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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design improvement phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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1

Feed-Pump Hydraulic Performance and Design Improvement, Phase I:  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Feed-Pump Hydraulic Performance Feed-Pump Hydraulic Performance and Design Improvement, Phase I: J2esearch Program Design Volume 2 EPRI EPRI CS-2323 Volume 2 Project 1884-6 Final Report March 1982 Keywords: Feed Pumps Feed Pump Reliability Feed Pump Hydraulics Feed Pump Design Feed Pump Research Feed Pump Specifications Prepared by Borg-Warner Corporation (Byron Jackson Pump Division and Borg-Warner Research Center) Carson, California and Massa^ f Technology Cambri__ . s ,-T. a a *a_^"nt.- ji^, w « ' jm.m ^j.^M\MMMim^mjii'mmmjmiiiimm\i- " I E CT R I C P 0 W E R R E S E A R C H I N ST ITO T E DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees,

2

Feed-pump hydraulic performance and design improvement, Phase I: research program design. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a result of prior EPRI-sponsored studies, it was concluded that a research program should be designed and implemented to provide an improved basis for the design, procurement, testing, and operation of large feed pumps with increased reliability and stability over the full range of operating conditions. This two-volume report contains a research plan which is based on a review of the present state of the art and which defines the necessary R and D program and estimates the benefits and costs of the program. The recommended research program consists of 30 interrelated tasks. It is designed to perform the needed research; to verify the results; to develop improved components; and to publish computer-aided design methods, pump specification guidelines, and a troubleshooting manual. Most of the technology proposed in the research plan is applicable to nuclear power plants as well as to fossil-fired plants. This volume contains appendixes on pump design, cavitation damage, performance testing, hydraulics, two-phase flow in pumps, flow stability, and rotor dynamics.

Brown, W.H.; Gopalakrishnan, S.; Fehlau, R.; Thompson, W.E.; Wilson, D.G.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Automated Phase Design and Timing Adjustment for Signal Phase Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we describe the design processes of human traffic engineers and the development of an automated system that solves the problem of timing adjustment in signal phase sequence design. i>Signal phase sequencing refers to the sequence of ... Keywords: automated design, case-based reasoning, signal phase design, traffic management

L. Wang; C. C. Hayes; R. R. Penner

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

MCFC PRODUCT DESIGN IMPROVEMENT  

SciTech Connect

This contract is supported by DOE and DOD/DARPA funds. The objective of the DOE program is to advance the direct carbonate fuel cell technology to a level suitable for commercial entry. The specific objectives of the DOD's initiative on 2 MW Fuel Cell Fixed Base Power Plant are: (A) to provide a detailed engineering design, development and cost estimate of the 2 MW fuel cell fixed base dual fuel power plant for DOD applications. Installation and operational support systems will also be developed. (B) To construct a full-size MW-class dual fuel power plant simulator.

Unknown

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

MCFC product design improvement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This contract is supported by DOE and DOD/DARPA funds. The objective of the DOE program is to advance the direct carbonate fuel cell technology to a level suitable for commercial entry. The specific objectives of the DOE's initiative on 2 MW Fuel Cell Fixed Base Power Plant are: (A) To provide a detailed engineering design, development and cost estimate of the 2 MW fuel cell fixed base dual fuel power plant for DOD applications. Installation and operational support systems will also be developed; and (B) To construct a full-size MW-class dual fuel power plant simulator. These objectives are planned to be achieved in the program coordinated with the Department of Energy, which has been funding a multiyear natural gas fueled direct fuel cell power plant program for civilian applications. Because many DARPA and DOE objectives are similar, the coordinated program activities are considered the most cost-effective for accomplishment of the program objectives. The DARPA/DOE joint program was launched in 1994. The DOE part of the program is expected to continue to the year 2000. The final output of this DOE program is to construct and operate a 2 MW power plant on an East Coast site. The site will be accessible to DOD energy/environmental systems base planners and logistics personnel as well as mission and policy planners to refine deployment configurations of this new power generation system for fixed base applications. A dual fuel fixed base design for military fuels operation, as well as support system logistics will be the key deliverables for the DARPA part of the program.

Unknown

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Improvements in 500-kHz Ultrasonic Phased-Array Probe Designs for Evaluation of Thick Section Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Piping Welds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PNNL has been studying and performing confirmatory research on the inspection of piping welds in coarse-grained steels for over 30 years. More recent efforts have been the application of low frequency phased array technology to this difficult to inspect material. The evolution of 500 kHz PA probes and the associated electronics and scanning protocol are documented in this report. The basis for the probe comparisons are responses from one mechanical fatigue crack and two thermal fatigue cracks in large-bore cast mockup specimens on loan from the Electric Power Research Institution. One of the most significant improvements was seen in the use of piezo-composite elements in the later two probes instead of the piezo-ceramic material used in the prototype array. This allowed a reduction in system gain of 30 dB and greatly reduced electronic noise. The latest probe had as much as a 5 dB increase in signal to noise, adding to its flaw discrimination capability. The system electronics for the latest probe were fully optimized for a 500 kHz center frequency, however significant improvements were not observed in the center frequency of the flaw responses. With improved scanner capabilities, smaller step sizes were used, allowing both line and raster data improvements to be made with the latest probe. The small step sizes produce high resolution images that improve flaw discrimination and, along with the increased signal-to-noise ratio inherent in the latest probe design, enhanced detection of the upper regions of the flaw make depth sizing more plausible. Finally, the physical sizes of the probes were progressively decreased allowing better access to the area of interest on specimens with weld crowns, and the latest probe was designed with non-integral wedges providing flexibility in focusing on different specimen geometries.

Crawford, Susan L.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Moran, Traci L.; Anderson, Michael T.; Diaz, Aaron A.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

MCFC PRODUCT DESIGN IMPROVEMENT  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the DOE program is to advance the direct carbonate fuel cell technology to a level suitable for commercial entry. The specific objectives of the DOD's initiative on 2 MW Fuel Cell Fixed Base Power Plant are: (1) To provide a detailed engineering design, development and cost estimate of the 2 MW fuel cell fixed base dual fuel power plant for DOD applications. Installation and operational support systems will also be developed. (2) To construct a full-size MW-class dual fuel power plant simulator. These objectives are planned to be achieved in the program coordinated with the Department of Energy, which has been funding a multiyear natural gas fueled direct fuel cell power plant program (DE-FC21-95MC31184) for civilian applications. Because many DARPA and DOE objectives are similar, the coordinated program activities are considered the most cost-effective for accomplishment of the program objectives. The DARPA/DOE joint program was launched in 1994. The DOE part of the program is expected to continue to Year 2000. The final output of this DOE program is to construct and operate a 2 MW power plant on an East Coast site. The site will be accessible to DOD energy/environmental systems base planners and logistics personnel as well as mission and policy planners to refine deployment configurations of this new power generation system for fixed base applications.

Unknown

2000-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

8

Semi-annual report on the project to design and experimentally test an improved geothermal drill bit, Phase II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The test facilities (the geothermal drilling vessel and the geothermal drill-bit seal tester) were completed and de-bugged, and the first tests were run on full-scale research drill bits and drill-bit seals. In addition, more materials information was gathered, and a number of additional seals of high-temperature elastomer materials were obtained for testing. Maurer Engineering has also been active in the design and procurement of candidate high-temperature drill-bit seals for testing, and has done a literature and patent search on the problem of drill-bit insert retention. Reed Tool Co. has cooperated in the fabrication of drill bits for testing, and has offered consultation on certain seal designs.

Barker, L.M.; Green, S.J.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Semi-annual report on the project to design and experimentally test an improved geothermal drill bit, phase II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The test facilities (the geothermal drilling vessel and the geothermal drill-bit seal tester) were completed and de-bugged, and the first tests were run on full-scale research drill bits and drill-bit seals. In addition, more materials information was gathered, and a number of additional seals of high-temperature elastomer materials were obtained for testing. Maurer Engineering, on a subcontract basis, has also been active in the design and procurement of candidate high-temperature drill-bit seals for testing, and has done a literature and patent search on the problem of drill-bit insert retention. Reed Tool Co. has cooperated in the fabrication of drill bits for testing, and has offered consultation on certain seal designs.

Barker, L.M.; Green, S.J.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Improving the design of solar cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improving the design of solar cells. Photovoltaic (PV) systems convert the sun's light directly to electrical power by absorption ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

11

Energy Savings by Cell Design Improvements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 3, 2011 ... Aluminum Reduction Technology: Energy Savings by Cell Design Improvements Sponsored by: The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society, ...

12

Bake Oven Design and Improvement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 13, 2012 ... Electrode Technology for Aluminium Production: Bake Oven Design and ... from shaft calciners is recovered for heating coal tar pitch and power ...

13

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Designer Glue Improves...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Designer Glue Improves Lithium-ion Battery Life By Mike Ross August 19, 2013 When it comes to improving the performance of lithium-ion batteries, no part should be overlooked - not...

14

Improved Engine Design Through More Efficient Combustion ...  

Improved Engine Design Through More Efficient Combustion Simulations The Multi-Zone Combustion Model (MCM) is a software tool that enables ...

15

Conceptual Phase Structural Design Tool for Microsatellites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gaining traction or momentum in the conceptual design phase for a complex system can be an arduous and daunting process, whether the complex system being designed is a satellite, airplane, car, or one of countless other ...

McLinko, Ryan (Ryan M.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Two-Phase Pressure Drop Technology for Design and Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book is the second in the "Technology for Design and Analysis" series. The first book, "Void Fraction Technology for Design and Analysis," focused on void fraction in steady-state and dynamic two-phase systems. Each book in the series provides engineering fundamentals and a perspective of the importance of the subject in industrial processes, and presents an overview of the measurement technology. This work also moves the technology forward by constructing improved models for steady-state and dynami...

1999-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

17

Increased Availability From Improved Condenser Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Performance parameters and flow characteristics on the shell side of surface condensers are becoming better understood. Contributing to this knowledge base is the recent ability to measure the physical properties as well as the quantity of gases being removed from the condenser by air removal equipment. Reviewed here are the commonality of these data from many operating condensers obtained over the past six years and other known condenser measurements, theory and laboratory experiments. These are combined to formulate global theoretical description of condenser dynamics describing the mechanism responsible for aeration and de-aeration, excess back pressure buildup due to air ingress or generation of other noncondensable gases, and the dissolubility of corrosive gases in condensate. The theoretical description supports a dynamic model useful for deciding condenser configuration design and design improvements. Features of design found in many operating condensers that promote aeration and resulting corrosion are presented. The benefits of the model and engineering design modifications to plant life cycle management, improved condenser performance, outage reduction and reliability improvements, lost load recovery and fuel savings are discussed. (author)

Harpster, Joseph W. [Intek, Inc., 751 Intek Way, Westerville, OH 43082 (United States)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELL PRODUCT DESIGN IMPROVEMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program efforts are focused on technology and system optimization for cost reduction, commercial design development, and prototype system field trials. The program is designed to advance the carbonate fuel cell technology from full-size field test to the commercial design. FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE) is in the later stage of the multiyear program for development and verification of carbonate fuel cell based power plants supported by DOE/NETL with additional funding from DOD/DARPA and the FuelCell Energy team. FCE has scaled up the technology to full-size and developed DFC{reg_sign} stack and balance-of-plant (BOP) equipment technology to meet product requirements, and acquired high rate manufacturing capabilities to reduce cost. FCE has designed submegawatt (DFC300A) and megawatt (DFC1500 and DFC3000) class fuel cell products for commercialization of its DFC{reg_sign} technology. A significant progress was made during the reporting period. The reforming unit design was optimized using a three-dimensional stack simulation model. Thermal and flow uniformities of the oxidant-In flow in the stack module were improved using computational fluid dynamics based flow simulation model. The manufacturing capacity was increased. The submegawatt stack module overall cost was reduced by {approx}30% on a per kW basis. An integrated deoxidizer-prereformer design was tested successfully at submegawatt scale using fuels simulating digester gas, coal bed methane gas and peak shave (natural) gas.

H.C. Maru; M. Farooque

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Molten carbonate fuel cell product design improvement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Drawing on the manufacture, field test, and post-test experience of the sixteen Santa Clara Demonstration Project (SCDP) stacks, ERC is finalizing the next generation commercial entry product design. The second generation cells are 50% larger in area, 40% lighter on equal geometric area basis, and 30% thinner than the earlier design. These improvements have resulted in doubling of the full-height stack power. A low-cost and high-strength matrix has also been developed for improving product ruggedness. The low-cost advanced cell design incorporating these improvements has been refined through six short stack tests. Power production per cell of two times the SCDP maximum power operation, over ten thermal cycles, and overall operating flexibility with respect to load and thermal changes have been demonstrated in these short stack tests. An internally insulated stack enclosure has been designed and fabricated to eliminate the need for an inert gas environment during operation. ERC has acquired the capability for testing 400kW full-height direct fuel ceil (DFC) stack and balance-of-plant equipment. With the readiness of the power plant test facility, the cell package design, and the stack module, full-height stack testing has begun. The first full- height stack incorporating the post-SCDP second generation design was completed. The stack reached a power level of 253 kW, setting a world record for the highest power production from the advanced fuel cell system. Excellent performance uniformity at this power level affirmed manufacturing reproducibility of the components at the factory. This unoptimized small size test has achieved pipeline natural gas to DC electricity conversion efficiency of 47% (based on lower heating value - LHV) including the parasitic power consumed by the BOP equipment; that should translate to more than 50% efficiency in commercial operation, before employing cogeneration. The power plant system also operated smoothly. With the success of this test confirming the full-height stack basic design and with the completion of SCDP stacks post-test feedback, manufacture of the full-height stack representing the commercial prototype design has been completed and system demonstration is planned to start in the first quarter of 1999. These developments as well as manufacturing advances are discussed in this report.

