National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for designated critical habitat

  1. Use of decision analysis to design a habitat restoration experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Use of decision analysis to design a habitat restoration experiment by Ian James Parnell B Project: Use of decision analysis to design a habitat restoration experiment Supervisory Committee costs associated with uncertain outcomes. I used decision analysis to design an example experiment

  2. Secure & Restore Critical Fisheries Habitat, Flathead Subbasin, FY2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuCharme, Lynn; Tohtz, Joel

    2008-11-12

    The construction of Hungry Horse Dam inundated 125 km of adfluvial trout habitat in the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries, impacting natural fish reproduction and rearing. Rapid residential and commercial growth in the Flathead Watershed now threaten the best remaining habitats and restrict our opportunities to offset natural resource losses. Hydropower development and other land disturbances caused severe declines in the range and abundance of our focal resident fish species, bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. Bull trout were listed as threatened in 1998 under the Endangered Species Act and westslope cutthroat were petitioned for listing under ESA. Westslope cutthroat are a species of special concern in Montana and a species of special consideration by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. The Secure & Protect Fisheries Habitat project follows the logical progression towards habitat restoration outlined in the Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan approved by the NWPPC in 1993. This project is also consistent with the 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program and the Flathead River Subbasin Plan that identifies the protection of habitats for these populations as one of the most critical needs in the subbasin and directs actions to offset habitat losses. The Flathead basin is one of the fastest growing human population centers in Montana. Riparian habitats are being rapidly developed and subdivided, causing habitat degradation and altering ecosystem functions. Remaining critical habitats in the Flathead Watershed need to be purchased or protected with conservation easements if westslope cutthroat and bull trout are to persist and expand within the subbasin. In addition, habitats degraded by past land uses need to be restored to maximize the value of remaining habitats and offset losses caused by the construction of Hungry Horse Dam. Securing and restoring remaining riparian habitat will benefit fish by shading and moderating water temperatures, stabilizing banks and protecting the integrity of channel dimension, improving woody debris recruitment for in-channel habitat features, producing terrestrial insects and leaf litter for recruitment to the stream, and helping to accommodate and attenuate flood flows. The purpose of this project is to work with willing landowners to protect the best remaining habitats in the Flathead subbasin as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan. The target areas for land protection activities follow the priorities established in the Flathead subbasin plan and include: (1) Class 1 waters as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; (2) Class 2 watersheds as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; and (3) 'Offsite mitigation' defined as those Class 1 and Class 2 watersheds that lack connectivity to the mainstem Flathead River or Flathead Lake. This program focuses on conserving the highest quality or most important riparian or fisheries habitat areas consistent with program criteria. The success of our efforts is subject to a property's actual availability and individual landowner negotiations. The program is guided using biological and project-based criteria that reflect not only the priority needs established in the Flathead subbasin plan, but also such factors as cost, credits, threats, and partners. The implementation of this project requires both an expense and a capital budget to allow work to be completed. This report addresses accomplishments under both budgets during FY08 as the two budgets are interrelated. The expense budget provided pre-acquisition funding to conduct activities such as surveys, appraisals, staff support, etc. The capital budget was used to purchase the interest in each parcel including closing costs. Both the pre-acquisition contract funds and the capital funds used to purchase fee title or conservation easements were spent in accordance with the terms negotiated within the FY08 through FY09 MOA between the Tribes, State, and BPA. In FY08, the focus of this project was to pursue all possible properties

  3. Autonomous Following RObot Critical Design Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liebling, Michael

    , tennis, football, soccer Repainting fading street lines Perimeter security Warehouse item retrieval/storage user input. Navigating to specific coordinates of a grid. #12;Critical Design Review: Project - schematic/PCB, digital compass Travis - mechanical - servo, reflective sensor, power Peter - mechanical

  4. Title 50 CFR 226 Designated Critical Habitat | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin Film Solar TechnologiesCFR 1201 GeneralInformation 1726

  5. Critically Exploring the Virtual Possession Design Space Through Fieldwork and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Critically Exploring the Virtual Possession Design Space Through Fieldwork and Constructive Design, photos, tickets); things that never had a lasting material form (e.g., electronic message archives devices and services (e.g., photo location information, music play histories, automatic and manual photo

  6. Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) - A critical evaluation by LCA and recommendations for improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Sebastien; Abeck, Heike; Bali, Nishil; Horvath, Arpad

    2007-01-01

    and Environmental Design (LEED): A critical evaluation byand Environmental Design (LEED) A critical evaluation by LCAGoal, Scope and Background. LEED (Leadership in Energy and

  7. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report XI, Volume V. Critical review of the design basis. [Critical review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1982-01-01

    Report XI, Technical Audit, is a compendium of research material used during the Initial Effort in making engineering comparisons and decisions. Volumes 4 and 5 of Report XI present those studies which provide a Critical Review of the Design Basis. The Critical Review Report, prepared by Intercontinental Econergy Associates, Inc., summarizes findings from an extensive review of the data base for the H-Coal process design. Volume 4 presents this review and assessment, and includes supporting material; specifically, Design Data Tabulation (Appendix A), Process Flow Sheets (Appendix B), and References (Appendix C). Volume 5 is a continuation of the references of Appendix C. Studies of a proprietary nature are noted and referenced, but are not included in these volumes. They are included in the Limited Access versions of these reports and may be reviewed by properly cleared personnel in the offices of Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc.

  8. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report XI, Volume IV. Critical review of the design basis. [Critical review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1981-05-01

    Report XI, Technical Audit, is a compendium of research material used during the Initial Effort in making engineering comparisons and decisions. Volumes 4 and 5 of Report XI present those studies which provide a Critical Review of the Design Basis. The Critical Review Report, prepared by Intercontinental Econergy Associates, Inc., summarizes findings from an extensive review of the data base for the H-Coal process design. Volume 4 presents this review and assessment, and includes supporting material; specifically, Design Data Tabulation (Appendix A), Process Flow Sheets (Appendix B), and References (Appendix C). Volume 5 is a continuation of the references of Appendix C. Studies of a proprietary nature are noted and referenced, but are not included in these volumes. They are included in the Limited Access versions of these reports and may be reviewed by properly cleared personnel in the offices of Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc.

  9. Tornado vs. Hurricane Which is More Critical for Design of U...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tornado vs. Hurricane Which is More Critical for Design of U.S. Nuclear Power Plants? Tornado vs. Hurricane Which is More Critical for Design of U.S. Nuclear Power Plants? Tornado...

  10. Design and Criticality Considerations for 9977 and 9978 Shipping Packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, R; Biswas, D; Abramczyk, G

    2008-11-25

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed two new, Type B, state-of-the-art, general purpose, fissile material Shipping Packages, designated 9977 and 9978, as replacements for the U.S. DOT specification 6M container, phased out in September 30, 2008 due to non-compliance with current requirements 10CFR71 regulation. The packages accommodate plutonium, uranium and other special nuclear materials in bulk quantities and in many forms with capabilities exceeding those of the 6M. These packages provide a high degree of single containment and comply with 10CFR71, Department of Energy (DOE) Order 460.1B, DOE Order 460.2, and 10CFR20 (As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA)). Allowed package contents were determined accounting for nuclear criticality, radiation shielding, and decay heat rate. The Criticality Safety Index (CSI) for the package is 1.0. The package utilizes passive cooling to maintain internal temperatures within limits. Radiation shielding analyses have established the contents for which the packages can be shipped under non-exclusive use in the Safe-Secure Trailer or under exclusive use. The packages are designed to ship radioactive contents in several configurations; Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs), nested food-pack cans, site specific containers, and DOE-STD-3013 containers. Each shipping package includes a 35-gallon stainless steel outer drum, insulation, a drum liner, and a single containment vessel (CV). The 9977 includes a 6-inch ID CV while the 9978 includes a 5-inch ID CV. One inch of Fiberfrax{reg_sign} insulation is wrapped around and attached to the sides and bottom of the liner. The volume between the Fiberfrax{reg_sign} and the drum wall is filled with polyurethane foam. Top and bottom aluminum Load Distribution Fixtures (LDFs) within the drum liner cavity, above and below the CV, center the CV in the liner, stiffen the package radially, and distribute loads away from the CV. The 6CV fits directly into the LDFs while honeycomb spacers position the 5CV in the LDFs.

  11. Status of ESA Listings & Critical Habitat Designations for West Coast Salmon & Steelhead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CITED · 6/16/93 (58 FR 33212) Final CHD for Sacramento River Winter-run Chinook · 12/28/93 (58 FR 68543 COLUMBIA DOMAIN · Snake River Sockeye (E) [FCH 12/28/93] · Snake River Fall Chinook (T) [FCH 12/28/93] · Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook (T) [FCH 12/28/93; 10/25/99] · Snake River Steelhead (T) [FCH 9

  12. Critical review of water based radiant cooling system design methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jingjuan Dove; Bauman, Fred; Schiavon, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    buildings CRITICAL REVIEW OF WATER BASED RADIANT COOLINGare two primary types of water-based radiant systems: (1)cooling/heating output, water supply temperatures Notes NA

  13. The Relationships of Media, Task, Spatial Presence, and Critical Thinking, in an Online Tutorial Designed to Teach Art Criticism 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Nancy O

    2013-11-08

    THE RELATIONSHIPS OF MEDIA, TASK, SPATIAL PRESENCE, AND CRITICAL THINKING, IN AN ONLINE TUTORIAL DESIGNED TO TEACH ART CRITICISM A Dissertation by NANCY OSTERBERG WOOD Submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies of Texas A&M University... in an online research tutorial. The four conditions comprised two levels of two factors: Media and Task. The two Media were Static, represented by a linked jpeg image of the artwork; and Dynamic Manipulation represented by an interactive Adobe Flash version...

  14. Fusion Engineering and Design 45 (1999) 377407 Critical heat flux analysis and R&D for the design of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    1999-01-01

    Fusion Engineering and Design 45 (1999) 377­407 Critical heat flux analysis and R&D for the design and the design analysis performed in converging on a choice of reference configuration and parameters which of the ITER divertor have to be designed for high heat fluxes (up to 20 MW/m2 over :10 s). Accommodation

  15. Designing Critical Experiments in Support of Full Burnup Credit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Don [ORNL; Roberts, Jeremy A [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    Burnup credit is the process of accounting for the negative reactivity due to fuel burnup and generation of parasitic absorbers over fuel assembly lifetime. For years, the fresh fuel assumption was used as a simple bound in criticality work for used fuel storage and transportation. More recently, major actinides have been included [1]. However, even this yields a highly conservative estimate in criticality calculations. Because of the numerous economical benefits including all available negative reactivity (i.e., full burnup credit) could provide [2], it is advantageous to work toward full burnup credit. Unfortunately, comparatively little work has been done to include non-major actinides and other fission products (FP) in burnup credit analyses due in part to insufficient experimental data for validation of codes and nuclear data. The Burnup Credit Criticality Experiment (BUCCX) at Sandia National Laboratory was a set of experiments with {sup 103}Rh that have relevance for burnup credit [3]. This work uses TSUNAMI-3D to investigate and adjust a BUCCX model to match isotope-specific, energy-dependent k{sub eff} sensitivity profiles to those of a representative high-capacity cask model (GBC-32) [4] for each FP of interest. The isotopes considered are {sup 149}Sm, {sup 143}Nd, {sup 103}Rh, {sup 133}Cs, {sup 155}Gd, {sup 152}Sm, {sup 99}Tc, {sup 145}Nd, {sup 153}Eu, {sup 147}Sm, {sup 109}Ag, {sup 95}Mo, {sup 150}Sm, {sup 101}Ru, and {sup 151}Eu. The goal is to understand the biases and bias uncertainties inherent in nuclear data, and ultimately, to apply these in support of full burnup credit.

  16. A SET OF CRITICAL HEURISTICS FOR VALUE SENSITIVE DESIGNERS AND USERS OF PERSUASIVE SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , fahri.yetim@uni-siegen.de Abstract This paper proposes a set of critical questions to guide reflections on persuasive systems. The questions are mainly based on value-based practical reasoning as suggested the purposiveness, goodness or rightness of system actions to be designed. In this approach, the critical questions

  17. Title 43 CFR 1610.7-2 Designation of Areas of Critical Environmental...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Federal RegulationFederal Regulation: Title 43 CFR 1610.7-2 Designation of Areas of Critical Environmental ConcernLegal...

  18. Unpacking Critical Parameters for Interface Design: Evaluating Notification Systems with the IRC Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCrickard, Scott

    Unpacking Critical Parameters for Interface Design: Evaluating Notification Systems with the IRC, reaction, and comprehension (or IRC) as a potential solution [15][16][17] (revisited later). This paper

  19. Tornado vs. Hurricane Which is More Critical for Design of U.S. Nuclear Power Plants?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tornado vs. Hurricane Which is More Critical for Design of U.S. Nuclear Power Plants? Javad Moslemian Sargent & Lundy, LLC U. S. Department of Energy Natural Phenomena Hazards Meeting October 21-22, 2014

  20. Task 8 -- Design and test of critical components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chance, T.F.

    1996-11-01

    This report covers tasks 8.1, 8.1.1, and 8.2. The primary objective of Task 8.1, Particulates Flow Deposition, is to characterize the particulate generated in an operating gas turbine combined cycle (GTCC) power plant whose configuration approximates that proposed for an ATS power plant. In addition, the task is to evaluate the use of full-flow filtering to reduce the steam particulate loads. Before the start of this task, GE had already negotiated an agreement with the candidate power plant, piping and a filter unit had already been installed at the power plant site, and major elements of the data acquisition system had been purchased. The objective of Task 8.1.1, Coolant Purity, is to expose typical ATS gas turbine airfoil cooling channel geometries to real steam flow to determine whether there are any unexpected deposit formations. The task is a static analog of the centrifugal deposition rig trials of Task 8.2, in which a bucket channel return bend is exposed to steam flow. Two cooling channel geometries are of primary interest in this static exposure. The primary objective of Task 8.2, Particle Centrifugal Sedimentation, is to determine the settling characteristics of particles in a cooling stream from an operating gas turbine combined cycle (GTCC) power plant when that stream is ducted through a passage experiencing the G-loads expected in a simulated bucket channel specimen representative of designs proposed for an ATS gas turbine.

  1. Validation of FSP Reactor Design with Sensitivity Studies of Beryllium-Reflected Critical Assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess; Margaret A. Marshall

    2013-02-01

    The baseline design for space nuclear power is a fission surface power (FSP) system: sodium-potassium (NaK) cooled, fast spectrum reactor with highly-enriched-uranium (HEU)-O2 fuel, stainless steel (SS) cladding, and beryllium reflectors with B4C control drums. Previous studies were performed to evaluate modeling capabilities and quantify uncertainties and biases associated with analysis methods and nuclear data. Comparison of Zero Power Plutonium Reactor (ZPPR)-20 benchmark experiments with the FSP design indicated that further reduction of the total design model uncertainty requires the reduction in uncertainties pertaining to beryllium and uranium cross-section data. Further comparison with three beryllium-reflected HEU-metal benchmark experiments performed at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) concluded the requirement that experimental validation data have similar cross section sensitivities to those found in the FSP design. A series of critical experiments was performed at ORCEF in the 1960s to support the Medium Power Reactor Experiment (MPRE) space reactor design. The small, compact critical assembly (SCCA) experiments were graphite- or beryllium-reflected assemblies of SS-clad, HEU-O2 fuel on a vertical lift machine. All five configurations were evaluated as benchmarks. Two of the five configurations were beryllium reflected, and further evaluated using the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis capabilities of SCALE 6.1. Validation of the example FSP design model was successful in reducing the primary uncertainty constituent, the Be(n,n) reaction, from 0.28 %dk/k to 0.0004 %dk/k. Further assessment of additional reactor physics measurements performed on the SCCA experiments may serve to further validate FSP design and operation.

  2. Concurrent design and optimization of a star tracker for space applications by identification of critical design parameters and their effect on a performance measure 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smit, Larissa Christine

    2001-01-01

    An optimization procedure to be used concurrently with a top-down general design process was developed. The optimization procedure consists of identifying the critical design parameters and analyzing their effect on a performance measure...

  3. Fault tree synthesis for software design analysis of PLC based safety-critical systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koo, S. R.; Cho, C. H. [Corporate R and D Inst., Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction Co., Ltd., 39-3, Seongbok-Dong, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 449-795 (Korea, Republic of); Seong, P. H. [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, 373-3 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    As a software verification and validation should be performed for the development of PLC based safety-critical systems, a software safety analysis is also considered in line with entire software life cycle. In this paper, we propose a technique of software safety analysis in the design phase. Among various software hazard analysis techniques, fault tree analysis is most widely used for the safety analysis of nuclear power plant systems. Fault tree analysis also has the most intuitive notation and makes both qualitative and quantitative analyses possible. To analyze the design phase more effectively, we propose a technique of fault tree synthesis, along with a universal fault tree template for the architecture modules of nuclear software. Consequently, we can analyze the safety of software on the basis of fault tree synthesis. (authors)

  4. Determining the Criticality of Processes in Kahn Process Networks for Design Space Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the critical path must have a criticality of 1 since none of them can be slowed down without increasing the length of the critical path. As another example, a process which is executed in parallel with a process on the critical path can be slowed down by a factor equal to the execution time of the process on the critical

  5. An Analysis of Hybrid Life Support Systems for Sustainable Habitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Margaret Miller

    2014-01-01

    The design of sustainable habitats on Earth, on other planetary surfaces, and in space, has motivated strategic planning with respect to life support (LS) system technology development and habitat design. Such planning ...

  6. Masters Thesis- Criticality Alarm System Design Guide with Accompanying Alarm System Development for the Radioisotope Production Laboratory in Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenfield, Bryce A.

    2009-12-20

    A detailed instructional manual was created to guide criticality safety engineers through the process of designing a criticality alarm system (CAS) for Department of Energy (DOE) hazard class 1 and 2 facilities. Regulatory and technical requirements were both addressed. A list of design tasks and technical subtasks are thoroughly analyzed to provide concise direction for how to complete the analysis. An example of the application of the design methodology, the Criticality Alarm System developed for the Radioisotope Production Laboratory (RPL) of Richland, Washington is also included. The analysis for RPL utilizes the Monte Carlo code MCNP5 for establishing detector coverage in the facility. Significant improvements to the existing CAS were made that increase the reliability, transparency, and coverage of the system.

  7. Bird Habitats

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & InspectionsBerylliumBiomimetic Dye Molecules foresBird Habitats

  8. Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) - A critical evaluation by LCA and recommendations for improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Sebastien; Abeck, Heike; Bali, Nishil; Horvath, Arpad

    2007-01-01

    LEED): A critical evaluation by LCA and recommendations forimprovement. Int J LCA 12 (special issue 1) 46-57. LifeLEED) A critical evaluation by LCA and recommendations for

  9. Habitat Relations Spatial Heterogeneity in Habitat Selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandercock, Brett K.

    of geographically weighted logistic regression to habitat selection by a wildlife species. As a case study, we geographically weighted regression (GWR), greater prairie-chicken, habitat selection, nest site selection

  10. Use of Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis in the Design of Reactor Physics and Criticality Benchmark Experiments for Advanced Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rearden, B.T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States); Anderson, W.J. [Framatome ANP, Inc. (France); Harms, G.A. [Sandia National Laboratories (United States)

    2005-08-15

    Framatome ANP, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the University of Florida are cooperating on the U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) project 2001-0124 to design, assemble, execute, analyze, and document a series of critical experiments to validate reactor physics and criticality safety codes for the analysis of commercial power reactor fuels consisting of UO{sub 2} with {sup 235}U enrichments {>=}5 wt%. The experiments will be conducted at the SNL Pulsed Reactor Facility.Framatome ANP and SNL produced two series of conceptual experiment designs based on typical parameters, such as fuel-to-moderator ratios, that meet the programmatic requirements of this project within the given restraints on available materials and facilities. ORNL used the Tools for Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis Methodology Implementation (TSUNAMI) to assess, from a detailed physics-based perspective, the similarity of the experiment designs to the commercial systems they are intended to validate. Based on the results of the TSUNAMI analysis, one series of experiments was found to be preferable to the other and will provide significant new data for the validation of reactor physics and criticality safety codes.

  11. Formal Methods for the Specification and Design of RealTime Safety Critical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostroff, Jonathan S.

    and control safety critical sys­ tems. Real­time software controls aircraft, shuts down nuclear power reac of computers in such systems offers considerable benefits, but also poses serious risks to life­time constraints: if the temperature of a nuclear reactor core is too high an alarm must be generated within some

  12. WILDLIFE HABITAT RELATIONS AND HABITAT FRAGMENTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in California's Hardwood Rangelands1 Barrett A. Garrison2 Frank W. Davis3 The nine papers in the following. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. Garrison and Davis Brief Overview of the Session on Wildlife Habitat and described a coordinated regional planning effort to conserve remaining habitats. Garrison and Standiford

  13. Designs for critical secondary control layouts for vehicles for the physically challenged 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lostetter, Michael F

    1995-01-01

    of the TALK system between able-bodied and physically challenged persons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Comparison of the accuracy for the TALK and TONE systems. 25 26 INTRODUCTION In the area of automotive adaptive equipment, safety is even inore... obtained through interviews, conducted by the author, with qualified experts in the automotive adaptive equipment field from industry and academia. This compilation of expert opinions and ideas helped to contribute to the design approaches discussed...

  14. Contrasting bee foraging in response to resource scale and local habitat management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    may critically depend on floral resource availability and habitat composition, yet the impacts Mexico, we investigated the influence of coffee floral resource levels and habitat management on native and exotic bees. In high-shade coffee habitats, native solitary bee and native social bee visitation

  15. Criticality Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Alsaed

    2004-09-14

    The ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003) presents the methodology for evaluating potential criticality situations in the monitored geologic repository. As stated in the referenced Topical Report, the detailed methodology for performing the disposal criticality analyses will be documented in model reports. Many of the models developed in support of the Topical Report differ from the definition of models as given in the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management procedure AP-SIII.10Q, ''Models'', in that they are procedural, rather than mathematical. These model reports document the detailed methodology necessary to implement the approach presented in the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report and provide calculations utilizing the methodology. Thus, the governing procedure for this type of report is AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses''. The ''Criticality Model'' is of this latter type, providing a process evaluating the criticality potential of in-package and external configurations. The purpose of this analysis is to layout the process for calculating the criticality potential for various in-package and external configurations and to calculate lower-bound tolerance limit (LBTL) values and determine range of applicability (ROA) parameters. The LBTL calculations and the ROA determinations are performed using selected benchmark experiments that are applicable to various waste forms and various in-package and external configurations. The waste forms considered in this calculation are pressurized water reactor (PWR), boiling water reactor (BWR), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Training Research Isotope General Atomic (TRIGA), Enrico Fermi, Shippingport pressurized water reactor, Shippingport light water breeder reactor (LWBR), N-Reactor, Melt and Dilute, and Fort Saint Vrain Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The scope of this analysis is to document the criticality computational method. The criticality computational method will be used for evaluating the criticality potential of configurations of fissionable materials (in-package and external to the waste package) within the repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada for all waste packages/waste forms. The criticality computational method is also applicable to preclosure configurations. The criticality computational method is a component of the methodology presented in ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003). How the criticality computational method fits in the overall disposal criticality analysis methodology is illustrated in Figure 1 (YMP 2003, Figure 3). This calculation will not provide direct input to the total system performance assessment for license application. It is to be used as necessary to determine the criticality potential of configuration classes as determined by the configuration probability analysis of the configuration generator model (BSC 2003a).

  16. Supporting Design of Safety-Critical Systems Dr Mark Nicholson, MATISSE Project (GR/R70590/01), University of York, UK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, Mark

    1, is likely to be a more appropriate development life cycle. Units Systems Platform ImplementationSupporting Design of Safety-Critical Systems Dr Mark Nicholson, MATISSE Project (GR/R70590 application areas, they may also lead to large economic losses, and even loss of human life. A computing

  17. Waterfowl habitats on reclaimed surface mined lands in southwestern Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, W.G.; Klimstra, W.D.; Nawrot, J.R.

    1984-12-01

    Loss of quality wetland habitat is probably the most important factor affecting populations of waterfowl in the United States. To counteract this problem programs for protecting critical habitats have been established and research for innovative methods to create wetlands are being pursued. Recently, attention has been given to evaluation of wetland habitats on lands surface-mined and to methods of reclamation to enhance their development as part of future planning. These data indicate quality wetland habitats can be a legitimate aspect of reclaimed surface-mined lands; and selective overburden handling, grading so as to maximize biologically productive zones and selective plantings contribute importantly to their value. Currently bond release criteria by the Illinois regulatory authority for wildlife habitat and developed water resources discourages reclamation that would maximize quality wetland habitats. Suggested changes in these criteria include alternative vegetation requirements for wetland habitats, more leniency on seasonally inundated shallow water areas, and variation from topsoil requirements when adequate unconsolidated substitute material is available. It is believed that such allowances would result in incentives for the industry to develop wetland habitats so vital to continued enjoyment of waterfowl resources.

  18. Habitat for Humanity of Metro Denver Zero Energy Demonstration Home

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-04-01

    This brochure describes the 2005 demonstration home designed by NREL and the Habitat for Humanity of Metro Denver. The completed home produced 24% more energy than it consumed over 12 months.

  19. Measuring-up in timber: A critical perspective on mid- and high-rise timber building design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleming, Patrick; Smith, Simon; Ramage, Michael

    2014-07-07

    timber elements in high-rise buildings is still in its infancy. This paper offers a new perspective on building with wood at this scale, beyond carbon sequestration and construction. Criticism of existing projects and proposals, including the authors’ own...

  20. Linking Ecological Function and Ecosystem Service Values of Estaurine Habitat Types Associated with a Barrier Island System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis, Jeffrey Michael

    2012-12-10

    for the provision of ecosystem services. This study is designed to model each habitat type in an effort to explicitly link the major estuarine habitat types of Mustang Island (oyster reefs, seagrass meadows, and intertidal salt marsh) to their contribution...

  1. A Multiple Watershed Approach to Assessing the Effects of Habitat Restoration Actions on Anadromous and Resident Fish Populations, Technical Report 2003-2004.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marmorek, David

    2004-03-01

    Habitat protection and restoration is a cornerstone of current strategies to restore ecosystems, recover endangered fish species, and rebuild fish stocks within the Columbia River Basin. Strategies featuring habitat restoration include the 2000 Biological Opinion on operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS BiOp) developed by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the 2000 Biological Opinion on Bull Trout developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Sub-Basin Plans developed under the Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NWPCC). There is however little quantitative information about the effectiveness of different habitat restoration techniques. Such information is crucial for helping scientists and program managers allocate limited funds towards the greatest benefits for fish populations. Therefore, it is critical to systematically test the hypotheses underlying habitat restoration actions for both anadromous and resident fish populations. This pilot project was developed through a proposal to the Innovative Projects fund of the NWPCC (ESSA 2002). It was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) following reviews by the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP 2002), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA 2002), the NWPCC and BPA. The study was designed to respond directly to the above described needs for information on the effectiveness of habitat restoration actions, including legal measures specified in the 2000 FCRPS BiOp (RPA 183, pg. 9-133, NMFS 2000). Due to the urgency of addressing these measures, the timeline of the project was accelerated from a duration of 18 months to 14 months. The purpose of this pilot project was to explore methods for evaluating past habitat restoration actions and their effects on fish populations. By doing so, the project will provide a foundation of retrospective analyses, on which to build prospective, multi-watershed designs for future habitat restoration actions. Such designs are being developed concurrently with this project by several other groups in the Columbia Basin (RME Workgroup 2003, NMFS 2003, Hillman and Paulsen 2002, Hillman 2003). By addressing questions about habitat restoration and monitoring (in coordination with other related efforts), we hope that this project will catalyze a shift in the Basin's paradigm of habitat restoration, moving from implementation of individual watershed projects towards rigorously designed and monitored, multiwatershed, adaptive management experiments. The project involved three phases of work, which were closely integrated with various related and ongoing efforts in the region: (1) Scoping - We met with a Core Group of habitat experts and managers to scope out a set of testable habitat restoration hypotheses, identify candidate watersheds and recommend participants for a data evaluation workshop. (2) Data Assembly - We contacted over 80 scientists and managers to help evaluate the suitability of each candidate watershed's historical data for assessing the effectiveness of past restoration actions. We eventually settled on the Yakima, Wenatchee, Clearwater, and Salmon subbasins, and began gathering relevant data for these watersheds at a workshop with habitat experts and managers. Data assembly continued for several months after the workshop. (3) Data Analysis and Synthesis - We explored statistical approaches towards retrospectively analyzing the effects of restoration 'treatments' at nested spatial scales across multiple watersheds (Chapters 2-5 of this report). These analyses provided a foundation for identifying existing constraints to testing restoration hypotheses, and opportunities to overcome these constraints through improved experimental designs, monitoring protocols and project selection strategies (Chapters 6 and 7 of this report). Finally, we developed a set of recommendations to improve the design, implementation, and monitoring of prospective habitat restoration programs in the Columbia River Basin (Chapter 8).

  2. Design of a Probe for Strain Sensitivity Studies of Critical Current Densities in SC Wires and Tapes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dhanaraj, N.; Barzi, E.; Turrioni, D.; Rusy, A.; Lombardo, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-07-01

    The design of a variable-temperature probe used to perform strain sensitivity measurements on LTS wires and HTS wires and tapes is described. The measurements are intended to be performed at liquid helium temperatures (4.2 K). The wire or tape to be measured is wound and soldered on to a helical spring device, which is fixed at one end and subjected to a torque at the free end. The design goal is to be able to achieve {+-} 0.8 % strain in the wire and tape. The probe is designed to carry a current of 2000A.

  3. Hydraulic and Habitat Suitability Analyses Technical Memorandum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix D Hydraulic and Habitat Suitability Analyses Technical Memorandum #12;COPYRIGHT DECEMBER Series 2 and Pond Series 3 Hydraulic and Habitat Suitability Analyses Prepared for Bureau of Reclamation HILL, INC. III Hydraulic and Habitat Suitability Analyses

  4. Safety-Critical Universit at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peleska, Jan - Fachbereich 3

    . Hazard Analysis and Risk Assessment 5. Design Criteria for Safety-Critical Systems 6. Validation, Veri#12. Hazard Analysis and Risk Assessment 5. Design Criteria for Safety-Critical Systems 6. Validation, Veri#12Safety-Critical Systems Prof. Dr. Jan Peleska Universit at Bremen | TZI Dr. Ing. Cornelia Zahlten

  5. Critical Materials:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Extraction Separation Processes for Critical Materials in 30- 21 Stage Test Facility (Bruce Moyer) ......

  6. Yakima Habitat Improvement Project Master Plan, Technical Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golder Associates, Inc.

    2003-04-22

    The Yakima Urban Growth Area (UGA) is a developing and growing urban area in south-central Washington. Despite increased development, the Yakima River and its tributaries within the UGA continue to support threatened populations of summer steelhead and bull trout as well as a variety of non-listed salmonid species. In order to provide for the maintenance and recovery of these species, while successfully planning for the continued growth and development within the UGA, the City of Yakima has undertaken the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project. The overall goal of the project is to maintain, preserve, and restore functioning fish and wildlife habitat within and immediately surrounding the Yakima UGA over the long term. Acquisition and protection of the fish and wildlife habitat associated with key properties in the UGA will prevent future subdivision along riparian corridors, reduce further degradation or removal of riparian habitat, and maintain or enhance the long term condition of aquatic habitat. By placing these properties in long-term protection, the threat of development from continued growth in the urban area will be removed. To most effectively implement the multi-year habitat acquisition and protection effort, the City has developed this Master Plan. The Master Plan provides the structure and guidance for future habitat acquisition and restoration activities to be performed within the Yakima Urban Area. The development of this Master Plan also supports several Reasonable and Prudent Alternatives (RPAs) of the NOAA Fisheries 2000 Biological Opinion (BiOp), as well as the Water Investment Action Agenda for the Yakima Basin, local planning efforts, and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program. This Master Plan also provides the framework for coordination of the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project with other fish and wildlife habitat acquisition and protection activities currently being implemented in the area. As a result of the planning effort leading to this Master Plan, a Technical Working Group (TWG) was established that represents most, if not all, fish and wildlife agencies/interests in the subbasin. This TWG met regularly throughout the planning process to provide input and review and was instrumental in the development of this plan. Preparation of this plan included the development of a quantitative prioritization process to rank 40,000 parcels within the Urban Growth Area based on the value of fish and wildlife habitat each parcel provided. Biological and physical criteria were developed and applied to all parcels through a GIS-based prioritization model. In the second-phase of the prioritization process, the TWG provided local expert knowledge and review of the properties. In selecting the most critical areas within the Urban Growth Area for protection, this project assessed the value of fish and wildlife habitat on the Yakima River. Well-developed habitat acquisition efforts (e.g., Yakima River Basin Water Enhancement Project by the Bureau of Reclamation and Yakama Nation acquisition projects) are already underway on the Yakima River mainstem. These efforts, however, face several limitations in protection of floodplain function that could be addressed through the support of the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project. This Master Plan integrates tributary habitat acquisition efforts with those ongoing on the Yakima River to best benefit fish and wildlife in the Urban Growth Area. The parcel ranking process identified 25 properties with the highest fish and wildlife value for habitat acquisition in the Yakima Urban Area. These parcels contain important fish and wildlife corridors on Ahtanum and Wide Hollow Creeks and the Naches River. The fifteen highest-ranking parcels of the 25 parcels identified were considered very high priority for protection of fish and wildlife habitat. These 15 parcels were subsequently grouped into four priority acquisition areas. This Master Plan outlines a four-year schedule for acquisition, protection, and restoration of the 25 highest ranked prop

  7. CRITICAL WATERFOWL HABITATS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA Patricia Hayes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , 189,842 ha (88%) has no formal protection. Knowledge of the location and status of these vital areas is essential for effective conservation and management of waterfowl populations. R12SUW En supplement au'emplacement et le statut de ces regions vitales pour une preservation et un arm+mgement eflicaces des populations

  8. LAKE MICHIGAN'S TRIBUTARY AND NEARSHORE FISH HABITATS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (Catostomidae). Coastal wetland habitats support spawning and early life stages of basses (Centrarchidae

  9. Oregon Sea Grant Marine Education Program at Hatfield Marine Science Center Build a Habitat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    Oregon Sea Grant Marine Education Program at Hatfield Marine Science Center Build a Habitat The Build a Habitat program at Hatfield Marine Science Center is designed to be a 50- minute hands a number of live marine organisms, learn about what they need to survive, and discover how they function

  10. Geopressured habitat: A literature review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negus-de Wys, Jane

    1992-09-01

    A literature review of the geopressured-geothermal habitat is summarized. Findings are presented and discussed with respect to the principal topics: Casual agents are both geological and geochemical; they include disequilibrium compaction of sediments, clay diagenesis, aquathermal pressuring, hydrocarbon generation, and lateral tectonic compression. The overall physical and chemical characteristics of the habitats are dictated by varying combinations of sedimentation rates, alteration mineralogy, permeability, porosity and pressure, temperature, fluid content and chemistry, and hydrodynamic flow. Habitat pressure seals are considered in terms of their formation processes, geologic characteristics, and physical behavior, including pressure release and reservoir pressure recharge on a geologic time scale. World-wide occurrence of geopressured-geothermal habitats is noted. The main thrust of this topic concerns the U.S.A. and Canada; in addition, reference is made to occurrences in China and indications from deep-sea vents, as well as the contribution of paleo-overpressure to habitat initiation and maintenance. Identification and assessment of the habitat is addressed in relation to use of hydrogeologic, geophysical, geochemical, and geothermic techniques, as well as well-logging and drill-stem-test data. Conclusions concerning the adequacy of the current state of knowledge and its applicability to resource exploration and development are set forth, together with recommendations for the thrust of future work.

  11. BRASH MANAGEMENT ON HABITAT RESTORATION SITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BRASH MANAGEMENT ON HABITAT RESTORATION SITES Supported financially by English Nature and the Woodland Trust Project: Brash Management on Habitat Restoration Sites Date: March 2003 Project leaders on Sustainable Woodlands & `FACT 7'Project on Environmental Land Management #12;2 BRASH MANAGEMENT ON HABITAT

  12. Research Article Habitat Use and Survival of Preflight Wild Turkey Broods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Mark C.

    Research Article Habitat Use and Survival of Preflight Wild Turkey Broods BRIAN L. SPEARS,1 Leasure Hall, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA ABSTRACT Wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo. This is a critical period of wild turkey life history, with poult survival ranging from 12% to 52%. We measured

  13. Habitat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hugh D. Wilson

    2011-08-10

    REVIEW C 77, 044908 (2008) Enhanced strange baryon production in Au+Au collisions compared to p+ p at?sNN = 200 GeV B. I. Abelev,10 M. M. Aggarwal,32 Z. Ahammed,47 B. D. Anderson,21 D. Arkhipkin,14 G. S. Averichev,13 Y. Bai,30 J. Balewski,18 O.... Barannikova,10 L. S. Barnby,2 J. Baudot,19 S. Baumgart,52 D. R. Beavis,3 R. Bellwied,50 F. Benedosso,30 R. R. Betts,10 S. Bhardwaj,37 A. Bhasin,20 A. K. Bhati,32 H. Bichsel,49 J. Bielcik,12 J. Bielcikova,12 L. C. Bland,3 S.-L. Blyth,24 M. Bombara,2 B. E...

  14. Integrating Deer, Quail and Turkey Habitat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyons, Robert K.; Ginnett, Tim F.

    2001-09-10

    With the proper management strategies, white-tailed deer, bobwhite quail and Rio Grande turkey habitat can be integrated in one wildlife enterprise....

  15. Focal Species and Representative Habitats Chuck Peven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    building and placement, loss of riparian habitat, water diversion, reduced large woody debris (LWD) recruitment, and flood control efforts that include LWD removal, berm construction, and stream channelization

  16. Habitat change and the scale of habitat selection: shifting gradients used by coexisting Arctic rodents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Douglas W.

    of association with the structure and composition of habitat. Abundant collared lemmings abandoned stations where altered habitat characteristics caused a shift to new locations along the wet-to-dry gradient convincing case that habitat loss and change thus represent the most pressing issue for the conservation

  17. Cost-effective variable selection in habitat surveys Douglas C. Braun* and John D. Reynolds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, John D.

