18 Chapter 6: Habitat Degradation and Loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gottgens, Hans

    March 4, 16, and 18 Chapter 6: Habitat Degradation and Loss Chapter 7: Habitat Fragmentation Chapter 12: Landscape Ecology and Management #12; What constitutes habitat degradation? When is habitat habitat degradation Pollution as a form of habitat degradation Protect what's left Conservation

  4. Critical Materials Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alex King

    2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King talks about the goals of the Critical Materials Institute in diversifying the supply of critical materials, developing substitute materials, developing tools and techniques for recycling critical materials, and forecasting materials needs to avoid future shortages.

  5. Critical Materials Institute

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Alex King

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King talks about the goals of the Critical Materials Institute in diversifying the supply of critical materials, developing substitute materials, developing tools and techniques for recycling critical materials, and forecasting materials needs to avoid future shortages.

  6. Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, 1990 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, Mike

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The annual report contains three individual subproject sections detailing tribal fisheries work completed during the summer and fall of 1990. Subproject I contains summaries of evaluation/monitoring efforts associated with the Bear Valley Creek, Idaho enhancement project. Subproject II contains an evaluation of the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River habitat enhancement project. Subproject III concerns the East Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho.

  7. Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sears, Sheryl

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams completely and irrevocably blocked anadromous fish migrations to the Upper Columbia River. Historically this area hosted vast numbers of salmon returning to their natal waters to reproduce and die. For the native peoples of the region, salmon and steelhead were a principle food source, providing physical nourishment and spiritual sustenance, and contributing to the religious practices and the cultural basis of tribal communities. The decaying remains of spawned-out salmon carcasses contributed untold amounts of nutrients into the aquatic, aerial, and terrestrial ecosystems of tributary habitats in the upper basin. Near the present site of Kettle Falls, Washington, the second largest Indian fishery in the state existed for thousands of years. Returning salmon were caught in nets and baskets or speared on their migration to the headwater of the Columbia River in British Columbia. Catch estimates at Kettle Falls range from 600,000 in 1940 to two (2) million around the turn of the century (UCUT, Report No.2). The loss of anadromous fish limited the opportunities for fisheries management and enhancement exclusively to those actions addressed to resident fish. The Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project is a mitigation project intended to enhance resident fish populations and to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses caused by hydropower system impacts. This substitution of resident fish for anadromous fish losses is considered in-place and out-of-kind mitigation. Upstream migration and passage barriers limit the amount of spawning and rearing habitat that might otherwise be utilized by rainbow trout. The results of even limited stream surveys and habitat inventories indicated that a potential for increased natural production exists. However, the lack of any comprehensive enhancement measures prompted the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center (UCUT), Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI) and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to develop and propose a comprehensive fishery management plan for Lake Roosevelt. The Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project (LRHIP) was designed with goals directed towards increasing natural production while maintaining genetic integrity among current tributary stocks. The initial phase of the Lake Roosevelt Habitat Improvement Project (Phase I, baseline data collection: 1990-91) was focused on the assessment of limiting factors, including the quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other constraints. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, five streams meeting specific criteria were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation -1992-1995). Four of these projects were on the Colville Indian Reservation South Nanamkin, North Nanamkin, Louie and Iron Creeks and one Blue Creek was on the Spokane Indian Reservation. At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring-1996-2000) began. This phase assessed the changes and determined the success achieved through the improvements. Data analysis showed that passage improvements are successful for increasing habitat availability and use. The results of in-stream habitat improvements were inconclusive. Project streams, to the last monitoring date, have shown increases in fish density following implementation of the improvements. In 2000 Bridge Creek, on the Colville Reservation was selected for the next phase of improvements. Data collection, including baseline stream survey and population data collection, was carried out during 2001 in preparation for the design and implementation of stream habitat/passage improvements. Agencies cooperating on the project include the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS, Ferry County District), Ferry County Conservation District, and Ferry County. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provided

  8. Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sears, Sheryl

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams completely and irrevocably blocked anadromous fish migrations to the Upper Columbia River. Historically this area hosted vast numbers of salmon returning to their natal waters to reproduce and die. For the native peoples of the region, salmon and steelhead were a principle food source, providing physical nourishment and spiritual sustenance, and contributing to the religious practices and the cultural basis of tribal communities. The decaying remains of spawned-out salmon carcasses contributed untold amounts of nutrients into the aquatic, aerial, and terrestrial ecosystems of tributary habitats in the upper basin. Near the present site of Kettle Falls, Washington, the second largest Indian fishery in the state existed for thousands of years. Returning salmon were caught in nets and baskets or speared on their migration to the headwater of the Columbia River in British Columbia. Catch estimates at Kettle Falls range from 600,000 in 1940 to two (2) million around the turn of the century (UCUT, Report No.2). The loss of anadromous fish limited the opportunities for fisheries management and enhancement exclusively to those actions addressed to resident fish. The Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project is a mitigation project intended to enhance resident fish populations and to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses caused by hydropower system impacts. This substitution of resident fish for anadromous fish losses is considered in-place and out-of-kind mitigation. Upstream migration and passage barriers limit the amount of spawning and rearing habitat that might otherwise be utilized by rainbow trout. The results of even limited stream surveys and habitat inventories indicated that a potential for increased natural production exists. However, the lack of any comprehensive enhancement measures prompted the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center (UCUT), Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI) and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to develop and propose a comprehensive fishery management plan for Lake Roosevelt. The Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project (LRHIP) was designed with goals directed towards increasing natural production while maintaining genetic integrity among current tributary stocks. The initial phase of the Lake Roosevelt Habitat Improvement Project (Phase I, baseline data collection: 1990-91) was focused on the assessment of limiting factors, including the quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other constraints. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, five streams meeting specific criteria were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation -1992-1995). Four of these projects were on the Colville Indian Reservation South Nanamkin, North Nanamkin, Louie and Iron Creeks and one Blue Creek was on the Spokane Indian Reservation. At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring-1996-2000) began. This phase assessed the changes and determined the success achieved through the improvements. Data analysis showed that passage improvements are successful for increasing habitat availability and use. The results of in-stream habitat improvements were inconclusive. Project streams, to the last monitoring date, have shown increases in fish density following implementation of the improvements. In 2000 Bridge Creek, on the Colville Reservation was selected for the next phase of improvements. Data collection, including baseline stream survey and population data collection, was carried out during 2001 in preparation for the design and implementation of stream habitat/passage improvements. Agencies cooperating on the project include the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS, Ferry County District), Ferry County Conservation District, and Ferry County. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provided

  9. Critical Areas of State Concern (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation designates the Chesapeake Bay, other Atlantic Coastal Bays, and their tributaries and adjacent lands as critical areas of state concern. It is state policy to protect these areas...

  10. Anomalous critical fields in quantum critical superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Putzke, C.; Walmsley, P.; Fletcher, J.D.; Malone, L.; Vignolles, D.; Proust, C.; Badoux, S.; See, P.; Beere, H.E.; Ritchie, D.A.; Kasahara, S.; Mizukami, Y.; Shibauchi, T.; Matsuda, Y.; Carrington, A.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -temperature superconductivity. However, the exact mechanism by which this occurs remains poorly understood. The iron-pnictide superconductor BaFe2(As1?xPx)2 is perhaps the clearest example to date of a high temperature quantum critical superconductor, and so it is a... mixing of antiferromagnetism and superconductivity, suggesting that a highly unusual vortex state is realised in quantum critical superconductors. Quantum critical points (QCPs) can be associated with a variety of different order-disorder phenomena...

  11. Lecture notes for criticality safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fullwood, R.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These lecture notes for criticality safety are prepared for the training of Department of Energy supervisory, project management, and administrative staff. Technical training and basic mathematics are assumed. The notes are designed for a two-day course, taught by two lecturers. Video tapes may be used at the options of the instructors. The notes provide all the materials that are necessary but outside reading will assist in the fullest understanding. The course begins with a nuclear physics overview. The reader is led from the macroscopic world into the microscopic world of atoms and the elementary particles that constitute atoms. The particles, their masses and sizes and properties associated with radioactive decay and fission are introduced along with Einstein's mass-energy equivalence. Radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, radiation penetration, shielding and health-effects are discussed to understand protection in case of a criticality accident. Fission, the fission products, particles and energy released are presented to appreciate the dangers of criticality. Nuclear cross sections are introduced to understand the effectiveness of slow neutrons to produce fission. Chain reactors are presented as an economy; effective use of the neutrons from fission leads to more fission resulting in a power reactor or a criticality excursion. The six-factor formula is presented for managing the neutron budget. This leads to concepts of material and geometric buckling which are used in simple calculations to assure safety from criticality. Experimental measurements and computer code calculations of criticality are discussed. To emphasize the reality, historical criticality accidents are presented in a table with major ones discussed to provide lessons-learned. Finally, standards, NRC guides and regulations, and DOE orders relating to criticality protection are presented.

  12. Northwest Montana Wildlife Habitat Enhancement: Hungry Horse Elk Mitigation Project: Monitoring and Evaluation Plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, Daniel; Malta, Patrick

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Portions of two important elk (Cervus elaphus) winter ranges totalling 8749 acres were lost due to the construction of the Hungry Horse Dam hydroelectric facility. This habitat loss decreased the carrying capacity of the both the elk and the mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus). In 1985, using funds from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as authorized by the Northwest Power Act, the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks (FWP) completed a wildlife mitigation plan for Hungry Horse Reservoir. This plan identified habitat enhancement of currently-occupied winter range as the most cost-efficient, easily implemented mitigation alternative available to address these large-scale losses of winter range. The Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, as amended in 1987, authorized BPA to fund winter range enhancement to meet an adjusted goal of 133 additional elk. A 28-month advance design phase of the BPA-funded project was initiated in September 1987. Primary goals of this phase of the project included detailed literature review, identification of enhancement areas, baseline (elk population and habitat) data collection, and preparation of 3-year and 10-year implementation plans. This document will serve as a site-specific habitat and population monitoring plan which outlines our recommendations for evaluating the results of enhancement efforts against mitigation goals. 25 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

  13. Design methods for displacement ventilation: Critical review.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Displacement ventilation in non-industrial premises, REHVADisplacement ventilation in non-industrial premises, REHVAof displacement ventilation in non-industrial premises. The

  14. Anadronous Fish Habitat Enhancement for the Middle Fork and Upper Salmon River, 1988 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, John ( US Forest Service, Intermountain Region, Boise, ID)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wild and natural salmon and steelhead populations in the Middle Fork and Upper Salmon River are at a critical low. Habitat enhancement through decreasing sediment loads, increasing vegetative cover, removing passage barriers, and providing habitat diversity is imperative to the survival of these specially adapted fish, until passage problems over the Columbia River dams are solved. Personnel from the Boise and Sawtooth National Forests completed all construction work planned for 1988. In Bear Valley, 1573 feet of juniper revetment was constructed at eleven sites, cattle were excluded from 1291 feet of streambanks to prevent bank breakdown, and a small ephemeral gully was filled with juniper trees. Work in the Upper Salmon Drainage consisted of constructing nine rock sills/weirs, two rock deflectors, placing riprap along forty feet of streambank, construction of 2.1 miles of fence on private lands, and opening up the original Valley Creek channel to provide spring chinook passage to the upper watershed. A detailed stream survey of anadromous fish habitat covering 72.0 miles of streams in the Middle Fork Sub-basin was completed.

  15. aegypti larval habitats: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    patterns in modeled particle transport to estuarine habitat with comparisons to larval fish Geosciences Websites Summary: settlement patterns of red drum larvae (Sciaenops...

  16. United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation Plans Under the Endangered Species...

  17. anopheline breeding habitats: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    strategies (e.g., maintaining engineered wetlands with an appropriate hydroperiod length) employed in cases of direct habitat loss. The timing of emigration away from natal...

  18. Relationship between juvenile steelhead survival and winter habitat availability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huber, Eric; Kayed, Sammy; Post, Charles

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ugedal. 2007. Shelter availability affects behaviour, size-and winter habitat availability Eric Huber, Sammy Kayed, andThe establishment and availability of interstitial spaces

  19. Major habitat purchase in Columbia estuary benefits salmon ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fredlund, Corps, 503-808-4510 (EDITORS: Click for maps, photos and video.) Major habitat purchase in Columbia estuary benefits salmon The Columbia Land Trust, Bonneville Power...

  20. Habitat for Humanity | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJumpEnergyStrategy | Open Energy Sector:ErgenicsHabitat

  1. Lower Klickitat Riparian and In-channel Habitat Restoration Project, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conley, Will

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project focuses on the lower Klickitat River and its tributaries that provide or affect salmonid habitat. The overall goal is to restore watershed health to aid recovery of salmonid stocks in the Klickitat subbasin. An emphasis is placed on restoration and protection of watersheds supporting anadromous fish production, particularly steelhead (Oncorhyncus mykiss) which are listed as 'Threatened' within the Mid-Columbia ESU. Restoration activities are aimed at restoring stream processes by removing or mitigating watershed perturbances and improving habitat conditions and water quality. In addition to steelhead, habitat improvements benefit Chinook (O. tshawytscha) and coho (O. kisutch) salmon, resident rainbow trout, and enhance habitat for many terrestrial and amphibian wildlife species. Protection activities compliment restoration efforts within the subbasin by securing refugia and preventing degradation. Since 90% of the project area is in private ownership, maximum effectiveness will be accomplished via cooperation with state, federal, tribal, and private entities. The project addresses goals and objectives presented in the Klickitat Subbasin Summary and the 1994 NWPPC Fish and Wildlife Program. Feedback from the 2000 Provincial Review process indicated a need for better information management to aid development of geographic priorities. Thus, an emphasis has been placed on database development and a review of existing information prior to pursuing more extensive implementation. Planning and design was initiated on several restoration projects. These priorities will be refined in future reports as the additional data is collected and analyzed. Tasks listed are for the April 1, 2001 to August 31, 2002 contract cycle, for which work was delayed during the summer of 2001 because the contract was not finalized until mid-August 2001. Accomplishments are provided for the September 1, 2001 to August 31, 2002 reporting period. During this reporting period, significant progress was made on acquisition and development of spatial data, monitoring of steelhead spawning, riparian revegetation, streamflow monitoring, completion of maintenance and repair work, completion of a working version of a habitat database, and completion of the Swale Creek assessment.

  2. Critical Materials Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AMO hosted a public workshop on Tuesday, April 3, 2012 in Arlington, VA to provide background information on critical materials assessment, the current research within DOE related to critical...

  3. Nuclear Multifragmentation Critical Exponents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfgang Bauer; William Friedman

    1994-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the critical exponents of nuclear multi-fragmentation have not been determined conclusively yet.

  4. MEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE STREAMS Review Paper Maintaining and restoring hydrologic habitat connectivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merenlender, Adina

    MEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE STREAMS Review Paper Maintaining and restoring hydrologic habitat connectivity in mediterranean streams: an integrated modeling framework Adina M. Merenlender · Mary K. Matella of hydrologic habitat connectivity and benefits of habitat restoration alternatives we provide: (1) a review

  5. Habitat configuration and availability influences the settlement of temperate reef fishes (Tripterygiidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shima, Jeff

    Habitat configuration and availability influences the settlement of temperate reef fishes 29 September 2013 Available online 23 October 2013 Keywords: Attraction vs. production Fragmentation Habitat availability Habitat configuration Settlement Tripterygiidae To survive, most benthic marine

  6. Nesting Range, Spatial Use, Habitat Selection and Sex Identification of the Greater Raodrunner (Geococcyx californianus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montalvo, Andrea

    2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    .05 percent. Habitat selection ratios showed a preference for ridge as well as grassland habitat and avoidance of bare ground and flatland habitats. The location data from west Texas was further analyzed to build a predictive logistic regression model...

  7. USING COMMERCIAL FORESTRY FOR ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION IN SENSITIVE BADGER HABITAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USING COMMERCIAL FORESTRY FOR ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION IN SENSITIVE BADGER HABITAT by Melissa Hogg BSc of Thesis: Using commercial forestry for ecosystem restoration in sensitive badger habitat Project Number prescribed fire. Commercial forestry can subsidize restoration work, but machinery may damage important

  8. anadronous fish habitat: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    anadronous fish habitat First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Essential Fish Habitat and...

  9. anadromus fish habitat: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    anadromus fish habitat First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Essential Fish Habitat and...

  10. Accomplishments of the Alaska Region's Habitat Conservation Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act, Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act, National Environmental Policy and conservation of Essential Fish Habitat (EFH) through fishery management, and environmental review of nonAccomplishments of the Alaska Region's Habitat Conservation Division in Fiscal Year 2006

  11. Global Dynamics of Zooplankton and Harmful Algae in Flowing Habitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Sze-Bi

    Global Dynamics of Zooplankton and Harmful Algae in Flowing Habitats Sze-Bi Hsu Feng-Bin Wang Xiao from the dynamics of harmful algae and zooplankton in flowing- water habitats where a main channel. For the system modeling the dynamics of algae and their toxin that contains little limiting nutrient, we

  12. RESTORING AND MAINTAINING RIPARIAN HABITAT ON PRIVATE PASTURELAND1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    RESTORING AND MAINTAINING RIPARIAN HABITAT ON PRIVATE PASTURELAND1 Nancy Reichard2 1 Presented Resources. Redwood Community Action Agency. Eureka, Calif. Abstract: Protecting riparian habitat from livestock grazing on private land is a complex task that requires paying attention to sociological

  13. Influence of Habitat Modifications on Habitat Composition and Anadromous Salmonid Populations in Fish Creek, Oregon, 1983-1988 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeves, Gordon H.; Everest, Fred H. (Oregon State University, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Corvallis, OR); Hohler, David B. (Mount Hood National Forest, Clackamas River Ranger District, Estacada, OR)

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modification of degraded habitats to increase populations of anadromous salmonids is a major focus of management agencies throughout the Pacific Northwest. Millions of dollars are spent annually on such efforts. Inherent in implementing habitat improvements is the need for quantitative evaluation of the biological and physical effects of such work. Reeves et al. (in press), however, noted that such evaluations are rare, making it difficult to assess the true results of habitat work. While it is not economically possible to thoroughly evaluate every habitat project, it is essential that intensive evaluations be done on selected representative projects. One such evaluation program has been underway since 1982 on Fish Creek, a tributary of the Clackamas River near Estacada, OR. Habitat modification has been done by the USDA Forest Service, Estacada Ranger District, Mt. Hood National Forest with funding provided in part by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The USDA Forest Service, Anadromous Fish Habitat Research Unit, Pacific Northwest Research Station (PNW), Corvallis, OR is charged with: (1) evaluating the biological and physical responses to habitat modifications on a basin scale; and (2) developing a cost-benefit analysis of the program. Preliminary results have been reported in a series of annual publications, Everest and Sedell 1983, 1984 and Everest et al. 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988. The objectives of this paper are to: (1) report 1988 observations of biological and physical changes in habitat, salmonid populations, and smolt production in Fish Creek, and (2) examine preliminary trends in fish habitat and populations related to habitat improvement over the period 1983-1988. We have prefaced the trends in the latter objective as preliminary because we believe it could take a minimum of 10 years before the full biological and physical responses to habitat work are realized. We therefore urge caution in interpreting these preliminary results.

  14. Evaluation of Critical Habitat for the California red-legged frog (Rana aurora draytonii)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Michael F.; Tennant, Tracy

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With Comparisons to Rana Aurora and Rana Pretiosa. Copeia.M. Jennings. May 1996. Rana aurora- Red -legged Frog [WebRed- Legged Frog, Rana aurora, Tadpoles. Animal Behaviour

  15. CTUIR Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat Project 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra

    2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2008 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2008-January 31, 2009) primary project activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight primary fisheries habitat enhancement projects were implemented on Meacham Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, McKay Creek, West Fork Spring Hollow, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying one fish passage barrier on West Birch Creek; (2) participating in six projects planting 10,000 trees and seeding 3225 pounds of native grasses; (3) donating 1000 ft of fencing and 1208 fence posts and associated hardware for 3.6 miles of livestock exclusion fencing projects in riparian areas of West Birch and Meacham Creek, and for tree screens to protect against beaver damage on West Fork Spring Hollow Creek; (4) using biological control (insects) to reduce noxious weeds on three treatment areas covering five acres on Meacham Creek; (5) planning activities for a levee setback project on Meacham Creek. We participated in additional secondary projects as opportunities arose. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major project areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation Project site (FY2006) and at additional easements and planned project sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at project sites prior to implementation. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each project site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and project partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each project's success. An Aquatic Habitat Inventory was conducted from river mile 0-8 on Isquulktpe Creek and the data collected was compared with data collected in 1994. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the duration of each project to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned project activities and biological opinions were written and approved. Project activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance in accordance with the Umatilla River Subbasin Salmon and Steelhead Production Plan (NPPC 1990) and the Final Umatilla Willow Subbasin Plan (Umatilla/Willow Subbasin Planning Team 2005).

  16. The Role of Social Capital and Collaborative Negotiations in Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jimeno, Nancy A.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    March 2001. p. 108. Beatley, Timothy. Habitat ConservationA; Nation; Federal Report, Pg. A8. Beatley, Timothy. Habitatof California Press, 1981. Beatley, Timothy. Habitat

  17. Criticality Model Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.M. Scaglione

    2003-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the ''Criticality Model Report'' is to validate the MCNP (CRWMS M&O 1998h) code's ability to accurately predict the effective neutron multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) for a range of conditions spanned by various critical configurations representative of the potential configurations commercial reactor assemblies stored in a waste package may take. Results of this work are an indication of the accuracy of MCNP for calculating eigenvalues, which will be used as input for criticality analyses for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage at the proposed Monitored Geologic Repository. The scope of this report is to document the development and validation of the criticality model. The scope of the criticality model is only applicable to commercial pressurized water reactor fuel. Valid ranges are established as part of the validation of the criticality model. This model activity follows the description in BSC (2002a).

  18. Reference handbook: Nuclear criticality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose for this handbook is to provide Rocky Flats personnel with the information necessary to understand the basic principles underlying a nuclear criticality.

  19. An experimental study of the oil evolution in critical piston ring pack regions and the effects of piston and ring designs in an internal combustion engine utilizing two-dimensional laser induced fluorescence and the impact on maritime economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vokac, Adam, 1978-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Faced with increasing concern for lubricating, oil consumption and engine friction, it is critical to understand the oil transport mechanisms in the power cylinder system. Lubricating oil travels through distinct regions ...

  20. Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program : Action Plan Final Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myra, David (South Central Washington Resource Conservation and Development Council, Ellensburg, WA); Ready, Carol A. (Kittitas County Water Purveyors, Ellensburg, WA)

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers activities conducted by the Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program under Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) grant project No. 2002-025-00 for fiscal year 2002. The Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program (YTAHP, Program) was organized to restore salmonid passage to Yakima tributaries that historically supported salmonids and improve habitat in areas where access is restored. Specifically, this program is designed to (a) screen unscreened diversion structures to prevent fish entrainment into artificial waterways; (b) provide for fish passage at man-made barriers, such as diversion dams, culverts, siphons and bridges; and (c) provide information and assistance to landowners interested in to contributing to the improvement of water quality, water reliability and stream habitat. The YTAHP developed from a number of groups actively engaged in watershed management, and/or habitat restoration within the Yakima River Basin. These groups include the Washington State Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), Kittitas County Conservation District (KCCD), North Yakima Conservation District (NYCD), Kittitas County Water Purveyors (KCWP), and Ahtanum Irrigation District (AID). The US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and Yakama Nation (YN) both participated in the development of the objectives of YTAHP. Other entities that will be involved during permitting or project review may include the YN, the federal Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and US Army Corps of Engineers (COE). Achievements of YTAHP with BPA Action Plan funding during FY 2002 were to: (1) Establish contracts with RC&D and YTAHP participants. (2) Determine contract mechanism for MWH engineering services. (3) Provide engineering designs and services for 11 early action projects, including inverted siphons, pump and gravity diversion screening, diversion metering, rock weirs for improved fish passage, headgates and fishways. These designs were used to submit for project implementation funding through the WA Salmon Recovery Funding Board. (4) Complete 6 early action projects on Ahtanum Creek--One gravity diversion was replaced with a pump and pump end screen and 5 pump end screens were installed. (5) Conduct two topographic surveys--For the City of Yakima on the Fruitvale diversion for the North Yakima Conservation District to support the installation of a pumping plant which would eliminate the need to divert directly from the Naches River and build the gravel berm each year during low flows. For the Taylor Ditch system for the North Yakima Conservation District to support as feasibility of opening the ditch for habitat and at the same time maintaining irrigation deliveries. (6) Procure materials for use in future YTAHP projects, including siphon pipe, delivery pipe, rock, screens, and water meters. These materials will act as match and support the completion of these subsequent YTAHP projects. Overall, with broad agency support and Action Plan funding through BPA, the YTAHP has achieved substantial enhancements that support aquatic species and which will leverage subsequent work through engineering designs and materials. The program was also able to establish the personnel and equipment support for beginning the stream assessment process on tributaries in Yakima and Kittitas Counties. Completion of this year's effort has provided significant inroads to working on the private lands in two counties which will be vital to future efforts by YTAHP and others to protect and enhance Yakima River Basin habitat.

  1. Vulnerability of critical infrastructures : identifying critical nodes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, Roger Gary; Robinson, David Gerald

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research was the development of tools and techniques for the identification of critical nodes within critical infrastructures. These are nodes that, if disrupted through natural events or terrorist action, would cause the most widespread, immediate damage. This research focuses on one particular element of the national infrastructure: the bulk power system. Through the identification of critical elements and the quantification of the consequences of their failure, site-specific vulnerability analyses can be focused at those locations where additional security measures could be effectively implemented. In particular, with appropriate sizing and placement within the grid, distributed generation in the form of regional power parks may reduce or even prevent the impact of widespread network power outages. Even without additional security measures, increased awareness of sensitive power grid locations can provide a basis for more effective national, state and local emergency planning. A number of methods for identifying critical nodes were investigated: small-world (or network theory), polyhedral dynamics, and an artificial intelligence-based search method - particle swarm optimization. PSO was found to be the only viable approach and was applied to a variety of industry accepted test networks to validate the ability of the approach to identify sets of critical nodes. The approach was coded in a software package called Buzzard and integrated with a traditional power flow code. A number of industry accepted test networks were employed to validate the approach. The techniques (and software) are not unique to power grid network, but could be applied to a variety of complex, interacting infrastructures.

  2. Critical Reading School COMSC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    Critical Reading School COMSC To become an effective researcher requires the ability to rapidly this is to read and critique relevant academic and scientific materials. The means by which these materials are accessed has changed dramatically over recent years, but the core skills of critical reading remain

  3. Design for manufacturability with regular fabrics in digital integrated circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gazor, Mehdi (Seyed Mehdi)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated circuit design is limited by manufacturability. As devices scale down, sensitivity to process variation increases dramatically, making design for manufacturability a critical concern. Designers must identify the ...

  4. area habitat evaluation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or test results. Please return this form to: Gray Squirrel; Wildlife Service; U. S. Fish; Wildlife Service 1987-01-01 2 Habitat Evaluation Procedures Group CiteSeer Summary:...

  5. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Southeast Volusia Habitat...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    executive director for the Habitat affiliate. "We started doing ENERGY STAR about 5 years ago, and DOE Builders Challenge 3 years ago, and then DOE Zero Energy Ready Home...

  6. Developing Lowland Habitat Networks in Scotland: Phase 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Developing Lowland Habitat Networks in Scotland: Phase 2 Jonathan Humphrey1 , Mike Smith1 reproduced from Ordnance Survey material with the permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of the Controller...............................................................................11 3.5 Construction of landuse change scenarios

  7. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Southeast Volusia Habitat...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    appliances, and ceiling fans, a solar water heater, an ERV, and a high-efficiency heat pump. To keep the ducts in conditioned space, the Habitat affiliate installed a rigid...

  8. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, Manatee County Habitat...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    R-23 ICF walls, a spray-foamed sealed attic, solar hot water, and a ducted mini-split heat pump. Manatee County Habitat for Humanity - Ellenton, FL More Documents & Publications...

  9. Habitat loss and the structure of plantanimal mutualistic networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortuna, Miguel A.

    LETTER Habitat loss and the structure of plant­animal mutualistic networks Miguel A. Fortuna Sevilla, Spain *Correspondence: E-mail: fortuna@ebd.csic.es Abstract Recent papers have described

  10. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Ladd Marsh, 2001 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the mid-1980s, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) has been participating in the Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA's) efforts to mitigate for the negative impacts to fish and wildlife resulting from the development and operation of the 7 Columbia Basin Federal Hydropower System. BPA's mitigation obligations were formally recognized and mandated by the Northwest Power Act of 1980 and are guided by the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NWPPC's) Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA funds fish and wildlife projects throughout the Basin to meet the habitat and population restorative goals and objectives outlined in the NWPPC's Fish and Wildlife Program and to fulfill its mitigation responsibilities under the Power Act. Impacts to wildlife resulting from hydrofacility construction/inundation were estimated using Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) in the mid and late 1980s and are documented in BPA' s Wildlife Loss Assessments (Rasmussen and Wright 1990,a,b,c,d) and in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Lower Snake River Wildlife Habitat Compensation Evaluation (ACOE 1991). The loss assessments provided estimates of lost habitat quality and quantity for the target species selected to represent the habitat cover types impacted by hydropower construction/inundation. The NWPPC incorporated these losses into their Fish and Wildlife Program, recognizing them as the unannualized losses attributable to the construction/inundation of the federal hydropower system (NWPPC 1995 and 2000, Table 1 1-4). The HEP methodology is used by wildlife managers within the Columbia Basin to determine habitat values, expressed as Habitat Units, gained through BPA-funded mitigation project work. ODFW and the other Oregon wildlife managers (i.e., U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Confederated Tribes of the Warms Springs Reservation of Oregon, Burns Paiute Tribe, and Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation [CTUIR]) have been working together since 1991 to coordinate the planning, selection, and implementation of BPA-funded wildlife mitigation projects. In 1997, the Oregon wildlife managers developed a programmatic project for mitigation planning and implementation within Oregon. The Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area Additions project is one of many habitat acquisition and restoration projects proposed under the Oregon wildlife managers programmatic project that have been approved and recommended for funding by the NWPPC. The Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area Additions mitigation project will protect and restore wetland, riparian and other habitats on newly acquired parcels at ODFW's Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area (LMWA). Wildlife habitat values resulting from the acquisition and enhancement of Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area lands will contribute towards mitigating for habitat lost as a result of the development and operation of the Columbia Basin hydropower system. This report summarizes the HEP survey conducted in June 2001 to document the baseline habitat values on four parcels recently added to the Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area: the 309.66-acre Wallender property, the 375.54-acre Simonis property, the 161.07-acre Conley Lake property, and the 74.55-acre Becker property. The 2001 HEP Team was comprised of the following members and agencies: Susan Barnes (ODFW), Allen Childs (CTUIR), Tracy Hames (Yakama Indian Nation), Dave Larson (ODFW), Cathy Nowak (Cat Tracks Wildlife Consulting), and Ken Rutherford (ODFW). Results of the HEP will be used to (1) determine the pre-restoration habitat values of the project sites, (2) the number of Habitat Units to be credited to BPA for protection of habitats within the project area, (3) determine the enhancement potential of the sites, and (4) develop a habitat management plan for the area.

  11. Habitat associations of fish assemblages in the Sulphur River, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morgan, Michael Neal

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of an instream flow study, information on summer distribution of fishes and habitat variables was collected from six sites at each of three flows in the Sulphur River, Texas. I evaluated (1) spatiotemporal relationships between instream...

  12. Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; Carl Property - Yakama Nation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul; Muse, Anthony

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A baseline habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the Carl property (160 acres) in June 2007 to determine the number of habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to acquire the property as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of McNary Dam. HEP surveys also helped assess the general ecological condition of the property. The Carl property appeared damaged from livestock grazing and exhibited a high percentage of invasive forbs. Exotic grasses, while present, did not comprise a large percentage of the available cover in most areas. Cover types were primarily grassland/shrubsteppe with a limited emergent vegetation component. Baseline HEP surveys generated 356.11 HUs or 2.2 HUs per acre. Habitat units were associated with the following HEP models: California quail (47.69 HUs), western meadowlark (114.78 HUs), mallard (131.93 HUs), Canada goose (60.34 HUs), and mink (1.38 HUs).

  13. Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; Graves Property - Yakama Nation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul; Muse, Anthony

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the Graves property (140 acres) in June 2007 to determine the number of habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to acquire the property as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of McNary Dam. HEP surveys also documented the general ecological condition of the property. The Graves property was significantly damaged from past/present livestock grazing practices. Baseline HEP surveys generated 284.28 habitat units (HUs) or 2.03 HUs per acre. Of these, 275.50 HUs were associated with the shrubsteppe/grassland cover type while 8.78 HUs were tied to the riparian shrub cover type.

  14. Habitat Appraisal Guide for Rio Grande Wild Turkey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cathey, James; Locke, Shawn; Ransom, Dean; DeMaso, Stephen; Schwertner, T. Wayne; Collier, Bret

    2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    and structure of the roost 5 Glennon and Porter (1999) found that townships in southwest New York with greater interspersion of forests and open areas supported larger turkey populations. Further- more, habitat suitability increased by provid- ing smaller...