P. Voyentzie; T. Leo; A. Kush; L. Christner; G. Carlson; C. Yuh

1998-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

20

Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Product Design Improvement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report provides results of Energy Research Corporation`s technical approach to performing the program `Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) Product Design Improvement` covered under the DOE-ERC Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-95MC31184. This work is supported by DOE/METC and DOD/DARPA as well as ERC Team funds. The objective of the DOE-sponsored program is to advance the direct carbonate fuel cell technology to a level suitable for commercial entry for civilian applications. The overall objective of the DOD/DARPA initiative is to adapt the civilian 2 MW-Class fuel cell power plant for dual fuel DOD applications. This program is designed to advance the carbonate fuel cell technology from the power plant demonstration status to the commercial entry early production unit design stage. The specific objectives which will allow attainment of these overall program goals are: (1) Provide environmental information to support DOE evaluation with respect to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), (2) Define market-responsive power plant requirements and specifications, (3) Establish design for multifuel, low-cost, modular, market-responsive power plant, (4) Resolve power plant manufacturing issues and define the design for the commercial manufacturing facility, (5) Acquire capabilities to support developmental testing of 0370 stacks and BOP equipment as required to prepare for commercial design, and (6) Resolve stack and BOP equipment technology issues and design, build, and field test a modular commercial prototype power plant to demonstrate readiness of the power plant for commercial entry.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design improvement phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELL PRODUCT DESIGN IMPROVEMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ongoing program is designed to advance the carbonate fuel cell technology from full-size proof-of-concept field test to the commercial design. DOE has been funding Direct FuelCell{reg_sign} (DFC{reg_sign}) development at FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE) for stationary power plant applications. The program efforts are focused on technology and system optimization for cost reduction, leading to commercial design development and prototype system field trials. FCE, Danbury, CT, is a world-recognized leader for the development and commercialization of high efficiency fuel cells that can generate clean electricity at power stations, or at distributed locations near the customers such as hospitals, schools, universities, hotels and other commercial and industrial applications. FCE has designed three different fuel cell power plant models (DFC300A, DFC1500 and DFC3000). FCE's power plants are based on its patented DFC{reg_sign} technology, where the fuel is directly fed to the fuel cell and hydrogen is generated internally. These power plants offer significant advantages compared to the existing power generation technologies--higher fuel efficiency, significantly lower emissions, quieter operation, flexible siting and permitting requirements, scalability and potentially lower operating costs. Also, the exhaust heat by-product can be used for cogeneration applications such as high-pressure steam, district heating and air conditioning. Several FCE sub-megawatt power plants are currently operating in Europe, Japan and the US. Because hydrogen is generated directly within the fuel cell module from readily available fuels such as natural gas and waste water treatment gas, DFC power plants are ready today and do not require the creation of a hydrogen infrastructure. Product improvement progress made during the reporting period in the areas of technology, manufacturing processes, cost reduction and balance of plant equipment designs is discussed in this report.

H.C. Maru; M. Farooque

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELL PRODUCT DESIGN IMPROVEMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program was designed to advance the carbonate fuel cell technology from full-size proof-of-concept field test to the commercial design. DOE has been funding Direct FuelCell{reg_sign} (DFC{reg_sign}) development at FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE, formerly Energy Research Corporation) from an early state of development for stationary power plant applications. The current program efforts were focused on technology and system development, and cost reduction, leading to commercial design development and prototype system field trials. FCE, in Danbury, CT, is a world-recognized leader for the development and commercialization of high efficiency fuel cells that can generate clean electricity at power stations, or at distributed locations near the customers such as hospitals, schools, universities, hotels and other commercial and industrial applications. FCE has designed three different fuel cell power plant models (DFC300A, DFC1500 and DFC3000). FCE's power plants are based on its patented DFC{reg_sign} technology, where a hydrocarbon fuel is directly fed to the fuel cell and hydrogen is generated internally. These power plants offer significant advantages compared to the existing power generation technologies--higher fuel efficiency, significantly lower emissions, quieter operation, flexible siting and permitting requirements, scalability and potentially lower operating costs. Also, the exhaust heat by-product can be used for cogeneration applications such as high-pressure steam, district heating and air conditioning. Several sub-MW power plants based on the DFC design are currently operating in Europe, Japan and the US. Several one-megawatt power plant design was verified by operation on natural gas at FCE. This plant is currently installed at a customer site in King County, WA under another US government program and is currently in operation. Because hydrogen is generated directly within the fuel cell module from readily available fuels such as natural gas and waste water treatment gas, DFC power plants are ready today and do not require the creation of a hydrogen infrastructure. Product improvement progress made during the program period in the areas of technology, manufacturing processes, cost reduction and balance-of-plant equipment designs is discussed in this report.

H.C. Maru; M. Farooque

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELL PRODUCT DESIGN IMPROVEMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ongoing program is designed to advance the carbonate fuel cell technology from full-size proof-of-concept field test to the commercial design. DOE has been funding Direct FuelCell{reg_sign} (DFC{reg_sign}) development at FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE) for stationary power plant applications. The program efforts are focused on technology and system optimization for cost reduction leading to commercial design development and prototype system field trials. FCE, Danbury, CT, is a world-recognized leader for the development and commercialization of high efficiency fuel cells that can generate clean electricity at power stations or in distributed locations near the customer, including hospitals, schools, universities, hotels and other commercial and industrial applications. FuelCell Energy has designed three different fuel cell power plant models (DFC300, DFC1500 and DFC3000). FCE's power plants are based on its patented Direct FuelCell technology, where the fuel is directly fed to fuel cell and hydrogen is generated internally. These power plants offer significant advantages compared to existing power generation technologies--higher fuel efficiency, significantly lower emissions, quieter operation, flexible siting and permitting requirements, scalability and potentially lower operating costs. Also, the exhaust heat by-product can be used for cogeneration applications such as high-pressure steam, district heating, and air conditioning. Several FCE sub-megawatt power plants are currently operating in Europe, Japan and the US. Because hydrogen is generated directly within the fuel cell module from readily available fuels such as natural gas and waste water treatment gas, DFC power plants are ready today and do not require the creation of a hydrogen infrastructure. Product improvement progress made during the reporting period in the areas of technology, manufacturing processes, cost reduction and balance of plant equipment designs is discussed in this report. FCE's DFC products development has been carried out under a joint public-private effort with DOE being the major contributor. Current funding is primarily under a Cooperative Agreement with DOE.

H. C. Maru; M. Farooque

2003-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

24

M-C Power`s product design and improvement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The sole mission of M-C Power is the development and subsequent commercialization of molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) stacks. These MCFC stacks are based on the Internally Manifolded Heat EXchanger plate design developed by the Institute of Gas Technology. Integration of the MCFC stack into a commercially viable power plant is the mission of the IMHEX{sup {reg_sign}} team. The team is composed of leaders in the packaging and design of power generation equipment, including fuel cell technology, and includes Stewart & Stevenson, Bechtel, The Institute of Gas Technology and M-C Power. In an effort to succeed in their respective missions, M-C Power and the IMHEX{sup {reg_sign}} team have developed a commercialization program. At the present time, the team is making the transition from Phase I (Technology Development) to Phase II (Product Design & Improvement) of the program. Phase II`s objective is a commercially viable (cost effective and technologically reliable) MCFC power plant ready for market by the turn of the century.

Scroppo, J.A.; Laurens, R.M.; Petraglia, V.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

25

MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELL PRODUCT DESIGN IMPROVEMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The carbonate fuel cell promises highly efficient, cost-effective and environmentally superior power generation from pipeline natural gas, coal gas, biogas, and other gaseous and liquid fuels. FuelCell Energy, Inc. has been engaged in the development of this unique technology, focusing on the development of the Direct Fuel Cell (DFC{reg_sign}). The DFC{reg_sign} design incorporates the unique internal reforming feature which allows utilization of a hydrocarbon fuel directly in the fuel cell without requiring any external reforming reactor and associated heat exchange equipment. This approach upgrades waste heat to chemical energy and thereby contributes to a higher overall conversion efficiency of fuel energy to electricity with low levels of environmental emissions. Among the internal reforming options, FuelCell Energy has selected the Indirect Internal Reforming (IIR)--Direct Internal Reforming (DIR) combination as its baseline design. The IIR-DIR combination allows reforming control (and thus cooling) over the entire cell area. This results in uniform cell temperature. In the IIR-DIR stack, a reforming unit (RU) is placed in between a group of fuel cells. The hydrocarbon fuel is first fed into the RU where it is reformed partially to hydrogen and carbon monoxide fuel using heat produced by the fuel cell electrochemical reactions. The reformed gases are then fed to the DIR chamber, where the residual fuel is reformed simultaneously with the electrochemical fuel cell reactions. FuelCell Energy plans to offer commercial DFC power plants in various sizes, focusing on the subMW as well as the MW-scale units. The plan is to offer standardized, packaged DFC power plants operating on natural gas or other hydrocarbon-containing fuels for commercial sale. The power plant design will include a diesel fuel processing option to allow dual fuel applications. These power plants, which can be shop-fabricated and sited near the user, are ideally suited for distributed power generation, industrial cogeneration, marine applications and uninterrupted power for military bases. FuelCell Energy operated a 1.8 MW plant at a utility site in 1996-97, the largest fuel cell power plant ever operated in North America. This proof-of-concept power plant demonstrated high efficiency, low emissions, reactive power control, and unattended operation capabilities. Drawing on the manufacture, field test, and post-test experience of the full-size power plant; FuelCell Energy launched the Product Design Improvement (PDI) program sponsored by government and the private-sector cost-share. The PDI efforts are focused on technology and system optimization for cost reduction, commercial design development, and prototype system field trials. The program was initiated in December 1994. Year 2000 program accomplishments are discussed in this report.

H.C. Maru; M. Farooque

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer mask designs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer, different image-plane mask designs can improve the operation of the interferometer. By keeping the test beam window of the mask small compared to the separation distance between the beams, the problem of energy from the reference beam leaking through the test beam window is reduced. By rotating the grating and mask 45.degree., only a single one-dimensional translation stage is required for phase-shifting. By keeping two reference pinholes in the same orientation about the test beam window, only a single grating orientation, and thus a single one-dimensional translation stage, is required. The use of a two-dimensional grating allows for a multiplicity of pinholes to be used about the pattern of diffracted orders of the grating at the mask. Orientation marks on the mask can be used to orient the device and indicate the position of the reference pinholes.

Goldberg, Kenneth Alan (Berkeley, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Improving Multi-Agent Architectural Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agents provide developers with a flexible way to structure systems around autonomous, communicating elements. To support the efficient development of such systems, design techniques need to be introduced. In this context, we propose an extension of the ... Keywords: Architectural Design, Multi-Agent Systems

Carla Silva; Jaelson Castro; Patrícia Tedesco; João Araújo; Ana Moreira; John Mylopoulos

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Alloy Design and Phase Stability Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 20, 2010... in MX Carbide/Nitride and the Z-Phase: A First Principles Approach: Michael Gao1; Chris Cowen1; Paul Jablonski1; Jeff Hawk1; 1NETL

29

A Radiation Tolerant Phase Locked Loop Design for Digital Electronics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With decreasing feature sizes, lowered supply voltages and increasing operating frequencies, the radiation tolerance of digital circuits is becoming an increasingly important problem. Many radiation hardening techniques have been presented in the literature for combinational as well as sequential logic. However, the radiation tolerance of clock generation circuitry has received scant attention to date. Recently, it has been shown that in the deep submicron regime, the clock network contributes significantly to the chip level Soft Error Rate (SER). The on-chip Phase Locked Loop (PLL) is particularly vulnerable to radiation strikes. In this thesis, we present a radiation hardened PLL design. Each of the components of this design-the voltage controlled oscillator (VCO), the phase frequency detector (PFD) and the charge pump/loop filter-are designed in a radiation tolerant manner. Whenever possible, the circuit elements used in our PLL exploit the fact that if a gate is implemented using only PMOS (NMOS) transistors then a radiation particle strike can result only in a logic 0 to 1 (1 to 0) flip. By separating the PMOS and NMOS devices, and splitting the gate output into two signals, extreme high levels of radiation tolerance are obtained. Our design uses two VCOs (with cross-coupled inverters) and charge pumps, so that a strike on any one is compensated by the other. Our PLL is tested for radiation immunity for critical charge values up to 250fC. Our SPICE-based results demonstrate that after exhaustively striking all circuit nodes, the worst case jitter of our hardened PLL is just 37.4 percent. In the worst case, our PLL returns to the locked state in 2 cycles of the VCO clock, after a radiation strike. These numbers are significant improvements over those of the best previously reported approaches.

Kumar, Rajesh

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Cost reduction through improved seismic design  

SciTech Connect

During the past decade, many significnt seismic technology developments have been accomplished by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) programs. Both base technology and major projects, such as the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) plant, have contributed to seismic technology development and validation. Improvements have come in the areas of ground motion definitions, soil-structure interaction, and structural analysis methods and criteria for piping, equipment, components, reactor core, and vessels. Examples of some of these lessons learned and technology developments are provided. Then, the highest priority seismic technology needs, achievable through DOE actions and sponsorship are identified and discussed. Satisfaction of these needs are expected to make important contributions toward cost avoidances and reduced capital costs of future liquid metal nuclear plants. 23 references, 12 figures.

Severud, L.K.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Continuous contour phase plate design. Final report, Project 2.  

SciTech Connect

We describe an iterative optimization algorithm developed for continuous contour phase plate design. With the help of this algorithm, a kinoform plate was designed to transform the square supergaussian beam into round supergaussian one. The phase function derived by the proposed method is smooth, has analytical representation, and has no singularities. Drawback is that this function does not provide smoothing of the incoming intensity distribution like random phase plates do and output intensity should be sensitive to variations of the illuminating light amplitude.

Shmalhausen, V.I.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Program for the improvement of downhole drilling motor bearings and seals. Phase V. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work done during the fifth and final phase of a program to improve downhole drilling motor bearing and seals is described. The principal activities in this phase were: (a) testing seals with abrasive-laden mud on the low-pressure side; (b) test second and third generation designs of both elastomeric chevron seals and Teflon U-seals; and (c) testing a full-scale bearing/seal package. Several operating parameters which have a radical effect on seal life were identified, and some promising designs and materials were tested.

DeLafosse, P.H.; Tibbitts, G.A.; Black, A.D.; DiBona, B.G.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

A Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Better Anode Design to Improve A Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries A Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries Print Friday, 23 March 2012 13:53 Lithium-ion batteries are in smart phones, laptops, most other consumer electronics, and the newest electric cars. Good as these batteries are, the need for energy storage in batteries is surpassing current technologies. In a lithium-ion battery, charge moves from the cathode to the anode, a critical component for storing energy. A team of Berkeley Lab scientists has designed a new kind of anode that absorbs eight times the lithium of current designs, and has maintained its greatly increased energy capacity after more than a year of testing and many hundreds of charge-discharge cycles. Cyclical Science Succeeds

34

Design and development of a laminated Fresnel lens for point-focus PV systems. Phase II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A laminated glass-plastic lens parquet using injection molded point focus Fresnel lenses is described. The second phase of a program aimed at investigating the cost effectiveness of a glass-plastic concentrator lens assembly is reported. The first phase dealt with the development of a first generation lens design, the selection of the preferred glass coverplate and glass-to-lens adhesive and initial injection molding lens molding trials. The second phase has dealt with the development of an improved lens design, a full size parquet lamination process, and a second group of injection molding lens molding trials.

Hodge, R.C.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Improving Phase Measurement Procedures for Pump-Probe Experiments  

SciTech Connect

Pump-probe experiments use a visible laser to excite an atom or molecule, while an X-ray pulse measures its shape. The phases and pulse times of each beam are used to calculate the object's positing at a given time - a moving picture of the chemical reaction. Currently, the fastest X-ray pulses can travel a time-length of five femtoseconds. However, present-day phase measurements can only be done as quickly as 50 femtoseconds. The purpose of this research is to explore ways in which phase-timing measurements can be improved. Three experiments are undergone to find the key factors in phase-timing. Different frequency mixers, the radio frequency (RF) components used for phase measurement, are tested for the highest sensitivity. These same mixers are then tested using two different power splitters for the lowest noise-to-sensitivity ratio. Lastly, the temperature dependency of phase is explored by testing each component at a range of temperatures to see how the phase is affected. This research demonstrated that certain mixers were more sensitive than others; on average, one mixer performed the best with a sensitivity of 0.0230 V/ps. The results also showed that same mixer combined with one splitter gave the best noise-to-sensitivity ratio overall with an average of 6.95E-04 fs/{radical}(Hz). All the components tested exhibited a temperature-dependent phase change (ranging from 1.69 to 81.6 fs/{sup o}C); the same mixer that performed at the highest sensitivity with the least noise had a significantly greater phase change than the other two. In conclusion, the experiments showed that a temperature-controlled environment is most appropriate for phase measurement. They also demonstrated that mixers are not significantly noisy and that certain types of mixers may perform better than others, which could be accounted for in their construction. The results of this research encourage further investigation into the study of different mixers and other RF components used in pump-probe experiments.