    Cost-effective variable selection in habitat surveys Douglas C. Braun* and John D. Reynolds Earth be explicitly incorpo- rated with costs of data collection to design cost-effective survey programmes. 2. We develop a step-by-step quantitative protocol to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of survey designs under

  18. Research Article Spatial Heterogeneity in Habitat Selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandercock, Brett K.

    inference and ineffective management. We present the first application of geographically weighted logistic the ecological effects of habitat components. ß 2012 The Wildlife Society. KEY WORDS geographically weighted regression to habitat selection by a wildlife species. As a case study, we examined nest site selection

  19. Climate Change Action Pack Climate & Habitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunawardena, Arunika

    Climate Change Action Pack Climate & Habitats B A C K G R O U DN C H E C K ! Habitat, Food, Water. Disease,predation,pollution, accidents and climatic conditions are among other limiting factors which can affect an animal's ability to meet its needs. This section will look further into the impact of Climate

  20. Marine and Estuarine Ecosystem and Habitat Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marine and Estuarine Ecosystem and Habitat Classification Rebecca J. Allee Megan Dethier Dail Brown Administration National Marine Fisheries Service NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-F/SPO-43 July 2000 #12;A copy-WestHighway Silver Spring, MD 20910 #12;Marine and Estuarine Ecosystem and Habitat Classification Rebecca J. Allee

  1. Use of social information for habitat selection in songbirds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Shannon Leigh

    2012-07-16

    Habitat selection research has focused on the role of vegetative and geologic habitat characteristics or antagonistic behavioral interactions. Conspecifics can confer information about habitat quality and provide positive density-dependent effects...

  2. High-Performance Affordable Housing with Habitat for Humanity...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    High-Performance Affordable Housing with Habitat for Humanity - Building America Top Innovation High-Performance Affordable Housing with Habitat for Humanity - Building America Top...

  3. Wind Turbine Interactions with Birds, Bats, and their Habitats...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Birds, Bats, and their Habitats: A Summary of Research Results and Priority Questions Wind Turbine Interactions with Birds, Bats, and their Habitats: A Summary of Research...

  4. Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, 1984 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konopacky, Richard C.

    1986-04-01

    This report has four volumes: a Tribal project annual report (Part 1) and three reports (Parts 2, 3, and 4) prepared for the Tribes by their engineering subcontractor. The Tribal project annual report contains reports for four subprojects within Project 83-359. Subproject I involved habitat and fish inventories in Bear Valley Creek, Valley County, Idaho that will be used to evaluate responses to ongoing habitat enhancement. Subproject II is the coordination/planning activities of the Project Leader in relation to other BPA-funded habitat enhancement projects that have or will occur within the traditional Treaty (Fort Bridger Treaty of 1868) fishing areas of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, Fort Hall Reservation, Idaho. Subproject III involved habitat and fish inventories (pretreatment) and habitat problem identification on the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River (including Jordan Creek). Subproject IV during 1985 involved habitat problem identification in the East Fork of the Salmon River and habitat and fish inventories (pretreatment) in Herd Creek, a tributary to the East Fork.

  5. Design-for-empowerment-for-design : computational structures for design democratization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vardouli, Theodora

    2012-01-01

    The vision to engage non-architects in the design of their habitat through the mediation of computer aids, dates back to the early computational era (1960s-1970s) and is currently being recast under cyber-cultural and ...

  6. Critical Materials:

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartmentEnergyEvery Thanksgiving,is designed asAMO hosted

  7. Red squirrel habitat mapping using remote sensing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flaherty, Silvia Susana

    2013-07-01

    The native Eurasian red squirrel is considered endangered in the UK and is under strict legal protection. Long-term management of its habitat is a key goal of the UK conservation strategy. Current selection criteria of ...

  8. Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, 1989 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, Mike

    1989-04-01

    This project was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The annual report contains three individual subproject papers detailing tribal fisheries work completed during the summer and fall of 1989. Subproject 1 contains summaries of evaluation/monitoring efforts associated with the Bear Valley Creek, Idaho enhancement project. Subproject 2 contains an evaluation of the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River habitat enhancement project. This report has been sub-divided into two parts: Part 1; stream evaluation and Part 2; pond series evaluation. Subproject 3 concerns the East Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho. This report summarizes the evaluation of the project to date including the 1989 pre-construction evaluation conducted within the East Fork drainage. Dredge mining has degraded spawning and rearing habitat for chinook salmon and steelhead trout in the Yankee Fork drainage of the Salmon River and in Bear Valley Creek. Mining, agricultural, and grazing practices degraded habitat in the East Fork of the Salmon River. Biological monitoring of the success of habitat enhancement for Bear Valley Creek and Yankee Fork are presented in this report. Physical and biological inventories prior to habitat enhancement in East Fork were also conducted. Four series of off-channel ponds of the Yankee Fork are shown to provide effective rearing habitat for chinook salmon. 45 refs., 49 figs., 24 tabs.

  9. The Integration of On-Line Monitoring and Reconfiguration Functions using EDAA - European design and Automation Association1149.4 Into a Safety Critical Automotive Electronic Control Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeffrey, C; Prosser, S; Lickess, M; Richardson, A; Riches, S

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an innovative application of EDAA - European design and Automation Association 1149.4 and the Integrated Diagnostic Reconfiguration (IDR) as tools for the implementation of an embedded test solution for an Automotive Electronic Control Unit implemented as a fully integrated mixed signal system. The paper described how the test architecture can be used for fault avoidance with results from a hardware prototype presented. The paper concludes that fault avoidance can be integrated into mixed signal electronic systems to handle key failure modes.

  10. Estimates of critical thermal environments for mule deer KATHERINEL. PARKERANDMICHAELP.GILLINGHAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gillingham, Michael

    Estimates of critical thermal environments for mule deer KATHERINEL. PARKERANDMICHAELP's thermal environment. Thermal conditions of different habitats for a species may then be compared the concept of critical thermal environments has aheady been proposed (Moen 1%8a), wildlife managers currently

  11. Wanaket Wildlife Area Management Plan : Five-Year Plan for Protecting, Enhancing, and Mitigating Wildlife Habitat Losses for the McNary Hydroelectric Facility.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

    2001-09-01

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to continue to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat at the Wanaket Wildlife Area. The Wanaket Wildlife Area was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1993. This management plan will provide an update of the original management plan approved by BPA in 1995. Wanaket will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the McNary Hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Wanaket Wildlife Area, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Wanaket Wildlife Area management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Wanaket Wildlife Area will be managed over the next five years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management. Specific project objectives are related to protection and enhancement of wildlife habitats and are expressed in terms of habitat units (HU's). Habitat units were developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service's Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP), and are designed to track habitat gains and/or losses associated with mitigation and/or development projects. Habitat Units for a given species are a product of habitat quantity (expressed in acres) and habitat quality estimates. Habitat quality estimates are developed using Habitat Suitability Indices (HSI). These indices are based on quantifiable habitat features such as vegetation height, shrub cover, or other parameters, which are known to provide life history requisites for mitigation species. Habitat Suitability Indices range from 0 to 1, with an HSI of 1 providing optimum habitat conditions for the selected species. One acre of optimum habitat provides one Habitat Unit. The objective of continued management of the Wanaket Wildlife Mitigation Area, including protection and enhancement of upland and wetland/wetland associated cover types, is to provide and maintain 2,334 HU's of protection credit and generate 2,495 HU's of enhancement credit by the year 2004.

  12. Results of preconstruction surveys used as a management technique for conserving endangered species and their habitats on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills), Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kato, T.T.; O'Farrell, T.P.; Johnson, J.W.

    1985-08-01

    In 1976 an intensive program of petroleum production at maximum efficient rate was initiated on the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills) in western Kern County, California. In a Biological Opinion required by the Endangered Species Act, the US Fish and Wildlife Service concluded that proposed construction and production activities may jeopardize the continued existence of the endangered San Joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica, and the blunt-nosed leopard lizard, Gambelia silus, inhabiting the Reserve. DOE committed itself to carrying out a compensation/mitigation plan to offset impacts of program activities on endangered species and their habitats. One compensation/mitigation strategy was to develop and implement preconstruction surveys to assess potential conflicts between proposed construction activities, and endangered species and their critical habitats, and to propose reasonable and prudent alternatives to avoid conflicts. Between 1980 and 1984, preconstruction surveys were completed for 296 of a total of 387 major construction projects encompassing 3590 acres. Fewer than 22% of the projects potentially conflicted with conservation of endangered species, and most conflicts were easily resolved by identifying sensitive areas that required protection. Only 8% of the projects received minor modification in their design or locations to satisfy conservation needs, and only three projects had to be completely relocated. No projects were cancelled or delayed because of conflicts with endangered species, and costs to conduct preconstruction surveys were minimal. 27 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Nowzari et al. Habitat Associations of Persian Wild Ass in Iran HABITAT ASSOCIATIONS OF PERSIAN WILD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubenstein, Daniel I.

    25 Nowzari et al. · Habitat Associations of Persian Wild Ass in Iran HABITAT ASSOCIATIONS OF PERSIAN WILD ASS (EQUUS HEMIONUS ONAGER) IN QA- TROUYEH NATIONAL PARK, IRAN HANIYEH NOWZARI, Department of Environment, Abadeh Branch, Islamic Azad University, Abadeh, Iran. Address: No.475, 90 alley, Ghasrodasht Av

  14. PREDICTING HABITAT RESPONSE TO FLOW USING GENERALIZED HABITAT MODELS FOR TROUT IN ROCKY MOUNTAIN STREAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bledsoe, Brian

    The Nature Conservancy, Fort Collins, Colorado USA ABSTRACT Dams and water diversions can dramatically alter the hydraulic habitats of stream ecosystems. Predicting how water depth and velocity respond to flow alteration is possible using hydraulic models, such as Physical Habitat Simulation (PHABSIM); however, such models

  15. Energy efficient low-income housing demonstration with Houston Habitat for Humanity. Final status report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-30

    Using DOE grant funds, the Alliance to Save Energy developed and managed an award-winning low-income housing demonstration in cooperation with Houston Habitat for Humanity at the 1996 and 1997 annual NAHB Builders Show in Houston, Texas. Using a unique group of over 30 national, state and local partners, the energy design of Houston Habitat houses was permanently upgraded to the Energy Star Homes Program threshold. Meeting Energy Star Homes Program criteria, the partner design team increased the level of efficiency approximately 30% over the 1992 Model Energy Code. This innovative design using commercially available materials added approximately $1,400 in cost-effective energy upgrades with an estimated payback of less than 8 years. The 30 public-private partners successfully demonstrated energy and resource efficient housing techniques to the 65,000 NAHB home show attendees and the over 3,000 Habitat affiliates. This project resulted in the Houston Habitat affiliate becoming the nation`s first low-income Energy Star Homes Program home builder. By the year 2000, Houston Habitat anticipates building over 500 homes to this new level of efficiency as well as set an example for other Habitat affiliates nationwide to follow. The 1997 demonstration house utilized an all-women volunteer builders team to construct a 3 bedroom home in Houston Habitat`s Woodglen Subdivision. Energy consumption was remotely metered by Texas A and M.

  16. Autoclave nuclear criticality safety analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D`Aquila, D.M. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States); Tayloe, R.W. Jr. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Steam-heated autoclaves are used in gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment plants to heat large cylinders of UF{sub 6}. Nuclear criticality safety for these autoclaves is evaluated. To enhance criticality safety, systems are incorporated into the design of autoclaves to limit the amount of water present. These safety systems also increase the likelihood that any UF{sub 6} inadvertently released from a cylinder into an autoclave is not released to the environment. Up to 140 pounds of water can be held up in large autoclaves. This mass of water is sufficient to support a nuclear criticality when optimally combined with 125 pounds of UF{sub 6} enriched to 5 percent U{sup 235}. However, water in autoclaves is widely dispersed as condensed droplets and vapor, and is extremely unlikely to form a critical configuration with released UF{sub 6}.

  17. Eder Acquisition 2007 Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the Eder acquisition in July 2007 to determine how many protection habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to acquire the project site as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams. Baseline HEP surveys generated 3,857.64 habitat units or 1.16 HUs per acre. HEP surveys also served to document general habitat conditions. Survey results indicated that the herbaceous plant community lacked forbs species, which may be due to both livestock grazing and the late timing of the surveys. Moreover, the herbaceous plant community lacked structure based on lower than expected visual obstruction readings (VOR); likely a direct result of livestock impacts. In addition, introduced herbaceous vegetation including cultivated pasture grasses, e.g. crested wheatgrass and/or invader species such as cheatgrass and mustard, were present on most areas surveyed. The shrub element within the shrubsteppe cover type was generally a mosaic of moderate to dense shrubby areas interspersed with open grassland communities while the 'steppe' component was almost entirely devoid of shrubs. Riparian shrub and forest areas were somewhat stressed by livestock. Moreover, shrub and tree communities along the lower reaches of Nine Mile Creek suffered from lack of water due to the previous landowners 'piping' water out of the stream channel.

  18. Criticality safety basics, a study guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V. L. Putman

    1999-09-01

    This document is a self-study and classroom guide, for criticality safety of activities with fissile materials outside nuclear reactors. This guide provides a basic overview of criticality safety and criticality accident prevention methods divided into three parts: theory, application, and history. Except for topic emphasis, theory and history information is general, while application information is specific to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Information presented here should be useful to personnel who must know criticality safety basics to perform their assignments safely or to design critically safe equipment or operations. However, the guide's primary target audience is fissile material handler candidates.

  19. Yuba River analysis aims to aid spring-run chinook salmon habitat rehabilitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory; Fulton, Aaron A; Morford, Scott L

    2010-01-01

    Spawning habitat rehabilitation-I. Conceptual approach and2004b. Spawning habitat rehabilitation-II. Using hypothesisrun chinook salmon habitat rehabilitation Courtesy of Ralph

  20. Critical Materials Institute

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Alex King

    2013-06-05

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King talks about the goals of the Critical Materials Institute in diversifying the supply of critical materials, developing substitute materials, developing tools and techniques for recycling critical materials, and forecasting materials needs to avoid future shortages.

  1. Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in Big Canyon Creek Watershed, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, Lynn

    2006-07-01

    The ''Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in the Big Canyon Creek Watershed'' is a multi-phase project to enhance steelhead trout in the Big Canyon Creek watershed by improving salmonid spawning and rearing habitat. Habitat is limited by extreme high runoff events, low summer flows, high water temperatures, poor instream cover, spawning gravel siltation, and sediment, nutrient and bacteria loading. Funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program, the project assists in mitigating damage to steelhead runs caused by the Columbia River hydroelectric dams. The project is sponsored by the Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District. Target fish species include steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Steelhead trout within the Snake River Basin were listed in 1997 as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Accomplishments for the contract period September 1, 2004 through October 31, 2005 include; 2.7 riparian miles treated, 3.0 wetland acres treated, 5,263.3 upland acres treated, 106.5 riparian acres treated, 76,285 general public reached, 3,000 students reached, 40 teachers reached, 18 maintenance plans completed, temperature data collected at 6 sites, 8 landowner applications received and processed, 14 land inventories completed, 58 habitat improvement project designs completed, 5 newsletters published, 6 habitat plans completed, 34 projects installed, 2 educational workshops, 6 displays, 1 television segment, 2 public service announcements, a noxious weed GIS coverage, and completion of NEPA, ESA, and cultural resources requirements.

  2. Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Volume 2, Idaho, 1984 Final and Annual Reports.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hair, Don

    1986-01-01

    In 1984, and under the auspices of the Northwest Power Planning Council, the Clear-water National Forest and the Bonneville Power Administration entered into a contractual agreement to improve anadromous fish habitat in Lolo Creek. This was to be the second and final year of instream enhancement work in Lolo Creek, a major tributary to the Clearwater River. The project was again entitled Lolo Creek Habitat Improvement (No.84-6) which was scheduled from April 1, 1984, through March 31, 1985. Project costs were not to exceed $39,109. The following report is a description of the project objectives, methodology, results, and conclusions of this year's work, based on the knowledge and experience gained through 2 years of enhancement work. The primary objective was to partially mitigate the juvenile and adult anadromous fish losses accrued through hydroelectric development in the Columbia and Snake River systems by enhancing the spawning and rearing habitats of selected Clearwater River tributaries for spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead trout. The enhancement was designed to ameliorate the ''limiting production factors'' by the in-stream placement of habitat structures that would positively alter the pool-riffle structure and increase the quality of over-winter habitat.

  3. Area C borrow Site Habitat Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Downs, Janelle L.

    2009-12-04

    A habitat quality assessment was performed within selected portions of the proposed Area C Borrow Source. The previously identified Bitterbrush / Indian ricegrass stabilized dune element occurrence was determined to be better described as a sagebrush /needle-and-thread grass element occurrence of fair to good quality. A new habitat polygon is suggested adjacent to this element occurrence, which would also be sagebrush/needle-and-thread grass, but of poor quality. The proposed site of initial borrow site development was found to be a very low quality community dominated by cheatgrass.

  4. Habitat Appraisal Guide for Rio Grande Wild Turkey 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cathey, James; Locke, Shawn; Ransom, Dean; DeMaso, Stephen; Schwertner, T. Wayne; Collier, Bret

    2007-09-04

    The Rio Grande wild turkey habitat appraisal guide gives landowners and managers a standardized, systematic way to evaluate current habitat conditions. It can be used to identify limiting factors. It also contains suggestions for improving...

  5. The Pennsylvania 4-H Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Project (WHEP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Pennsylvania 4-H Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Project (WHEP) Originally Written By: Edward L. Neilson, Jr. and Delwin E. Benson, Ph.D. Adapted From the 4-H Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Program National..........................................................................................................................3 A Real Life Project

  6. High Performance Home Building Guide for Habitat for Humanity Affiliates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindsey Marburger

    2010-10-01

    This guide covers basic principles of high performance Habitat construction, steps to achieving high performance Habitat construction, resources to help improve building practices, materials, etc., and affiliate profiles and recommendations.

  7. NREL/Habitat for Humanity Zero Energy Home: A Cold-Climate Case Study for Affordable Zero Energy Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norton, P.; Christensen, C.; Hancock, E.; Barker, G.; Reeves, P.

    2008-06-01

    The design of this 1,280-square-foot, three-bedroom Habitat for Humanity of Metro Denver zero energy home carefully combines envelope efficiency, efficient equipment, appliances and lighting, and passive and active solar features to reach the zero energy goal. The home was designed with an early version (July 22, 2004) of the BEOpt building optimization software; DOE2 and TRNSYS were used to perform additional analysis. This engineering approach was tempered by regular discussions with Habitat construction staff and volunteers. These discussions weighed the applicability of the optimized solutions to the special needs and economics of a Habitat house--moving the design toward simple, easily maintained mechanical systems and volunteer-friendly construction techniques. A data acquisition system was installed in the completed home to monitor its performance.

  8. Nearshore Habitat How Bank Armoring & Overwater Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nearshore Habitat How Bank Armoring & Overwater Structures Shape the Health of Pacific Salmon structures--such as docks, marinas, and boat ramps--in and over the water to provide human access to our region's waterways. While overwater structures and bank armoring can provide important functions

  9. COMPUTER-BASED CRITICS Gerhard Fischer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Gerhard

    than I , we are bUilding systems that augment human intelligence -- in other words, we are building], active and passive help systems [12], design environments [11], and critics [7, 13], which we focus- building experience. We propose a general framework for critics, present specific requirements

  10. Iterative Methods for Criticality Computations in Neutron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheichl, Robert

    reactor (i.e. the criticality of the reactor), and thus plays an important role in the design and safety provides rather precise criteria on how accurate the inner solves need to be in order for the whole

  11. Lecture notes for criticality safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fullwood, R.

    1992-03-01

    These lecture notes for criticality safety are prepared for the training of Department of Energy supervisory, project management, and administrative staff. Technical training and basic mathematics are assumed. The notes are designed for a two-day course, taught by two lecturers. Video tapes may be used at the options of the instructors. The notes provide all the materials that are necessary but outside reading will assist in the fullest understanding. The course begins with a nuclear physics overview. The reader is led from the macroscopic world into the microscopic world of atoms and the elementary particles that constitute atoms. The particles, their masses and sizes and properties associated with radioactive decay and fission are introduced along with Einstein's mass-energy equivalence. Radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, radiation penetration, shielding and health-effects are discussed to understand protection in case of a criticality accident. Fission, the fission products, particles and energy released are presented to appreciate the dangers of criticality. Nuclear cross sections are introduced to understand the effectiveness of slow neutrons to produce fission. Chain reactors are presented as an economy; effective use of the neutrons from fission leads to more fission resulting in a power reactor or a criticality excursion. The six-factor formula is presented for managing the neutron budget. This leads to concepts of material and geometric buckling which are used in simple calculations to assure safety from criticality. Experimental measurements and computer code calculations of criticality are discussed. To emphasize the reality, historical criticality accidents are presented in a table with major ones discussed to provide lessons-learned. Finally, standards, NRC guides and regulations, and DOE orders relating to criticality protection are presented.

  12. Influence of grazing management on population attributes, habitats, and habitat selection of bobwhites in south Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkins, Robert Neal

    1987-01-01

    or shot on two grazing systems on La Copita Research Area, Jim Wells County, Texas, fall 1985 to fall 1986. . . . . . . . . ~ . 30 Dates and numbers of habitat samples taken for each ecological season of bobwhite quail on two 5 razing systems on La... Count. y, Texas, 1985-1986. 3. 5 Mean visual obscurity indices for available (shaded) and ouail selected (unshaded) habitats at four levels on two grazing systems for three biological seasons on La Copita Research Area, Jim Wells County, Texas, 1985...

  13. HABITAT PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan B-209

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    HABITAT PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan B-209 Associated Species: spruce grouse: Carol R. Foss Affiliation: New Hampshire Audubon Element 1: Distribution and Habitat 1.1 Habitat on mineral soils. In northern New Hampshire, these range from well or moderately well drained upland forests

  14. HABITAT PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanB-10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    HABITAT PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanB-10 Associated Species: Timber rattlesnake. Foss, Audubon Society of New Hampshire Element 1: Distribution and Habitat 1.1 Habitat description Appalachian oak pine forest systems are found mostly below 900 ft elevation in southern New Hampshire south

  15. Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, Part 1, 1984 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konopacky, Richard C.

    1985-06-01

    This volume contains reports on subprojects involving the determining of alternatives to enhance salmonid habitat on patented land in Bear Valley Creek, Idaho, coordination activities for habitat projects occurring on streams within fishing areas of the Shoshone-Bannock Indian Tribes, and habitat and fish inventories in the Salmon River. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual reports. (ACR)

  16. ORIGINAL PAPER How habitat affects the benefits of communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donaldson-Matasci, Matina

    ORIGINAL PAPER How habitat affects the benefits of communication in collectively foraging honey, and what is it about those habitats that makes communication useful? In this study, we examine the effects of floral distribution patterns on the benefits of dance communication across five different habitats

  17. TRAVERSE GRAVIMETER EXPERIMENT CRITICAL DESIGN REVIEW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    /RQA/GE MIT/DL NASA/MSC - CPD - Crew Procedures Engineer NASA/MSC/ASPO Arthur D. Little Inc. Arthur D. Little Vernon Shi.elds Max D. Holley Stan Bachman P. R. Maloney R. Parker J. Fitzgerald Paul J. Hickson Mamik. Toth P. V. Mason D. G. Hoag R. R. Ragan L. Schnee Dick Lopez Bob Maselek Dan Bland D. T. Lockard Daniel

  18. Design methods for displacement ventilation: Critical review.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano

    2006-01-01

    big space or if cooling/heating floor/ceiling systems areheating system (radiant panels, convectors, radiators or fan coil units at floor

  19. Design methods for displacement ventilation: Critical review.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano

    2006-01-01

    1988, Indoor Airflow, Air quality and Energy Consumption in1988, Indoor Airflow, Air quality and Energy Consumption inhigh indoor air quality in energy efficient way may be a

  20. Critical Infrastructure and Cyber Security 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doll, Abby; Pirrong, Renee; Jennings, Matthew; Stasny, George; Giblin, Andy; Shaffer, Steph; Anderson, Aimee

    2011-01-01

    cyber security. They designated responsibility for cyber-security to the newly formed Department of Homeland Security, a duty that has continued to today 3. The group was tasked with creating a method of protecting the critical components.... 2010. 15 Mar. 2011. http://www.d tic.mil/doctrine/new_pubs/jp1_02.pdf 10 Comments on the Economic and Security Implications Of Recent Developments in the World Oil Market , 107th Cong. (2000) (testimony of Robert E. Ebel). http...

  1. Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, 1990 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, Mike

    1991-12-01

    The annual report contains three individual subproject sections detailing tribal fisheries work completed during the summer and fall of 1990. Subproject I contains summaries of evaluation/monitoring efforts associated with the Bear Valley Creek, Idaho enhancement project. Subproject II contains an evaluation of the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River habitat enhancement project. Subproject III concerns the East Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho.

  2. Critical Materials Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AMO hosted a public workshop on Tuesday, April 3, 2012 in Arlington, VA to provide background information on critical materials assessment, the current research within DOE related to critical...

  3. Approaches for Developing Uniform Hazard Spectra at Critical...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Hazard Spectra at Critical Facilities Preliminary Assessment of the Impact of 2014 Seismic Study on WTP Design Evaluation of the SRS Seismic Hazard Considering the EPRI 2013...

  4. A Study to Increase Participation of Habitat for Humanity Affiliates in LEED for Homes Certification 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabb, Amy Elizabeth

    2013-04-30

    to find the most common points earned. Section 6 provides the conclusions and recommendations for future work. LIMITATIONS AND DELIMITATIONS This paper is focusing on studying LEED participation of Habitat for Humanity affiliates in Texas...: ? Innovation and Design ? Location and Linkage ? Sustainable Sites ? Water Efficiencies ? Energy and Atmosphere ? Materials and Resources ? Indoor Air Quality 8 ? Awareness and Education A maximum of 136 points can be earned with cutoffs at 45...

  5. PRECLOSURE CRITICALITY ANALYSIS PROCESS REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.E. Danise

    2004-10-25

    This report describes a process for performing preclosure criticality analyses for a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These analyses will be performed from the time of receipt of fissile material until permanent closure of the repository (preclosure period). The process describes how criticality safety analyses will be performed for various configurations of waste in or out of waste packages that could occur during preclosure as a result of normal operations or event sequences. The criticality safety analysis considers those event sequences resulting in unanticipated moderation, loss of neutron absorber, geometric changes, or administrative errors in waste form placement (loading) of the waste package. The report proposes a criticality analyses process for preclosure to allow a consistent transition from preclosure to postclosure, thereby possibly reducing potential cost increases and delays in licensing of Yucca Mountain. The proposed approach provides the advantage of using a parallel regulatory framework for evaluation of preclosure and postclosure performance and is consistent with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's approach of supporting risk-informed, performance-based regulation for fuel cycle facilities, ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan, Final Report'', and 10 CFR Part 63. The criticality-related criteria for ensuring subcriticality are also described as well as which guidance documents will be utilized. Preclosure operations and facilities have significant similarities to existing facilities and operations currently regulated by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; therefore, the design approach for preclosure criticality safety will be dictated by existing regulatory requirements while using a risk-informed approach with burnup credit for in-package operations.

  6. An Efficient Computation of Statistically Critical Sequential Paths Under Retiming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Sung Kyu

    An Efficient Computation of Statistically Critical Sequential Paths Under Retiming Mongkol the statistically critical paths under retiming, which are the paths with a high probability of becoming timing- critical after retiming. SRTA enables the designers to perform circuit optimization on these paths

  7. United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation Plans Under the Endangered Species Act Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Permitting...

  8. BPA celebrates protection of Lemhi River fish and wildlife habitat

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    celebrates-protection-of-Lemhi-River-fish-and-wildlife-habitat Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives...

  9. EVALUATION OF HABITAT RESTORATION OBJECTIVES Developed by Mobrand Biometrics, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EVALUATION OF HABITAT RESTORATION OBJECTIVES Developed by Mobrand Biometrics, Inc. 2004 "Active given the likely measures at hand and the economic, social and ecological constraints of the Subbasin

  10. Relationship between juvenile steelhead survival and winter habitat availability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huber, Eric; Kayed, Sammy; Post, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Ugedal. 2007. Shelter availability affects behaviour, size-and winter habitat availability Eric Huber, Sammy Kayed, andThe establishment and availability of interstitial spaces

  11. Adaptation to Ephemeral Habitat May Overcome Natural Barriers and Severe Habitat Fragmentation in a Fire-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Sabrina

    in a Fire- Dependent Species, the Bachman's Sparrow (Peucaea aestivalis) Blain Cerame1 , James A. Cox2 , Robb T. Brumfield3 , James W. Tucker4¤ , Sabrina S. Taylor1 * 1 School of Renewable Natural Resources diversity in highly fragmented habitat. Citation: Cerame B, Cox JA, Brumfield RT, Tucker JW, Taylor SS (2014

  12. Criticality Model Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.M. Scaglione

    2003-03-12

    The purpose of the ''Criticality Model Report'' is to validate the MCNP (CRWMS M&O 1998h) code's ability to accurately predict the effective neutron multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) for a range of conditions spanned by various critical configurations representative of the potential configurations commercial reactor assemblies stored in a waste package may take. Results of this work are an indication of the accuracy of MCNP for calculating eigenvalues, which will be used as input for criticality analyses for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage at the proposed Monitored Geologic Repository. The scope of this report is to document the development and validation of the criticality model. The scope of the criticality model is only applicable to commercial pressurized water reactor fuel. Valid ranges are established as part of the validation of the criticality model. This model activity follows the description in BSC (2002a).

  13. Transport at criticality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Buchel; C. Pagnutti

    2009-12-16

    We study second order phase transitions in non-conformal holographic models of gauge theory/string theory correspondence at finite temperature and zero chemical potential. We compute critical exponents of the bulk viscosity near the transition and interpret our results in the framework of available models of dynamical critical phenomena. Intriguingly, although some of the models we discuss belong to different static universality classes, they appear to share the same dynamical critical exponent.

  14. Critical Materials Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Critical Materials Workshop U.S. Department of Energy April 3, 2012 eere.energy.gov Dr. Leo Christodoulou Program Manager Advanced Manufacturing Office Energy Efficiency and...

  15. Reference handbook: Nuclear criticality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-06

    The purpose for this handbook is to provide Rocky Flats personnel with the information necessary to understand the basic principles underlying a nuclear criticality.

  16. An experimental study of the oil evolution in critical piston ring pack regions and the effects of piston and ring designs in an internal combustion engine utilizing two-dimensional laser induced fluorescence and the impact on maritime economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vokac, Adam, 1978-

    2004-01-01

    Faced with increasing concern for lubricating, oil consumption and engine friction, it is critical to understand the oil transport mechanisms in the power cylinder system. Lubricating oil travels through distinct regions ...

  17. CAP: Criticality AnCAP: Criticality An Efficient Speculatip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torrellas, Josep

    - Tracks running tasks andg their context Novel components of CAPNovel components of CAP - Critical path builder Builds path and analyzes graph - Critical path predictor #12;CAP OvCAP Ov T ll t th hTo collect the critical path calculation is easyp y o find critical path #12;Critical PatCritical Pat T i i l l t d

  18. Common Name Scientific Name Status Critical Habitat in AK? Humpback Whale Megaptera novaeangliae Endangered No

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Threatened No Lower Columbia River Coho Salmon* Oncorhynchus kisutch Threatened No Hood Canal Summer Run Chum Lepidochelys olivacea Threatened No Upper Columbia River Spring Chinook Salmon* Oncorhynchus tshawytscha Endangered No Snake River Sockeye Salmon* Oncorhynchus nerka Endangered No WHALES PINNIPEDS REPTILES FISH

  19. Vulnerability of critical infrastructures : identifying critical nodes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, Roger Gary; Robinson, David Gerald

    2004-06-01

    The objective of this research was the development of tools and techniques for the identification of critical nodes within critical infrastructures. These are nodes that, if disrupted through natural events or terrorist action, would cause the most widespread, immediate damage. This research focuses on one particular element of the national infrastructure: the bulk power system. Through the identification of critical elements and the quantification of the consequences of their failure, site-specific vulnerability analyses can be focused at those locations where additional security measures could be effectively implemented. In particular, with appropriate sizing and placement within the grid, distributed generation in the form of regional power parks may reduce or even prevent the impact of widespread network power outages. Even without additional security measures, increased awareness of sensitive power grid locations can provide a basis for more effective national, state and local emergency planning. A number of methods for identifying critical nodes were investigated: small-world (or network theory), polyhedral dynamics, and an artificial intelligence-based search method - particle swarm optimization. PSO was found to be the only viable approach and was applied to a variety of industry accepted test networks to validate the ability of the approach to identify sets of critical nodes. The approach was coded in a software package called Buzzard and integrated with a traditional power flow code. A number of industry accepted test networks were employed to validate the approach. The techniques (and software) are not unique to power grid network, but could be applied to a variety of complex, interacting infrastructures.

  20. Bat habitat research. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, B.L.; Bosworth, W.R.; Doering, R.W.

    1993-12-31

    This progress report describes activities over the current reporting period to characterize the habitats of bats on the INEL. Research tasks are entitled Monitoring bat habitation of caves on the INEL to determine species present, numbers, and seasons of use; Monitor bat use of man-made ponds at the INEL to determine species present and rates of use of these waters; If the Big Lost River is flowing on the INEL and/or if the Big Lost River sinks contain water, determine species present, numbers and seasons of use; Determine the habitat requirement of Townsend`s big-eared bats, including the microclimate of caves containing Townsend`s big-eared bats as compared to other caves that do not contain bats; Determine and describe an economical and efficient bat census technique to be used periodically by INEL scientists to determine the status of bats on the INEL; and Provide a suggestive management and protective plan for bat species on the INEL that might, in the future, be added to the endangered and sensitive list;

  1. Global Dynamics of Zooplankton and Harmful Algae in Flowing Habitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Sze-Bi

    Global Dynamics of Zooplankton and Harmful Algae in Flowing Habitats Sze-Bi Hsu Feng-Bin Wang Xiao from the dynamics of harmful algae and zooplankton in flowing- water habitats where a main channel. For the system modeling the dynamics of algae and their toxin that contains little limiting nutrient, we

  2. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Do sex and habitat differences in antipredator behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandpipers are sexually dimorphic, with females about 15% longer-billed and 10% heavier than males. We than com- pensatory. However, with respect to habitat use, birds appeared to compensate for the higher-off against other factors. Keywords Habitat quality Á Local distribution Á Predation danger Á Sexual

  3. Simulated and human metapopulations created by habitat selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Douglas W.

    that resident Canadians move between cities to maximize income. Key assumptions: Groups in different habitats to maximize median household income. Conclusion: Local extinction and recolonization is easily created can be treated as different populations. Different Canadian cities represent separate habitats. Income

  4. Sustainable Housing: Opportunities for improved energy efficient home construction by Habitat for Humanity in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Sustainable Housing: Opportunities for improved energy efficient home construction by Habitat of Saskatchewan Saskatoon By Kurtis Trefry Keywords: Sustainable, energy efficient, insulation, Habitat for energy efficient building practices to be more readily adopted by Habitat for Humanity in Saskatoon

  5. Habitat configuration and availability influences the settlement of temperate reef fishes (Tripterygiidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shima, Jeff

    Habitat configuration and availability influences the settlement of temperate reef fishes 29 September 2013 Available online 23 October 2013 Keywords: Attraction vs. production Fragmentation Habitat availability Habitat configuration Settlement Tripterygiidae To survive, most benthic marine

  6. Integrated Design: A High-Performance Solution for Affordable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Habitat, MA Green Mountain Habitat, VT Habitat of Schenectady, NY Habitat of Washington, DC Philadelphia Habitat, PA System Building Research Alliance, New York, NY Clayton Homes,...

  7. CTUIR Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat Project 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra

    2009-02-09

    The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2008 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2008-January 31, 2009) primary project activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight primary fisheries habitat enhancement projects were implemented on Meacham Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, McKay Creek, West Fork Spring Hollow, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying one fish passage barrier on West Birch Creek; (2) participating in six projects planting 10,000 trees and seeding 3225 pounds of native grasses; (3) donating 1000 ft of fencing and 1208 fence posts and associated hardware for 3.6 miles of livestock exclusion fencing projects in riparian areas of West Birch and Meacham Creek, and for tree screens to protect against beaver damage on West Fork Spring Hollow Creek; (4) using biological control (insects) to reduce noxious weeds on three treatment areas covering five acres on Meacham Creek; (5) planning activities for a levee setback project on Meacham Creek. We participated in additional secondary projects as opportunities arose. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major project areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation Project site (FY2006) and at additional easements and planned project sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at project sites prior to implementation. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each project site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and project partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each project's success. An Aquatic Habitat Inventory was conducted from river mile 0-8 on Isquulktpe Creek and the data collected was compared with data collected in 1994. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the duration of each project to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned project activities and biological opinions were written and approved. Project activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance in accordance with the Umatilla River Subbasin Salmon and Steelhead Production Plan (NPPC 1990) and the Final Umatilla Willow Subbasin Plan (Umatilla/Willow Subbasin Planning Team 2005).

  8. Design for manufacturability with regular fabrics in digital integrated circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gazor, Mehdi (Seyed Mehdi)

    2005-01-01

    Integrated circuit design is limited by manufacturability. As devices scale down, sensitivity to process variation increases dramatically, making design for manufacturability a critical concern. Designers must identify the ...

  9. Must Criticism Be Constructive?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geuss, Raymond

    2012-10-01

    ’ criti - cism is somehow defective, objectionable, or inappropriate. It is part of the responsibility of a critic, it is assumed, not simply to denigrate some institution, social arrangement, or form of action, but to do so while pro- viding at least... to the third of my three dimensions. In cases of ‘full-blown’ criticism the first and second of these aspects are explicitly connected. I would not usually think I had in front of me a case of ‘criti - cism’ — or at any rate of ‘criticism’ in the full...