  15. Essential Fish Habitat (EFH) 5-year Review for 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ...............................................................................................................................9 4 ENVIRONMENTAL AND MANAGEMENT CHANGES SINCE 2005 EFH EIS ANALYSIS.................................................................................................................... 10 4.1 Environmental and habitat changes since 2005 EFH EIS ..............................................................................10 4.2 Research since the EFH EIS

  16. State-of-the-art review and report on critical aspects and scale-up considerations in the design of fluidized-bed reactors. Final report on Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is given on the design of distributor plates and opening geometry to provide uniform flow over the reactor area. The design of granular bed filters is also considered. Pressure drops and particle size in the bed are discussed. (LTN)

  17. Hydrocarbon habitat of the west Netherlands basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Jager, J. (Nederlandse Aardolie Maatschappij, Assen (Netherlands)); Doyle, M. (Petroleum Development Oman, Muscat (Oman)); Grantham, P. (KSEPL/Shell Research, Rijswijk (Netherlands)); Mabillard, J. (Shell Nigeria, Port Harcourt (Nigeria))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The complex West Netherlands Basin contains oil and gas in Triassic and Upper Jurassic to Cretaceous clastic reservoir sequences. The understanding has always been that the Carboniferous coal measures have generated only gas and the Jurassic marine Posidonia Shale only oil. However, detailed geochemical analyses show that both source rocks have generated oil and gas. Geochemical fingerprinting established a correlation of the hydrocarbons with the main source rocks. The occurrence of these different hydrocarbons is consistent with migration routes. Map-based charge modeling shows that the main phase of hydrocarbon generation occurred prior to the Late Cretaceous inversion of the West Netherlands Basin. However, along the southwest flank of the basin and in lows between the inversion highs, significant charge continued during the Tertiary. Biodegradation of oils in Jurassic and Cretaceous reservoirs occurred during the earliest Tertiary, but only in reservoirs that were at that time at temperatures of less then 70 to 80[degrees]C, where bacteria could survive. This study shows that also in a mature hydrocarbon province an integrated hydrocarbon habitat study with modern analyses and state-of-the-art technology can lead to a much improved understanding of the distribution of oil and gas in the subsurface. The results of this study will allow a better risk assessment for remaining prospects, and an improved prediction of the type of trapped hydrocarbons in terms of gas, oil, and biodegraded oil.

  18. High Critical Current Coated Conductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paranthaman, M. P.; Selvamanickam, V. (SuperPower, Inc.)

    2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the important critical needs that came out of the DOEs coated conductor workshop was to develop a high throughput and economic deposition process for YBCO. Metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique, the most critical steps in high technical micro fabrications, has been widely employed in semiconductor industry for various thin film growth. SuperPower has demonstrated that (Y,Gd)BCO films can be deposited rapid with world record performance. In addition to high critical current density with increased film thickness, flux pinning properties of REBCO films needs to be improved to meet the DOE requirements for various electric-power equipments. We have shown that doping with Zr can result in BZO nanocolumns, but at substantially reduced deposition rate. The primary purpose of this subtask is to develop high current density MOCVD-REBCO coated conductors based on the ion-beam assisted (IBAD)-MgO deposition process. Another purpose of this subtask is to investigate HTS conductor design optimization (maximize Je) with emphasis on stability and protection issues, and ac loss for REBCO coated conductors.

  19. Waterfowl food and habitat utilization on a southern reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ouchley, James Kelby

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Twenty ? one waterfowl surveys were conducted during the first season 12 and data from 13 of these were used in the habitat utilization analysis. Eight surveys were in the second seasons analysis. These surveys were chosen on the basis of thoroughness...WATERFOWL FOOD AND HABITAT UTILIZATION ON A SOUTHERN RESERVOIR A Thesis by JAMES KELBY OUCHLEY 1 Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May...

  20. Greater sage-grouse winter habitat selection and energy development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doherty, K.E.; Naugle, D.E.; Walker, B.L.; Graham, J.M. [University of Montana, Missoula, MT (United States)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent energy development has resulted in rapid and large-scale changes to western shrub-steppe ecosystems without a complete understanding of its potential impacts on wildlife populations. We modeled winter habitat use by female greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana, USA, to 1) identify landscape features that influenced sage-grouse habitat selection, 2) assess the scale at which selection occurred, 3) spatially depict winter habitat quality in a Geographic Information System, and 4) assess the effect of coal-bed natural gas (CBNG) development on winter habitat selection. We developed a model of winter habitat selection based on 435 aerial relocations of 200 radiomarked female sage-grouse obtained during the winters of 2005 and 2006. Percent sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) cover on the landscape was an important predictor of use by sage-grouse in winter. Sage-grouse were 1.3 times more likely to occupy sagebrush habitats that lacked CBNG wells within a 4-km{sup 2} area, compared to those that had the maximum density of 12.3 wells per 4 km{sup 2} allowed on federal lands. We validated the model with 74 locations from 74 radiomarked individuals obtained during the winters of 2004 and 2007. This winter habitat model based on vegetation, topography, and CBNG avoidance was highly predictive (validation R{sup 2} = 0.984). Our spatially explicit model can be used to identify areas that provide the best remaining habitat for wintering sage-grouse in the PRB to mitigate impacts of energy development.

  1. Habitat selection of the Wood Thrush nesting in east Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrie, Neil Ross

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HABITAT SELECTION OF THE WOOD THRUSH NESTING IN EAST TEXAS A Thesis by NEIL ROSS CARRIE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1995 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences HABITAT SELECTION OF THE WOOD THRUSH NESTING IN EAST TEXAS A Thesis by NEIL ROSS CARRIE Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  2. Critical Materials Hub

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Critical materials, including some rare earth elements that possess unique magnetic, catalytic, and luminescent properties, are key resources needed to manufacture products for the clean energy economy. These materials are so critical to the technologies that enable wind turbines, solar panels, electric vehicles, and energy-efficient lighting that DOE's 2010 and 2011 Critical Materials Strategy reported that supply challenges for five rare earth metalsdysprosium, neodymium, terbium, europium, and yttriumcould affect clean energy technology deployment in the coming years.1, 2

  3. The Critical Materials Institute | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program The NIF andPoints of ContactDepartmentThe Critical

  4. Critical thickness in silicone thermosets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deopura, Manish, 1975-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Critical thickness effects are utilized to achieve high fracture toughness in brittle polymers. The postulate of critical thickness, which is: "Macroscopically brittle polymers deform in a ductile fashion below a critical ...

  5. Terrestrial habitat mapping of the Oak Ridge Reservation: 1996 Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington-Allen, R.A.; Ashwood, T.L.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US DOE is in the process of remediating historical contamination on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Two key components are ecological risk assessment and monitoring. In 1994 a strategy was developed and a specific program was initiated to implement the strategy for the terrestrial biota of the entire ORR. This document details results of the first task: development of a habitat map and habitat models for key species of interest. During the last 50 years ORR has been a relatively protected island of plant and animal habitats in a region of rapidly expanding urbanization. A preliminary biodiversity assessment of the ORR by the Nature Conservancy in 1995 noted 272 occurrences of significant plant and animal species and communities. Field surveys of threatened and endangered species show that the ORR contains 20 rare plant species, 4 of which are on the state list of endangered species. The rest are either on the state list of threatened species or listed as being of special concern. The ORR provides habitat for some 60 reptilian and amphibian species; more than 120 species of terrestrial birds; 32 species of waterfowl, wading birds, and shorebirds; and about 40 mammalian species. The ORR is both a refuge for rare species and a reservoir of recruitment for surrounding environments and wildlife management areas. Cedar barrens, river bluffs, and wetlands have been identified as the habitat for most rare vascular plant species on the ORR.

  6. Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Volume I, Oregon, Supplement A: Habitat Enhancement Evaluation of Fish and Wash Creeks, 1983 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everest, Fred

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Habitat improvements for anadromous salmonids on Fish Creek in the upper Clackamas Basin were evaluated. The primary objectives of the evaluation effort include: (1) evaluate and quantify the changes in salmonid spawning and rearing habitat resulting from a variety of habitat improvements; (2) evaluate and quantify the changes in fish populations and biomass resulting from habitat improvements; and (3) evaluate the cost-effectiveness of habitat improvements developed with BPA and KV funds on Fish Creek. This report integrates data for the evaluation efforts collected in the Fish Creek Basin in 1982 and 1983. 3 references, 34 figures, 23 tables.

  7. Critical Materials Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave theJuly 30,Crafty Gifts for the EnergyCreditSite |CriticalCritical

  8. Critical Materials Workshop Agenda

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave theJuly 30,Crafty Gifts for the EnergyCreditSite |CriticalCritical

  9. Criticality Safety Evaluation Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facilities Process Water Handling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KESSLER, S.F.

    2000-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the criticality concerns associated with process water handling in the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. The controls and limitations on equipment design and operations to control potential criticality occurrences are identified.

  10. On the economic optimality of marine reserves when fishing damages habitat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moeller, Holly Villacorta

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I expand a spatially-explicit bioeconomic fishery model to include the negative effects of fishing effort on habitat quality. I consider two forms of effort driven habitat damage: First, fishing effort may ...

  11. Assessment of estuarine habitats for resident and estuarine-dependent species: tools for conservation and management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shervette, Virginia Rhea

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    My research in coastal Ecuador and the northern Gulf of Mexico (GOM) elucidated differences in value of shallow estuarine habitats for fishes and invertebrates. I focused on mangrove and tidal river habitats in Ecuador, ...

  12. Will a Forest Habitat Network in the Scottish Highlands be both feasible and truly sustainable?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Vanessa

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Forest Habitat Network (FHN) concept has emerged in recent years as a strategy to reverse processes of deforestation and ecosystem degradation by connecting existing woodland habitat and increasing forest area. This thesis presents a wide...

  13. The impacts of mining on the habitat ecology of raccoons in east-central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beucler, Michele

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Habitat alterations associated with strip-mining and reclamation may reduce the suitability of an area for wildlife by redistributing requirements for survival and reproduction. I evaluated several predictions regarding the impacts of habitat...

  14. Distribution, habitat preference, competitive interactions and predation of French Polynesian Bryozoa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dibble, Connor D

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DISTRIBUTION, HABITAT PREFERENCE, COMPETITIVE INTERACTIONSfronds, I quantified the distribution of bryozoans in aorea, French Polynesia; distribution I NTRODUCTION Fouling

  15. Ontogenetic shift in habitat by early juvenile queen conch,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    using suction dredges (Iversen et a!., 1987; Stoner, unpub1. data) but few early juveniles have been populations IAppeldoorn, 1984), mass rearing of large juveniles (1- and 2-years-old) is costly (Siddall, 1983 with the identification of suitable habitats (Iversen et a!., 1986; Stoner and Sandt. 1991; Stoner, unpub1. data). Despite

  16. anadromous fish habitat: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    anadromous fish habitat First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Working paper on restoration...

  17. Wind, Klickitat, Hood and Fifteen Mile Habitat Site Visits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind, Klickitat, Hood and Fifteen Mile Habitat Site Visits April 17-19th, 2013 ISRP Review Team (4 at the Sheraton Airport at 7:15 a.m. Site Visits: Depart airport and head east: Wind, Klickitat, White Salmon in this review: 1998-019-00 Wind River Watershed Underwood Conservation District (UCD), US Forest Service (USFS

  18. Habitat Abstracting Logic Melissa Bingham, Eric Cummings, Vincenzo Buttari, Sherryll

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Jennifer S.

    habitat, navigates towards can, secures can, and abstracts it by locating recycle bin and then disposes World Applications Detection and removal of objects in an environment unsafe for humans. Recycling faster when battery is fully charged. Advisor: Dr. Jennifer Kay of Rowan University Computer Science

  19. Extinction rates under nonrandom patterns of habitat loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    conversion on species extinctions assume that habitat conversion occurs at ran- dom. This assumption allows predictions about extinction rates based on the speciesarea relationship. We show that the spatially compositional gradients, or species richness, also alter pre- dicted species extinction rates. We illustrate

  20. THE BIOLOGY OF RARE AND DECLINING SPECIES AND HABITATS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    activities on declining species and habitats. Rarity, declining populations, and extinctions are natural may underiie llaturalpopulation declines of species leading to extirpationsand extinctions (Allendorf: additional factors push species towards extinction Ziswiler (1967) noted that 53 of the 77 species of birds

  1. Creating Wildlife Habitat with Native Florida Freshwater Wetland Plants1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    CIR 912 Creating Wildlife Habitat with Native Florida Freshwater Wetland Plants1 Martin B. Main by establishing and managing desirable native plants. Native wetland plants play important ecological roles many more species than non-native plants because native wildlife evolved with native plant communities

  2. Ambient habitat noise and vibration at the Georgia Aquarium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Michael T.

    Ambient habitat noise and vibration at the Georgia Aquarium P. M. Scheifele Department significant levels of background noise due to pumps and motors. This noise, together with pool architecture to quantify the ambient noise levels in the water from machine vibration and from in-air performance speaker

  3. Restoration of Soldier Spring: an isolated habitat for native

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the channel and restore aquatic habitat along 450 m of degraded stream. Following treatment, the bed refilled in the stream declined as the degradation worsened, but it rebounded following the restoration treatments. While the stream. New restoration efforts began in 1998 with support from a number of tribal, federal, and school

  4. An Analysis of a Large Scale Habitat Monitoring Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihada, Basem

    of the Atlantic University of California, Berkeley 2150 Shattuck Avenue 105 Eden St. Berkeley, California 94720 Berkeley, California 94704 Bar Harbor, ME 04609 ABSTRACT Habitat and environmental monitoring is a driving underestimated the impact of multi- hop traffic overhearing and the nuances of power source selection. While

  5. adaptable habitat construction: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    adaptable habitat construction First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Appendix J 2008...

  6. A primer for criticality calculations with DANTSYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busch, R.D. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nuclear Criticality Safety Group

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the closure of many experimental facilities, the nuclear safety analyst has to rely on computer calculations to identify safe limits for the handling and storage of fissile materials. Although deterministic methods often do not provide exact models of a system, a substantial amount of reliable information on nuclear systems can be obtained using these methods if the user understands their limitations. To guide criticality specialists in this area, the Nuclear Criticality Safety Group at the University of New Mexico (UNM) in cooperation with the Radiation Transport Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has designed a primer to help the analyst understand and use the DANTSYS deterministic transport code for nuclear criticality safety analyses. DANTSYS is the new name of the group of codes formerly known as: ONEDANT, TWODANT, TWOHEX, TWOGQ, and THREEDANT. The primer is designed to teach bu example, with each example illustrating two or three DANTSYS features useful in criticality analyses. Starting with a Quickstart chapter, the primer gives an overview of the basic requirements for DANTSYS input and allows the user to quickly run a simple criticality problem with DANTSYS. Each chapter has a list of basic objectives at the beginning identifying the goal of the chapter and the individual DANTSYS features covered in detail in the chapter example problems. On completion of the primer, it is expected that the user will be comfortable doing criticality calculations with DANTSYS and can handle 60--80% of the situations that normally arise in a facility. The primary provides a set of input files that can be selective modified by the user to fit each particular problem.

  7. Relating fish biomass to habitat and chemistry in headwater streams of the northeastern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Clifford E.

    Relating fish biomass to habitat and chemistry in headwater streams of the northeastern United influencing total fish biomass in streams, but few studies have evaluated the relative influence of habitat and pH together. We measured total fish biomass, stream habitat, and stream pH in sixteen sites from

  8. 2005 Proc. Annu. Conf. SEAFWA Movement and Habitat Selection of Largemouth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    . Annu. Conf. Southeast. Assoc. Fish and Wild. Agencies 59:227240 Habitat selection by largemouth bass2005 Proc. Annu. Conf. SEAFWA Movement and Habitat Selection of Largemouth Bass in a Florida Steep Street, Ruskin, FL 33570 Abstract: The movement and habitat selection of largemouth bass (Micropterus

  9. Quantitative Measures of Rearing And Spawning Habitat Characteristics For Stream-Dwelling Salmonids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeley, Ernest R.

    for stream-dwelling salmonids: guidelines for habitat restoration. Province of British Columbia, MinistryQuantitative Measures of Rearing And Spawning Habitat Characteristics For Stream-Dwelling Salmonids: Guidelines For Habitat Restoration by E.R. Keeley and P.A. Slaney Watershed Restoration Project Report No. 4

  10. OVERLAP OF PREDICTED COLD-WATER CORAL HABITAT AND BOTTOM-CONTACT FISHERIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OVERLAP OF PREDICTED COLD-WATER CORAL HABITAT AND BOTTOM-CONTACT FISHERIES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA of Resource Management Title of Thesis: Overlap of predicted cold-water coral habitat and bottom- contact-contact fishing on cold-water corals (class Anthozoa) due to the role corals play in providing biogenic habitat

  11. Critical QCD in Nuclear Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. G. Antoniou; Y. F. Contoyiannis; F. K. Diakonos; G. Mavromanolakis

    2005-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed study of correlated scalars, produced in collisions of nuclei and associated with the $\\sigma$-field fluctuations, $(\\delta \\sigma)^2= $, at the QCD critical point (critical fluctuations), is performed on the basis of a critical event generator (Critical Monte-Carlo) developed in our previous work. The aim of this analysis is to reveal suitable observables of critical QCD in the multiparticle environment of simulated events and select appropriate signatures of the critical point, associated with new and strong effects in nuclear collisions.

  12. CANISTER HANDLING FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.E. Sanders

    2005-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This design calculation revises and updates the previous criticality evaluation for the canister handling, transfer and staging operations to be performed in the Canister Handling Facility (CHF) documented in BSC [Bechtel SAIC Company] 2004 [DIRS 167614]. The purpose of the calculation is to demonstrate that the handling operations of canisters performed in the CHF meet the nuclear criticality safety design criteria specified in the ''Project Design Criteria (PDC) Document'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171599], Section 4.9.2.2), the nuclear facility safety requirement in ''Project Requirements Document'' (Canori and Leitner 2003 [DIRS 166275], p. 4-206), the functional/operational nuclear safety requirement in the ''Project Functional and Operational Requirements'' document (Curry 2004 [DIRS 170557], p. 75), and the functional nuclear criticality safety requirements described in the ''Canister Handling Facility Description Document'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168992], Sections 3.1.1.3.4.13 and 3.2.3). Specific scope of work contained in this activity consists of updating the Category 1 and 2 event sequence evaluations as identified in the ''Categorization of Event Sequences for License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167268], Section 7). The CHF is limited in throughput capacity to handling sealed U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) canisters, defense high-level radioactive waste (DHLW), naval canisters, multicanister overpacks (MCOs), vertical dual-purpose canisters (DPCs), and multipurpose canisters (MPCs) (if and when they become available) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168992], p. 1-1). It should be noted that the design and safety analyses of the naval canisters are the responsibility of the U.S. Department of the Navy (Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program) and will not be included in this document. In addition, this calculation is valid for the current design of the CHF and may not reflect the ongoing design evolution of the facility. However, it is anticipated that design changes to the facility layout will have little or no impact on the criticality results and/or conclusions presented in this document. This calculation is subject to the ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (DOE 2004 [DIRS 171539]) because the CHF is included in the Q-List (BSC 2005 [DIRS 171190], p. A-3) as an item important to safety. This calculation is prepared in accordance with AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses'' [DIRS 168413].

  13. Golden-cheeked Warbler (Dendroica chrysoparia) habitat fragmentation in Travis County, Texas: a remote sensing and geographical information system analysis of habitat extent, pattern and condition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moses, Michael Edwin

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    analysis procedures were assessed for their utility in characterizing fragmentation patterns. Benson (1990) attempted to calculate a fractal dimension of potential GCW habitat "patches" within larger GCW habitat 'sites' and then correlate this parameter... recreational recreational Study Site Size (ha) 3, 420 1, 655 1, 202 1, 069 1, 833 504 1, 393 517 93 BULL CREEK Bull Creek (1, 655 ha) is characterized by a large, nearly contiguous block of habitat (Table 1). The topography is dominated by three...

  14. Critical pulse power components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarjeant, W.J.; Rohwein, G.J.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Critical components for pulsed power conditioning systems will be reviewed. Particular emphasis will be placed on those components requiring significant development efforts. Capacitors, for example, are one of the weakest elements in high-power pulsed systems, especially when operation at high-repetition frequencies for extended periods of time are necessary. Switches are by far the weakest active components of pulse power systems. In particular, opening switches are essentially nonexistent for most applications. Insulaton in all systems and components requires development and improvement. Efforts under way in technology base development of pulse power components will be discussed.

  15. Critically damped quantum search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Mizel

    2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Although measurement and unitary processes can accomplish any quantum evolution in principle, thinking in terms of dissipation and damping can be powerful. We propose a modification of Grover's algorithm in which the idea of damping plays a natural role. Remarkably, we have found that there is a critical damping value that divides between the quantum $O(\\sqrt{N})$ and classical O(N) search regimes. In addition, by allowing the damping to vary in a fashion we describe, one obtains a fixed-point quantum search algorithm in which ignorance of the number of targets increases the number of oracle queries only by a factor of 1.5.

  16. Critical Materials Strategy Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1.SpaceFluorControlsEnergy ReaffirmedCritical Materials

  17. Nuclear Engineering Nuclear Criticality Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    development, Nuclear Operations Division (NOD) waste management and storage activities and other laboratoryNuclear Engineering Nuclear Criticality Safety The Nuclear Engineering Division (NE) of Argonne National Laboratory is experienced in performing criticality safety and shielding evaluations for nuclear

  18. CASE CRITICAL Keystone XL Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    CASE CRITICAL Keystone XL Pipeline: A Line in the Sand? Case Critical is presented by ASU's Global Professor, ASU's School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning The Keystone XL Pipeline, a large

  19. Natural regeneration in two central Idaho grand fir habitat types. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geier-Hayes, K.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural regeneration of five conifer species was surveyed in two central Idaho grand fir habitat types. The habitat types range from warm, dry (grand fir/white spirea) to mesic (Grand fir/Mountain Maple). Four harvest-regeneration methods and four site preparation techniques were sampled. Recommendations for obtaining natural regeneration vary primarily by habitat type. Conifer seedlings in the warm, dry grand fir white spirea habitat type require site protection for establishment. In the mesic grand fir/mountain maple habitat type, tall shrub potential can reduce the opportunity to establish early seral conifer species.

  20. Development of a Habitat Suitability Index Model for the Sage Sparrow on the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duberstein, Corey A.; Simmons, Mary Ann; Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Becker, James M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mitigation threshold guidelines for the Hanford Site are based on habitat requirements of the sage sparrow (Amphispiza belli) and only apply to areas with a mature sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) overstory and a native understory. The sage sparrow habitat requirements are based on literature values and are not specific to the Hanford Site. To refine these guidelines for the Site, a multi-year study was undertaken to quantify habitat characteristics of sage sparrow territories. These characteristics were then used to develop a habitat suitability index (HSI) model which can be used to estimate the habitat value of specific locations on the Site.

  1. A RE-INTRODUCTION TO ANOMALIES OF CRITICALITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PUIGH RJ

    2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1974, a small innocuous document was submitted to the American Nuclear Society's Criticality Safety Division for publication that would have lasting impacts on this nuclear field The author was Duane Clayton, manager of the Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Critical Mass Lab, the world's preeminent reactor critical experimenter with plutonium solutions. The document was entitled, 'Anomalies of Criticality'. 'Anomalies...' was a compilation of more than thirty separate and distinct examples of departures from what might be commonly expected in the field of nuclear criticality. Mr. Clayton's publication was the derivative of more than ten thousand experiments and countless analytical studies conducted world-wide on every conceivable reactor system imaginable: from fissile bearing solutions to solids, blocks to arrays of fuel rods, low-enriched uranium oxide systems to pure plutonium and highly enriched uranium systems. After publication, the document was commonly used within the nuclear fuel cycle and reactor community to train potential criticality/reactor analysts, experimenters and fuel handlers on important things for consideration when designing systems with critically 'safe' parameters in mind The purpose of this paper is to re-introduce 'Anomalies of Criticality' to the current Criticality Safety community and to add new 'anomalies' to the existing compendium. By so doing, it is the authors' hope that a new generation of nuclear workers and criticality engineers will benefit from its content and might continue to build upon this work in support of the nuclear renaissance that is about to occur.

  2. Evaluating stream habitat using a 2D hydraulic model Supervisor: Dr Rhian Thomas (Rhian.thomas@glasgow.ac.uk)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Zaoyang

    including pearl fishing, industrial and agricultural pollution, siltation, physical riverbed habitat of habitat restorations, such as the construction of habitat enhancement measures and the removal of past in meters, depth and substrate data, and the construction of habitat suitability curves for Atlantic salmon

  3. Role of Tidal Saltwater Habitats for Juvenile Salmonids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Which Habitats are Used by Juvenile Salmon April 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 90) ScrubShrub Forested Emergent #12;0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% CS WSI PAB PE UCC ETI LES composition varies through the year 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov From

  4. Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats of the Lower Columbia River, 20072010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Storch, Adam; Skalski, J. R.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Mallette, Christine; Borde, Amy B.; Van Dyke, E.; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Sather, Nichole K.; Teel, David; Dawley, Earl M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Jones, Tucker A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Kuligowski, D. R.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The TFM study was designed to investigate the ecology and early life history of juvenile salmonids within shallow (<5 m) tidal freshwater habitats of the LCRE. We started collecting field data in June 2007. Since then, monthly sampling has occurred in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta (rkm 192208) and at other sites and times in lower river reaches of tidal freshwater (rkm 110 to 141). This report provides a comprehensive synthesis of data covering the field period from June 2007 through April 2010.

  5. Critical point analysis of phase envelope diagram

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soetikno, Darmadi; Siagian, Ucok W. R. [Department of Petroleum Engineering, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Kusdiantara, Rudy, E-mail: rkusdiantara@s.itb.ac.id; Puspita, Dila, E-mail: rkusdiantara@s.itb.ac.id; Sidarto, Kuntjoro A., E-mail: rkusdiantara@s.itb.ac.id; Soewono, Edy; Gunawan, Agus Y. [Department of Mathematics, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase diagram or phase envelope is a relation between temperature and pressure that shows the condition of equilibria between the different phases of chemical compounds, mixture of compounds, and solutions. Phase diagram is an important issue in chemical thermodynamics and hydrocarbon reservoir. It is very useful for process simulation, hydrocarbon reactor design, and petroleum engineering studies. It is constructed from the bubble line, dew line, and critical point. Bubble line and dew line are composed of bubble points and dew points, respectively. Bubble point is the first point at which the gas is formed when a liquid is heated. Meanwhile, dew point is the first point where the liquid is formed when the gas is cooled. Critical point is the point where all of the properties of gases and liquids are equal, such as temperature, pressure, amount of substance, and others. Critical point is very useful in fuel processing and dissolution of certain chemicals. Here in this paper, we will show the critical point analytically. Then, it will be compared with numerical calculations of Peng-Robinson equation by using Newton-Raphson method. As case studies, several hydrocarbon mixtures are simulated using by Matlab.

  6. Influence of safeguards and fire protection on criticality safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Six, D E

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are several positive influences of safeguards and fire protection on criticality safety. Experts in each discipline must be aware of regulations and requirements of the others and work together to ensure a fault-tree design. EG and G Idaho, Inc., routinely uses an Occupancy-Use Readiness Manual to consider all aspects of criticality safety, fire protection, and safeguards. The use of the analytical tree is described.

  7. Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, Annual Report 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Skalski, J. R.; Dawley, Earl M.; Coleman, Andre M.; Ostrand, Kenneth G.; Hanson, Kyle C.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Donley, Erin E.; Ke, Yinghai; Buenau, Kate E.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Townsend, Richard L.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the 2010 research conducted under the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) project EST-P-09-1, titled Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, and known as the 'Salmon Benefits' study. The primary goal of the study is to establish scientific methods to quantify habitat restoration benefits to listed salmon and trout in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) in three required areas: habitat connectivity, early life history diversity, and survival (Figure ES.1). The general study approach was to first evaluate the state of the science regarding the ability to quantify benefits to listed salmon and trout from habitat restoration actions in the LCRE in the 2009 project year, and then, if feasible, in subsequent project years to develop quantitative indices of habitat connectivity, early life history diversity, and survival. Based on the 2009 literature review, the following definitions are used in this study. Habitat connectivity is defined as a landscape descriptor concerning the ability of organisms to move among habitat patches, including the spatial arrangement of habitats (structural connectivity) and how the perception and behavior of salmon affect the potential for movement among habitats (functional connectivity). Life history is defined as the combination of traits exhibited by an organism throughout its life cycle, and for the purposes of this investigation, a life history strategy refers to the body size and temporal patterns of estuarine usage exhibited by migrating juvenile salmon. Survival is defined as the probability of fish remaining alive over a defined amount of space and/or time. The objectives of the 4-year study are as follows: (1) develop and test a quantitative index of juvenile salmon habitat connectivity in the LCRE incorporating structural, functional, and hydrologic components; (2) develop and test a quantitative index of the early life history diversity of juvenile salmon in the LCRE; (3) assess and, if feasible, develop and test a quantitative index of the survival benefits of tidal wetland habitat restoration (hydrologic reconnection) in the LCRE; and (4) synthesize the results of investigations into the indices for habitat connectivity, early life history diversity, and survival benefits.

  8. Dormaier and Chester Butte 2007 Follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analyses were conducted on the Dormaier and Chester Butte wildlife mitigation sites in April 2007 to determine the number of additional habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to enhance, and maintain the project sites as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The Dormaier follow-up HEP survey generated 482.92 habitat units (HU) or 1.51 HUs per acre for an increase of 34.92 HUs over baseline credits. Likewise, 2,949.06 HUs (1.45 HUs/acre) were generated from the Chester Butte follow-up HEP analysis for an increase of 1,511.29 habitat units above baseline survey results. Combined, BPA will be credited with an additional 1,546.21 follow-up habitat units from the Dormaier and Chester Butte parcels.

  9. Evaluation of Cask Drop Criticality Issues at K Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GOLDMANN, L.H.

    2000-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of ability of Multi-canister Overpack (MCO) to withstand drops at K Basin without exceeding the criticality design requirements. Report concludes the MCO will function acceptably. The spent fuel currently residing in the 105 KE and 105 KW storage basins will be placed in fuel storage baskets which will be loaded into the MCO cask assembly. During the basket loading operations the MCO cask assembly will be positioned near the bottom of the south load out pit (SLOP). The loaded MCO cask will be lifted from the SLOP transferred to the transport trailer and delivered to the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). In the wet condition there is a potential for criticality problems if significant changes in the designed fuel configurations occur. The purpose of this report is to address structural issues associated with criticality design features for MCO cask drop accidents in the 105 KE and 105 KW facilities.

  10. Critical adsorption and critical Casimir forces for geometrically structured confinements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Trndle; L. Harnau; S. Dietrich

    2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the behavior of fluids, confined by geometrically structured substrates, upon approaching a critical point at T = Tc in their bulk phase diagram. As generic substrate structures periodic arrays of wedges and ridges are considered. Based on general renormalization group arguments we calculate, within mean field approximation, the universal scaling functions for order parameter profiles of a fluid close to a single structured substrate and discuss the decay of its spatial variation into the bulk. We compare the excess adsorption at corrugated substrates with the one at planar walls. The confinement of a critical fluid by two walls generates effective critical Casimir forces between them. We calculate corresponding universal scaling functions for the normal critical Casimir force between a flat and a geometrically structured substrate as well as the lateral critical Casimir force between two identically patterned substrates.

  11. Lower Klickitat Riparian and In-channel Habitat Restoration Project; Klickitat Watershed Enhancement, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conley, Will

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of the Klickitat Watershed Enhancement Project (KWEP) is to restore watershed health to aid recovery of salmonid stocks in the Klickitat subbasin. An emphasis is placed on restoration and protection of stream reaches and watersheds supporting native anadromous fish production, particularly steelhead (Oncorhyncus mykiss; ESA- listed as 'Threatened' within the Mid-Columbia ESU) and spring Chinook (O. tshawytscha). Habitat restoration activities in the Klickitat subbasin augment goals and objectives of the Yakima Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP), NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program, Klickitat Subbasin Summary and the NMFS Biological Opinion (All-H paper). Work is conducted to enhance instream and contributing upland habitat to facilitate increased natural production potential for native salmonid stocks. Efforts in the Klickitat Subbasin fall into two main categories: (1) identification and prioritization of sites for protection and restoration activities, (2) implementation of protection and restoration measures. KWEP personnel also assist monitoring efforts of the YKFP Monitoring & Evaluation Project. During the September 2002-August 2003 reporting period, KWEP personnel continued efforts to address feedback from the August 2000 Provincial Review that indicated a need for better information management and development of geographic priorities by: (1) Assisting development of the Strategic Habitat Plan for the Klickitat Lead Entity (Task A3.1) and Klickitat steelhead EDT model (Task A4.1); (2) Improving the functionality of reference point, habitat unit, and large woody debris modules of the habitat database as well as addition of a temperature module (Tasks A1.1-1.2); (3) Continuing development and acquisition of GIS data (Task A1.3); (4) Ongoing data collection efforts to fill information gaps including streamflow, habitat, and temperature (Objectives C1 and C2); and (5) Completion of planning, field work, and hydrologic modeling associated with roads assessment in the White Creek watershed (Task A4.2). Significant milestones associated with restoration projects during the reporting period included: (1) Completion of the Surveyors Fish Creek Passage Enhancement project (Task B2.3); (2) Completion of interagency agreements for the Klickitat Meadows (Task B2.4) and Klickitat Mill (Task B2.10) projects; (3) Completion of topographic surveys for the Klickitat Meadows (Task B2.4), Klickitat River Meadows (Task B2.5), Trout Creek and Bear Creek culvert replacements (Task B2.7), and Snyder Swale II (Task B2.13) projects; (4) Completion of the Snyder Swale II - Phase 1 project (Task B2.13); (5) Completion of design, planning, and permitting for the Klickitat Mill project (Task B2.10) and initiation of construction; (6) Design for the Trout and Bear Creek culverts (B2.7) were brought to the 60% level; and (7) Completion of design work for the for the Klickitat Meadows (Task B2.4) and Klickitat River Meadows (Task B2.5) projects.

  12. Hunting, Habitat, and Indigenous Settlement Patterns: A Geographic Analysis of Bugl Wildlife Use in Western Panama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Derek Anthony

    2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation analyzes indigenous wildlife use from a geographic perspective, focusing on the relationships between hunting, habitat, and settlement patterns. Fieldwork took place among five neighboring communities in ...