Not Available

2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

36

Electric car design. Interim summary report, Phase I: deliverable item 9  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work included in this Interim Summary Report is part of the Electric Car Program, the goal of which is to develop by 1979 a totally new electric car with substantially improved performance over those electric cars available in 1976. The rationale used in designing a four-passenger electric car for use in an urban environment is presented. The approach taken was to design an electric car utilizing current technology. On the basis of tradeoff analyses, upgrading improvements were identified which would permit the electric car to more nearly meet all of the ERDA near-term goals. The electric car design, including the chassis, drive train, major components, and the control are summarized. The Phase I electric car design will meet many of the ERDA near-term goals. Upgrading development programs are identified which, when incorporated in Phase II vehicle development, will result in upgraded performance, which essentially meets ERDA's near-term goals.

Not Available

1977-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

37

Phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer grating designs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer, by sending the zeroth-order diffraction to the reference pinhole of the mask and the first-order diffraction to the test beam window of the mask, the test and reference beam intensities can be balanced and the fringe contrast improved. Additionally, using a duty cycle of the diffraction grating other than 50%, the fringe contrast can also be improved.

Naulleau, Patrick (Oakland, CA); Goldberg, Kenneth Alan (Berkeley, CA); Tejnil, Edita (San Carlos, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Design considerations for a two-phase turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A two-phase turbine, using a low-quality steam-water mixture as a working fluid, was designed, built, and tested in the laboratory. Two-phase fluids are found naturally in most geothermal fields throughout the world and can also be used in the conversion of waste heat from industrial sources. The thermodynamic and fluid-dynamic properties of such fluid mixtures are reviewed, with specific reference to the selection and design of an appropriate expander. Various types of practically realizable expanders are considered, and the choice of a single-stage, axial-flow, impulse turbine is explained. Also the basic design parameters, including sizing and blade and nozzle geometry, are described.

Comfort, W.J. III; Beadle, C.W.

1978-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

39

Method to Improve Steel Creep Strength by Alloy Design  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Improve Steel Creep Strength by Alloy Design to Improve Steel Creep Strength by Alloy Design and Heat Treatment Opportunity Research is active on the patent pending technology, titled "Creep Resistant High Temperature Martensitic Steel." This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview The operating efficiency of coal-fired power plants is directly related to combustion system temperature and pressure. Incorporation of ultrasupercritical (USC) steam conditions into new or existing power plants can increase efficiency and reduce coal utilization, while reducing carbon dioxide emissions. Traditional materials used in USC power plants do not possess the creep capability for long-term use above 610 °C. Under USC

40

Embedded Sensors and Controls to Improve Component Performance and Reliability Conceptual Design Report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate improved reliability and increased performance made possible by deeply embedding instrumentation and controls (I&C) in nuclear power plant (NPP) components and systems. The project is employing a highly instrumented canned rotor, magnetic bearing, fluoride salt pump as its I&C technology demonstration platform. I&C is intimately part of the basic millisecond-by-millisecond functioning of the system; treating I&C as an integral part of the system design is innovative and will allow significant improvement in capabilities and performance. As systems become more complex and greater performance is required, traditional I&C design techniques become inadequate and more advanced I&C needs to be applied. New I&C techniques enable optimal and reliable performance and tolerance of noise and uncertainties in the system rather than merely monitoring quasistable performance. Traditionally, I&C has been incorporated in NPP components after the design is nearly complete; adequate performance was obtained through over-design. By incorporating I&C at the beginning of the design phase, the control system can provide superior performance and reliability and enable designs that are otherwise impossible. This report describes the progress and status of the project and provides a conceptual design overview for the platform to demonstrate the performance and reliability improvements enabled by advanced embedded I&C.

Kisner, R.; Melin, A.; Burress, T.; Fugate, D.; Holcomb, D.; Wilgen, J.; Miller, J.; Wilson, D.; Silva, P.; Whitlow, L.; Peretz, F.

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design improvement phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries Print Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries Print Lithium-ion batteries are in smart phones, laptops, most other consumer electronics, and the newest electric cars. Good as these batteries are, the need for energy storage in batteries is surpassing current technologies. In a lithium-ion battery, charge moves from the cathode to the anode, a critical component for storing energy. A team of Berkeley Lab scientists has designed a new kind of anode that absorbs eight times the lithium of current designs, and has maintained its greatly increased energy capacity after more than a year of testing and many hundreds of charge-discharge cycles. Cyclical Science Succeeds The anode achievement described in this highlight provides a rare scientific showcase, combining advanced tools of synthesis, characterization, and simulation in a novel approach to materials development. Gao Liu's original research team, part of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division (EETD), got the ball rolling by designing the original series of polyfluorene-based conducting polymers. Then, Wanli Yang of the ALS suggested soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy to determine their key electronic properties. To better understand these results, and their relevance to the conductivity of the polymer, the growing team sought a theoretical explanation from Lin-Wang Wang of Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division (MSD). By conducting calculations on the promising polymers at Berkeley Lab's National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC), the team gained insight into what was really happening in the PF with the carbonyl functional group, singling it out for further development.

42

A Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries Print A Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries Print Lithium-ion batteries are in smart phones, laptops, most other consumer electronics, and the newest electric cars. Good as these batteries are, the need for energy storage in batteries is surpassing current technologies. In a lithium-ion battery, charge moves from the cathode to the anode, a critical component for storing energy. A team of Berkeley Lab scientists has designed a new kind of anode that absorbs eight times the lithium of current designs, and has maintained its greatly increased energy capacity after more than a year of testing and many hundreds of charge-discharge cycles. Cyclical Science Succeeds The anode achievement described in this highlight provides a rare scientific showcase, combining advanced tools of synthesis, characterization, and simulation in a novel approach to materials development. Gao Liu's original research team, part of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division (EETD), got the ball rolling by designing the original series of polyfluorene-based conducting polymers. Then, Wanli Yang of the ALS suggested soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy to determine their key electronic properties. To better understand these results, and their relevance to the conductivity of the polymer, the growing team sought a theoretical explanation from Lin-Wang Wang of Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division (MSD). By conducting calculations on the promising polymers at Berkeley Lab's National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC), the team gained insight into what was really happening in the PF with the carbonyl functional group, singling it out for further development.

43

A Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries Print A Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries Print Lithium-ion batteries are in smart phones, laptops, most other consumer electronics, and the newest electric cars. Good as these batteries are, the need for energy storage in batteries is surpassing current technologies. In a lithium-ion battery, charge moves from the cathode to the anode, a critical component for storing energy. A team of Berkeley Lab scientists has designed a new kind of anode that absorbs eight times the lithium of current designs, and has maintained its greatly increased energy capacity after more than a year of testing and many hundreds of charge-discharge cycles. Cyclical Science Succeeds The anode achievement described in this highlight provides a rare scientific showcase, combining advanced tools of synthesis, characterization, and simulation in a novel approach to materials development. Gao Liu's original research team, part of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division (EETD), got the ball rolling by designing the original series of polyfluorene-based conducting polymers. Then, Wanli Yang of the ALS suggested soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy to determine their key electronic properties. To better understand these results, and their relevance to the conductivity of the polymer, the growing team sought a theoretical explanation from Lin-Wang Wang of Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division (MSD). By conducting calculations on the promising polymers at Berkeley Lab's National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC), the team gained insight into what was really happening in the PF with the carbonyl functional group, singling it out for further development.

44

Preconceptual design of the gas-phase decontamination demonstration cart  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Removal of uranium deposits from the interior surfaces of gaseous diffusion equipment will be a major portion of the overall multibillion dollar effort to decontaminate and decommission the gaseous diffusion plants. Long-term low-temperature (LTLT) gas-phase decontamination is being developed at the K-25 Site as an in situ decontamination process that is expected to significantly lower the decontamination costs, reduce worker exposure to radioactive materials, and reduce safeguard concerns. This report documents the preconceptual design of the process equipment that is necessary to conduct a full-scale demonstration of the LTLT method in accordance with the process steps listed above. The process equipment and method proposed in this report are not intended to represent a full-scale production campaign design and operation, since the gas evacuation, gas charging, and off-gas handling systems that would be cost effective in a production campaign are not cost effective for a first-time demonstration. However, the design presented here is expected to be applicable to special decontamination projects beyond the demonstration, which could include the Deposit Recovery Program. The equipment will therefore be sized to a 200 ft size 1 converter (plus a substantial conservative design margin), which is the largest item of interest for gas phase decontamination in the Deposit Recovery Program. The decontamination equipment will allow recovery of the UF{sub 6}, which is generated from the reaction of ClF{sub 3} with the uranium deposits, by use of NaF traps.

Munday, E.B.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Red River Stream Improvement Final Design Nez Perce National Forest.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details the final stream improvement design along the reach of Red River between the bridge below Dawson Creek, upstream for approximately 2 miles, Idaho County, Idaho. Geomorphic mapping, hydrologic profiles and cross-sections were presented along with existing fish habitat maps in the conceptual design report. This information is used to develop a stream improvement design intended to improve aquatic habitat and restore riparian health in the reach. The area was placer mined using large bucket dredges between 1938 and 1957. This activity removed most of the riparian vegetation in the stream corridor and obliterated the channel bed and banks. The reach was also cut-off from most valley margin tributaries. In the 50 years since large-scale dredging ceased, the channel has been re-established and parts of the riparian zone have grown in. However, the recruitment of large woody debris to the stream has been extremely low and overhead cover is poor. Pool habitat makes up more than 37% of the reach, and habitat diversity is much better than the project reach on Crooked River. There is little large woody debris in the stream to provide cover for spawning and juvenile rearing, because the majority of the woody debris does not span a significant part of the channel, but is mainly on the side slopes of the stream. Most of the riparian zone has very little soil or subsoil left after the mining and so now consists primarily of unconsolidated cobble tailings or heavily compacted gravel tailings. Knapweed and lodgepole pine are the most successful colonizers of these post mining landforms. Tributary fans which add complexity to many other streams in the region, have been isolated from the main reach due to placer mining and road building.

Watershed Consulting, LLC

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Design and evaluation of a two-phase turbine for low quality steam--water mixtures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new two-phase turbine was designed and built for testing in the laboratory, using a low quality steam-water mixture as a working fluid. The measured performance compares well with performance predictions of a numerical model of the expander. Details of the selection of the type of expander are given. The design of an experimental expander for use in a clean two-phase flow laboratory experiment and the development of a numerical model for performance analysis and extrapolations are described. Experiments including static cascade performance with two-phase fluid, disk friction and windage measurements, and two-phase performance measurements of the experimental expander are reported. Comparisons of the numerical model and experimental results, and the prediction of the performance of an advanced design, indicating how performance improvements can be achieved, are also included. An engine efficiency of 23 percent for a single-nozzle test was measured. Full admission performance, based upon the numerical model and achievable nozzle thrust coefficients indicate that an engine efficiency of between 38 and 48 percent can be realized with present technology. If maximum liquid removal loss is assumed, this performance range is predicted to be 38 to 41 percent. Droplet size reduction and the development and implementation of enhanced two-phase flow analysis techniques should make it possible to achieve the research goal of 70 percent engine efficiency.

Comfort, W.J. III

1977-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

47

DWPF Melter Glass Pump Implementation and Design Improvement  

SciTech Connect

In order to improve the melt rate of high level waste slurry feed being vitrified in the Savannah River Sites (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Melter, a melter glass pump (pump 1) was installed in the DWPF Melter on February 10, 2004. The glass pump increased melt rate by generating a forced convection within the molten glass pool, thereby increasing the heat transfer from the molten glass to the unmolten feed cold cap that is on top of the glass pool. After operating for over four months, the pump was removed on June 22, 2004 due to indications that it had failed. The removed pump exhibited obvious signs of corrosion, had collapsed inward at the glass exit slots at the melt line, and was dog-legged in the same area. This lead to the pump being redesigned to improve its mechanical integrity (increased wall thickness and strength) while maintaining its hydraulic diameter as large as possible. The improved DWPF glass pump (pump 2) was installed on September 15, 2004. The impact of the new design on pump life, along with analysis of the glass pumps impact on melt rate in the DWPF Melter is discussed in this paper.

MICHAEL, SMITH

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

X_II_DesignPhase_Topical_Report_Dec05.book  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Topical Report Topical Report submitted to The Department of Energy (DoE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under Contract # DE-FC26-04NT42264 for PHASE I TOPICAL REPORT Reporting Period: 10-01-2004 to 12-31-2005 compiled as part of the project titled Explorer-II: Wireless Self-powered Visual and NDE Robotic Inspection System for Live Gas Distribution Mains Document Number: REP-GOV-DOE-051231 Date of Submission: January 31 st , 2006 submitted by Carnegie Mellon University The Robotics Institute - REC #10 on 40th Street Pittsburgh, PA 15201 (412) 268-2000 Administrative Contact: Susan Burkett Technical Contact: Hagen Schempf, Ph.D. Explorer-II:Wireless Self-powered Visual and NDE Robotic Inspection System for Live Gas Distribution Mains Topical Report - Design Phase i DISCLAIMER

49

ALPR PRELIMINARY DESIGN STUDY (ARGONNE LOW POWER REACTOR). PHASE I  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary design study, Phase I of the ALPR . project, has been made in accordance with the Army Reactors Branch specifications for a nuclear ''package'' power plant with a 200 to 260 kw electric and 400 kw heating capacity..The plant is to be installed at the Idaho Reactor Testing Station as a prototype for remote arctic installations. The ''conventiornl'' power plant as well as the exterior reactor components are described, and cost estimates are given. ''Nuclear'' components of the reactor are described. (auth)

Treshow, M.; Hamer, E.; Pearlman, H.; Rossin, D.; Shaftman, D.