  10. Critical Materials Hub

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Critical materials, including some rare earth elements that possess unique magnetic, catalytic, and luminescent properties, are key resources needed to manufacture products for the clean energy economy. These materials are so critical to the technologies that enable wind turbines, solar panels, electric vehicles, and energy-efficient lighting that DOE's 2010 and 2011 Critical Materials Strategy reported that supply challenges for five rare earth metals—dysprosium, neodymium, terbium, europium, and yttrium—could affect clean energy technology deployment in the coming years.1, 2

  11. FUSION OF HYPERSPECTRAL AND BATHYMETRY DATA FOR IMPROVED BENTHIC HABITAT MAPPING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    FUSION OF HYPERSPECTRAL AND BATHYMETRY DATA FOR IMPROVED BENTHIC HABITAT MAPPING Maria C. Torres, coastal remote sensing, underwater unmixing, benthic habitat mapping, data fusion. #12;

  12. Analysing and modelling the impact of habitat fragmentation on species diversity: a macroecological perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthews, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    that hold in all cases across habitat island systems.because most habi- tat island systems are highly disturbedislands, to habitat island systems, is inappro- priate as it

  13. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Sandy River Delta, Technical Report 2000-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Ann; Ratti, John

    2002-02-01

    Land managers are often challenged with the mandate to control exotic and invasive plant species. Reed canarygrass (Phalaris arundinacea) and Himalayan blackberry (Rubus discolor) are 2 such species that are currently threatening natural areas in western United States. Reed canarygrass may be native to the inland northwest (Antieau 2000), but it has invaded many wetland areas as dense, monoculture stands. Spread of this plant species is largely attributed to human disturbances, e.g., draining, farming (Antieau 2000). Reed canarygrass often dominates other emergent vegetation such as cattail (Typha spp.) and bulrush (Scirpus spp.) (Whitson et al. 1996, Apfelbaum and Sams 1987), and the resulting habitat is largely unsuitable for wetland birds. Himalayan blackberry was introduced to the United States as a garden shrub and was planted at wildlife-management areas for food and cover. It easily colonizes disturbed places, such as roadsides, ditches, and flood plains (Hoshovsky 2000). Once established, it forms a thick, impenetrable stand, which excludes native shrub species. Although Himalayan blackberry does provide food and cover for wildlife, particularly during fall and winter, it decreases habitat diversity, and therefore, may decrease wildlife diversity. Furthermore, patterns of avian nest predation may be altered in some exotic-shrub communities (Schmidt and Whelan 1999). For land managers to make sound decisions regarding invasive-plant control, it is useful to obtain information on current plant distributions in relation to targeted wildlife species, and then use models to predict how those species may respond to changes in vegetation. The Habitat Evaluations Program was developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to evaluate current and future habitat conditions for fish and wildlife (Stiehl 1994). The program is based on Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) models for specific wildlife species. Each model contains several variables that represent life requisites (e.g., food and nesting cover) for that species. These variables are evaluated with vegetation sampling, and/or through the interpretation of aerial photographs and the like. Variable values are assigned a numerical score. The score may be based on a categorical rating (e.g . , different vegetation types receive different scores based on their importance for that species) or may be the result of a linear relationship (e.g., the score increases with the variable value; Figure 1). Variable scores are then input into a mathematical formula, which results in an HSI score. The HSI score ranges from 0-1, with 0 representing poor-quality habitat and 1 optimal habitat. HSI models assume a positive, linear relationship between wildlife-species density and the HSI score. For example, with an HSI score of 1, we assume that a species will be present at its highest density. Models can be projected into the future by changing variable values and observing the corresponding changes in HSI scores. Most models are relatively simple, but some are complex. These models have come under considerable scrutiny in the last several years, particularly concerning the validity of model assumptions (Van Horne 1983, Laymon and Barrett 1986, Hobbs and Hanley 1990, Kellner et al. 1992). Regardless of criticisms, these models may be used with success when there is an understanding and acceptance of model limitations. Each model should be evaluated as to its applicability in a given situation. Model validation, where results have on-the-ground verification, is highly recommended. Specific objectives of this project were to (1) conduct avian surveys and measure the present vegetation at the Sandy River Delta, (2) input the vegetation data into HSI models for 5 avian species, (3) evaluate the current habitat suitability for these species, and (4) predict species responses to potential changes in vegetation, resulting from the removal of reed canarygrass and/or Himalayan blackberry.

  14. The Critical Materials Institute | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDidDevelopment TopMetathesisSediments and Related J. BennettThe Critical

  15. Critical Materials Workshop Agenda

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Critical Materials Workshop Sheraton Crystal City 1800 Jefferson Davis Highway, Arlington, VA April 3, 2012, 8 am - 5 pm Time (EDT) Activity Speaker 8:00 am - 9:00 am Registration...

  16. CRITICAL MATERIALS INSTITUTE PROJECTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    INL National Technology Roadmap for Critical Materials 4 4-3 4.3.3 McCall, Scott LLNL Additive Manufacturing of Permanent Magnets 2 2-1 2.1.2 Turchi, Patrice LLNL Materials...

  17. Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program : Action Plan Final Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myra, David (South Central Washington Resource Conservation and Development Council, Ellensburg, WA); Ready, Carol A. (Kittitas County Water Purveyors, Ellensburg, WA)

    2003-04-01

    This report covers activities conducted by the Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program under Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) grant project No. 2002-025-00 for fiscal year 2002. The Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program (YTAHP, Program) was organized to restore salmonid passage to Yakima tributaries that historically supported salmonids and improve habitat in areas where access is restored. Specifically, this program is designed to (a) screen unscreened diversion structures to prevent fish entrainment into artificial waterways; (b) provide for fish passage at man-made barriers, such as diversion dams, culverts, siphons and bridges; and (c) provide information and assistance to landowners interested in to contributing to the improvement of water quality, water reliability and stream habitat. The YTAHP developed from a number of groups actively engaged in watershed management, and/or habitat restoration within the Yakima River Basin. These groups include the Washington State Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), Kittitas County Conservation District (KCCD), North Yakima Conservation District (NYCD), Kittitas County Water Purveyors (KCWP), and Ahtanum Irrigation District (AID). The US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and Yakama Nation (YN) both participated in the development of the objectives of YTAHP. Other entities that will be involved during permitting or project review may include the YN, the federal Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and US Army Corps of Engineers (COE). Achievements of YTAHP with BPA Action Plan funding during FY 2002 were to: (1) Establish contracts with RC&D and YTAHP participants. (2) Determine contract mechanism for MWH engineering services. (3) Provide engineering designs and services for 11 early action projects, including inverted siphons, pump and gravity diversion screening, diversion metering, rock weirs for improved fish passage, headgates and fishways. These designs were used to submit for project implementation funding through the WA Salmon Recovery Funding Board. (4) Complete 6 early action projects on Ahtanum Creek--One gravity diversion was replaced with a pump and pump end screen and 5 pump end screens were installed. (5) Conduct two topographic surveys--For the City of Yakima on the Fruitvale diversion for the North Yakima Conservation District to support the installation of a pumping plant which would eliminate the need to divert directly from the Naches River and build the gravel berm each year during low flows. For the Taylor Ditch system for the North Yakima Conservation District to support as feasibility of opening the ditch for habitat and at the same time maintaining irrigation deliveries. (6) Procure materials for use in future YTAHP projects, including siphon pipe, delivery pipe, rock, screens, and water meters. These materials will act as match and support the completion of these subsequent YTAHP projects. Overall, with broad agency support and Action Plan funding through BPA, the YTAHP has achieved substantial enhancements that support aquatic species and which will leverage subsequent work through engineering designs and materials. The program was also able to establish the personnel and equipment support for beginning the stream assessment process on tributaries in Yakima and Kittitas Counties. Completion of this year's effort has provided significant inroads to working on the private lands in two counties which will be vital to future efforts by YTAHP and others to protect and enhance Yakima River Basin habitat.

  18. Preliminary Safety Design RM

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Preliminary Safety Design Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF Pr C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R reliminar Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan ry Safety view Module...

  19. Critical thickness in silicone thermosets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deopura, Manish, 1975-

    2005-01-01

    Critical thickness effects are utilized to achieve high fracture toughness in brittle polymers. The postulate of critical thickness, which is: "Macroscopically brittle polymers deform in a ductile fashion below a critical ...

  20. Hydrocarbon habitat of the west Netherlands basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Jager, J. (Nederlandse Aardolie Maatschappij, Assen (Netherlands)); Doyle, M. (Petroleum Development Oman, Muscat (Oman)); Grantham, P. (KSEPL/Shell Research, Rijswijk (Netherlands)); Mabillard, J. (Shell Nigeria, Port Harcourt (Nigeria))

    1993-09-01

    The complex West Netherlands Basin contains oil and gas in Triassic and Upper Jurassic to Cretaceous clastic reservoir sequences. The understanding has always been that the Carboniferous coal measures have generated only gas and the Jurassic marine Posidonia Shale only oil. However, detailed geochemical analyses show that both source rocks have generated oil and gas. Geochemical fingerprinting established a correlation of the hydrocarbons with the main source rocks. The occurrence of these different hydrocarbons is consistent with migration routes. Map-based charge modeling shows that the main phase of hydrocarbon generation occurred prior to the Late Cretaceous inversion of the West Netherlands Basin. However, along the southwest flank of the basin and in lows between the inversion highs, significant charge continued during the Tertiary. Biodegradation of oils in Jurassic and Cretaceous reservoirs occurred during the earliest Tertiary, but only in reservoirs that were at that time at temperatures of less then 70 to 80[degrees]C, where bacteria could survive. This study shows that also in a mature hydrocarbon province an integrated hydrocarbon habitat study with modern analyses and state-of-the-art technology can lead to a much improved understanding of the distribution of oil and gas in the subsurface. The results of this study will allow a better risk assessment for remaining prospects, and an improved prediction of the type of trapped hydrocarbons in terms of gas, oil, and biodegraded oil.

  1. Criticality Safety | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Nuclear Safety Management American Nuclear Society, Nuclear Criticality Safety Division ANSIANS-8 Standards U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Criticality Safety Program Orders,...

  2. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Manatee County Habitat...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    has R-23 ICF walls, a spray-foamed sealed attic, solar hot water, and a ducted mini-split heat pump. BAZeroEnergyReadyManateeHabitatForHumanity062414.pdf More Documents &...

  3. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Southeast Volusia Habitat...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    appliances, and ceiling fans, a solar water heater, an ERV, and a high-efficiency heat pump. To keep the ducts in conditioned space, the Habitat affiliate installed a rigid...

  4. Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; Carl Property - Yakama Nation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul; Muse, Anthony

    2008-02-01

    A baseline habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the Carl property (160 acres) in June 2007 to determine the number of habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to acquire the property as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of McNary Dam. HEP surveys also helped assess the general ecological condition of the property. The Carl property appeared damaged from livestock grazing and exhibited a high percentage of invasive forbs. Exotic grasses, while present, did not comprise a large percentage of the available cover in most areas. Cover types were primarily grassland/shrubsteppe with a limited emergent vegetation component. Baseline HEP surveys generated 356.11 HUs or 2.2 HUs per acre. Habitat units were associated with the following HEP models: California quail (47.69 HUs), western meadowlark (114.78 HUs), mallard (131.93 HUs), Canada goose (60.34 HUs), and mink (1.38 HUs).

  5. AVLIS Criticality risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brereton, S.J., LLNL

    1998-04-29

    Evaluation of criticality safety has become an important task in preparing for the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) uranium enrichment runs that will take place during the Integrated Process Demonstration (IPD) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This integrated operation of AVLIS systems under plant-like conditions will be used to verify the performance of process equipment and to demonstrate the sustained integrated enrichment performance of these systems using operating parameters that are similar to production plant specifications. Because of the potential criticality concerns associated with enriched uranium, substantial effort has been aimed towards understanding the potential system failures of interest from a criticality standpoint, and evaluating them in detail. The AVLIS process is based on selective photoionization of uranium atoms of atomic weight 235 (U-235) in a vapor stream, followed by electrostatic extraction. The process is illustrated in Figure 1. Two major subsystems are involved: the uranium separator and the laser system. In the separator, metallic uranium is fed into a crucible where it is heated and vaporized by an electron beam. The atomic U-235/U-238 vapor stream moves away from the molten uranium and is illuminated by precisely tuned beams of dye laser light. Upon absorption of the tuned dye laser light, the U-235 atoms become excited and eject electrons (become photoionized), giving them a net positive charge. The ions of U-235 are moved preferentially by an electrostatic field to condense on the product collector, forming the enriched uranium product. The remaining vapor, which is depleted in U-235 (tails), passes unaffected through the photoionization/extractor zone and accumulates on collectors in the top of the separator. Tails and product collector surfaces operate at elevated temperatures so that deposited materials flow as segregated liquid streams. The separated uranium condensates (uranium enriched in U-235 and uranium depleted in U-235) are cooled and accumulated in solid metallic form in canisters. The collected product and tails material is weighed and transferred into certified, critically safe, shipping containers (DOT specification 6M with 2R containment vessel). These will be temporarily stored, and then shipped offsite either for use by a fuel fabricator, or for disposal. Tails material will be packaged for disposal. A criticality risk assessment was performed for AVLIS IPD runs. In this analysis, the likelihood of occurrence of a criticality was examined. For the AVLIS process, there are a number of areas that have been specifically examined to assess whether or not the frequency of occurrence of a criticality is credible (frequency of occurrence > 10-6/yr). In this paper, we discuss only two of the areas: the separator and canister operations.

  6. The effect of imbalance distribution and measurement locations on critical speeds in a turboprop engine rotor 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marin, Manuel

    1996-01-01

    The critical speeds of a turbomachine can be defined as the speeds at which synchronous response to imbalance is maximum (Vance,1988). Identifying the proper placement of critical speeds is very important in the design process of turbomachinery...

  7. Criticality Safety Evaluation Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facilities Process Water Handling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KESSLER, S.F.

    2000-08-10

    This report addresses the criticality concerns associated with process water handling in the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. The controls and limitations on equipment design and operations to control potential criticality occurrences are identified.

  8. A primer for criticality calculations with DANTSYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busch, R.D.

    1997-08-01

    With the closure of many experimental facilities, the nuclear safety analyst has to rely on computer calculations to identify safe limits for the handling and storage of fissile materials. Although deterministic methods often do not provide exact models of a system, a substantial amount of reliable information on nuclear systems can be obtained using these methods if the user understands their limitations. To guide criticality specialists in this area, the Nuclear Criticality Safety Group at the University of New Mexico (UNM) in cooperation with the Radiation Transport Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has designed a primer to help the analyst understand and use the DANTSYS deterministic transport code for nuclear criticality safety analyses. DANTSYS is the new name of the group of codes formerly known as: ONEDANT, TWODANT, TWOHEX, TWOGQ, and THREEDANT. The primer is designed to teach bu example, with each example illustrating two or three DANTSYS features useful in criticality analyses. Starting with a Quickstart chapter, the primer gives an overview of the basic requirements for DANTSYS input and allows the user to quickly run a simple criticality problem with DANTSYS. Each chapter has a list of basic objectives at the beginning identifying the goal of the chapter and the individual DANTSYS features covered in detail in the chapter example problems. On completion of the primer, it is expected that the user will be comfortable doing criticality calculations with DANTSYS and can handle 60--80% of the situations that normally arise in a facility. The primary provides a set of input files that can be selective modified by the user to fit each particular problem.

  9. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for the Noxon Rapids and Cabinet Gorge Hydroelectric Projects, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bissell, Gael

    1985-04-01

    Mitigation projects for wildlife species impacted by the Noxon Rapids and Cabinet Gorge hydroelectric projects are recommended. First priority projects encompass the development of long-term wildlife management plans for WWP lands adjacent to the two reservoirs. General objectives for all WWP lands include alternatives designed to protect or enhance existing wildlife habitat. It is also suggested that WWP evaluate the current status of beaver and river otter populations occupying the reservoirs and implement indicated management. Second priority projects include the protection/enhancement of wildlife habitat on state owned or privately owned lands. Long-term wildlife management agreements would be developed with Montana School Trust lands and may involve reimbursement of revenues lost to the state. Third priority projects include the enhancement of big game winter ranges located on Kootenai National Forest lands. 1 ref., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  10. Design Editorial Design Innovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    juxtaposition of innovation versus invention: "Invention is the first occurrence of an idea for a new product such as innovation strategies, product design, service inno- vation, cutting-edge designers, design awards, and green design. Much of that perspective on innovation is then tied to industrial or product design, often

  11. COVARIANCE PLASTICITY AND REGULATED CRITICALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Daniel

    COVARIANCE PLASTICITY AND REGULATED CRITICALITY Elie Bienenstock Division of Applied Mathematics plasticity may cause the brain to operate near criticality. We analyze the effect of such a regulation of Hebbian covariance plasticity. Such a regulation may bring the system near criticality. We suggest

  12. Electrostatic interactions in critical solvents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Bier; Andrea Gambassi; Martin Oettel; S. Dietrich

    2011-04-29

    The subtle interplay between critical phenomena and electrostatics is investigated by considering the effective force acting on two parallel walls confining a near-critical binary liquid mixture with added salt. The ion-solvent coupling can turn a non-critical repulsive electrostatic force into an attractive one upon approaching the critical point. However, the effective force is eventually dominated by the critical Casimir effect, the universal properties of which are not altered by the presence of salt. This observation allows a consistent interpretation of recent experimental data.

  13. Assessment of estuarine habitats for resident and estuarine-dependent species: tools for conservation and management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shervette, Virginia Rhea

    2009-05-15

    My research in coastal Ecuador and the northern Gulf of Mexico (GOM) elucidated differences in value of shallow estuarine habitats for fishes and invertebrates. I focused on mangrove and tidal river habitats in Ecuador, ...

  14. Building America Top Innovations 2012: High-Performance Affordable Housing with Habitat for Humanity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes Building America support of Habitat for Humanity including researchers who wrote Habitat construction guides and teams that have worked with affiliates on numerous field projects.

  15. Marine Habitat Mapping Technology Workshop for Alaska April 2-4, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Marine Habitat Mapping Technology Workshop for Alaska April 2-4, 2007 Anchorage, Alaska ABSTRACTS -- INVITED SPEAKERS --------------------------------------------------- Marine habitat mapping: What National Marine Fisheries Service Doug Woodby Chief Scientist for Commercial Fisheries, Alaska Department

  16. Teaching Critical Thinking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmes, N G; Bonn, D A

    2015-01-01

    The ability to make decisions based on data, with its inherent uncertainties and variability, is a complex and vital skill in the modern world. The need for such quantitative critical thinking occurs in many different contexts, and while it is an important goal of education, that goal is seldom being achieved. We argue that the key element for developing this ability is repeated practice in making decisions based on data, with feedback on those decisions. We demonstrate a structure for providing suitable practice that can be applied in any instructional setting that involves the acquisition of data and relating that data to scientific models. This study reports the results of applying that structure in an introductory physics lab course. Students in an experimental condition were repeatedly instructed to make and act on quantitative comparisons between datasets, and between data and models, an approach that is common to all science disciplines. These instructions were slowly faded across the course. After the...

  17. An Analysis of a Large Scale Habitat Monitoring Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihada, Basem

    of the Atlantic University of California, Berkeley 2150 Shattuck Avenue 105 Eden St. Berkeley, California 94720 Berkeley, California 94704 Bar Harbor, ME 04609 ABSTRACT Habitat and environmental monitoring is a driving underestimated the impact of multi- hop traffic overhearing and the nuances of power source selection. While

  18. Improving Habitat Injured by Spill Response: Restoring the Night Sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on reverse side). The project involves multiple components: ·Foreachconservationsiteidentified,assessments Horizon oil spill, such as heavy equipment operation and lighting the beaches at night, caused significant is to restore beach nesting habitat for sea turtles by replacing harmful artificial lighting. Methods

  19. Wind, Klickitat, Hood and Fifteen Mile Habitat Site Visits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind, Klickitat, Hood and Fifteen Mile Habitat Site Visits April 17-19th, 2013 ISRP Review Team (4 at the Sheraton Airport at 7:15 a.m. Site Visits: Depart airport and head east: Wind, Klickitat, White Salmon in this review: 1998-019-00 Wind River Watershed Underwood Conservation District (UCD), US Forest Service (USFS

  20. Research Article Rio Grande Wild Turkey Habitat Selection in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Mark C.

    Research Article Rio Grande Wild Turkey Habitat Selection in the Southern Great Plains GALON I, USA ABSTRACT We recorded telemetry locations from 1,129 radiotagged turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo have the highest impact on nesting in riparian zones due to turkey use of grass as nesting cover

  1. Nordic Society Oikos Colonization and Saturation of Habitats by Lizards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nordic Society Oikos Colonization and Saturation of Habitats by Lizards Author(s): Robert T. M. 78, No. 2 (Mar., 1997), pp. 283-290 Published by: Blackwell Publishing on behalf of Nordic Society speciesin colonization,differencesamonghabitattypes in colonization,andthe timetrajectoryof colonization

  2. Leaf synchrony and insect herbivory among tropical tree habitat specialists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fine, Paul V.A.

    Growth defense tradeoff theory predicts that plants in low-resource habitats invest more energy exhibit more synchrony in leaf pro- duction due to the low cost and investment to replace leaf tissue. We within four of five lineages, the direction of the effect was variable. All species showed short time

  3. Annual Progress Report Fish Research Project Oregon : Project title, Evaluation of Habitat Improvements -- John Day River.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, Erik A.

    1984-01-01

    This report summarizes data collected in 1983 to evaluate habitat improvements in Deer, Camp, and Clear creeks, tributaries of the John Day River. The studies are designed to evaluate changes in abundance of spring chinook and summer steelhead due to habitat improvement projects and to contrast fishery benefits with costs of construction and maintenance of each project. Structure types being evaluated are: (1) log weirs, rock weirs, log deflectors, and in stream boulders in Deer Creek; (2) log weirs in Camp Creek; and (3) log weir-boulder combinations and introduced spawning gravel in Clear Creek. Abundance of juvenile steelhead ranged from 16% to 119% higher in the improved (treatment) area than in the unimproved (control) area of Deer Creek. However, abundance of steelhead in Camp Creek was not significantly different between treatment and control areas. Chinook and steelhead abundance in Clear Creek was 50% and 25% lower, respectively in 1983, than the mean abundance estimated in three previous years. The age structure of steelhead was similar between treatment and control areas in Deer and Clear creeks. The treatment area in Camp Creek, however, had a higher percentage of age 2 and older steelhead than the control. Steelhead redd counts in Camp Creek were 36% lower in 1983 than the previous five year average. Steelhead redd counts in Deer Creek were not made in 1983 because of high streamflows. Chinook redds counted in Clear Creek were 64% lower than the five year average. Surface area, volume, cover, and spawning gravel were the same or higher than the corresponding control in each stream except in Deer Creek where there was less available cover and spawning gravel in sections with rock weirs and in those with log deflectors, respectively. Pool:riffle ratios ranged from 57:43 in sections in upper Clear Creek with log weirs to 9:91 in sections in Deer Creek with rock weirs. Smolt production following habitat improvements is estimated for each stream. Preliminary cost estimates are summarized for each habitat project and economic benefits are calculated for Deer Creek.

  4. Distribution, habitat preference, competitive interactions and predation of French Polynesian Bryozoa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dibble, Connor D

    2009-01-01

    DISTRIBUTION, HABITAT PREFERENCE, COMPETITIVE INTERACTIONSfronds, I quantified the distribution of bryozoans in aorea, French Polynesia; distribution I NTRODUCTION Fouling

  5. Oceanographic Controls on Coral Reef Habitats in Present and Future Climates /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, Lauren Amelia

    2013-01-01

    endangered species (e.g. [Kumar & Stohlgren 2009]), to map potential habitats for cold water coral reefs (

  6. Power spectra and distribution of contrasts of natural images from different habitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grzywacz, Norberto

    Power spectra and distribution of contrasts of natural images from different habitats Rosario M, atmospheric and underwater habitats were compared. For these habitats, we looked at two measures of the power spectrum and one of the distributions of contrasts. From power spectra, we analyzed the log­log slope

  7. Enhanced Management of Avian Breeding Habitat Injured by Response in the Florida Panhandle, Alabama, and Mississippi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by response activities to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill negatively affected habitat necessary for beach known causes of disturbance to beach nesting habitat. Methods and Results of Offsets Estimation habitat. Photo: Chris Burney, Florida FWC Deepwater Horizon Natural Resource Damage Assessment Trustees

  8. NEW DATA ON THE POPULATION, DISTRIBUTION AND HABITAT PREFERENCES OF THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seoane, Javier

    NEW DATA ON THE POPULATION, DISTRIBUTION AND HABITAT PREFERENCES OF THE CANARY ISLANDS STONECHAT, distribution and habitat preferences of the Canary Islands stonechat Saxicola dacotiae. This paper updates estimates of population size, distribution and habitat preferences of the endemic Canary Islands stonechat

  9. Habitat Selection and Its Effect on Reproductive Output in the Herring Gull in Newfoundland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierotti, Raymond

    1982-06-01

    habitats. In both 1977 and 1978, chicks from rocky habitat grew at the fastest rate and were heavier than chicks in the other habitats. Finally, results of an experiment to test the egg-production capacity of females demonstrated that female gulls in rocky...

  10. Relating fish biomass to habitat and chemistry in headwater streams of the northeastern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Clifford E.

    Relating fish biomass to habitat and chemistry in headwater streams of the northeastern United influencing total fish biomass in streams, but few studies have evaluated the relative influence of habitat and pH together. We measured total fish biomass, stream habitat, and stream pH in sixteen sites from

  11. Critical Path Analysis for the Execution of Parallel and Distributed Programs Cui-Qing Yang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Barton P.

    Critical Path Analysis for the Execution of Parallel and Distributed Programs Cui-Qing Yang. One example of such techniques finds the critical path through a graph of a program's execution history. This paper presents the design, implementation and test- ing of the critical path analysis

  12. Design Editorial Design Intent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    Journal of Mechanical Design Editorial Design Intent Is this paper suitable for JMD of criteria to answer the question. As editor of JMD, apart from the obvious criteria of quality and research assumed my editorial duties is the paper's design intent. It was in that spirit that I wrote the Design

  13. Critical point analysis of phase envelope diagram

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soetikno, Darmadi; Siagian, Ucok W. R.; Kusdiantara, Rudy Puspita, Dila Sidarto, Kuntjoro A. Soewono, Edy; Gunawan, Agus Y.

    2014-03-24

    Phase diagram or phase envelope is a relation between temperature and pressure that shows the condition of equilibria between the different phases of chemical compounds, mixture of compounds, and solutions. Phase diagram is an important issue in chemical thermodynamics and hydrocarbon reservoir. It is very useful for process simulation, hydrocarbon reactor design, and petroleum engineering studies. It is constructed from the bubble line, dew line, and critical point. Bubble line and dew line are composed of bubble points and dew points, respectively. Bubble point is the first point at which the gas is formed when a liquid is heated. Meanwhile, dew point is the first point where the liquid is formed when the gas is cooled. Critical point is the point where all of the properties of gases and liquids are equal, such as temperature, pressure, amount of substance, and others. Critical point is very useful in fuel processing and dissolution of certain chemicals. Here in this paper, we will show the critical point analytically. Then, it will be compared with numerical calculations of Peng-Robinson equation by using Newton-Raphson method. As case studies, several hydrocarbon mixtures are simulated using by Matlab.

  14. Home Range and Habitat Selection of the Endangered Euphrates Softshell Turtle Rafetus euphraticus in a Fragmented Habitat in Southwestern Iran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plummer, Michael V.

    in a Fragmented Habitat in Southwestern Iran HANYEH GHAFFARI 1,4, *, FLORA IHLOW 2,4 , MICHAEL V. PLUMMER 3 University, Tehran, Iran [ghaffari.hanyeh@gmail.com; mkarami@ut.ac.ir; khorasan@ut.ac.ir; barbodsafaei Regulating Dam Lake in southwestern Iran. Twelve adult turtles were trapped, fitted with radio

  15. History of critical experiments at Pajarito Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paxton, H.C.

    1983-03-01

    This account describes critical and subcritical assemblies operated remotely at the Pajarito Canyon Site at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Earliest assemblies, directed exclusively toward the nuclear weapons program, were for safety tests. Other weapon-related assemblies provided neutronic information to check detailed weapon calculations. Topsy, the first of these critical assemblies, was followed by Lady Godiva, Jezebel, Flattop, and ultimately Big Ten. As reactor programs came to Los Alamos, design studies and mockups were tested at Pajarito Site. For example, nearly all 16 Rover reactors intended for Nevada tests were preceded by zero-power mockups and proof tests at Pajarito Site. Expanded interest and capability led to fast-pulse assemblies, culminating in Godiva IV and Skua, and to the Kinglet and Sheba solution assemblies.

  16. Analysis of SP-100 critical experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sapir, J.L.; Brandon, D.I.; Collins, P.J.; Cowan, C.L.; Porter, C.A.; Andre, S.V.

    1988-01-01

    In support of the SP-100 space nuclear power source program, preliminary critical benchmark experiments were performed at the ZPPR facility at ANL-W. These configurations are representative of small, fast-spectrum, BeO-reflected, liquid metal-cooled space reactor designs at a 300-kWe power level. Analyses were performed using MCNP (Monte Carlo) and TWODANT (discrete ordinates) transport codes to calculate system criticality, control worth, and power distribution. Both methods calculated eigenvalues within 0.5% of the experimental results. Internal-poison-rod worth was underpredicted and radial reflector worth was overpredicted by both codes by up to 20%. MCNP-calculated control drum worths were underestimated by approximately 8%. Good agreement with experimental values was observed for /sup 235/U fission and for /sup 238/U fission and capture rates with the best agreement occurring in the fuel region and slightly poorer predictions apparent near BeO moderator. 7 refs., 12 figs.

  17. Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartmentEnergyEvery Thanksgiving,is designed as a practicalAlex

  18. Critical Materials Strategy Summary

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartmentEnergyEvery Thanksgiving,is designed as a

  19. Resources | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultiday ProductionDesigning ResilientResources AvailableResources

  20. Development of a Habitat Suitability Index Model for the Sage Sparrow on the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duberstein, Corey A.; Simmons, Mary Ann; Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Becker, James M.

    2008-01-01

    Mitigation threshold guidelines for the Hanford Site are based on habitat requirements of the sage sparrow (Amphispiza belli) and only apply to areas with a mature sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) overstory and a native understory. The sage sparrow habitat requirements are based on literature values and are not specific to the Hanford Site. To refine these guidelines for the Site, a multi-year study was undertaken to quantify habitat characteristics of sage sparrow territories. These characteristics were then used to develop a habitat suitability index (HSI) model which can be used to estimate the habitat value of specific locations on the Site.

  1. Appears in the 2006 IEEE International Symposium on Performance Analysis of Systems and Software (ISPASS 2006) Critical Path Analysis of the TRIPS Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keckler, Stephen W.

    (ISPASS 2006) Critical Path Analysis of the TRIPS Architecture Ramadass Nagarajan Xia Chen Robert G. Mc on the graph, designers can gain insights into the bottlenecks of a design. This paper extends critical path expansion of the design space. Prior research has shown the utility of critical path anal- ysis in solving

  2. CriTi-CAL: A computer program for Critical Coiled Tubing Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, X.

    1995-12-31

    A computer software package for simulating coiled tubing operations has been developed at Rogaland Research. The software is named CriTiCAL, for Critical Coiled Tubing Calculations. It is a PC program running under Microsoft Windows. CriTi-CAL is designed for predicting force, stress, torque, lockup, circulation pressure losses and along-hole-depth corrections for coiled tubing workover and drilling operations. CriTi-CAL features an user-friendly interface, integrated work string and survey editors, flexible input units and output format, on-line documentation and extensive error trapping. CriTi-CAL was developed by using a combination of Visual Basic and C. Such an approach is an effective way to quickly develop high quality small to medium size software for the oil industry. The software is based on the results of intensive experimental and theoretical studies on buckling and post-buckling of coiled tubing at Rogaland Research. The software has been validated by full-scale test results and field data.

  3. Design for manufacturability Design verification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Chintan

    ITRS Design #12;Design · Design for manufacturability · Design verification #12;Design for Manufacturability · Architecture challenges · Logic and circuit challenges · Layout and physical design challenges · Expected to be the source of multiple DFM challenges · Invest in variability reduction or design

  4. Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project: 1990 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheeler, Carl A.

    1991-01-01

    The Umatilla habitat improvement program is funded under the Northwest Power Planning Council`s Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program measure 704 (d) (1) 34.02, and targets the improvement of water quality and the restoration of riparian areas, spawning and rearing habitat of steelhead, spring and fall chinook and coho salmon. The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation are responsible for enhancing stream reaches within the Reservation boundaries as guided by an implementation plan developed cooperatively with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and the USDA Forest Service, Umatilla National Forest. Treatment areas included the lower 4 miles of Meacham Creek, the lower {1/4} mile of Boston Canyon Creek, and the Umatilla River between RM 78.5 and 80. The upper {1/2} of the Meacham Creek project area including Boston Canyon Creek, which were initially enhanced during 1989, were reentered for maintenance and continued enhancements. Approximately 2400 cu. yds. of boulders and 1000 cu. yds. of riprap was used in the construction of in-stream, stream bank and flood plain structures and in the anchoring of large organic debris (LOD) placements. In-stream structures were designed to increase instream cover and channel stability and develop of a defined thalweg to focus low summer flows. Flood plain structures were designed to reduce sediment inputs and facilitate deposition on flood plains. Riparian recovery was enhanced through the planting of over 1000 willow cuttings and 400 lbs. of grass seed mix and through the exclusion of livestock from the riparian corridor with 4.5 miles of high tensile smooth wire fence. Photo documentation and elevational transects were used to monitor changes in channel morphology and riparian recovery at permanent standardized points throughout the projects. Water quality (temperature and turbidity) data was collected at locations within the project area and in tributaries programmed for future enhancements.

  5. Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement; 1995 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laws, Troy S.

    1996-06-01

    This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife`s Umatilla Basin Habitat Improvement Project. Major activities undertaken during this report period included: (1) Flood damage assessment of project leases after the May 1995 and November 1995 floods, (2) reconstruction of 0.75 miles of riparian fence, (3) inspection and routine maintenance of 14.8 miles of fence, (4) collection of approximately 55,000 native willow and cottonwood cuttings and installation of approximately 21,600 of these material, (5) implementation of two bioengineering projects and initiation of a third project, (6) installation of approximately 30 tree/rootwads for fish habitat enhancement, (7) removal of an abandoned flood irrigation dam/fish barrier, (8) collection and summarization of physical and biological monitoring data, and (9) extensive interagency coordination.

  6. Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement; 1994 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laws, Troy S.

    1995-06-01

    This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife`s Umatilla Basin Habitat Improvement Project. Major activities undertaken during this report period included: 1) Flood damage assessment of project leases after the May 1994 flood, 2) reconstruction of 1.25 miles of high tensile steel fence, 3) inspection and routine maintenance of 14.8 miles of fence, 4) collection of approximately 6,600 cottonwood and willow cuttings for transplanting in spring of 1995, 5) establishment of three bioengineered habitat restoration demonstration projects, 6) Implementation of a streambank stabilization workshop (bioengineering techniques) for Umatilla Basin residents and resource agency personnel, 7) collection and summarization of physical and biological monitoring data, and 8) extensive interagency coordination.

  7. Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats of the Lower Columbia River, 2007–2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Storch, Adam; Skalski, J. R.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Mallette, Christine; Borde, Amy B.; Van Dyke, E.; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Sather, Nichole K.; Teel, David; Dawley, Earl M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Jones, Tucker A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Kuligowski, D. R.

    2011-03-01

    The TFM study was designed to investigate the ecology and early life history of juvenile salmonids within shallow (<5 m) tidal freshwater habitats of the LCRE. We started collecting field data in June 2007. Since then, monthly sampling has occurred in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta (rkm 192–208) and at other sites and times in lower river reaches of tidal freshwater (rkm 110 to 141). This report provides a comprehensive synthesis of data covering the field period from June 2007 through April 2010.

  8. Hanford Waste Treatment Plant completes critical system design...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    trips. They are scheduled to arrive later this fall. "The LAW melters are the largest waste-processing melters ever built, and there's been considerable work dedicated to...

  9. Critical review of water based radiant cooling system design methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jingjuan Dove; Bauman, Fred; Schiavon, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    shown that radiant system cooling capacity could be enhancedof trends regarding radiant system cooling load analysis andEmbedded Radiant Heating and Cooling Systems, International

  10. Supply Chain Network Design for Critical Needs with Outsourcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    1Isenberg School of Management University of Massachusetts Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 2Management, Pennsylvania 19355 NetSci 2010 Conference Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA May 12 - 14, 2010 with Outsourcing Applications to Vaccine Production and Emergency Preparedness and Humanitarian Logistics Numerical

  11. Effects of habitat destruction and resource supplementation in a ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-03-31

    the predator as a function of its colonization rate, for the ignorant-predator ..... On critical thre- sholds in landscape connectivity: a management perspect- ive.

  12. Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, Annual Report 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Skalski, J. R.; Dawley, Earl M.; Coleman, Andre M.; Ostrand, Kenneth G.; Hanson, Kyle C.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Donley, Erin E.; Ke, Yinghai; Buenau, Kate E.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Townsend, Richard L.

    2011-10-01

    This report describes the 2010 research conducted under the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) project EST-P-09-1, titled Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, and known as the 'Salmon Benefits' study. The primary goal of the study is to establish scientific methods to quantify habitat restoration benefits to listed salmon and trout in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) in three required areas: habitat connectivity, early life history diversity, and survival (Figure ES.1). The general study approach was to first evaluate the state of the science regarding the ability to quantify benefits to listed salmon and trout from habitat restoration actions in the LCRE in the 2009 project year, and then, if feasible, in subsequent project years to develop quantitative indices of habitat connectivity, early life history diversity, and survival. Based on the 2009 literature review, the following definitions are used in this study. Habitat connectivity is defined as a landscape descriptor concerning the ability of organisms to move among habitat patches, including the spatial arrangement of habitats (structural connectivity) and how the perception and behavior of salmon affect the potential for movement among habitats (functional connectivity). Life history is defined as the combination of traits exhibited by an organism throughout its life cycle, and for the purposes of this investigation, a life history strategy refers to the body size and temporal patterns of estuarine usage exhibited by migrating juvenile salmon. Survival is defined as the probability of fish remaining alive over a defined amount of space and/or time. The objectives of the 4-year study are as follows: (1) develop and test a quantitative index of juvenile salmon habitat connectivity in the LCRE incorporating structural, functional, and hydrologic components; (2) develop and test a quantitative index of the early life history diversity of juvenile salmon in the LCRE; (3) assess and, if feasible, develop and test a quantitative index of the survival benefits of tidal wetland habitat restoration (hydrologic reconnection) in the LCRE; and (4) synthesize the results of investigations into the indices for habitat connectivity, early life history diversity, and survival benefits.