  13. Availability, usage and expected contribution of potential nursery habitats for the California halibut

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fodrie, Fredrick Joel; Mendoza, Guillermo F.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of a damsel?sh re?ect availability of suitable habitat.locate/ecss Availability, usage and expected contribution ofthe spatial coverage (availability) of all potential nursery

  14. The effects of background adaptation and food availability on habitat preference of Corythoichthys flavofasciatus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iyer, Neetha

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ADAPTATION AND FOOD AVAILABILITY ON HABITAT PREFERENCE OFchoice is related to the availability of food, presence ofbackground adaptation, food availability, or a combination

  15. The role of social aggregations and protected areas in killer whale conservation: The mixed blessing of critical habitat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    decline. On 20 August 2007, a barge loaded with $10,000 L of diesel sank in the area, exposing 25, protected areas have been used to mitigate effects of human activities on mammals such as grizzly bears

  16. Shorebird Surveys in Ensenada Pabellones and Bahia Santa Maria, Sinaloa, Mexico: Critical Winter Habitats for Pacific Flyway Shorebirds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew Engilis, Jr.,, Lewis W. Oring, Eduardo Carrera, Jeffery W. Nelson, Antonio Martinez Lopez ...

  17. Evaluation of development of wild turkey habitat in New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spicer, Robert L

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hebeet L, 8yiaer 9eheittad to the Qxadaate whoa], of tha Agrtealtersl aad Roahaeieal Collage af Teaa? ie $Nthial fluff llllwet af tha ~aiJAsoet& feF tho 60~ of J ?eaarg, l958 Rior Sab)eats Wildlife Raeegesaet RFALUATION OF DEFHLORKNT OF NLD... TUHKZI HABITAT IH IE? RZCLCO Robert L. Spioer Approved ae to etFle and oontent bye Chalrjman of Coea1. ttee Head of or Stadent, Achrlsor Panner' p l$$S 'This studP was a pro)est of tho Federal kid Division of tho New Xoaieo Qaue and Pish...

  18. Alaska Fish Habitat Permit Application | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEEAisin Seiki G60Alameda2008 | Open Energy2009 ||Fish Habitat

  19. Hawaii Habitat Conservation Plans Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG|Information OpenEI Reference LibraryAddHawaii Habitat Conservation

  20. Optical Delineation of Benthic Habitat Using an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moline, Mark A.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Evans, Nathan R.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To improve understanding and characterization of coastal regions, there has been an increasing emphasis on autonomous systems that can sample the ocean on relevant scales. Autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) with active propulsion are especially well suited for studies of the coastal ocean because they are able to provide systematic and near-synoptic spatial observations. With this capability, science users are beginning to integrate sensor suits for a broad range of specific and often novel applications. Here, the relatively mature Remote Environmental Monitoring Units (REMUS) AUV system is configured with multi-spectral radiometers to delineate benthic habitat in Sequim Bay, WA. The vehicle was deployed in a grid pattern along 5 km of coastline in depths from 30 to less than 2 meters. Similar to satellite and/or aerial remote sensing, the bandwidth ratios from the downward looking radiance sensor and upward looking irradiance sensor were used to identify beds of eelgrass on sub-meter scales. Strong correlations were found between the optical reflectance signals and the geo-referenced in situ data collected with underwater video within the grid. Results demonstrate the ability of AUVs to map littoral habitats at high resolution and highlight the overall utility of the REMUS vehicle for nearshore oceanography.

  1. Habitat restoration on naval petroleum reserves in Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, D.C. [EG& G Energy Measurements, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    One of several task performed under contract to the Department of Energy (DOE) by EG & G Energy Measurements as part of the endangered species program is the restoration of abandoned well pads, roads, pipelines and soil borrow sites resulting from oil and gas production activities on Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC). Naval Petroleum Reserves in California is located in the Elk Hills approximately 30 miles southwest of Bakersfield in the rain shadow of the coastal range. Annual precipitation is approximately five inches. Reclamation of disturbed habitat on NPRC began with research plots and test trials in the early 1980s. Full scale reclamation began in 1985 and has continued through the 1989 planting season. Almost 700 acres have been revegetated, which represents over 1,200 sites distributed over the 47,250 acres of NPRC and averaging less than .75 acre in size. Monitoring of the sites began in 1987 to establish reclamation success and evaluate reclamation techniques. Reclamation objectives include the improvement of wildlife habitat for four endangered species living on NPRC, and the protection of the soils from wind and water erosion on the disturbed sites.

  2. Sensitivity analysis of coupled criticality calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perko, Z.; Kloosterman, J. L.; Lathouwers, D. [Delft Univ. of Technology, Faculty of Applied Physics, Dept. of Radiation, Radionuclides and Reactors, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB, Delft (Netherlands)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Perturbation theory based sensitivity analysis is a vital part of todays' nuclear reactor design. This paper presents an extension of standard techniques to examine coupled criticality problems with mutual feedback between neutronics and an augmenting system (for example thermal-hydraulics). The proposed procedure uses a neutronic and an augmenting adjoint function to efficiently calculate the first order change in responses of interest due to variations of the parameters describing the coupled problem. The effect of the perturbations is considered in two different ways in our study: either a change is allowed in the power level while maintaining criticality (power perturbation) or a change is allowed in the eigenvalue while the power is constrained (eigenvalue perturbation). The calculated response can be the change in the power level, the reactivity worth of the perturbation, or the change in any functional of the flux, the augmenting dependent variables and the input parameters. To obtain power- and criticality-constrained sensitivities power- and k-reset procedures can be applied yielding identical results. Both the theoretical background and an application to a one dimensional slab problem are presented, along with an iterative procedure to compute the necessary adjoint functions using the neutronics and the augmenting codes separately, thus eliminating the need of developing new programs to solve the coupled adjoint problem. (authors)

  3. Safety-critical design of the Generic Driving Actuator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cuijpers, Pieter

    the same interfaces as a human driver does: it controls the steering wheel, the brake pedal and the throttle pedal. The GDA consists of three robots to control each interface: a steering robot and two pedal- quirements a software model is built in the proces-algebraic language CRL. The requirements

  4. Critical embedded systems : trends in the design Nicolas NAVET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navet, Nicolas

    , >6 comm. protocols, multi-layered run-time environment (AUTOSAR), multi-source software, multi-core CPUs, number of variants, etc 7 BMW 7 Series networking architecture [11] ZGW = central gateway 4 CAN

  5. Critical embedded systems : trends in the design Nicolas NAVET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navet, Nicolas

    complexity: 70 ECUs, 2500 signals, >6 comm. protocols, multi-layered run-time environment (AUTOSAR), multi-source software, multi-core CPUs, number of variants, etc #12;7 BMW 7 Series networking architecture [11] ZGW

  6. Critical embedded systems : trends in the design Nicolas NAVET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navet, Nicolas

    -time environment (AUTOSAR), multi-source software, multi-core CPUs, number of variants, etc #12;7 BMW 7 Series

  7. Ratsnakes and Brush Piles: Intended and Unintended Consequences of Improving Habitat for Wildlife?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weatherhead, Patrick J.

    Ratsnakes and Brush Piles: Intended and Unintended Consequences of Improving Habitat for Wildlife, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Champaign 61820 ABSTRACT.--Brush pile creation is a common habitat of brush pile creation and the indirect effects of brush piles on multi-species interactions. Here we

  8. HABITAT SELECTION OF A LARGE HERBIVORE AT HIGH DENSITY AND WITHOUT PREDATION: TRADE-OFF BETWEEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laval, Université

    summer home ranges and core areas. We sampled vegetation in the core areas and in the rest of the home habitat patches over forested ones, suggesting that they adopted a foraging strategy favoring energy of habitat selection demonstrate that herbivores can adjust their behavior to other limiting factors when

  9. Journal of Biogeography (1992)I9,383-390 Habitat distribution of canary chaffinchesamong islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrascal, Luis M.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Journal of Biogeography (1992)I9,383-390 Habitat distribution of canary chaffinchesamong islands studied for the Canary Islands (Tenerife and El Hierro). The Common Chaffinch was significantly denser time. Key words. Canary Islands, Chaffinches (Fringilla spp.), habitat preferences, competitive

  10. How fragmentation and corridors affect wind dynamics and seed dispersal in open habitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orrock, John

    Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210; c Movement Ecology Laboratory, Department widespread human-induced changes such as habitat loss, landscape fragmentation, and climate instability measurements, and seed releases in a large-scale experimental landscape to show that habitat corridors affect

  11. DIETARY OVERLAP IN FRUGIVOROUSAND INSECTIVOROUS BATS FROM EDAPHIC CERRADO HABITATS OF BRAZIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willig, Michael

    DIETARY OVERLAP IN FRUGIVOROUSAND INSECTIVOROUS BATS FROM EDAPHIC CERRADO HABITATS OF BRAZIL north- eastern Brazil suggest significant ecologicalseparation of species. Nonetheless, recent sim edaphic Cerrado habitats on the Chapada do Araripe in northeastern Brazil. For each of the 11 most common

  12. Habitat loss and the disassembly of mutalistic networks Miguel A. Fortuna, Abhay Krishna and Jordi Bascompte

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortuna, Miguel A.

    938 Habitat loss and the disassembly of mutalistic networks Miguel A. Fortuna, Abhay Krishna and Jordi Bascompte M. A. Fortuna (fortuna@ebd.csic.es), A. Krishna and J. Bascompte, Integrative Ecology for their robustness to habitat loss, Fortuna and Bascompte (2006) analyzed a spatially implicit meta-community model

  13. Assessment of estuarine habitats for resident and estuarine-dependent species: tools for conservation and management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shervette, Virginia Rhea

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    and provide us with countless other services. In spite of all this, humans all over the world continue to negatively impact estuarine ecosystems through activities such as alteration of habitat, pollution, and compromising freshwater input. In general, we... Salt marsh ecosystems in Gulf of Mexico................................ 6 Nursery habitat hypothesis ....................................................... 7 Dissertation objectives...

  14. Habitat Use and Movements of Adult White Bass in Lake Poinsett

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .. SOUTH DAKOTA c ) o o o Habitat Use and Movements of Adult White Bass in Lake Poinsett South Dakota Department of Game, Fish and Parks Wildlife Division Joe Foss Building Pierre, South Dakota 57501-3182 Completion Report No. 99-15 #12;,-. ...., (""l r" rm Habitat Use and Movements ofAdult White Bass in Lake

  15. Effects of piscivore-mediated habitat use on growth, diet and zooplankton consumption of roach: an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effects of piscivore-mediated habitat use on growth, diet and zooplankton consumption of roach, Limnological Institute, Konstanz, Germany SUMMARY 1. We used an individual based modelling approach for roach; (ii) analyse the relevance of these habitat shifts for the diet, activity costs and growth of roach

  16. FISH HABITAT OPTIMIZATION TO PRIORITIZE RIVER RESTORATION DECISIONS S. E. NULLa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    ) from a natal stream and is applied as a case study in California's Shasta River. Restoration activitiesFISH HABITAT OPTIMIZATION TO PRIORITIZE RIVER RESTORATION DECISIONS S. E. NULLa * and J. R. LUNDb restoration alternatives for improving fish habitat by evaluating tradeoffs between fish production

  17. The Effect of Shoreline Recreational Angling Activities on Aquatic and Riparian Habitat Within an Urban Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooke, Steven J.

    The Effect of Shoreline Recreational Angling Activities on Aquatic and Riparian Habitat Within activity may negatively impact littoral and riparian habitats independent of any direct or indirect influences of fish harvest or fishing mortality through mechanisms such as disturbance (e.g., trampling

  18. FOOD, ACTIVITY, AND HABITAT OF THREE "PICKERTYPE" MICROCARNIVOROUS FISHES IN THE KELP FORESTS OFF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FOOD, ACTIVITY, AND HABITAT OF THREE "PICKER·TYPE" MICROCARNIVOROUS FISHES IN THE KELP FORESTS OFF, and habitat preference were compared between the kelp perch, Brachyistius frenatus; the sefiorita, Oxyjulis californica; and the white seaperch, Phanerodonfurcatus, all of which co-occur in areas of reef and kelp off

  19. Accomplishments of the Alaska Region's Habitat Conservation Division in Fiscal Year 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conservation and Management Act, Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act, National Environmental Policy Act, FederalAccomplishments of the Alaska Region's Habitat Conservation Division in Fiscal Year 2004 This report provides a summary of Habitat Conservation Division (HCD) activities in support of the sustainable

  20. Accomplishments of the Alaska Region's Habitat Conservation Division in Fiscal Year 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conservation and Management Act, Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act, National Environmental Policy Act, FederalAccomplishments of the Alaska Region's Habitat Conservation Division in Fiscal Year 2005 This report provides a summary of Habitat Conservation Division (HCD) activities in support of the sustainable

  1. Prioritizing winter habitat quality for greater sage-grouse in a landscape influenced by energy development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beck, Jeffrey L.

    Prioritizing winter habitat quality for greater sage-grouse in a landscape influenced by energy, and F. C. Blomquist. 2014. Prioritizing winter habitat quality for Greater Sage-Grouse in a landscape influenced by energy development. Ecosphere 5(2):15. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/ES13-00238. 1 Abstract

  2. Hydraulic Habitat Model Comparison_12_03_09 Desiree Tullos and Beth Copeland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Hydraulic Habitat Model Comparison_12_03_09 Desiree Tullos and Beth Copeland Review of Hydraulic;Hydraulic Habitat Model Comparison_12_03_09 Desiree Tullos and Beth Copeland Name PHABSIM Spatial scale and Observations on Flow Determination in New Zealand Regulated Streams: Advances in Ecology. Plenum Press, New

  3. Habitat-Lite: A GSC case study based on free text terms for environmental metadata

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyrpides, Nikos; Hirschman, Lynette; Clark, Cheryl; Cohen, K. Bretonnel; Mardis, Scott; Luciano, Joanne; Kottmann, Renzo; Cole, James; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos; Field, Dawn

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is an urgent need to capture metadata on the rapidly growing number of genomic, metagenomic and related sequences, such as 16S ribosomal genes. This need is a major focus within the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC), and Habitat is a key metadata descriptor in the proposed 'Minimum Information about a Genome Sequence' (MIGS) specification. The goal of the work described here is to provide a light-weight, easy-to-use (small) set of terms ('Habitat-Lite') that captures high-level information about habitat while preserving a mapping to the recently launched Environment Ontology (EnvO). Our motivation for building Habitat-Lite is to meet the needs of multiple users, such as annotators curating these data, database providers hosting the data, and biologists and bioinformaticians alike who need to search and employ such data in comparative analyses. Here, we report a case study based on semi-automated identification of terms from GenBank and GOLD. We estimate that the terms in the initial version of Habitat-Lite would provide useful labels for over 60% of the kinds of information found in the GenBank isolation-source field, and around 85% of the terms in the GOLD habitat field. We present a revised version of Habitat-Lite and invite the community's feedback on its further development in order to provide a minimum list of terms to capture high-level habitat information and to provide classification bins needed for future studies.

  4. Habitat for Humanity: La Grange, Georgia, 2003 Jimmy Carter Work Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Troup-Chambers Habitat for Humanity built a Habitat house to ENERGY STAR standards in LaGrange, Georgia, in 2003. The project was so successfully that all Troup-Chambers houses will now be built to ENERGY STAR standards.

  5. Habitat Variability and Complexity in the Upper San Francisco Estuary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moyle, Peter B; Lund, Jay R.; Bennett, William A; Fleenor, William E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bioscience 51:633-641. Bennett WA. 2005. Critical assessmentuc/item/0725n5vk. Bennett WA, Moyle PB. 1996. Where have allJ, Hanak L, Fleenor W, Bennett W, Howitt R, Mount J, Moyle

  6. Effects of Habitat Characteristics on Occupancy and Productivity of a Forest-Dependent Songbird in an Urban Landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, Dianne Hali

    2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    determined minimum patch-size thresholds for productivity measurements, and also monitored effects on productivity from canopy cover, woodland composition, distance to and size of the nearest habitat patch, and distance to the nearest habitat patch >100 ha. I...

  7. Beyond biology: understanding regional, multi-species habitat conservation plans from an ecological, economic, and sociopolitical perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Jennifer

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    through a survey measuring people's attitudes towards regional, multi-species habitat conservation plans in three general areas: ecological, economical, and socio-political costs and benefits of the plans. I have also studied the actual texts of habitat...

  8. Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs among land-use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rissman, Adena

    Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs and services, including timber production, carbon sequestration and storage, scenic amenities, and wildlife habitat. International efforts to mitigate climate change through forest carbon sequestration

  9. Criticality Safety Basics for INL FMHs and CSOs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V. L. Putman

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear power is a valuable and efficient energy alternative in our energy-intensive society. However, material that can generate nuclear power has properties that require this material be handled with caution. If improperly handled, a criticality accident could result, which could severely harm workers. This document is a modular self-study guide about Criticality Safety Principles. This guide's purpose it to help you work safely in areas where fissionable nuclear materials may be present, avoiding the severe radiological and programmatic impacts of a criticality accident. It is designed to stress the fundamental physical concepts behind criticality controls and the importance of criticality safety when handling fissionable materials outside nuclear reactors. This study guide was developed for fissionable-material-handler and criticality-safety-officer candidates to use with related web-based course 00INL189, BEA Criticality Safety Principles, and to help prepare for the course exams. These individuals must understand basic information presented here. This guide may also be useful to other Idaho National Laboratory personnel who must know criticality safety basics to perform their assignments safely or to design critically safe equipment or operations. This guide also includes additional information that will not be included in 00INL189 tests. The additional information is in appendices and paragraphs with headings that begin with 'Did you know,' or with, 'Been there Done that'. Fissionable-material-handler and criticality-safety-officer candidates may review additional information at their own discretion. This guide is revised as needed to reflect program changes, user requests, and better information. Issued in 2006, Revision 0 established the basic text and integrated various programs from former contractors. Revision 1 incorporates operation and program changes implemented since 2006. It also incorporates suggestions, clarifications, and additional information from readers and from personnel who took course 00INL189. Revision 1 also completely reorganized the training to better emphasize physical concepts behind the criticality controls that fissionable material handlers and criticality safety officers must understand. The reorganization is based on and consistent with changes made to course 00INL189 due to a review of course exam results and to discussions with personnel who conduct area-specific training.

  10. Computing Criticality of Lines in Power Systems Computational Research Div.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Computing Criticality of Lines in Power Systems Ali Pinar Computational Research Div. Lawrence. Planning and operating criteria are designed so that "the interconnected power system shall be operated a vulnerability in the a power system is im- portant, however, system robustness requires identifying all

  11. Marine reserve design: optimal size, habitats, species affinities, diversity, and ocean microclimate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parnell, P Ed; Dayton, P K; Lennert-Cody, C E; Rasmussen, L L; Leichter, J J

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    stability of some California kelp communities. EcologicalTemporal and spatial scales of kelp demography: the role ofand recovery in a kelp forest community. Ecological

  12. Marine reserve design: optimal size, habitats, species affinities, diversity, and ocean microclimate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parnell, P Ed; Dayton, P K; Lennert-Cody, C E; Rasmussen, L L; Leichter, J J

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    relationship between kelp nutrient concentrations (NO 3 )thermocline is that giant kelp is nutrient limited relative1984. Episodic nutrient supply to a kelp forest ecosystem in

  13. Design, Development, and Testing of an Inflatable Habitat Element for NASA Lunar Analogue Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akin, David

    is not pressurized. The inflatable envelope also includes a simulated radiation protection layer and a thermal 5m diameter footprint, an internal volume of 60m2 , and retains its shape when the envelope

  14. Systematic review of the influence of foraging habitat on red-cockaded woodpecker reproductive success.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garabedian, James E. [North Carolina State University

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Relationships between foraging habitat and reproductive success provide compelling evidence of the contribution of specific vegetative features to foraging habitat quality, a potentially limiting factor for many animal populations. For example, foraging habitat quality likely will gain importance in the recovery of the threatened red-cockaded woodpecker Picoides borealis (RCW) in the USA as immediate nesting constraints are mitigated. Several researchers have characterized resource selection by foraging RCWs, but emerging research linking reproductive success (e.g. clutch size, nestling and fledgling production, and group size) and foraging habitat features has yet to be synthesized. Therefore, we reviewed peer-refereed scientific literature and technical resources (e.g. books, symposia proceedings, and technical reports) that examined RCW foraging ecology, foraging habitat, or demography to evaluate evidence for effects of the key foraging habitat features described in the species recovery plan on group reproductive success. Fitness-based habitat models suggest foraging habitat with low to intermediate pine Pinus spp. densities, presence of large and old pines, minimal midstory development, and herbaceous groundcover support more productive RCW groups. However, the relationships between some foraging habitat features and RCW reproductive success are not well supported by empirical data. In addition, few regression models account for > 30% of variation in reproductive success, and unstandardized multiple and simple linear regression coefficient estimates typically range from -0.100 to 0.100, suggesting ancillary variables and perhaps indirect mechanisms influence reproductive success. These findings suggest additional research is needed to address uncertainty in relationships between foraging habitat features and RCW reproductive success and in the mechanisms underlying those relationships.

  15. Critical phenomena in perfect fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David W. Neilsen; Matthew W. Choptuik

    1999-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the gravitational collapse of a spherically symmetric, perfect fluid with equation of state P = (Gamma -1)rho. We restrict attention to the ultrarelativistic (``kinetic-energy-dominated'', ``scale-free'') limit where black hole formation is anticipated to turn on at infinitesimal black hole mass (Type II behavior). Critical solutions (those which sit at the threshold of black hole formation in parametrized families of collapse) are found by solving the system of ODEs which result from a self-similar ansatz, and by solving the full Einstein/fluid PDEs in spherical symmetry. These latter PDE solutions (``simulations'') extend the pioneering work of Evans and Coleman (Gamma = 4/3) and verify that the continuously self-similar solutions previously found by Maison and Hara et al for $1.05 Gamma_dn are nodal points rather than focal points as previously reported. We also find a critical solution for Gamma = 2, and present evidence that it is continuously self-similar and Type II. Mass-scaling exponents for all of the critical solutions are calculated by evolving near-critical initial data, with results which confirm and extend previous calculations based on linear perturbation theory. Finally, we comment on critical solutions generated with an ideal-gas equation of state.

  16. Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobocinski, Kathryn; Johnson, Gary; Sather, Nichole [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the first annual report for the study titled 'Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta in the Lower Columbia River'. Hereafter, we refer to this research as the Tidal Freshwater Monitoring (TFM) Study. The study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The project is performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The goal of the 2007-2009 Tidal Freshwater Monitoring Study is to answer the following questions: In what types of habitats within the tidal freshwater area of the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE; Figure 1) are yearling and subyearling salmonids found, when are they present, and under what environmental conditions?1 And, what is the ecological importance2 of shallow (0-5 m) tidal freshwater habitats to the recovery of Upper Columbia River spring Chinook salmon and steelhead and Snake River fall Chinook salmon? Research in 2007 focused mainly on the first question, with fish stock identification data providing some indication of Chinook salmon presence at the variety of habitat types sampled. The objectives and sub-objectives for the 2007 study were as follows: (1) Habitat and Fish Community Characteristics-Provide basic data on habitat and fish community characteristics for yearling and subyearling salmonids at selected sites in the tidal freshwater reach in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta. (1a) Characterize vegetation assemblage percent cover, conventional water quality, substrate composition, and beach slope at each of six sampling sites in various tidal freshwater habitat types. (1b) Determine fish community characteristics, including species composition, abundance, and temporal and spatial distributions. (1c) Estimate the stock of origin for the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon captured at the sampling sites using genetic analysis. (1d) Statistically assess the relationship between salmonid abundance and habitat parameters, including ancillary variables such as temperature and river stage. (2) Acoustic Telemetry Monitoring-Assess feasibility of applying Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) technology to determine migration characteristics from upriver of Bonneville Dam through the study area (vicinity of the Sandy River delta/Washougal River confluence). (2a) Determine species composition, release locations, and distributions of JSATS-tagged fish. (2b) Estimate run timing, residence times, and migration pathways for these fish. Additionally, both objectives serve the purpose of baseline research for a potential tidal rechannelization project on the Sandy River. The U.S. Forest Service, in partnership with the Bonneville Power Administration and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, is currently pursuing reconnection of the east (relict) Sandy River channel with the current channel to improve fish and wildlife habitat in the Sandy River delta. Our study design and the location of sampling sites in this reach provide baseline data to evaluate the potential restoration.

  17. CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION Multiple Efforts to Secure...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION Multiple Efforts to Secure Control Systems Are Under Way, but Challenges Remain CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION Multiple Efforts to Secure...

  18. DOE and Critical Materials Video (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a text version of the "DOE and Critical Materials" video presented at the Critical Materials Workshop, held on April 3, 2012 in Arlington, Virginia.

  19. Critical Materials Workshop Plenary Session Videos | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Critical Materials Workshop Plenary Session Videos Critical Materials Workshop Plenary Session Videos Welcome and Overview of Workshop and Energy Innovation Hubs Speakers * Dr. Leo...

  20. Critical Gravity in Four Dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lue, H. [China Economics and Management Academy, Central University of Finance and Economics, Beijing 100081 (China); Institute for Advanced Study, Shenzhen University, Nanhai Avenue 3688, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Pope, C. N. [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge University, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 OWA (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We study four-dimensional gravity theories that are rendered renormalizable by the inclusion of curvature-squared terms to the usual Einstein action with a cosmological constant. By choosing the parameters appropriately, the massive scalar mode can be eliminated and the massive spin-2 mode can become massless. This ''critical'' theory may be viewed as a four-dimensional analogue of chiral topologically massive gravity, or of critical 'new massive gravity' with a cosmological constant, in three dimensions. We find that the on-shell energy for the remaining massless gravitons vanishes. There are also logarithmic spin-2 modes, which have positive energy. The mass and entropy of standard Schwarzschild-type black holes vanish. The critical theory might provide a consistent toy model for quantum gravity in four dimensions.

  1. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Oxbow Conservation Area, 2002-2005 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochran, Brian

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was performed to determine baseline habitat units on the Oxbow Conservation Area in Grant County, Oregon. The evaluation is a required part of the Memorandum of Agreement between the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) relating to the acquisition and management of the Oxbow Conservation Area. The HEP team was comprised of individuals from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. The survey was conducted using the following HEP evaluation models for key species: black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapilla), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), mink (Mustela vison), western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginiana), and yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Cover types used in this survey were conifer forest, irrigated meadow, riparian meadow, upland meadow, riparian shrub, upland shrub, and mine tailings. The project generated 701.3 habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. Results for each HEP species are: (1) Black-capped chickadee habitat was good, with only isolated areas lacking snags or having low tree canopy cover. (2) Mallard habitat was poor in upland meadows and marginal elsewhere due to a lack of herbaceous/shrub cover and low herbaceous height. (3) Mink habitat was good, limited only by the lack of the shrub component. (4) Western meadowlark habitat was marginal in upland meadow and mine tailing cover types and good in irrigated meadow. Percent cover of grass and height of herbaceous variables were limiting factors. (5) White-tailed deer habitat was marginal due to relatively low tree canopy cover, reduced shrub cover, and limited browse diversity. (6) Yellow Warbler habitat was marginal due to less than optimum shrub height and the lack of hydrophytic shrubs. General ratings (poor, marginal, etc.) are described in the introduction section.

  2. Idaho Habitat Evaluation for Off-Site Mitigation Record : Annual Report 1987.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrosky, Charles E.; Holubetz, Terry B. (Idaho Dept. of Fish and Game, Boise, ID (USA)

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho Department of Fish and Game has been monitoring and evaluating existing and proposed habitat improvement projects for steelhead (Salmo gairdneri) and chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Clearwater and Salmon River drainages over the last four years. Projects included in the evaluation are funded by, or proposed for funding by, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Northwest Power Planning Act as off-site mitigation for downstream hydropower development on the Snake and Columbia rivers. A mitigation record is being developed to use increased smolt production at full seeding as the best measure of benefit from a habitat enhancement project. Determination of full benefit from a project depends on presence of adequate numbers of fish to document actual increases in fish production. The depressed nature of upriver anadromous stocks have precluded attainment of full benefit of any habitat project in Idaho. Partial benefit will be credited to the mitigation record in the interim period of run restoration. According to the BPA Work Plan, project implementors have the primary responsibility for measuring physical habitat and estimating habitat change. To date, Idaho habitat projects have been implemented primarily by the US Forest Service (USFS). The Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (SBT) have sponsored three projects (Bear Valley Mine, Yankee Fork, and the proposed East Fork Salmon River projects). IDFG implemented two barrier-removal projects (Johnson Creek and Boulder Creek) that the USFS was unable to sponsor at that time. The role of IDFG in physical habitat monitoring is primarily to link habitat quality and habitat change to changes in actual, or potential, fish production. Individual papers were processed separately for the data base.

  3. Southern Regional Center for Lightweight Innovative Design (SRCLID...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and experimentally validate physics-based multiscale material models for design optimization of components, systems, and lightweight materials for applications critical to the...

  4. Critical experiments at Sandia National Laboratories : technical meeting on low-power critical facilities and small reactors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harms, Gary A.; Ford, John T.; Barber, Allison Delo

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has conducted radiation effects testing for the Department of Energy (DOE) and other contractors supporting the DOE since the 1960's. Over this period, the research reactor facilities at Sandia have had a primary mission to provide appropriate nuclear radiation environments for radiation testing and qualification of electronic components and other devices. The current generation of reactors includes the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR), a water-moderated pool-type reactor, fueled by elements constructed from UO2-BeO ceramic fuel pellets, and the Sandia Pulse Reactor III (SPR-III), a bare metal fast burst reactor utilizing a uranium-molybdenum alloy fuel. The SPR-III is currently defueled. The SPR Facility (SPRF) has hosted a series of critical experiments. A purpose-built critical experiment was first operated at the SPRF in the late 1980's. This experiment, called the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Critical Experiment (CX), was designed to explore the reactor physics of a nuclear thermal rocket motor. This experiment was fueled with highly-enriched uranium carbide fuel in annular water-moderated fuel elements. The experiment program was completed and the fuel for the experiment was moved off-site. A second critical experiment, the Burnup Credit Critical Experiment (BUCCX) was operated at Sandia in 2002. The critical assembly for this experiment was based on the assembly used in the CX modified to accommodate low-enriched pin-type fuel in water moderator. This experiment was designed as a platform in which the reactivity effects of specific fission product poisons could be measured. Experiments were carried out on rhodium, an important fission product poison. The fuel and assembly hardware for the BUCCX remains at Sandia and is available for future experimentation. The critical experiment currently in operation at the SPRF is the Seven Percent Critical Experiment (7uPCX). This experiment is designed to provide benchmark reactor physics data to support validation of the reactor physics codes used to design commercial reactor fuel elements in an enrichment range above the current 5% enrichment cap. A first set of critical experiments in the 7uPCX has been completed. More experiments are planned in the 7uPCX series. The critical experiments at Sandia National Laboratories are currently funded by the US Department of Energy Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP). The NCSP has committed to maintain the critical experiment capability at Sandia and to support the development of a critical experiments training course at the facility. The training course is intended to provide hands-on experiment experience for the training of new and re-training of practicing Nuclear Criticality Safety Engineers. The current plans are for the development of the course to continue through the first part of fiscal year 2011 with the development culminating is the delivery of a prototype of the course in the latter part of the fiscal year. The course will be available in fiscal year 2012.

  5. Columbia River Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report / Scotch Creek Wildlife Area, Berg Brothers, and Douglas County Pygmy Rabbit Projects.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Habitat Evaluation Procedure study was conducted to determine baseline habitat units (HUs) on the Scotch Creek, Mineral Hill, Pogue Mountain, Chesaw and Tunk Valley Habitat Areas (collectively known as the Scotch Creek Wildlife Area) in Okanogan County, Sagebrush Flat and the Dormaler property in Douglas County, and the Berg Brothers ranch located in Okanogan County within the Colville Reservation. A HEP team comprised of individuals from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (Appendix A) conducted baseline habitat surveys using the following HEP evaluation species: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus), pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginiana), mink (Mustela vison), Canada goose (Branta canadensis), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), Lewis woodpecker (Melanerpes lewis), and Yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Results of the HEP analysis are listed below. General ratings (poor, marginal, fair, etc.,) are described in Appendix B. Mule deer habitat was marginal lacking diversity and quantify of suitable browse species. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat was marginal lacking residual nesting cover and suitable winter habitat Pygmy rabbit habitat was in fair condition except for the Dormaier property which was rated marginal due to excessive shrub canopy closure at some sites. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation project lands and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, information from this document could be used by wildlife habitat managers to develop management strategies for specific project sites.

  6. Managing Critical Management Improvement Initiatives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Provides requirements and responsibilities for planning, executing and assessing critical management improvement initiatives within DOE. DOE N 251.59, dated 9/27/2004, extends this Notice until 10/01/2005. Archived 11-8-10. Does not cancel other directives.

  7. High critical current superconducting tapes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holesinger, Terry G. (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Improvements in critical current capacity for superconducting film structures are disclosed and include the use of a superconducting RE-BCO layer including a mixture of rare earth metals, e.g., yttrium and europium, where the ratio of yttrium to europium in the RE-BCO layer ranges from about 3 to 1 to from about 1.5 to 1.

  8. An Integrated Formal Approach for Developing High Quality Software for Safety-Critical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ouyang, Meng

    This report presents the results of a study which devises an Integrated Formal Approach (IFA) for improving specifications of the designs of computer programs used in safety-critical systems. In this IFA, the formal ...

  9. Materials in design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perata, Alfredo Ferando

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    alloys have good machinability. Melding has two -25- critical factors, the weakness of aluminum alloys at high temperatures and oxidation. However, aluminum derives its corrosion ? resistance quality from this oxide, It has to removed before welding...-Ferrous Metals Copper alloys Aluminum Magnesium Lead Zinc Tin Non-Metallic Materials Wood Stone Brick Cement Cont rete Rubber Leather Asbestos Mica Ceramics Glass Engineering design has to have in consideration, the use to which the material...