1956-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

50

Detail design of a 10.4-m stretched-membrane dish. Phase 2, Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes efforts conducted under Tasks 3 and 4 of the second phase of the project to develop a single-element stretched-membrane dish concept to reduce the cost of a high-performance concentrating solar collector. We completed the detailed design for such a collector suitable to drive a 25-kWe Stirling motor generator. The design includes the collectors, optical element, the drive, and support systems. The aperture of the optical element was sized to provide the required energy to the engine based on test data and analytical models of the concentrator receiver, and engine. The design of the optical element was improved based on experience gained from the design, fabrication, and testing of several prototypes.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Improved cell design for lithium alloy/metal sulfide battery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosed lithium alloy/iron sulfide cell design provides loop-like positive and negative sheet metal current collectors electrically insulated from one another by separator means, the positive collector being located outwardly of the negative collector. The collectors are initially secured within an open-ended cell housing, which allows for collector pretesting for electrical shorts prior to adding any electrode materials and/or electrolyte to the cell. Separate chambers are defined outwardly of the positive collector and inwardly of the negative collector open respectively in opposite directions toward the open ends of the cell housing; and positive and negative electrode materials can be extruded into these respective chambers via the opposite open housing ends. The chambers and cell housing ends can then be sealed closed. A cross wall structurally reinforces the cell housing and also thereby defines two cavities, and paired positive and negative collectors are disposed in each cavity and electrically connected in parallel. The cell design provides for a high specific energy output and improved operating life in that any charge-discharge cycle swelling of the positive electrode material will be inwardly against only the positive collector to minimize shorts caused by the collectors shifting relative to one another.

Kaun, T.D.

1984-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

52

Improved Engine Design Concepts Using the Second Law of Thermodynamics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was aimed at developing and using numerical tools which incorporate the second law of thermodynamics to better understand engine operation and particularly the combustion process. A major activity of this project was the continual enhancement and use of an existing engine cycle simulation to investigate a wide range of engine parameters and concepts. The major motivation of these investigations was to improve engine efficiency. These improvements were examined from both the first law and second law perspective. One of the most important aspects of this work was the identification of the combustion irreversibilities as functions of engine design and operating parameters. The combustion irreversibility may be quantified in a number of ways but one especially useful way is by determining the destruction of exergy (availability) during the combustion process. This destruction is the penalty due to converting the fuel exergy to thermal energy for producing work. The engine cycle simulation was used to examine the performance of an automotive (5.7 liter), V-8 spark-ignition engine. A base case was defined for operation at 1400 rpm, stoichiometric, MBT spark timing with a bmep of 325 kPa. For this condition, the destruction of exergy during the combustion process was 21.0%. Variations of many engine parameters (including speed, load, and spark timing) did not alter the level of destruction very much (with these variations, the exergy destruction was within the range of 20.5-21.5%). Also, the use of turbocharging or the use of an over-expanded engine design did not significantly change the exergy destruction. The exergy destruction during combustion was most affected by increased inlet oxygen concentration (which reduced the destruction due to the higher combustion temperatures) and by the use of cooled EGR (which increased the destruction). This work has demonstrated that, in general, the exergy destruction for conventional engines is fairly constant ({approx}21%) for a range of operating and design parameters. Further, to achieve high efficiency engines requires that the exergy be managed and not necessarily reduced. The overall thermodynamics is the final discriminator regarding high efficiency engines.

None

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

53

Controller Design of Power Quality-Improving Appliances  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an innovative solution to power quality problems -- using power quality improving (PQI) appliances to reduce harmonic currents and improve the power factor in buildings.

Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Zhou, Ning; Lu, Ning

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion power system development. Phase I: preliminary design. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Westinghouse has completed the Preliminary Design Phase for the Power System Development of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Demonstration Plant project. This study included the development of a preliminary design for a Modular Application scaled power system (10MWe) and Heat Exchanger Test Articles, both based on the concept developed in the Conceptual Design Phase. The results of this study were used to improve the baseline design of the 50MWe module for the Commercial Size Power System, which was recommended for the demonstration plant by the conceptual design study. The 50MWe module was selected since it has the lowest cost, and since its size convincingly demonstrates that future economically viable commercial plants, having reliable operation with credible anticipated costs, are possible. Additional optimization studies on the size of the power system plus hull continue to identify 50MWe as the preferred minimum cost configuration. This study was limited to a closed cycle ammonia power system module, using a seawater temperature difference of 40/sup 0/F, and a surface platform/ship reference hull. This volume describes system operation, a complete test program to verify mechanical reliability and thermal performance, fabrication and installation operations, and a cost analysis. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

55

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion power system development. Phase I: preliminary design. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Westinghouse has completed the Preliminary Desigh Phase for the Power System Development of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Demonstration Plant project. This study included the development of a preliminary design for a Modular Application scaled power system (10MWe) and Heat Exchanger Test Articles, both based on the concept developed in the Conceptual Design Phase. The results of this study were used to improve the baseline design of the 50MWe module for the Commercial Size Power System, which was recommended for the demonstration plant by the conceptual design study. The 50MWe module was selected since it has the lowest cost, and since its size convincingly demonstrates that future economically viable commercial plants, having reliable operation with credible anticipated costs, are possible. Additional optimization studies on the size of the power system plus hull continue to identify 50MWe as the preferred minimum cost configuration. This study was limited to a closed cycle ammonia power system module, using a seawater temperature difference of 40/sup 0/F, and a surface platform/ship reference hull. This volume presents the preliminary design configuration and system optimization. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

56

Conceptual design report -- Gasification Product Improvement Facility (GPIF)  

SciTech Connect

The problems heretofore with coal gasification and IGCC concepts have been their high cost and historical poor performance of fixed-bed gasifiers, particularly on caking coals. The Gasification Product Improvement Facility (GPIF) project is being developed to solve these problems through the development of a novel coal gasification invention which incorporates pyrolysis (carbonization) with gasification (fixed-bed). It employs a pyrolyzer (carbonizer) to avoid sticky coal agglomeration caused in the conventional process of gradually heating coal through the 400 F to 900 F range. In so doing, the coal is rapidly heated sufficiently such that the coal tar exists in gaseous form rather than as a liquid. Gaseous tars are then thermally cracked prior to the completion of the gasification process. During the subsequent endothermic gasification reactions, volatilized alkali can become chemically bound to aluminosilicates in (or added to) the ash. To reduce NH{sub 3} and HCN from fuel born nitrogen, steam injection is minimized, and residual nitrogen compounds are partially chemically reduced in the cracking stage in the upper gasifier region. Assuming testing confirms successful deployment of all these integrated processes, future IGCC applications will be much simplified, require significantly less mechanical components, and will likely achieve the $1,000/kWe commercialized system cost goal of the GPIF project. This report describes the process and its operation, design of the plant and equipment, site requirements, and the cost and schedule. 23 refs., 45 figs., 23 tabs.

Sadowski, R.S.; Skinner, W.H.; House, L.S.; Duck, R.R. [CRS Sirrine Engineers, Inc., Greenville, SC (United States); Lisauskas, R.A.; Dixit, V.J. [Riley Stoker Corp., Worcester, MA (United States); Morgan, M.E.; Johnson, S.A. [PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (United States). PowerServe Div.; Boni, A.A. [PSI-Environmental Instruments Corp., Andover, MA (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

DESIGN OF PHASE INDUCED AMPLITUDE APODIZATION CORONAGRAPHS OVER SQUARE APERTURES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a theoretical study pertaining to the feasibility of Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) units using deformable mirrors (DMs). We begin by reviewing the general derivation of the design equations driving PIAA. We then show how to solve these equations for square apertures and show the performance of pure PIAA systems in the ray optics regime. We tie these design equations into the study of edge diffraction effects and provide a general expression for the field after a full propagation through a PIAA coronagraph. Third, we illustrate how a combination of pre- and post-apodizers yields a contrast of 10{sup -10} even in the presence of diffractive effects, for configuration with neither wavefront errors or wavefront control. Finally, we present novel PIAA configurations over square apertures which circumvent the constraints on the manufacturing of PIAA optics by inducing the apodization with two square DMs. Such solutions rely on pupil size smaller than currently envisioned static PIAA solutions and thus require aggressive pre- and post-apodizing screens in order to mitigate for diffractive effect between the two mirrors. As a result they are associated with significant loss in performance, throughput in particular.

Pueyo, Laurent [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 366 Bloomberg Center, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Jeremy Kasdin, N.; Carlotti, Alexis [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Vanderbei, Robert, E-mail: lap@pha.jhu.edu [Department of Operations Research and Financial Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Cyclone Boiler Reburn NOx Control Improvements via Cyclone Design Improvements and Advanced Air Staging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eastman Kodak owns three Babcock & Wilcox coal fired cyclone boilers and one Combustion Engineering pulverized coal boiler located at Kodak Park in Rochester, New York. Duke Energy Generation Services (DEGS) operates and maintains the steam and electric generation equipment for Kodak and has primary responsibility for related capital project development and execution. The Kodak plant is capable of generating approximately 1,900,000 pounds of steam and 130 MW’s of electrical power. To achieve the required level of NOx control, Kodak chose The Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) Company's, Natural Gas Reburn technology for the three cyclone boilers. The relatively low capital cost of the system and reasonable cost of natural gas in the mid 1990’s made Natural Gas Reburn an economic fit for the RACT requirements of 0.60#’s/Mmbtu NOx. The run up in natural gas prices since 2002 has increased the cost of NOx removed from ~ $2000/ton to ~$5000/ton based on fuel expense alone. In an effort to curtail the cost of control, Duke Energy Generations Services and Kodak implemented a series of projects that integrated Cyclone Design Improvements and Advancements in Air Staging along with ESP inlet flue modifications that resulted in decreasing the Natural Gas required for NOx control ~ 40% from baseline levels saving the plant several million dollars per year in fuel expense. Significant improvements in opacity and filterable PM were also realized by these changes.

Morabito, B.; Nee, B.; Goff, V.; Maringo, G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Usability and game design : improving the MITAR Game Editor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Creating MIT Augmented Realty (MITAR) games can be a daunting task. MITAR game designers require a usable game editor to simplify this process. The MITAR Game Editor was the first editor to provide game designers with the ...

Falconi, Robert F

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

New Detector Design Improves Gamma-rays Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... beam, and a much improved safety system ... reproducibility of measurements is of critical importance ... to be applied to account for the nuclear decay of ...

2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design improvement phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

IMPROVED IRON CATALYSTS FOR SLURRY PHASE FISCHER-TROPSCH SYNTHESIS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PureVision Technology, Inc. (PureVision) of Fort Lupton, Colorado is developing a process for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into fuel-grade ethanol and specialty chemicals in order to enhance national energy security, rural economies, and environmental quality. Lignocellulosic-containing plants are those types of biomass that include wood, agricultural residues, and paper wastes. Lignocellulose is composed of the biopolymers cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Cellulose, a polymer of glucose, is the component in lignocellulose that has potential for the production of fuel-grade ethanol by direct fermentation of the glucose. However, enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose and raw cellulose into glucose is hindered by the presence of lignin. The cellulase enzyme, which hydrolyzes cellulose to glucose, becomes irreversibly bound to lignin. This requires using the enzyme in reagent quantities rather than in catalytic concentration. The extensive use of this enzyme is expensive and adversely affects the economics of ethanol production. PureVision has approached this problem by developing a biomass fractionator to pretreat the lignocellulose to yield a highly pure cellulose fraction. The biomass fractionator is based on sequentially treating the biomass with hot water, hot alkaline solutions, and polishing the cellulose fraction with a wet alkaline oxidation step. In September 2001 PureVision and Western Research Institute (WRI) initiated a jointly sponsored research project with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate their pretreatment technology, develop an understanding of the chemistry, and provide the data required to design and fabricate a one- to two-ton/day pilot-scale unit. The efforts during the first year of this program completed the design, fabrication, and shakedown of a bench-scale reactor system and evaluated the fractionation of corn stover. The results from the evaluation of corn stover have shown that water hydrolysis prior to alkaline hydrolysis may be beneficial in removing hemicellulose and lignin from the feedstock. In addition, alkaline hydrolysis has been shown to remove a significant portion of the hemicellulose and lignin. The resulting cellulose can be exposed to a finishing step with wet alkaline oxidation to remove the remaining lignin. The final product is a highly pure cellulose fraction containing less than 1% of the native lignin with an overall yield in excess of 85% of the native cellulose. This report summarizes the results from the first year's effort to move the technology to commercialization.

Dr. Dragomir B. Bukur; Dr. Lech Nowicki; Victor Carreto-Vazquez; Dr. Wen-Ping Ma

2001-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

62

Annual report on the project to design and experimentally test an improved geothermal drill bit  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported in a research and development program to design, build, and test an improved geothermal drill bit. The major tasks of the Phase I effort are entitled: failure mechanisms of existing bits; new steels and new bearing design; and new seals and lubricants. It appears that a significant gain in drill-bit life can be attained by the use of higher-temperature steels which retain more hardness at temperatures above 260/sup 0/C (500/sup 0/F). Such steels are available, and two research bits of high-temperature steels were made and will shortly be tested in a laboratory-simulated full-scale geothermal drilling environment. Two control bits of the same design, but made with conventional drill bit steels, were also obtained for identical laboratory test runs, so that the performance of the research bits can be meaningfully assessed. Base-line properties of the steels, such as hardness and fracture toughness as functions of temperature, are being measured to further assess the value of the high-temperature steels selected for the research bits. A geothermal test vessel was designed and fabricated in which the full-scale drill bits will be tested. The vessel is capable of temperature to 427/sup 0/C (800/sup 0/F) and pressures to 35 MPa (5,000 psi). Seal and lubrication designs were studied, and the state of the art in high-temperature seals and lubricants was assessed. Some candidate seals and lubricants have been obtained for testing, and others are being procured. In addition, a seal test vessel has been designed and will soon be completed which can simulate the geothermal drilling environment in full-scale testing of seal and lubricant designs and materials. (JGB)

Barker, L.M.; Green, S.J.; Maurer, W.C.; DeVries, L.K.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Improved Load Plan Design Through Integer Programming Based Local Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present integer programming models of the service network design problem faced by less-than-truckload LTL freight transportation carriers and a solution approach for the large-scale instances that result in practical applications. To accurately represent ... Keywords: freight transportation, heuristic search, network design

Alan Erera, Michael Hewitt, Martin Savelsbergh, Yang Zhang

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Improving best-phase image quality in cardiac CT by motion correction with MAM optimization  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Research in image reconstruction for cardiac CT aims at using motion correction algorithms to improve the image quality of the coronary arteries. The key to those algorithms is motion estimation, which is currently based on 3-D/3-D registration to align the structures of interest in images acquired in multiple heart phases. The need for an extended scan data range covering several heart phases is critical in terms of radiation dose to the patient and limits the clinical potential of the method. Furthermore, literature reports only slight quality improvements of the motion corrected images when compared to the most quiet phase (best-phase) that was actually used for motion estimation. In this paper a motion estimation algorithm is proposed which does not require an extended scan range but works with a short scan data interval, and which markedly improves the best-phase image quality. Methods: Motion estimation is based on the definition of motion artifact metrics (MAM) to quantify motion artifacts in a 3-D reconstructed image volume. The authors use two different MAMs, entropy, and positivity. By adjusting the motion field parameters, the MAM of the resulting motion-compensated reconstruction is optimized using a gradient descent procedure. In this way motion artifacts are minimized. For a fast and practical implementation, only analytical methods are used for motion estimation and compensation. Both the MAM-optimization and a 3-D/3-D registration-based motion estimation algorithm were investigated by means of a computer-simulated vessel with a cardiac motion profile. Image quality was evaluated using normalized cross-correlation (NCC) with the ground truth template and root-mean-square deviation (RMSD). Four coronary CT angiography patient cases were reconstructed to evaluate the clinical performance of the proposed method. Results: For the MAM-approach, the best-phase image quality could be improved for all investigated heart phases, with a maximum improvement of the NCC value by 100% and of the RMSD value by 81%. The corresponding maximum improvements for the registration-based approach were 20% and 40%. In phases with very rapid motion the registration-based algorithm obtained better image quality, while the image quality of the MAM algorithm was superior in phases with less motion. The image quality improvement of the MAM optimization was visually confirmed for the different clinical cases. Conclusions: The proposed method allows a software-based best-phase image quality improvement in coronary CT angiography. A short scan data interval at the target heart phase is sufficient, no additional scan data in other cardiac phases are required. The algorithm is therefore directly applicable to any standard cardiac CT acquisition protocol.