  13. Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, Part 1 of 2, 1986 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richards, Carl

    1987-03-01

    The tribal project annual report contains reports for four subprojects within Project 83-359. Subproject I involved fish inventories in Bear Valley Creek, Idaho, that will be used in conjunction with 1984 and 1985 fish and habitat pre-treatment (baseline) data to evaluate effects of habitat enhancement on the habitat and fish community in Bear Valley Creek overtime. Subproject II is the coordination/planning activities of the Project Leader in relation to other BPA-funded habitat enhancement projects that have or will occur in the upper-Salmon River basin. Subproject III involved fish inventories (pre-treatment) in the Yankee Fork drainage of the Salmon River, and habitat problem identification on Fivemile and Ramey Creek. Subproject IV involved baseline habitat and fish inventories on the East Fork of the Salmon River, Herd Creek and Big-Boulder Creek. Individual abstracts have been prepared for the four subproject reports. 20 refs., 37 figs., 22 tabs.

  14. Criticality Safety Basics for INL FMHs and CSOs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V. L. Putman

    2012-04-01

    Nuclear power is a valuable and efficient energy alternative in our energy-intensive society. However, material that can generate nuclear power has properties that require this material be handled with caution. If improperly handled, a criticality accident could result, which could severely harm workers. This document is a modular self-study guide about Criticality Safety Principles. This guide's purpose it to help you work safely in areas where fissionable nuclear materials may be present, avoiding the severe radiological and programmatic impacts of a criticality accident. It is designed to stress the fundamental physical concepts behind criticality controls and the importance of criticality safety when handling fissionable materials outside nuclear reactors. This study guide was developed for fissionable-material-handler and criticality-safety-officer candidates to use with related web-based course 00INL189, BEA Criticality Safety Principles, and to help prepare for the course exams. These individuals must understand basic information presented here. This guide may also be useful to other Idaho National Laboratory personnel who must know criticality safety basics to perform their assignments safely or to design critically safe equipment or operations. This guide also includes additional information that will not be included in 00INL189 tests. The additional information is in appendices and paragraphs with headings that begin with 'Did you know,' or with, 'Been there Done that'. Fissionable-material-handler and criticality-safety-officer candidates may review additional information at their own discretion. This guide is revised as needed to reflect program changes, user requests, and better information. Issued in 2006, Revision 0 established the basic text and integrated various programs from former contractors. Revision 1 incorporates operation and program changes implemented since 2006. It also incorporates suggestions, clarifications, and additional information from readers and from personnel who took course 00INL189. Revision 1 also completely reorganized the training to better emphasize physical concepts behind the criticality controls that fissionable material handlers and criticality safety officers must understand. The reorganization is based on and consistent with changes made to course 00INL189 due to a review of course exam results and to discussions with personnel who conduct area-specific training.

  15. I. INTRODUCTION Civil and critical infrastructure systems such as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Shmuel S.

    of scientific principles to the design, maintenance and improvement of the critical infrastructures in our of any one element (e.g. generator, transmission line, transformer etc.). The last two decades brought System Engineering Research Center (PSERC) and by the Center for Electric Reliability Technology

  16. Critical Review Microbial Electrolysis Cells for High Yield Hydrogen Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Critical Review Microbial Electrolysis Cells for High Yield Hydrogen Gas Production from Organic A S S E , , § A N D R E N ´E A . R O Z E N D A L | Hydrogen Energy Center, and Department of Civil.2 V in practice) in specially designed microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), can result in a high yield

  17. Mitigation measures for impacts to fish habitat: Maine turnpike modernization and widening — a case study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Scott; Simmons, Richard

    2001-01-01

    IMPACTS TO FISH HABITAT: MAINE TURNPIKE MODERNIZATION ANDAbstract Funding Source: Maine Turnpike Authority TotalStatement A 30-mile segment of Maine Turnpike from mile 12

  18. Habitat Use and Energetic Carrying Capacity of American Black Ducks Wintering in Western Tennessee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    ) More info on Habitat Use Manage for more energe)cally important foods, and other waterfowl, and es)mate energe)c carrying capacity, in treated

  19. Gastropods and their habitats from the northern Red Sea (Egypt: Safaga)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuschin, Martin

    Gastropods and their habitats from the northern Red Sea (Egypt: Safaga) Part 1: Patellogastropoda. Keywords: Mollusca, biodiversity, Red Sea, Indian Ocean, Egypt, assemblages Zusammenfassung Mehr als 2100

  20. Hydrological Regimes, Pond Morphology, and Habitat Use: Predicting the Impact of an Emerging Aquatic Pathogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briggs, Cheryl J.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrological Regimes, Pond Morphology, and Habitat Use:with infection, are the pond morphology and the topographyis that differences in the pond morphology and topography of

  1. Availability, usage and expected contribution of potential nursery habitats for the California halibut

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fodrie, Fredrick Joel; Mendoza, Guillermo F.

    2006-01-01

    of a damsel?sh re?ect availability of suitable habitat.locate/ecss Availability, usage and expected contribution ofthe spatial coverage (availability) of all potential nursery

  2. The effects of background adaptation and food availability on habitat preference of Corythoichthys flavofasciatus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iyer, Neetha

    2012-01-01

    ADAPTATION AND FOOD AVAILABILITY ON HABITAT PREFERENCE OFchoice is related to the availability of food, presence ofbackground adaptation, food availability, or a combination

  3. Critical behavior in topological ensembles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Bulycheva; A. Gorsky; S. Nechaev

    2015-02-11

    We consider the relation between three physical problems: 2D directed lattice random walks, ensembles of $T_{n,n+1}$ torus knots, and instanton ensembles in 5D SQED with one compact dimension in $\\Omega$ background and with 5D Chern-Simons term at the level one. All these ensembles exhibit the critical behavior typical for the "area+length+corners" statistics of grand ensembles of 2D directed paths. Using the combinatorial description, we obtain an explicit expression of the generating function for $q$-Narayana numbers which amounts to the new critical behavior in the ensemble of $T_{n,n+1}$ torus knots and in the ensemble of instantons in 5D SQED. Depending on the number of the nontrivial fugacities, we get either the critical point, or cascade of critical lines and critical surfaces. In the 5D gauge theory the phase transition is of the 3rd order, while in the ensemble of paths and ensemble of knots it is typically of the 1st order. We also discuss the relation with the integrable models.

  4. Habitat restoration on naval petroleum reserves in Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, D.C. [EG& G Energy Measurements, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)

    1990-12-31

    One of several task performed under contract to the Department of Energy (DOE) by EG & G Energy Measurements as part of the endangered species program is the restoration of abandoned well pads, roads, pipelines and soil borrow sites resulting from oil and gas production activities on Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC). Naval Petroleum Reserves in California is located in the Elk Hills approximately 30 miles southwest of Bakersfield in the rain shadow of the coastal range. Annual precipitation is approximately five inches. Reclamation of disturbed habitat on NPRC began with research plots and test trials in the early 1980s. Full scale reclamation began in 1985 and has continued through the 1989 planting season. Almost 700 acres have been revegetated, which represents over 1,200 sites distributed over the 47,250 acres of NPRC and averaging less than .75 acre in size. Monitoring of the sites began in 1987 to establish reclamation success and evaluate reclamation techniques. Reclamation objectives include the improvement of wildlife habitat for four endangered species living on NPRC, and the protection of the soils from wind and water erosion on the disturbed sites.

  5. Microsoft Word - Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    White House Office of the Press Secretary For Immediate Release October 31, 2013 Presidential Proclamation -- Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience Month, 2013 CRITICAL...

  6. DOE and Critical Materials Video (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a text version of the "DOE and Critical Materials" video presented at the Critical Materials Workshop, held on April 3, 2012 in Arlington, Virginia.

  7. Nuclear criticality safety: 2-day training course

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlesser, J.A.

    1997-02-01

    This compilation of notes is presented as a source reference for the criticality safety course. At the completion of this training course, the attendee will: be able to define terms commonly used in nuclear criticality safety; be able to appreciate the fundamentals of nuclear criticality safety; be able to identify factors which affect nuclear criticality safety; be able to identify examples of criticality controls as used as Los Alamos; be able to identify examples of circumstances present during criticality accidents; have participated in conducting two critical experiments; be asked to complete a critique of the nuclear criticality safety training course.

  8. CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION Multiple Efforts to Secure...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION Multiple Efforts to Secure Control Systems Are Under Way, but Challenges Remain CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION Multiple Efforts to Secure...

  9. Marine reserve design: optimal size, habitats, species affinities, diversity, and ocean microclimate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parnell, P Ed; Dayton, P K; Lennert-Cody, C E; Rasmussen, L L; Leichter, J J

    2006-01-01

    arti?cial reef. Bulletin of Marine Science 55(2–3):709–723.bimaculoides. Bulletin of Marine Science 49(1–2): Largier,2001. California’s living marine resources: a status report.

  10. Golden-cheeked Warbler (Dendroica chrysoparia) habitat fragmentation in Travis County, Texas: a remote sensing and geographical information system analysis of habitat extent, pattern and condition 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moses, Michael Edwin

    1996-01-01

    Wild species in human populated areas face continuous habitat loss and fragmentation. This study focused on past and present declines of the Goldencheeked Warbler (GCW), a neotropical migrant dependent on a highly specialized ...

  11. The Effect of Shoreline Recreational Angling Activities on Aquatic and Riparian Habitat Within an Urban Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooke, Steven J.

    The Effect of Shoreline Recreational Angling Activities on Aquatic and Riparian Habitat Within activity may negatively impact littoral and riparian habitats independent of any direct or indirect influences of fish harvest or fishing mortality through mechanisms such as disturbance (e.g., trampling

  12. HOME RANGE AND HABITAT USE OF FERAL HOGS (SUS SCROFA) IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jodice, Patrick

    i i HOME RANGE AND HABITAT USE OF FERAL HOGS (SUS SCROFA) IN CONGAREE NATIONAL PARK A Thesis of the most destructive exotic wildlife species in the southeastern U.S. is the feral hog (Sus scrofa). To learn more about feral hog movement patterns and habitat use, hogs were radio-collared and tracked from

  13. SHORT COMMUNICATION Habitat patch size and isolation as predictors of occupancy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agnarsson, Ingi

    of argyrodine spider kleptoparasites in Nephila webs Ingi Agnarsson Received: 13 October 2010 /Revised: 22. Spider webs as habitat patches for obligate web kleptoparasites are free from these problems. Each individ- ual web is a highly discrete and readily measured habitat patch, and the detection probability

  14. SAN JOAQUIN RIVER RIPARIAN HABITAT BELOW FRIANT DAM: PRESERVATION AND RESTORATION1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SAN JOAQUIN RIVER RIPARIAN HABITAT BELOW FRIANT DAM: PRESERVATION AND RESTORATION1 2 Donn Furman 1 Executive Director, San Joaquin River Committee, Fresno, California. Abstract: Riparian habitat along California's San Joa- quin River in the 25 miles between Friant Darn and Free- way 99 occurs on approximately

  15. SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION AND GEOMORPHIC CONDITION OF FISH HABITAT IN STREAMS: AN ANALYSIS USING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    , and altering habitat quantity and quality (National Research Council, 1992, 1999). As stream and river managers for ecosystem integrity (Lammert and Allan, 1999; Roy et al., 2003a,b; Sullivan et al., 2004, 2006a,b; Chessman), and the assumption that good geomorphic conditions translate directly into better aquatic habitat and biodiversity

  16. Does thermal quality of the environment affect habitat selection by musk turtles (Sternotherus odoratus)?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    Does thermal quality of the environment affect habitat selection by musk turtles (Sternotherus by the musk turtle in a thermally challenging region where the link should be particularly strong. I expected be accomplished by selecting thermally superior habitats. From early May to late August 2007, I located 22 musk

  17. Habitat-Lite: A GSC case study based on free text terms for environmental metadata

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyrpides, Nikos; Hirschman, Lynette; Clark, Cheryl; Cohen, K. Bretonnel; Mardis, Scott; Luciano, Joanne; Kottmann, Renzo; Cole, James; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos; Field, Dawn

    2008-04-01

    There is an urgent need to capture metadata on the rapidly growing number of genomic, metagenomic and related sequences, such as 16S ribosomal genes. This need is a major focus within the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC), and Habitat is a key metadata descriptor in the proposed 'Minimum Information about a Genome Sequence' (MIGS) specification. The goal of the work described here is to provide a light-weight, easy-to-use (small) set of terms ('Habitat-Lite') that captures high-level information about habitat while preserving a mapping to the recently launched Environment Ontology (EnvO). Our motivation for building Habitat-Lite is to meet the needs of multiple users, such as annotators curating these data, database providers hosting the data, and biologists and bioinformaticians alike who need to search and employ such data in comparative analyses. Here, we report a case study based on semi-automated identification of terms from GenBank and GOLD. We estimate that the terms in the initial version of Habitat-Lite would provide useful labels for over 60% of the kinds of information found in the GenBank isolation-source field, and around 85% of the terms in the GOLD habitat field. We present a revised version of Habitat-Lite and invite the community's feedback on its further development in order to provide a minimum list of terms to capture high-level habitat information and to provide classification bins needed for future studies.

  18. Ideal Free Distribution Theory Bioscene 27 Habitat Quality and the Distribution of Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonovics, Janis

    Ideal Free Distribution Theory Bioscene 27 Habitat Quality and the Distribution of Fish: Are Fish of the ideal free distribution theory. In this laboratory exercise, students will expose a group of fish to two: fish foraging, ideal free distribution theory, patchy resources, habitat quality Introduction The ideal

  19. Relative Habitat Value Of Alternative Substrates Used In Oyster Reef Restoration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Lindsey Marie

    2013-08-08

    Oyster reef habitats have declined from historic levels due to a variety of reasons, including overharvest, disease, and degraded water quality. The harvesting of oysters has led to a loss of reef habitat for both oysters and reef-associated fauna...

  20. AN ASSESSMENT OF WOOD DUCK DISTRIBUTION, ABUNDANCE AND RIPARIAN BREEDING PAIR HABITATS IN SOUTH DAKOTA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AN ASSESSMENT OF WOOD DUCK DISTRIBUTION, ABUNDANCE AND RIPARIAN BREEDING PAIR HABITATS IN SOUTH #12;AN ASSESSMENT OF WOOD DUCK DISTRIBUTION, ABUNDANCE AND RIPARIAN BREEDING PAIR HABITATS IN SOUTH Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences #12;AN ASSESSMENT OF WOOD DUCK DISTRIBUTION, ABUNDANCE AND RIPARIAN

  1. HABITAT SELECTION AND USE BY BREEDING HEN PHEASANTS IN EASTERN SOUTH DAKOTA, 1999-2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HABITAT SELECTION AND USE BY BREEDING HEN PHEASANTS IN EASTERN SOUTH DAKOTA, 1999-2001 BY Rebecca D BY BREEDING HEN PHEASANTS IN EASTERN SOUTH DAKOTA, 1999-2001 This thesis is approved as a creditable HABITAT SELECTION AND USE BY BREEDING HEN PHESANTS IN EASTERN SOUTH DAKOTA, 1999-2001 Rebecca D

  2. VECTOR CONTROL, PEST MANAGEMENT, RESISTANCE, REPELLENTS Effects of Larval Habitat Substrate on Pyriproxyfen Efficacy Against

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VECTOR CONTROL, PEST MANAGEMENT, RESISTANCE, REPELLENTS Effects of Larval Habitat SubstrateÞcial containers. Tires, battery boxes, waste containers, earthenware, paper cups, discarded metaldrums,coconutshells,leafaxils,andglassbottles were key larval habitats of dengue vectors Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus in industrial, urban

  3. Criteria for Suitable Spawning Habitat for the Robust Redhorse Moxostoma robustum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radcliffe, David

    populations persist in rivers with flows influenced by hydropower dams. The robust redhorse is uncommon. Potential loss of suitable habitat as a result of hydrologic alteration, especially for life history stages considered having the narrowest habitat requirements, is a primary management concern. Evaluating potential

  4. BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY -ORIGINAL PAPER Lemming winter habitat choice: a snow-fencing experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krebs, Charles J.

    to enhance winter reproduction and sur- vival by arctic lemmings (Lemmus and Dicrostonyx spp). This leads a component of this hypothesis, that snow depth influences habitat choice, at three Canadian Arctic sites is a primary determinant of winter habitat choice by tundra lemmings and voles. Keywords Arctic ecology Á

  5. Habitat suitability modeling for the eastern hog-nosed snake, Heterodon platirhinos, in Ontario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    Habitat suitability modeling for the eastern hog-nosed snake, Heterodon platirhinos, in Ontario, the eastern hog- nosed snake, Heterodon platirhinos, is found in a limited portion of southern Ontario Ontario, it is crucial to document what limits the snake's habitat to direct conservation efforts better

  6. DIETARY OVERLAP IN FRUGIVOROUSAND INSECTIVOROUS BATS FROM EDAPHIC CERRADO HABITATS OF BRAZIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willig, Michael

    DIETARY OVERLAP IN FRUGIVOROUSAND INSECTIVOROUS BATS FROM EDAPHIC CERRADO HABITATS OF BRAZIL north- eastern Brazil suggest significant ecologicalseparation of species. Nonetheless, recent sim edaphic Cerrado habitats on the Chapada do Araripe in northeastern Brazil. For each of the 11 most common

  7. Hydraulic Habitat Model Comparison_12_03_09 Desiree Tullos and Beth Copeland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Hydraulic Habitat Model Comparison_12_03_09 Desiree Tullos and Beth Copeland Review of Hydraulic;Hydraulic Habitat Model Comparison_12_03_09 Desiree Tullos and Beth Copeland Name PHABSIM Spatial scale and Observations on Flow Determination in New Zealand Regulated Streams: Advances in Ecology. Plenum Press, New

  8. Mitigation measures for fish habitat improvement in Alpine rivers affected by hydropower operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitigation measures for fish habitat improvement in Alpine rivers affected by hydropower operations In mountainous areas, high-head-storage hydropower plants produce peak load energy. The resulting unsteady water habitat improvement. This method was applied to an Alpine river downstream of a complex storage hydropower

  9. From Forest to Solar Farm: An Evaluation of Habitat Availability on a Solar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    : Crystalline solar photovoltaic modules Land use: ~200 acres Over 164,000 Panels #12;Sustainability Forest wildlife friendly solar habitats Show wildlife use will not impact solar efficiency Recommend bestFrom Forest to Solar Farm: An Evaluation of Habitat Availability on a Solar Farm

  10. Prioritizing winter habitat quality for greater sage-grouse in a landscape influenced by energy development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beck, Jeffrey L.

    Prioritizing winter habitat quality for greater sage-grouse in a landscape influenced by energy, and F. C. Blomquist. 2014. Prioritizing winter habitat quality for Greater Sage-Grouse in a landscape influenced by energy development. Ecosphere 5(2):15. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/ES13-00238. 1 Abstract

  11. Journal of Biogeography (1992)I9,383-390 Habitat distribution of canary chaffinchesamong islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrascal, Luis M.

    1992-01-01

    Journal of Biogeography (1992)I9,383-390 Habitat distribution of canary chaffinchesamong islands studied for the Canary Islands (Tenerife and El Hierro). The Common Chaffinch was significantly denser time. Key words. Canary Islands, Chaffinches (Fringilla spp.), habitat preferences, competitive

  12. The Effects of Habitat Complexity on the Cognitive Performance of Two Fish Species and Their Hybrids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chance, Heather

    2008-08-19

    The complexity of an animal’s habitat plays a significant role in behavior, morphology as well as other life history traits. Habitat complexity may also play a significant role in an animal’s cognitive capabilities such as learning and memory...

  13. Hurricane, Habitat Degradation, and Land Loss Effects on Brown Pelican Nesting Colonies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karubian, Jordan

    Hurricane, Habitat Degradation, and Land Loss Effects on Brown Pelican Nesting Colonies Scott T.J., and Leberg, P.L., 2013. Hurricane, habitat degradation, and land loss effects on Brown Pelican nesting colonies of coastal avifauna are perennially threatened by hurricanes, land loss, and environmental

  14. ELLIS, TIMOTHY ALAN. Assessing Nursery Quality for Southern Flounder, Paralichthys lethostigma, through Fish Energy Content and Habitat Abiotic Conditions. (Under the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckel, Jeffrey A.

    habitat quality were compared: fish energy content and habitat abiotic conditions. The hypothesis habitat quality. When measured on appropriate temporal and spatial scales, total fish energy contentABSTRACT ELLIS, TIMOTHY ALAN. Assessing Nursery Quality for Southern Flounder, Paralichthys

  15. Critical length limiting super-low friction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ming Ma; Andrea Benassi; Andrea Vanossi; Michael Urbakh

    2015-01-02

    Since the demonstration of super-low friction (superlubricity) in graphite at nanoscale, one of the main challenges in the field of nano- and micro-mechanics was to scale this phenomenon up. A key question to be addressed is to what extent superlubricity could persist, and what mechanisms could lead to its failure. Here, using an edge-driven Frenkel-Kontorova model, we establish a connection between the critical length above which superlubricity disappears and both intrinsic material properties and experimental parameters. A striking boost in dissipated energy with chain length emerges abruptly due to a high-friction stick-slip mechanism caused by deformation of the slider leading to a local commensuration with the substrate lattice. We derived a parameter-free analytical model for the critical length that is in excellent agreement with our numerical simulations. Our results provide a new perspective on friction and nano-manipulation and can serve as a theoretical basis for designing nano-devices with super-low friction, such as carbon nanotubes.

  16. Liouville Brownian motion at criticality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rémi Rhodes; Vincent Vargas

    2015-02-15

    In this paper, we construct the Brownian motion of Liouville Quantum Gravity with central charge $c=1$ (more precisely we restrict to the corresponding free field theory). Liouville quantum gravity with $c=1$ corresponds to two-dimensional string theory and is the conjectural scaling limit of large planar maps weighted with a $O(n=2)$ loop model or a $Q=4$-state Potts model embedded in a two dimensional surface in a conformal manner. Following \\cite{GRV1}, we start by constructing the critical LBM from one fixed point $x\\in\\mathbb{R}^2$ (or $x\\in\\S^2$), which amounts to changing the speed of a standard planar Brownian motion depending on the local behaviour of the critical Liouville measure $M'(dx)=-X(x)e^{2X(x)}\\,dx$ (where $X$ is a Gaussian Free Field, say on $\\mathbb{S}^2$). Extending this construction simultaneously to all points in $\\mathbb{R}^2$ requires a fine analysis of the potential properties of the measure $M'$. This allows us to construct a strong Markov process with continuous sample paths living on the support of $M'$, namely a dense set of Hausdorff dimension $0$. We finally construct the associated Liouville semigroup, resolvent, Green function, heat kernel and Dirichlet form. In passing, we extend to quite a general setting the construction of the critical Gaussian multiplicative chaos that was initiated in \\cite{Rnew7,Rnew12} and also establish new capacity estimates for the critical Gaussian multiplicative chaos.

  17. Managing Critical Management Improvement Initiatives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-10-01

    Provides requirements and responsibilities for planning, executing and assessing critical management improvement initiatives within DOE. DOE N 251.59, dated 9/27/2004, extends this Notice until 10/01/2005. Archived 11-8-10. Does not cancel other directives.

  18. High critical current superconducting tapes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holesinger, Terry G. (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-09-23

    Improvements in critical current capacity for superconducting film structures are disclosed and include the use of a superconducting RE-BCO layer including a mixture of rare earth metals, e.g., yttrium and europium, where the ratio of yttrium to europium in the RE-BCO layer ranges from about 3 to 1 to from about 1.5 to 1.

  19. First Responders and Criticality Accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valerie L. Putman; Douglas M. Minnema

    2005-11-01

    Nuclear criticality accident descriptions typically include, but do not focus on, information useful to first responders. We studied these accidents, noting characteristics to help (1) first responders prepare for such an event and (2) emergency drill planners develop appropriate simulations for training. We also provide recommendations to help people prepare for such events in the future.

  20. Criticality assessment of LLRWDF closure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarrack, A.G.; Weber, J.H.; Woody, N.D.

    1992-10-06

    During the operation of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility (LLRWDF), large amounts (greater than 100 kg) of enriched uranium (EU) were buried. This EU came primarily from the closing and decontamination of the Naval Fuels Facility in the time period from 1987--1989. Waste Management Operations (WMO) procedures were used to keep the EU boxes separated to prevent possible criticality during normal operation. Closure of the LLRWDF is currently being planned, and waste stabilization by Dynamic Compaction (DC) is proposed. Dynamic compaction will crush the containers in the LLRWDF and result in changes in their geometry. Research of the LLRWDF operations and record keeping practices have shown that the EU contents of trenches are known, but details of the arrangement of the contents cannot be proven. Reviews of the trench contents, combined with analysis of potential critical configurations, revealed that some portions of the LLRWDF can be expected to be free of criticality concerns while other sections have credible probabilities for the assembly of a critical mass, even in the uncompacted configuration. This will have an impact on the closure options and which trenches can be compacted.

  1. Critical phenomena in atmospheric precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    LETTERS Critical phenomena in atmospheric precipitation OLE PETERS1,2,3 * AND J. DAVID NEELIN3 1 convection and precipitation (the order parameter)--with correlated regions on scales of tens to hundreds the climatological mean by an order of magnitude or more. Moist convection and the accompanying precipitation have

  2. Critical experiments at Sandia National Laboratories : technical meeting on low-power critical facilities and small reactors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harms, Gary A.; Ford, John T.; Barber, Allison Delo

    2010-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has conducted radiation effects testing for the Department of Energy (DOE) and other contractors supporting the DOE since the 1960's. Over this period, the research reactor facilities at Sandia have had a primary mission to provide appropriate nuclear radiation environments for radiation testing and qualification of electronic components and other devices. The current generation of reactors includes the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR), a water-moderated pool-type reactor, fueled by elements constructed from UO2-BeO ceramic fuel pellets, and the Sandia Pulse Reactor III (SPR-III), a bare metal fast burst reactor utilizing a uranium-molybdenum alloy fuel. The SPR-III is currently defueled. The SPR Facility (SPRF) has hosted a series of critical experiments. A purpose-built critical experiment was first operated at the SPRF in the late 1980's. This experiment, called the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Critical Experiment (CX), was designed to explore the reactor physics of a nuclear thermal rocket motor. This experiment was fueled with highly-enriched uranium carbide fuel in annular water-moderated fuel elements. The experiment program was completed and the fuel for the experiment was moved off-site. A second critical experiment, the Burnup Credit Critical Experiment (BUCCX) was operated at Sandia in 2002. The critical assembly for this experiment was based on the assembly used in the CX modified to accommodate low-enriched pin-type fuel in water moderator. This experiment was designed as a platform in which the reactivity effects of specific fission product poisons could be measured. Experiments were carried out on rhodium, an important fission product poison. The fuel and assembly hardware for the BUCCX remains at Sandia and is available for future experimentation. The critical experiment currently in operation at the SPRF is the Seven Percent Critical Experiment (7uPCX). This experiment is designed to provide benchmark reactor physics data to support validation of the reactor physics codes used to design commercial reactor fuel elements in an enrichment range above the current 5% enrichment cap. A first set of critical experiments in the 7uPCX has been completed. More experiments are planned in the 7uPCX series. The critical experiments at Sandia National Laboratories are currently funded by the US Department of Energy Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP). The NCSP has committed to maintain the critical experiment capability at Sandia and to support the development of a critical experiments training course at the facility. The training course is intended to provide hands-on experiment experience for the training of new and re-training of practicing Nuclear Criticality Safety Engineers. The current plans are for the development of the course to continue through the first part of fiscal year 2011 with the development culminating is the delivery of a prototype of the course in the latter part of the fiscal year. The course will be available in fiscal year 2012.

  3. Rainwater Wildlife Area Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen B.

    2004-01-01

    The 8,768 acre Rainwater Wildlife Area was acquired in September 1998 by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) through an agreement with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to partially offset habitat losses associated with construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the mainstem Columbia River. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to BPA for acquired lands. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grassland cover types are evaluated in this study. Targeted wildlife species include downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), black-capped chickadee (Parus atricopillus), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 65,300, 594m{sup 2}2 plots, and 112 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 153.3 and 7,187.46 acres were evaluated for each target wildlife mitigation species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total baseline habitat units credited to BPA for the Rainwater Wildlife Area and its seven target species is 5,185.3 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing, road de-commissioning/obliteration, reforestation and thinning, control of competing and unwanted vegetation (including noxious weeds), reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence, and facilitating development of natural stable stream channels and associated floodplains. Implementation of habitat enhancement and restoration activities could generate an additional 1,850 habitat units in 10 years. Baseline and estimated future habitat units total 7,035.3 for the Rainwater Wildlife Area. Habitat protection, enhancement and restoration will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

  4. Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs among land-use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rissman, Adena

    Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs and services, including timber production, carbon sequestration and storage, scenic amenities, and wildlife habitat. International efforts to mitigate climate change through forest carbon sequestration

  5. Systematic review of the influence of foraging habitat on red-cockaded woodpecker reproductive success.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garabedian, James E.

    2014-04-01

    Relationships between foraging habitat and reproductive success provide compelling evidence of the contribution of specific vegetative features to foraging habitat quality, a potentially limiting factor for many animal populations. For example, foraging habitat quality likely will gain importance in the recovery of the threatened red-cockaded woodpecker Picoides borealis (RCW) in the USA as immediate nesting constraints are mitigated. Several researchers have characterized resource selection by foraging RCWs, but emerging research linking reproductive success (e.g. clutch size, nestling and fledgling production, and group size) and foraging habitat features has yet to be synthesized. Therefore, we reviewed peer-refereed scientific literature and technical resources (e.g. books, symposia proceedings, and technical reports) that examined RCW foraging ecology, foraging habitat, or demography to evaluate evidence for effects of the key foraging habitat features described in the species’ recovery plan on group reproductive success. Fitness-based habitat models suggest foraging habitat with low to intermediate pine Pinus spp. densities, presence of large and old pines, minimal midstory development, and herbaceous groundcover support more productive RCW groups. However, the relationships between some foraging habitat features and RCW reproductive success are not well supported by empirical data. In addition, few regression models account for > 30% of variation in reproductive success, and unstandardized multiple and simple linear regression coefficient estimates typically range from -0.100 to 0.100, suggesting ancillary variables and perhaps indirect mechanisms influence reproductive success. These findings suggest additional research is needed to address uncertainty in relationships between foraging habitat features and RCW reproductive success and in the mechanisms underlying those relationships.

  6. An Integrated Formal Approach for Developing High Quality Software for Safety-Critical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ouyang, Meng

    This report presents the results of a study which devises an Integrated Formal Approach (IFA) for improving specifications of the designs of computer programs used in safety-critical systems. In this IFA, the formal ...

  7. NAME: Restoring Coastal Estuarine Habitat in Three North Carolina Estuaries LOCATION: Brunswick, Carteret, Onslow and New Hanover Counties, North Carolina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    NAME: Restoring Coastal Estuarine Habitat in Three North Carolina Estuaries LOCATION: Brunswick, Carteret, Onslow and New Hanover Counties, North Carolina ACRES: 9.3 acres of oyster habitat and 1.24 acres of saltmarsh habitat NON-FEDERAL SPONSOR: North Carolina Coastal Federation PROJECT DESCRIPTION: The proposed

  8. A Comparison of Total Phosphorus, Chlorophyll a, and Zooplankton in Embayment, Nearshore, and Offshore Habitats of Lake Ontario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Spencer

    , and Offshore Habitats of Lake Ontario Spencer R. Hall1,4, Nijole K. Pauliukonis1,5, Edward L. Mills1,*, Lars G were compared in embayment, nearshore, and offshore habitats of Lake Ontario, 1995 to 1997 temperatures than both nearshore and offshore habitats, while overall areal zooplankton biomass was highest

  9. Critical mass: Women in science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-03-01

    This report describes a video presentation designed to introduce science to middle and high school science classes as a field which is attractive to women. It is designed to facilitate thought and discussion on the issue of gender stereotypes and discrimination, and is intended for use as part of a curriculum plan which will discuss these issues.

  10. Los Alamos Critical Assemblies Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malenfant, R.E.

    1981-06-01

    The Critical Assemblies Facility of the Los Alamos National Laboratory has been in existence for thirty-five years. In that period, many thousands of measurements have been made on assemblies of /sup 235/U, /sup 233/U, and /sup 239/Pu in various configurations, including the nitrate, sulfate, fluoride, carbide, and oxide chemical compositions and the solid, liquid, and gaseous states. The present complex of eleven operating machines is described, and typical applications are presented.

  11. Heat Recovery Design Considerations for Cogeneration Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasquinelli, D. M.; Burns, E. D.

    1985-01-01

    The design and integration of the heat recovery section, which includes the steam generation, auxiliary firing, and steam turbine modules, is critical to the overall performance and economics of cogeneration, systems. In gas turbine topping...

  12. Designed-in Security for Cyber-Physical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peisert, Sean; Margulies, Jonathan; Nicol, David M; Khurana, Himanshu; Sawall, Chris

    2014-01-01

    ROUNDTABLE Designed-in Security for Cyber-Physical Systemsin security”: one from academia, one from a cyber-physicalcyber inci- dent while sustaining critical func- tions. ” Without designed-in security

  13. A test of an expert-based bird-habitat relationship model in South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilgo, John, C.; Gartner, David, L.; Chapman, Brian, R.; Dunning, John, B., Jr.; Franzreb, Kathleen, E.; Gauthreaux, Sidney, A.; Greenberg, Catheryn, H.; Levey, Douglas, J.; Miller, Karl, V.; Pearson, Scott, F.

    2002-01-01

    Wildlife-habitat relationships models are used widely by land managers to provide information on which species are likely to occur in an area of interest and may be impacted by a proposed management activity. Few such models have been tested. Recent Avian census data from the Savannah River Site, South Carolina was used to validate BIRDHAB, a geographic information system (GIS) model developed by United States Forest Service resource managers to predict relative habitat quality for birds at the stand level on national forests in the southeastern United States. BIRDHAB is based on the species-habitat matrices presented by Hamel (1992).

  14. Advanced turbine systems program: Conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, November 1, 1995--January 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-04-09

    Several tasks were completed. Design and test of critical components are discussed. Plans for the next reporting period are outlined.

  15. Motives for Practicing Criticism as a ‘Rational Science’ in Lord Kames’s Elements of Criticism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Innocenti, Beth

    2001-01-01

    The way Lord Kames practices criticism in Elements of Criticism (1762) is not motivated by the new philosophy per se. His use of the new philosophy in the practice of criticism addresses social, political, and nationalistic circumstances. After...

  16. Only critical information was scanned

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the Weldon Spring,7=cr5rnP 7694 i+lJNewS e Only critical

  17. Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, Annual Report 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Skalski, John R.; Dawley, Earl M.; Coleman, Andre M.

    2010-08-01

    This report describes the 2009 research conducted under the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE or Corps) project EST-09-P-01, titled “Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary.” The research was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Marine Science Laboratory and Hydrology Group, in partnership with the University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, Columbia Basin Research, and Earl Dawley (NOAA Fisheries, retired). This Columbia River Fish Mitigation Program project, referred to as “Salmonid Benefits,” was started in FY 2009 to evaluate the state-of-the science regarding the ability to quantify the benefits to listed salmonids1 of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary.

  18. Habitat Evaluation: Guidance for the Review of Environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This Environmental Protection Agency document is designed to assist NEPA reviewers in evaluation the ecological risks associated with the impacts of federal activities....

  19. Habitat Restoration/Enhancement Fort Hall Reservation : 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osborne, Hunter

    2009-07-23

    Habitat enhancement, protection and monitoring were the focus of the Resident Fisheries Program during 2008. Enhancement and protection included sloping, fencing and planting wetlands plugs at sites on Spring Creek (Head-waters). Many previously constructed instream structures (rock barbs and wing dams) were repaired throughout the Fort Hall Indian Reservation (Reservation). Physical sampling during 2008 included sediment and depth measurements (SADMS) in Spring Creek at the Car Removal site. SADMS, used to track changes in channel morphology and specifically track movements of silt through Bottoms stream systems were completed for 5 strata on Spring Creek. Water temperature and chemistry were monitored monthly on Spring Creek, Clear Creek, Diggie Creek, and Portneuf (Jimmy Drinks) and Blackfoot rivers. Fish population densities and biomass were sampled in five reservation streams which included nine sites. Sampling protocols were identical to methods used in past years. Numbers of fish in Spring Creek series remained relatively low, however, there was an increase of biomass overall since 1993. Salmonid fry densities were monitored near Broncho Bridge and were similar to 2006, and 2007, however, as in years past, high densities of macrophytes make it very difficult to see fry in addition to lack of field technicians. Mean catch rate by anglers on Bottoms streams stayed the same as 2007 at 1.5/hr. Numbers of fish larger than 18-inches caught by anglers increased from 2007 at .20 to .26/hr.

  20. Critical Materials Workshop Plenary Session Videos

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Above are the plenary session videos of the Critical Materials Workshop held on April 3, 2012 in Arlington, Virginia.

  1. Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Assessment More Documents & Publications Wireless System Considerations When Implementing NERC Critical Infrastructure Protection...