  10. Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, Annual Report 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Skalski, John R.; Dawley, Earl M.; Coleman, Andre M.

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the 2009 research conducted under the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE or Corps) project EST-09-P-01, titled Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary. The research was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Marine Science Laboratory and Hydrology Group, in partnership with the University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, Columbia Basin Research, and Earl Dawley (NOAA Fisheries, retired). This Columbia River Fish Mitigation Program project, referred to as Salmonid Benefits, was started in FY 2009 to evaluate the state-of-the science regarding the ability to quantify the benefits to listed salmonids1 of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary.

  11. TRANSPORTATION CASK RECEIPT/RETURN FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY EVALUATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.E. Sanders

    2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this design calculation is to demonstrate that the handling operations of transportation casks performed in the Transportation Cask Receipt and Return Facility (TCRRF) and Buffer Area meet the nuclear criticality safety design criteria specified in the ''Project Design Criteria (PDC) Document'' (BSC [Bechtel SAIC Company] 2004 [DIRS 171599], Section 4.9.2.2), and the functional nuclear criticality safety requirement described in the ''Transportation Cask Receipt/Return Facility Description Document'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170217], Section 3.2.3). Specific scope of work contained in this activity consists of the following items: (1) Evaluate criticality effects for both dry and fully flooded conditions pertaining to TCRRF and Buffer Area operations for defense in depth. (2) Evaluate Category 1 and 2 event sequences for the TCRRF as identified in the ''Categorization of Event Sequences for License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167268], Section 7). This evaluation includes credible fuel reconfiguration conditions. In addition to the scope of work listed above, an evaluation was also performed of modeling assumptions for commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) regarding inclusion of plenum and end regions of the active fuel. This calculation is limited to CSNF and US Department of Energy (DOE) SNF. it should be mentioned that the latter waste form is evaluated more in depth in the ''Canister Handling Facility Criticality Safety Calculations (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167614]). Further, the design and safety analyses of the naval SNF canisters are the responsibility of the US Department of the Navy (Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program) and will not be included in this document. In addition, this calculation is valid for the current design of the TCRRF and Buffer Area and may not reflect the ongoing design evolution of the facility. However, it is anticipated that design changes to the facility layout will have little or no impact on the criticality results and/or conclusions presented in this document. This calculation is subject to the ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (DOE 2004 [DIRS 171539]) because the TCRRF is included in the Q-List (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168361], p. A-3) as an item important to safety. This calculation is prepared in accordance with AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses'' [DIRS 168413].

  12. Little Science Confronts the Data Deluge: Habitat Ecology, Embedded Sensor Networks, and Digital Libraries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borgman, C L; Wallis, J C; Enyedy, N

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A. (2003). The Data Deluge: An e-Science Perspective. GridScience Confronts the Data Deluge: Habitat Ecology, EmbeddedScientists are facing a deluge of data beyond what can be

  13. Restoration of resaca wetlands and associated wet prairie habitats at Palo Alto Battlefield National Historic Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Margo, Michael Ray

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Cultivation and drainage projects associated with livestock production have substantially disturbed resaca wetlands and wet prairie habitats in southern Texas. As a consequence of the anthropogenic disturbances, the area of these wetlands has been...

  14. Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Volume I, Oregon, 1984 Final and Annual Reports.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Rod

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains reports on habitat improvement and fisheries enhancement projects conducted in the following subbasins: (1) Clackamas River; (2) Hood River; :(3) Deschutes River; (4) John Day River; (5) Umatilla River; and (6) Grande Ronde River. (ACR)

  15. Habitat associations of cavity-nesting owls in the Sierra Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groce, Julie Elizabeth

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Several species of small, cavity-nesting owls occur in the Sierra Nevada, including in areas impacted by human activities. The owls typically use standing dead trees (snags) for nest sites. Although descriptive studies exist regarding habitats...

  16. Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Volume 1, Oregon, 1986 Final and Annual Reports.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuart, Amy

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes activities implemented for fisheries habitat improvement work on priority drainages in the Clackamas and Hood River sub-basins. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the reports on individual projects. (ACR)

  17. The Effects of Habitat Complexity on the Cognitive Performance of Two Fish Species and Their Hybrids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chance, Heather

    2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    attributes. In the field, I quantified habitat complexity in populations of two species of swordtail fishes Xiphophorus birchmanni and X. malinche as well as two populations of naturally occurring X. birchmanni/X. malinche hybrids found in the Rio Calnali...

  18. The effects of habitat composition, quality, and breaks on home ranges of exploited nearshore reef fishes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowe, Christopher G.; Caselle, Jennifer

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    habitat utilization of adult kelp bass Paralabrax clathratusBarred sand bass Sheephead Kelp bass Ocean whitefish Of thewhich was faster than kelp bass (6 d and 7 d following

  19. Perennial Agroenergy Feedstocks as En Route Habitat for Spring Migratory Birds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    to evaluate the ability of two candidate second-generation agroenergy feed- stocks (switchgrass, Panicum- generation agroenergy feedstocks may provide suitable hab- itat. We take a multi-scaled spatial approach. Keywords Biofuels . Agriculture . Grassland birds . Habitat selection . Agroecology . Switchgrass

  20. Relative Habitat Value Of Alternative Substrates Used In Oyster Reef Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Lindsey Marie

    2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    and in limited supply. This study incorporated field and laboratory experiments to assess the relative habitat value of alternative substrates (crushed concrete, porcelain, crushed limestone, and river rock, as well as oyster shell) for larval oyster recruitment...

  1. Movements and Habitat Use of Female Leopard Sharks in Elkhorn Slough, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlisle, Aaron B.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sharks used low intertidal mudflat habitats (-0.5 to 0 m andgiving birth in a shallow mudflat in Catalina Harbor, Santafauna of a temperate tidal mudflat. Estuarine, Coastal and

  2. Habitat Restoration/Enhancement Fort Hall Reservation : 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osborne, Hunter [Shoshone Bannock Tribes

    2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Habitat enhancement, protection and monitoring were the focus of the Resident Fisheries Program during 2008. Enhancement and protection included sloping, fencing and planting wetlands plugs at sites on Spring Creek (Head-waters). Many previously constructed instream structures (rock barbs and wing dams) were repaired throughout the Fort Hall Indian Reservation (Reservation). Physical sampling during 2008 included sediment and depth measurements (SADMS) in Spring Creek at the Car Removal site. SADMS, used to track changes in channel morphology and specifically track movements of silt through Bottoms stream systems were completed for 5 strata on Spring Creek. Water temperature and chemistry were monitored monthly on Spring Creek, Clear Creek, Diggie Creek, and Portneuf (Jimmy Drinks) and Blackfoot rivers. Fish population densities and biomass were sampled in five reservation streams which included nine sites. Sampling protocols were identical to methods used in past years. Numbers of fish in Spring Creek series remained relatively low, however, there was an increase of biomass overall since 1993. Salmonid fry densities were monitored near Broncho Bridge and were similar to 2006, and 2007, however, as in years past, high densities of macrophytes make it very difficult to see fry in addition to lack of field technicians. Mean catch rate by anglers on Bottoms streams stayed the same as 2007 at 1.5/hr. Numbers of fish larger than 18-inches caught by anglers increased from 2007 at .20 to .26/hr.

  3. Factors contributing to nest predation within habitat of the Golden-checked Warbler, Travis County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fink, Mark Lewis

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FACTORS CONTRIBUTING TO NEST PREDATION WITHIN HABITAT OF THE GOLDEN-CHEEKED WARBLER, TRAVIS COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by MARK LEWIS FINK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1996 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences FACTORS CONTRIBUTING TO NEST PREDATION WITHIN HABITAT OF THE GOLDEN-CHEEKED WARBLER, TRAVIS COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by MARK LEWIS FINK...

  4. Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Volume 1, Oregon, 1985 Annual and Final Reports.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, Ken

    1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hot Springs Fork of the Collawash River is a major sub-drainage in the Clackamas River drainage. Emphasis species for natural production are spring chinook, coho salmon, and winter steelhead. Increased natural production appears limited by a lack of quality rearing habitat. Habitat complexity over approximately 70% of accessible area to anadromous fish has been reduced over the last 40 years by numerous factors. Natural passage barriers limit anadromous fish access to over 7 miles of high quality habitat. In the first year of a multi-year effort to improve fish habitat in the Hot Springs Fork drainage, passage enhancement on two tributaries and channel rehabilitation on one of those tributaries was completed. Three waterfalls on Nohorn Creek were evaluated and passage improved on the uppermost waterfall to provide steelhead full access to 2.4 miles of good quality habitat. The work was completed in October 1985 and involved blasting three jump pools and two holding pools into the waterfall. On Pansy Creek, four potential passage barriers were evaluated and passage improvement work conducted on two logjams and one waterfall. Minor modifications were made to a waterfall to increase flow into a side channel which allows passage around the waterfall. Channel rehabilitation efforts on Pansy Creek (RM 0.0 to 0.3) to increase low flow pool rearing habitat and spawning habitat including blasting five pools into areas of bedrock substrate and using a track-mounted backhoe to construct instream structures. On site materials were used to construct three log sills, three boulder berms, a boulder flow deflector, and five log and boulder structures. Also, an alcove was excavated to provide overwinter rearing habitat. Pre-project monitoring consisting of physical and biological data collection was completed in the project area.

  5. Critical mass: Women in science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a video presentation designed to introduce science to middle and high school science classes as a field which is attractive to women. It is designed to facilitate thought and discussion on the issue of gender stereotypes and discrimination, and is intended for use as part of a curriculum plan which will discuss these issues.

  6. Degenerate and critical Bloch branes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souza Dutra, A. de [Abdus Salam ICTP, Strada Costiera 11, Trieste, I-34100 Italy (Italy); UNESP-Campus de Guaratingueta-DFQ, Departmento de Fisica e Quimica, 12516-410 Guaratingueta SP Brasil (Brazil); Amaro de Faria, A. C. Jr.; Hott, M. [UNESP-Campus de Guaratingueta-DFQ, Departmento de Fisica e Quimica, 12516-410 Guaratingueta SP Brasil (Brazil)

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last few years a number of works reported the appearance of thick branes with internal structure, induced by the parameter which controls the interaction between two scalar fields coupled to gravity in (4,1) dimensions in warped space-time with one extra dimension. Here we show that one can implement the control over the brane thickness without needing to change the potential parameter. On the contrary, this is going to be done by means of the variation of a parameter associated with the domain wall degeneracy. We also report the existence of novel and qualitatively different solutions for a critical value of the degeneracy parameter, which could be called critical Bloch branes.

  7. Heat Recovery Design Considerations for Cogeneration Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasquinelli, D. M.; Burns, E. D.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and integration of the heat recovery section, which includes the steam generation, auxiliary firing, and steam turbine modules, is critical to the overall performance and economics of cogeneration, systems. In gas turbine topping...

  8. Heat Recovery Design Considerations for Cogeneration Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasquinelli, D. M.; Burns, E. D.

    The design and integration of the heat recovery section, which includes the steam generation, auxiliary firing, and steam turbine modules, is critical to the overall performance and economics of cogeneration, systems. In gas turbine topping...

  9. Applied Optimal Shape Design B. Mohammadi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pironneau, Olivier

    are critical too. The paper is also a summary of the material covered in our recent book[7] keywords · Electromagnetically optimal shapes, such as in stealth airplanes · Wave canceling fore bulbe in boat design · Drag

  10. Spawning Habitat Studies of Hanford Reach Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geist, David R.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Chien, Yi-Ju (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

    2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted this study for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with funding provided through the Northwest Power and Conservation Council(a) and the BPA Fish and Wildlife Program. The study was conducted in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. The goal of study was to determine the physical habitat factors necessary to define the redd capacity of fall Chinook salmon that spawn in large mainstem rivers like the Hanford Reach and Snake River. The study was originally commissioned in FY 1994 and then recommissioned in FY 2000 through the Fish and Wildlife Program rolling review of the Columbia River Basin projects. The work described in this report covers the period from 1994 through 2004; however, the majority of the information comes from the last four years of the study (2000 through 2004). Results from the work conducted from 1994 to 2000 were covered in an earlier report. More than any other stock of Pacific salmon, fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) have suffered severe impacts from the hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. Fall Chinook salmon rely heavily on mainstem habitats for all phases of their life cycle, and mainstem hydroelectric dams have inundated or blocked areas that were historically used for spawning and rearing. The natural flow pattern that existed in the historic period has been altered by the dams, which in turn have affected the physical and biological template upon which fall Chinook salmon depend upon for successful reproduction. Operation of the dams to produce power to meet short-term needs in electricity (termed power peaking) produces unnatural fluctuations in flow over a 24-hour cycle. These flow fluctuations alter the physical habitat and disrupt the cues that salmon use to select spawning sites, as well as strand fish in near-shore habitat that becomes dewatered. The quality of spawning gravels has been affected by dam construction, flood protection, and agricultural and industrial development. In some cases, the riverbed is armored such that it is more difficult for spawners to move, while in other cases the intrusion of fine sediment into spawning gravels has reduced water flow to sensitive eggs and young fry. Recovery of fall Chinook salmon populations may involve habitat restoration through such actions as dam removal and reservoir drawdown. In addition, habitat protection will be accomplished through set-asides of existing high-quality habitat. A key component to evaluating these actions is quantifying the salmon spawning habitat potential of a given river reach so that realistic recovery goals for salmon abundance can be developed. Quantifying salmon spawning habitat potential requires an understanding of the spawning behavior of Chinook salmon, as well as an understanding of the physical habitat where these fish spawn. Increasingly, fish biologists are recognizing that assessing the physical habitat of riverine systems where salmon spawn goes beyond measuring microhabitat like water depth, velocity, and substrate size. Geomorphic features of the river measured over a range of spatial scales set up the physical template upon which the microhabitat develops, and successful assessments of spawning habitat potential incorporate these geomorphic features. We had three primary objectives for this study. The first objective was to determine the relationship between physical habitats at different spatial scales and fall Chinook salmon spawning locations. The second objective was to estimate the fall Chinook salmon redd capacity for the Reach. The third objective was to suggest a protocol for determining preferable spawning reaches of fall Chinook salmon. To ensure that we collected physical data within habitat that was representative of the full range of potential spawning habitat, the study area was stratified based on geomorphic features of the river using a two-dimensional river channel index that classified the river cross section into one of four shapes based on channel symmetry, depth, and width. We found t

  11. Tank farms criticality safety manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FORT, L.A.

    2003-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This document defines the Tank Farms Contractor (TFC) criticality safety program, as required by Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Subpart 830.204(b)(6), ''Documented Safety Analysis'' (10 CFR 830.204 (b)(6)), and US Department of Energy (DOE) 0 420.1A, Facility Safety, Section 4.3, ''Criticality Safety.'' In addition, this document contains certain best management practices, adopted by TFC management based on successful Hanford Site facility practices. Requirements in this manual are based on the contractor requirements document (CRD) found in Attachment 2 of DOE 0 420.1A, Section 4.3, ''Nuclear Criticality Safety,'' and the cited revisions of applicable standards published jointly by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and the American Nuclear Society (ANS) as listed in Appendix A. As an informational device, requirements directly imposed by the CRD or ANSI/ANS Standards are shown in boldface. Requirements developed as best management practices through experience and maintained consistent with Hanford Site practice are shown in italics. Recommendations and explanatory material are provided in plain type.

  12. Advanced turbine systems program: Conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, November 1, 1995--January 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Several tasks were completed. Design and test of critical components are discussed. Plans for the next reporting period are outlined.

  13. Nuclear Criticality Safety Application Guide: Safety Analysis Report Update Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (MMES) is committed to performing and documenting safety analyses for facilities it manages for the Department of Energy (DOE). Safety analyses are performed to identify hazards and potential accidents; to analyze the adequacy of measures taken to eliminate, control, or mitigate hazards; and to evaluate potential accidents and determine associated risks. Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) are prepared to document the safety analysis to ensure facilities can be operated safely and in accordance with regulations. Many of the facilities requiring a SAR process fissionable material creating the potential for a nuclear criticality accident. MMES has long had a nuclear criticality safety program that provides the technical support to fissionable material operations to ensure the safe processing and storage of fissionable materials. The guiding philosophy of the program has always been the application of the double-contingency principle, which states: {open_quotes}process designs shall incorporate sufficient factors of safety to require at least two unlikely, independent, and concurrent changes in process conditions before a criticality accident is possible.{close_quotes} At Energy Systems analyses have generally been maintained to document that no single normal or abnormal operating conditions that could reasonably be expected to occur can cause a nuclear criticality accident. This application guide provides a summary description of the MMES Nuclear Criticality Safety Program and the MMES Criticality Accident Alarm System requirements for inclusion in facility SARs. The guide also suggests a way to incorporate the analyses conducted pursuant to the double-contingency principle into the SAR. The prime objective is to minimize duplicative effort between the NCSA process and the SAR process and yet adequately describe the methodology utilized to prevent a nuclear criticality accident.

  14. Assessing Habitat for Avian Species in Assessing Habitat for Avian Species in an Integrated Forage/Biofuels an Integrated Forage/Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    in an Integrated Forage/Biofuels an Integrated Forage/Biofuels Management System Management System in the Midin NWSG mixes beneficial to forage, biofuels production, and wildlife habitatp , 3. identify wildlife habitat benefits associated with varying forage and biofuels management strategies 4. identify optimum

  15. Confederated Tribes Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat Project : Annual Report Fiscal Year 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra

    2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2007 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2007-January 31, 2008) primary project activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight fisheries habitat enhancement projects were implemented on Meacham Creek, Camp Creek, Greasewood Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying five fish passage barriers on four creeks, (2) planting 1,275 saplings and seeding 130 pounds of native grasses, (3) constructing two miles of riparian fencing for livestock exclusion, (4) coordinating activities related to the installation of two off-channel, solar-powered watering areas for livestock, and (5) developing eight water gap access sites to reduce impacts from livestock. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major project areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation Project site (FY2006) and at all existing easements and planned project sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at project sites prior to implementation. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the life of each project to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned project activities and biological opinions were written and approved. Project activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each project site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and project partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each project's success.

  16. Idaho Habitat Evaluation for Offsite Mitigation Record : Annual Report FY 1984.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrosky, Charles Edward; Holubetz, Terry

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An evaluation of existing and proposed habitat improvement projects for anadromous fish in the Clearwater River and Salmon River drainages was conducted. The Clearwater River and Salmon River drainages account for virtually all of Idaho's wild and natural production of summer steelhead and spring and summer chinook salmon, as well as a remnant run of sockeye salmon. Habitat enhancement projects are intended to either increase the amount of habitat, or increase the carrying capacity of existing (usually, degraded) habitat, or both. Migration barriers, such as waterfalls, culverts, and water diversions, can be modified to make available habitat that is not being used, or is underutilized, by anadromous fish. The objectives of this evaluation are: (1) document physical changes in habitat; (2) measure changes in steelhead and chinook production attributable to habitat enhancement projects; (3) measure changes in standing crops of resident fish species due to enhancement; and (4) determine project effectiveness, including relative costs and benefits, to establish the record of credit for mitigation and to guide future management actions. It was not possible to define the level of enhancement for any BPA project in 1984. Evaluations for all projects except three were in the pre-treatment phase during 1984. Because full benefits cannot be defined at current low seeding levels, projects must be monitored until full-seeding is approached. We obtained post-treatment information for three projects in 1984: Lolo Creek instream structures; upper Lochsa River instream structures; and screening of the irrigation diversion on Pole Creek. Of the three, only the Lolo Creek project exhibited any apparent benefits; these apparent benefits were not conclusively determined in 1984. The Lolo Creek project requires a follow-up evaluation in 1985. The Pole Creek project requires better passage for adult chinook at the irrigation diversion. 36 refs., 71 figs., 50 tabs. (ACR)

  17. Spring in January! : the bifocal nature of urban community habitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doone, Ryan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis aims to reconnect man to natural flows by designing spaces with overlapping thermal comfort regions between people and plants. Cities encourage metaphysical awakenings and foster physical re-connections to ...

  18. A review of criticality accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stratton, W R; Smith, D R

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Criticality accidents and the characteristics of prompt power excursions are discussed. Forty-one accidental power transients are reviewed. In each case where available, enough detail is given to help visualize the physical situation, the cause or causes of the accident, the history and characteristics of the transient, the energy release, and the consequences, if any, to personnel and property. Excursions associated with large power reactors are not included in this study, except that some information on the major accident at the Chernobyl reactor in April 1986 is provided in the Appendix. 67 refs., 21 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Criticality Safety | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesvilleAbout » Contact Us ContactPracticesWinter (PartCriticality Safety

  20. Characterization and Monitoring Data for Evaluating Constructed Emergent Sandbar Habitat in the Missouri River Mainstem 2004-2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duberstein, Corey A.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) provides the primary operational management of the Missouri River Main Stem Reservoir System. Management of the Missouri River has generally reduced peak river flows that form and maintain emergent sandbar habitat. Emergent sandbars provide non-vegetated nesting habitat for the endangered interior least tern (Sternula antillarum athalassos) and the threatened Northern Great Plains piping plover (Charadrius melodus). Since 2000, piping plover nesting habitat within the Gavins Point Reach, Garrison Reach, Lake Oahe, and Lake Sakakawea has fledged the majority of piping plovers produced along the Missouri River system. Habitats within Lewis and Clark Lake have also recently become important plover production areas. Mechanical construction of emergent sandbar habitat (ESH) within some of these reaches within the Missouri River began in 2004. Through 2009, 11 sandbar complexes had been constructed (10 in Gavins Point Reach, 1 in Lewis and Clarke Lake) totaling about 543 ac of piping plover and interior least tern nesting habitat. ESH Construction has resulted in a net gain of tern and plover nesting habitat. Both terns and plovers successfully nest and fledge young on constructed sandbars, and constructed habitats were preferred over natural habitats. Natural processes may limit the viability of constructed sandbars as nesting habitat. Continued research is needed to identify if changes in constructed sandbar engineering and management increase the length of time constructed habitats effectively function as nesting habitat. However, the transfer of information from researchers to planners through technical research reports may not be timely enough to effectively foster the feedback mechanisms of an adaptive management strategy.

  1. Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Assessment More Documents & Publications Wireless System Considerations When Implementing NERC Critical Infrastructure Protection...

  2. Critical Materials Workshop Final Participant List

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    List of participants who attended the Critical Materials Workshop held on April 3, 2012 in Arlington, VA

  3. California spiny lobster (Panulirus interruptus) movement behavior and habitat use: Implications for the effectiveness of marine protected areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withy-Allen, Kira R.Y.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and R. S. Steneck. 1993. Kelp beds as habitat for Americanin southern California kelp forest ecosystems. Science 312:and reduced expectations in kelp forest communities. Journal

  4. 90 4,000 Meters under the Ice The Arctic is one of the habitats undergoing the most

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PlanckResearch 89 RUSSIA Special RUSSIA Special #12;#12;TEXT MAREN EMMERICH The Arctic is one of the habitats

  5. Ecology, habitat preference, and conservation of Neotropical non-volant mammal communities in Costa Rica's Caribbean lowlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero, Andrea

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Biodiversity in the tropics is continually being threatened by anthropogenic disturbances such as habitat degradation and fragmentation. Unfortunately, conservation decisions and management of wildlife are difficult tasks ...

  6. Anomalies of Nuclear Criticality, Revision 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, E. D.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Durst, Bonita E.; Erickson, David; Puigh, Raymond J.

    2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is revision 6 of the Anomalies of Nuclear Criticality. This report is required reading for the training of criticality professionals in many organizations both nationally and internationally. This report describes many different classes of nuclear criticality anomalies that are different than expected.

  7. Introduction Granular Flow at the Critical State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhn, Matthew R.

    : granular topology at the critical state 2D materials only Micro-scale statistics of topology: coordination Scope and Objectives Focus: granular topology at the critical state 2D materials only MicroIntroduction Topology Geometry Granular Flow at the Critical State as a Topologically Disordered

  8. Fusion algebra of critical percolation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jorgen Rasmussen; Paul A. Pearce

    2007-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an explicit conjecture for the chiral fusion algebra of critical percolation considering Virasoro representations with no enlarged or extended symmetry algebra. The representations we take to generate fusion are countably infinite in number. The ensuing fusion rules are quasi-rational in the sense that the fusion of a finite number of these representations decomposes into a finite direct sum of these representations. The fusion rules are commutative, associative and exhibit an sl(2) structure. They involve representations which we call Kac representations of which some are reducible yet indecomposable representations of rank 1. In particular, the identity of the fusion algebra is a reducible yet indecomposable Kac representation of rank 1. We make detailed comparisons of our fusion rules with the recent results of Eberle-Flohr and Read-Saleur. Notably, in agreement with Eberle-Flohr, we find the appearance of indecomposable representations of rank 3. Our fusion rules are supported by extensive numerical studies of an integrable lattice model of critical percolation. Details of our lattice findings and numerical results will be presented elsewhere.

  9. Reactor Testing and Qualification: Prioritized High-level Criticality Testing Needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Bragg-Sitton; J. Bess; J. Werner; G. Harms; S. Bailey

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) were tasked with reviewing possible criticality testing needs to support development of the fission surface power system reactor design. Reactor physics testing can provide significant information to aid in development of technologies associated with small, fast spectrum reactors that could be applied for non-terrestrial power systems, leading to eventual system qualification. Several studies have been conducted in recent years to assess the data and analyses required to design and build a space fission power system with high confidence that the system will perform as designed [Marcille, 2004a, 2004b; Weaver, 2007; Parry et al., 2008]. This report will provide a summary of previous critical tests and physics measurements that are potentially applicable to the current reactor design (both those that have been benchmarked and those not yet benchmarked), summarize recent studies of potential nuclear testing needs for space reactor development and their applicability to the current baseline fission surface power (FSP) system design, and provide an overview of a suite of tests (separate effects, sub-critical or critical) that could fill in the information database to improve the accuracy of physics modeling efforts as the FSP design is refined. Some recommendations for tasks that could be completed in the near term are also included. Specific recommendations on critical test configurations will be reserved until after the sensitivity analyses being conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are completed (due August 2011).

  10. Lower Columbia River and Estuary Habitat Monitoring Study, 2011 - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borde, Amy B.; Kaufmann, Ronald M.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Thom, Ronald M.; Wright, Cynthia L.

    2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecosystem Monitoring Program is a collaborative effort between the Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership (LCREP), University of Washington, Wetland Ecosystem Team (UW), US Geological Survey, Water Science Center (USGS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA-Fisheries, hereafter NOAA), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Marine Sciences Laboratory (PNNL). The goal of the program is to conduct emergent wetland monitoring aimed at characterizing salmonid habitats in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) from the mouth of the estuary to Bonneville Dam (Figure 1). This is an ecosystem based monitoring program focused on evaluating status and trends in habitat and reducing uncertainties regarding these ecosystems to ultimately improve the survival of juvenile salmonids through the LCRE. This project comprehensively assesses habitat, fish, food web, and abiotic conditions in the lower river, focusing on shallow water and vegetated habitats used by juvenile salmonids for feeding, rearing and refugia. The information is intended to be used to guide management actions associated with species recovery, particularly that of threatened and endangered salmonids. PNNLs role in this multi-year study is to monitor the habitat structure (e.g., vegetation, topography, channel morphology, and sediment type) as well as hydrologic patterns.

  11. Overview of multivariate methods and their application to studies of wildlife habitat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shugart, H.H. Jr.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multivariate statistical techniques as methods of choice in analyzing habitat relations among animals have distinct advantages over competitive methodologies. These considerations, joined with a reduction in the cost of computer time, the increased availability of multivariate statistical packages, and an increased willingness on the part of ecologists to use mathematics and statistics as tools, have created an exponentially increasing interest in multivariate statistical methods over the past decade. It is important to note that the earliest multivariate statistical analyses in ecology did more than introduce a set of appropriate and needed methodologies to ecology. The studies emphasized different spatial and organizational scales from those typically emphasized in habitat studies. The new studies, that used multivariate methods, emphasized individual organisms' responses in a heterogeneous environment. This philosophical (and to some degree, methodological) emphasis on heterogeneity has led to a potential to predict the consequences of disturbances and management on wildlife habitat. One recent development in this regard has been the coupling of forest succession simulators with multivariate analysis of habitat to predict habitat availability under different timber management procedures.

  12. CRITICALITY SAFETY TRAINING AT FLUOR HANFORD (FH)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TOFFER, H.

    2005-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fluor Hanford Criticality Safety engineers are extensively trained. The objectives and requirements for training are derived from Department of Energy (DOE) and American National Standards Institute/American Nuclear Society Standards (ANSI/ANS), and are captured in the Hanford Criticality Safety Program manual, HNF-7098. Qualification cards have been established for the general Criticality Safety Engineer (CSE) analyst, CSEs who support specific facilities, and for the facility Criticality Safety Representatives (CSRs). Refresher training and continuous education in the discipline are emphasized. Weekly Brown Bag Sessions keep the criticality safety engineers informed of the latest developments and historic perspectives.

  13. Bibliography for nuclear criticality accident experience, alarm systems, and emergency management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Putman, V.L.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The characteristics, detection, and emergency management of nuclear criticality accidents outside reactors has been an important component of criticality safety for as long as the need for this specialized safety discipline has been recognized. The general interest and importance of such topics receives special emphasis because of the potentially lethal, albeit highly localized, effects of criticality accidents and because of heightened public and regulatory concerns for any undesirable event in nuclear and radiological fields. This bibliography lists references which are potentially applicable to or interesting for criticality alarm, detection, and warning systems; criticality accident emergency management; and their associated programs. The lists are annotated to assist bibliography users in identifying applicable: industry and regulatory guidance and requirements, with historical development information and comments; criticality accident characteristics, consequences, experiences, and responses; hazard-, risk-, or safety-analysis criteria; CAS design and qualification criteria; CAS calibration, maintenance, repair, and testing criteria; experiences of CAS designers and maintainers; criticality accident emergency management (planning, preparedness, response, and recovery) requirements and guidance; criticality accident emergency management experience, plans, and techniques; methods and tools for analysis; and additional bibliographies.

  14. On the Criticality Safety of Transuranic Sodium Fast Reactor Fuel Transport Casks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samuel Bays; Ayodeji Alajo

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work addresses the neutronic performance and criticality safety issues of transport casks for fuel pertaining to low conversion ratio sodium cooled fast reactors, conventionally known as Advanced Burner Reactors. The criticality of a one, three, seven and 19-assembly cask capacity is presented. Both dry helium and flooded water filled casks are considered. No credit for fuel burnup or fission products was assumed. As many as possible of the conservatisms used in licensing light water reactor universal transport casks were incorporated into this SFR cask criticality design and analysis. It was found that at 7-assemblies or more, adding moderator to the SFR cask increases criticality margin. Also, removal of MAs from the fuel increases criticality margin of dry casks and takes a slight amount of margin away for wet casks. Assuming credit for borated fuel tube liners, this design analysis suggests that as many as 19 assemblies can be loaded in a cask if limited purely by criticality safety. If no credit for boron is assumed, the cask could possibly hold seven assemblies if low conversion ratio fast reactor grade fuel and not breeder reactor grade fuel is assumed. The analysis showed that there is a need for new cask designs for fast reactors spent fuel transportation. There is a potential of modifying existing transportation cask design as the starting point for fast reactor spent fuel transportation.

  15. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Hellsgate Project, 1999-2000 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, Matthew

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was conducted on lands acquired and/or managed (4,568 acres total) by the Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate project) to mitigate some of the losses associated with the original construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam and inundation of habitats behind the dams. Three separate properties, totaling 2,224 acres were purchased in 1998. One property composed of two separate parcels, mostly grassland lies southeast of the town of Nespelem in Okanogan County (770 acres) and was formerly called the Hinman property. The former Hinman property lies within an area the Tribes have set aside for the protection and preservation of the sharp-tailed grouse (Agency Butte unit). This special management area minus the Hinman acquisition contains 2,388 acres in a long-term lease with the Tribes. The second property lies just south of the Silver Creek turnoff (Ferry County) and is bisected by the Hellsgate Road (part of the Friedlander unit). This parcel contains 60 acres of riparian and conifer forest cover. The third property (now named the Sand Hills unit) acquired for mitigation (1,394 acres) lies within the Hellsgate Reserve in Ferry County. This new acquisition links two existing mitigation parcels (the old Sand Hills parcels and the Lundstrum Flat parcel, all former Kuehne purchases) together forming one large unit. HEP team members included individuals from the Colville Confederated Tribes Fish and Wildlife Department (CTCR), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The HEP team conducted a baseline habitat survey using the following HEP species models: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), mink (Mustela vison), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), bobcat (Lynx rufus), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), and sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus). HEP analysis and results are discussed within the body of the text. The cover types evaluated for this study were grasslands, shrub-steppe, rock, conifer forest and woodland, and riparian. These same cover types were evaluated for other Hellsgate Project acquisitions within the same geographic area. Mule deer habitat on the Sand Hills unit rated good overall for winter food and cover in the shrub-steppe and conifer woodland cover types. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat on the former Hinman property and special management area rated good for nesting and brood rearing in the grassland cover type. Mink habitat on the Friedlander parcel rated poor due to lack of food and cover in and along the riparian cover type. The Downy woodpecker rated poor for food and cover on the Friedlander parcel in the conifer forest cover type. This species also rated poor on the conifer woodland habitat on the Hinman parcel. Yellow warbler habitat on the Agency Butte Special Management area rated very poor due to lack of shrubs for cover and reproduction around the scattered semi/permanent ponds that occur on the area. Bobcat habitat on this same area rated poor due to lack of cover and food. Fragmentation of existing quality habitat is also a problem for both these species. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation and managed lands, and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, this information will be used to manage these lands for the benefit of wildlife.