Rohkohl, Christopher; Bruder, Herbert; Stierstorfer, Karl [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstrasse 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Flohr, Thomas [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstrasse 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard Karls University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

Using design of experiments to improve a batch chemical process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Novartis Vaccines and Diagnostics has made a strong commitment to manufacturing seasonal influenza vaccines through their cell culture technology called Optaflu®. The goal of this project is to improve overall process yield ...

Hill, Andrew, S.M. (Andrew James). Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Two-phase chromium-niobium alloys exhibiting improved mechanical properties at high temperatures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The specification discloses chromium-niobium alloys which exhibit improved mechanical properties at high temperatures in the range of 1250.degree. C. and improved room temperature ductility. The alloys contain a Cr.sub.2 Nb-rich intermetallic phase and a Cr-rich phase with an overall niobium concentration in the range of from about 5 to about 18 at. %. The high temperature strength is substantially greater than that of state of the art nickel-based superalloys for enhanced high temperature service. Further improvements in the properties of the compositions are obtained by alloying with rhenium and aluminum; and additional rare-earth and other elements.

Liu, Chain T. (Oak Ridge, TN); Takeyama, Masao (Tokyo, JP)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Two-phase chromium-niobium alloys exhibiting improved mechanical properties at high temperatures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The specification discloses chromium-niobium alloys which exhibit improved mechanical properties at high temperatures in the range of 1250 C and improved room temperature ductility. The alloys contain a Cr[sub 2]Nb-rich intermetallic phase and a Cr-rich phase with an overall niobium concentration in the range of from about 5 to about 18 at. %. The high temperature strength is substantially greater than that of state of the art nickel-based superalloys for enhanced high temperature service. Further improvements in the properties of the compositions are obtained by alloying with rhenium and aluminum; and additional rare-earth and other elements. 14 figures.

Liu, C.T.; Takeyama, Masao.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Phase Calculation and its Use in Alloy Design Program for Nickel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PHASE CALCULATION AND ITS USE. IN ALLOY DESIGN PROGRAM FOR NICKEL-BASE SUPERALLOYS. H. Harada, K. Ohno, T. Yamagata,. T. Yokokawa

69

Methods to improve school design in Sierra Leone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most schools in Sierra Leone are constructed using a standard design with little variation from building to building. They are relatively high-cost and have poor ventilation, lighting and thermal comfort. In January 2010, ...

Clonts, Kelly A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Improved Design of Nuclear Reactor Control System | U.S. DOE...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Improved Design of Nuclear Reactor Control System Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives...

71

Reduced gravity rankine cycle design and optimization with passive vortex phase separation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid-metal Rankine power conversion systems (PCS) coupled with a fission reactor remain an attractive option for space power applications because system specific power and efficiency is very favorable for plant designs of 100 kW(e) or higher. Potential drawbacks to the technology in a reduced gravity environment include two-phase fluid management processes such as liquid-vapor phase separation. The most critical location for phase separation is at the boiler exit where only vapor must be sent to the turbine because blade erosion occurs from high velocity liquid droplets entrained by vapor flow. Previous studies have proposed that rotary separators be used to separate the liquid and vapor from a two phase mixture. However these devices have complex turbo machinery, require kilowatts of power and are untested for high vapor flow conditions. The Interphase Transport Phenomena (ITP) laboratory has developed a low-power, passive microgravity vortex phase separator (MVS) which has already proven to be an essential component of two-phase systems operating in low gravity environments. This thesis presents results from flight experiments where a Rankine cycle was operated in a reduced gravity environment for the first time by utilizing the MVS for liquid and vapor phase separation. The MVS was able to operate under saturated conditions and adjust to system transients as it would in the Rankine cycle by controlling the amount of liquid and vapor within the device. A new model is developed for the MVS to predict separation performance at high vapor flow conditions for sizing the separator at the boiler, condenser, and turbine locations within the cycle by using a volume limiting method. This model factors in the following separator characteristics: mass, pumping power, and available buffer volume for system transients. The study is concluded with overall Rankine efficiency and performance changes due to adding vortex phase separation and a schematic of the Rankine cycle with the integration of the MVS is presented. The results from this thesis indicate the thermal to electric efficiency and specific mass of the cycle can be improved by using the MVS to separate the two phases instead of a rotary separator.

Supak, Kevin Robert

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Reduced gravity Rankine cycle system design and optimization study with passive vortex phase separation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid-metal Rankine power conversion systems (PCS) coupled with a fission reactor remain an attractive option for space power applications because system specific power and efficiency is very favorable for plant designs of 100 kW(e) or higher. Potential drawbacks to the technology in a reduced gravity environment include two-phase fluid management processes such as liquid-vapor phase separation. The most critical location for phase separation is at the boiler exit where only vapor must be sent to the turbine because blade erosion occurs from high velocity liquid droplets entrained by vapor flow. Previous studies have proposed that rotary separators be used to separate the liquid and vapor from a two phase mixture. However these devices have complex turbo machinery, require kilowatts of power and are untested for high vapor flow conditions. The Interphase Transport Phenomena (ITP) laboratory has developed a low-power, passive microgravity vortex phase separator (MVS) which has already proven to be an essential component of two-phase systems operating in low gravity environments. This thesis presents results from flight experiments where a Rankine cycle was operated in a reduced gravity environment for the first time by utilizing the MVS for liquid and vapor phase separation. The MVS was able to operate under saturated conditions and adjust to system transients as it would in the Rankine cycle by controlling the amount of liquid and vapor within the device. A new model is developed for the MVS to predict separation performance at high vapor flow conditions for sizing the separator at the boiler, condenser, and turbine locations within the cycle by using a volume limiting method. This model factors in the following separator characteristics: mass, pumping power, and available buffer volume for system transients. The study is concluded with overall Rankine efficiency and performance changes due to adding vortex phase separation and a schematic of the Rankine cycle with the integration of the MVS is presented. The results from this thesis indicate the thermal to electric efficiency and specific mass of the cycle can be improved by using the MVS to separate the two phases instead of a rotary separator.

Supak, Kevin Robert

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Permanent magnet assisted synchronous reluctance motor, design and performance improvement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently, permanent magnet assisted (PMa)-synchronous reluctance motors (SynRM) have been considered as a possible alternative motor drive for high performance applications. In order to have an efficient motor drive, performing of three steps in design of the overall drive is not avoidable. These steps are design optimization of the motor, identification of the motor parameter and implementation of an advanced control system to ensure optimum operation. Therefore, this dissertation first deals with the design optimization of the Permanent Magnet Assisted Synchronous Reluctance Motor (PMa-SynRM). Various key points in the rotor design of a low cost PMa-SynRM are introduced and their effects are studied. Finite element approach has been utilized to show the effects of these parameters on the developed average electromagnetic torque and the total d-q inductances. As it can be inferred from the name of the motor, there are some permanent magnets mounted in the rotor core. One of the features considered in the design of this motor is the magnetization of the permanent magnets mounted in the rotor core using the stator windings to reduce the manufacturing cost. At the next step, identification of the motor parameters is discussed. Variation of motor parameters due to temperature and airgap flux has been reported in the literatures. Use of off-line models for estimating the motor parameters is known as a computationally intensive method, especially when the models include the effect of cross saturation. Therefore in practical applications, on-line parameter estimation is favored to achieve a high performance control system. In this dissertation, a simple practical method for parameter estimation of the PMa-SynRM is introduced. Last part of the dissertation presents one advanced control strategy which utilized the introduced parameter estimator. A practical Maximum Torque Per Ampere (MTPA) control scheme along with a simple parameter estimator for PMa-SynRM is introduced. This method is capable of maintaining the MTPA condition and stays robust against the variations of motor parameters. Effectiveness of the motor design procedure and the control strategy is validated by presenting simulation and experimental results of a 1.5 kW prototype PMa-SynRM, designed and manufactured through the introduced design method.

Niazi, Peyman

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Energy codes and the building design process: Opportunities for improvement  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Policy Act (EPAct), passed by Congress in 1992, requires states to adopt building energy codes for new commercial buildings that meet or exceed the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) and Illuminating Engineers Society of North America (IES) Standard 90.1-1989 by October 24, 1994. In response to EPAct many states will be adopting a state-wide energy code for the first time. Understanding the role of stakeholders in the building design process is key to the successful implementation of these codes. In 1993, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted a survey of architects and designers to determine how much they know about energy codes, to what extent energy-efficiency concerns influence the design process, and how they convey information about energy-efficient designs and products to their clients. Findings of the PNL survey, together with related information from a survey by the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and other reports, are presented in this report. This information may be helpful for state and utility energy program managers and others who will be involved in promoting the adoption and implementation of state energy codes that meet the requirements of EPAct.

Sandahl, L.J.; Shankle, D.L.; Rigler, E.J.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Improved ADCP Performance Using a Hydrodynamically Designed Boom Mount  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of the design and testing of a hydrodynamic mount for a direct-reading 150-kHz acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) operated over the side of a small inshore vessel in transect mode (i.e., while steaming). The ...

E. B. Colbourne; J. Helbig; D. Cumming

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Advanced conceptual design report. Phase II. Liquid effluent treatment and disposal Project W-252  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Advanced Conceptual Design Report (ACDR) provides a documented review and analysis of the Conceptual Design Report (CDR), WHC-SD-W252-CDR-001, June 30, 1993. The ACDR provides further design evaluation of the major design approaches and uncertainties identified in the original CDR. The ACDR will provide a firmer basis for the both the design approach and the associated planning for the performance of the Definitive Design phase of the project.

NONE

1995-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

77

Design of a microbreather for two-phase microchannel devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multiphase flows in microchannels are encountered in a variety of microfluidic applications. Two-phase microchannel heat sinks leverage the latent heat of vaporization to offer an efficient method of dissipating large heat ...

Alexander, Brentan R

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Design and analysis of a second order phase locked loops (PLLs)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work concerns with the design and analysis of phase locked loops (PLLs). In the last decade a lot of works have been done about the analysis of PLLs. The phase locked loops are analyzed briefly, second order, third order, and fourth order. In practically ... Keywords: charge pump PLL (CPPPL), loop filter (LF), phase locked loop (PLL)

Diary R. Sulaiman

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Using Forward Markets to Improve Electricity Market Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forward markets, both medium term and long term, complement the spot market for wholesale electricity. The forward markets reduce risk, mitigate market power, and coordinate new investment. In the medium term, a forward energy market lets suppliers and demanders lock in energy prices and quantities for one to three years. In the long term, a forward reliability market assures adequate resources are available when they are needed most. The forward markets reduce risk for both sides of the market, since they reduce the quantity of energy that trades at the more volatile spot price. Spot market power is mitigated by putting suppliers and demanders in a more balanced position at the time of the spot market. The markets also reduce transaction costs and improve liquidity and transparency. Recent innovations to the Colombia market illustrate the basic elements of the forward markets and their beneficial role. 1

Lawrence M. Ausubel; Peter Cramton

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

OTEC riser cable system, Phase II: conceptual design  

SciTech Connect

Studies are summarized of conceptual designs of riser cable systems for OTEC pilot plants of both the spar and plantship configurations located at sites off the southeast coast of Puerto Rico. The studies utilize a baseline pilot plant riser cable, the design of which has been developed and reported on in other reports. Baseline riser cable systems for OTEC pilot plants are identified, system hardware consistent with these designs are conceptualized, and comparisons of the various system concepts are provided. It is concluded that there are three riser cable systems feasible for a spar pilot plant platform at the Punta Yeguas site, and two riser cable systems feasible at the plantship pilot plant at the Punta Tuna site. Recommendations for further investigations in the areas of materials, hardware design and pre-installation site surveys are also addressed.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design improvement phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Conceptual Design of an Ultra-Dense Phase Injector and Feed System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) has developed an innovative gasifier concept that uses rocket engine technology to significantly improve gasifier performance, life, and cost compared to current state-of-the-art systems. One key feature of the PWR concept is the use of an ultra-dense phase feed system to provide dry coal to the multi-element injector. This report describes the design of an ultra-dense phase multi-element injector and feed system for use on PWR gasifiers operating at pressures to 1,000 psia. For the design of this injector and feed system, the pulverized coal's Bingham fluid yield stress is approximately 11 Pascals (Pa) with a coefficient of rigidity of 10 centipoise (cp). These values are typical of earlier experimental testing conducted with dried pulverized coal below 18 wt% moisture -- see, e.g., Sprouse and Schuman (1983, 1986). Each individual injector element is designed for a coal flow rate between 3 and 4 tons/hr (0.76 to 1.0 kg/sec) at full flow conditions. Hence, a small 400 to 500 tons/day (4.2 to 5.25 kg/sec) gasifier will require a 6-element injector, a 1,500 tons/day (15.7 kg/sec) gasifier will require an 18-element injector and a 3,000 tons/day (31.5 kg/sec) gasifier will require a 36-element injector. These injectors and feed systems are capable of 'turn-down' below 50% of full-flow operation.

Ken Sprouse; Fred Widman; Alan Darby

2006-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

82

Improvements of a Mixed-Phase Cloud Scheme Using Aircraft Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To improve the quality of forecasts of mixed-phase clouds in winter storms, some aspects of a cloud scheme are examined in detail. Modifications to the basic formalism and specification of selected parameters of the cloud model are studied, and ...

André Tremblay; Paul A. Vaillancourt; Stewart G. Cober; Anna Glazer; George A. Isaac

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Accelerating PV Cost Effectiveness Through Systems Design, Engineering, and Quality Assurance: Phase I Annual Technical Report, 4 November 2004 - 3 November 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During Phase I of this PV Manufacturing R&D subcontract, PowerLight Corporation has made significant progress toward the reduction of installed costs for commercial-scale, rooftop PV systems. PowerLight has worked to reduce operating costs by improving long-term reliability and performance through the development of more sophisticated tools used in system design and monitoring. Additionally, PowerLight has implemented design improvements with the goal of reducing cost while maintaining and/or improving product quality. As part of this effort, PowerLight also modified manufacturing and shipping processes to accommodate these design changes, streamline material flow, reduce cost, and decrease waste streams. During Phase II of this project, PowerLight plans to continue this work with the goal of reducing system cost and improving system performance.