  2. Critical Materials Workshop Final Participant List

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    List of participants who attended the Critical Materials Workshop held on April 3, 2012 in Arlington, VA

  3. Fusion algebra of critical percolation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jorgen Rasmussen; Paul A. Pearce

    2007-08-08

    We present an explicit conjecture for the chiral fusion algebra of critical percolation considering Virasoro representations with no enlarged or extended symmetry algebra. The representations we take to generate fusion are countably infinite in number. The ensuing fusion rules are quasi-rational in the sense that the fusion of a finite number of these representations decomposes into a finite direct sum of these representations. The fusion rules are commutative, associative and exhibit an sl(2) structure. They involve representations which we call Kac representations of which some are reducible yet indecomposable representations of rank 1. In particular, the identity of the fusion algebra is a reducible yet indecomposable Kac representation of rank 1. We make detailed comparisons of our fusion rules with the recent results of Eberle-Flohr and Read-Saleur. Notably, in agreement with Eberle-Flohr, we find the appearance of indecomposable representations of rank 3. Our fusion rules are supported by extensive numerical studies of an integrable lattice model of critical percolation. Details of our lattice findings and numerical results will be presented elsewhere.

  4. EVALUATION OF TUCANNON HABITAT RESTORATION OBJECTIVES Developed by: Mobrand Biometrics, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the LWD habitat objective for both the Tucannon mainstem from Cummings Cr to the Hatchery (Tuc12 LWD loading was much higher Historically in Tuc 12 than Tuc 16 (30 pieces per channel width vs. 4

  5. SNAKE SPECIES RICHNESS IN RELATION TO HABITAT IN THE POST OAK SAVANNAH OF EAST CENTRAL TEXAS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Putegnat, John

    2006-07-11

    habitats are 7 surrounded by rattlebush (Sesbania drummondii), greenbriar, yaupon, black willow (Salix nigra), and post oaks. Capture, Handling, and Data Collection Surveys were conducted for snake species from April ? August 2005, following...

  6. DOE Tour of Zero: The Laurel Gardens by Habitat for Humanity...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    highly efficient 1,290-square-foot home by Habitat for Humanity of South Sarasota County, Florida, is built to the requirements of the U.S. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home program and...

  7. Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Volume I, Oregon, 1984 Final and Annual Reports.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Rod

    1986-02-01

    This volume contains reports on habitat improvement and fisheries enhancement projects conducted in the following subbasins: (1) Clackamas River; (2) Hood River; :(3) Deschutes River; (4) John Day River; (5) Umatilla River; and (6) Grande Ronde River. (ACR)

  8. NAME: Habitat Restoration in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii LOCATION: Kaneohe Bay, County of Honolulu, Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    NAME: Habitat Restoration in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii LOCATION: Kaneohe Bay, County of Honolulu, Hawaii ACRES: 13 acres coral reef NON-FEDERAL SPONSOR: State of Hawaii: Department of Land and Natural

  9. Habitat associations of cavity-nesting owls in the Sierra Nevada 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groce, Julie Elizabeth

    2009-05-15

    Several species of small, cavity-nesting owls occur in the Sierra Nevada, including in areas impacted by human activities. The owls typically use standing dead trees (snags) for nest sites. Although descriptive studies exist regarding habitats...

  10. Forest Resources: Creating Roadside Habitat http://tfsweb.tamu.edu Page 1 of 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for water, nutrients, and space. Eventually, the pine canopy will completely close and stand harvest. Once roadsides are cleared, mow or disk roadside habitat every 2 ­ 3 years to maintain

  11. CREATING HABITAT FOR THE YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO (COCCYZUS AMERICANA) 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and others 1987). This decline in num- bers is associated with decline in their riparian wood- land habitats 1985 to present (Laymon and Halter- man 1985, 1987). On the basis of data from these stud- ies

  12. ESTIMATION OF JUVENILE SALMON HABITAT IN PACIFIC RIM RIVERS USING MULTISCALAR REMOTE SENSING AND GEOSPATIAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montana, University of

    ESTIMATION OF JUVENILE SALMON HABITAT IN PACIFIC RIM RIVERS USING MULTISCALAR REMOTE SENSING) encompassing over 3 400 000 km2 and most North Pacific Rim (NPR) salmon rivers. Similar classifications were

  13. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Rainwater Wildlife Area, 1998-2001 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen

    2004-01-01

    The 8,768 acre Rainwater Wildlife Area was acquired in September 1998 by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) through an agreement with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to partially offset habitat losses associated with construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the mainstem Columbia River. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to BPA for acquired lands. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grassland rover types are evaluated in this study. Targeted wildlife species include downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), black-capped chickadee (Parus atricopillus), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnella neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 65,300, 594m{sup 2} plots, and 112 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 153.3 and 7,187.46 acres were evaluated for each target wildlife mitigation species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total baseline habitat units credited to BPA for the Rainwater Wildlife Area and its seven target species is 5,185.3 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing, road de-commissioning/obliteration, reforestation and thinning, control of competing and unwanted vegetation (including noxious weeds), reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence, and facilitating development of natural stable stream channels and associated floodplains. Implementation of habitat enhancement and restoration activities could generate an additional 1,850 habitat units in 10 years. Baseline and estimated future habitat units total 7,035.3 for the Rainwater Wildlife Area. Habitat protection, enhancement and restoration will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and plant community resiliency in all cover types. Watershed conditions, including floodplain/riparian, and instream habitat quality should improve as well providing multiple benefits for terrestrial and aquatic resources. While such benefits are not necessarily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they are consistent with the NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program.

  14. Willow species (genus: Salix) with contrasting habitat affinities differ in their photoprotective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Willow species (genus: Salix) with contrasting habitat affinities differ in their photoprotective, we investigated the response of six willow (Salix) species to a short- term drought. In a greenhouse

  15. LOCUST HABITAT MONITORING AND RISK ASSESSMENT USING REMOTE SENSING AND GIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latchininsky, Alexandre

    Antarctica and can affect the livelihoods of one in 10 people on Earth. To prevent economic and environmental habitat, providing the insects with nutrition and shelter. Under the preventive mode, locust control

  16. SUPERBOTS ON THE LUNAR SURFACE: A HABITAT OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE SYSTEM (HOMS). S. J. Lawrence1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Wei-Min

    mitigation, such as microwave sintering of areas (using SuperBot walkers equipped with specialized microwave modules) surrounding the habitat, (2) in-situ solar panel production (3) solar panel cleaning (using Super

  17. Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Volume 1, Oregon, 1986 Final and Annual Reports.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuart, Amy

    1987-01-01

    This report describes activities implemented for fisheries habitat improvement work on priority drainages in the Clackamas and Hood River sub-basins. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the reports on individual projects. (ACR)

  18. Habitat associations and photo-identification of sea otters in Simpson Bay, Prince William Sound, Alaska 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilkinson, Andrea Karin

    2006-04-12

    Habitat associations of sea otters during resting and feeding were investigated in Simpson Bay, Prince William Sound, Alaska during the summer months of 2001-2003. Sea otter locations collected during boat surveys were overlaid on bathymetry...

  19. Reactor Testing and Qualification: Prioritized High-level Criticality Testing Needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Bragg-Sitton; J. Bess; J. Werner; G. Harms; S. Bailey

    2011-09-01

    Researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) were tasked with reviewing possible criticality testing needs to support development of the fission surface power system reactor design. Reactor physics testing can provide significant information to aid in development of technologies associated with small, fast spectrum reactors that could be applied for non-terrestrial power systems, leading to eventual system qualification. Several studies have been conducted in recent years to assess the data and analyses required to design and build a space fission power system with high confidence that the system will perform as designed [Marcille, 2004a, 2004b; Weaver, 2007; Parry et al., 2008]. This report will provide a summary of previous critical tests and physics measurements that are potentially applicable to the current reactor design (both those that have been benchmarked and those not yet benchmarked), summarize recent studies of potential nuclear testing needs for space reactor development and their applicability to the current baseline fission surface power (FSP) system design, and provide an overview of a suite of tests (separate effects, sub-critical or critical) that could fill in the information database to improve the accuracy of physics modeling efforts as the FSP design is refined. Some recommendations for tasks that could be completed in the near term are also included. Specific recommendations on critical test configurations will be reserved until after the sensitivity analyses being conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are completed (due August 2011).

  20. Criticality calculations with MCNP{trademark}: A primer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmon, C.D. II; Busch, R.D.; Briesmeister, J.F.; Forster, R.A. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-06-06

    With the closure of many experimental facilities, the nuclear criticality safety analyst increasingly is required to rely on computer calculations to identify safe limits for the handling and storage of fissile materials. However, in many cases, the analyst has little experience with the specific codes available at his/her facility. This primer will help you, the analyst, understand and use the MCNP Monte Carlo code for nuclear criticality safety analyses. It assumes that you have a college education in a technical field. There is no assumption of familiarity with Monte Carlo codes in general or with MCNP in particular. Appendix A gives an introduction to Monte Carlo techniques. The primer is designed to teach by example, with each example illustrating two or three features of MCNP that are useful in criticality analyses. Beginning with a Quickstart chapter, the primer gives an overview of the basic requirements for MCNP input and allows you to run a simple criticality problem with MCNP. This chapter is not designed to explain either the input or the MCNP options in detail; but rather it introduces basic concepts that are further explained in following chapters. Each chapter begins with a list of basic objectives that identify the goal of the chapter, and a list of the individual MCNP features that are covered in detail in the unique chapter example problems. It is expected that on completion of the primer you will be comfortable using MCNP in criticality calculations and will be capable of handling 80 to 90 percent of the situations that normally arise in a facility. The primer provides a set of basic input files that you can selectively modify to fit the particular problem at hand.

  1. Spawning Habitat Studies of Hanford Reach Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geist, David R.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Chien, Yi-Ju

    2009-03-02

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted this study for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with funding provided through the Northwest Power and Conservation Council(a) and the BPA Fish and Wildlife Program. The study was conducted in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. The goal of study was to determine the physical habitat factors necessary to define the redd capacity of fall Chinook salmon that spawn in large mainstem rivers like the Hanford Reach and Snake River. The study was originally commissioned in FY 1994 and then recommissioned in FY 2000 through the Fish and Wildlife Program rolling review of the Columbia River Basin projects. The work described in this report covers the period from 1994 through 2004; however, the majority of the information comes from the last four years of the study (2000 through 2004). Results from the work conducted from 1994 to 2000 were covered in an earlier report. More than any other stock of Pacific salmon, fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) have suffered severe impacts from the hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. Fall Chinook salmon rely heavily on mainstem habitats for all phases of their life cycle, and mainstem hydroelectric dams have inundated or blocked areas that were historically used for spawning and rearing. The natural flow pattern that existed in the historic period has been altered by the dams, which in turn have affected the physical and biological template upon which fall Chinook salmon depend upon for successful reproduction. Operation of the dams to produce power to meet short-term needs in electricity (termed power peaking) produces unnatural fluctuations in flow over a 24-hour cycle. These flow fluctuations alter the physical habitat and disrupt the cues that salmon use to select spawning sites, as well as strand fish in near-shore habitat that becomes dewatered. The quality of spawning gravels has been affected by dam construction, flood protection, and agricultural and industrial development. In some cases, the riverbed is armored such that it is more difficult for spawners to move, while in other cases the intrusion of fine sediment into spawning gravels has reduced water flow to sensitive eggs and young fry. Recovery of fall Chinook salmon populations may involve habitat restoration through such actions as dam removal and reservoir drawdown. In addition, habitat protection will be accomplished through set-asides of existing high-quality habitat. A key component to evaluating these actions is quantifying the salmon spawning habitat potential of a given river reach so that realistic recovery goals for salmon abundance can be developed. Quantifying salmon spawning habitat potential requires an understanding of the spawning behavior of Chinook salmon, as well as an understanding of the physical habitat where these fish spawn. Increasingly, fish biologists are recognizing that assessing the physical habitat of riverine systems where salmon spawn goes beyond measuring microhabitat like water depth, velocity, and substrate size. Geomorphic features of the river measured over a range of spatial scales set up the physical template upon which the microhabitat develops, and successful assessments of spawning habitat potential incorporate these geomorphic features. We had three primary objectives for this study. The first objective was to determine the relationship between physical habitats at different spatial scales and fall Chinook salmon spawning locations. The second objective was to estimate the fall Chinook salmon redd capacity for the Reach. The third objective was to suggest a protocol for determining preferable spawning reaches of fall Chinook salmon. To ensure that we collected physical data within habitat that was representative of the full range of potential spawning habitat, the study area was stratified based on geomorphic features of the river using a two-dimensional river channel index that classified the river cross section into one of four shapes based on channel symmetry, depth, and width. We found t

  2. Critical heat flux test apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Welsh, Robert E. (West Mifflin, PA); Doman, Marvin J. (McKeesport, PA); Wilson, Edward C. (West Mifflin, PA)

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for testing, in situ, highly irradiated specimens at high temperature transients is provided. A specimen, which has a thermocouple device attached thereto, is manipulated into test position in a sealed quartz heating tube by a robot. An induction coil around a heating portion of the tube is powered by a radio frequency generator to heat the specimen. Sensors are connected to monitor the temperatures of the specimen and the induction coil. A quench chamber is located below the heating portion to permit rapid cooling of the specimen which is moved into this quench chamber once it is heated to a critical temperature. A vacuum pump is connected to the apparatus to collect any released fission gases which are analyzed at a remote location.

  3. Design of heterogeneous turbine blade Xiaoping Qian, Deba Dutta*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Xiaoping

    Design of heterogeneous turbine blade Xiaoping Qian, Deba Dutta* Department of Mechanical material. A critical task of such synthesis in turbine blade design is an effective design method approach for turbine blade design, which ties B-spline representation of a turbine blade to a physics

  4. Structure Fitness Sharing (SFS) for Evolutionary Design by Genetic Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Structure Fitness Sharing (SFS) for Evolutionary Design by Genetic Programming Abstract Balanced structure and parameter search is critical to evolutionary design with genetic programming (GP). Structure problems such as algorithm design, program induction and logic design, in which only structure search

  5. Bibliography for nuclear criticality accident experience, alarm systems, and emergency management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Putman, V.L.

    1995-09-01

    The characteristics, detection, and emergency management of nuclear criticality accidents outside reactors has been an important component of criticality safety for as long as the need for this specialized safety discipline has been recognized. The general interest and importance of such topics receives special emphasis because of the potentially lethal, albeit highly localized, effects of criticality accidents and because of heightened public and regulatory concerns for any undesirable event in nuclear and radiological fields. This bibliography lists references which are potentially applicable to or interesting for criticality alarm, detection, and warning systems; criticality accident emergency management; and their associated programs. The lists are annotated to assist bibliography users in identifying applicable: industry and regulatory guidance and requirements, with historical development information and comments; criticality accident characteristics, consequences, experiences, and responses; hazard-, risk-, or safety-analysis criteria; CAS design and qualification criteria; CAS calibration, maintenance, repair, and testing criteria; experiences of CAS designers and maintainers; criticality accident emergency management (planning, preparedness, response, and recovery) requirements and guidance; criticality accident emergency management experience, plans, and techniques; methods and tools for analysis; and additional bibliographies.

  6. 2011 Annual Criticality Safety Program Performance Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrea Hoffman

    2011-12-01

    The 2011 review of the INL Criticality Safety Program has determined that the program is robust and effective. The review was prepared for, and fulfills Contract Data Requirements List (CDRL) item H.20, 'Annual Criticality Safety Program performance summary that includes the status of assessments, issues, corrective actions, infractions, requirements management, training, and programmatic support.' This performance summary addresses the status of these important elements of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Assessments - Assessments in 2011 were planned and scheduled. The scheduled assessments included a Criticality Safety Program Effectiveness Review, Criticality Control Area Inspections, a Protection of Controlled Unclassified Information Inspection, an Assessment of Criticality Safety SQA, and this management assessment of the Criticality Safety Program. All of the assessments were completed with the exception of the 'Effectiveness Review' for SSPSF, which was delayed due to emerging work. Although minor issues were identified in the assessments, no issues or combination of issues indicated that the INL Criticality Safety Program was ineffective. The identification of issues demonstrates the importance of an assessment program to the overall health and effectiveness of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Issues and Corrective Actions - There are relatively few criticality safety related issues in the Laboratory ICAMS system. Most were identified by Criticality Safety Program assessments. No issues indicate ineffectiveness in the INL Criticality Safety Program. All of the issues are being worked and there are no imminent criticality concerns. Infractions - There was one criticality safety related violation in 2011. On January 18, 2011, it was discovered that a fuel plate bundle in the Nuclear Materials Inspection and Storage (NMIS) facility exceeded the fissionable mass limit, resulting in a technical safety requirement (TSR) violation. The TSR limits fuel plate bundles to 1085 grams U-235, which is the maximum loading of an ATR fuel element. The overloaded fuel plate bundle contained 1097 grams U-235 and was assembled under an 1100 gram U-235 limit in 1982. In 2003, the limit was reduced to 1085 grams citing a new criticality safety evaluation for ATR fuel elements. The fuel plate bundle inventories were not checked for compliance prior to implementing the reduced limit. A subsequent review of the NMIS inventory did not identify further violations. Requirements Management - The INL Criticality Safety program is organized and well documented. The source requirements for the INL Criticality Safety Program are from 10 CFR 830.204, DOE Order 420.1B, Chapter III, 'Nuclear Criticality Safety,' ANSI/ANS 8-series Industry Standards, and DOE Standards. These source requirements are documented in LRD-18001, 'INL Criticality Safety Program Requirements Manual.' The majority of the criticality safety source requirements are contained in DOE Order 420.1B because it invokes all of the ANSI/ANS 8-Series Standards. DOE Order 420.1B also invokes several DOE Standards, including DOE-STD-3007, 'Guidelines for Preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations at Department of Energy Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities.' DOE Order 420.1B contains requirements for DOE 'Heads of Field Elements' to approve the criticality safety program and specific elements of the program, namely, the qualification of criticality staff and the method for preparing criticality safety evaluations. This was accomplished by the approval of SAR-400, 'INL Standardized Nuclear Safety Basis Manual,' Chapter 6, 'Prevention of Inadvertent Criticality.' Chapter 6 of SAR-400 contains sufficient detail and/or reference to the specific DOE and contractor documents that adequately describe the INL Criticality Safety Program per the elements specified in DOE Order 420.1B. The Safety Evaluation Report for SAR-400 specifically recognizes that the approval of SAR-400 approves the INL Criticality Safety Program. No new source requirements were released in 2011. A revision to LRD-18001 is

  7. Assessing Habitat for Avian Species in Assessing Habitat for Avian Species in an Integrated Forage/Biofuels an Integrated Forage/Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    in an Integrated Forage/Biofuels an Integrated Forage/Biofuels Management System Management System in the Midin NWSG mixes beneficial to forage, biofuels production, and wildlife habitatp , 3. identify wildlife habitat benefits associated with varying forage and biofuels management strategies 4. identify optimum

  8. Confederated Tribes Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat Project : Annual Report Fiscal Year 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra

    2008-12-02

    The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2007 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2007-January 31, 2008) primary project activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight fisheries habitat enhancement projects were implemented on Meacham Creek, Camp Creek, Greasewood Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying five fish passage barriers on four creeks, (2) planting 1,275 saplings and seeding 130 pounds of native grasses, (3) constructing two miles of riparian fencing for livestock exclusion, (4) coordinating activities related to the installation of two off-channel, solar-powered watering areas for livestock, and (5) developing eight water gap access sites to reduce impacts from livestock. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major project areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation Project site (FY2006) and at all existing easements and planned project sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at project sites prior to implementation. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the life of each project to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned project activities and biological opinions were written and approved. Project activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each project site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and project partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each project's success.

  9. Spring in January! : the bifocal nature of urban community habitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doone, Ryan

    2011-01-01

    This thesis aims to reconnect man to natural flows by designing spaces with overlapping thermal comfort regions between people and plants. Cities encourage metaphysical awakenings and foster physical re-connections to ...

  10. Engitectural Design 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gagliardi, D. R.

    1996-01-01

    to the mechanical systems of building, and in a hot and humid climate the issues are magnified. Therefore, this paper will discuss the concepts and merits of a new design process called: Engitectural Design. Engitectural Design is the concept of blending the many...

  11. Foundations and Trends R Electronic Design Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carloni, Luca

    between environment (plant to be controlled) and design (digital controller) into consideration electronics is bringing information and control systems of increasing complexity to every aspects of our lives. The most challenging designs are safety-critical systems, such as transportation systems (e.g., airplanes

  12. Characterization and Monitoring Data for Evaluating Constructed Emergent Sandbar Habitat in the Missouri River Mainstem 2004-2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duberstein, Corey A.

    2011-04-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) provides the primary operational management of the Missouri River Main Stem Reservoir System. Management of the Missouri River has generally reduced peak river flows that form and maintain emergent sandbar habitat. Emergent sandbars provide non-vegetated nesting habitat for the endangered interior least tern (Sternula antillarum athalassos) and the threatened Northern Great Plains piping plover (Charadrius melodus). Since 2000, piping plover nesting habitat within the Gavins Point Reach, Garrison Reach, Lake Oahe, and Lake Sakakawea has fledged the majority of piping plovers produced along the Missouri River system. Habitats within Lewis and Clark Lake have also recently become important plover production areas. Mechanical construction of emergent sandbar habitat (ESH) within some of these reaches within the Missouri River began in 2004. Through 2009, 11 sandbar complexes had been constructed (10 in Gavins Point Reach, 1 in Lewis and Clarke Lake) totaling about 543 ac of piping plover and interior least tern nesting habitat. ESH Construction has resulted in a net gain of tern and plover nesting habitat. Both terns and plovers successfully nest and fledge young on constructed sandbars, and constructed habitats were preferred over natural habitats. Natural processes may limit the viability of constructed sandbars as nesting habitat. Continued research is needed to identify if changes in constructed sandbar engineering and management increase the length of time constructed habitats effectively function as nesting habitat. However, the transfer of information from researchers to planners through technical research reports may not be timely enough to effectively foster the feedback mechanisms of an adaptive management strategy.

  13. Critical links and nonlocal rerouting in complex supply networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witthaut, Dirk; Zhang, Xiaozhu; Hallerberg, Sarah; Timme, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Link failures repeatedly induce large-scale outages in power grids and other supply networks. Yet, it is still not well understood, which links are particularly prone to inducing such outages. Here we analyze how the nature and location of each link impact the network's capability to maintain stable supply. We propose two criteria to identify critical links on the basis of the topology and the load distribution of the network prior to link failure. They are determined via a link's redundant capacity and a renormalized linear response theory we derive. These criteria outperform critical link prediction based on local measures such as loads. The results not only further our understanding of the physics of supply networks in general. As both criteria are available before any outage from the state of normal operation, they may also help real-time monitoring of grid operation, employing counter-measures and support network planning and design.

  14. Population Recovery and Conservation Habitat Restoration Water Use and Hydropower Forests and Fish EAST FORK OWYHEE RIVER SALMON AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Population Recovery and Conservation · Habitat Restoration · Water Use and Hydropower · Forests........................................................................................................................................... 18 Water Quality Analysis ....................................................................................................................... 18 Nevada Division of Environmental Protection Water Quality Sampling

  15. NQA-1 Commercial Grade Dedication Critical Characteristics |...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Dedication Critical Characteristics May 5, 2015 Presenter: Randy P. Lanham, PE, CSP, Fire Protection Chief Engineer Consolidated Nuclear Solutions - Pantex, LLC Topics Covered:...

  16. Critical function and success path summary display

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

    1995-01-01

    The content of and hierarchical access to three levels of display pages containing information on critical function monitoring and success path monitoring.

  17. Computing Criticality of Lines in Power Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinar, Ali; Reichert, Adam; Lesieutre, Bernard

    2006-10-13

    We propose a computationally efficient method based onnonlinear optimization to identify critical lines, failure of which cancause severe blackouts. Our method computes criticality measure for alllines at a time, as opposed to detecting a single vulnerability,providing a global view of the system. This information on criticality oflines can be used to identify multiple contingencies by selectivelyexploring multiple combinations of broken lines. The effectiveness of ourmethod is demonstrated on the IEEE 30 and 118 bus systems, where we canvery quickly detect the most critical lines in the system and identifysevere multiple contingencies.

  18. Overview of multivariate methods and their application to studies of wildlife habitat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shugart, H.H. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Multivariate statistical techniques as methods of choice in analyzing habitat relations among animals have distinct advantages over competitive methodologies. These considerations, joined with a reduction in the cost of computer time, the increased availability of multivariate statistical packages, and an increased willingness on the part of ecologists to use mathematics and statistics as tools, have created an exponentially increasing interest in multivariate statistical methods over the past decade. It is important to note that the earliest multivariate statistical analyses in ecology did more than introduce a set of appropriate and needed methodologies to ecology. The studies emphasized different spatial and organizational scales from those typically emphasized in habitat studies. The new studies, that used multivariate methods, emphasized individual organisms' responses in a heterogeneous environment. This philosophical (and to some degree, methodological) emphasis on heterogeneity has led to a potential to predict the consequences of disturbances and management on wildlife habitat. One recent development in this regard has been the coupling of forest succession simulators with multivariate analysis of habitat to predict habitat availability under different timber management procedures.

  19. Lower Columbia River and Estuary Habitat Monitoring Study, 2011 - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borde, Amy B.; Kaufmann, Ronald M.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Thom, Ronald M.; Wright, Cynthia L.

    2012-03-22

    The Ecosystem Monitoring Program is a collaborative effort between the Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership (LCREP), University of Washington, Wetland Ecosystem Team (UW), US Geological Survey, Water Science Center (USGS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA-Fisheries, hereafter NOAA), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Marine Sciences Laboratory (PNNL). The goal of the program is to conduct emergent wetland monitoring aimed at characterizing salmonid habitats in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) from the mouth of the estuary to Bonneville Dam (Figure 1). This is an ecosystem based monitoring program focused on evaluating status and trends in habitat and reducing uncertainties regarding these ecosystems to ultimately improve the survival of juvenile salmonids through the LCRE. This project comprehensively assesses habitat, fish, food web, and abiotic conditions in the lower river, focusing on shallow water and vegetated habitats used by juvenile salmonids for feeding, rearing and refugia. The information is intended to be used to guide management actions associated with species recovery, particularly that of threatened and endangered salmonids. PNNL’s role in this multi-year study is to monitor the habitat structure (e.g., vegetation, topography, channel morphology, and sediment type) as well as hydrologic patterns.

  20. SILENE Benchmark Critical Experiments for Criticality Accident Alarm Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Thomas Martin; Reynolds, Kevin H.

    2011-01-01

    In October 2010 a series of benchmark experiments was conducted at the Commissariat a Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA) Valduc SILENE [1] facility. These experiments were a joint effort between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the French CEA. The purpose of these experiments was to create three benchmarks for the verification and validation of radiation transport codes and evaluated nuclear data used in the analysis of criticality accident alarm systems (CAASs). This presentation will discuss the geometric configuration of these experiments and the quantities that were measured and will present some preliminary comparisons between the measured data and calculations. This series consisted of three single-pulsed experiments with the SILENE reactor. During the first experiment the reactor was bare (unshielded), but during the second and third experiments it was shielded by lead and polyethylene, respectively. During each experiment several neutron activation foils and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed around the reactor, and some of these detectors were themselves shielded from the reactor by high-density magnetite and barite concrete, standard concrete, and/or BoroBond. All the concrete was provided by CEA Saclay, and the BoroBond was provided by Y-12 National Security Complex. Figure 1 is a picture of the SILENE reactor cell configured for pulse 1. Also included in these experiments were measurements of the neutron and photon spectra with two BICRON BC-501A liquid scintillators. These two detectors were provided and operated by CEA Valduc. They were set up just outside the SILENE reactor cell with additional lead shielding to prevent the detectors from being saturated. The final detectors involved in the experiments were two different types of CAAS detectors. The Babcock International Group provided three CIDAS CAAS detectors, which measured photon dose and dose rate with a Geiger-Mueller tube. CIDAS detectors are currently in use at Y-12 in the newly constructed Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility. The second CAAS detector used a {sup 6}LiF TLD to absorb neutrons and a silicon detector to count the charge particles released by these absorption events. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory provided four of these detectors, which had formerly been used at the Rocky Flats facility in the United States.

  1. AN INTEGRATED ENVIRONMENT OF S/W SPECIFICATION AND V&V FOR SAFETY-CRITICAL SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AN INTEGRATED ENVIRONMENT OF S/W SPECIFICATION AND V&V FOR SAFETY-CRITICAL SYSTEMS Abstract, an integrated environment of S/W specification and V&V is proposed for safety-critical systems. Integrated environment consists of SIS-RT for concept phase, NuSRS for requirement phase, NuSDS for design phase, and Nu

  2. Italy in the Mediterranean Today: A New Critical Topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fogu, Claudio; Re, Lucia

    2010-01-01

    Today: A New Critical Topography Claudio Fogu and Lucia Reto function as an ideal topography of the critical territory

  3. Fragmentation of habitats used by neotropical migratory birds in Southern Appalachians and the neotropics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearson, S.M.; Dale, V.H.; Offerman, H.L. |

    1993-12-31

    Recent declines in North American breeding populations have sparked great concern over the effects of habitat fragmentation. Neotropical migrant birds use and are influenced by two biomes during a single life span. Yet assessment of the relative importance of changes in tropical wintering areas versus temperate breeding areas is complicated by regional variation in rates and extent of habitat change. Landscape-level measurements of forest fragmentation derived from remotely-sensed data provide a means to compare the patterns of habitat modification on the wintering and breeding grounds of migrant birds. This study quantifies patterns of forest fragmentation in the Southern Appalachian Mountains and tropical Amazon and relates these patterns to the resource needs of neotropical migrant birds. Study sites were selected from remotely-sensed images to represent a range of forest fragmentation (highly fragmented landscape to continuous forest).

  4. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Hellsgate Project, 1999-2000 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, Matthew

    2000-05-01

    A Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was conducted on lands acquired and/or managed (4,568 acres total) by the Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate project) to mitigate some of the losses associated with the original construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam and inundation of habitats behind the dams. Three separate properties, totaling 2,224 acres were purchased in 1998. One property composed of two separate parcels, mostly grassland lies southeast of the town of Nespelem in Okanogan County (770 acres) and was formerly called the Hinman property. The former Hinman property lies within an area the Tribes have set aside for the protection and preservation of the sharp-tailed grouse (Agency Butte unit). This special management area minus the Hinman acquisition contains 2,388 acres in a long-term lease with the Tribes. The second property lies just south of the Silver Creek turnoff (Ferry County) and is bisected by the Hellsgate Road (part of the Friedlander unit). This parcel contains 60 acres of riparian and conifer forest cover. The third property (now named the Sand Hills unit) acquired for mitigation (1,394 acres) lies within the Hellsgate Reserve in Ferry County. This new acquisition links two existing mitigation parcels (the old Sand Hills parcels and the Lundstrum Flat parcel, all former Kuehne purchases) together forming one large unit. HEP team members included individuals from the Colville Confederated Tribes Fish and Wildlife Department (CTCR), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The HEP team conducted a baseline habitat survey using the following HEP species models: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), mink (Mustela vison), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), bobcat (Lynx rufus), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), and sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus). HEP analysis and results are discussed within the body of the text. The cover types evaluated for this study were grasslands, shrub-steppe, rock, conifer forest and woodland, and riparian. These same cover types were evaluated for other Hellsgate Project acquisitions within the same geographic area. Mule deer habitat on the Sand Hills unit rated good overall for winter food and cover in the shrub-steppe and conifer woodland cover types. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat on the former Hinman property and special management area rated good for nesting and brood rearing in the grassland cover type. Mink habitat on the Friedlander parcel rated poor due to lack of food and cover in and along the riparian cover type. The Downy woodpecker rated poor for food and cover on the Friedlander parcel in the conifer forest cover type. This species also rated poor on the conifer woodland habitat on the Hinman parcel. Yellow warbler habitat on the Agency Butte Special Management area rated very poor due to lack of shrubs for cover and reproduction around the scattered semi/permanent ponds that occur on the area. Bobcat habitat on this same area rated poor due to lack of cover and food. Fragmentation of existing quality habitat is also a problem for both these species. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation and managed lands, and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, this information will be used to manage these lands for the benefit of wildlife.

  5. TRIPOLI-4 criticality calculations for MOX fuelled SNEAK 7A and 7B fast critical assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Y. K. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA-Saclay, DEN/DANS/DM2S/SERMA, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France)

    2012-07-01

    A prototype Generation IV fast neutron reactor is under design and development in France. The MOX fuel will be introduced into this self-generating core in order to demonstrate low net plutonium production. To support the TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo transport code in criticality calculations of fast reactors, the effective delayed neutron fraction {beta}eff estimation and the Probability Tables (PT) option to treat the unresolved resonance region of cross-sections are two essentials. In this study, TRIPOLI-4 calculations have been made using current nuclear data libraries JEFF-3.1.1 and ENDF/B-VII.0 to benchmark the reactor physics parameters of the MOX fuelled SNEAK 7A and 7B fast critical assemblies. TRIPOLI-4 calculated K{sub eff} and {beta}eff of the homogeneous R-Z models and the 3D multi-cell models have been validated against the measured ones. The impact of the PT option on K{sub eff} is 340 {+-} 10 pcm for SNEAK 7A core and 410 {+-} 12 pcm for 7B. Four-group spectra and energy spectral indices, f8/f5, f9/f5, and c8/f5 in the two SNEAK cores have also been calculated with the TRIPOLI-4 mesh tally. Calculated spectrum-hardening index f8/f5 is 0.0418 for SNEAK 7A and 0.0315 for 7B. From this study the SNEAK 3D models have been verified for the next revision of IRPhE (International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments). (authors)

  6. Critical technologies research: Opportunities for DOE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    Recent studies have identified a number of critical technologies that are essential to the nation's defense, economic competitiveness, energy independence, and betterment of public health. The National Critical Technologies Panel (NCTP) has identified the following critical technology areas: Aeronautics and Surface Transportation; Biotechnology and Life Sciences; Energy and Environment; Information and Communications; Manufacturing; and Materials. Sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Research (OER), the Critical Technologies Research Workshop was held in May 1992. Approximately 100 scientists, engineers, and managers from the national laboratories, industry, academia, and govemment participated. The objective of the Berkeley Workshop was to advance the role of the DOE multiprogram energy laboratories in critical technologies research by describing, defining, and illustrating research areas, opportunities, resources, and key decisions necessary to achieve national research goals. An agenda was developed that looked at DOE's capabilities and options for research in critical technologies and provided a forum for industry, academia, govemment, and the national laboratories to address: Critical technology research needs; existing research activities and resources; capabilities of the national laboratories; and opportunities for national laboratories, industries, and universities. The Workshop included plenary sessions in which presentations by technology and policy leaders set the context for further inquiry into critical technology issues and research opportunities. Separate sessions then focused on each of the following major areas of technology: Advanced materials; biotechnology and life sciences; energy and environment; information and communication; and manufacturing and transportation.

  7. Critical technologies research: Opportunities for DOE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    Recent studies have identified a number of critical technologies that are essential to the nation`s defense, economic competitiveness, energy independence, and betterment of public health. The National Critical Technologies Panel (NCTP) has identified the following critical technology areas: Aeronautics and Surface Transportation; Biotechnology and Life Sciences; Energy and Environment; Information and Communications; Manufacturing; and Materials. Sponsored by the Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Research (OER), the Critical Technologies Research Workshop was held in May 1992. Approximately 100 scientists, engineers, and managers from the national laboratories, industry, academia, and govemment participated. The objective of the Berkeley Workshop was to advance the role of the DOE multiprogram energy laboratories in critical technologies research by describing, defining, and illustrating research areas, opportunities, resources, and key decisions necessary to achieve national research goals. An agenda was developed that looked at DOE`s capabilities and options for research in critical technologies and provided a forum for industry, academia, govemment, and the national laboratories to address: Critical technology research needs; existing research activities and resources; capabilities of the national laboratories; and opportunities for national laboratories, industries, and universities. The Workshop included plenary sessions in which presentations by technology and policy leaders set the context for further inquiry into critical technology issues and research opportunities. Separate sessions then focused on each of the following major areas of technology: Advanced materials; biotechnology and life sciences; energy and environment; information and communication; and manufacturing and transportation.

  8. Critical National Infrastructure Reliability Modeling and Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . · Telecommunications: Congestion or disruption of key communications nodes by fire, wind, water, or sabotage · Power of Homeland Security is protection of our critical national infrastructures including power, communications, transportation, and water. This paper presents models to quantify the interdependencies of critical

  9. Steady water waves with multiple critical layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mats Ehrnström; Joachim Escher; Erik Wahlén

    2011-04-01

    We construct small-amplitude periodic water waves with multiple critical layers. In addition to waves with arbitrarily many critical layers and a single crest in each period, two-dimensional sets of waves with several crests and troughs in each period are found. The setting is that of steady two-dimensional finite-depth gravity water waves with vorticity.

  10. Self-organizing criticality among Chinese cities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Shujuan

    2010-07-14

    This dissertation employs the theory of self-organizing criticality (SOC) into the study of Chinese cities. SOC was proposed at the end of the 1980s to explain system complexity by combining both self-organizing and critical behaviors. SOC has been...

  11. Critical aspects of hierarchical protein folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alex Hansen; Mogens H. Jensen; Kim Sneppen; Giovanni Zocchi

    1998-01-13

    We argue that the first order folding transitions of proteins observed at physiological chemical conditions end in a critical point for a given temperature and chemical potential of the surrounding water. We investigate this critical point using a hierarchical Hamiltonian and determine its universality class. This class differs qualitatively from those of other known models.

  12. Enhancing critical current density of cuprate superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaudhari, Praveen

    2015-06-16

    The present invention concerns the enhancement of critical current densities in cuprate superconductors. Such enhancement of critical current densities include using wave function symmetry and restricting movement of Abrikosov (A) vortices, Josephson (J) vortices, or Abrikosov-Josephson (A-J) vortices by using the half integer vortices associated with d-wave symmetry present in the grain boundary.