  16. Critical heat flux test apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Welsh, Robert E. (West Mifflin, PA); Doman, Marvin J. (McKeesport, PA); Wilson, Edward C. (West Mifflin, PA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for testing, in situ, highly irradiated specimens at high temperature transients is provided. A specimen, which has a thermocouple device attached thereto, is manipulated into test position in a sealed quartz heating tube by a robot. An induction coil around a heating portion of the tube is powered by a radio frequency generator to heat the specimen. Sensors are connected to monitor the temperatures of the specimen and the induction coil. A quench chamber is located below the heating portion to permit rapid cooling of the specimen which is moved into this quench chamber once it is heated to a critical temperature. A vacuum pump is connected to the apparatus to collect any released fission gases which are analyzed at a remote location.

  17. Counterterms, critical gravity and holography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kallol Sen; Aninda Sinha; Nemani V. Suryanarayana

    2012-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider counterterms for odd dimensional holographic CFTs. These counterterms are derived by demanding cut-off independence of the CFT partition function on $S^d$ and $S^1 \\times S^{d-1}$. The same choice of counterterms leads to a cut-off independent Schwarzschild black hole entropy. When treated as independent actions, these counterterm actions resemble critical theories of gravity, i.e., higher curvature gravity theories where the additional massive spin-2 modes become massless. Equivalently, in the context of AdS/CFT, these are theories where at least one of the central charges associated with the trace anomaly vanishes. Connections between these theories and logarithmic CFTs are discussed. For a specific choice of parameters, the theories arising from counterterms are non-dynamical and resemble a DBI generalization of gravity. For even dimensional CFTs, analogous counterterms cancel log-independent cut-off dependence.

  18. Top 10 critical thinking tips Critical thinking at university is similiar to any critical thinking you do in your everyday life. It is about asking questions,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , as well as other materials.. 6. Eight-step model The eight-step model to develop critical thinkingTop 10 critical thinking tips Critical thinking at university is similiar to any critical thinking evaluations. Here are some top 10 tips about critical thinking at university. 1. Ask questions Critical

  19. 2011 Annual Criticality Safety Program Performance Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrea Hoffman

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2011 review of the INL Criticality Safety Program has determined that the program is robust and effective. The review was prepared for, and fulfills Contract Data Requirements List (CDRL) item H.20, 'Annual Criticality Safety Program performance summary that includes the status of assessments, issues, corrective actions, infractions, requirements management, training, and programmatic support.' This performance summary addresses the status of these important elements of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Assessments - Assessments in 2011 were planned and scheduled. The scheduled assessments included a Criticality Safety Program Effectiveness Review, Criticality Control Area Inspections, a Protection of Controlled Unclassified Information Inspection, an Assessment of Criticality Safety SQA, and this management assessment of the Criticality Safety Program. All of the assessments were completed with the exception of the 'Effectiveness Review' for SSPSF, which was delayed due to emerging work. Although minor issues were identified in the assessments, no issues or combination of issues indicated that the INL Criticality Safety Program was ineffective. The identification of issues demonstrates the importance of an assessment program to the overall health and effectiveness of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Issues and Corrective Actions - There are relatively few criticality safety related issues in the Laboratory ICAMS system. Most were identified by Criticality Safety Program assessments. No issues indicate ineffectiveness in the INL Criticality Safety Program. All of the issues are being worked and there are no imminent criticality concerns. Infractions - There was one criticality safety related violation in 2011. On January 18, 2011, it was discovered that a fuel plate bundle in the Nuclear Materials Inspection and Storage (NMIS) facility exceeded the fissionable mass limit, resulting in a technical safety requirement (TSR) violation. The TSR limits fuel plate bundles to 1085 grams U-235, which is the maximum loading of an ATR fuel element. The overloaded fuel plate bundle contained 1097 grams U-235 and was assembled under an 1100 gram U-235 limit in 1982. In 2003, the limit was reduced to 1085 grams citing a new criticality safety evaluation for ATR fuel elements. The fuel plate bundle inventories were not checked for compliance prior to implementing the reduced limit. A subsequent review of the NMIS inventory did not identify further violations. Requirements Management - The INL Criticality Safety program is organized and well documented. The source requirements for the INL Criticality Safety Program are from 10 CFR 830.204, DOE Order 420.1B, Chapter III, 'Nuclear Criticality Safety,' ANSI/ANS 8-series Industry Standards, and DOE Standards. These source requirements are documented in LRD-18001, 'INL Criticality Safety Program Requirements Manual.' The majority of the criticality safety source requirements are contained in DOE Order 420.1B because it invokes all of the ANSI/ANS 8-Series Standards. DOE Order 420.1B also invokes several DOE Standards, including DOE-STD-3007, 'Guidelines for Preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations at Department of Energy Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities.' DOE Order 420.1B contains requirements for DOE 'Heads of Field Elements' to approve the criticality safety program and specific elements of the program, namely, the qualification of criticality staff and the method for preparing criticality safety evaluations. This was accomplished by the approval of SAR-400, 'INL Standardized Nuclear Safety Basis Manual,' Chapter 6, 'Prevention of Inadvertent Criticality.' Chapter 6 of SAR-400 contains sufficient detail and/or reference to the specific DOE and contractor documents that adequately describe the INL Criticality Safety Program per the elements specified in DOE Order 420.1B. The Safety Evaluation Report for SAR-400 specifically recognizes that the approval of SAR-400 approves the INL Criticality Safety Program. No new source requirements were released in 2011. A revision to LRD-18001 is

  20. Population and habitat on the feudal domain iria at the beginning of the XVIth century Eugen Ghita Populaie i habitat pe domeniul cetii iria la nceputul secolului al XVI lea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Population and habitat on the feudal domain iria at the beginning of the XVIth century Eugen Ghita and habitat on the feudal domain iria at the beginning of the XVIth century" is based on a statistical feudal domain in Transylvania in the middle Ages. The 8152 inhabitants, where nearly 90% for them

  1. Session: Non-fatality and habitat impacts on birds from wind energy development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strickland, Dale

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop was consisted of one paper presentation followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The session focused on discussion of non-collision impacts of wind energy projects on birds, primarily impacts to habitat. The presentation included information about the impacts of habitat fragmentation, disturbance, and site avoidance from wind turbines, as well as from roads, transmission facilities, and other related construction at wind project sites. Whether birds habituate to the presence of turbines and the influence of regional factors were also addressed. The paper given by Dale Strickland was titled ''Overview of Non-Collision Related Impacts from Wind Projects''.

  2. Conceptual design report, TWRS Privatization Phase I, site development and roads, subproject W-505

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, G.

    1997-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This document includes Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the site development, construction of new roads and improvements at existing road intersections, habitat mitigation, roadway lighting, and construction power needed for the construction of two Private Contractor (PC) Facilities. Approximately 50 hectare (124 acres) land parcel, east of the Grout Facility, is planned for the PC facilities.

  3. SAMPLE INTERNSHIP DESCRIPTION NOT CURRENTLY OPEN FOR INFORMATION ONLY Digital Design/Social Media Intern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SAMPLE INTERNSHIP DESCRIPTION NOT CURRENTLY OPEN FOR INFORMATION ONLY Digital Design/Social Media Intern Salmon Safe Portland-based environmental nonprofit focused on water quality and habitat media internship to assist in developing and promoting a new website. The internship will reside at our

  4. Cranberry Bogs: The effect of cultivation and restoration on habitat distribution, benthic invertebrate communities, and food webs in stream ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    the variation in these dynamics between cultivated, restored and natural streams, I classified habitat along/detritus formed the base of the food web. This indicates that when restoring streams, attention should be paid, agriculture, habitat distribution, benthic invertebrates, food web, stream restoration Introduction Land use

  5. Trembling aspen Current Figure S9a. Projected habitat of trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michaux). The left image

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamann, Andreas

    Trembling aspen Current Figure S9a. Projected habitat of trembling aspen (Populus-2006 Recent Average1961-1990 Climate Normal #12;Trembling aspen 2020s Figure S9b. Projected habitat of trembling aspen for the 20112040 normal period according to 18 climate change

  6. Historic Habitat Opportunities and Food-Web Linkages of Juvenile Salmon in the Columbia River Estuary and Their Implications for Managing River Flows and Restoring Estuarine Habitat, Physical Sciences Component, Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay, David A. [Portland State University

    2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-term changes and fluctuations in river flow, water properties, tides, and sediment transport in the Columbia River and its estuary have had a profound effect on Columbia River salmonids and their habitat. Understanding the river-flow, temperature, tidal, and sediment-supply regimes of the Lower Columbia River (LCR) and how they interact with habitat is, therefore, critical to development of system management and restoration strategies. It is also useful to separate management and climate impacts on hydrologic properties and habitat. This contract, part of a larger project led by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), consists of three work elements, one with five tasks. The first work element relates to reconstruction of historic conditions in a broad sense. The second and third elements consist, respectively, of participation in project-wide integration efforts, and reporting. This report focuses on the five tasks within the historic reconstruction work element. It in part satisfies the reporting requirement, and it forms the basis for our participation in the project integration effort. The first task consists of several topics related to historic changes in river stage and tide. Within this task, the chart datum levels of 14 historic bathymetric surveys completed before definition of Columbia River Datum (CRD) were related to CRD, to enable analysis of these surveys by other project scientists. We have also modeled tidal datums and properties (lower low water or LLW, higher high water or HHW, mean water level or MWL, and greater diurnal tidal range or GDTR) as a function of river flow and tidal range at Astoria. These calculations have been carried for 10 year intervals (1940-date) for 21 stations, though most stations have data for only a few time intervals. Longer-term analyses involve the records at Astoria (1925-date) and Vancouver (1902-date). Water levels for any given river flow have decreased substantially (0.3-1.8 m, depending on river flow and tidal range), and tidal ranges have increased considerably (by a factor of 1.5 to 4 for most river-flow levels) since the 1900-1940 period at most stations, with the largest percentage changes occurring at upriver stations. These changes have been caused by a combination of changes in channel roughness, shape and alignment, changes in coastal tides, and (possibly) bed degradation. Tides are growing throughout the Northeast Pacific, and Astoria (Tongue Pt) has one of the most rapid rates of increase in tidal range in the entire Eastern Pacific, about 0.3m per century. More than half of this change appears to result from changes within the system, the rest from larger scale changes in coastal tides. Regression models of HHW have been used to estimate daily shallow water habitat (SWHA) available in a {approx}25 mile long reach of the system from Eagle Cliff to Kalama for 1925-2004 under four different scenarios (the four possible combinations of diked/undiked and observed flow/ virgin flow). More than 70% of the habitat in this reach has been lost (modern conditions vs. virgin flow with not dikes). In contrast, however, to the reach between Skamokawa and Beaver, selective dike removal (instead of a combination of dike removal and flow restoration) would suffice to increase spring SWHA. The second task consists of reconstruction of the hydrologic cycle before 1878, based on historic documents and inversion of tidal data collected before the onset of the historic flow record in 1878. We have a complete list of freshet times and peak flows for 1858-1877, and scattered freshet information for 1841-1857. Based on tidal data, we have reconstructed the annual flow cycles for 1870 and 1871; other time periods between 1854 and 1867 are under analysis. The three remaining tasks relate to post-1878 hydrologic conditions (flows, sediment supply and water temperature), and separation of the human and climate influences thereon. Estimated ob-served (sometimes routed), adjusted (corrected for reservoir manipulation) and virgin (corrected also for irrigation div

  7. Determining Home Range and Preferred Habitat of Feral Horses on the Nevada National Security Site Using Geographic Information Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, Ashley V. [NSTec

    2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Feral horses (Equus caballus) are free-roaming descendants of domesticated horses and legally protected by the Wild and Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act of 1971, which mandates how feral horses and burros should be managed and protected on federal lands. Using a geographic information system to determine the home range and suitable habitat of feral horses on the federally managed Nevada National Security Site can enable wildlife biologists in making best management practice recommendations. Home range was estimated at 88.1 square kilometers. Site suitability was calculated for elevation, forage, slope, water presence and horse observations. These variables were combined in successive iterations into one polygon. Suitability rankings established that 85 square kilometers are most suitable habitat, with 2,052 square kilometers of good habitat 1,252 square kilometers of fair habitat and 122 square kilometers of least suitable habitat.

  8. Elements of a nuclear criticality safety program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopper, C.M.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear criticality safety programs throughout the United States are quite successful, as compared with other safety disciplines, at protecting life and property, especially when regarded as a developing safety function with no historical perspective for the cause and effect of process nuclear criticality accidents before 1943. The programs evolved through self-imposed and regulatory-imposed incentives. They are the products of conscientious individuals, supportive corporations, obliged regulators, and intervenors (political, public, and private). The maturing of nuclear criticality safety programs throughout the United States has been spasmodic, with stability provided by the volunteer standards efforts within the American Nuclear Society. This presentation provides the status, relative to current needs, for nuclear criticality safety program elements that address organization of and assignments for nuclear criticality safety program responsibilities; personnel qualifications; and analytical capabilities for the technical definition of critical, subcritical, safety and operating limits, and program quality assurance.

  9. Criticality Safety Evaluation of a LLNL Training Assembly for Criticality Safety (TACS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heinrichs, D P

    2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Hands-on experimental training in the physical behavior of multiplying systems is one of ten key areas of training required for practitioners to become qualified in the discipline of criticality safety as identified in DOE-STD-1135-99, ''Guidance for Nuclear Criticality Safety Engineer Training and Qualification''. This document is a criticality safety evaluation of the training activities (or operations) associated with HS-3200, ''Laboratory Class for Criticality Safety''. These activities utilize the Training Assembly for Criticality Safety (TACS). The original intent of HS-3200 was to provide LLNL fissile material handlers with a practical hands-on experience as a supplement to the academic training they receive biennially in HS-3100, ''Fundamentals of Criticality Safety'', as required by ANSI/ANS-8.20-1991, ''Nuclear Criticality Safety Training''. HS-3200 is to be enhanced to also address the training needs of nuclear criticality safety professionals under the auspices of the NNSA Nuclear Criticality Safety Program.

  10. Greater Sage-Grouse Habitat Use and Population Demographics at the Simpson Ridge Wind Resource Area, Carbon County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory D. Johnson; Chad W. LeBeau; Ryan Nielsen; Troy Rintz; Jamey Eddy; Matt Holloran

    2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was conducted to obtain baseline data on use of the proposed Simpson Ridge Wind Resource Area (SRWRA) in Carbon County, Wyoming by greater sage-grouse. The first two study years were designed to determine pre-construction seasonally selected habitats and population-level vital rates (productivity and survival). The presence of an existing wind energy facility in the project area, the PacifiCorp Seven Mile Hill (SMH) project, allowed us to obtain some information on initial sage-grouse response to wind turbines the first two years following construction. To our knowledge these are the first quantitative data on sage-grouse response to an existing wind energy development. This report presents results of the first two study years (April 1, 2009 through March 30, 2011). This study was selected for continued funding by the National Wind Coordinating Collaborative Sage-Grouse Collaborative (NWCC-SGC) and has been ongoing since March 30, 2011. Future reports summarizing results of this research will be distributed through the NWCC-SGC. To investigate population trends through time, we determined the distribution and numbers of males using leks throughout the study area, which included a 4-mile radius buffer around the SRWRA. Over the 2-year study, 116 female greater sage-grouse were captured by spotlighting and use of hoop nets on roosts surrounding leks during the breeding period. Radio marked birds were located anywhere from twice a week to once a month, depending on season. All radio-locations were classified to season. We developed predictor variables used to predict success of fitness parameters and relative probability of habitat selection within the SRWRA and SMH study areas. Anthropogenic features included paved highways, overhead transmission lines, wind turbines and turbine access roads. Environmental variables included vegetation and topography features. Home ranges were estimated using a kernel density estimator. We developed resource selection functions (RSF) to estimate probability of selection within the SRWRA and SMH. Fourteen active greater sage-grouse leks were documented during lek surveys Mean lek size decreased from 37 in 2008 to 22 in 2010. Four leks located 0.61, 1.3, 1.4 and 2.5 km from the nearest wind turbine remained active throughout the study, but the total number of males counted on these four leks decreased from 162 the first year prior to construction (2008), to 97 in 2010. Similar lek declines were noted in regional leks not associated with wind energy development throughout Carbon County. We obtained 2,659 sage-grouse locations from radio-equipped females, which were used to map use of each project area by season. The sage-grouse populations within both study areas are relatively non-migratory, as radio-marked sage-grouse used similar areas during all annual life cycles. Potential impacts to sage-grouse from wind energy infrastructure are not well understood. The data rom this study provide insight into the early interactions of wind energy infrastructure and sage-grouse. Nest success and brood-rearing success were not statistically different between areas with and without wind energy development in the short-term. Nest success also was not influenced by anthropogenic features such as turbines in the short-term. Additionally, female survival was similar among both study areas, suggesting wind energy infrastructure was not impacting female survival in the short-term; however, further analysis is needed to identify habitats with different levels of risk to better understand the impact of wind enregy development on survival. Nest and brood-rearing habitat selection were not influenced by turbines in the short-term; however, summer habitat selection occurred within habitats closer to wind turbines. Major roads were avoided in both study areas and during most of the seasons. The impact of transmission lines varied among study areas, suggesting other landscape features may be influencing selection. The data provided in this report are preliminary and are not meant to provide a basis for fo

  11. Criticality parameters for tank waste evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, C.A.

    1997-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear criticality parameters were developed as a basis for evaluating criticality safety for waste stored in the high-level waste tank farms on the Hanford Site in Washington State. The plutonium critical concentration and critical mass were calculated using a conservative waste model (CWM). The primary requirement of a CWM is that it have a lower neutron absorption than any actual waste. Graphs are provided of the critical mass as a function of plutonium concentration for spheres and for uniform slab layers in a 22.9-m-diameter tank. Minimum subcritical absorber-to-plutonium mass rates were calculated for waste components selected for their relative abundance and neutron absorption capacity. Comparison of measured absorber-to-plutonium mass ratios in their corresponding subcritical limit mass ratios provides a means of assessing whether criticality is possible for waste of the measured composition. A comparison is made between the plutonium critical concentrations in CWM solids and in a postulated real waste. This comparison shows that the actual critical parameters are likely to be significantly larger than those obtained using the CWM, thus providing confidence that the margin of safety obtained to the criticality safety evaluation is conservative.

  12. 209-E Critical Mass Laboratory - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and a control room from which experiments could be remotely monitored and controlled. Criticality experiments, where a nuclear chain reaction becomes self-sustaining, were also...

  13. Critical function and success path summary display

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The content of and hierarchical access to three levels of display pages containing information on critical function monitoring and success path monitoring.

  14. CMI Education and Outreach | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Education and Outreach The Critical Materials Institute offers a variety of educational opportunities through several partners, including the Colorado School of Mines and Iowa...

  15. Abstract. Maximum likelihood supervised classifications with 1-m 128 band hyperspectral data accurately map in-stream habitats in the Lamar River,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcus, W. Andrew

    accurately map in-stream habitats in the Lamar River, Wyoming with producer's accuracies of 91% for pools, 87

  16. Redwood Creek, Marin County 2010 Monitoring Study of a Salmonid Habitat Stream Restoration Project: Seven-?Year Post-?Project Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crockett, Richard; Cundy, Fiona; Hanley, Colin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Salmonid Habitat Stream Restoration Project: Seven-?227 | Stream and River Restoration Term Project | in the Stream and River Restoration class

  17. Survey of the Fishes and Habitat of Western South Dakota Streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Survey of the Fishes and Habitat of Western South Dakota Streams By Brandon C. Harland A thesis in the duck blind as well as in the field with my labs. Last but not least, I owe more than thanks to my wife. This thesis is dedicated to hunting companions, the abundance of game, and the opportunity to pursue them

  18. Habitat Projects Completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, 1999 Completion Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Bradley J.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Program (ACMWP) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The Asotin Creek watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington in WRIA 35. According to WDFW's Priority WRIA's by At-Risk Stock Significance Map, it is the highest priority in southeastern WA. Snake River spring chinook salmon, summer steelhead and bull trout, which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. The ACMWP began coordinating habitat projects in 1995. Approximately two hundred seventy-six projects have been implemented through the ACMWP as of 1999. Twenty of these projects were funded in part through Bonneville Power Administration's 1999 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. These projects used a variety of methods to enhance and protect watershed conditions. In-stream work for fish habitat included construction of hard structures (e.g. vortex rock weirs), meander reconstruction, placement of large woody debris (LWD) and whole trees and improvements to off-channel rearing habitat; thirty-eight were created with these structures. Three miles of stream benefited from riparian improvements such as vegetative plantings (17,000 trees and shrubs) and noxious weed control. Two sediment basin constructions, 67 acres of grass seeding, and seven hundred forty-five acres of minimum till were implemented to reduce sediment production and delivery to streams in the watershed.

  19. ORIGINAL PAPER The role of fallow in habitat use by the Lesser Kestrel during

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ). In order to minimize the environmental impact of intensive agricul- ture, voluntary agri-environmental The maintenance of fallows has been shown to prevent the loss of farmland biodiversity caused by agricultural.9%), likely affecting habitat use by Lesser Kestrel through an increase of other non- preferred crops (e

  20. It's intuitively obvious that habitat is important to fishes and the fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    It's intuitively obvious that habitat is important to fishes and the fisheries they support to account for it in fisheries management. This is especially true for marine fishes like gag grouper fisherman worth his or her salt has a closely-guarded collection of GPS coordinates and an electronic fish

  1. The Effects of Large Storm Events on Basin-Range Riparia_nStream Habitats1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    This report des cribes habitat changes in Creek show peak flows of 114 cfs on May 30, three riparian stream was to randomly select ~:Sstream and subdivide it into 181 6.02 laced at 10-ft intervals along t he UJ

  2. Morphological Abnormalities in Amphibians in Agricultural Habitats: A Case Study of the Common Frog Rana temporaria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meril, Juha

    background deformity frequency of 05%. Many chemical contaminants, including agrochemicals, can cause along an agrochemical gradient. Abnormalities occurred in a low frequency (1% of the studied individuals abnormality frequencies in the habitats most likely exposed to agrochemicals. Hence, the data suggest

  3. Freshwater mussels and water quality: A review of the effects of hydrologic and instream habitat alterations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watters, G. Thomas

    , The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43212 ABSTRACT: Hydraulic impacts represent a suite of habitat. These hydraulic impacts thus overlap each other to one degree or another. I have attempted to break them down to divert water to mills and turbines, where its seemingly limitless power ground grain, cut lumber

  4. The Effects of Timber as a Biofuel on the Occupancy and Habitat Suitability of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    1 The Effects of Timber as a Biofuel on the Occupancy and Habitat Suitability of the Indiana Bat of Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries Introduction Biofuel: National Security Stimulate Local Economies Negative Impacts of Biofuel Production Decreased Site Productivity/Decreased Soil Conservation

  5. Ecosystem Engineers in the Pelagic Realm: Alteration of Habitat by Species Ranging from Microbes to Jellyfish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabiri, John O.

    SYMPOSIUM Ecosystem Engineers in the Pelagic Realm: Alteration of Habitat by Species Ranging from, Engineering and Applied Science, Pasadena, CA, 91125, USA From the symposium ``Marine Ecosystem Engineers@si.edu Synopsis Ecosystem engineers are species that alter the physical environment in ways that create new

  6. Comparing GIS-based habitat models for applications in EIA and SEA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gontier, Mikael, E-mail: gontier@kth.s [Department of Land and Water Resources Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Moertberg, Ulla, E-mail: mortberg@kth.s [Department of Land and Water Resources Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Balfors, Berit, E-mail: balfors@kth.s [Department of Land and Water Resources Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Land use changes, urbanisation and infrastructure developments in particular, cause fragmentation of natural habitats and threaten biodiversity. Tools and measures must be adapted to assess and remedy the potential effects on biodiversity caused by human activities and developments. Within physical planning, environmental impact assessment (EIA) and strategic environmental assessment (SEA) play important roles in the prediction and assessment of biodiversity-related impacts from planned developments. However, adapted prediction tools to forecast and quantify potential impacts on biodiversity components are lacking. This study tested and compared four different GIS-based habitat models and assessed their relevance for applications in environmental assessment. The models were implemented in the Stockholm region in central Sweden and applied to data on the crested tit (Parus cristatus), a sedentary bird species of coniferous forest. All four models performed well and allowed the distribution of suitable habitats for the crested tit in the Stockholm region to be predicted. The models were also used to predict and quantify habitat loss for two regional development scenarios. The study highlighted the importance of model selection in impact prediction. Criteria that are relevant for the choice of model for predicting impacts on biodiversity were identified and discussed. Finally, the importance of environmental assessment for the preservation of biodiversity within the general frame of biodiversity conservation is emphasised.

  7. Nyman RNR 3108 Renewable Natural Resources 3108: CASE STUDIES IN HABITAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nyman, John

    Nyman RNR 3108 Renewable Natural Resources 3108: CASE STUDIES IN HABITAT RESTORATION Syllabus:30 to 1:20; Thursdays, Room 141 Renewable Natural Resources Building Laboratory: 1:30-4:20, Thursdays, departs from Room 141, Renewable Natural Resources Building. Field notebooks are required for all field

  8. Mapping locust habitats in River Ili Delta, Kazakhstan, using Landsat imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latchininsky, Alexandre

    Mapping locust habitats in River Ili Delta, Kazakhstan, using Landsat imagery Ramesh Sivanpillai a Protection, Almaty, Kazakhstan Received 11 August 2005; received in revised form 10 March 2006; accepted 21 March 2006 Available online 3 May 2006 Abstract The River Ili delta in southeast Kazakhstan

  9. Protocols for Monitoring Habitat Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roegner, G. Curtis; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Thom, Ronald M.; Dawley, Earl M.; Whiting, Allan H.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Johnson, Gary E.

    2008-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Protocols for monitoring salmon habitat restoration projects are essential for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' environmental efforts in the Columbia River estuary. This manual provides state-of-the science data collection and analysis methods for landscape features, water quality, and fish species composition, among others.

  10. From Forest to Solar Farm: An Evaluation of Habitat Availability on a Solar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    : Crystalline solar photovoltaic modules Land use: ~200 acres Over 164,000 Panels #12;Sustainability ForestFrom Forest to Solar Farm: An Evaluation of Habitat Availability on a Solar Farm - Amherst December 13, 2012 #12;Solar Energy Land intensive Growing number of facilities Little research

  11. Breeding bird populations and habitat associations within the Savannah River Site (SRS).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauthreaux, Sidney, A.; Steven J. Wagner.

    2005-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Gauthreaux, Sidney, A., and Steven J. Wagner. 2005. Breeding bird populations and habitat associations within the Savannah River Site (SRS). Final Report. USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, Aiken, SC. 48 pp. Abstract: During the 1970's and 1980's a dramatic decline occurred in the populations of Neotropical migratory birds, species that breed in North America and winter south of the border in Central and South America and in the Caribbean. In 1991 an international initiative was mounted by U. S. governmental land management agencies, nongovernmental conservation agencies, and the academic and lay ornithological communities to understand the decline of Neotropical migratory birds in the Americas. In cooperation with the USDA Forest Service - Savannah River (FS - SR) we began 1992 a project directed to monitoring population densities of breeding birds using the Breeding Bird Census (BBC) methodology in selected habitats within the Savannah River Site SRS. In addition we related point count data on the occurrence of breeding Neotropical migrants and other bird species to the habitat data gathered by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program of the USDA Forest Service and data on habitat treatments within forest stands.

  12. A Review of Tennessee's Regulatory Framework Relative to Habitat Conservation Planning on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    Industrial & Municipal Wastewater Stormwater - Municipal (MS4) - Construction Habitat Alteration Section 404 SUPPLY PROJECTS INSTREAM FLOW STORMWATER/ POLLUTED RUNOFF WASTEWATER TREATMENT #12;3 Cumberland HCP, land use regulations #12;5 State Implementation PERMITS Federal Clean Water Act TN Water Pollution

  13. Habitat-Related Benthic Macrofaunal Assemblages of Bays and Estuaries of the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and sediment grain size, were identified: (A) Puget Sound fine sediment, (B) Puget Sound coarse sediment, (C and oligohaline. The Puget Sound, southern California, and San Francisco Bay assemblages were geographically to small spatial scale habitat heterogeneity and temporal change were both low in Puget Sound, but temporal

  14. Distribution and Habitat Associations of Billfish and Swordfish Larvae across Mesoscale Features in the Gulf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rooker, Jay R.

    Distribution and Habitat Associations of Billfish and Swordfish Larvae across Mesoscale Features additive models (GAMs). Mesoscale features in the NGoM affected the distribution and abundance of billfish and Swordfish Larvae across Mesoscale Features in the Gulf of Mexico. PLoS ONE 7(4): e34180. doi:10.1371/journal

  15. Can Habitat Alteration and Spring Angling Explain Largemouth Bass Nest Success?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Micropterus spp. As keystone predators and valued sport fish in North American lakes, black basses MicropterusCan Habitat Alteration and Spring Angling Explain Largemouth Bass Nest Success? TYLER WAGNER, 13 Natural Resources Building, East Lansing, Michigan 48824, USA Abstract.--Largemouth bass

  16. Comparing Stream Geomorphology and Channel Habitat along a Stream Restoration Gradient Sam Stewart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    Comparing Stream Geomorphology and Channel Habitat along a Stream Restoration Gradient Sam Stewart University #12;Abstract Stream restoration is a growing science due to the realization that the human into a whole reach study. This involved selecting four stream sites that would create a stream restoration

  17. River restoration, habitat heterogeneity and biodiversity: a failure of theory or practice?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Margaret A.

    heterogeneity (HH) promotes restoration of biodiversity. This paradigm is reflected in stream restoration in streams that were not in need of restoration. 3. We found habitat and macroinvertebrate data for 78 independent stream or river restoration projects described by 18 different author groups in which invertebrate

  18. Butterfly species richness and community composition in forests affected by ENSO-induced burning and habitat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mooers, Arne

    shown to be sensitive to global climate change (Dennis 1993); non-migrat@hotmail.com. Department of Biological Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, B.C. Canada V5A 1S6. 1 To whom surrounded by the burned forest this indicates that the habitat (burned or unburned) overrides geographical

  19. 2003. The Journal of Arachnology 31:344349 SPIDER WEBS AS HABITAT PATCHES--THE DISTRIBUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agnarsson, Ingi

    344 2003. The Journal of Arachnology 31:344349 SPIDER WEBS AS HABITAT PATCHES--THE DISTRIBUTION OF KLEPTOPARASITES (ARGYRODES, THERIDIIDAE) AMONG HOST WEBS (NEPHILA, TETRAGNATHIDAE) Ingi Agnarsson: Systematic adult golden orb weavers (Nephila clavipes) have kleptoparasites of the genus Ar- gyrodes in their webs

  20. Norbert V. DeByle Aspen forests provide important habitat for many

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WILDLIFE Norbert V. DeByle Aspen forests provide important habitat for many species of wildlife of the interior West, aspen groves may be the only source of abundant forage; in the grasslands they may be the sole source of cover. A primary value of the aspen ecosystem in the West during the past century has

  1. FOOD AND HABITAT OF THREE SWITCH-FEEDING FISHES IN THE KELP FORESTS OFF SANTABARBARA, CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FOOD AND HABITAT OF THREE SWITCH-FEEDING FISHES IN THE KELP FORESTS OFF SANTABARBARA, CALIFORNIA the blue rockfish, Sebastes mystinus, kelp bass, Parolabrax clathratus, and oliverockfish, Sebastes serronoides, all ofwhich cooccur in areas ofreefand giant kelp off Santa Barbara, Calif. The three species

  2. Nesting habitat of Chubut Steamer Ducks in Patagonia, Mara Laura AgeroA,D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nesting habitat of Chubut Steamer Ducks in Patagonia, Argentina María Laura AgüeroA,D , J. Pablo in Patagonia, Argentina, between 2004 and 2006. This area encompasses the main breeding range of the species of Central Patagonia, Argentina (Madge and Burn 1988). Breeding range extends along approximately 500 km

  3. Communities of fungal endophytes in tropical forest grasses: highly diverse host-and habitat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coley, Phyllis

    Communities of fungal endophytes in tropical forest grasses: highly diverse host- and habitat: Charles W. Bacon Keywords: Barro Colorado Island Biodiversity Community assembly Fungal endophytes Poaceae- studied endophytes in the lowland forests of Panama. We used sequence data for 402 isolates from two

  4. Habitat selection and movement patterns of cattle and white-tailed deer in a temperate savanna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Depew, Jarrod Jason

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    similarity. Unsupervised classifications were conducted in each of the 9 soil type AOI?s (Fig 2.1) using Erdas Imagine 8.5. Pixels were grouped into 50 different spectral classes that were subsequently used for the unsupervised classification... ??...????????????????????????14 III HABITAT SELECTION AND PASTURE UTILIZATION BY WHITE-TAILED DEER AND CATTLE ????????????.???16 Materials and Methods ??..?..??????????.???????..17 Results ????????????????????????.???....21 Discussion...

  5. Comparison of anuran acoustic communities of two habitat types in the Danum Valley Conservation Area,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hödl, Walter

    Comparison of anuran acoustic communities of two habitat types in the Danum Valley Conservation frequency and demand acoustic adaptations to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. Selective logging represents a major threat to stream-breeding anurans in Sabah. Pollution of clear water threatens the stream

  6. Acoustics of Anthropogenic Habitats: Noise Pollution and its Impacts on Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Leah B.

    Acoustics of Anthropogenic Habitats: Noise Pollution and its Impacts on Wildlife Caitlin Kight by anthropogenic noise pollution, which is often louder, has a different frequency emphasis, and may occur over a different temporal scale, than natural noise. Although a handful of studies have indicated that acoustically

  7. Enhancing the detection and classification of coral reef and associated benthic habitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rundquist, Donald C.