Botkin, J.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Improved Design of Nuclear Reactor Control System | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Improved Design of Nuclear Reactor Improved Design of Nuclear Reactor Control System Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives Improved Design of Nuclear Reactor Control System Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/instrumentation: Improved Design of Nuclear Reactor Control System Developed at: Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF)

85

The Sulfur-Iodine Cycle: Process Analysis and Design Using Comprehensive Phase Equilibrium Measurements and Modeling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Of the 100+ thermochemical hydrogen cycles that have been proposed, the Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) Cycle is a primary target of international interest for the centralized production of hydrogen from nuclear power. However, the cycle involves complex and highly nonideal phase behavior at extreme conditions that is only beginning to be understood and modeled for process simulation. The consequence is that current designs and efficiency projections have large uncertainties, as they are based on incomplete data that must be extrapolated from property models. This situation prevents reliable assessment of the potential viability of the system and, even more, a basis for efficient process design. The goal of this NERI award (05-006) was to generate phase-equilibrium data, property models, and comprehensive process simulations so that an accurate evaluation of the S-I Cycle could be made. Our focus was on Section III of the Cycle, where the hydrogen is produced by decomposition of hydroiodic acid (HI) in the presence of water and iodine (I2) in a reactive distillation (RD) column. The results of this project were to be transferred to the nuclear hydrogen community in the form of reliable flowsheet models for the S-I process. Many of the project objectives were achieved. At Clemson University, a unique, tantalum-based, phase-equilibrium apparatus incorporating a view cell was designed and constructed for measuring fluid-phase equilibria for mixtures of iodine, HI, and water (known as HIx) at temperatures to 350 °C and pressures to 100 bar. Such measurements were of particular interest for developing a working understanding of the expected operation of the RD column in Section III. The view cell allowed for the IR observation and discernment of vapor-liquid (VL), liquid-liquid, and liquid-liquid-vapor (LLVE) equilibria for HIx systems. For the I2-H2O system, liquid-liquid equilibrium (LLE) was discovered to exist at temperatures up to 310-315 °C, in contrast to the models and predictions of earlier workers. For the I2-HI-H2O ternary, LLE and LLVE were all observed for the first time at temperatures of 160 and 200 °C. Three LLE tie-lines were measured at 160 °C, and preliminary indications are that the underlying phase behavior could result in further improvements in the performance of the S-I Cycle. Unfortunately, these new results were obtained too late in the project to be incorporated into the modeling and simulation work described below. At the University of Virginia, a uniquely complete and reliable model was developed for the thermodynamic properties of HIx, covering the range of conditions expected for the separation of product hydrogen and recycled iodine in the RD column located in Section III. The model was validated with all available property spectroscopy data. The results provide major advances over prior understanding of the chemical speciation involved. The model was implemented in process simulation studies of the S-I Cycle, which showed improvement in energy efficiency to 42%, as well as significantly smaller capital requirements due to lower pressure operation and much smaller equipment sizes. The result is that the S-I Cycle may be much more economically feasible than was previously thought. If both the experimental and modeling work described above were to be continued to ultimate process optimization, both the American public and the global community would benefit from this alternative energy source that does not produce carbon emissions.

Thies, Mark C.; O'Connell, J. P.; Gorensek, Maximilian B.

2010-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

86

Automated design synthesis of robotic/human workcells for improved manufacturing system design in hazardous environments  

SciTech Connect

Manufacturing tasks that are deemed too hazardous for workers require the use of automation, robotics, and/or other remote handling tools. The associated hazards may be radiological or nonradiological, and based on the characteristics of the environment and processing, a design may necessitate robotic labor, human labor, or both. There are also other factors such as cost, ergonomics, maintenance, and efficiency that also effect task allocation and other design choices. Handling the tradeoffs of these factors can be complex, and lack of experience can be an issue when trying to determine if and what feasible automation/robotics options exist. To address this problem, we utilize common engineering design approaches adapted more for manufacturing system design in hazardous environments. We limit our scope to the conceptual and embodiment design stages, specifically a computational algorithm for concept generation and early design evaluation. In regard to concept generation, we first develop the functional model or function structure for the process, using the common 'verb-noun' format for describing function. A common language or functional basis for manufacturing was developed and utilized to formalize function descriptions and guide rules for function decomposition. Potential components for embodiment are also grouped in terms of this functional language and are stored in a database. The properties of each component are given as quantitative and qualitative criteria. Operators are also rated for task-relevant criteria which are used to address task compatibility. Through the gathering of process requirements/constraints, construction of the component database, and development of the manufacturing basis and rule set, design knowledge is stored and available for computer use. Thus, once the higher level process functions are defined, the computer can automate the synthesis of new design concepts through alternating steps of embodiment and function structure updates/decomposition. In the process, criteria guide function allocation of components/operators and help ensure compatibility and feasibility. Through multiple function assignment options and varied function structures, multiple design concepts are created. All of the generated designs are then evaluated based on a number of relevant evaluation criteria: cost, dose, ergonomics, hazards, efficiency, etc. These criteria are computed using physical properties/parameters of each system based on the qualities an engineer would use to make evaluations. Nuclear processes such as oxide conversion and electrorefining are utilized to aid algorithm development and provide test cases for the completed program. Through our approach, we capture design knowledge related to manufacturing and other operations in hazardous environments to enable a computational program to automatically generate and evaluate system design concepts.

Williams, Joshua M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

87

The design and initial testing of a beam phase and energy measurement for LEDA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A diagnostic system being designed to measure the beam phase and beam energy of the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) is described and the characterization of the prototype presented. The accelerator

J. Power; M. Stettler

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

designer phase transitions in lithium-based spinels  

SciTech Connect

When electrons in a metal become correlated with each other, new cooperative behavior can arise. This correlation is magnified when the metal has magnetic ions embedded in it. These atomic magnets try to line up with each other, but in doing so actually create a correlation between the motions of conduction electrons. In turn, these correlated electron motions prevent the magnetic ions from aligning, even at zero Kelvin. When this competition is strongest (at the so-called quantum critical point-QCP) the response of the system can no longer be described using the text book theory for metals. In addition, a range of new phenomena has been seen to emerge in the vicinity of a QCP, such as heavy-fermion superconductivity, coexistence of magnetism and superconductivity and hyper-scaling. The main goal of our research is to try to unravel the details of the feedback mechanism between electron motion and magnetism that lies at the heart of this new physics. We have chosen lithium-based spinel structures as the most promising family of systems to achieve our goal. Known lithium-based spinels Li{sub x}M{sub 2}O{sub 4} [M=V, Ti and Mn] show a variety of ground states: heavy-fermion, superconducting, or geometrically frustrated local moment systems. Li{sub x}M{sub 2}O{sub 4} should be ideal systems for studying QCPs since their properties can easily be fine-tuned, simply by extracting some Li [which can be done without introducing disorder in the immediate surroundings of the magnetic ions]. The premise of the proposal was that since this Li-extraction can be done both in the metallic as well as in insulating compounds, that we can expand the types of quantum phase transitions that can be studied to beyond transitions in magnetic metals. The project called for developing a better understanding of quantum phase transitions by measuring all aspects of the electronic response of Li{sub x}M{sub 2}O{sub 4} by means of neutron scattering, giving microscopic information about the behavior of the individual magnetic moments and their interactions, as well as by macroscopic measurements. In addition, the aim was to synthesize new lithium-based spinel compounds by using other transition metals that exhibit both 3{sup +} and 4{sup +} valencies. Here we report on the progress we have made during the course of this grant both towards the stated goals and on new avenues that developed as a direct result of the data we collected during this grant.

Wouter Montfrooij

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

89

Conceptual design report for immobilized high-level waste interim storage facility (Phase 1)  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB Bldg. 212H) will be utilized to interim store Phase 1 HLW products. Project W-464, Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage, will procure an onsite transportation system and retrofit the CSB to accommodate the Phase 1 HLW products. The Conceptual Design Report establishes the Project W-464 technical and cost basis.

Burgard, K.C.

1998-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

90

Conceptual design report for immobilized high-level waste interim storage facility (Phase 1)  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB Bldg. 212H) will be utilized to interim store Phase 1 HLW products. Project W-464, Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage, will procure an onsite transportation system and retrofit the CSB to accommodate the Phase 1 HLW products. The Conceptual Design Report establishes the Project W-464 technical and cost basis.

Burgard, K.C.

1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

91

Synchronous Motor Observability Study and an Improved Zero-speed Position Estimation Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor (PMSM) observability analysis for sensor- less control design here for the surface Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor (PMSM) to overcome position observabilitySynchronous Motor Observability Study and an Improved Zero-speed Position Estimation Design Dalila

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

92

Spectral-domain phase microscopy with improved sensitivity using two-dimensional detector arrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work we demonstrate the use of two-dimensional detectors to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and sensitivity in spectral-domain phase microscopy for subnanometer accuracy measurements. We show that an increase in SNR can be obtained, from 82 dB to 105 dB, using 150 pixel lines of a low-cost CCD camera as compared to a single line, to compute an averaged axial scan. In optimal mechanical conditions, phase stability as small as 92 {mu}rad, corresponding to 6 pm displacement accuracy, could be obtained. We also experimentally demonstrate the benefit of spatial-averaging in terms of the reduction of signal fading due to an axially moving sample. The applications of the improved system are illustrated by imaging live cells in culture.

Singh, K.; Dion, C.; Ozaki, T. [Centre de Recherche, Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Energie, Materiaux et Telecommunications, Varennes, Quebec (Canada); Lesk, M. R. [Centre de Recherche, Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Departement d'Ophtalmologie, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Costantino, S. [Centre de Recherche, Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Departement d'Ophtalmologie, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Institut de Genie Biomedical, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

Variation resilient low-power circuit design methodology using on-chip phase locked loop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a variation resilient circuit design technique for maintaining parametric yield of design under inherent variation in process parameters. We propose to utilize on-chip phase locked loop (PLL) as a sensor to detect process, VDD, ... Keywords: NBTI, PLL, process variation, system reliability

Kunhyuk Kang; Keejong Kim; Kaushik Roy

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Design and fabrication of a low cost Darrieus vertical axis wing turbine system. Phase I. Technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The contract has two phases, a design phase and a fabrication and installation phase. Presented is the work completed in Phase I, the design phase. The Sandia 17 m was used as the background machine from which design information was drawn. By concentrating the modifications on an existing design, emphasis was focused on component cost reduction rather than selection of optimal configuration or operating modes. The resulting design is a stretched version of the Sandia 17 m preserving the same rotor diameter and many other good features, but in the meantime lighter in weight, larger in capacity, and anticipated to be more cost effective.

None,

1979-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

95

Design of a digital multiradian phase detector and its application in fusion plasma interferometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We discuss the circuit design of a digital multiradian phase detector that measures the phase difference between two 10 kHz square wave TTL signals and provides the result as a binary number. The phase resolution of the circuit is 1/64 period and its dynamic range is 256 periods. This circuit has been developed for fusion plasma interferometry with submillimeter waves on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. The results from interferometric density measurement are discussed and compared to those obtained with the previously used phase detectors, especially with respect to the occurrence of phase jumps. It is illustrated that the new phase measurement provides a powerful tool for automatic real-time validation of the measured density, which is important for feedback algorithms that are sensitive to spurious density signals.

Mlynek, A.; Schramm, G.; Eixenberger, H.; Sips, G.; McCormick, K.; Zilker, M.; Behler, K.; Eheberg, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching 85748 (Germany); Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

Design report on SCDAP/RELAP5 model improvements - debris bed and molten pool behavior  

SciTech Connect

the SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 computer code is designed to describe the overall reactor coolant system thermal-hydraulic response, core damage progression, and in combination with VICTORIA, fission product release and transport during severe accidents. Improvements for existing debris bed and molten pool models in the SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.1 code are described in this report. Model improvements to address (a) debris bed formation, heating, and melting; (b) molten pool formation and growth; and (c) molten pool crust failure are discussed. Relevant data, existing models, proposed modeling changes, and the anticipated impact of the changes are discussed. Recommendations for the assessment of improved models are provided.

Allison, C.M.; Rempe, J.L.; Chavez, S.A.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Chemical systems for improved oil recovery: Phase behavior, oil recovery, and mobility control studies  

SciTech Connect

Selected surfactant systems containing a series of ethoxylated nonionic surfactants in combination with an anionic surfactant system have been studied to evaluate phase behavior as well as oil recovery potential. These experiments were conducted to evaluate possible improved phase behavior and overall oil recovery potential of mixed surfactant systems over a broad range of conditions. Both polyacrylamide polymers and Xanthan biopolymers were evaluated. Studies were initiated to use a chemical flooding simulation program, UTCHEM, to simulate oil recovery for laboratory and field applications and evaluate its use to simulate oil saturation distributions obtained in CT-monitoring of oil recovery experiments. The phase behavior studies focused on evaluating the effect of anionic-nonionic surfactant proportion on overall phase behavior. Two distinct transition behaviors were observed, depending on the dominant surfactant in the overall system. The first type of transition corresponded to more conventional behavior attributed to nonionic-dominant surfactant systems. This behavior is manifested by an oil-water-surfactant system that inverts from a water-external (highly conducting) microemulsion to an oil-external (nonconducting) one, as a function of temperature. The latter type which inverts in an opposite manner can be attributed to the separation of the anionic-nonionic mixtures into water- and oil-soluble surfactants. Both types of transition behavior can still be used to identify relative proximity to optimal areas. Determining these transition ranges provided more insight on how the behavior of these surfactant mixtures was affected by altering component proportions. Efforts to optimize the chemical system for oil displacement experiments were also undertaken. Phase behavior studies with systems formulated with biopolymer in solution were conducted.

Llave, F.; Gall, B.; Gao, H., Scott, L., Cook, I.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Molten carbonate fuel cell product design and improvement. Quarterly report, December 1994--March 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Primary objective is to establish the commercial readiness of MW- class IMHEX {reg_sign} MCFC power plants for distributed generation, cogeneration, and compressor station applications. The following tasks are reported: product definition/planning, system design/analysis, manufacturing process development, packaging/assembly, test facilities, and technology development/improvement/verification.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Advanced reactor design study. Assessing nonbackfittable concepts for improving uranium utilization in light water reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the Advanced Reactor Design Study (ARDS) is to identify and evaluate nonbackfittable concepts for improving uranium utilization in light water reactors (LWRs). The results of this study provide a basis for selecting and demonstrating specific nonbackfittable concepts that have good potential for implementation. Lead responsibility for managing the study was assigned to the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Nonbackfittable concepts for improving uranium utilization in LWRs on the once-through fuel cycle were selected separately for PWRs and BWRs due to basic differences in the way specific concepts apply to those plants. Nonbackfittable concepts are those that are too costly to incorporate in existing plants, and thus, could only be economically incorporated in new reactor designs or plants in very early stages of construction. Essential results of the Advanced Reactor Design Study are summarized.

Fleischman, R.M.; Goldsmith, S.; Newman, D.F.; Trapp, T.J.; Spinrad, B.I.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Design and Development of Gas-Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone Compact Separators for Three-Phase Flow  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this five-year project (October, 1997--September, 2002) is to expand the current research activities of Tulsa University Separation Technology Projects (TUSTP) to multiphase oil/water/gas separation. This project will be executed in two phases. Phase I (1997--2000) will focus on the investigations of the complex multiphase hydrodynamic flow behavior in a three-phase Gas-Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone (GLCC) Separator. The activities of this phase will include the development of a mechanistic model, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulator, and detailed experimentation on the three-phase GLCC. The experimental and CFD simulation results will be suitably integrated with the mechanistic model. In Phase II (2000--2002), the developed GLCC separator will be tested under high pressure and real crudes conditions. This is crucial for validating the GLCC design for field application and facilitating easy and rapid technology deployment. Design criteria for industrial applications will be developed based on these results and will be incorporated into the mechanistic model by TUSTP.