  13. Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 1995 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, R.Todd

    1996-05-01

    During the 1995 - 96 project period, four new habitat enhancement projects were implemented under the Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) in the upper Umatilla River Basin. A total of 38,644 feet of high tensile smooth wire fencing was constructed along 3.6 miles of riparian corridor in the Meacham Creek, Wildhorse Creek, Greasewood Creek, West Fork of Greasewood Creek and Mission Creek watersheds. Additional enhancements on Wildhorse Creek and the lower Greasewood Creek System included: (1) installation of 0.43 miles of smooth wire between river mile (RM) 10.25 and RM 10.5 Wildhorse Creek (fence posts and structures had been previously placed on this property during the 1994 - 95 project period), (2) construction of 46 sediment retention structures in stream channels and maintenance to 18 existing sediment retention structures between RM 9.5 and RM 10.25 Wildhorse Creek, and (3) revegetation of stream corridor areas and adjacent terraces with 500 pounds of native grass seed or close species equivalents and 5,000 native riparian shrub/tree species to assist in floodplain recovery, stream channel stability and filtering of sediments during high flow periods. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) funds were cost shared with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds, provided under this project, to accomplish habitat enhancements. Water quality monitoring continued and was expanded for temperature and turbidity throughout the upper Umatilla River Watershed. Physical habitat surveys were conducted on the lower 13 river miles of Wildhorse Creek and within the Greasewood Creek Project Area to characterize habitat quality and to quantify various habitat types by area.

  14. Seminar in Critical Inquiry Twenty-first Century Nuclear Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeMone, D. V.

    2002-02-25

    Critical Inquiry, has not only been successful in increasing university student retention rate but also in improving student academic performance beyond the initial year of transition into the University. The seminar course herein reviewed is a balanced combination of student personal and academic skill development combined with a solid background in modern nuclear systems. It is a valid premise to assume that entering students as well as stakeholders of the general public demonstrate equal levels of capability. Nuclear systems is designed to give a broad and basic knowledge of nuclear power, medical, industrial, research, and military systems (nuclear systems) in 20-25 hours.

  15. Incoherent transport in clean quantum critical metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard A. Davison; Blaise Goutéraux; Sean A. Hartnoll

    2015-07-25

    In a clean quantum critical metal, and in the absence of umklapp, most d.c. conductivities are formally infinite due to momentum conservation. However, there is a particular combination of the charge and heat currents which has a finite, universal conductivity. In this paper, we describe the physics of this conductivity $\\sigma_Q$ in quantum critical metals obtained by charge doping a strongly interacting conformal field theory. We show that it satisfies an Einstein relation and controls the diffusivity of a conserved charge in the metal. We compute $\\sigma_Q$ in a class of theories with holographic gravitational duals. Finally, we show how the temperature scaling of $\\sigma_Q$ depends on certain critical exponents characterizing the quantum critical metal. The holographic results are found to be reproduced by the scaling analysis, with the charge density operator becoming marginal in the emergent low energy quantum critical theory.

  16. Incoherent transport in clean quantum critical metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davison, Richard A; Hartnoll, Sean A

    2015-01-01

    In a clean quantum critical metal, and in the absence of umklapp, most d.c. conductivities are formally infinite due to momentum conservation. However, there is a particular combination of the charge and heat currents which has a finite, universal conductivity. In this paper, we describe the physics of this conductivity $\\sigma_Q$ in quantum critical metals obtained by charge doping a strongly interacting conformal field theory. We show that it satisfies an Einstein relation and controls the diffusivity of a conserved charge in the metal. We compute $\\sigma_Q$ in a class of theories with holographic gravitational duals. Finally, we show how the temperature scaling of $\\sigma_Q$ depends on certain critical exponents characterizing the quantum critical metal. The holographic results are found to be reproduced by the scaling analysis, with the charge density operator becoming marginal in the emergent low energy quantum critical theory.

  17. Criticality Code Validation Exercises with TSUNAMI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    In the criticality code validation of common systems, many paths may exist to a correct bias, bias uncertainty, and upper subcritical limit. The challenge for the criticality analyst is to select an efficient, defensible, and safe methodology to consistently obtain the correct values. One method of testing criticality code validation techniques is to use a sample system with a known bias as a test application and determine whether the methods employed can reproduce the known bias. In this paper, a low-enriched uranium (LEU) lattice critical experiment with a known bias is used as the test application, and numerous other LEU experiments are used as the benchmarks for the criticality code validation exercises using traditional and advanced parametric techniques. The parameters explored are enrichment, energy of average lethargy causing fission (EALF), and the TSUNAMI integral index ck with experiments with varying degrees of similarity. This paper is an extension of a previously published summary.

  18. Population and habitat on the feudal domain iria at the beginning of the XVIth century Eugen Ghita Populaie i habitat pe domeniul cetii iria la nceputul secolului al XVI lea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Population and habitat on the feudal domain iria at the beginning of the XVIth century Eugen Ghita and habitat on the feudal domain iria at the beginning of the XVIth century" is based on a statistical feudal domain in Transylvania in the middle Ages. The 8152 inhabitants, where nearly 90% for them

  19. ArcGIS tools for streamlining habitat map data integrationArcGIS tools for streamlining habitat map data integration Paul Jessop, Chris Goldfinger, Chris RomsosPaul Jessop, Chris Goldfinger, Chris Romsos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldfinger, Chris

    ArcGIS tools for streamlining habitat map data integrationArcGIS tools for streamlining habitat map. In addressing these problems, we are developing ArcGIS tools that streamline the regeneration of data quality navigation). The data quality tools encapsulate and automate specific processing steps used to create ranked

  20. OOTW Force Design Tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, R.E.; Hartley, D.S.III; Packard, S.L.

    1999-05-01

    This report documents refined requirements for tools to aid the process of force design in Operations Other Than War (OOTWs). It recommends actions for the creation of one tool and work on other tools relating to mission planning. It also identifies the governmental agencies and commands with interests in each tool, from whom should come the user advisory groups overseeing the respective tool development activities. The understanding of OOTWs and their analytical support requirements has matured to the point where action can be taken in three areas: force design, collaborative analysis, and impact analysis. While the nature of the action and the length of time before complete results can be expected depends on the area, in each case the action should begin immediately. Force design for OOTWs is not a technically difficult process. Like force design for combat operations, it is a process of matching the capabilities of forces against the specified and implied tasks of the operation, considering the constraints of logistics, transport and force availabilities. However, there is a critical difference that restricts the usefulness of combat force design tools for OOTWs: the combat tools are built to infer non-combat capability requirements from combat capability requirements and cannot reverse the direction of the inference, as is required for OOTWs. Recently, OOTWs have played a larger role in force assessment, system effectiveness and tradeoff analysis, and concept and doctrine development and analysis. In the first Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR), each of the Services created its own OOTW force design tool. Unfortunately, the tools address different parts of the problem and do not coordinate the use of competing capabilities. These tools satisfied the immediate requirements of the QDR, but do not provide a long-term cost-effective solution.

  1. Mechanizing Exploratory Game Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Adam Marshall

    2012-01-01

    Game Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.4.1 Designlevel Design Spaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  2. Summary Many seasonally flooded habitats in the tropics are dominated by one or a few tree species. We tested the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coley, Phyllis

    Summary Many seasonally flooded habitats in the tropics are dominated by one or a few tree species. We tested the hypothesis that the inability to tolerate flooding restricts most species from becoming established in flood-prone habitats. We comparedmorphologicalandphysiologicalresponsestoflood- ing

  3. Monitoring salmon habitat in small streams using streambed profiling and the importance of large woody debris for juvenile chinook salmon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) determine the importance of large woody debris (LWD) in providing fish habitat in small, boreal forest of fish habitat in placer-mined streams. LWD was abundant and formed 28% of the pools in these streams correlated with LWD abundance. My findings suggest that LWD performs a similar function in creating fish

  4. Species Diversity of Seed-Eating Desert Rodents in Sand Dune Habitats Author(s): James H. Brown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, James H.

    Species Diversity of Seed-Eating Desert Rodents in Sand Dune Habitats Author(s): James H. Brown DIVERSITY OF SEED-EATING DESERT RODENTS IN SAND DUNE HABITATS' JAMES H. BROWN Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City 84112 Abstract.The seed-eatingrodent faunas were sampled on 18 dunes

  5. Tolerance of resting cells of freshwater and terrestrial benthic diatoms to experimental desiccation and freezing is habitat-dependent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    desiccation and freezing is habitat-dependent CAROLINE SOUFFREAU, PIETER VANORMELINGEN, KOEN SABBE AND WIM of freshwater and terrestrial benthic diatoms to experimental desiccation and freezing is habitat, except for strains of some terrestrial taxa, freezing. In contrast, resting cells of several

  6. Primary Research Paper Is there a link between the type of habitat and the patterns of abundance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernández, José Carlos

    , 38206 Canary Islands, Spain (*Author for correspondence: E-mail: ftuya@yahoo.es) Received 11 January, Canary Islands, habitat, holothurians, rocky reefs, sea urchins Abstract The presence of a mosaic, including two islands and several replicated sites within each type of habitat and island. Three species

  7. Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development quarterly report, May--July 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    Progress for the quarter is reported in the areas of system definition and analysis and design and test of critical components.

  8. Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, February, 1996--April, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-07-08

    This paper describes the design and testing of critical gas turbine components. Development of catalytic combustors and diagnostic equipment is included.

  9. The Use of Catalysts in Near-Critical Water Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2005-06-26

    The use of heterogeneous catalysts in near-critical water processing provides many challenges of material stability in addition to the normal questions of chemical activity. Conventional catalyst materials developed in traditional organic chemistry or petroleum chemistry applications provide a source of information of materials with the required activities but often without the required stability when used in hot liquid water. The importance of the use of catalysts in near-critical water processing plays a particularly crucial role for the development of renewable fuels and chemicals based on biomass feedstocks. Stability issues include both those related to the catalytic metal and also to the catalyst support material. In fact, the stability of the support is the most likely concern when using conventional catalyst formulations in near-critical water processing. Processing test results are used to show important design parameters for catalyst formulations for use in wet biomass gasification in high-pressure water and in catalytic hydrogenations in water for production of value-added chemical products from biomass in the biorefinery concept. Analytical methods including powder x-ray diffraction for crystallite size and composition determination, surface area and porosity measurements, and elemental analysis have all been used to quantify differences in catalyst materials before and after use. By these methods both the chemical and physical stability of heterogeneous catalysts can be verified.

  10. Determining Home Range and Preferred Habitat of Feral Horses on the Nevada National Security Site Using Geographic Information Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, Ashley V.

    2014-05-30

    Feral horses (Equus caballus) are free-roaming descendants of domesticated horses and legally protected by the Wild and Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act of 1971, which mandates how feral horses and burros should be managed and protected on federal lands. Using a geographic information system to determine the home range and suitable habitat of feral horses on the federally managed Nevada National Security Site can enable wildlife biologists in making best management practice recommendations. Home range was estimated at 88.1 square kilometers. Site suitability was calculated for elevation, forage, slope, water presence and horse observations. These variables were combined in successive iterations into one polygon. Suitability rankings established that 85 square kilometers are most suitable habitat, with 2,052 square kilometers of good habitat 1,252 square kilometers of fair habitat and 122 square kilometers of least suitable habitat.

  11. Greater Sage-Grouse Habitat Use and Population Demographics at the Simpson Ridge Wind Resource Area, Carbon County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory D. Johnson; Chad W. LeBeau; Ryan Nielsen; Troy Rintz; Jamey Eddy; Matt Holloran

    2012-03-27

    This study was conducted to obtain baseline data on use of the proposed Simpson Ridge Wind Resource Area (SRWRA) in Carbon County, Wyoming by greater sage-grouse. The first two study years were designed to determine pre-construction seasonally selected habitats and population-level vital rates (productivity and survival). The presence of an existing wind energy facility in the project area, the PacifiCorp Seven Mile Hill (SMH) project, allowed us to obtain some information on initial sage-grouse response to wind turbines the first two years following construction. To our knowledge these are the first quantitative data on sage-grouse response to an existing wind energy development. This report presents results of the first two study years (April 1, 2009 through March 30, 2011). This study was selected for continued funding by the National Wind Coordinating Collaborative Sage-Grouse Collaborative (NWCC-SGC) and has been ongoing since March 30, 2011. Future reports summarizing results of this research will be distributed through the NWCC-SGC. To investigate population trends through time, we determined the distribution and numbers of males using leks throughout the study area, which included a 4-mile radius buffer around the SRWRA. Over the 2-year study, 116 female greater sage-grouse were captured by spotlighting and use of hoop nets on roosts surrounding leks during the breeding period. Radio marked birds were located anywhere from twice a week to once a month, depending on season. All radio-locations were classified to season. We developed predictor variables used to predict success of fitness parameters and relative probability of habitat selection within the SRWRA and SMH study areas. Anthropogenic features included paved highways, overhead transmission lines, wind turbines and turbine access roads. Environmental variables included vegetation and topography features. Home ranges were estimated using a kernel density estimator. We developed resource selection functions (RSF) to estimate probability of selection within the SRWRA and SMH. Fourteen active greater sage-grouse leks were documented during lek surveys Mean lek size decreased from 37 in 2008 to 22 in 2010. Four leks located 0.61, 1.3, 1.4 and 2.5 km from the nearest wind turbine remained active throughout the study, but the total number of males counted on these four leks decreased from 162 the first year prior to construction (2008), to 97 in 2010. Similar lek declines were noted in regional leks not associated with wind energy development throughout Carbon County. We obtained 2,659 sage-grouse locations from radio-equipped females, which were used to map use of each project area by season. The sage-grouse populations within both study areas are relatively non-migratory, as radio-marked sage-grouse used similar areas during all annual life cycles. Potential impacts to sage-grouse from wind energy infrastructure are not well understood. The data rom this study provide insight into the early interactions of wind energy infrastructure and sage-grouse. Nest success and brood-rearing success were not statistically different between areas with and without wind energy development in the short-term. Nest success also was not influenced by anthropogenic features such as turbines in the short-term. Additionally, female survival was similar among both study areas, suggesting wind energy infrastructure was not impacting female survival in the short-term; however, further analysis is needed to identify habitats with different levels of risk to better understand the impact of wind enregy development on survival. Nest and brood-rearing habitat selection were not influenced by turbines in the short-term; however, summer habitat selection occurred within habitats closer to wind turbines. Major roads were avoided in both study areas and during most of the seasons. The impact of transmission lines varied among study areas, suggesting other landscape features may be influencing selection. The data provided in this report are preliminary and are not meant to provide a basis for fo

  12. Structure Fitness Sharing (SFS) for Evolutionary Design by Genetic Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Jianjun

    Structure Fitness Sharing (SFS) for Evolutionary Design by Genetic Programming Abstract Balanced structure and parameter search is critical to evolutionary design with Genetic programming (GP). Structure and in neural network design. In all of these problems, the objective is to search for an open-ended structure

  13. Oil platforms off California are among the most productive marine fish habitats globally

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Love, Milton

    Oil platforms off California are among the most productive marine fish habitats globally Jeremy T (received for review June 20, 2014) Secondary (i.e., heterotrophic or animal) production is a main pathway. We found that oil and gas platforms off the coast of California have the highest secondary fish

  14. 2005 Proc. Annu. Conf. SEAFWA Movement and Habitat Selection of Largemouth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    prey. Increasing structural habitat may not measurably increase angler catch rates for largemouth bass their efforts on educating anglers to direct fishing effort to open areas to increase catch rates of largemouth and Rainwater 1975, Schlagenhoff and Murphy 1985, Betsill et al. 1986), shoreline (Lyons 1983, Wanjala et al

  15. Effects of Regulated River Flows on Habitat Suitability for the Robust Redhorse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwak, Thomas J.

    , with wild populations occurring in three drainages from North Carolina to Georgia. Hydroelectric dams have Robust Redhorse habitat was recently prescribed for Blewett Falls Dam, a hydroelectric facility frag- mentation as a result of hydroelectric dams (Warren et al. 1997, 2000; Ricciardi and Rasmussen

  16. SEASONALITY OF FISHES OCCUPYING A SURF ZONE HABITAT IN THE NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AND STEPHEN T. ROSS2 ABSTRACf The ichthyofauna occupying the surfzone habitat ofHom Island, Mississippi tides), increased metabolic efficiency via heat acquisition, and protection from predation. Surf zone occurrences within the surf zone of Horn Island, Miss., a barrier island in the northern Gulf of Mexico

  17. Enhancing the detection and classification of coral reef and associated benthic habitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rundquist, Donald C.

    Enhancing the detection and classification of coral reef and associated benthic habitats. Rundquist, M. Lawson, and R. Perk (2007), Enhancing the detection and classification of coral reef and Atkinson, 2000]. Holden and LeDrew [1999] have shown that a high-resolution in situ spectral library can

  18. BIRD USE OF NATURAL AND RECENTLY REVEGETATED COTTONWOOD-WILLOW HABITATS ON THE KERN RIVER1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BIRD USE OF NATURAL AND RECENTLY REVEGETATED COTTONWOOD-WILLOW HABITATS ON THE KERN RIVER1 William Conference; September 22-24, 1988; Davis, California. 2 Wildlife Biologist, Center for Environmental Studies of the California-endangered yellow-billed cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus; Anderson and Laymon, 1989). In addition, we

  19. Fates of methane from different lake habitats: Connecting whole-lake budgets and CH4 emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Michael L.

    Fates of methane from different lake habitats: Connecting whole-lake budgets and CH4 emissions September 2007; revised 3 February 2008; accepted 28 February 2008; published 24 May 2008. [1] Methane (CH4 clear. We quantified internal cycling and methane emissions in three lakes during summer stratification

  20. American Journal of Botany 88(6): 10961102. 2001. HABITAT-RELATED ERROR IN ESTIMATING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilf, Peter

    for this habitat variation to introduce error into temperature reconstructions, based on field data from a modern proportion of liana species with toothed leaves in lakeside and riverside samples appears to be responsible forests between the proportion of woody dicotyledonous spe- cies with entire-margined leaves in a flora

  1. Nekton of New Seagrass Habitats Colonizing a Subsided Salt Marsh in Galveston Bay, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nekton of New Seagrass Habitats Colonizing a Subsided Salt Marsh in Galveston Bay, Texas SETH P Delwood Beach Road, Panama City, Florida 32408 ABSTRACT: Subsidence and erosion of intertidal salt marsh on this system is the extrac- tion of subsurface oil, gas, and water resources that has caused land subsidence

  2. Natural recovery and restoration in giant panda habitat after the Wenchuan earthquake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natural recovery and restoration in giant panda habitat after the Wenchuan earthquake Jindong Zhang in revised form 20 January 2014 Accepted 21 January 2014 Keywords: Earthquake Restoration Natural recovery Reserve in Sichuan, China after the catastrophic Wenchuan earthquake (magnitude 8.0) in 2008, which caused

  3. MAINE GAP ANALYSIS VERTEBRATE DATA -PART I: DISTRIBUTION, HABITAT RELATIONS, AND STATUS OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boone, Randall B.

    MAINE GAP ANALYSIS VERTEBRATE DATA - PART I: DISTRIBUTION, HABITAT RELATIONS, AND STATUS OF AMPHIBIANS, REPTILES AND MAMMALS IN MAINE Randall B. Boonea Department of Wildlife Ecology and Maine Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469-5755 and William B. Krohn

  4. MAINE GAP ANALYSIS VERTEBRATE DATA -PART II: DISTRIBUTION, HABITAT RELATIONS, AND STATUS OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boone, Randall B.

    MAINE GAP ANALYSIS VERTEBRATE DATA - PART II: DISTRIBUTION, HABITAT RELATIONS, AND STATUS OF BREEDING BIRDS IN MAINE Randall B. Boonea Department of Wildlife Ecology and Maine Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469-5755 and William B. Krohn USGS Biological

  5. INSIGHT: Internet-Sensor Integration for Habitat Monitoring Murat Demirbas Ken Yian Chow Chieh Shyan Wan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    strength monitoring system, we investigate monitoring of a controlled, small environment via WSN. We seeINSIGHT: Internet-Sensor Integration for Habitat Monitoring Murat Demirbas Ken Yian Chow Chieh, and deploying of an Internet accessible wireless sensor network for monitoring of the temperature, humidity

  6. Distribution and Habitat Associations of Billfish and Swordfish Larvae across Mesoscale Features in the Gulf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rooker, Jay R.

    Distribution and Habitat Associations of Billfish and Swordfish Larvae across Mesoscale Features additive models (GAMs). Mesoscale features in the NGoM affected the distribution and abundance of billfish and Swordfish Larvae across Mesoscale Features in the Gulf of Mexico. PLoS ONE 7(4): e34180. doi:10.1371/journal

  7. Santa Monica Mountain Steelhead Assessment Santa Monica Mountains Steelhead Habitat Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Ed

    Santa Monica Mountain Steelhead Assessment 1 Santa Monica Mountains Steelhead Habitat Assessment identify which basins in the Santa Monica Mountains (SMM) are most capable of supporting steelhead trout watersheds within the SMM. Field Setting Geology of the Santa Monica Mountains The Santa Monica Mountains

  8. Production of stream habitat gradients by montane watersheds: hypothesis tests based on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that lotic communities are structured by the quality and quantity of energy inputs to a streamProduction of stream habitat gradients by montane watersheds: hypothesis tests based on spatially of mountain watersheds interact to cause gradients in three stream attributes: baseflow stream widths, total

  9. Civil engineering is concerned with virtually all aspects of the urban habitat and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Civil engineering is concerned with virtually all aspects of the urban habitat and the interactions place for a graduate student in civil engineering. Our strength is in the comprehensive nature of our Engineering: MEng, MASc, PhD Cities Engineering and Management: MEngCEM Engineering Education: Master's and Ph

  10. Are hybrid species more fit than ancestral parent species in the current hybrid species habitats?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieseberg, Loren

    Are hybrid species more fit than ancestral parent species in the current hybrid species habitats? L Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada Introduction Hybridization is receiving renewed attention as an important). For homoploid hybridization in plants, where chromosome number remains the same, models and empirical evi- dence

  11. Land use and habitat gradients determine bird community diversity and abundance in suburban, rural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Land use and habitat gradients determine bird community diversity and abundance in suburban, rural, with reserves slightly below rural. Although reserves were like rural lands in diversity of bird communities bird communities, but differed in grassland and savanna bird communities. The extensive rural forests

  12. USING RESIDENT SMALL MAMMALS TO ASSESS THE HABITAT POTENTIAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BIOFUELS FEEDSTOCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USING RESIDENT SMALL MAMMALS TO ASSESS THE HABITAT POTENTIAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BIOFUELS FEEDSTOCKS ...................................................................................................................35 CHAPTER 2: Comparing survival of deer mice across experimental biofuels plots in Eastern South ...................................................................................................................65 CHAPTER 3: Small mammal diversity across 4 experimental biofuels plots in Eastern South Dakota

  13. HABITAT AND POPULATIONS OF THE VALLEY ELDERBERRY LONGHORN BEETLE ALONG THE SACRAMENTO RIVER1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HABITAT AND POPULATIONS OF THE VALLEY ELDERBERRY LONGHORN BEETLE ALONG THE SACRAMENTO RIVER1 F, and Environmental Specialist, respectively, Jones & Stokes Associates, Inc., Sacramento, California. Abstract: Prior and Putah Creek in the Sacramento Valley, and along several rivers in the northern San Joaquin Valley

  14. SAMPLING, DISTRIBUTION, DISPERSAL Larval Mosquito Habitat Utilization and Community Dynamics of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    vector of dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever (Estrada-Franco and Craig 1995, Knudsen et al. 1996). Ae. albopictus was solely respon- sible from the outbreak of dengue fever in Hawaii during 2001 (Efßer et alSAMPLING, DISTRIBUTION, DISPERSAL Larval Mosquito Habitat Utilization and Community Dynamics

  15. It's intuitively obvious that habitat is important to fishes and the fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    It's intuitively obvious that habitat is important to fishes and the fisheries they support to account for it in fisheries management. This is especially true for marine fishes like gag grouper fisherman worth his or her salt has a closely-guarded collection of GPS coordinates and an electronic fish

  16. WINTER HABITAT SELECTION AND SURVIVAL BY SAGE-GROUSE IN SOUTHEASTERN ALBERTA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldridge, Cameron

    WINTER HABITAT SELECTION AND SURVIVAL BY SAGE-GROUSE IN SOUTHEASTERN ALBERTA FINAL PROJECT REPORT FOR 2003 - 2004 SAGE-GROUSE FUNDING PARTNERS Cameron L. Aldridge* (University of Alberta) Randy Lee (Alberta Conservation Association) Paul Jones (Alberta Conservation Association) Joel Nicholson (Alberta

  17. Page 1 of 2 Rank Project Title Applicant Name State Acreage and Habitats ERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    , Submerged Aquatic Vegetation Planting, and Oyster Reef Establishment. Cornell Cooperative Extension,275 6 Restoration of historically degraged eelgrass and bay scallops to the coastal bays of Virginia Restoration Fish Habitat Breakwater Project The City of Gulf Breeze FL 3 salt marsh, 1 dune, 5 water column, 2

  18. Nyman RNR 3108 Renewable Natural Resources 3108: CASE STUDIES IN HABITAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nyman, John

    Nyman RNR 3108 Renewable Natural Resources 3108: CASE STUDIES IN HABITAT RESTORATION Syllabus:30 to 1:20; Thursdays, Room 141 Renewable Natural Resources Building Laboratory: 1:30-4:20, Thursdays, departs from Room 141, Renewable Natural Resources Building. Field notebooks are required for all field

  19. Characterization of Habitat for Hawksbill Turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) in Los Roques Archipelago National Park, Venezuela 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Luciana E.

    2010-10-12

    marinas y efecto de las actividades humana sobre estas especies y sus habitats dentro del Parque Nacional Archipielago Los Roques - primer informe de avance. Fundaci?n Cient?fica Los Roques FCLR (2007) Programa integral de conservaci?n y desarrollo...

  20. Comfort Conditions in a Habitat for Humanity House in Central Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kootin-Sanwu, V.; Haberl, J. S.; Kim, B.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary results of an analysis of measured comfort conditions for a Habitat for humanity house in central Texas. In the case study house indoor-outdoor temperature, humidity and C02 levels have been monitored in an attempt...

  1. Habitat Projects Completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, 1999 Completion Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Bradley J.

    2000-01-01

    The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Program (ACMWP) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The Asotin Creek watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington in WRIA 35. According to WDFW's Priority WRIA's by At-Risk Stock Significance Map, it is the highest priority in southeastern WA. Snake River spring chinook salmon, summer steelhead and bull trout, which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. The ACMWP began coordinating habitat projects in 1995. Approximately two hundred seventy-six projects have been implemented through the ACMWP as of 1999. Twenty of these projects were funded in part through Bonneville Power Administration's 1999 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. These projects used a variety of methods to enhance and protect watershed conditions. In-stream work for fish habitat included construction of hard structures (e.g. vortex rock weirs), meander reconstruction, placement of large woody debris (LWD) and whole trees and improvements to off-channel rearing habitat; thirty-eight were created with these structures. Three miles of stream benefited from riparian improvements such as vegetative plantings (17,000 trees and shrubs) and noxious weed control. Two sediment basin constructions, 67 acres of grass seeding, and seven hundred forty-five acres of minimum till were implemented to reduce sediment production and delivery to streams in the watershed.

  2. Habitat Projects Completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, 1998 Completion Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Bradley J.

    1999-11-01

    The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Program (ACMWP) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The Asotin Creek watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington. Snake River spring chinook salmon, summer steelhead and bull trout, which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. The ACMWP began coordinating habitat projects in 1995. Approximately two hundred forty-six projects have been implemented through the ACMWP as of 1998. Fifty-nine of these projects were funded in part through Bonneville Power Administration's 1998 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. These projects used a variety of methods to enhance and protect watershed conditions. In-stream work for fish habitat included construction of hard structures (e.g. vortex rock weirs), meander reconstruction, placement of large woody debris (LWD) and whole trees and improvements to off-channel rearing habitat; one hundred thirty-nine pools were created with these structures. Three miles of stream benefited from riparian improvements such as fencing, vegetative plantings, and noxious weed control. Two alternative water developments were completed, providing off-stream-watering sources for livestock. 20,500 ft of upland terrace construction, seven sediment basin construction, one hundred eighty-seven acres of grass seeding, eight hundred fifty acres of direct seeding and eighteen sediment basin cleanouts were implemented to reduce sediment production and delivery to streams in the watershed.

  3. SKIPJACK TUNA, KATSVWONVS PELAMIS, HABITAT BASED ON TEMPERATURE AND OXYGEN REQUIREMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SKIPJACK TUNA, KATSVWONVS PELAMIS, HABITAT BASED ON TEMPERATURE AND OXYGEN REQUIREMENTS RICHARD A,Katsuwonus pelamis, has generally been assumed to be the warm surface layers oftropical and subtropical ocean, where. For skipjack tuna, Katsllwonus pelamis (Lin- naeus), the question "Where are the fish?" is par- ticularly hard

  4. Hydrological and habitat controls of algal biodiversity and biomass in a subtropical flood-pulsed wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    Hydrological and habitat controls of algal biodiversity and biomass in a subtropical flood;Microalgae, base of aquatic food webs Ecosystem services. Provisioning: food, fiber and fuel. Regulating estimate of algal biodiversity in the Okavango Delta A2)Explain biomass and diversity patterns in relation

  5. Data Mining on Large Data Set for Predicting Salmon Spawning Habitat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, YuLong; Murray, Christopher J.; Hanrahan, Timothy P.; Geist, David R.

    2008-07-01

    Hydraulic properties related to river flow affect salmon spawning habitat. Accurate prediction of salmon spawning habitat and understanding the influential properties on the spawning behavior are of great interest for hydroelectric dam management. Previous research predicted salmon spawning habitat through deriving river specific spawning suitability indices and employing a function estimate method like logistic regression on several static river flow related properties and had some success. The objective of this study was two-fold. First dynamic river flow properties associated with upstream dam operation were successfully derived from a huge set of time series of both water velocity and water depth for about one fifth of a million habitat cells through principal component analysis (PCA) using nonlinear iterative partial least squares (NIPLAS). The inclusion of dynamic variables in the models greatly improved the model prediction. Secondly, nine machine learning methods were applied to the data and it was found that decision tree and rule induction methods were generally outperformed usually used logistic regression. Specifically random forest, an advanced decision tree algorithm, provided unanimous better results. Over-prediction problem in previous studies were greatly alleviated.

  6. Shell decay rates of native and alien freshwater bivalves and implications for habitat engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shell decay rates of native and alien freshwater bivalves and implications for habitat engineering by the alien Corbicula and Dreissena may have little effect on standing stocks of spent shells, unless the aliens invade sites where unionids are scarce or absent. Keywords: aragonite, calcite, calcium carbonate

  7. The woodlands of Britain, in common with many natural habitats throughout the World,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    273 The woodlands of Britain, in common with many natural habitats throughout the World, have objectives in order to create `joined-up' sustainable forest landscapes. The woodland resource Woodland once', Kevin Watts explains the new ideas in managing fragmented woodland for conservation and biodiversity

  8. Existing Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Habitat for Humanity South Sarasota County, Venice, Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-11-01

    PNNL and Calcs Plus helped the South Sarasota County Florida Habitat for Humanity retrofit a 1978 single-story home by stripping old drywall, air sealing concrete block walls, and installing rigid insulation, furring strips, and new drywall. The attic was sealed and insulated with spray foam to house a new heat pump.

  9. EVALUATING UNCERTAINTY IN PHYSICAL HABITAT MODELLING IN A HIGH-GRADIENT MOUNTAIN STREAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venditti, Jeremy G.

    . Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. key words: instream flow; low-flow period; fish habitat; run-of-river. Instream flow requirements are often required for run-of-the river (RoR) hydroelectric project developments, Canada c Department of Geography, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada d Bridge River Generation

  10. Freshwater mussels and water quality: A review of the effects of hydrologic and instream habitat alterations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watters, G. Thomas

    , The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43212 ABSTRACT: Hydraulic impacts represent a suite of habitat. These hydraulic impacts thus overlap each other to one degree or another. I have attempted to break them down Perhaps mankinds earliest attempt to manipulate free- flowing water was the dam. Dams could be used

  11. Characterization of late Campanian and Maastrichtian planktonic foraminiferal depth habitats and vital activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and vital activities based on stable isotopes Sigal Abramovich a;Ã , Gerta Keller a , Doris Stu«ben b the deeper thermocline layer during cool climatic intervals. Two distinct types of `vital effect' mechanisms reserved. Keywords: late Cretaceous; planktonic foraminifera; stable isotopes; depth habitats; vital e

  12. Perennial Agroenergy Feedstocks as En Route Habitat for Spring Migratory Birds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    +Business Media New York 2012 Abstract Increased production of bioenergy crops in North America is projected unit area (species density) was relative- ly higher in switchgrass fields. The percent land cover and species density. Habitat patch size and within-patch vegetation structure were unimportant in predicting

  13. CRITICALITY SAFETY CONTROLS AND THE SAFETY BASIS AT PFP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kessler, S

    2009-04-21

    With the implementation of DOE Order 420.1B, Facility Safety, and DOE-STD-3007-2007, 'Guidelines for Preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations at Department of Energy Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities', a new requirement was imposed that all criticality safety controls be evaluated for inclusion in the facility Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) and that the evaluation process be documented in the site Criticality Safety Program Description Document (CSPDD). At the Hanford site in Washington State the CSPDD, HNF-31695, 'General Description of the FH Criticality Safety Program', requires each facility develop a linking document called a Criticality Control Review (CCR) to document performance of these evaluations. Chapter 5, Appendix 5B of HNF-7098, Criticality Safety Program, provided an example of a format for a CCR that could be used in lieu of each facility developing its own CCR. Since the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) is presently undergoing Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D), new procedures are being developed for cleanout of equipment and systems that have not been operated in years. Existing Criticality Safety Evaluations (CSE) are revised, or new ones written, to develop the controls required to support D&D activities. Other Hanford facilities, including PFP, had difficulty using the basic CCR out of HNF-7098 when first implemented. Interpretation of the new guidelines indicated that many of the controls needed to be elevated to TSR level controls. Criterion 2 of the standard, requiring that the consequence of a criticality be examined for establishing the classification of a control, was not addressed. Upon in-depth review by PFP Criticality Safety staff, it was not clear that the programmatic interpretation of criterion 8C could be applied at PFP. Therefore, the PFP Criticality Safety staff decided to write their own CCR. The PFP CCR provides additional guidance for the evaluation team to use by clarifying the evaluation criteria in DOE-STD-3007-2007. In reviewing documents used in classifying controls for Nuclear Safety, it was noted that DOE-HDBK-1188, 'Glossary of Environment, Health, and Safety Terms', defines an Administrative Control (AC) in terms that are different than typically used in Criticality Safety. As part of this CCR, a new term, Criticality Administrative Control (CAC) was defined to clarify the difference between an AC used for criticality safety and an AC used for nuclear safety. In Nuclear Safety terms, an AC is a provision relating to organization and management, procedures, recordkeeping, assessment, and reporting necessary to ensure safe operation of a facility. A CAC was defined as an administrative control derived in a criticality safety analysis that is implemented to ensure double contingency. According to criterion 2 of Section IV, 'Linkage to the Documented Safety Analysis', of DOESTD-3007-2007, the consequence of a criticality should be examined for the purposes of classifying the significance of a control or component. HNF-PRO-700, 'Safety Basis Development', provides control selection criteria based on consequence and risk that may be used in the development of a Criticality Safety Evaluation (CSE) to establish the classification of a component as a design feature, as safety class or safety significant, i.e., an Engineered Safety Feature (ESF), or as equipment important to safety; or merely provides defense-in-depth. Similar logic is applied to the CACs. Criterion 8C of DOE-STD-3007-2007, as written, added to the confusion of using the basic CCR from HNF-7098. The PFP CCR attempts to clarify this criterion by revising it to say 'Programmatic commitments or general references to control philosophy (e.g., mass control or spacing control or concentration control as an overall control strategy for the process without specific quantification of individual limits) is included in the PFP DSA'. Table 1 shows the PFP methodology for evaluating CACs. This evaluation process has been in use since February of 2008 and has proven to be simple and effective. Each control identified i

  14. Nuclear Criticality Safety Guide for Fire Protection

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This guide is intended to provide information for use by fire protection professionals in the application of reasonable methods of fire protection in those facilities where there is a potential for nuclear criticality.

  15. Critical-Point Structure in Finite Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Leviatan

    2006-12-04

    Properties of quantum shape-phase transitions in finite nuclei are considered in the framework of the interacting boson model. Special emphasis is paid to the dynamics at the critical-point of a general first-order phase transition.

  16. Neutron absorbing coating for nuclear criticality control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mizia, Ronald E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Richard N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Swank, William D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lister, Tedd E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Pinhero, Patrick J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2007-10-23

    A neutron absorbing coating for use on a substrate, and which provides nuclear criticality control is described and which includes a nickel, chromium, molybdenum, and gadolinium alloy having less than about 5% boron, by weight.

  17. Intervention: Critical physical geography Rebecca Lave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Rebecca

    Intervention: Critical physical geography Rebecca Lave Department of Geography, Indiana University Matthew W. Wilson Department of Geography, University of Kentucky Elizabeth S. Barron Department Christine Biermann Department of Geography, The Ohio State University Mark A. Carey Department of History

  18. Photovoltaic Incentive Design Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoff, T. E.

    2006-12-01

    Investments in customer-owned grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) energy systems are growing at a steady pace. This is due, in part, to the availability of attractive economic incentives offered by public state agencies and utilities. In the United States, these incentives have largely been upfront lump payments tied to the system capacity rating. While capacity-based ''buydowns'' have stimulated the domestic PV market, they have been criticized for subsidizing systems with potentially poor energy performance. As a result, the industry has been forced to consider alternative incentive structures, particularly ones that pay based on long-term measured performance. The industry, however, lacks consensus in the debate over the tradeoffs between upfront incentive payments versus longer-term payments for energy delivery. This handbook is designed for agencies and utilities that offer or intend to offer incentive programs for customer-owned PV systems. Its purpose is to help select, design, and implement incentive programs that best meet programmatic goals. The handbook begins with a discussion of the various available incentive structures and then provides qualitative and quantitative tools necessary to design the most appropriate incentive structure. It concludes with program administration considerations.