    Enhancing the detection and classification of coral reef and associated benthic habitats. Rundquist, M. Lawson, and R. Perk (2007), Enhancing the detection and classification of coral reef and Atkinson, 2000]. Holden and LeDrew [1999] have shown that a high-resolution in situ spectral library can

  8. The CTARA-Habitat Center water project Jal-Swarajya Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    .5 projects per village already done! lack of community ownership-poor O&M, poor recovery of water chargesThe CTARA-Habitat Center water project Jal-Swarajya Review () April 22, 2008 1 / 22 #12;Jal-Swarajya-Overview Maharashtra-a water profile. Jal-Swarajya, the background and broad objectives Main features-options, choices

  9. The habitat range of sirenians extends from strictly fresh water (Amazonian manatee, Trichechus inunguis) to strictly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ortiz, Rudy M.

    in salt water and fed lettuce, which is consistent with a lack of mariposia. Manatees in fresh water drankThe habitat range of sirenians extends from strictly fresh water (Amazonian manatee, Trichechus. This flexibility suggests that drinking both fresh and salt water may be common in this species. However, drinking

  10. A landscape approach to sustainable forest management and habitat quality modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A landscape approach to sustainable forest management and habitat quality modelling Luque, S.(1) (1 on biodiversity conservation as a proxy for ecological dimensions of sustainable forest management the work to be met by forest landscape managers. This is particular challenging nowadays because of the increasing

  11. Wetland Plant Guide for Assessing Habitat Impacts of Real-Time Salinity Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Feldmann, Sara A.

    2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This wetland plant guide was developed to aid moist soil plant identification and to assist in the mapping of waterfowl and shorebird habitat in the Grassland Water District and surrounding wetland areas. The motivation for this habitat mapping project was a concern that real-time salinity management of wetland drainage might have long-term consequences for wildfowl habitat health--changes in wetland drawdown schedules might, over the long term, lead to increased soil salinity and other conditions unfavorable to propagation of the most desirable moist soil plants. Hence, the implementation of a program to monitor annual changes in the most common moist soil plants might serve as an index of habitat health and sustainability. Our review of the current scientific and popular literature failed to identify a good, comprehensive field guide that could be used to calibrate and verify high resolution remote sensing imagery, that we had started to use to develop maps of wetland moist soil plants in the Grassland Water District. Since completing the guide it has been used to conduct ground truthing field surveys using the California Native Plant Society methodology in 2004. Results of this survey and a previous wetland plant survey in 2003 are published in a companion LBNL publication summarizing 4 years of fieldwork to advance the science of real-time wetland salinity management.

  12. Comfort Conditions in a Habitat for Humanity House in Central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kootin-Sanwu, V.; Haberl, J. S.; Kim, B.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents preliminary results of an analysis of measured comfort conditions for a Habitat for humanity house in central Texas. In the case study house indoor-outdoor temperature, humidity and C02 levels have been monitored in an attempt...

  13. SKIPJACK TUNA, KATSVWONVS PELAMIS, HABITAT BASED ON TEMPERATURE AND OXYGEN REQUIREMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SKIPJACK TUNA, KATSVWONVS PELAMIS, HABITAT BASED ON TEMPERATURE AND OXYGEN REQUIREMENTS RICHARD A,Katsuwonus pelamis, has generally been assumed to be the warm surface layers oftropical and subtropical ocean, where. For skipjack tuna, Katsllwonus pelamis (Lin- naeus), the question "Where are the fish?" is par- ticularly hard

  14. Salmon Life Histories, Habitats, and Food Webs in the Columbia River Estuary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salmon Life Histories, Habitats, and Food Webs in the Columbia River Estuary Daniel J. Bottom NOAA of tidal wetlands could further limit the capacity of estuarine food webs to support juvenile salmon during the last century, contemporary salmon food webs still rely disproportionately on wetland

  15. USING RESIDENT SMALL MAMMALS TO ASSESS THE HABITAT POTENTIAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BIOFUELS FEEDSTOCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USING RESIDENT SMALL MAMMALS TO ASSESS THE HABITAT POTENTIAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BIOFUELS FEEDSTOCKS ...................................................................................................................35 CHAPTER 2: Comparing survival of deer mice across experimental biofuels plots in Eastern South ...................................................................................................................65 CHAPTER 3: Small mammal diversity across 4 experimental biofuels plots in Eastern South Dakota

  16. Habitat use of Golden-Cheeked Warblers in Travis County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beardmore, Carol Jeannette

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and compared to vegetation in stands of warbler habitat. The breeding season was divided into two parts (March-April and May-June); the second part being characterized by the presence of young. Golden-cheeked Warblers switched from foraging in Plateau live oaks...

  17. Urban brownfields as temporary habitats: driving forces for the diversity of phytophagous insects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleyer, Michael

    Urban brownfields as temporary habitats: driving forces for the diversity of phytophagous insects Barbara Strauss and Robert Biedermann Strauss, B. and Biedermann, R. 2006. Urban brownfields as temporary brownfields (derelict sites), we studied the influence of local factors (successional age, vegetation

  18. Progress and critical issues for IFE blanket and chamber research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdou, M.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Latkowski, J.F.; Logan, B.G.; Meier, W.R.; Moir, R.W.; Nobile, A.; Peterson, P.F.; Petti, D.; Schultz, K.R.; Tillack, M.S.

    1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Advances in high gain target designs for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE), and the initiation of construction of large megajoule-class laser facilities in the U.S. (National Ignition Facility) and France (Laser-Megajoule) capable of testing the requirements for inertial fusion ignition and propagating burn, have improved the prospects for IFE. Accordingly, there have recently been modest increases in the US fusion research program related to the feasibility of IFE. These research areas include heavy-ion accelerators, Krypton-Fluoride (KrF) gas lasers, diode-pumped, solid-state (DPSSL) lasers, IFE target designs for higher gains, feasibility of low cost IFE target fabrication and accurate injection, and long-lasting IFE fusion chambers and final optics. Since several studies of conceptual IFE power plant and driver designs were completed in 1992-1996 [1-5], U.S. research in the IFE blanket, chamber, and target technology areas has focused on the critical issues relating to the feasibility of IFE concepts towards the goal of achieving economically-competitive and environmentally-attractive fusion energy. This paper discusses the critical issues in these areas, and the approaches taken to address these issues. The U.S. research in these areas, called IFE Chamber and Target Technologies, is coordinated through the Virtual Laboratory for Technology (VLT) formed by the Department of Energy in December 1998.

  19. Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGowan, Vance

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an agreement to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In July of 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the intergovernmental contract, and on March 1, 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is on private lands and therefore requires that considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance of, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. This project calls for passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing as the primary method to restore degraded streams to a normative condition. Active remediation techniques using plantings, off-site water developments, site-specific instream structures, or whole channel alterations are also utilized where applicable. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and local watershed councils. Work undertaken during 2002 included: (1) Implementing 1 new fencing project in the Wallowa subbasin that will protect an additional 0.95 miles of stream and 22.9 acres of habitat; (2) Conducting instream work activities in 3 streams to enhance habitat and/or restore natural channel dimensions, patterns or profiles; (3) Planting 31,733 plants along 3.7 stream miles, (4) Establishing 71 new photopoints and retaking 254 existing photopoint pictures; (5) Monitoring stream temperatures at 12 locations on 6 streams; (6) Completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 100.5 miles of project fences. Since initiation of the project in 1984 over 68.7 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams and 1,933 acres of habitat have been protected, enhanced and maintained.

  20. Red River Stream Improvement Final Design Nez Perce National Forest.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watershed Consulting, LLC

    2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the final stream improvement design along the reach of Red River between the bridge below Dawson Creek, upstream for approximately 2 miles, Idaho County, Idaho. Geomorphic mapping, hydrologic profiles and cross-sections were presented along with existing fish habitat maps in the conceptual design report. This information is used to develop a stream improvement design intended to improve aquatic habitat and restore riparian health in the reach. The area was placer mined using large bucket dredges between 1938 and 1957. This activity removed most of the riparian vegetation in the stream corridor and obliterated the channel bed and banks. The reach was also cut-off from most valley margin tributaries. In the 50 years since large-scale dredging ceased, the channel has been re-established and parts of the riparian zone have grown in. However, the recruitment of large woody debris to the stream has been extremely low and overhead cover is poor. Pool habitat makes up more than 37% of the reach, and habitat diversity is much better than the project reach on Crooked River. There is little large woody debris in the stream to provide cover for spawning and juvenile rearing, because the majority of the woody debris does not span a significant part of the channel, but is mainly on the side slopes of the stream. Most of the riparian zone has very little soil or subsoil left after the mining and so now consists primarily of unconsolidated cobble tailings or heavily compacted gravel tailings. Knapweed and lodgepole pine are the most successful colonizers of these post mining landforms. Tributary fans which add complexity to many other streams in the region, have been isolated from the main reach due to placer mining and road building.

  1. Fine scale daily movements and habitat use of East Pacific green turtles at a shallow coastal lagoon in Baja California Sur, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Leah R.

    movements and habitat use of East Pacific green turtles (Chelonia mydas) at Laguna San Ignacio, a shallowFine scale daily movements and habitat use of East Pacific green turtles at a shallow coastal Daily movements Fine scale Green turtle Habitat use Vagility Green turtles spend most of their lives

  2. Greater sage-grouse population response to energy development and habitat loss

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, B.L.; Naugle, D.E.; Doherty, K.E. [University of Montana, Missoula, MT (United States)

    2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Modification of landscapes due to energy development may alter both habitat use and vital rates of sensitive wildlife species. Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana, USA, have experienced rapid, widespread changes to their habitat due to recent coal-bed natural gas (CBNG) development. We analyzed lek-count, habitat, and infrastructure data to assess how CBNG development and other landscape features influenced trends in the numbers of male sage-grouse observed and persistence of leks in the PRB. From 2001 to 2005, the number of males observed on leks in CBNG fields declined more rapidly than leks outside of CBNG. Of leks active in 1997 or later, only 38% of 26 leks in CBNG fields remained active by 2004-2005, compared to 84% of 250 leks outside CBNG fields. By 2005, leks in CBNG fields had 46% fewer males per active lek than leks outside of CBNG. Persistence of 110 leks was positively influenced by the proportion of sagebrush habitat within 6.4 km of the lek. After controlling for habitat, we found support for negative effects of CBNG development within 0.8 km and 3.2 km of the lek and for a time lag between CBNG development and lek disappearance. Current lease stipulations that prohibit development within 0.4 km of sage-grouse leks on federal lands are inadequate to ensure lek persistence and may result in impacts to breeding populations over larger areas. Seasonal restrictions on drilling and construction do not address impacts caused by loss of sagebrush and incursion of infrastructure that can affect populations over long periods of time. Regulatory agencies may need to increase spatial restrictions on development, industry may need to rapidly implement more effective mitigation measures, or both, to reduce impacts of CBNG development on sage-grouse populations in the PRB.

  3. Idaho Habitat Evaluation for Off-Site Mitigation Record : Annual Report 1985.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrosky, Charles E.; Holubetz, Terry B.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation approaches to document a record of credit for mitigation were developed in 1984-1985 for most of the habitat projects. Restoration of upriver anadromous fish runs through increased passage survival at main stem Columbia and Snake River dams is essential to the establishment of an off-site mitigation record, as well as to the success of the entire Fish and Wildlife program. The mitigation record is being developed to use increased smolt production (i.e., yield) at full-seeding as the basic measure of benefit from a habitat project. The IDFG evaluation approach consists of three basic, integrated levels: general monitoring, standing crop evaluations, and intensive studies. Annual general monitoring of anadromous fish densities in a small number of sections for each project will be used to follow population trends and define full-seeding levels. For most projects, smolt production will be estimated indirectly from standing crop estimates by factoring appropriate survival rates from parr to smolt stages. Intensive studies in a few key production streams will be initiated to determine these appropriate survival rates and provide other basic biological information that is needed for evaluation of the Fish and Wildlife program. A common physical habitat and fish population data base is being developed for every BPA habitat project in Idaho to be integrated at each level of evaluation. Compatibility of data is also needed between Idaho and other agencies and tribes in the Columbia River basin. No final determination of mitigation credit for any Idaho habitat enhancement project has been attainable to date.

  4. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report Wanaket Wildlife Area, Techical Report 2005-2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Regional HEP Team (RHT) and Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Wildlife Program staff conducted a follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis on the Wanaket Wildlife Management Area in June 2005. The 2005 HEP investigation generated 3,084.48 habitat units (HUs) for a net increase of 752.18 HUs above 1990/1995 baseline survey results. The HU to acre ratio also increased from 0.84:1.0 to 1.16:1.0. The largest increase in habitat units occurred in the shrubsteppe/grassland cover type (California quail and western meadowlark models), which increased from 1,544 HUs to 2,777 HUs (+43%), while agriculture cover type HUs were eliminated because agricultural lands (managed pasture) were converted to shrubsteppe/grassland. In addition to the agriculture cover type, major changes in habitat structure occurred in the shrubsteppe/grassland cover type due to the 2001 wildfire which removed the shrub component from well over 95% of its former range. The number of acres of all other cover types remained relatively stable; however, habitat quality improved in the riparian herb and riparian shrub cover types. The number and type of HEP species models used during the 2005 HEP analysis were identical to those used in the 1990/1995 baseline HEP surveys. The number of species models employed to evaluate the shrubsteppe/grassland, sand/gravel/mud/cobble, and riparian herb cover types, however, were fewer than reported in the McNary Dam Loss Assessment (Rassmussen and Wright 1989) for the same cover types.

  5. RNEDE: Resilient Network Design Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkat Venkatasubramanian, Tanu Malik, Arun Giridh; Craig Rieger; Keith Daum; Miles McQueen

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern living is more and more dependent on the intricate web of critical infrastructure systems. The failure or damage of such systems can cause huge disruptions. Traditional design of this web of critical infrastructure systems was based on the principles of functionality and reliability. However, it is increasingly being realized that such design objectives are not sufficient. Threats, disruptions and faults often compromise the network, taking away the benefits of an efficient and reliable design. Thus, traditional network design parameters must be combined with self-healing mechanisms to obtain a resilient design of the network. In this paper, we present RNEDEa resilient network design environment that that not only optimizes the network for performance but tolerates fluctuations in its structure that result from external threats and disruptions. The environment evaluates a set of remedial actions to bring a compromised network to an optimal level of functionality. The environment includes a visualizer that enables the network administrator to be aware of the current state of the network and the suggested remedial actions at all times.

  6. TRIPOLI-4 criticality calculations for MOX fuelled SNEAK 7A and 7B fast critical assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Y. K. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA-Saclay, DEN/DANS/DM2S/SERMA, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A prototype Generation IV fast neutron reactor is under design and development in France. The MOX fuel will be introduced into this self-generating core in order to demonstrate low net plutonium production. To support the TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo transport code in criticality calculations of fast reactors, the effective delayed neutron fraction {beta}eff estimation and the Probability Tables (PT) option to treat the unresolved resonance region of cross-sections are two essentials. In this study, TRIPOLI-4 calculations have been made using current nuclear data libraries JEFF-3.1.1 and ENDF/B-VII.0 to benchmark the reactor physics parameters of the MOX fuelled SNEAK 7A and 7B fast critical assemblies. TRIPOLI-4 calculated K{sub eff} and {beta}eff of the homogeneous R-Z models and the 3D multi-cell models have been validated against the measured ones. The impact of the PT option on K{sub eff} is 340 {+-} 10 pcm for SNEAK 7A core and 410 {+-} 12 pcm for 7B. Four-group spectra and energy spectral indices, f8/f5, f9/f5, and c8/f5 in the two SNEAK cores have also been calculated with the TRIPOLI-4 mesh tally. Calculated spectrum-hardening index f8/f5 is 0.0418 for SNEAK 7A and 0.0315 for 7B. From this study the SNEAK 3D models have been verified for the next revision of IRPhE (International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments). (authors)

  7. Isolation of ambient aerosols of known critical supersaturation: the differential critical supersaturation separator (DSCS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osborn, Robert John

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A field-deployable instrument has been developed that isolates from an ambient aerosol population only those particles that have critical supersaturations, Sc, within a narrow, user-specified, range. This Differential Critical Supersaturation...

  8. Southeastern Colorado Survey of Critical Biological Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southeastern Colorado Survey of Critical Biological Resources 2007 #12;ii #12;Southeastern Colorado Survey of Critical Biological Resources Prepared for: Colorado Cattleman's Agricultural Land Trust 8833 Department of Natural Resources Division of State Board of Land Commissioners 1313 Sherman Street Denver, CO

  9. Critical aspects of hierarchical protein folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alex Hansen; Mogens H. Jensen; Kim Sneppen; Giovanni Zocchi

    1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We argue that the first order folding transitions of proteins observed at physiological chemical conditions end in a critical point for a given temperature and chemical potential of the surrounding water. We investigate this critical point using a hierarchical Hamiltonian and determine its universality class. This class differs qualitatively from those of other known models.

  10. Steady water waves with multiple critical layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mats Ehrnstrm; Joachim Escher; Erik Wahln

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct small-amplitude periodic water waves with multiple critical layers. In addition to waves with arbitrarily many critical layers and a single crest in each period, two-dimensional sets of waves with several crests and troughs in each period are found. The setting is that of steady two-dimensional finite-depth gravity water waves with vorticity.

  11. Critical technologies research: Opportunities for DOE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies have identified a number of critical technologies that are essential to the nation`s defense, economic competitiveness, energy independence, and betterment of public health. The National Critical Technologies Panel (NCTP) has identified the following critical technology areas: Aeronautics and Surface Transportation; Biotechnology and Life Sciences; Energy and Environment; Information and Communications; Manufacturing; and Materials. Sponsored by the Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Research (OER), the Critical Technologies Research Workshop was held in May 1992. Approximately 100 scientists, engineers, and managers from the national laboratories, industry, academia, and govemment participated. The objective of the Berkeley Workshop was to advance the role of the DOE multiprogram energy laboratories in critical technologies research by describing, defining, and illustrating research areas, opportunities, resources, and key decisions necessary to achieve national research goals. An agenda was developed that looked at DOE`s capabilities and options for research in critical technologies and provided a forum for industry, academia, govemment, and the national laboratories to address: Critical technology research needs; existing research activities and resources; capabilities of the national laboratories; and opportunities for national laboratories, industries, and universities. The Workshop included plenary sessions in which presentations by technology and policy leaders set the context for further inquiry into critical technology issues and research opportunities. Separate sessions then focused on each of the following major areas of technology: Advanced materials; biotechnology and life sciences; energy and environment; information and communication; and manufacturing and transportation.

  12. Critical technologies research: Opportunities for DOE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies have identified a number of critical technologies that are essential to the nation's defense, economic competitiveness, energy independence, and betterment of public health. The National Critical Technologies Panel (NCTP) has identified the following critical technology areas: Aeronautics and Surface Transportation; Biotechnology and Life Sciences; Energy and Environment; Information and Communications; Manufacturing; and Materials. Sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Research (OER), the Critical Technologies Research Workshop was held in May 1992. Approximately 100 scientists, engineers, and managers from the national laboratories, industry, academia, and govemment participated. The objective of the Berkeley Workshop was to advance the role of the DOE multiprogram energy laboratories in critical technologies research by describing, defining, and illustrating research areas, opportunities, resources, and key decisions necessary to achieve national research goals. An agenda was developed that looked at DOE's capabilities and options for research in critical technologies and provided a forum for industry, academia, govemment, and the national laboratories to address: Critical technology research needs; existing research activities and resources; capabilities of the national laboratories; and opportunities for national laboratories, industries, and universities. The Workshop included plenary sessions in which presentations by technology and policy leaders set the context for further inquiry into critical technology issues and research opportunities. Separate sessions then focused on each of the following major areas of technology: Advanced materials; biotechnology and life sciences; energy and environment; information and communication; and manufacturing and transportation.

  13. Critical phenomena in N=2* plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Buchel; C. Pagnutti

    2010-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We use gauge theory/string theory correspondence to study finite temperature critical behaviour of mass deformed N=4 SU(N) supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory at strong coupling, also known as N=2* gauge theory. For certain range of the mass parameters, N=2* plasma undergoes a second-order phase transition. We compute all the static critical exponents of the model and demonstrate that the transition is of the mean-field theory type. We show that the dynamical critical exponent of the model is z=0, with multiple hydrodynamic relaxation rates at criticality. We point out that the dynamical critical phenomena in N=2* plasma is outside the dynamical universality classes established by Hohenberg and Halperin.

  14. Sharp-tailed Grouse Restoration; Colville Tribes Restore Habitat for Sharp-tailed Grouse, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, Richard

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Columbian Sharp-Tailed Grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus) (CSTG) are an important traditional and cultural species to the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STOI), and other Tribes in the Region. They were once the most abundant upland bird in the Region. Currently, the largest remaining population in Washington State occurs on the CCT Reservation in Okanogan County. Increasing agricultural practices and other land uses has contributed to the decline of sharp-tail habitat and populations putting this species at risk. The decline of this species is not new (Yokum, 1952, Buss and Dziedzic, 1955, Zeigler, 1979, Meints 1991, and Crawford and Snyder 1994). The Tribes (CCT and STOI) are determined to protect, enhance and restore habitat for this species continued existence. When Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Hydro-projects were constructed, inundated habitat used by this species was lost forever adding to overall decline. To compensate and prevent further habitat loss, the CCT proposed a project with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funding to address this species and their habitat requirements. The projects main focus is to address habitat utilized by the current CSTG population and determine ways to protect, restore, and enhance habitats for the conservation of this species over time. The project went through the NPPC Review Process and was funded through FY03 by BPA. This report addresses part of the current CCT effort to address the conservation of this species on the Colville Reservation.

  15. Development of a Software Design Tool for Hybrid Solar-Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for heating and cooling, the critical heat pump design entering fluid temperature, and the thermal performance of a solar collector (selected from a product database), the total...

  16. OOTW Force Design Tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, R.E.; Hartley, D.S.III; Packard, S.L.

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents refined requirements for tools to aid the process of force design in Operations Other Than War (OOTWs). It recommends actions for the creation of one tool and work on other tools relating to mission planning. It also identifies the governmental agencies and commands with interests in each tool, from whom should come the user advisory groups overseeing the respective tool development activities. The understanding of OOTWs and their analytical support requirements has matured to the point where action can be taken in three areas: force design, collaborative analysis, and impact analysis. While the nature of the action and the length of time before complete results can be expected depends on the area, in each case the action should begin immediately. Force design for OOTWs is not a technically difficult process. Like force design for combat operations, it is a process of matching the capabilities of forces against the specified and implied tasks of the operation, considering the constraints of logistics, transport and force availabilities. However, there is a critical difference that restricts the usefulness of combat force design tools for OOTWs: the combat tools are built to infer non-combat capability requirements from combat capability requirements and cannot reverse the direction of the inference, as is required for OOTWs. Recently, OOTWs have played a larger role in force assessment, system effectiveness and tradeoff analysis, and concept and doctrine development and analysis. In the first Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR), each of the Services created its own OOTW force design tool. Unfortunately, the tools address different parts of the problem and do not coordinate the use of competing capabilities. These tools satisfied the immediate requirements of the QDR, but do not provide a long-term cost-effective solution.

  17. Designing Reactors to Facilitate Decommissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard H. Meservey

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Critics of nuclear power often cite issues with tail-end-of-the-fuel-cycle activities as reasons to oppose the building of new reactors. In fact, waste disposal and the decommissioning of large nuclear reactors have proven more challenging than anticipated. In the early days of the nuclear power industry the design and operation of various reactor systems was given a great deal of attention. Little effort, however, was expended on end-of-the-cycle activities, such as decommissioning and disposal of wastes. As early power and test reactors have been decommissioned difficulties with end-of-the-fuel-cycle activities have become evident. Even the small test reactors common at the INEEL were not designed to facilitate their eventual decontamination, decommissioning, and dismantlement. The results are that decommissioning of these facilities is expensive, time consuming, relatively hazardous, and generates large volumes of waste. This situation clearly supports critics concerns about building a new generation of power reactors.

  18. FEATURES, EVENTS, AND PROCESSES: SYSTEM-LEVEL AND CRITICALITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.L. McGregor

    2000-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to identify and document the screening analyses for the features, events, and processes (FEPs) that do not easily fit into the existing Process Model Report (PMR) structure. These FEPs include the 3 1 FEPs designated as System-Level Primary FEPs and the 22 FEPs designated as Criticality Primary FEPs. A list of these FEPs is provided in Section 1.1. This AMR (AN-WIS-MD-000019) documents the Screening Decision and Regulatory Basis, Screening Argument, and Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Disposition for each of the subject Primary FEPs. This AMR provides screening information and decisions for the TSPA-SR report and provides the same information for incorporation into a project-specific FEPs database. This AMR may also assist reviewers during the licensing-review process.

  19. Application of Covariance Data to Criticality Safety Data Validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broadhead, B.L.; Hopper, C.M.; Parks, C.V.

    1999-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of cross-section covariance data has long been a key part of traditional sensitivity and uncertainty analyses (S/U). This paper presents the application of S/U methodologies to the data validation tasks of a criticality safety computational study. The S/U methods presented are designed to provide a formal means of establishing the area (or range) of applicability for criticality safety data validation studies. The goal of this work is to develop parameters that can be used to formally determine the ''similarity'' of a benchmark experiment (or a set of benchmark experiments individually) and the application area that is to be validated. These parameters are termed D parameters, which represent the differences by energy group of S/U-generated sensitivity profiles, and ck parameters, which are the correlation coefficients, each of which gives information relative to the similarity between pairs of selected systems. The application of a Generalized Linear Least-Squares Methodology ( GLLSM) tool to criticality safety validation tasks is also described in this paper. These methods and guidelines are also applied to a sample validation for uranium systems with enrichments greater than 5 wt %.

  20. The Use of Catalysts in Near-Critical Water Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2005-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of heterogeneous catalysts in near-critical water processing provides many challenges of material stability in addition to the normal questions of chemical activity. Conventional catalyst materials developed in traditional organic chemistry or petroleum chemistry applications provide a source of information of materials with the required activities but often without the required stability when used in hot liquid water. The importance of the use of catalysts in near-critical water processing plays a particularly crucial role for the development of renewable fuels and chemicals based on biomass feedstocks. Stability issues include both those related to the catalytic metal and also to the catalyst support material. In fact, the stability of the support is the most likely concern when using conventional catalyst formulations in near-critical water processing. Processing test results are used to show important design parameters for catalyst formulations for use in wet biomass gasification in high-pressure water and in catalytic hydrogenations in water for production of value-added chemical products from biomass in the biorefinery concept. Analytical methods including powder x-ray diffraction for crystallite size and composition determination, surface area and porosity measurements, and elemental analysis have all been used to quantify differences in catalyst materials before and after use. By these methods both the chemical and physical stability of heterogeneous catalysts can be verified.

  1. CRITICALITY SAFETY CONTROLS AND THE SAFETY BASIS AT PFP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kessler, S

    2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    With the implementation of DOE Order 420.1B, Facility Safety, and DOE-STD-3007-2007, 'Guidelines for Preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations at Department of Energy Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities', a new requirement was imposed that all criticality safety controls be evaluated for inclusion in the facility Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) and that the evaluation process be documented in the site Criticality Safety Program Description Document (CSPDD). At the Hanford site in Washington State the CSPDD, HNF-31695, 'General Description of the FH Criticality Safety Program', requires each facility develop a linking document called a Criticality Control Review (CCR) to document performance of these evaluations. Chapter 5, Appendix 5B of HNF-7098, Criticality Safety Program, provided an example of a format for a CCR that could be used in lieu of each facility developing its own CCR. Since the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) is presently undergoing Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D), new procedures are being developed for cleanout of equipment and systems that have not been operated in years. Existing Criticality Safety Evaluations (CSE) are revised, or new ones written, to develop the controls required to support D&D activities. Other Hanford facilities, including PFP, had difficulty using the basic CCR out of HNF-7098 when first implemented. Interpretation of the new guidelines indicated that many of the controls needed to be elevated to TSR level controls. Criterion 2 of the standard, requiring that the consequence of a criticality be examined for establishing the classification of a control, was not addressed. Upon in-depth review by PFP Criticality Safety staff, it was not clear that the programmatic interpretation of criterion 8C could be applied at PFP. Therefore, the PFP Criticality Safety staff decided to write their own CCR. The PFP CCR provides additional guidance for the evaluation team to use by clarifying the evaluation criteria in DOE-STD-3007-2007. In reviewing documents used in classifying controls for Nuclear Safety, it was noted that DOE-HDBK-1188, 'Glossary of Environment, Health, and Safety Terms', defines an Administrative Control (AC) in terms that are different than typically used in Criticality Safety. As part of this CCR, a new term, Criticality Administrative Control (CAC) was defined to clarify the difference between an AC used for criticality safety and an AC used for nuclear safety. In Nuclear Safety terms, an AC is a provision relating to organization and management, procedures, recordkeeping, assessment, and reporting necessary to ensure safe operation of a facility. A CAC was defined as an administrative control derived in a criticality safety analysis that is implemented to ensure double contingency. According to criterion 2 of Section IV, 'Linkage to the Documented Safety Analysis', of DOESTD-3007-2007, the consequence of a criticality should be examined for the purposes of classifying the significance of a control or component. HNF-PRO-700, 'Safety Basis Development', provides control selection criteria based on consequence and risk that may be used in the development of a Criticality Safety Evaluation (CSE) to establish the classification of a component as a design feature, as safety class or safety significant, i.e., an Engineered Safety Feature (ESF), or as equipment important to safety; or merely provides defense-in-depth. Similar logic is applied to the CACs. Criterion 8C of DOE-STD-3007-2007, as written, added to the confusion of using the basic CCR from HNF-7098. The PFP CCR attempts to clarify this criterion by revising it to say 'Programmatic commitments or general references to control philosophy (e.g., mass control or spacing control or concentration control as an overall control strategy for the process without specific quantification of individual limits) is included in the PFP DSA'. Table 1 shows the PFP methodology for evaluating CACs. This evaluation process has been in use since February of 2008 and has proven to be simple and effective. Each control identified i

  2. Benchmarking of Graphite Reflected Critical Assemblies of UO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret A. Marshall; John D. Bess

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of experiments were carried out in 1963 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) for use in space reactor research programs. A core containing 93.2% enriched UO2 fuel rods was used in these experiments. The first part of the experimental series consisted of 253 tightly-packed fuel rods (1.27 cm triangular pitch) with graphite reflectors [1], the second part used 253 graphite-reflected fuel rods organized in a 1.506 cm triangular pitch [2], and the final part of the experimental series consisted of 253 beryllium-reflected fuel rods with a 1.506 cm triangular pitch. [3] Fission rate distribution and cadmium ratio measurements were taken for all three parts of the experimental series. Reactivity coefficient measurements were taken for various materials placed in the beryllium reflected core. The first part of this experimental series has been evaluated for inclusion in the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) [4] and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) Handbooks, [5] and is discussed below. These experiments are of interest as benchmarks because they support the validation of compact reactor designs with similar characteristics to the design parameters for a space nuclear fission surface power systems. [6

  3. Analysis of the Black-Capped Vireo habitat at Kickapoo Caverns State Park, Texas using a Geographic Information System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castiaux, Nathalie

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    not reveal a strong association between BCV location and slope exposure (aspect). For six-sub-landscapes, with different percentages of BCV suitable habitat, a modified fractal dimension was computed inside the GIS. This fractal dimension calculation...

  4. Post-fire successional effects on breeding grassland birds in mesquite savanna habitats of the Texas rolling plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Stephanie L.

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    North American grasslands and grassland birds have declined drastically due to habitat degradation by fire suppression (i.e., woody encroachment), fragmentation, and conversion to croplands. A better understanding is needed ...

  5. Accepted biodiversity loss of peatland habitats in Environmental Impact Assessments for onshore windfarm developments in the South West of Scotland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, Iain I

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    rapid development over recent years within Scotland to help achieve renewable energy targets. A lot of these developments occur in areas where valuable peatland habitat is present, which is abundant in Scotland but globally scarce. Analysis of several...

  6. Habitat use and occurrence of the bull shark (Carcharhinus leucas) near the Sabine Pass inlet of Texas and Louisiana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shipley, Jennifer Brooke

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of nearshore Gulf of Mexico habitats adjacent to Sabine Pass, a tidal inlet forming the southernmost border between Texas and Louisiana, in bull shark (Carcharhinus leucas) life history as well as the impact of selected environmental...

  7. Spatial and Temporal Variation in the Diet of Tree Swallows: Implications for Trace-Element Exposure After Habitat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, William A.

    to determine if trace elements from a recently remediated coal fly ash spill were moving into the terrestrial terrestrial habitats or industrial disposal practices that use water to dilute or hold contaminated materials

  8. Linking Ecological Function and Ecosystem Service Values of Estaurine Habitat Types Associated with a Barrier Island System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis, Jeffrey Michael

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Ecosystem services are benefits humans receive as a function of natural processes. Many current studies seek to express these benefits as an economic value per unit of habitat type without quantifying the ecological functions that allow...

  9. A GIS-based Spatial Model for Predicting Habitat Suitability for Juvenile Mutton Snapper (Lutjanus analis) in Belize

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    redes de reas Marinas Protegidas. Este trabajo evala el uso del enfoque ecosistmico en el manejo. Parmetros ecosistmicos de entrada incluyeron tipo de habitat marino, distancia de nado a los sitios de

  10. Concept Paper for Real-Time Temperature and Water Quality Management for San Joaquin River Riparian Habitat Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Report. Real-time Water Quality Management for SJR RiparianReal-time Water Quality Management for SJR Riparian HabitatPaper Real-time Water Quality Management for SJR Riparian

  11. Impact of the Proposed I-69 Corridor on Bobcat (Felis rufus) Habitat in Southwestern Indiana Jeffrey L. Ashby1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    , interstate, and highway shapefiles from the IndianaMap website (indianamap.org), and then classified the study area. The I-69 corridor shapefile was then added and the reduction in habitat calculated to show

  12. King County Nearshore Habitat Mapping Data Report: Picnic Point to Shilshole Bay Marina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodruff, Dana L.; Farley, Paul J.; Borde, Amy B.; Southard, John A.; Thom, Ronald M.