Mohan, Ram S.; Shoham, Ovadia

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design improvement phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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101

Design and Development of Gas-Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone Compact Separators for Three-Phase Flow  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this five-year project (October 1997--September 2002) was to expand the current research activities of Tulsa University Separation Technology Projects (TUSTP) to multiphase oil/water/gas separation. This project was executed in two phases. Phase I (1997--2000) focused on the investigations of the complex multiphase hydrodynamic flow behavior in a three-phase Gas-Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone (GLCC) Separator. The activities of this phase included the development of a mechanistic model, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulator, and detailed experimentation on the three-phase GLCC. The experimental and CFD simulation results will be suitably integrated with the mechanistic model. In Phase II (2000--2002), the developed GLCC separator will be tested under high pressure and real crude conditions. This is crucial for validating the GLCC design for field application and facilitating easy and rapid technology deployment. Design criteria for industrial applications will be developed based on these results and will be incorporated into the mechanistic model by TUSTP.

Mohan, R.S.; Shoham, O.

2001-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

102

Improved superconductor for transmission line applications, phase I. Final report, January 1, 1975--June 30, 1975  

SciTech Connect

The analysis of an existing superconducting power transmission cable design indicated that economic benefits in the area of refrigeration can be derived from the substitution of Nb$sub 3$Ge superconductor for the presently planned Nb$sub 3$Sn. However, the cost of Nb$sub 3$Ge must be comparable to that of Nb$sub 3$Sn, which is achievable when preparing Nb$sub 3$Ge by the chemical vapor deposition. Alternatively, technical benefits can be obtained. The most essential and prerequisite requirement is that the Nb$sub 3$Ge critical current density be improved significantly over the present state-of-the art. Other properties of Nb$sub 3$Ge are generally suitable for the transmission line application and/or require only moderate improvements. (auth)

Braginski, A.I.; Mauser, S.F.; Roland, G.W.; Burghardt, R.R.; Daniel, M.R.; Janocko, M.A.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

IMPROVING THE DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS FOR PARTICLE ACCELERATORS  

SciTech Connect

The field quality in superconducting magnets has been improved to a level that it does not appear to be a limiting factor on the performance of RHIC. The many methods developed, improved and adopted during the course of this work have contributed significantly to that performance. One can not only design and construct magnets with better field quality than in one made before but can also improve on that quality after construction. The relative field error ({Delta}B/B) can now be made as low as a few parts in 10{sup {minus}5} at 2/3 of the coil radius. This is about an order of magnitude better than what is generally expected for superconducting magnets. This extra high field quality is crucial to the luminosity performance of RHIC. The research work described here covers a number of areas which all must be addressed to build the production magnets with a high field quality. The work has been limited to the magnetic design of the cross section which in most cases essentially determines the field quality performance of the whole magnet since these magnets are generally long. Though the conclusions to be presented in this chapter have been discussed at the end of each chapter, a summary of them might be useful to present a complete picture. The lessons learned from these experiences may be useful in the design of new magnets. The possibilities of future improvements will also be presented.

GUPTA,R.C.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Optimal Multicarrier Phase-Coded Waveform Design for Detection of Extended Targets  

SciTech Connect

We design a parametric multicarrier phase-coded (MCPC) waveform that achieves the optimal performance in detecting an extended target in the presence of signal-dependent interference. Traditional waveform design techniques provide only the optimal energy spectral density of the transmit waveform and suffer a performance loss in the synthesis process of the time-domain signal. Therefore, we opt for directly designing an MCPC waveform in terms of its time-frequency codes to obtain the optimal detection performance. First, we describe the modeling assumptions considering an extended target buried within the signal-dependent clutter with known power spectral density, and deduce the performance characteristics of the optimal detector. Then, considering an MCPC signal transmission, we express the detection characteristics in terms of the phase-codes of the MCPC waveform and propose to optimally design the MCPC signal by maximizing the detection probability. Our numerical results demonstrate that the designed MCPC signal attains the optimal detection performance and requires a lesser computational time than the other parametric waveform design approach.

Sen, Satyabrata [ORNL; Glover, Charles Wayne [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Advanced conceptual design report solid waste retrieval facility, phase I, project W-113  

SciTech Connect

Project W-113 will provide the equipment and facilities necessary to retrieve suspect transuranic (TRU) waste from Trench 04 of the 218W-4C burial ground. As part of the retrieval process, waste drums will be assayed, overpacked, vented, head-gas sampled, and x-rayed prior to shipment to the Phase V storage facility in preparation for receipt at the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP). Advanced Conceptual Design (ACD) studies focused on project items warranting further definition prior to Title I design and areas where the potential for cost savings existed. This ACD Report documents the studies performed during FY93 to optimize the equipment and facilities provided in relation to other SWOC facilities and to provide additional design information for Definitive Design.

Smith, K.E.

1994-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

106

Embedded Sensors and Controls to Improve Component Performance and Reliability: Conceptual Design Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall project objective is to demonstrate improved reliability and increased performance made possible by deeply embedding instrumentation and controls (I&C) in nuclear power plant components. The project is employing a highly instrumented canned rotor, magnetic bearing, fluoride salt pump as its I&C technology demonstration vehicle. The project s focus is not primarily on pump design, but instead is on methods to deeply embed I&C within a pump system. However, because the I&C is intimately part of the basic millisecond-by-millisecond functioning of the pump, the I&C design cannot proceed in isolation from the other aspects of the pump. The pump will not function if the characteristics of the I&C are not embedded within the design because the I&C enables performance of the basic function rather than merely monitoring quasi-stable performance. Traditionally, I&C has been incorporated in nuclear power plant (NPP) components after their design is nearly complete; adequate performance was obtained through over-design. This report describes the progress and status of the project and provides a conceptual design overview for the embedded I&C pump.

Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Melin, Alexander M [ORNL; Burress, Timothy A [ORNL; Fugate, David L [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Wilgen, John B [ORNL; Miller, John M [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Silva, Pamela C [ORNL; Whitlow, Lynsie J [ORNL; Peretz, Fred J [ORNL

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Operating Experience Level 1 - Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond Design Basis Events  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OE-1: 2013-01 April 2013 OE-1: 2013-01 April 2013 Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond Design Basis Events PURPOSE: The purpose of this Operating Experience (OE) document is to (1) provide results from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration , initiatives related to beyond design basis events (BDBEs) , and (2) provide direction for enhancing capabilities for mitigating BDBEs at DOE sites . BACKGROUND: After the March 2011 Fukushima Daiich i nuclear plant accident in Japan , DOE embarked upon several initiatives to investigate the safety posture of its nuclear facilities relative to BDBEs. These initiatives included issuing Safety Bulletin 2011-01 , Events Beyond Design Safety Basis Analysis, conducting pilots to refine possible

108

An economic decision framework using modeling for improving aquifer remediation design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reducing cost is a critical challenge facing environmental remediation today. One of the most effective ways of reducing costs is to improve decision-making. This can range from choosing more cost- effective remediation alternatives (for example, determining whether a groundwater contamination plume should be remediated or not) to improving data collection (for example, determining when data collection should stoop). Uncertainty in site conditions presents a major challenge for effective decision-making. We present a framework for increasing the effectiveness of remedial design decision-making at groundwater contamination sites where there is uncertainty in many parameters that affect remediation design. The objective is to provide an easy-to-use economic framework for making remediation decisions. The presented framework is used to 1) select the best remedial design from a suite of possible ones, 2) estimate if additional data collection is cost-effective, and 3) determine the most important parameters to be sampled. The framework is developed by combining elements from Latin-Hypercube simulation of contaminant transport, economic risk-cost-benefit analysis, and Regional Sensitivity Analysis (RSA).

James, B.R.; Gwo, J.P.; Toran, L.E.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Improving the efficiency of residential air-distribution systems in California, Phase 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of the first phase of a multiyear research project. The project`s goal is to investigate ways to improve the efficiency of air-distribution systems in detached, single-family residences in California. First-year efforts included: A survey of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) contractors in California. A 31-house field study of distribution-system performance based on diagnostic measurements. Development of an integrated air-flow and thermal-simulation tool for investigating residential air-distribution system performance. Highlights of the field results include the following: Building envelopes for houses built after 1979 appear to be approximately 30% tighter. Duct-system tightness showed no apparent improvement in post-1979 houses. Distribution-fan operation added an average of 0.45 air changes per hour (ACH) to the average measured rate of 0.24 ACH. The simulation tool developed is based on DOE-2 for the thermal simulations and on MOVECOMP, an air-flow network simulation model, for the duct/house leakage and flow interactions. The first complete set of simulations performed (for a ranch house in Sacramento) indicated that the overall heating-season efficiency of the duct systems was approximately 65% to 70% and that the overall cooling-season efficiency was between 60% and 75%. The wide range in cooling-season efficiency reflects the difference between systems with attic return ducts and those with crawl-space return ducts, the former being less efficient. The simulations also indicated that the building envelope`s UA-value, a measurement of thermoconductivity, did not have a significant impact on the overall efficiency of the air-distribution system.

Modera, M.; Dickerhoff, D.; Jansky, R.; Smith, B.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Analysis and thermal-design improvements of downhole tools for use in hot-dry wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Design improvements made for downhole thermal protection of systems based on results obtained from the analysis of the electronics, heat sink, and dewar packaged in a steel tubular body are described. Results include heat flux at the tool surface, temperature-time histories of each subsystem and isotherm contour plots during the simulation. The analysis showed that the thermal potential between the electronics and the heat sink was in the wrong direction and also was too small to remove heat entering the electronics section. Also, the conductance of the available heat transfer paths from electronics to heat sink was too small to remove that heat efficiently. Significant improvements in survival at high temperatures were achieved by increasing the available thermal capacity of the heat sink, increasing the thermal potential between the heat sink and electronics, and vastly increasing the conductance of the heat transfer paths.

Bennett, G.A.; Sherman, G.R.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Improving the phase stability and oxidation resistance of B-NiAl  

SciTech Connect

High temperature alloys are essential to many industries that require a stable material to perform in harsh oxidative environments. Many of these alloys are suited for specific applications such as jet engine turbine blades where most other materials would either melt or oxidize and crumble (1). These alloys must have a high melting temperature, excellent oxidation resistance, good creep resistance, and decent fracture toughness to be successfully used in such environments. The discovery of Ni based superalloys in the 1940s revolutionized the high temperature alloy industry and there has been continued development of these alloys since their advent (2). These materials are capable of operating in oxidative environments in the presence of combustion gases, water vapor and at temperatures around 1050 C. Demands for increased f uel efficiency, however, has highlighted the need for materials that can be used under similar atmospheres and at temperatures in excess of 1200 C. The current Ni based superalloys are restricted to lower temperatures due to the presence of a number of low melting phases that result in softening of the alloys above 1000 C. Therefore, recent research has been aimed at exploring and developing newer alloy systems that can meet the escalating requirements. This thesis comprises a part of such an effort. The motivation of this work is to develop a novel high temperature alloy system that shows improved performance at higher temperatures than the currently employed alloys. The desired alloy should be in accordance with the requirements established in the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) FutureGen program having an operating temperature around 1300 C. Alloys based on NiAl offer significant potential payoffs as structural materials in gas turbine applications due to a unique range of physical and mechanical properties. Alloying additions to NiAl could be used to further improve the pertinent properties that currently limit this system from replacing Ni based superalloys. Modifications to NiAl were explored to increase the phase stability and oxidation resistance which would allow these alloys to be used at even higher temperatures yielding greater efficiencies. The extended Miedema model was an effective tool that screened all of the potential phase space for ternary substitutions to NiAl and found the few potential systems worth further investigation. After production of the alloys it was determined that Ir, Rh, and Pd were the top candidates for substitution on Ni site up to 12 at%. The melting temperature of NiAl could be increased as much as 150 C with 12 at% Ir and 130 C with 12 at% Rh substitution. Pall adium on the other hand decreased the melting temperature by 50 C at the 12 at% substitution level. The grain size was found to have a profound influence on the oxidation resistance. Both Ir and Rh substitutions resulted in finer grain sizes compared to Pd substitutions or base NiAl. The grain size increased drastically during high temperature annealing with the PGM substitutions hindering grain growth only slightly. However, the addition of 0.05 at% Hf limited the grain growth dramatically during high temperature annealing. NiAl inherently has respectable oxidation resistance up to 1100 C. It was found through experimental testing that both Ir and Rh substitutions improve the oxidation resistance of NiAl at ultra-high temperatures with Ir performing the best. Both PGM substitutions decreased the growth rate as well as forming a more adherent oxide scale. Pd substitutions appeared to have a negligible effect to the oxidation resistance of NiAl. Hafnium addition of 0.05 at% was found to decrease the oxidation rate as well as increase the scale adherence. The combination of both Ir substitution (6-9 at%) and Hf addition (0.05 at%) produced the alloy with the best oxidation resistance. Although improvements in phase stability and oxidation resistance have been made to the NiAl system, more development and testing are still needed. Two major issues yet to be resolved are the low fracture toughn

Brammer, Travis

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

Use of Solid Hydride Fuel for Improved long-Life LWR Core Designs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project was to assess the feasibility of improving the performance of PWR and BWR cores by using solid hydride fuels instead of the commonly used oxide fuel. The primary measure of performance considered is the bus-bar cost of electricity (COE). Additional performance measures considered are safety, fuel bundle design simplicity – in particular for BWR’s, and plutonium incineration capability. It was found that hydride fuel can safely operate in PWR’s and BWR’s without restricting the linear heat generation rate of these reactors relative to that attainable with oxide fuel. A couple of promising applications of hydride fuel in PWR’s and BWR’s were identified: (1) Eliminating dedicated water moderator volumes in BWR cores thus enabling to significantly increase the cooled fuel rods surface area as well as the coolant flow cross section area in a given volume fuel bundle while significantly reducing the heterogeneity of BWR fuel bundles thus achieving flatter pin-by-pin power distribution. The net result is a possibility to significantly increase the core power density – on the order of 30% and, possibly, more, while greatly simplifying the fuel bundle design. Implementation of the above modifications is, though, not straightforward; it requires a design of completely different control system that could probably be implemented only in newly designed plants. It also requires increasing the coolant pressure drop across the core. (2) Recycling plutonium in PWR’s more effectively than is possible with oxide fuel by virtue of a couple of unique features of hydride fuel – reduced inventory of U-238 and increased inventory of hydrogen. As a result, the hydride fuelled core achieves nearly double the average discharge burnup and the fraction of the loaded Pu it incinerates in one pass is double that of the MOX fuel. The fissile fraction of the Pu in the discharged hydride fuel is only ~2/3 that of the MOX fuel and the discharged hydride fuel is more proliferation resistant. Preliminary feasibility assessment indicates that by replacing some of the ZrH1.6 by ThH2 it will be possible to further improve the plutonium incineration capability of PWR’s. Other possibly promising applications of hydride fuel were identified but not evaluated in this work. A number of promising oxide fueled PWR core designs were also found as spin-offs of this study: (1) The optimal oxide fueled PWR core design features smaller fuel rod diameter of D=6.5 mm and a larger pitch-to-diameter ratio of P/D=1.39 than presently practiced by industry – 9.5mm and 1.326. This optimal design can provide a 30% increase in the power density and a 24% reduction in the cost of electricity (COE) provided the PWR could be designed to have the coolant pressure drop across the core increased from the reference 29 psia to 60 psia. (2) Using wire wrapped oxide fuel rods in hexagonal fuel assemblies it is possible to design PWR cores to operate at 54% higher power density than the reference PWR design that uses grid spacers and a square lattice, provided 60 psia coolant pressure drop across the core could be accommodated. Uprating existing PWR’s to use such cores could result in 40% reduction in the COE. The optimal lattice geometry is D = 8.08 mm and P/D = 1.41. The most notable advantages of wire wraps over grid spacers are their significant lower pressure drop, higher critical heat flux and improved vibrations characteristics.