  19. RELAP5 subcooled critical flow model verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petelin, S.; Gortnar, O.; Mavko, B. (Institut Jozef Stefan, Ljubljana (Solomon Islands))

    1993-01-01

    We discuss some results of the RELAP5 break modeling during the analysis of International Standard Problem 27 (ISP-27) performed on the BETHSY facility. This study deals with the discontinuity of the RELAP5 critical flow prediction in a strongly subcooled region. Such unrealistic behavior was observed during the pretest simulations of ISP-27. Based on the investigation, a RELAP5 code correction is suggested that ensures a more appropriate simulation of the critical discharge of strongly subcooled liquid.

  20. Modelling and Design of Resilient Networks under Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cetinkaya, Egemen Kemal

    2013-12-31

    that can help evaluate design choices for the current and Future Internet. Graph models to analyse critical infrastructures are examined and a multilevel graph model is developed to study interdependencies between different networks. Furthermore, graph...

  1. Design and Development of a Vacuum Dehumidification Test Facility 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaff, Francesco Nima

    2014-08-13

    A test facility was designed and constructed with the capability of isolating critical variables for controlling the novel membrane dehumidification-enabled cooling system’s operation parameters as well as for acquiring preliminary membrane...

  2. Nonradiative recombination --critical in choosing quantum well number for InGaN/GaN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    results indicate that, though the efficiency droop is suppressed, the LED optical power is first improved-emitting diodes (LEDs) possessing varied quantum well (QW) numbers were systematically investigated both guidelines on choosing the critical QW number when designing LED structures. ©2014 Optical Society of America

  3. Time Valid One-Time Signature for Time-Critical Multicast Data Authentication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nahrstedt, Klara

    malicious attacks. In this paper, we propose a novel signature model ­ Time Valid One-Time Signature (TVTime Valid One-Time Signature for Time-Critical Multicast Data Authentication Qiyan Wang, Himanshu-OTS) ­ to boost the efficiency of regular one-time signature schemes. Based on the TV-OTS model, we design

  4. The Infeasibility of Quantifying the Reliability of Life-Critical Real-Time Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, Ricky W.

    in life-critical applications such as industrial-plant control, aircraft control, nuclear-reactor control in control applications. At first, the digital systems were designed to perform the same functions, or nuclear- warhead arming? What will be the price of software failure as digital computers are applied more

  5. Shielding and criticality characterization of ALR8(SI) plutonium storage containers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terekhin, Yevgeniy Vasilyevich

    1999-01-01

    An examination of the shielding and criticality safety performance of the Pantex-designed ALR8(SI) container for storage of ex-weapons pits is described. Both experimental and calculational studies were performed. The MCNP-4A code was used...

  6. Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, February 1995--April 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    Research continued on the design of advanced turbine systems. This report describes the design and test of critical components such as blades, materials, cooling, combustion, and optical diagnostics probes.

  7. Design of semi-active variable impedance materials using field-responsive fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eastman, Douglas Elmer

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis, I explored the design of a thin variable impedance material using electrorheological (ER) fluid that is intended to be worn by humans. To determine the critical design parameters of this material, the shear ...

  8. A decomposition-based approach for the integration of product development and manufacturing system design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Yong-Suk, 1975-

    2002-01-01

    Using a structured approach to understand the interaction between product design decisions and manufacturing system design is critical to reflect manufacturing system issues early in the product development process. Early ...

  9. Issues associated with a total systems approach to designing dependable systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chisholm, G.H.

    1995-12-31

    A total system approach, developed by the nuclear-reactor-safety community, is extrapolated to the design of complex, critical systems. The essential properties of these systems are described, and a generic paradigm for subsequent designs is proposed.

  10. Design and optimization of actuation mechanisms for rapid skin closure device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, Andrew T. (Andrew Thomas)

    2012-01-01

    Innovative mechanism designs were explored for the actuation of critical components in a novel rapid skin closure device used to close long surgical incisions. The rapid skin closure device is designed to speed up the wound ...

  11. Functional design of mechanical products based on behavior-driven function-environment-structure modeling framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, W.Y.

    The relative significance of upstream design activity to downstream design activity is widely recognized, due to its critical role in determining the final product’s functionality. Although there are now some general ...

  12. COUPLING CONSTRAINT BOUNDARY MAPPING IN THE PROCESS DESIGN PARAMETER SPACE WITH COMMERCIAL PROCESS SIMULATOR TO ESTIMATE PROCESS DESIGN RELIABILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Elim Rosalva

    2010-01-25

    design and an evaluation of the safety factor effectiveness in increasing reliability would identify which equipment is unnecessarily oversized, which is critically undersized and which uncertainties are the principal contributors to low reliability...

  13. Design Rational

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeeting |Design Competitions Design Competitions National9

  14. Design Editorial Design Analysis and Synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    Journal of Mechanical Design Editorial Design Analysis and Synthesis What is design? Why is design to call it simply design analysis. If a design exists, I can analyze its behavior. Based on the results of the analysis, I may have to modify the design to make it fit better to my purpose. The implication of analysis

  15. Meta-Design--Design for Designers Gerhard Fischer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Gerhard

    1 Meta-Design--Design for Designers Gerhard Fischer Center for LifeLong Learning and Design (L3 D-0430 USA gerhard@cs.colorado.edu Eric Scharff Center for LifeLong Learning and Design (L3 D) Department scharffe@cs.colorado.edu ABSTRACT One fundamental challenge for the design of the interactive systems

  16. Household disposables as breeding habitats of dengue vectors: Linking wastes and public health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, Soumyajit, E-mail: soumyajitb@gmail.com [Department of Zoology, University of Calcutta, 35 Ballygunge Circular Road, Kolkata 700 019 (India); Aditya, Gautam, E-mail: gautamaditya2001@gmail.com [Department of Zoology, University of Calcutta, 35 Ballygunge Circular Road, Kolkata 700 019 (India); Department of Zoology, The University of Burdwan, Golapbag, Burdwan 713 104 (India); Saha, Goutam K, E-mail: gkszoo@rediffmail.com [Department of Zoology, University of Calcutta, 35 Ballygunge Circular Road, Kolkata 700 019 (India)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An assessment of different household wastes as larval habitats of dengue vectors Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus was made using Kolkata, India as a model geographical area. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Household wastes of four major categories namely earthen, porcelain, plastic and coconut shells varied significantly for Aedes immature depending on species, month and location. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Based on the relative density of Aedes immature, cluster analyses allowed segregation and classification of the waste containers and relative importance as mosquito larval habitats. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conversion of disposed wastes into larval habitats cautions for continuance of Aedes population in Kolkata and similar cities of tropics lacking suitable waste management practices. - Abstract: An assessment of the household wastes as larval habitats of the dengue vectors was made considering Kolkata, India, as geographical area. Wastes of four major categories, namely, earthen, porcelain, plastic and coconut shells were monitored for positive with immature of either Aedes aegypti or Aedes albopictus. Twenty six types of wastes with varying size and shape, resembling containers, were identified that hosted mosquito immature. The number of waste containers positive for Aedes immature varied significantly (P < 0.05) with respect to location, type and month. The relative density of Aedes immature in the waste containers varied significantly (P < 0.05) with the types and months. The significant interaction between the month, waste container types and density of Aedes immature suggest that the household wastes are important contributors to the maintenance of the population of Aedes mosquito in the city. Based on the relative density of mosquito immature in the wastes, cluster analysis allowed segregation and classification of the wastes and their importance as mosquito larval habitats. Apparently, the containers that are most frequently disposed off contributed largely to the sustenance of Aedes mosquito population in the city. This calls for a strict legislation towards disposal as well as enhanced management of the household wastes. A link between the wastes disposed and subsequent conversion to the mosquito larval habitats cautions for continuance of Aedes population and possibility of dengue epidemics if the existing management practices are not improved.

  17. U.S. Department of Energy Critical Materials Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, D.; Diamond, D.; Li, J.; Sandalow, D.; Telleen, P.; Wanner, B.

    2010-12-01

    This report examines the role of rare earth metals and other materials in the clean energy economy. It was prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) based on data collected and research performed during 2010. Its main conclusions include: (a) Several clean energy technologies -- including wind turbines, electric vehicles, photovoltaic cells and fluorescent lighting -- use materials at risk of supply disruptions in the short term. Those risks will generally decrease in the medium and long term. (b) Clean energy technologies currently constitute about 20 percent of global consumption of critical materials. As clean energy technologies are deployed more widely in the decades ahead, their share of global consumption of critical materials will likely grow. (c) Of the materials analyzed, five rare earth metals (dysprosium, neodymium, terbium, europium and yttrium), as well as indium, are assessed as most critical in the short term. For this purpose, 'criticality' is a measure that combines importance to the clean energy economy and risk of supply disruption. (d) Sound policies and strategic investments can reduce the risk of supply disruptions, especially in the medium and long term. (e) Data with respect to many of the issues considered in this report are sparse. In the report, DOE describes plans to (i) develop its first integrated research agenda addressing critical materials, building on three technical workshops convened by the Department during November and December 2010; (ii) strengthen its capacity for information-gathering on this topic; and (iii) work closely with international partners, including Japan and Europe, to reduce vulnerability to supply disruptions and address critical material needs. DOE will work with other stakeholders -- including interagency colleagues, Congress and the public -- to shape policy tools that strengthen the United States' strategic capabilities. DOE also announces its plan to develop an updated critical materials strategy, based upon additional events and information, by the end of 2011.DOE's strategy with respect to critical materials rests on three pillars. First, diversified global supply chains are essential. To manage supply risk, multiple sources of materials are required. This means taking steps to facilitate extraction, processing and manufacturing here in the United States, as well as encouraging other nations to expedite alternative supplies. In all cases, extraction and processing should be done in an environmentally sound manner. Second, substitutes must be developed. Research leading to material and technology substitutes will improve flexibility and help meet the material needs of the clean energy economy. Third, recycling, reuse and more efficient use could significantly lower world demand for newly extracted materials. Research into recycling processes coupled with well-designed policies will help make recycling economically viable over time.The scope of this report is limited. It does not address the material needs of the entire economy, the entire energy sector or even all clean energy technologies. Time and resource limitations precluded a comprehensive scope. Among the topics that merit additional research are the use of rare earth metals in catalytic converters and in petroleum refining. These topics are discussed briefly in Chapter 2.

  18. The Critical Mass Laboratory at Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothe, Robert E

    2003-10-15

    The Critical Mass Laboratory (CML) at Rocky Flats northwest of Denver, Colorado, was built in 1964 and commissioned to conduct nuclear experiments on January 28, 1965. It was built to attain more accurate and precise experimental data to ensure nuclear criticality safety at the plant than were previously possible. Prior to its construction, safety data were obtained from long extrapolations of subcritical data (called in situ experiments), calculated parameters from reactor engineering 'models', and a few other imprecise methods. About 1700 critical and critical-approach experiments involving several chemical forms of enriched uranium and plutonium were performed between then and 1988. These experiments included single units and arrays of fissile materials, reflected and 'bare' systems, and configurations with various degrees of moderation, as well as some containing strong neutron absorbers. In 1989, a raid by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) caused the plant as a whole to focus on 'resumption' instead of further criticality safety experiments. Though either not recognized or not admitted for a few years, that FBI raid did sound the death knell for the CML. The plant's optimistic goal of resumption evolved to one of deactivation, decommissioning, and plantwide demolition during the 1990s. The once-proud CML facility was finally demolished in April of 2002.

  19. Robust design using sequential computer experiments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Abhishek

    2004-09-30

    step for robust design is to classify the input factors as controllable factors or design variables, xc, and noise factors or environmental variables, xe. We suppose the domain of y is ? which is a fixed subset of d and ?ec x . The process... follows the style and format of ASME Journal of Manufacturing Science and Engineering. 2 • PWB thickness & material properties • Component properties • Interconnect geometry Bending von Mises stress of critical solder joints INPUTS: x...

  20. Fuel Cells for Critical Communications Backup Power | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cells for Critical Communications Backup Power Fuel Cells for Critical Communications Backup Power This presentation provides information about using fuel cells for emergency...

  1. Critical Materials Research in DOE Video (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a text version of the "Critical Materials Research in DOE" video presented at the Critical Materials Workshop, held on April 3, 2012 in Arlington, Virginia.

  2. Department of Energy Critical Materials Strategy Video (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a text version of the "Department of Energy Critical Materials Strategy" video presented at the Critical Materials Workshop, held on April 3, 2012 in Arlington, Virginia.

  3. CNG, Hydrogen, CNG-Hydrogen Blends - Critical Fuel Properties...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CNG, Hydrogen, CNG-Hydrogen Blends - Critical Fuel Properties and Behavior CNG, Hydrogen, CNG-Hydrogen Blends - Critical Fuel Properties and Behavior Presentation given by Jay...

  4. The Critical Materials Institute announces two new industry members...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Critical Materials Institute announces two new industry members Contacts: For release: Aug. 18, 2015 Alex King, Director, Critical Materials Institute, (515) 296-4505 Laura...

  5. Critical Materials Institute's rare-earth recycling tech goes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Critical Materials Institute's rare-earth recycling tech goes commercial OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Aug. 10, 2015-The Critical Materials Institute is celebrating its first commercial...

  6. Effects of Ignition Quality and Fuel Composition on Critical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ignition Quality and Fuel Composition on Critical Equivalence Ratio Effects of Ignition Quality and Fuel Composition on Critical Equivalence Ratio Our research shows that fuel can...

  7. DOE NSF Partnership to Address Critical Challenges in Hydrogen...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    NSF Partnership to Address Critical Challenges in Hydrogen Production from Solar Water Splitting DOE NSF Partnership to Address Critical Challenges in Hydrogen Production from...

  8. National Academies Criticality Methodology and Assessment Video (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a text version of the "National Academies Criticality Methodology and Assessment" video presented at the Critical Materials Workshop, held on April 3, 2012 in Arlington, Virginia.

  9. NIST Roadmap for Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity February 12, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NIST Roadmap for Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity February 12, 2014 1. Introduction This companion Roadmap to the Framework for Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity ("the

  10. The Department of Energy Releases Strategy on Critical Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Department of Energy Releases Strategy on Critical Materials The Department of Energy Releases Strategy on Critical Materials December 15, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis The Department...

  11. President's 2014 Budget Proposes Critical Investments in Clean...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    President's 2014 Budget Proposes Critical Investments in Clean Energy President's 2014 Budget Proposes Critical Investments in Clean Energy April 17, 2013 - 2:01pm Addthis...

  12. Nuclear Data for Criticality Safety and Reactor Applications at the Gaerttner LINAC Center Y. Danon, R.M. Bahran, E.J. Blain, A.M. Daskalakis, B.J. McDermott, D.G. Williams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    Nuclear Data for Criticality Safety and Reactor Applications at the Gaerttner LINAC Center Y. Danon used in reactor and nuclear criticality safety applications. The goal of this program is to provide to nuclear criticality, neutron shielding applications, nuclear reactor design, and to better understand

  13. Multiple Critical Points in Effective Quark Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferroni, Lorenzo; Pinto, Marcus B

    2010-01-01

    We consider the two flavor version of the Linear Sigma Model as well as of the Nambu Jona-Lasinio model, at finite temperature and quark chemical potential, beyond the Mean Field Approximation. Using parameter values for the pion and quark current masses which weakly break chiral symmetry we show that both models can present more than one critical end point. In particular, we explicitly show that the appearance of a new critical point associated with a first order line at high temperature and low densities could help to conciliate some lattice results with model predictions. Using different techniques, we perform an extensive thermodynamical analysis to understand the physical nature of the different critical points. For both models, our results suggest that the new first order line which starts at vanishing chemical potential has a more chiral character than the usual line which displays a character more reminiscent of a liquid-gas phase transition.

  14. Dynamic trapping near a quantum critical point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Kolodrubetz; Emanuel Katz; Anatoli Polkovnikov

    2015-03-02

    The study of dynamics in closed quantum systems has recently been revitalized by the emergence of experimental systems that are well-isolated from their environment. In this paper, we consider the closed-system dynamics of an archetypal model: spins near a second order quantum critical point, which are traditionally described by the Kibble-Zurek mechanism. Imbuing the driving field with Newtonian dynamics, we find that the full closed system exhibits a robust new phenomenon -- dynamic critical trapping -- in which the system is self-trapped near the critical point due to efficient absorption of field kinetic energy by heating the quantum spins. We quantify limits in which this phenomenon can be observed and generalize these results by developing a Kibble-Zurek scaling theory that incorporates the dynamic field. Our findings can potentially be interesting in the context of early universe physics, where the role of the driving field is played by the inflaton or a modulus.

  15. Variable-Temperature Critical-Current Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. F. Goodrich; T. C. Stauffer

    2009-05-19

    This is the final report of a three year contract that covered 09/19/2005 to 07/14/2008. We requested and received a no cost time extension for the third year, 07/15/2007 to 07/14/2008, to allow DoE to send us funds if they became available during that year. It turned out that we did not receive any funding for the third year. The following paper covers our variable-temperature critical-current measurements. We made transport critical-current (Ic) measurements on commercial multifilamentary Nb3Sn strands at temperatures (T) from 4 to 17 K and magnetic fields (H) from 0 to 14 T. One of the unique features of our measurements is that we can cover a wide range of critical currents from less than 0.1 A to over 700 A.

  16. Assessment of Salmonids and Their Habitat Conditions in the Walla Walla River Basin within Washington, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendel, Glen; Trump, Jeremy; Gembala, Mike

    2003-09-01

    This study began in 1998 to assess salmonid distribution, relative abundance, genetics, and the condition of salmonid habitats in the Walla Walla River basin. Stream flows in the Walla Walla Basin continue to show a general trend that begins with a sharp decline in discharge in late June, followed by low summer flows and then an increase in discharge in fall and winter. Manual stream flow measurements at Pepper bridge showed an increase in 2002 of 110-185% from July-September, over flows from 2001. This increase is apparently associated with a 2000 settlement agreement between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the irrigation districts to leave minimum flows in the river. Stream temperatures in the Walla Walla basin were similar to those in 2001. Upper montane tributaries maintained maximum summer temperatures below 65 F, while sites in mid and lower Touchet and Walla Walla rivers frequently had daily maximum temperatures well above 68 F (high enough to inhibit migration in adult and juvenile salmonids, and to sharply reduce survival of their embryos and fry). These high temperatures are possibly the most critical physiological barrier to salmonids in the Walla Walla basin, but other factors (available water, turbidity or sediment deposition, cover, lack of pools, etc.) also play a part in salmonid survival, migration, and breeding success. The increased flows in the Walla Walla, due to the 2000 settlement agreement, have not shown consistent improvements to stream temperatures. Rainbow/steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) trout represent the most common salmonid in the basin. Densities of Rainbow/steelhead in the Walla Walla River from the Washington/Oregon stateline to Mojonnier Rd. dropped slightly from 2001, but are still considerably higher than before the 2000 settlement agreement. Other salmonids including; bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni), and brown trout (Salmo trutta) had low densities, and limited distribution throughout the basin. A large return of adult spring chinook to the Touchet River drainage in 2001 produced higher densities of juvenile chinook in 2002 than have been seen in recent years, especially in the Wolf Fork. The adult return in 2002 was substantially less than what was seen in 2001. Due to poor water conditions and trouble getting personnel hired, spawning surveys were limited in 2002. Surveyors found only one redd in four Walla Walla River tributaries (Cottonwood Ck., East Little Walla Walla, West Little Walla Walla, and Mill Ck.), and 59 redds in Touchet River tributaries (10 in the North Fork Touchet, 30 in the South Fork Touchet, and 19 in the Wolf Fork). Bull trout spawning surveys in the upper Touchet River tributaries found a total of 125 redds and 150 live fish (92 redds and 75 fish in the Wolf Fork, 2 redds and 1 fish in the Burnt Fork, 0 redds and 1 fish in the South Fork Touchet, 29 redds and 71 fish in the North Fork Touchet, and 2 redds and 2 fish in Lewis Ck.). A preliminary steelhead genetics analysis was completed as part of this project. Results indicate differences between naturally produced steelhead and those produced in the hatchery. There were also apparent genetic differences among the naturally produced fish from different areas of the basin. Detailed results are reported in Bumgarner et al. 2003. Recommendations for assessment activities in 2003 included: (1) continue to monitor the Walla Walla River (focusing from the stateline to McDonald Rd.), the Mill Ck system, and the Little Walla Walla System. (2) reevaluate Whiskey Ck. for abundance and distribution of salmonids, and Lewis Ck. for bull trout density and distribution. (3) select or develop a habitat survey protocol and begin to conduct habitat inventory and assessment surveys. (4) summarize bull trout data for Mill Ck, South Fork Touchet, and Lewis Ck. (5) begin to evaluate temperature and flow data to assess if the habitat conditions exist for spring chinook in the Touchet River.

  17. Criticality Safety Basics for INL Emergency Responders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valerie L. Putman

    2012-08-01

    This document is a modular self-study guide about criticality safety principles for Idaho National Laboratory emergency responders. This guide provides basic criticality safety information for people who, in response to an emergency, might enter an area that contains much fissionable (or fissile) material. The information should help responders understand unique factors that might be important in responding to a criticality accident or in preventing a criticality accident while responding to a different emergency.

    This study guide specifically supplements web-based training for firefighters (0INL1226) and includes information for other Idaho National Laboratory first responders. However, the guide audience also includes other first responders such as radiological control personnel.

    For interested readers, this guide includes clearly marked additional information that will not be included on tests. The additional information includes historical examples (Been there. Done that.), as well as facts and more in-depth information (Did you know …).

    INL criticality safety personnel revise this guide as needed to reflect program changes, user requests, and better information. Revision 0, issued May 2007, established the basic text. Revision 1 incorporates operation, program, and training changes implemented since 2007. Revision 1 increases focus on first responders because later responders are more likely to have more assistance and guidance from facility personnel and subject matter experts. Revision 1 also completely reorganized the training to better emphasize physical concepts behind the criticality controls that help keep emergency responders safe. The changes are based on and consistent with changes made to course 0INL1226.

  18. QCD Critical Point: The Race is On

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gavai, Rajiv V

    2014-01-01

    A critical point in the phase diagram of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), if established either theoretically or experimentally, would be as profound a discovery as the good-old gas-liquid critical point. Unlike the latter, however, first-principles based approaches are being employed to locate it theoretically. Due to the short lived nature of the concerned phases, novel experimental techniques are needed to search for it. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in USA has an experimental program to do so. This short review is an attempt to provide a glimpse of the race between the theorists and the experimentalists as well as that of the synergy between them.

  19. Critical Masses for Unreflected Metal Spheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westfall, Robert Michael; Wright, Richard Q

    2009-01-01

    Calculated critical masses of bare metal spheres for 28 actinide isotopes, using the SCALE/XSDRNPM one-dimensional, discrete-ordinates system, are presented. ENDF/B-VI, ENDF/B-VII, and JENDL-3.3 cross sections were used in the calculations. Results are given for isotopes of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, curium, californium, and for one isotope of einsteinium. Calculated k values for these same nuclides are also given. We show that, for non-threshold or low-threshold fission nuclides, a good approximation for the nuclide k is the value of nubar at 1 MeV. A plot of the critical mass versus k values is given for 19 nuclides with A-numbers between 232 and 250. The peaks in the critical mass curve (for seven nuclides) correspond to dips in the k curve. For the seven cases with the largest critical mass, six are even-even nuclides. Neptunium-237, with a critical mass of about 62.7 kg (ENDF/B-VI calculation), has an odd number of protons and an even number of neutrons. However, two cases with quite small critical masses, 232U and 236Pu, are also even-even. These two nuclides do not exhibit threshold fission behavior like most other even-even nuclides. The largest critical mass is 208.8 kg for 243Am and the smallest is 2.44 kg for 251Cf. The calculated k values vary from 1.5022 for 234U to 4.4767 for 251Cf. A correlation between the calculated critical mass (kg) and the fission spectrum averaged value of is given for the elements U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm, and Cf. For each of the five elements, a fit to the data for that element is provided. In each case the fit employs a negative exponential of the form mass = exp(A + B ~ ln( ) The values of A and B are element dependent and vary slightly for each of the five elements. The method described here is mainly applicable for non-threshold fission nuclides (15 of the 28 nuclides considered in this paper). There are three exceptions, 238Pu, 244Cm, and 250Cf, which all exhibit threshold fission behavior.

  20. HANFORD NUCLEAR CRITICALITY SAFETY PROGRAM DATABASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TOFFER, H.

    2005-05-02

    The Hanford Database is a useful information retrieval tool for a criticality safety practitioner. The database contains nuclear criticality literature screened for parameter studies. The entries, characterized with a value index, are segregated into 16 major and six minor categories. A majority of the screened entries have abstracts and a limited number are connected to the Office of Scientific and Technology Information (OSTI) database of full-size documents. Simple and complex searches of the data can be accomplished very rapidly and the end-product of the searches could be a full-size document. The paper contains a description of the database, user instructions, and a number of examples.

  1. Editor: Barbara Lorenz Cover Design: John Hobbs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Barbara Lorenz Cover Design: John Hobbs Graphics: Ivan Lorenz John Hobbs Cover Photo: Ranch Road 337 Bandera County, Texas Cover Photo: Ranch Road 337 Bandera County, Texas Cover Photo: John Hobbs #12. Participation at national and in- ternational meetings and professional conferences is a critical part of our

  2. Communicating Design Research Effectively

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roschuni, Celeste Nicole

    2012-01-01

    5.3 Persuasion in Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Design Process andCommunication 2.1 Design Process Models . . . . . . . . .

  3. The impacts of mining on the habitat ecology of raccoons in east-central Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beucler, Michele

    1995-01-01

    and Movements Results Home Ranges Habitat Use Diel Activity and Movements Discussion. Management Implications. 10 13 13 15 18 . . 19 . . 20 20 . . 26 . . 32 37 . . 42 III RESTING SITE USE BY RACCOONS IN UNMINED AND RECLAIMED AREAS . 45.... (aimed Shrubland Ulrims stare Populus defrordes Borrhoos frofunlfoflo Panicum vrrgorum Elaeagrtris umbelloro Ulmus ufare Paulrorn I'Inorunt Herbaceous plams Rubus spp 35 34 06 202 Grove Improved Pasture Developed'. Poult rocdo Plntoms...

  4. Forestry herbicide influences on biodiversity and wildlife habitats in Southern forests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Karl V.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract In the southern United States, herbicide use continues to increase for timber management in commercial pine (Pinus spp.) plantations, for modifying wildlife habitats, and for invasive plant control. Several studies have reported that single applications of forestry herbicides at stand initiation have minor and temporary impacts on plant communities and wildlife habitat conditions, with some reports of enhanced habitat conditions for both game and nongame species. Due to the high resiliency of floral communities, plant species richness and diversity rebound rapidly after single herbicide treatments, with short- and long-term compositional shifts according to the selectivity and efficacy of the herbicide used. Recently, however, a shift to the Southeast in North American timber supplies has resulted in increased forest management intensity. Current site-preparation techniques rely on herbicide combinations, often coupled with mechanical treatments and >1 years of post-planting applications to enhance the spectrum and duration of vegetation control. This near-total control of associated vegetation at establishment and more rapid pine canopy closure, coupled with shortened and repeated rotations, likely will affect plant diversity and wildlife habitat quality. Development of mitigation methods at the stand and landscape levels will be required to minimize vegetative and wildlife impacts while allowing continued improvement in pine productivity. More uncertain are long-term impacts of increasing invasive plant occupation and the projected increase in herbicide use that will be needed to reverse this worsening situation. In addition, the potential of herbicides to meet wildlife management objectives in areas where traditional techniques have high social costs (e.g., prescribed fire) should be fully explored.

  5. Forestry herbicide influences on biodiversity and wildlife habitat in Southern forests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Karl V.; Miller, James, H.

    2004-07-01

    Abstract In the southern United States, herbicide use continues to increase for timber management in commercial pine (Pinus spp.) plantations, for modifying wildlife habitats, and for invasive plant control. Several studies have reported that single applications of forestry herbicides at stand initiation have minor and temporary impacts on plant communities and wildlife habitat conditions, with some reports of enhanced habitat conditions for both game and nongame species. Due to the high resiliency of floral communities, plant species richness and diversity rebound rapidly after single herbicide treatments, with short- and long-term compositional shifts according to the selectivity and efficacy of the herbicide used. Recently, however, a shift to the Southeast in North American timber supplies has resulted in increased forest management intensity. Current site-preparation techniques rely on herbicide combinations, often coupled with mechanical treatments and >1 years of post-planting applications to enhance the spectrum and duration of vegetation control. This near-total control of associated vegetation at establishment and more rapid pine canopy closure, coupled with shortened and repeated rotations, likely will affect plant diversity and wildlife habitat quality. Development of mitigation methods at the stand and landscape levels will be required to minimize vegetative and wildlife impacts while allowing continued improvement in pine productivity. More uncertain are long-term impacts of increasing invasive plant occupation and the projected increase in herbicide use that will be needed to reverse this worsening situation. In addition, the potential of herbicides to meet wildlife management objectives in areas where traditional techniques have high social costs (e.g., prescribed fire) should be fully explored.

  6. Analysis of Godiva-IV delayed-critical and static super-prompt-critical conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosteller, Russell D; Goda, Joetta M

    2009-01-01

    Super-prompt-critical burst experiments were conducted on the Godiva-IV assembly at Los Alamos National Laboratory from the 1960s through 2005. Detailed and simplified benchmark models have been constructed for four delayed-critical experiments and for the static phase of a super-prompt-critical burst experiment. In addition, a two-dimensional cylindrical model has been developed for the super-prompt-critical condition. Criticality calculations have been performed for all of those models with four modern nuclear data libraries: ENDFIB-VI, ENDF/8-VII.0, JEFF-3.1 , and JENDL-3.3. Overall, JENDL-3.3 produces the best agreement with the reference values for k{sub eff}.

  7. The Use of Geographic Information Systems to Model Habitat for Puma concolor cougar in the Northern Blue Ridge of Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houser, Rhonda

    2002-05-18

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) was used to predict suitable habitat for the eastern cougar (Puma concolor cougar) in the Northern Blue Ridge of Virginia. Two areas were studied, a primary area nested inside a secondary area. Objectives were...

  8. Analysis of the Black-Capped Vireo habitat at Kickapoo Caverns State Park, Texas using a Geographic Information System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castiaux, Nathalie

    1995-01-01

    A Geographic Information System (GIS) database was developed for Y,-ickapoo Cavern State Park, Tx. The digital database was used to characterize the Black-Capped Vireo ( Vireo Attricapillus Woodhouse) breeding habitat, and to produce a potential...

  9. The Wilson Journal of Ornithology 120(4):830839, 2008 RESPONSE OF SONGBIRDS TO RIPARIAN WILLOW HABITAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debinski, Diane M.

    ABSTRACT.--We compared the structure of riparian willow (Salix spp.) habitat and songbird diversity across- itat changes in other environments. Montane riparian willows (Salix spp.) support the great- est

  10. Broad scale agreement between intertidal habitats and adaptive traits on a basis of contrasting population genetic structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borges, Rita

    stress. In southwest England (SW UK) and northern Iberia (N. Iberia), populations living in estuaries estuarine location. In contrast, SW UK samples clustered according to habitat and formed three distinct

  11. Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM): Group Crisis Intervention, 4th June 2006, International Critical Incident Stress Foundation, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM): Group Crisis Intervention, 4th Edition, June 2006 Management (CISM): Group Crisis Intervention, 4th Edition, June 2006, International Critical Incident Stress

  12. Idaho Habitat/Natural Production Monitoring, Pt. I: General Monitoring Subproject : Annual Progress Report 1990.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rich, Bruce A.; Scully, Richard J.; Petrosky, Charles Edward

    1992-01-01

    The Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) has been monitoring and evaluating proposed and existing habitat improvement projects for rainbow-steelhead trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, hereafter called steelhead, and chinook salmon O. tshawytscha, hereafter called chinook, in the Clearwater and Salmon River drainages for the past seven years. Projects included in the evaluation are funded by, or proposed for funding by, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Northwest Power Planning Act as off-site mitigation for downstream hydropower development on the Snake and Columbia rivers. This evaluation project is also funded under the same authority (Fish and Wildlife Program, Northwest Power Planning Council). A mitigation record is being developed using increased carrying capacity and/or survival as the best measure of benefit from a habitat enhancement project. Determination of full benefit from a project depends on completion or maturation of the project and presence of adequate numbers of fish to document actual increases in fish production. The depressed status of upriver anadromous stocks has precluded measuring full benefits of any habitat project in Idaho. Partial benefit is credited to the mitigation record in the interim period of run restoration.

  13. Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in the Lapwai Creek Watershed, Technical Report 2003-2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, Lynn

    2007-02-01

    The Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in the Lapwai Creek Watershed is a multi-phase project to enhance steelhead trout in the Lapwai Creek watershed by improving salmonid spawning and rearing habitat. Habitat is limited by extreme high runoff events, low summer flows, high water temperatures, poor instream cover, spawning gravel siltation, and sediment, nutrient and bacteria loading. Funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program, the project assists in mitigating damage to steelhead runs caused by the Columbia River hydroelectric dams. The project is sponsored by the Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District). Target fish species include steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Steelhead trout within the Snake River Basin were listed in 1997 as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Accomplishments for the contract period December 1, 2003 through February 28, 2004 include; seven grade stabilization structures, 0.67 acres of wetland plantings, ten acres tree planting, 500 linear feet streambank erosion control, two acres grass seeding, and 120 acres weed control.

  14. The Habitat Preferences of Myotis Bats in Western North Dakota: Using Land Cover to Predict Distribution Patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Steven

    2013-01-15

    Patterns Introduction • Currently, there is a lack of knowledge about the spatial extent of suitable bat habitat within North Dakota. • The need to understand preferred bat habitat is the driving force behind this project. • The goal of this project... Credit: eol.org Long Legged Bat Myotis volans Photo Credit: eol.org Eared ti evoti Photo Credit: Fort Collins Bat Project Western Small Footed Bat Myotis ciliolabrum Long Legged Bat Myotis volans Long Earred Bat Myotis evotis Western...

  15. Analytical determination of critical crack size in solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, C.P.

    1988-05-01

    Although solar cells usually have chips and cracks, no material specifications concerning the allowable crack size on solar cells are available for quality assurance and engineering design usage. Any material specifications that the cell manufacturers use were developed for cosmetic reasons that have no technical basis. Therefore, the Applied Solar Energy Corporation (ASEC) has sponsored a continuing program for the fracture mechanics evaluation of GaAs. Fracture mechanics concepts were utilized to develop an analytical model that can predict the critical crack size of solar cells. This model indicates that the edge cracks of a solar cell are more critical than its surface cracks. In addition, the model suggests that the material specifications on the allowable crack size used for Si solar cells should not be applied to GaAs solar cells. The analytical model was applied to Si and GaAs solar cells, but it would also be applicable to the semiconductor wafers of other materials, such as a GaAs thin film on a Ge substrate, using appropriate input data.

  16. Introduction Critically ill patients requiring mechanical venti-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Todd

    Introduction Critically ill patients requiring mechanical venti- lation are at significant risk techniques are generally, invasive, labor inten- sive and slow [1, 9]. The culture delay often pro- motes unnecessary antibiotic exposure with an associated increased risk of both subsequent infectious complications

  17. Timely PTS Applications Critical to Staying Navy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timely PTS Applications Critical to Staying Navy Navy Personnel Command (NPC) is reminding commands and Sailors that submitting Perform to Serve (PTS) applications is the key to being able to stay Navy/10 explains how PTS is used to shape the Navy, and includes all business rules concerning. Commands must

  18. Geological carbon sequestration: critical legal issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    Geological carbon sequestration: critical legal issues Ray Purdy and Richard Macrory January 2004 Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research Working Paper 45 #12;1 Geological carbon sequestration an integrated assessment of geological carbon sequestration (Project ID code T2.21). #12;2 1 Introduction

  19. Criticality calculations for Step-2 GPHS modules.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hensen, Danielle Lynn; Lipinski, Ronald J.

    2007-08-01

    The Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) will use an improved version of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) module as its source of thermal power. This new version, referred to as the Step-2 GPHS Module, has additional and thicker layers of carbon fiber material (Fine Weaved Pierced Fabric) for increased strength over the original GPHS module. The GPHS uses alpha decay of {sup 238}Pu in the oxide form as the primary source of heat, and small amounts of other actinides are also present in the oxide fuel. Criticality calculations have been performed by previous researchers on the original version of the GPHS module (Step 0). This paper presents criticality calculations for the present Step-2 version. The Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code (MCNPX) was used for these calculations. Numerous configurations of GPHS module arrays surrounded by wet sand and other materials (to reflect the neutrons back into the stack with minimal absorption) were modeled. For geometries with eight GPHS modules (from a single MMRTG) surrounded by wet sand, the configuration is extremely sub-critical; k{sub eff} is about 0.3. It requires about 1000 GPHS modules (from 125 MMRTGs) in a close-spaced stack to approach criticality (k{sub eff} = 1.0) when surrounded by wet sand. The effect of beryllium in the MMRTG was found to be relatively small.

  20. Criticality Calculations for Step-2 GPHS Modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipinski, Ronald J. [Advanced Nuclear Concepts Department, Sandia National Laboratories, P.O Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Hensen, Danielle L. [Risk and Reliability Department Sandia National Laboratories, P.O Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

    2008-01-21

    The Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) will use an improved version of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) module as its source of thermal power. This new version, referred to as the Step-2 GPHS Module, has additional and thicker layers of carbon fiber material (Fine Weaved Pierced Fabric) for increased strength over the original GPHS module. The GPHS uses alpha decay of {sup 238}Pu in the oxide form as the primary source of heat, and small amounts of other actinides are also present in the oxide fuel. Criticality calculations have been performed by previous researchers on the original version of the GPHS module (Step 0). This paper presents criticality calculations for the present Step-2 version. The Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code (MCNPX) was used for these calculations. Numerous configurations of GPHS module arrays surrounded by wet sand and other materials (to reflect the neutrons back into the stack with minimal absorption) were modeled. For geometries with eight GPHS modules (from a single MMRTG) surrounded by wet sand, the configuration is extremely sub-critical; k{sub eff} is about 0.3. It requires about 1000 GPHS modules (from 125 MMRTGs) in a close-spaced stack to approach criticality (k{sub eff} = 1.0) when surrounded by wet sand. The effect of beryllium in the MMRTG was found to be relatively small.