    2000-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to provide accurate, georeferenced maps of benthic habitats to assist in the siting of a new wastewater treatment plant outfall and the assessment of habitats of endangered, threatened, and economically important species. The mapping was conducted in the fall of 1999 using two complementary techniques: side-scan sonar and underwater videography. Products derived from these techniques include geographic information system (GIS) compatible polygon data of substrate type and vegetation cover, including eelgrass and kelp. Additional GIS overlays include underwater video track line data of total macroalgae, selected macroalgal species, fish, and macroinvertebrates. The combined tools of geo-referenced side-scan sonar and underwater video is a powerful technique for assessing and mapping of nearshore habitat in Puget Sound. Side-scan sonar offers the ability to map eelgrass with high spatial accuracy and resolution, and provides information on patch size, shape, and coverage. It also provides information on substrate change and location of specific targets (e.g., piers, docks, pilings, large boulders, debris piles). The addition of underwater video is a complementary tool providing both groundtruthing for the sonar and additional information on macro fauna and flora. As a groundtruthing technique, the video was able to confirm differences between substrate types, as well as detect subtle spatial changes in substrate. It also verified information related to eelgrass, including the density classification categories and the type of substrate associated with eelgrass, which could not be determined easily with side- scan sonar. Video is also a powerful tool for mapping the location of macroalgae, (including kelp and Ulva), fish and macroinvertebrates. The ability to geo-locate these resources in their functional habitat provides an added layer of information and analytical potential.

  13. Microsoft Word - TRILATERAL CRITICAL MATERIALS WORKSHOP Summary...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the European Union, Japan and the United States, as well as guests from Australia and Canada, to discuss how best to ensure an adequate supply of critical materials for a clean...

  14. Neutron absorbing coating for nuclear criticality control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mizia, Ronald E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Richard N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Swank, William D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lister, Tedd E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Pinhero, Patrick J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron absorbing coating for use on a substrate, and which provides nuclear criticality control is described and which includes a nickel, chromium, molybdenum, and gadolinium alloy having less than about 5% boron, by weight.

  15. Oak Ridge Critical Experiment Facility (Building 9213)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Joe has continued to hold up this facility as one of the key elements in today's nuclear criticality safety program worldwide. He attributes much of what is routine about...

  16. Quantum Criticality at the Origin of Life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vattay, Gabor; Csabai, Istvan; Kaufmann, Ali Nassimi an Stuart A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Why life persists at the edge of chaos is a question at the very heart of evolution. Here we show that molecules taking part in biochemical processes from small molecules to proteins are critical quantum mechanically. Electronic Hamiltonians of biomolecules are tuned exactly to the critical point of the metal-insulator transition separating the Anderson localized insulator phase from the conducting disordered metal phase. Using tools from Random Matrix Theory we confirm that the energy level statistics of these biomolecules show the universal transitional distribution of the metal-insulator critical point and the wave functions are multifractals in accordance with the theory of Anderson transitions. The findings point to the existence of a universal mechanism of charge transport in living matter. The revealed bio-conductor material is neither a metal nor an insulator but a new quantum critical material which can exist only in highly evolved systems and has unique material properties.

  17. Quantum Criticality at the Origin of Life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabor Vattay; Dennis Salahub; Istvan Csabai; Ali Nassimi; Stuart A. Kaufmann

    2015-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Why life persists at the edge of chaos is a question at the very heart of evolution. Here we show that molecules taking part in biochemical processes from small molecules to proteins are critical quantum mechanically. Electronic Hamiltonians of biomolecules are tuned exactly to the critical point of the metal-insulator transition separating the Anderson localized insulator phase from the conducting disordered metal phase. Using tools from Random Matrix Theory we confirm that the energy level statistics of these biomolecules show the universal transitional distribution of the metal-insulator critical point and the wave functions are multifractals in accordance with the theory of Anderson transitions. The findings point to the existence of a universal mechanism of charge transport in living matter. The revealed bio-conductor material is neither a metal nor an insulator but a new quantum critical material which can exist only in highly evolved systems and has unique material properties.

  18. CMI Meeting September 2014 | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CMI Meeting September 2014 The Critical Materials Institute will have its second annual meeting September 9-11, 2014, at The Ames Laboratory in Ames, IA. The meeting will include...

  19. Nuclear criticality safety department training implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, K.J.; Taylor, R.G.; Worley, C.A.

    1996-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Criticality Safety Department (NCSD) is committed to developing and maintaining a staff of qualified personnel to meet the current and anticipated needs in Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The NCSD Qualification Program is described in Y/DD-694, Qualification Program, Nuclear Criticality Safety Department This document provides a listing of the roles and responsibilities of NCSD personnel with respect to training and details of the Training Management System (TMS) programs, Mentoring Checklists and Checksheets, as well as other documentation utilized to implement the program. This document supersedes Y/DD-696, Revision 2, dated 3/27/96, Training Implementation, Nuclear Criticality Safety Department. There are no backfit requirements associated with revisions to this document.

  20. RELAP5 subcooled critical flow model verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petelin, S.; Gortnar, O.; Mavko, B. (Institut Jozef Stefan, Ljubljana (Solomon Islands))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss some results of the RELAP5 break modeling during the analysis of International Standard Problem 27 (ISP-27) performed on the BETHSY facility. This study deals with the discontinuity of the RELAP5 critical flow prediction in a strongly subcooled region. Such unrealistic behavior was observed during the pretest simulations of ISP-27. Based on the investigation, a RELAP5 code correction is suggested that ensures a more appropriate simulation of the critical discharge of strongly subcooled liquid.

  1. Critical frequency in nuclear chiral rotation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Olbratowski; J. Dobaczewski; J. Dudek

    2002-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the cranked Skyrme-Hartree-Fock approach the self-consistent solutions have been obtained for planar and chiral rotational bands in 132La. It turns out that the chiral band cannot exist below some critical rotational frequency which in the present case equals omega=0.6MeV. The appearance of the critical frequency is explained in terms of a simple classical model of two gyroscopes coupled to a triaxial rigid body.

  2. Quantum critical benchmark for density functional theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul E. Grabowski; Kieron Burke

    2014-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Two electrons at the threshold of ionization represent a severe test case for electronic structure theory. A pseudospectral method yields a very accurate density of the two-electron ion with nuclear charge close to the critical value. Highly accurate energy components and potentials of Kohn-Sham density functional theory are given, as well as a useful parametrization of the critical density. The challenges for density functional approximations and the strength of correlation are also discussed.

  3. Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, February 1995--April 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research continued on the design of advanced turbine systems. This report describes the design and test of critical components such as blades, materials, cooling, combustion, and optical diagnostics probes.

  4. A decomposition-based approach for the integration of product development and manufacturing system design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Yong-Suk, 1975-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a structured approach to understand the interaction between product design decisions and manufacturing system design is critical to reflect manufacturing system issues early in the product development process. Early ...

  5. Issues associated with a total systems approach to designing dependable systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chisholm, G.H.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A total system approach, developed by the nuclear-reactor-safety community, is extrapolated to the design of complex, critical systems. The essential properties of these systems are described, and a generic paradigm for subsequent designs is proposed.

  6. REANALYSIS OF F-STATISTIC GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE SEARCHES WITH THE HIGHER CRITICISM STATISTIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, M. F.; Melatos, A. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia)] [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia); Delaigle, A.; Hall, P., E-mail: mfb@unimelb.edu.au [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new method of gravitational-wave detection using a modified form of higher criticism, a statistical technique introduced by Donoho and Jin. Higher criticism is designed to detect a group of sparse, weak sources, none of which are strong enough to be reliably estimated or detected individually. We apply higher criticism as a second-pass method to synthetic F-statistic and C-statistic data for a monochromatic periodic source in a binary system and quantify the improvement relative to the first-pass methods. We find that higher criticism on C-statistic data is more sensitive by {approx}6% than the C-statistic alone under optimal conditions (i.e., binary orbit known exactly) and the relative advantage increases as the error in the orbital parameters increases. Higher criticism is robust even when the source is not monochromatic (e.g., phase-wandering in an accreting system). Applying higher criticism to a phase-wandering source over multiple time intervals gives a {approx}> 30% increase in detectability with few assumptions about the frequency evolution. By contrast, in all-sky searches for unknown periodic sources, which are dominated by the brightest source, second-pass higher criticism does not provide any benefits over a first-pass search.

  7. Blackbrush shrublands occupy about three million acres of land in the western United States and they provide critical habitat for animals such as desert rodents, birds, and bighorn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of decades of work by U.S. Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station (RMRS) researchers Susan Meyer, Bryce Richardson, Rosemary Pendleton, Burton Pendleton, and Stanley Kitchen. Blackbrush shrublands Stanley Kitchen, this position between major climatic zones is significant because "blackbrush

  8. CRITICAL MESSAGE INTEGRITY OVER A SHARED NETWORK 1 1 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koopman, Philip

    , the simplest way to assure system safety is to isolate critical and non-critical components to prevent defects often contain a mixture of critical and non-critical software processes that need to communicate with each other. Critical software is "software whose failure could have an impact on safety, or could cause

  9. *Co-advised by Benoit Baudry and Arnaud Blouin Challenges of Testing for Critical Interactive Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    *Co-advised by Benoit Baudry and Arnaud Blouin Challenges of Testing for Critical Interactive.lelli_leitao_dantas@inria.fr Abstract--Interactive systems cover all systems that represent a bridge to enable the user interaction over an interface. The advance of technologies such as ubiquitous computing brings new interaction designs. The new

  10. Advanced Turbine Systems Program: Conceptual design and product development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Objective is to provide the conceptual design and product development plant for an ultra high efficiency, environmentally superior, and cost competitive industrial gas turbine system to be commercialized by the year 2000 (secondary objective is to begin early development of technologies critical to the success of ATS). This report addresses the remaining 7 of the 9 subtasks in Task 8, Design and Test of Critical Components: catalytic combustion, recuperator, high- temperature turbine disc, advanced control system, and ceramic materials.

  11. Historic Habitat Opportunities and Food-Web Linkages of Juvenile Salmon in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report of Research.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bottom, Daniel L.; Simenstad, Charles A.; Campbell, Lance [Northwest Fisheries Science Center

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2002 with support from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), an interagency research team began investigating salmon life histories and habitat use in the lower Columbia River estuary to fill significant data gaps about the estuary's potential role in salmon decline and recovery . The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provided additional funding in 2004 to reconstruct historical changes in estuarine habitat opportunities and food web linkages of Columbia River salmon (Onchorhynchus spp.). Together these studies constitute the estuary's first comprehensive investigation of shallow-water habitats, including selected emergent, forested, and scrub-shrub wetlands. Among other findings, this research documented the importance of wetlands as nursery areas for juvenile salmon; quantified historical changes in the amounts and distributions of diverse habitat types in the lower estuary; documented estuarine residence times, ranging from weeks to months for many juvenile Chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha); and provided new evidence that contemporary salmonid food webs are supported disproportionately by wetland-derived prey resources. The results of these lower-estuary investigations also raised many new questions about habitat functions, historical habitat distributions, and salmon life histories in other areas of the Columbia River estuary that have not been adequately investigated. For example, quantitative estimates of historical habitat changes are available only for the lower 75 km of the estuary, although tidal influence extends 217 km upriver to Bonneville Dam. Because the otolith techniques used to reconstruct salmon life histories rely on detection of a chemical signature (strontium) for salt water, the estuarine residency information we have collected to date applies only to the lower 30 or 35 km of the estuary, where fish first encounter ocean water. We lack information about salmon habitat use, life histories, and growth within the long tidal-fresh reaches of the main-stem river and many tidally-influenced estuary tributaries. Finally, our surveys to date characterize wetland habitats within island complexes distributed in the main channel of the lower estuary. Yet some of the most significant wetland losses have occurred along the estuary's periphery, including shoreline areas and tributary junctions. These habitats may or may not function similarly as the island complexes that we have surveyed to date. In 2007 we initiated a second phase of the BPA estuary study (Phase II) to address specific uncertainties about salmon in tidal-fresh and tributary habitats of the Columbia River estuary. This report summarizes 2007 and 2008 Phase II results and addresses three principal research questions: (1) What was the historic distribution of estuarine and floodplain habitats from Astoria to Bonneville Dam? (2) Do individual patterns of estuarine residency and growth of juvenile Chinook salmon vary among wetland habitat types along the estuarine tidal gradient? (3) Are salmon rearing opportunities and life histories in the restoring wetland landscape of lower Grays River similar to those documented for island complexes of the main-stem estuary? Phase II extended our analysis of historical habitat distribution in the estuary above Rkm 75 to near Bonneville Dam. For this analysis we digitized the original nineteenth-century topographic (T-sheets) and hydrographic (H-sheets) survey maps for the entire estuary. Although all T-sheets (Rkm 0 to Rkm 206) were converted to GIS in 2005 with support for the USACE estuary project, final reconstruction of historical habitats throughout the estuary requires completion of the remaining H-sheet GIS maps above Rkm 75 and their integration with the T-sheets. This report summarizes progress to date on compiling the upper estuary H-sheets above Rkm 75. For the USACE estuary project, we analyzed otoliths from Chinook salmon collected near the estuary mouth in 2003-05 to estimate variability in estuary residence times among juvenile out migrants. In Phase II we expanded these analyses to comp

  12. WIPP-016, Rev. 0 Nuclear Criticality Safety Evaluation for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WIPP-016, Rev. 0 Nuclear Criticality Safety Evaluation for Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste/2008 Guidance (if applicable): _______________________ #12;NUCLEAR CRITICALITY SAFETY EVALUATION FOR CONTACT, directors, employees, agents, consultants or personal services contractors. #12;NUCLEAR CRITICALITY SAFETY

  13. Firing the Canon: Multiple Insularities in Jazz Criticism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, Christopher

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Whereas many jazz scholars focus on jazz criticism's construction and implications of a single, or insular, jazz canon, this dissertation argues that what many jazz critics do is precisely the opposite. These critics disrupt ...

  14. Nuclear Data for Criticality Safety and Reactor Applications at the Gaerttner LINAC Center Y. Danon, R.M. Bahran, E.J. Blain, A.M. Daskalakis, B.J. McDermott, D.G. Williams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    Nuclear Data for Criticality Safety and Reactor Applications at the Gaerttner LINAC Center Y. Danon used in reactor and nuclear criticality safety applications. The goal of this program is to provide to nuclear criticality, neutron shielding applications, nuclear reactor design, and to better understand

  15. U.S. Department of Energy Critical Materials Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, D.; Diamond, D.; Li, J.; Sandalow, D.; Telleen, P.; Wanner, B.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the role of rare earth metals and other materials in the clean energy economy. It was prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) based on data collected and research performed during 2010. Its main conclusions include: (a) Several clean energy technologies -- including wind turbines, electric vehicles, photovoltaic cells and fluorescent lighting -- use materials at risk of supply disruptions in the short term. Those risks will generally decrease in the medium and long term. (b) Clean energy technologies currently constitute about 20 percent of global consumption of critical materials. As clean energy technologies are deployed more widely in the decades ahead, their share of global consumption of critical materials will likely grow. (c) Of the materials analyzed, five rare earth metals (dysprosium, neodymium, terbium, europium and yttrium), as well as indium, are assessed as most critical in the short term. For this purpose, 'criticality' is a measure that combines importance to the clean energy economy and risk of supply disruption. (d) Sound policies and strategic investments can reduce the risk of supply disruptions, especially in the medium and long term. (e) Data with respect to many of the issues considered in this report are sparse. In the report, DOE describes plans to (i) develop its first integrated research agenda addressing critical materials, building on three technical workshops convened by the Department during November and December 2010; (ii) strengthen its capacity for information-gathering on this topic; and (iii) work closely with international partners, including Japan and Europe, to reduce vulnerability to supply disruptions and address critical material needs. DOE will work with other stakeholders -- including interagency colleagues, Congress and the public -- to shape policy tools that strengthen the United States' strategic capabilities. DOE also announces its plan to develop an updated critical materials strategy, based upon additional events and information, by the end of 2011.DOE's strategy with respect to critical materials rests on three pillars. First, diversified global supply chains are essential. To manage supply risk, multiple sources of materials are required. This means taking steps to facilitate extraction, processing and manufacturing here in the United States, as well as encouraging other nations to expedite alternative supplies. In all cases, extraction and processing should be done in an environmentally sound manner. Second, substitutes must be developed. Research leading to material and technology substitutes will improve flexibility and help meet the material needs of the clean energy economy. Third, recycling, reuse and more efficient use could significantly lower world demand for newly extracted materials. Research into recycling processes coupled with well-designed policies will help make recycling economically viable over time.The scope of this report is limited. It does not address the material needs of the entire economy, the entire energy sector or even all clean energy technologies. Time and resource limitations precluded a comprehensive scope. Among the topics that merit additional research are the use of rare earth metals in catalytic converters and in petroleum refining. These topics are discussed briefly in Chapter 2.

  16. The Critical Mass Laboratory at Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothe, Robert E

    2003-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Critical Mass Laboratory (CML) at Rocky Flats northwest of Denver, Colorado, was built in 1964 and commissioned to conduct nuclear experiments on January 28, 1965. It was built to attain more accurate and precise experimental data to ensure nuclear criticality safety at the plant than were previously possible. Prior to its construction, safety data were obtained from long extrapolations of subcritical data (called in situ experiments), calculated parameters from reactor engineering 'models', and a few other imprecise methods. About 1700 critical and critical-approach experiments involving several chemical forms of enriched uranium and plutonium were performed between then and 1988. These experiments included single units and arrays of fissile materials, reflected and 'bare' systems, and configurations with various degrees of moderation, as well as some containing strong neutron absorbers. In 1989, a raid by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) caused the plant as a whole to focus on 'resumption' instead of further criticality safety experiments. Though either not recognized or not admitted for a few years, that FBI raid did sound the death knell for the CML. The plant's optimistic goal of resumption evolved to one of deactivation, decommissioning, and plantwide demolition during the 1990s. The once-proud CML facility was finally demolished in April of 2002.

  17. Effects of Ignition Quality and Fuel Composition on Critical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Effects of Ignition Quality and Fuel Composition on Critical Equivalence Ratio Effects of Ignition Quality and Fuel Composition on Critical Equivalence Ratio Our research shows...

  18. CNG, Hydrogen, CNG-Hydrogen Blends - Critical Fuel Properties...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    CNG, Hydrogen, CNG-Hydrogen Blends - Critical Fuel Properties and Behavior CNG, Hydrogen, CNG-Hydrogen Blends - Critical Fuel Properties and Behavior Presentation given by Jay...

  19. antiferromagnetic quantum critical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    quasiparticles are strongly coupled and acquire spectral functions with a common dynamic critical exponent. We obtain results for critical exponents and for the variation in...

  20. Department of Energy Critical Materials Strategy Video (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a text version of the "Department of Energy Critical Materials Strategy" video presented at the Critical Materials Workshop, held on April 3, 2012 in Arlington, Virginia.

  1. Critical Materials and Rare Futures: Ames Laboratory Signs a...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Critical Materials and Rare Futures: Ames Laboratory Signs a New Agreement on Rare-Earth Research Critical Materials and Rare Futures: Ames Laboratory Signs a New Agreement on...

  2. Critical Materials Research in DOE Video (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a text version of the "Critical Materials Research in DOE" video presented at the Critical Materials Workshop, held on April 3, 2012 in Arlington, Virginia.

  3. SciTech Connect: Relationship between critical tensile stress...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Relationship between critical tensile stress and fracture toughness in mild steel Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Relationship between critical tensile stress and...

  4. National Academies Criticality Methodology and Assessment Video (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a text version of the "National Academies Criticality Methodology and Assessment" video presented at the Critical Materials Workshop, held on April 3, 2012 in Arlington, Virginia.

  5. Advanced energy design and operation technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brambley, M.R.; Crawley, D.B.

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current practice in design of commercial buildings does not adequately consider the relationships between design decisions and energy performance. Estimates indicate that if energy criteria were integral to the design process, more than 15% of the energy used in new buildings could be conserved. This could be done using readily available energy-efficient design knowledge, without any increase in first costs. Furthermore, building design necessarily involves assumptions concerning use and operation of the building once it is built. Currently, operations practices intended by the designer are not adequately transferred during commissioning to building operators for use as guides during operation. Advanced technologies for overcoming these problems are described in this paper. The advanced energy design and operations technologies will consist of an intelligent automated design advisor that utilizes artificial intelligence and other advanced computer technologies to provide assistance to and encourage interaction among all participants in the design process. Assistance will be provided at all points in the building design process, especially in the early phases of design (e.g., during building programming) where decisions can have particularly significant impacts on energy consumption. The technology used for the design advisor will facilitate transfer of critical operation guidance to building operators and, coupled with monitoring technology, provide feedback on performance to the design process. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Benchmark calculations on the phase II problem of uncertainty analyses for criticality safety assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, G. S.; Lee, J.; Kim, G. Y.; Woo, S. W. [Korea Inst. of Nuclear Safety, 62 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-338 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The phase II benchmark problem of expert group UACSA includes a configuration of a PWR fuel storage rack and focuses on the uncertainty of criticality from manufacturing tolerance of design parameters such as fuel enrichment, density, diameter, thickness of neutron absorber and structural material, and so on. It provides probability density functions for each design parameter. In this paper, upper limits of k{sub eff} of 95%/95% tolerance with two methods are calculated by sampling design parameters using given probability distributions and compared with the result from traditional approach. (authors)

  7. Criticality Safety Basics for INL Emergency Responders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valerie L. Putman

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a modular self-study guide about criticality safety principles for Idaho National Laboratory emergency responders. This guide provides basic criticality safety information for people who, in response to an emergency, might enter an area that contains much fissionable (or fissile) material. The information should help responders understand unique factors that might be important in responding to a criticality accident or in preventing a criticality accident while responding to a different emergency.

    This study guide specifically supplements web-based training for firefighters (0INL1226) and includes information for other Idaho National Laboratory first responders. However, the guide audience also includes other first responders such as radiological control personnel.

    For interested readers, this guide includes clearly marked additional information that will not be included on tests. The additional information includes historical examples (Been there. Done that.), as well as facts and more in-depth information (Did you know ).

    INL criticality safety personnel revise this guide as needed to reflect program changes, user requests, and better information. Revision 0, issued May 2007, established the basic text. Revision 1 incorporates operation, program, and training changes implemented since 2007. Revision 1 increases focus on first responders because later responders are more likely to have more assistance and guidance from facility personnel and subject matter experts. Revision 1 also completely reorganized the training to better emphasize physical concepts behind the criticality controls that help keep emergency responders safe. The changes are based on and consistent with changes made to course 0INL1226.

  8. CRITICALITY HAZOP EFFICIENTLY EVALUATING HAZARDS OF NEW OR REVISED CRITICALITY SAFETY EVALUATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CARSON DM

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The 'Criticality HazOp' technique, as developed at Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP), has allowed for efficiencies enabling shortening of the time necessary to complete new or revised criticality safety evaluation reports (CSERs). For example, in the last half of 2007 at PFP, CSER revisions undergoing the 'Criticality HazOp' process were completed at a higher rate than previously achievable. The efficiencies gained through use of the 'Criticality HazOp' process come from the preliminary narrowing of potential scenarios for the Criticality analyst to fully evaluate in preparation of the new or revised CSER, and from the use of a systematized 'Criticality HazOp' group assessment of the relevant conditions to show which few parameter/condition/deviation combinations actually require analytical effort. The 'Criticality HazOp' has not only provided efficiencies of time, but has brought to criticality safety evaluation revisions the benefits of a structured hazard evaluation method and the enhanced insight that may be gained from direct involvement of a team in the process. In addition, involved personnel have gained a higher degree of confidence and understanding of the resulting CSER product.

  9. QCD Critical Point: The Race is On

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajiv V. Gavai

    2014-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A critical point in the phase diagram of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), if established either theoretically or experimentally, would be as profound a discovery as the good-old gas-liquid critical point. Unlike the latter, however, first-principles based approaches are being employed to locate it theoretically. Due to the short lived nature of the concerned phases, novel experimental techniques are needed to search for it. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in USA has an experimental program to do so. This short review is an attempt to provide a glimpse of the race between the theorists and the experimentalists as well as that of the synergy between them.

  10. Generalized Holographic Quantum Criticality at Finite Density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Goutraux; E. Kiritsis

    2013-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the near-extremal solutions of Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton theories, studied in ArXiv:1005.4690, provide IR quantum critical geometries, by embedding classes of them in higher-dimensional AdS and Lifshitz solutions. This explains the scaling of their thermodynamic functions and their IR transport coefficients, the nature of their spectra, the Gubser bound, and regulates their singularities. We propose that these are the most general quantum critical IR asymptotics at finite density of EMD theories.

  11. 1 L. Schneider, Traditions et renouveau de l'habitat de hauteur dans la Gaule du sud-est Entre Antiquit et haut Moyen Age

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    'un habitat de plaine qui pouvait être également groupé (Raynaud 2002a), le concept d explorés. Face à la traditionnelle rhétorique des ruptures et des continuités, il reste toujours à mettre. Schneider, Traditions et renouveau de l'habitat de hauteur dans la Gaule du sud-est habitats de plaine et

  12. Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myra, D.; Ready, C.

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program (YTAHP) was organized to restore salmonid passage to Yakima tributaries that historically supported salmonids and to improve habitat in areas where access is restored. This program intends to (a) screen unscreened diversion structures to prevent fish entrainment into artificial waterways; (b) provide for fish passage at man-made barriers, such as diversion dams, culverts, siphons and bridges; and (c) provide information and assistance to landowners interested in to contributing to the improvement of water quality, water reliability and stream habitat. The YTAHP developed from a number of groups actively engaged in watershed management, and/or habitat restoration within the Yakima River Basin. These groups include the Washington State Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), Kittitas County Conservation District (KCCD), North Yakima Conservation District (NYCD), Kittitas County Water Purveyors (KCWP), and Ahtanum Irrigation District (AID). The US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and Yakama Nation (YN) both participated in the development of the objectives of YTAHP. Other entities that will be involved during permitting or project review may include the YN, the federal Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and US Army Corps of Engineers (COE). The objectives of YTAHP are listed below and also include subtasks detailed in the report: (1) Conduct Early Action Projects; (2) Review Strategic Plan; (3) Restore Access, including stream inventory, prioritization, implementation; and (4) Provide opportunities to improve habitat and conserve resources. The BPA YTAHP funding supported activities of the program which are described in this report. These activities are primarily related to objective 1 (conduct early action projects) and parts of objectives 2-4. The work supported by YTAHP funding will support a series of scheduled projects and be made larger by complementary funding through NRSC EQIP, Irrigation Efficiencies, WA State Salmon Recovery Funding Board and other local, state and federal programs. Projects completed FY-03: The Cooke Creek siphon and screen/bypass was completed on time and within budget. The Rosbach Farms project was completed in cooperation with the NRCS Environmental Quality Incentives Program and the KCCD's Irrigation Efficiencies Program. Tributary survey teams were trained and surveys of tributaries in Yakima and Kittitas counties commenced in December of 2002. By the end of September 2003 Cowiche Creek in Yakima County was completed as well as Coleman, Reecer, Currier, Dry, Cabin, Indian, and Jack Creeks in Kittitas County. A screen was installed on the Hernandez/Ringer diversion in cooperation with the NRCS office in Kittitas County. YTAHP submitted six applications to the Salmon Recovery Funding Board and three were selected and funded. Another Salmon Recovery Funding Board project awarded in 2000 to the Yakama Nation was transferred to the KCCD. Two miles of fencing of riparian zones on the north fork Ahtanum was completed by the North Yakima Conservation District in cooperation with the Department of Natural Resources and the Ahtanum Irrigation District and funded by US fish and Wildlife as part of YTAHP's outreach partnering. Completion of this year's effort has provided significant inroads to working on the private lands in two counties which will be vital to future efforts by YTAHP and others to protect and enhance Yakima River Basin habitat. 2003 saw the migration of the WEB site from MWH to the Kittitas County Conservation District and can be accessed at www.kccd.net.

  13. Major safety and operational concerns for fuel debris criticality control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonoike, K.; Sono, H.; Umeda, M.; Yamane, Y.; Kugo, T.; Suyama, K. [Fukushima Project Team, Japan Atomic Energy Agency Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It can be seen from the criticality control viewpoint that the requirement divides the decommissioning work into two parts. One is the present condition where it is requested to prevent criticality and to monitor subcritical condition while the debris is untouched. The other is future work where the subcritical condition shall be ensured even if the debris condition is changed intentionally by raising water level, debris retrieval, etc. Repair of damages on the containment vessel (CV) walls is one of the most important objectives at present in the site. On completion of this task, it will become possible to raise water levels in the CVs and to shield the extremely high radiation emitted from the debris but there is a dilemma: raising the water level in the CVs implies to bring the debris closer to criticality because of the role of water for slowing down neutrons. This may be solved if the coolant water will start circulating in closed loops, and if a sufficient concentration of soluble neutron poison (borated water for instance) will be introduced in the loop. It should be still noted that this solution has a risk of worsening corrosion of the CV walls. Design of the retrieval operation of debris should be proposed as early as possible, which must include a neutron poison concentration required to ensure that the debris chunk is subcritical. In parallel, the development of the measurement system to monitor subcritical condition of the debris chunk should be conducted in case the borated water cannot be used continuously. The system would be based on a neutron counter with a high sensitivity and an appropriate shield for gamma-rays, and the adequate statistical signal processing.

  14. Designer Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruce A. Bassett; David Parkinson; Robert C. Nichol

    2005-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We highlight the flexibility of the IPSO experiment-design framework by contrasting its application to CMB, weak lensing and redshift surveys. We illustrate the latter with a 10 parameter MCMC D-optimisation of a dark energy redshift survey. When averaged over a standard dark energy model space the resulting optimal survey typically has only one or two redshift bins, located at zoptimisation we show how the statistical power of such surveys is significantly enhanced. Experiment design is aided by the richness of the figure of merit landscape which means one can impose secondary optimisation criteria at little cost. For example, one may choose either to maximally test a single model (such as \\Lambda CDM) or to get the most general model-independent constraints possible (e.g. on a whole space of dark energy models). Such freedom points to a future where cosmological experiments become increasingly specialised and optimisation increasingly important.

  15. An SF6 autoexpansion breaker; The correlation between magnetic arc control and critical current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernard, G.; Girard, A.; Malkin, P. (Etablissements Merlin et Gerin, 38 - Grenoble (France)); Scarpa, P. (Univ. of Liege (BE))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is possible to design SF6 autoexpansion breakers which are free from critical currents. In these devices which combine arc rotation in a magnetic field and thermal expansion of gas, critical currents can effectively occur if these effects are incorrectly created and combined. An analytic and experimental method optimizing the current at which rotation should start is presented. The study of the gas flow then ensures coupling with expansion. These investigations lead to representation of a thermal time constant directly related to interrupting capacity.

  16. Reactor Physics and Criticality Benchmark Evaluations for Advanced Nuclear Fuel - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Anderson; James Tulenko; Bradley Rearden; Gary Harms

    2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear industry interest in advanced fuel and reactor design often drives towards fuel with uranium enrichments greater than 5 wt% 235U. Unfortunately, little data exists, in the form of reactor physics and criticality benchmarks, for uranium enrichments ranging between 5 and 10 wt% 235U. The primary purpose of this project is to provide benchmarks for fuel similar to what may be required for advanced light water reactors (LWRs). These experiments will ultimately provide additional information for application to the criticality-safety bases for commercial fuel facilities handling greater than 5 wt% 235U fuel.

  17. Approaching total absorption at near infrared in a large area monolayer graphene by critical coupling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yonghao; Chadha, Arvinder; Zhao, Deyin; Shuai, Yichen; Menon, Laxmy; Yang, Hongjun; Zhou, Weidong, E-mail: wzhou@uta.edu [Nanophotonics Lab, Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, Texas 76019 (United States); Piper, Jessica R.; Fan, Shanhui [Ginzton Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Jia, Yichen; Xia, Fengnian [Department of Electrical Engineering, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Ma, Zhenqiang [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate experimentally close to total absorption in monolayer graphene based on critical coupling with guided resonances in transfer printed photonic crystal Fano resonance filters at near infrared. Measured peak absorptions of 35% and 85% were obtained from cavity coupled monolayer graphene for the structures without and with back reflectors, respectively. These measured values agree very well with the theoretical values predicted with the coupled mode theory based critical coupling design. Such strong light-matter interactions can lead to extremely compact and high performance photonic devices based on large area monolayer graphene and other twodimensional materials.

  18. Intrusion-Tolerant Self-Healing Devices for Critical Infrastructure Protection Paulo Sousa, Alysson N. Bessani, Wagner S. Dantas, Fabio Souto, Miguel Correia, Nuno F. Neves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Correia, Miguel

    }@lasige.di.fc.ul.pt, {mpc, nuno}@di.fc.ul.pt Abstract Critical infrastructures like the power grid are essen- tially different resilience requirements. 1. Introduction Critical infrastructures (CI) like the power grid are es. At least one tool specifically designed to find vulnerabilities in these infrastructures is known to exist

  19. Habitat associations and photo-identification of sea otters in Simpson Bay, Prince William Sound, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilkinson, Andrea Karin

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    waters. They are typically found within a few miles of shore and depths shallower that 40m (Kenyon 1975, Rotterman and Simon- Jackson 1988, Riedman and Estes 1990, Reeves et al. 2002). Canopy-forming kelp beds are an important component of sea otter... habitat throughout much of their range, used by 3 the otters for resting and foraging; they are not, however, a necessary component as many sea otter populations occur in areas without kelp beds (Miller 1974, Rotterman and Simon-Jackson 1988, Riedman...