  1. Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    and a Polymer Engineer with Michelin Americas Research and Development Corporation in Greenville, SC. He has hadInstitute for Critical Technology and Applied Science www.ictas.vt.edu NEW HORIZONS ICTAS SEMINAR) 3. CBET-Broadening Participation Research Initiation Grant in Engineering Program (BRIGE) 4. Science

  2. Determination of Critical Exponents in Nuclear Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. F. J. Mueller; ALADIN collaboration

    1996-07-08

    Signatures of critical behaviour in nuclear fragmentation are often based on arguments from percolation theory. We demonstrate with general thermodynamic considerations and studies of the Ising model that the reliance on percolation as a reference model bears the risk of missing parts of the essential physics.

  3. Derived critical loci I -Basics Gabriele Vezzosi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vezzosi, Gabriele

    Derived critical loci I - Basics Gabriele Vezzosi Dipartimento di Sistemi ed Informatica Universit`a di Firenze Italy Notes ­ September 2011 Contents 1 Introduction 1 2 Koszul complexes and derived zero . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 2.2 Affine derived zero loci . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2

  4. Complex systems analysis of series of blackouts: cascading failure, critical points, and self-organization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, Ian [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Carreras, Benjamin A [ORNL; Lynch, Vickie E [ORNL; Newman, David E [University of Alaska

    2007-01-01

    We give an overview of a complex systems approach to large blackouts of electric power transmission systems caused by cascading failure. Instead of looking at the details of particular blackouts, we study the statistics and dynamics of series of blackouts with approximate global models. Blackout data from several countries suggest that the frequency of large blackouts is governed by a power law. The power law makes the risk of large blackouts consequential and is consistent with the power system being a complex system designed and operated near a critical point. Power system overall loading or stress relative to operating limits is a key factor affecting the risk of cascading failure. Power system blackout models and abstract models of cascading failure show critical points with power law behavior as load is increased. To explain why the power system is operated near these critical points and inspired by concepts from self-organized criticality, we suggest that power system operating margins evolve slowly to near a critical point and confirm this idea using a power system model. The slow evolution of the power system is driven by a steady increase in electric loading, economic pressures to maximize the use of the grid, and the engineering responses to blackouts that upgrade the system. Mitigation of blackout risk should account for dynamical effects in complex self-organized critical systems. For example, some methods of suppressing small blackouts could ultimately increase the risk of large blackouts.

  5. Nuclear criticality safety evaluation of large cylinder cleaning operations in X-705, Portsmouth Gaseous diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheaffer, M.K.; Keeton, S.C.; Lutz, H.F.

    1995-06-01

    This report evaluates nuclear criticality safety for large cylinder cleaning operations in the Decontamination and Recovery Facility, X-705, at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. A general description of current cleaning procedures and required hardware/equipment is presented, and documentation for large cylinder cleaning operations is identified and described. Control parameters, design features, administrative controls, and safety systems relevant to nuclear criticality are discussed individually, followed by an overall assessment based on the Double Contingency Principle. Recommendations for enhanced safety are suggested, and issues for increased efficiency are presented.

  6. Approaching total absorption at near infrared in a large area monolayer graphene by critical coupling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yonghao; Chadha, Arvinder; Zhao, Deyin; Shuai, Yichen; Menon, Laxmy; Yang, Hongjun; Zhou, Weidong; Piper, Jessica R.; Fan, Shanhui; Jia, Yichen; Xia, Fengnian; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2014-11-03

    We demonstrate experimentally close to total absorption in monolayer graphene based on critical coupling with guided resonances in transfer printed photonic crystal Fano resonance filters at near infrared. Measured peak absorptions of 35% and 85% were obtained from cavity coupled monolayer graphene for the structures without and with back reflectors, respectively. These measured values agree very well with the theoretical values predicted with the coupled mode theory based critical coupling design. Such strong light-matter interactions can lead to extremely compact and high performance photonic devices based on large area monolayer graphene and other two–dimensional materials.

  7. Review of Yucca Mountain Disposal Criticality Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scaglione, John M [ORNL] [ORNL; Wagner, John C [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, submitted a license application for construction authorization of a deep geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in June of 2008. The license application is currently under review by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. However,on March 3, 2010 the DOE filed a motion requesting withdrawal of the license application. With the withdrawal request and the development of the Blue Ribbon Commission to seek alternative strategies for disposing of spent fuel, the status of the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain is uncertain. What is certain is that spent nuclear fuel (SNF) will continue to be generated and some long-lived components of the SNF will eventually need a disposition path(s). Strategies for the back end of the fuel cycle will continue to be developed and need to include the insights from the experience gained during the development of the Yucca Mountain license application. Detailed studies were performed and considerable progress was made in many key areas in terms of increased understanding of relevant phenomena and issues regarding geologic disposal of SNF. This paper reviews selected technical studies performed in support of the disposal criticality analysis licensing basis and the use of burnup credit. Topics include assembly misload analysis, isotopic and criticality validation, commercial reactor critical analyses, loading curves, alternative waste package and criticality control studies, radial burnup data and effects, and implementation of a conservative application model in the criticality probabilistic evaluation as well as other information that is applicable to operations regarding spent fuel outside the reactor. This paper summarizes the work and significant accomplishments in these areas and provides a resource for future, related activities.

  8. Early Warning Signals for Critical Transitions: A Generalized Modeling Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    rangelands [9], and desertification [10]. Warning signals for impending critical transitions are highly

  9. Design of Embedded Systems: Formal Models, Validation, and Synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grosu, Radu

    critical situations, where reliability and safety are more important criteria than performance. TodayDesign of Embedded Systems: Formal Models, Validation, and Synthesis S. Edwards, L. Lavagno, E. A. Lee, and A. Sangiovanni-Vincentelli November 5, 1999 Abstract This paper addresses the design

  10. Refined critical balance in strong Alfvenic turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Mallet; A. A. Schekochihin; B. D. G. Chandran

    2015-08-24

    We present numerical evidence that in strong Alfvenic turbulence, the critical balance principle---equality of the nonlinear decorrelation and linear propagation times---is scale invariant, in the sense that the probability distribution of the ratio of these times is independent of scale. This result only holds if the local alignment of the Elsasser fields is taken into account in calculating the nonlinear time. At any given scale, the degree of alignment is found to increase with fluctuation amplitude, supporting the idea that the cause of alignment is mutual dynamical shearing of Elsasser fields. The scale-invariance of critical balance (while all other quantities of interest are strongly intermittent, i.e., have scale-dependent distributions) suggests that it is the most robust of the scaling principles used to describe Alfvenic turbulence. The quality afforded by situ fluctuation measurements in the solar wind allows for direct verification of this fundamental principle.

  11. Design Editorial A Design Societies Federation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    Journal of Mechanical Design Editorial A Design Societies Federation You can recognize the many faces of design by looking at the many different professional societies that promote design around the world. These societies may have roots in engineering or archi- tecture or industrial design but they all

  12. Architecture for high critical current superconducting tapes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01

    Improvements in critical current capacity for superconducting film structures are disclosed and include the use of, e.g., multilayer YBCO structures where individual YBCO layers are separated by a layer of an insulating material such as CeO.sub.2 and the like, a layer of a conducting material such as strontium ruthenium oxide and the like or by a second superconducting material such as SmBCO and the like.

  13. EPR and Bell's theorem: A critical review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stapp, H.P. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

    1991-01-01

    The argument of Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen is reviewed with attention to logical structure and character of assumptions. Bohr's reply is discussed. Bell's contribution is formulated without use of hidden variables, and efforts to equate hidden variables to realism are critically examined. An alternative derivation of nonlocality that makes no use of hidden variables, microrealism, counterfactual definiteness, or any other assumption alien to orthodox quantum thinking is described in detail, with particular attention to the quartet or broken-square question.

  14. Critical regimes of internal gravity wave generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vitaly V. Bulatov; Yuriy V. Vladimirov; Vasily A. Vakorin

    2005-11-27

    The problem of constructing an asymptotic representation of the solution of the internal gravity wave field exited by a source moving at a velocity close to the maximum group velocity of the individual wave mode is considered. For the critical regimes of individual mode generation the asymptotic representation of the solution obtained is expressed in terms of a zero-order Macdonald function. The results of numerical calculations based on the exact and asymptotic formulas are given.

  15. Tuning effective interactions close to the critical point in colloidal suspensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicoletta Gnan; Emanuela Zaccarelli; Francesco Sciortino

    2012-09-11

    We report a numerical investigation of two colloids immersed in a critical solvent, with the aim of quantifying the effective colloid-colloid interaction potential. By turning on an attraction between the colloid and the solvent particles we follow the evolution from the case in which the solvent density close to the colloids changes from values smaller than the bulk to values larger than the bulk. We thus effectively implement the so-called $(+,+)$ and $(-,-)$ boundary conditions defined in field theoretical approaches focused on the description of critical Casimir forces. We find that the effective potential at large distances decays exponentially, with a characteristic decay length compatible with the bulk critical correlation length, in full agreement with theoretical predictions. We also investigate the case of $(+,-)$ boundary condition, where the effective potential becomes repulsive. Our study provides a guidance for a design of the interaction potential which can be exploited to control the stability of colloidal systems.

  16. Apparatus and method for critical current measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Joe A. (Espanola, NM); Dye, Robert C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for the measurement of the critical current of a superconductive sample, e.g., a clad superconductive sample, the apparatus including a conductive coil, a means for maintaining the coil in proximity to a superconductive sample, an electrical connection means for passing a low amplitude alternating current through the coil, a cooling means for maintaining the superconductive sample at a preselected temperature, a means for passing a current through the superconductive sample, and, a means for monitoring reactance of the coil, is disclosed, together with a process of measuring the critical current of a superconductive material, e.g., a clad superconductive material, by placing a superconductive material into the vicinity of the conductive coil of such an apparatus, cooling the superconductive material to a preselected temperature, passing a low amplitude alternating current through the coil, the alternating current capable of generating a magnetic field sufficient to penetrate, e.g., any cladding, and to induce eddy currents in the superconductive material, passing a steadily increasing current through the superconductive material, the current characterized as having a different frequency than the alternating current, and, monitoring the reactance of the coil with a phase sensitive detector as the current passed through the superconductive material is steadily increased whereby critical current of the superconductive material can be observed as the point whereat a component of impedance deviates.

  17. Critical Masses for Unreflected Metal Spheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westfall, Robert Michael; Goluoglu, Sedat; Wright, Richard Q

    2009-01-01

    Critical masses of bare metal spheres for 33 actinide isotopes, using the SCALE/XSDRNPM one-dimensional, discrete-ordinates system, are presented. ENDF/B-VI, ENDF/B-VII, and JENDL-3.3 cross sections were used in the calculations. Results are given for isotopes of U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm, and Cf and for one isotope of Es. Calculated k-infinity values for 41 actinides are also given. For the nonthreshold or low-threshold fission nuclides, a good approximation for the nuclide k-infinity is the value of nubar at 1 MeV. A correlation between the calculated critical mass (kg) and the fission spectrum averaged value of F is given for the elements U, Np, Pu, Cm, and Cf as CM (kg) = exp (A + B ln( F)).(1) The values of A and B are element dependent and vary slightly for each of the five elements. The method described here is mainly applicable for nonthreshold fission nuclides (15 of the 31 nuclides considered in this paper). We conclude that equation (1) is useful for predicting the critical mass for nonthreshold fission nuclides if we have accurate values of the fission spectrum averaged F.

  18. Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myra, D.; Ready, C.

    2003-12-01

    The Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program (YTAHP) was organized to restore salmonid passage to Yakima tributaries that historically supported salmonids and to improve habitat in areas where access is restored. This program intends to (a) screen unscreened diversion structures to prevent fish entrainment into artificial waterways; (b) provide for fish passage at man-made barriers, such as diversion dams, culverts, siphons and bridges; and (c) provide information and assistance to landowners interested in to contributing to the improvement of water quality, water reliability and stream habitat. The YTAHP developed from a number of groups actively engaged in watershed management, and/or habitat restoration within the Yakima River Basin. These groups include the Washington State Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), Kittitas County Conservation District (KCCD), North Yakima Conservation District (NYCD), Kittitas County Water Purveyors (KCWP), and Ahtanum Irrigation District (AID). The US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and Yakama Nation (YN) both participated in the development of the objectives of YTAHP. Other entities that will be involved during permitting or project review may include the YN, the federal Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and US Army Corps of Engineers (COE). The objectives of YTAHP are listed below and also include subtasks detailed in the report: (1) Conduct Early Action Projects; (2) Review Strategic Plan; (3) Restore Access, including stream inventory, prioritization, implementation; and (4) Provide opportunities to improve habitat and conserve resources. The BPA YTAHP funding supported activities of the program which are described in this report. These activities are primarily related to objective 1 (conduct early action projects) and parts of objectives 2-4. The work supported by YTAHP funding will support a series of scheduled projects and be made larger by complementary funding through NRSC EQIP, Irrigation Efficiencies, WA State Salmon Recovery Funding Board and other local, state and federal programs. Projects completed FY-03: The Cooke Creek siphon and screen/bypass was completed on time and within budget. The Rosbach Farms project was completed in cooperation with the NRCS Environmental Quality Incentives Program and the KCCD's Irrigation Efficiencies Program. Tributary survey teams were trained and surveys of tributaries in Yakima and Kittitas counties commenced in December of 2002. By the end of September 2003 Cowiche Creek in Yakima County was completed as well as Coleman, Reecer, Currier, Dry, Cabin, Indian, and Jack Creeks in Kittitas County. A screen was installed on the Hernandez/Ringer diversion in cooperation with the NRCS office in Kittitas County. YTAHP submitted six applications to the Salmon Recovery Funding Board and three were selected and funded. Another Salmon Recovery Funding Board project awarded in 2000 to the Yakama Nation was transferred to the KCCD. Two miles of fencing of riparian zones on the north fork Ahtanum was completed by the North Yakima Conservation District in cooperation with the Department of Natural Resources and the Ahtanum Irrigation District and funded by US fish and Wildlife as part of YTAHP's outreach partnering. Completion of this year's effort has provided significant inroads to working on the private lands in two counties which will be vital to future efforts by YTAHP and others to protect and enhance Yakima River Basin habitat. 2003 saw the migration of the WEB site from MWH to the Kittitas County Conservation District and can be accessed at www.kccd.net.

  19. habitat ( ) 3 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert W. Corbett

    2011-08-02

    , Osage, Rogers, Tulsa, and Wagoner counties. INCOG?s purpose is to promote economy and ef?ciency in government by providing a forum for regional cooperation and by supporting members with planning, development, management, research, and coordination... www.incog.org MAILING ADDRESS 201 W. 5th Street Suite 600 Tulsa, OK 74103-4236 The 1,200 square-mile Tulsa Transportation Management Area (TMA) is comprised of Tulsa County and portions of Creek, Osage, Rogers, and Wagoner counties. The area...

  20. habitat 70 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James R. Manhart

    2011-08-10

    Psychological Association (APA) and American Counseling Association (ACA) journals to provide an historical account and synthesis of which statistical techniques were most prevalent in the fields of education and psychology. These reviews represented a total...

  1. Habitat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hugh D. Wilson

    2011-08-10

    People--human capital--are an important resource in making a farm or ranch business more competitive in today's business environment. This publication summarizes the ideas about modern personnel management that illustrate ways to attain a farm...

  2. habitat 110 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James R. Manhart

    2011-08-10

    , encompassing T91 and the almost identical P91. 8 Table 1. Composition of Grade 91 steel [20]. Element Weight % C 0.08-0.12 Mn 0.30-0.60 P 0.01 max S 0.01 max Si 0.20-0.50 Cr 8.00-9.50 Mo 0.85-1.05 Ni 0.40 max V 0.18-0.25 Nb 0.06-0.10 N 0...

  3. habitat 24 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James R. Manhart

    2011-08-10

    A site-wide steam modeling and optimization program (Visual Mesa) was implemented at the Bayou Cogen plant in Bayport, Texas in 1997 and has been in use continuously since that time. This program optimizes steam production among four cogen units...

  4. habitat 109 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James R. Manhart

    2011-08-10

    as Applied to Composite Materials Processing.......................... 5 1.4 Outline of the Dissertation.......................................................... 7 1.5 Contributions and Limitations of the Dissertation ..................... 7... Field..................... 13 2.3 A Sphere under a Uniform Electric Field Gradient .......................................... 15 3.1 A Photograph of the Electrode and Electromagnet Arrays............................... 27 3.2 Cross...

  5. habitat 118 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James R. Manhart

    2011-08-10

    -1 EXPLOITING HISTORICAL DATA AND DIVERSE GERMPLASM TO INCREASE MAIZE GRAIN YIELD IN TEXAS A Dissertation by IVAN DARIO BARRERO FARFAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... Copyright 2013 Ivan Dario Barrero Farfan ii ABSTRACT The U.S. is the largest maize producer in the world with a production of 300 million tons in 2012. Approximately 86% of the maize production is focused on the Midwestern states. The rest...

  6. habitat 20 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James R. Manhart

    2011-08-10

    . Page Barley Pearler Drum-Grinder DEHULLING BY SHEARING Pretreatments. Sample Sheller 15 15 19 IV Rubber Disk Huller DEHULLING BY POPPING. Pressure Popping Vacuum Popping CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 28 33 33 39 45 APPENDIX A.... Popping. Abrasive Grinding. Shearing 45 45 46 Procedure for Particle Size Determination DPL-16 Seed Data. 51 APPENDIX B. 52 Tables on test runs 53-69 LITERATURE CITED. 70 71 viii LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page Barley Pearler. Barley Pearler...

  7. habitat 93 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James R. Manhart

    2011-08-10

    ?? IEB ?697?99B? 6? 9B7T63? ??? ?? ?3?TE6??T63?9 8E35 TAB 3TABE B88B7T9 IEB ?697?99B? 6? TAB ?LLB??6?? ??L67I4 73EEB7T63?9 IEB ?6?B? 6? ?I?4B ?? ??83ET??ITB4? ?3 ?ITI ?BEB TI?B? T3 3?TI6? I? B9T65ITB 38 TAB 4399B9 EB9?4T6?? 8E35 TAB ?BI? T65B9 38 TAB...

  8. Habitat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hugh D. Wilson

    2011-08-10

    ?_?c?g?Q ?f?j?_?d?j?Q?f?j?_?d?j?Q?f?j?_?d?j?Q?f?j?_?d?j?Q?f?j?_?d?j?Q?f?j?_?d?j?Q?f?j?_?d?j?Q?f?j?_?d?j?Q?f?j?_?d?j?Q?f?j?_?d?j?Q?f?j?_?d?j?Q?f?j?_?d?j?Q ?m...?b?Q ?a?_?a?a?a?b?Q?a?_?a?a?a?b?Q?a?_?a?a?a?b?Q?a?_?a?a?a?b?Q?a?_?a?a?a?b?Q?a?_?a?a?a?b?Q?a?_?a?a?a?b?Q?a?_?a?a?a?b?Q?a?_?a?a?a?b?Q?a?_?a?a?a?b?Q?a?_?a?a?a?b?Q?a?_?a?a?a?b?Q?a?_?a?a?a?b?Q?a?_?a?a?a?b?Q ?d?a?h?_?j?f?Q?d?a?h?_?j?f?Q?d?a?h?_?j?f?Q?d?a?h?_?j?f?Q?d?a?h?_?j?f?Q?d?a?h?_?j?f?Q?d?a?h?_?j?f?Q?d?a?h?_?j?f?Q?d...

  9. Bird Habitats

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bluebird (Sialia mexicana) - primary species Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides) Ash-throated Flycatcher (Myiarchus cinerascens) Mountain Chickadee (Poecile gambeli) House...

  10. habitat 36 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James R. Manhart

    2011-08-10

    using the quadrature. For instance, the scalar flux is given by: g2030g4666g1876 g4667 g3404 g3533 g2032g3040 g4666g1876g4667g1875g3040g3015g3040g2880g2869 . (2.36) All our calculations are performed using Gauss quadrature. The spatial grid... the following equation: ?g2919g2879g2869g2870g4672g2922g2878g2869g2870g4673 g4666ng4667 g3404 h ? q g2919 g3398 ?g2919g2878g2869g2870g4672g2922g2878g2869g2870g4673 g3428?g2930h2 g3397 ?g2924 g3432 ? g3428?g2930h2 g3398 ?g2924 g3432g2879g2869. (3.6) Here...

  11. Habitat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hugh D. Wilson

    2011-08-10

    of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Co-Chairs of Committee, M. Suhail Zubairy Marlan O. Scully Committee Members, Alexei Sokolov Philip R. Hemmer Head of Department, Edward S. Fry May 2010 Major Subject: Physics iii ABSTRACT A Study on the Coherent Atomic... Effects and Their Applications. (May 2010) Qingqing Sun, B.S., Peking University; M.S., Peking University Co?Chairs of Advisory Committee: Dr. M. Suhail Zubairy Dr. Marlan O. Scully Coherent atomic states prepared by laser field can have quantum...

  12. habitat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert W. Corbett

    2011-08-02

    u r c e ............. ............... .............. .. 57 Table Page 8. Mean Squares for Influence of Animals Upon Eating Accept? ability of Left and Right Loin Steaks and Chuck Roasts . . . . 58 9. Mean Squares for Influence of Families Upon... and Chuck Roasts by Individual S i r e s ...................... ............... 83 9. Mean Tenderness Shear Force Values and Family Panel Scores for Beef Loin Steaks and Chuck Roasts by Sires . .............. 84 10. Family Panel Mean Scores...

  13. habitat 14 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beverly Thompson

    2011-08-10

    of the fly puparia from which parasitoids emerged, (2) rearing of cucurbit infesting tephritids and their parasitoids in Kenya, (3) rearing of flowerhead infesting tephritids and their parasitoids in Kenya and Hawaii, and (4) host range testing of Psyttalia...

  14. habitat 99 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James R. Manhart

    2011-08-10

    exposures in Lozier Canyon, Texas. Two conflicting hypotheses were proposed: 1) Sedimentary structures in Facies A are hummocky cross-stratification (HCS) and swaley cross-stratification (SCS), which indicates a shelfal depositional environment above...

  15. habitat 58 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James R. Manhart

    2011-08-10

    Binders (Lion through Valero) .................................................... 30 Figure II-9. Ductility versus DSR Function [G'/(?'/G')] for PAV* and ER Aged PMAs and Base Binders (Wright through MnRoad) ........................... 32... xii Page Figure II-10. Ductility versus DSR Function [G'/(?'/G')] for PAV* and ER Aged PMAs and Base Binders (Lion through Valero) .................................. 32 Figure II-11. Ductility versus DSR Function [G'/(?'/G')] for PAV* and ER Aged...

  16. habitat 92 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James R. Manhart

    2011-08-10

    to provide the 0.25 V, 131 kHz current required and to obtain a 0 V output when dry and a 5 V output when wet. A field reliability test was successfully performed with the sensor passively monitoring the transitions from wet to dry at Langford Building A...

  17. habitat 105 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James R. Manhart

    2011-08-10

    Cooling System; R&D Research and Development; RPV Reactor Pressure Vessel; RST Reynolds Stress Transport; SNU Seoul National University; T temperature; viii T? temperature of water in the annulus; Tc temperature of the standpipes... ................................................................. 56 4.3.1 Sensitivity Analysis on the Standpipes Mass Flow Rate for the Water-Cooled RCCS Configuration ..................................................... 56 4.3.2 Sensitivity Analysis on the RPV Power Generated for the Water- Cooled RCCS...

  18. habitat 31 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James R. Manhart

    2011-08-10

    Abbreviations used in the specimens tested. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4. 5 FREQUENCY SWEEP AT CONSTANT HEIGHT, FSCH. . . . . . . . 4. 5. 1 Dynamic shear modulus, G*, and m-values. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4. 5. 2 Shear phase angle.... 4. 5. 3 G*/sin 8 ratio. . 4. 6 SIMPLE SHEAR TEST AT CONSTANT HEIGHT, SSCH. . . . , . . 4. 6. 1 Maximum shear strain. 4. 6. 2 Permanent shear strain. 4. 6. 3 Recovered shear strain. 54 54 56 61 67 70 70 73 83 92 99 100 103 103...

  19. habitat 21 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James R. Manhart

    2011-08-10

    G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 5.5 ?0. 2 ?0. 1 0. 0 0. 1 0. 2 After Transformation f(y|?=?0.05531) Residua l G GGG GG G GGG G G G G G G G G GGGGG GGG G G G GG G G G GG... GG GG GG G G G GG G G GGG G G G G G GG G 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 5.5 3. 5 4. 0 4. 5 5. 0 5. 5 f(y|?=?0.05531) Model estimat e Figure 2: (Left column:) The results with no transformation, and the (Right columns:) results after...

  20. habitat 29 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James R. Manhart

    2011-08-10

    in figure 5.1. The network is centered at 29.79 N, 95.31 W. These sensors are arranged in an outward spiral with average baseline of 25 km between sensors and an average network radius of 75 km. Figure 5.2 provides an overview of the sensor locations... of (30.3N, 95.77W) and lower right coordinate of (29.3N, 94.77W), hereafter known as the NLDN domain, was defined to geographically select NLDN derived cloud-to-ground flashes for analysis. This area constitutes the peak performance region...

  1. habitat 82 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James R. Manhart

    2011-08-10

    Smart Financing for Smart Cities CATEE 2014 November 19 1 Drew Byrd City Leader, Schneider Electric ESL-KT-14-11-29 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Global energy consumption continues to rise... with no sign of slowing down 2Confidential Property of Schneider Electric ESL-KT-14-11-29 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 This dilemma is impacted further by l l b l t dsevera g o a mega- ren s Urbanization...

  2. habitat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert W. Corbett

    2011-08-02

    /plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 President: S ecret8 ry: Editor: NEWSLETTER No. 20 J2net Qu~?lrton1 15 Letter D[-lilJ., Ceirnb8pn, Lochg'ilphe2d, ~rgyll, Scotlel1d. Heth Hel1em, F1f1t 3, 36 Cl"phelll Rei., J3edofrd, EngL'ncl. Sheil[-l Clerk, 6 Crcd..., everyone! It's nov, e yepI' since Jenet, !3eth 2nd I, ~11ong witih Helen?lVIcCf.H.'thy, took over the running of SfJ?l\\G. It doesn't seem th2t long.' It's been 8 yeer th8t 1188 scen 8 number of chengas, .?nd given us hope for 8 reviv8l of ST,\\H THEK 8t...

  3. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Manatee County Habitat for Humanity, Ellenton, Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-09-01

    In this 18-home community, all homes are LEED Platinum and meet ENERGY STAR for Homes Version 3 requirements, HERS 23–53. Half way through the project, Habitat for Humanity heard about the DOE Challenge Home program and signed on, committing to build the next home, a three-bedroom, two-bath, 1,143 ft2 duplex, to Challenge Home criteria. The home is the first DOE Challenge Home in Manatee County, and was awarded a 2013 Housing Innovation Award in the affordable builder category.

  4. Benchmark Evaluation of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiment Program Critical Configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret A. Marshall; John D. Bess

    2013-02-01

    A series of small, compact critical assembly (SCCA) experiments were performed in 1962-1965 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) for the Medium-Power Reactor Experiment (MPRE) program. The MPRE was a stainless-steel clad, highly enriched uranium (HEU)-O2 fuelled, BeO reflected reactor design to provide electrical power to space vehicles. Cooling and heat transfer were to be achieved by boiling potassium in the reactor core and passing vapor directly through a turbine. Graphite- and beryllium-reflected assemblies were constructed at ORCEF to verify the critical mass, power distribution, and other reactor physics measurements needed to validate reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. The experimental series was broken into three parts, with the third portion of the experiments representing the beryllium-reflected measurements. The latter experiments are of interest for validating current reactor design efforts for a fission surface power reactor. The entire series has been evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments and submitted for publication in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments and in the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments.

  5. Analysis on burnup step effect for evaluating reactor criticality and fuel breeding ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saputra, Geby; Purnama, Aditya Rizki; Permana, Sidik; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi

    2014-09-30

    Criticality condition of the reactors is one of the important factors for evaluating reactor operation and nuclear fuel breeding ratio is another factor to show nuclear fuel sustainability. This study analyzes the effect of burnup steps and cycle operation step for evaluating the criticality condition of the reactor as well as the performance of nuclear fuel breeding or breeding ratio (BR). Burnup step is performed based on a day step analysis which is varied from 10 days up to 800 days and for cycle operation from 1 cycle up to 8 cycles reactor operations. In addition, calculation efficiency based on the variation of computer processors to run the analysis in term of time (time efficiency in the calculation) have been also investigated. Optimization method for reactor design analysis which is used a large fast breeder reactor type as a reference case was performed by adopting an established reactor design code of JOINT-FR. The results show a criticality condition becomes higher for smaller burnup step (day) and for breeding ratio becomes less for smaller burnup step (day). Some nuclides contribute to make better criticality when smaller burnup step due to individul nuclide half-live. Calculation time for different burnup step shows a correlation with the time consuming requirement for more details step calculation, although the consuming time is not directly equivalent with the how many time the burnup time step is divided.

  6. Uncertainties in the effects of burnup and their impact on criticality safety licensing criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, R.W.; Fisher, L.E.

    1990-07-13

    Current criteria for criticality safety for spent fuel shipping and storage casks are conservative because no credit is permitted for the effects of burnup of the fuel inside the cask. Cask designs that will transport and store large numbers of fuel assemblies (20 or more) must devote a substantial part of their payload to criticality control measures if they are to meet this criteria. The Department of Energy is developing the data necessary to support safety analyses that incorporate the effects of burnup for the next generation of spent fuel shipping casks. The efforts described here are devoted to the development of acceptance criteria that will be the basis for accepting safety analyses. Preliminary estimates of the uncertainties of the effects of burnup have been developed to provide a basis for the consideration of critically safety criteria. The criticality safety margins in a spent fuel shipping or storage cask are dominated by the portions of a fuel assembly that are in low power regions of a reactor core, and the reactor operating conditions are very different from spent fuel storage or transport cask conditions. Consequently, the experience that has been gathered during years of reactor operation does not apply directly to the prediction of criticality safety margins for spent fuel shipping or storage casks. The preliminary estimates of the uncertainties presented in this paper must be refined by both analytical and empirical studies that address both the magnitude of the uncertainties and their interdependence. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Critical assessment of thorium reactor technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drenkhahn, Robert (Robert A.)

    2012-01-01

    Thorium-based fuels for nuclear reactors are being considered for use with current and future designs in both large and small-scale energy production. Thorium-232 is as abundant on Earth as lead, far more common than all ...

  8. Dwell on Design [Dispatches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    ity and commitment to green design can inspire innovationof “product design, prefab, green building practices,modernism and green living. The Dwell on Design conference

  9. Dwell on Design [Dispatches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    Dwell on Design Lisa Sullivan Since its inception, in 2000,green living. The Dwell on Design conference and show, helds triple theme, of modern design, sustainability, and smart

  10. Aquatic macrophyte and animal communities in a recently restored brackish marsh: possible influences of restoration design and the invasive plant species Myriophyllum spicatum 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Michael Thomas

    2012-07-16

    been lost since the 1930s and losses in the Lower Neches watershed have been some of the most extensive. Restoration is a way to mitigate these losses and can be accomplished in many ways. Each restoration design creates different aquatic habitats...

  11. Understanding Bulk Power Reliability: The Importance of Good Data and A Critical Review of Existing Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, Emily; Eto, Joseph H.; LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi

    2011-10-19

    Bulk power system reliability is of critical importance to the electricity sector. Complete and accurate information on events affecting the bulk power system is essential for assessing trends and efforts to maintain or improve reliability. Yet, current sources of this information were not designed with these uses in mind. They were designed, instead, to support real-time emergency notification to industry and government first-responders. This paper reviews information currently collected by both industry and government sources for this purpose and assesses factors that might affect their usefulness in supporting the academic literature that has relied upon them to draw conclusions about the reliability of the US electric power system.

  12. Approaches to acceptable risk: a critical guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischhoff, B.; Lichtenstein, S.; Slovic, P.; Keeney, R.; Derby, S.

    1980-12-01

    Acceptable-risk decisions are an essential step in the management of technological hazards. In many situations, they constitute the weak (or missing) link in the management process. The absence of an adequate decision-making methodology often produces indecision, inconsistency, and dissatisfaction. The result is neither good for hazard management nor good for society. This report offers a critical analysis of the viability of various approaches as guides to acceptable-risk decisions. This report seeks to define acceptable-risk decisions and to examine some frequently proposed, but inappropriate, solutions. 255 refs., 22 figs., 25 tabs.

  13. Disentanglement in a quantum critical environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhe Sun; Xiaoguang Wang; C. P. Sun

    2007-04-10

    We study the dynamical process of disentanglement of two qubits and two qutrits coupled to an Ising spin chain in a transverse field, which exhibits a quantum phase transition. We use the concurrence and negativity to quantify entanglement of two qubits and two qutrits, respectively. Explicit connections between the concurrence (negativity) and the decoherence factors are given for two initial states, the pure maximally entangled state and the mixed Werner state. We find that the concurrence and negativity decay exponentially with fourth power of time in the vicinity of critical point of the environmental system.

  14. Traveling water waves with critical layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ailo Aasen; Kristoffer Varholm

    2015-08-19

    We establish the existence of small-amplitude uni- and bimodal steady periodic gravity waves with an affine vorticity distribution. The solutions describe waves with critical layers and an arbitrary number of crests and troughs in each minimal period. Our bifurcation argument differs slightly from earlier theory, and under certain conditions we prove that the waves found are different from the ones in previous investigations. An important part of the analysis is a fairly complete description of the small-amplitude solutions. Finally, we investigate the asymptotic behavior of solutions on the local bifurcation set.

  15. REACT: Alternatives to Critical Materials in Magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    REACT Project: The 14 projects that comprise ARPA-E’s REACT Project, short for “Rare Earth Alternatives in Critical Technologies”, are developing cost-effective alternatives to rare earths, the naturally occurring minerals with unique magnetic properties that are used in electric vehicle (EV) motors and wind generators. The REACT projects will identify low-cost and abundant replacement materials for rare earths while encouraging existing technologies to use them more efficiently. These alternatives would facilitate the widespread use of EVs and wind power, drastically reducing the amount of greenhouse gases released into the atmosphere.

  16. Thermoelectric efficiency of critical quantum junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mihail Mintchev; Luca Santoni; Paul Sorba

    2013-10-30

    We derive the efficiency at maximal power of a scale-invariant (critical) quantum junction in exact form. Both Fermi and Bose statistics are considered. We show that time-reversal invariance is spontaneously broken. For fermions we implement a new mechanism for efficiency enhancement above the Curzon-Ahlborn bound, based on a shift of the particle energy in each heat reservoir, proportional to its temperature. In this setting fermionic junctions can even reach at maximal power the Carnot efficiency. The bosonic junctions at maximal power turn out to be less efficient then the fermionic ones.

  17. Critical Nuclear Utilities Upgrade Project (CNUUP) (4572)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent Bonding in Actinide SandwichCray era Craycourse-inventoryCritical

  18. Fuel Cells for Critical Communications Backup Power

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015ExecutiveFluorescentDanKathy LoftusFuel CellFuel Fuelgreen hfor Critical

  19. Critical Waves and the Length Problem of Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. B. Laughlin

    2015-04-17

    It is pointed out that the mystery of how biological systems measure their lengths vanishes away if one premises that they have discovered a way to generate linear waves analogous to compressional sound. These can be used to detect length at either large or small scales using echo timing and fringe counting. It is shown that suitable linear chemical potential waves can, in fact, be manufactured by tuning to criticality conventional reaction-diffusion with a small number substances. Min oscillations in E. coli are cited as precedent resonant length measurement using chemical potential waves analogous to laser detection. Mitotic structures in eucaryotes are identified as candidates for such an effect at higher frequency. The engineering principle is shown to be very general and functionally the same as that used by hearing organs. PNAS Significance Statement: This paper invokes physical principles to address the question of how living things might use reaction-diffusion to measure out and regulate the many thousands of lengths required to make their body parts and internal organs. It argues that two ideas have been missing. One is that oscillation is necessary to achieve the necessary design stability and plasticity. The other is that the system must be tuned to criticality to stabilize the propagation velocity, thus enabling clocks to function as meter sticks. The broader significance is twofold: First, a fundamental piece of the machinery of life is probably invisible to present-day biochemical methods because they are too slow. Second, the simplicity of growth and form identified a century ago by D'Arcy Thompson is probably a symptom of biological engineering strategies, not primitive law.

  20. Nuclear criticality safety calculational analysis for small-diameter containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeTellier, M.S.; Smallwood, D.J.; Henkel, J.A. [and others

    1995-11-01

    This report documents calculations performed to establish a technical basis for the nuclear criticality safety of favorable geometry containers, sometimes referred to as 5-inch containers, in use at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. A list of containers currently used in the plant is shown in Table 1.0-1. These containers are currently used throughout the plant with no mass limits. The use of containers with geometries or material types other than those addressed in this evaluation must be bounded by this analysis or have an additional analysis performed. The following five basic container geometries were modeled and bound all container geometries in Table 1.0-1: (1) 4.32-inch-diameter by 50-inch-high polyethylene bottle; (2) 5.0-inch-diameter by 24-inch-high polyethylene bottle; (3) 5.25-inch-diameter by 24-inch-high steel can ({open_quotes}F-can{close_quotes}); (4) 5.25-inch-diameter by 15-inch-high steel can ({open_quotes}Z-can{close_quotes}); and (5) 5.0-inch-diameter by 9-inch-high polybottle ({open_quotes}CO-4{close_quotes}). Each container type is evaluated using five basic reflection and interaction models that include single containers and multiple containers in normal and in credible abnormal conditions. The uranium materials evaluated are UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}+H{sub 2}O and UF{sub 4}+oil materials at 100% and 10% enrichments and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, and H{sub 2}O at 100% enrichment. The design basis safe criticality limit for the Portsmouth facility is k{sub eff} + 2{sigma} < 0.95. The KENO study results may be used as the basis for evaluating general use of these containers in the plant.