  20. Population ecology of the Concho water snake, Nerodia harteri paucimaculata, in artificial habitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whiting, Martin John

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    characterized by rocky shorelines devoid of vegetation; however, when the lake rose in 1992, the new shoreline at Pecan Creek entered a growth of salt cedar with less exposed rock. Cervenka Dam was a stretch of riffle less than 100 m, located on the Colorado... rainfall caused a dramatic rise in lake elevation (Fig. 1 and 3). Habitat at the two primary sites (Pump Station and Pecan Creek) was impacted. At Pecan Creek, the lake edge extended into salt cedar (Tamarix) growth, where a corresponding reduction...

  1. Avian populations of urban woodlands: comparisons, habitat requirements, and management implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchnick, Alan David

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    savannah and river bottom were originally characterized by more of an open savannah with a ground cover of mid and tall grasses (Smeins and Slack 1978). Within the last decades, Brazos County has become thicketized as a result of overgrazing, aban... habitat types (forest, parkland, and savannah), six subhab1tat types (open forest, closed forest, th1cket forest, closed parkland, open parkland, and savannah), and three area s1ze classes (small, medium, and large) were ident1f1ed and compared...

  2. Redbird Red Habitat for Humanity Net Zero Energy Home Project Summary

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010InJanuary 29, 2013Redbird Red Habitat for Humanity

  3. ANGULAR MEASUREMENTS OF HTS CRITICAL CURRENT FOR HIGH FIELD SOLENOIDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turrioni, D.; Barzi, E.; Lamm, M.; Lombardo, V.; Zlobin, A. V. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Batavia, Illinois, 60510 (United States); Thieme, C. [American Superconductor (AMSC) Westborough, MA, 01581 (United States)

    2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An experiment is in the works at Fermilab to confirm that ionization cooling is an efficient way to shrink the size of a muon beam. This would pave the way for Muon Collider machines, which however require in their last stages of acceleration very high field solenoids. The use of high temperature superconducting materials (HTS) is being considered for these magnets using Helium or higher temperature refrigeration. A sample holder was designed to perform critical current (I{sub c}) measurements of HTS conductors under externally applied magnetic fields varying from zero to 90 degree with respect to the c-axis. This was performed in an ample range of temperatures and magnetic field values. A description of the test setup and results for (Bi,Pb){sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} (BSCCO-2223) tapes, and Second Generation HTS in the form of 348 superconductor are presented.

  4. habitat 109

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James R. Manhart

    2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    as Applied to Composite Materials Processing.......................... 5 1.4 Outline of the Dissertation.......................................................... 7 1.5 Contributions and Limitations of the Dissertation ..................... 7... Field..................... 13 2.3 A Sphere under a Uniform Electric Field Gradient .......................................... 15 3.1 A Photograph of the Electrode and Electromagnet Arrays............................... 27 3.2 Cross...

  5. habitat 105

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James R. Manhart

    2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Cooling System; R&D Research and Development; RPV Reactor Pressure Vessel; RST Reynolds Stress Transport; SNU Seoul National University; T temperature; viii T? temperature of water in the annulus; Tc temperature of the standpipes... ................................................................. 56 4.3.1 Sensitivity Analysis on the Standpipes Mass Flow Rate for the Water-Cooled RCCS Configuration ..................................................... 56 4.3.2 Sensitivity Analysis on the RPV Power Generated for the Water- Cooled RCCS...

  6. Bird Habitats

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alamos, coupled with monitoring chronic low-level exposure to chemical releases and climate change. RELATED IMAGES http:farm8.staticflickr.com725976844696381aee0c642cs.jpg...

  7. Bird Habitats

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find Find MoreTechnicalBiomimeticSupportingPanel toBird

  8. Criticality calculations for Step-2 GPHS modules.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hensen, Danielle Lynn; Lipinski, Ronald J.

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) will use an improved version of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) module as its source of thermal power. This new version, referred to as the Step-2 GPHS Module, has additional and thicker layers of carbon fiber material (Fine Weaved Pierced Fabric) for increased strength over the original GPHS module. The GPHS uses alpha decay of {sup 238}Pu in the oxide form as the primary source of heat, and small amounts of other actinides are also present in the oxide fuel. Criticality calculations have been performed by previous researchers on the original version of the GPHS module (Step 0). This paper presents criticality calculations for the present Step-2 version. The Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code (MCNPX) was used for these calculations. Numerous configurations of GPHS module arrays surrounded by wet sand and other materials (to reflect the neutrons back into the stack with minimal absorption) were modeled. For geometries with eight GPHS modules (from a single MMRTG) surrounded by wet sand, the configuration is extremely sub-critical; k{sub eff} is about 0.3. It requires about 1000 GPHS modules (from 125 MMRTGs) in a close-spaced stack to approach criticality (k{sub eff} = 1.0) when surrounded by wet sand. The effect of beryllium in the MMRTG was found to be relatively small.

  9. Criticality Calculations for Step-2 GPHS Modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipinski, Ronald J. [Advanced Nuclear Concepts Department, Sandia National Laboratories, P.O Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Hensen, Danielle L. [Risk and Reliability Department Sandia National Laboratories, P.O Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

    2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) will use an improved version of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) module as its source of thermal power. This new version, referred to as the Step-2 GPHS Module, has additional and thicker layers of carbon fiber material (Fine Weaved Pierced Fabric) for increased strength over the original GPHS module. The GPHS uses alpha decay of {sup 238}Pu in the oxide form as the primary source of heat, and small amounts of other actinides are also present in the oxide fuel. Criticality calculations have been performed by previous researchers on the original version of the GPHS module (Step 0). This paper presents criticality calculations for the present Step-2 version. The Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code (MCNPX) was used for these calculations. Numerous configurations of GPHS module arrays surrounded by wet sand and other materials (to reflect the neutrons back into the stack with minimal absorption) were modeled. For geometries with eight GPHS modules (from a single MMRTG) surrounded by wet sand, the configuration is extremely sub-critical; k{sub eff} is about 0.3. It requires about 1000 GPHS modules (from 125 MMRTGs) in a close-spaced stack to approach criticality (k{sub eff} = 1.0) when surrounded by wet sand. The effect of beryllium in the MMRTG was found to be relatively small.

  10. Timely PTS Applications Critical to Staying Navy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timely PTS Applications Critical to Staying Navy Navy Personnel Command (NPC) is reminding commands and Sailors that submitting Perform to Serve (PTS) applications is the key to being able to stay Navy/10 explains how PTS is used to shape the Navy, and includes all business rules concerning. Commands must

  11. Testing Subgroup Workshop on Critical Property Needs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ConditionsTestTestPropertyProperty #12;Critical Test, Standard Test Method and Test Conditions E1426 (xrd), E837 (hole drilling) Residual sensitivity unknowns X52 NIST Workshop conclusion: consider X70 and below as well as >X70. #12;Initial

  12. Robust Critical Node Selection by Benders Decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    critical node selection problem, we define the following decision variables ..... method to generate Pareto-optimal cuts thus achieving very good speed-ups compared to ... Barabsi-Albert graphs generated using the Barabsi graph generator (Dreier, 2006). ...... Computers & Operations Research, 38(12):1766 1774, 2011.

  13. Critical in PROJECT TITLE COMMENTS BPA NPCC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PLANNING AND CONSERVATION COUNCIL AND BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION "RANKINGS" FOR PROJECTS UNDER in annual planning budget and feasibility of approach to achieve efficiencies. BPA reduced by $250PROJECT NUMBER (BiOp Critical in Italics) PROJECT TITLE COMMENTS BPA NPCC 35019 Develop

  14. Criticality of the European Electricity Grid Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arrowsmith, David

    1 Criticality of the European Electricity Grid Network MANMADE EU NEST FUNDING D.K. Arrowsmith (catastrophic failure of network components), functional (electricity grid blackouts, supply chain), volatility the qualitative characteristics of power disruptions from a large synchronously-connected electricity grid

  15. Intrusion-Tolerant Protection for Critical Infrastructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neves, Nuno

    of an organization in the face of accidents and attacks. How- ever, they are not simple firewalls but distributed]. In recent years these systems evolved in several aspects that greatly increased their exposure to cyber-attacks, a critical information infrastructure is formed by facilities, like power transformation substations or cor

  16. Geological carbon sequestration: critical legal issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    Geological carbon sequestration: critical legal issues Ray Purdy and Richard Macrory January 2004 Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research Working Paper 45 #12;1 Geological carbon sequestration an integrated assessment of geological carbon sequestration (Project ID code T2.21). #12;2 1 Introduction

  17. Determination of Critical Exponents in Nuclear Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. F. J. Mueller; ALADIN collaboration

    1996-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Signatures of critical behaviour in nuclear fragmentation are often based on arguments from percolation theory. We demonstrate with general thermodynamic considerations and studies of the Ising model that the reliance on percolation as a reference model bears the risk of missing parts of the essential physics.

  18. AUTOMATED CRITICAL PEAK PRICING FIELD TESTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) for development of the DR Automation Server System This project could not have been completed without extensive: Greg Watson and Mark Lott C&C Building Automation: Mark Johnson and John Fiegel Chabot Space AUTOMATED CRITICAL PEAK PRICING FIELD TESTS: 2006 PROGRAM DESCRIPTION AND RESULTS

  19. Critical Nuclear Charges for N-Electron Atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kais, Sabre

    Critical Nuclear Charges for N-Electron Atoms ALEXEI V. SERGEEV, SABRE KAIS Department of Chemistry, which is treated as a continuous parameter, approaches its critical value. The critical nuclear charge: critical nuclear charges; N-electron atoms; stability of atomic dianions Introduction he question

  20. Status of fusion reactor blanket design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.L.; Sze, D.K.

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides a brief review of the Blanket Comparison and Selection Study (BCSS)/sup 1/ and an overview of more recent fusion reactor blanket design efforts. Specific areas covered include improvements in leading blanket concepts identified in the BCSS, viz., self-cooled liquid metal concepts, helium-cooled solid breeder concepts, and helium-cooled liquid breeder concepts. In addition, a summary of innovative blanket concepts and design features is presented. The key features and critical issues associated with these designs are identified.

  1. Effects of Hydroelectric Dam Operations on the Restoration Potential of Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Spawning Habitat Final Report, October 2005 - September 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanrahan, Timothy P.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Arntzen, Evan V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes research conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as part of the Fish and Wildlife Program directed by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council. The study evaluated the restoration potential of Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat within the impounded lower Snake River. The objective of the research was to determine if hydroelectric dam operations could be modified, within existing system constraints (e.g., minimum to normal pool levels; without partial removal of a dam structure), to increase the amount of available fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the lower Snake River. Empirical and modeled physical habitat data were used to compare potential fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Snake River, under current and modified dam operations, with the analogous physical characteristics of an existing fall Chinook salmon spawning area in the Columbia River. The two Snake River study areas included the Ice Harbor Dam tailrace downstream to the Highway 12 bridge and the Lower Granite Dam tailrace downstream approximately 12 river kilometers. These areas represent tailwater habitat (i.e., riverine segments extending from a dam downstream to the backwater influence from the next dam downstream). We used a reference site, indicative of current fall Chinook salmon spawning areas in tailwater habitat, against which to compare the physical characteristics of each study site. The reference site for tailwater habitats was the section extending downstream from the Wanapum Dam tailrace on the Columbia River. Fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat use data, including water depth, velocity, substrate size and channelbed slope, from the Wanapum reference area were used to define spawning habitat suitability based on these variables. Fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat suitability of the Snake River study areas was estimated by applying the Wanapum reference reach habitat suitability criteria to measured and modeled habitat data from the Snake River study areas. Channel morphology data from the Wanapum reference reach and the Snake River study areas were evaluated to identify geomorphically suitable fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat. The results of this study indicate that a majority of the Ice Harbor and Lower Granite study areas contain suitable fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat under existing hydrosystem operations. However, a large majority of the currently available fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Ice Harbor and Lower Granite study areas is of low quality. The potential for increasing, through modifications to hydrosystem operations (i.e., minimum pool elevation of the next downstream dam), the quantity or quality of fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat appears to be limited. Estimates of the amount of potential fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Ice Harbor study area decreased as the McNary Dam forebay elevation was lowered from normal to minimum pool elevation. Estimates of the amount of potential fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Lower Granite study area increased as the Little Goose Dam forebay elevation was lowered from normal to minimum pool elevation; however, 97% of the available habitat was categorized within the range of lowest quality. In both the Ice Harbor and Lower Granite study areas, water velocity appears to be more of a limiting factor than water depth for fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat, with both study areas dominated by low-magnitude water velocity. The geomorphic suitability of both study areas appears to be compromised for fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat, with the Ice Harbor study area lacking significant bedforms along the longitudinal thalweg profile and the Lower Granite study area lacking cross-sectional topographic diversity. To increase the quantity of available fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Ice Harbor and Lower Granite study area, modifications to hydroelectric dam operations beyond those evaluated in this study likely would be necessary. M

  2. The Zeus Copper/Uranium Critical Experiment at NCERC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, Rene G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hayes, David K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bounds, John Alan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jackman, Kevin R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goda, Joetta M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A critical experiment was performed to provide nuclear data in a non-thermal neutron spectrum and to reestablish experimental capability relevant to Stockpile Stewardship and Technical Nuclear Forensic programs. Irradiation foils were placed at specific locations in the Zeus all oralloy critical experiment to obtain fission ratios. These ratios were compared with others from other critical assemblies to assess the degree of softness in the neutron spectrum. This critical experiment was performed at the National Criticality Experiments Research Center (NCERC) in Nevada.

  3. Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sather, NK; Johnson, GE; Storch, AJ [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2009-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The tidal freshwater monitoring (TFM) project reported herein is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [USACE], and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act (ESA) as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System. The project is being performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Project No. 2005-001-00). The research is a collaborative effort among the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the University of Washington. The overarching goal of the TFM project is to bridge the gap in knowledge between tidal freshwater habitats and the early life history attributes of migrating salmon. The research questions include: In what types of habitats within the tidal freshwater area of the Columbia River are juvenile salmon found, when are they present, and under what environmental conditions? What is the ecological contribution of shallow (0-5 m) tidal freshwater habitats to the recovery of ESA-listed salmon in the Columbia River basin? Field data collection for the TFM project commenced in June 2007 and since then has continued monthly at six to nine sites in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta (river kilometer 192-208). While this report includes summary data spanning the 19-month period of study from June 2007 through December 2008, it highlights sampling conducted during calendar year 2008. Detailed data for calendar year 2007 were reported previously. The 2008 research objectives were as follows: (1) Characterize the vegetation composition and percent cover, conventional water quality, water surface elevation, substrate composition, bathymetry, and beach slope at the study sites within the vicinity of the Sandy River delta. (2) Characterize the fish community and juvenile salmon migration, including species composition, length-frequency distribution, density (number/m{sup 2}), and temporal and spatial distributions in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). (3) Determine the stock of origin for juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) captured at sampling sites through genetic identification. (4) Characterize the diets of juvenile Chinook and coho (O. kisutch) salmon captured within the study area. (5) Estimate run timing, residence times, and migration pathways for acoustic-tagged fish in the study area. (6) Conduct a baseline evaluation of the potential restoration to reconnect the old Sandy River channel with the delta. (7) Apply fish density data to initiate a design for a juvenile salmon monitoring program for beach habitats within the tidal freshwater segment of the LCRE (river kilometer 56-234).

  4. Linking habitat use of Hudson River striped bass to accumulation of polychlorinated biphenyl congeners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, J.T.F.; Secor, D.H.; Zlokovitz, E.; Wales, S.Q.; Baker, J.E.

    2000-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1976, the commercial striped bass fishery in the Hudson River (NY) has been closed due to total polychlorinated biphenyl (t-PCB) concentrations that exceed the US Food and Drug Administration's advisory level of 2 {micro}g/g-wet weight. Extensive monitoring of Hudson River striped bass demonstrated much more variability in t-PCB levels among individual striped bass than could be explained by their age, sex, or lipid contents. To investigate the possible role of differential habitat use among subpopulations of striped bass in controlling their PCB exposures, 70 fish collected throughout the Hudson River estuary and Long Island Sound in 1994--1995 were analyzed for PCB congeners, and their lifetime migration behaviors were estimated by otolith microchemistry. The mean salinity encountered during the fish's last growth season prior to capture was inversely correlated with the t-PCB body burden. Striped bass permanently residing in fresh and oligohaline portions of the estuary adjacent to known PCB sources had elevated t-PCB levels and congeneric patterns with higher proportions of di-, tri-, and tetrachlorobiphenyls. Conversely, fish spending the majority of their life in more saline waters of the estuary or migrating frequently throughout the salinity gradient contained lower PCB levels composed of more highly chlorinated congeners. The approach used in this study allows habitat use to be incorporated into exposure assessments for anadromous fish species such as striped bass.

  5. Diet of desert tortoises at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and implications for habitat reclamation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakestraw, D.L.; Holt, E.A.; Rautenstrauch, K.R.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The diet of desert tortoises at Yucca Mountain was assessed during 1992 to 1995 using a combination of feeding observations and scat analysis. Feeding observation data (1993 through 1995) showed that tortoises fed on a wide variety of items. The most frequently eaten items were forbs and annual grasses. These two forage groups comprised more than 90% of all bites taken. Analysis of scat (1992 and 1993) also showed that grasses and forbs were the most common groups, making up more than 80% of the composition of scat. Yearly differences between proportions of species in the diet were observed and were most likely attributable to differences in plant productivity, which is linked to rainfall patterns. Non-native species were an important component of the diet in all years, accounting for 13 to 50% of all bites observed and 6 to 24% of scat contents. A list of all items encountered in the diet is provided. To facilitate reclamation of desert tortoise habitat disturbed by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, native forage species that should be included in reclamation seed mixes, when feasible, were identified. Although shrubs make up only a small proportion of the diet, they should also be included in reclamation efforts because they provide habitat structure. Tortoise cover sites, and microhabitats amenable to seed germination and seedling establishment. In addition, non-native species should not be planted on reclaimed sites and, if necessary, sites should be recontoured and soil compaction reduced prior to planting.

  6. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Technical Report 2000-2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allard, Donna

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steigenvald Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR, refuge) was established as a result of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) transferring ownership of the Stevenson tract located in the historic Steigerwald Lake site to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS, Service) for the mitigation of the fish and wildlife losses associated with the construction of a second powerhouse at the Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River and relocation of the town of North Bonneville (Public Law 98-396). The construction project was completed in 1983 and resulted in the loss of approximately 577 acres of habitat on the Washington shore of the Columbia River (USFWS, 1982). The COE determined that acquisition and development of the Steigenvald Lake area, along with other on-site project management actions, would meet their legal obligation to mitigate for these impacts (USCOE, 1985). Mitigation requirements included restoration and enhancement of this property to increase overall habitat diversity and productivity. From 1994 to 1999, 317 acres of additional lands, consisting of four tracts of contiguous land, were added to the original refuge with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds provided through the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement. These tracts comprised Straub (191 acres), James (90 acres), Burlington Northern (27 acres), and Bliss (9 acres). Refer to Figure 1. Under this Agreement, BPA budgeted $2,730,000 to the Service for 'the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Federal hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River or its tributaries' in the state of Washington (BPA, 1993). Lands acquired for mitigation resulting from BPA actions are evaluated using the habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) methodology, which quantifies how many Habitat Units (HUs) are to be credited to BPA. HUs or credits gained lessen BPA's debt, which was formally tabulated in the Federal Columbia River Power System Loss Assessments and adopted as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program as a BPA obligation (BPA, 1994). Steigenvald Lake NWR is located in southwest Washington (Clark County), within the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area. Historically part of the Columbia River flood plain, the refuge area was disconnected from the river by a series of dikes constructed by the COE for flood control in 1966. An aerial photograph from 1948 portrays this area as an exceedingly complex mosaic of open water, wetlands, sloughs, willow and cottonwood stands, wet meadows, upland pastures, and agricultural fields, which once supported a large assemblage of fish and wildlife populations. Eliminating the threat of periodic inundation by the Columbia River allowed landowners to more completely convert the area into upland pasture and farmland through channelization and removal of standing water. Native pastures were 'improved' for grazing by the introduction of non-native fescues, orchard grass, ryegrass, and numerous clovers. Although efforts to drain the lake were not entirely successful, wetland values were still significantly reduced.

  7. Critical Fields, Thermally Activated Transport, and Critical Current Density of Beta-FeSe Single Crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrovic, C.; Lei, H.; Hu, R.

    2011-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present critical fields, thermally activated flux flow (TAFF), and critical current density of tetragonal phase {beta}-FeSe single crystals. The upper critical fields H{sub c2}(T) for H {parallel} (101) and H {perpendicular} (101) are nearly isotropic and are likely governed by the Pauli limiting process. The large Ginzburg-Landau parameter {Kappa} {approx} 72.3(2) indicates that {beta}-FeSe is a type-II superconductor with a smaller penetration depth than in Fe(Te, Se). The resistivity below T{sub c} follows Arrhenius TAFF behavior. For both field directions below 30 kOe, single-vortex pinning is dominant, whereas collective creep becomes important above 30 kOe. The critical current density J{sub c} from M-H loops for H {parallel} (101) is about five times larger than for H {perpendicular} (101), yet much smaller than in other iron-based superconductors.

  8. Redd Site Selection and Spawning Habitat Use by Fall Chinook Salmon, Hanford Reach, Columbia River : Final Report 1995 - 1998.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geist, David R.

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes results of research activities conducted from 1995 through 1998 on identifying the spawning habitat requirements of fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. The project investigated whether traditional spawning habitat models could be improved in order to make better predictions of available habitat for fall chinook salmon in the Snake River. Results suggest models could be improved if they used spawning area-specific, rather than river-specific, spawning characteristics; incorporated hyporheic discharge measurements; and gave further consideration to the geomorphic features that are present in the unconstrained segments of large alluvial rivers. Ultimately the recovery of endangered fall chinook salmon will depend on how well we are able to recreate the characteristics once common in alluvial floodplains of large rivers. The results from this research can be used to better define the relationship between these physical habitat characteristics and fall chinook salmon spawning site selection, and provide more efficient use of limited recovery resources. This report is divided into four chapters which were presented in the author's doctoral dissertation which he completed through the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Oregon State University. Each of the chapters has been published in peer reviewed journals or is currently under review. Chapter one is a conceptual spawning habitat model that describes how geomorphic features of river channels create hydraulic processes, including hyporheic flows, that influence where salmon spawn in unconstrained reaches of large mainstem alluvial rivers. Chapter two describes the comparison of the physical factors associated with fall chinook salmon redd clusters located at two sites within the Reach. Spatial point pattern analysis of redds showed that redd clusters averaged approximately 10 hectares in area and their locations were consistent from year to year. The tendency to spawn in clusters suggests fall chinook salmon's use of spawning habitat is highly selective. Hydraulic characteristics of the redd clusters were significantly different than the habitat surrounding them. Velocity and lateral slope of the river bottom were the most important habitat variables in predicting redd site selection. While these variables explained a large proportion of the variance in redd site selection (86 to 96%), some unmeasured factors still accounted for a small percentage of actual spawning site selection. Chapter three describes the results from an investigation into the hyporheic characteristics of the two spawning areas studied in chapter two. This investigation showed that the magnitude and chemical characteristics of hyporheic discharge were different between and within two spawning areas. Apparently, fall chinook salmon used chemical and physical cues from the discharge to locate spawning areas. Finally, chapter four describes a unique method that was developed to install piezometers into the cobble bed of the Columbia River.

  9. Inverted critical adsorption of polyelectrolytes in confinement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Carvalho, Sidney J; Cherstvy, Andrey G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    What are the fundamental laws for the adsorption of charged polymers onto oppositely charged surfaces, for convex, planar, and concave geometries? This question is at the heart of surface coating applications, various complex formation phenomena, as well as in the context of cellular and viral biophysics. It has been a long-standing challenge in theoretical polymer physics; for realistic systems the quantitative understanding is however often achievable only by computer simulations. In this study, we present the findings of such extensive Monte-Carlo in silico experiments for polymer-surface adsorption in confined domains. We study the inverted critical adsorption of finite-length polyelectrolytes in three fundamental geometries: planar slit, cylindrical pore, and spherical cavity. The scaling relations extracted from simulations for the critical surface charge density $\\sigma_c$-defining the adsorption-desorption transition-are in excellent agreement with our analytical calculations based on the ground-state...

  10. Inhomogeneous Systems with Unusual Critical Behaviour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Igli; I. Peschel; L. Turban

    1997-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The phase transitions and critical properties of two types of inhomogeneous systems are reviewed. In one case, the local critical behaviour results from the particular shape of the system. Here scale-invariant forms like wedges or cones are considered as well as general parabolic shapes. In the other case the system contains defects, either narrow ones in the form of lines or stars, or extended ones where the couplings deviate from their bulk values according to power laws. In each case the perturbation may be irrelevant, marginal or relevant. In the marginal case one finds local exponents which depend on a parameter. In the relevant case unusual stretched exponential behaviour and/or local first order transitions appear. The discussion combines mean field theory, scaling considerations, conformal transformations and perturbation theory. A number of examples are Ising models for which exact results can be obtained. Some walks and polymer problems are considered, too.

  11. Aesthetic and Ethical Criticism in Herodas' Mimiamboi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slagowski, Benjamin Michael

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    , but unlike Callimachus will do so in response to criticism rather than in anticipation. There is another reference to Hipponax in Callimachus' thirteenth iamb, where the poetic persona (presumably Callimachus himself) twice refers to Ephesus, where... ? ? (Pfeiffer Fr. 203, 64-66) Having come neither to Ephesus nor having mixed with the Ionians, to Ephesus, where those intending to produce choliambic verses are learnedly inspired. Callimachus mentions Ephesus and the Ionians because...

  12. Results from 2010 Caliban Criticality Dosimetry Intercomparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veinot, K. G.

    2011-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The external dosimetry program participated in a criticality dosimetry intercomparison conducted at the Caliban facility in Valduc, France in 2010. Representatives from the dosimetry and instrumentation groups were present during testing which included irradiations of whole-body beta/gamma (HBGT) and neutron thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), a fixed nuclear accident dosimeter (FNAD), electronic alarming dosimeters, and a humanoid phantom filled with reference man concentrations of sodium. This report reviews the testing procedures, preparations, irradiations, and presents results of the tests.

  13. Inverted critical adsorption of polyelectrolytes in confinement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidney J. de Carvalho; Ralf Metzler; Andrey G. Cherstvy

    2015-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    What are the fundamental laws for the adsorption of charged polymers onto oppositely charged surfaces, for convex, planar, and concave geometries? This question is at the heart of surface coating applications, various complex formation phenomena, as well as in the context of cellular and viral biophysics. It has been a long-standing challenge in theoretical polymer physics; for realistic systems the quantitative understanding is however often achievable only by computer simulations. In this study, we present the findings of such extensive Monte-Carlo in silico experiments for polymer-surface adsorption in confined domains. We study the inverted critical adsorption of finite-length polyelectrolytes in three fundamental geometries: planar slit, cylindrical pore, and spherical cavity. The scaling relations extracted from simulations for the critical surface charge density $\\sigma_c$-defining the adsorption-desorption transition-are in excellent agreement with our analytical calculations based on the ground-state analysis of the Edwards equation. In particular, we confirm the magnitude and scaling of $\\sigma_c$ for the concave interfaces versus the Debye screening length $1/\\kappa$ and the extent of confinement $a$ for these three interfaces for small $\\kappa a$ values. For large $\\kappa a$ the critical adsorption condition approaches the planar limit. The transition between the two regimes takes place when the radius of surface curvature or half of the slit thickness $a$ is of the order of $1/\\kappa$. We also rationalize how $\\sigma_c(\\kappa)$ gets modified for semi-flexible versus flexible chains under external confinement. We examine the implications of the chain length onto critical adsorption-the effect often hard to tackle theoretically-putting an emphasis on polymers inside attractive spherical cavities.

  14. Architecture for high critical current superconducting tapes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Improvements in critical current capacity for superconducting film structures are disclosed and include the use of, e.g., multilayer YBCO structures where individual YBCO layers are separated by a layer of an insulating material such as CeO.sub.2 and the like, a layer of a conducting material such as strontium ruthenium oxide and the like or by a second superconducting material such as SmBCO and the like.

  15. EPR and Bell's theorem: A critical review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stapp, H.P. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The argument of Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen is reviewed with attention to logical structure and character of assumptions. Bohr's reply is discussed. Bell's contribution is formulated without use of hidden variables, and efforts to equate hidden variables to realism are critically examined. An alternative derivation of nonlocality that makes no use of hidden variables, microrealism, counterfactual definiteness, or any other assumption alien to orthodox quantum thinking is described in detail, with particular attention to the quartet or broken-square question.

  16. CMI in the News | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess Stories Siteandscience, and8Critical Materials

  17. Apparatus and method for critical current measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Joe A. (Espanola, NM); Dye, Robert C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for the measurement of the critical current of a superconductive sample, e.g., a clad superconductive sample, the apparatus including a conductive coil, a means for maintaining the coil in proximity to a superconductive sample, an electrical connection means for passing a low amplitude alternating current through the coil, a cooling means for maintaining the superconductive sample at a preselected temperature, a means for passing a current through the superconductive sample, and, a means for monitoring reactance of the coil, is disclosed, together with a process of measuring the critical current of a superconductive material, e.g., a clad superconductive material, by placing a superconductive material into the vicinity of the conductive coil of such an apparatus, cooling the superconductive material to a preselected temperature, passing a low amplitude alternating current through the coil, the alternating current capable of generating a magnetic field sufficient to penetrate, e.g., any cladding, and to induce eddy currents in the superconductive material, passing a steadily increasing current through the superconductive material, the current characterized as having a different frequency than the alternating current, and, monitoring the reactance of the coil with a phase sensitive detector as the current passed through the superconductive material is steadily increased whereby critical current of the superconductive material can be observed as the point whereat a component of impedance deviates.

  18. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Oleson Tracts of the Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge, 2001-2002 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allard, Donna; Smith, maureen; Schmidt, Peter

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Located in the northern Willamette River basin, Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) was established in 1992 with an approved acquisition boundary to accommodate willing sellers with potentially restorable holdings within the Tualatin River floodplain. The Refuge's floodplain of seasonal and emergent wetlands, Oregon ash riparian hardwood, riparian shrub, coniferous forest, and Garry oak communities are representative of remnant plant communities historically common in the Willamette River valley and offer an opportunity to compensate for wildlife habitat losses associated with the Willamette River basin federal hydroelectric projects. The purchase of the Oleson Units as additions to the Refuge using Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds will partially mitigate for wildlife habitat and target species losses incurred as a result of construction and inundation activities at Dexter and Detroit Dams. Lands acquired for mitigation of Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) impacts to wildlife are evaluated using the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) methodology, which quantifies how many Habitat Units (HUs) are to be credited to BPA. HUs or credits gained lessen BPA's debt, which was formally tabulated in the FCRPS Loss Assessments and adopted as part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Fish and Wildlife Program as a BPA obligation (NWPCC, 1994 and 2000). There are two basic management scenarios to consider for this evaluation: (1) Habitats can be managed without restoration activities to benefit wildlife populations, or (2) Habitats can be restored using a number of techniques to improve habitat values more quickly. Without restoration, upland and wetland areas may be periodically mowed and disced to prevent invasion of exotic vegetation, volunteer trees and shrubs may grow to expand forested areas, and cooperative farming may be employed to provide forage for migrating and wintering waterfowl. Abandoned cropland would comprise over half the total acreage and may be mowed or hayed to reduce exotic vegetation. Grasslands and wetlands may similarly be mowed or hayed, or left fallow. Wetlands would be subject to periodic flooding from the Tualatin River, but would drain quickly and promote undesirable vegetation. Riverine, forested wetland, and mixed forest habitats would likely change little from their current condition. Active restoration would include restoring wetlands with limited use of dikes and water control structures; planting and maintaining native grass, trees, and shrubs; and aggressive management of non-native invasive vegetation. Hydrology would be restored to emergent wetlands mimicking natural cycles thus promoting hydrophytic vegetation beneficial to fish and wildlife. Grassland and former crop areas would be planted with native grasses and trees to recreate prairie and savanna habitat types. Riverine riparian and forested wetland areas would be expanded by planting native trees and shrubs benefiting a multitude of species. Although a 'hands off' approach may provide habitat benefits after many decades, a more proactive approach would provide far more benefits to fish and wildlife, and thus would provide additional habitat credits more quickly.

  19. Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Willamette River Basin, 1934-1942, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains summary reports of stream habitat-surveys, conducted in the Willamette River basin, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1934-1942. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries contained in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power Administration. The Bureau of Fisheries survey is unique because it is the only long-term data set that quantifies fish habitat in a manner that is replicable over time; no other similar work is known to exist. Other surveys, such as Thompson and Haas (1960), inventoried extensive areas in a manner that was mostly qualitative, subjectively estimating physical characteristics like bank cover and stream shading. Spawning, rearing, and resting habitat were not systematically quantified to allow comparisons over time. Knowledge of past and present quantity and quality of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin is essential to any effort to enhance fish populations. Habitat condition is a key element in monitoring and evaluating progress towards the doubling goal. Integration of this information into the Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Plan can provide the basis to greatly enhance understanding of past, present, and future habitat conditions in the basin to provide for improved management decisions.

  20. Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Yakima River Basin, 1934-1942, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains summary reports of stream habitat surveys, conducted in the Yakima River basin, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1934-1942. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power Administration. The Bureau of Fisheries survey is unique because it is the only long-term data set that quantifies fish habitat in a manner that is replicable over time; no other similar work is known to exist. Other surveys, such as Thompson and Haas (1960), inventoried extensive areas in a manner that was mostly qualitative, subjectively estimating physical characteristics like bank cover and stream shading. Spawning, rearing, and resting habitat were not systematically quantified to allow comparisons over time. Knowledge of the past and present quantity and quality of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin is essential to any effort to enhance fish populations. Habitat condition is a key element in monitoring and evaluating progress towards the doubling goal. Integration of this information into the Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Plan can provide the baseline information to greatly enhance understanding of past, present, and future habitat conditions in the basin to provide for improved management decisions.