Greenspan, E

2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

113

NREL-Led Team Improves and Accelerates Battery Design (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is leading some of the best minds from U.S. auto manufacturers, battery developers, and automotive simulation tool developers in a $20 million project to accelerate the development of battery packs and thus the wider adoption of electric-drive vehicles. The Computer-Aided Engineering for Electric Drive Vehicle Batteries (CAEBAT) collaboration is developing sophisticated software tools to help improve and accelerate battery design and boost the performance and consumer appeal of electric-drive vehicles with the ultimate goal of diminishing petroleum consumption and polluting emissions.

Not Available

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Evaluation of Beam Loss and Energy Depositions for a Possible Phase II Design for LHC Collimation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The LHC beams are designed to have high stability and to be stored for many hours. The nominal beam intensity lifetime is expected to be of the order of 20h. The Phase II collimation system has to be able to handle particle losses in stable physics conditions at 7 TeV in order to avoid beam aborts and to allow correction of parameters and restoration to nominal conditions. Monte Carlo simulations are needed in order to evaluate the behavior of metallic high-Z collimators during operation scenarios using a realistic distribution of losses, which is a mix of the three limiting halo cases. Moreover, the consequences in the IR7 insertion of the worst (case) abnormal beam loss are evaluated. The case refers to a spontaneous trigger of the horizontal extraction kicker at top energy, when Phase II collimators are used. These studies are an important input for engineering design of the collimation Phase II system and for the evaluation of their effect on adjacent components. The goal is to build collimators that can survive the expected conditions during LHC stable physics runs, in order to avoid quenches of the SC magnets and to protect other LHC equipments.

Lari, L.; /EPFL-ISIC, Lausanne /CERN; Assmann, R.; /CERN; Bracco, C.; /EPFL-ISIC, Lausanne /CERN; Brugger, M.; /CERN; Cerutti, F.; /CERN; Doyle, E.; /SLAC; Ferrari, A.; /CERN; Keller, L.; Lundgren, S.; Markiewicz, Thomas W.; /SLAC; Mauri, M.; Redaelli, S.; Sarchiapone, L.; /CERN; Smith, J.; /SLAC; Vlachoudis, V.; Weiler, T.; /CERN

2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

115

Evaluation of Beam Losses And Energy Deposition for a Possible Phase II Design for LHC Collimation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) beams are designed to have high stability and to be stored for many hours. The nominal beam intensity lifetime is expected to be of the order of 20h. The Phase II collimation system has to be able to handle particle losses in stable physics conditions at 7 TeV in order to avoid beam aborts and to allow correction of parameters and restoration to nominal conditions. Monte Carlo simulations are needed in order to evaluate the behavior of metallic high-Z collimators during operation scenarios using a realistic distribution of losses, which is a mix of the three limiting halo cases. Moreover, the consequences in the IR7 insertion of the worst (case) abnormal beam loss are evaluated. The case refers to a spontaneous trigger of the horizontal extraction kicker at top energy, when Phase II collimators are used. These studies are an important input for engineering design of the collimation Phase II system and for the evaluation of their effect on adjacent components. The goal is to build collimators that can survive the expected conditions during LHC stable physics runs, in order to avoid quenches of the SC magnets and to protect other LHC equipments.

Lari, L.; Assmann, R.W.; Bracco, C.; Brugger, M.; Cerutti, F.; Ferrari, A.; Mauri, M.; Redaelli, S.; Sarchiapone, L.; Vlachoudis, Vasilis; Weiler, Th.; /CERN; Doyle, J.E.; Keller, L.; Lundgren, S.A.; Markiewicz, Thomas W.; Smith, J.C.; /SLAC; Lari, L.; /LPHE, Lausanne

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Analysis of Improved Reference Design for a Nuclear-Driven High Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant  

SciTech Connect

The use of High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) for the efficient production of hydrogen without the greenhouse gas emissions associated with conventional fossil-fuel hydrogen production techniques has been under investigation at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INL) for the last several years. The activities at the INL have included the development, testing and analysis of large numbers of solid oxide electrolysis cells, and the analyses of potential plant designs for large scale production of hydrogen using an advanced Very-High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) to provide the process heat and electricity to drive the electrolysis process. The results of these system analyses, using the UniSim process analysis software, have shown that the HTE process, when coupled to a VHTR capable of operating at reactor outlet temperatures of 800 °C to 950 °C, has the potential to produce the large quantities of hydrogen needed to meet future energy and transportation needs with hydrogen production efficiencies in excess of 50%. In addition, economic analyses performed on the INL reference plant design, optimized to maximize the hydrogen production rate for a 600 MWt VHTR, have shown that a large nuclear-driven HTE hydrogen production plant can to be economically competitive with conventional hydrogen production processes, particularly when the penalties associated with greenhouse gas emissions are considered. The results of this research led to the selection in 2009 of HTE as the preferred concept in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) hydrogen technology down-selection process. However, the down-selection process, along with continued technical assessments at the INL, has resulted in a number of proposed modifications and refinements to improve the original INL reference HTE design. These modifications include changes in plant configuration, operating conditions and individual component designs. This paper describes the resulting new INL reference design and presents results of system analyses performed to optimize the design and to determine required plant performance and operating conditions.

Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O' Brien; Michael G. McKellar

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Improving Performance of Cluster Based Routing Protocol using Cross-Layer Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main goal of routing protocol is to efficiency delivers data from source to destination. All routing protocols are the same in this goal, but the way they adopt to achieve it is different, so routing strategy has an egregious role on the performance of an ad hoc network. Most of routing protocols proposed for ad hoc networks have a flat structure. These protocols expand the control overhead packets to discover or maintain a route. On the other hand a number of hierarchical-based routing protocols have been developed, mostly are based on layered design. These protocols improve network performances especially when the network size grows up since details about remote portion of network can be handled in an aggregate manner. Although, there is another approach to design a protocol called cross-layer design. Using this approach information can exchange between different layer of protocol stack, result in optimizing network performances. In this paper, we intend to exert cross-layer design to optimize Cluster B...

Jahanbakhsh, Kazem

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Limitations of Bispectral Infrared Cloud Phase Determination and Potential for Improvement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determining cloud thermodynamic phase using infrared satellite observations typically requires a priori assumptions about relationships between cloud phase and cloud temperature. In this study, limitations of an approach using two infrared ...

Shaima L. Nasiri; Brian H. Kahn

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Structural Composites Industries 4 kilowatt wind system development. Phase I: design and analysis, technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 4 kW small wind energy conversion system (SWECS) has been designed for residential applications in which relatively low (10 mph) mean annual wind speeds prevail. The objectives were to develop such a machine to produce electrical energy at 6 cents per kWh while operating in parallel with a utility grid or auxiliary generator. The Phase I effort began in November, 1979 and was carried through the Final Design Review in February 1981. During this period extensive trade, optimization and analytical studies were performed in an effort to provide the optimum machine to best meet the objectives. Certain components, systems and manufacturing processes were tested and evaluated and detail design drawings were produced. The resulting design is a 31-foot diameter horizontal axis downwind machine rated 5.7 kW and incorporating the following unique features: Composite Blades; Free-Standing Composite Tower; Torque-Actuated Blade Pitch Control. The design meets or exceeds all contract requirements except that for cost of energy. The target 6 cents per kWh will be achieved in a mean wind speed slightly below 12 mph instead of the specified 10 mph.

Malkine, N.; Bottrell, G.; Weingart, O.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF GAS-LIQUID CYLINDRICAL CYCLONE COMPACT SEPARATORS FOR THREE-PHASE FLOW  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a brief overview of the activities and tasks accomplished during the second half year (April 1, 2001-September 30, 2001) of the fourth project year budget period (October 1, 2000-September 30, 2001). An executive summary is presented initially followed by the tasks of the current budget period. Then, detailed description of the experimental and modeling investigations are presented. Subsequently, the technical and scientific results of the activities of this project period are presented with some discussions. The findings of this investigation are summarized in the ''Conclusions'' section followed by relevant references. The fourth project year activities are divided into three main parts, which are carried out in parallel. The first part is continuation of the experimental program that includes a study of the oil/water two-phase behavior at high pressures and control system development for the three-phase GLCC{copyright}. This investigation will be eventually extended for three-phase flow. The second part consists of the development of a simplified mechanistic model incorporating the experimental results and behavior of dispersion of oil in water and water in oil. This will provide an insight into the hydrodynamic flow behavior and serve as the design tool for the industry. Although useful for sizing GLCC{copyright} for proven applications, the mechanistic model will not provide detailed hydrodynamic flow behavior information needed to screen new geometric variations or to study the effect of fluid property variations. Therefore, in the third part, the more rigorous approach of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) will be utilized. Multidimensional multiphase flow simulation at high pressures and for real crude conditions will provide much greater depth into the understanding of the physical phenomena and the mathematical analysis of three-phase GLCC{copyright} design and performance.

Dr. Ram S. Mohan; Dr. Ovadia Shoham

2001-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

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121

DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF GAS-LIQUID CYLINDRICAL CYCLONE COMPACT SEPARATORS FOR THREE-PHASE FLOW  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a brief overview of the activities and tasks accomplished during the first half year (October 1, 2000-March 31, 2001) of the fourth project year budget period (October 1, 2000-September 30, 2001). An executive summary is presented initially followed by the tasks of the current budget period. Then, detailed description of the experimental and modeling investigations are presented. Subsequently, the technical and scientific results of the activities of this project period are presented with some discussions. The findings of this investigation are summarized in the ''Conclusions'' section followed by relevant references. The fourth project year activities are divided into three main parts, which are carried out in parallel. The first part is continuation of the experimental program that includes a study of the oil/water two-phase behavior at high pressures and control system development for the three-phase GLCC{copyright}. This investigation will be eventually extended for three-phase flow. The second part consists of the development of a simplified mechanistic model incorporating the experimental results and behavior of dispersion of oil in water and water in oil. This will provide an insight into the hydrodynamic flow behavior and serve as the design tool for the industry. Although useful for sizing GLCC{copyright} for proven applications, the mechanistic model will not provide detailed hydrodynamic flow behavior information needed to screen new geometric variations or to study the effect of fluid property variations. Therefore, in the third part, the more rigorous approach of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) will be utilized. Multidimensional multiphase flow simulation at high pressures and for real crude conditions will provide much greater depth into the understanding of the physical phenomena and the mathematical analysis of three-phase GLCC{copyright} design and performance.

Dr. Ram S. Mohan; Dr. Ovadia Shoham

2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

122

Nanoalloy composition-temperature phase diagram for catalyst design: Case study of Ag-Au  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By coupling a cluster expansion with density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we determine the configurational thermodynamics (site preferences and occupations) for alloyed nanoparticles (NPs) as functions of composition (c) and temperature (T), exemplified using a 55-atom Ag-Au truncated cuboctahedron NP. The c-T phase diagram for site occupations gives detailed design information for alloyed NP, especially the thermodynamically stable active sites for catalysis and how they change with stoichiometry and processing temperature. Generally, Ag prefers core and Au prefers shell, agreeing with our universal core-shell preference assessed from DFT impurity segregation energies but with interesting multishell configurations having specific active sites.

Wang, Lin-Lin; Tan, Teck L.; Johnson, Duane D.

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

123

TMS320F2812 DSP controller for dynamic voltage restorer (DVR) application for improving of a three phase inverter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses a control technique improvement of a three-phase inverter using TMS320F2812 DSP controller for Dynamic Voltage Restorer (DVR) applications. The output of the inverter is then connected to a voltage grid via a second order filter ... Keywords: TMS320F2812 DSP, dynamic voltage restorer (DVR), filter, inverters, total harmonic distortion (THD)

R. Omar; N. A. Rahim

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Alternatives generation and analysis for the Phase I intermediate waste feed staging system design requirements  

SciTech Connect

This alternatives generation and analysis (AGA) addresses the question: What is the design basis for the facilities required to stage low-level waste (LLW) feed to the Phase I private contractors? Alternative designs for the intermediate waste feed staging system were developed, analyzed, and compared. Based on these analyses, this document recommends installing mixer pumps in the central pump pit of double-shell tanks 241-AP-102 and 241-AP-104. Also recommended is installing decant/transfer pumps at these tanks. These recommendations have clear advantages in that they provide a low shedule impact/risk and the highest operability of all the alternatives investigated. This revision incorporates comments from the decision board.

Claghorn, R.D., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

125

Robust design as a driver of engine cylinder heads evolution : a framework for identifying product improvement paths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fundamental goal of Robust Design is to improve the quality of a product by minimizing the effects of variation. A key contributor to robustness over the long term is R&D. Therefore, a framework is desired to help ...

Gómez de la Mora, Luz de Lourdes

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

The Florida Area Cumulus Experiment's Second Phase (FACE-2). Part I: The Experimental Design, Implementation and Basic Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Florida Area Cumulus Experiment (FACE) is a single area, randomized experiment designed to assess the ground-level rainfall effects of dynamic cloud seeding in summer on the south Florida peninsula. The second phase of FACE (FACE-2), an ...

Anthony G. Barnston; William L. Woodley; John A. Flueck; Michael H. Brown

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Optimum system design of a three-phase rectifier-inverter type of frequency changer  

SciTech Connect

Steadily decreasing prices and improved performance of semiconductor devices have raised expectations towards the development and large-scale application of motor-mounted static converters. In view of this, the design of a rectifier-inverter type of frequency changer which requires very small reactive components is considered. Accordingly, rectifier and inverter PWM schemes which generate the minimum possible harmonic distortion are first discussed. By using a suitable analysis method, ''optimum'' design data are obtained for every major system component. Resulting reactive component values are shown to be considerably smaller than the ones required by typical rectifier-inverter structures. Predicted key results are verified by computer simulation.

Ziogas, P.D.; Kang, Y-G.; Stefanovic, V.R.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Bosque River Environmental Infrastructure Improvement Plan: Phase II BMP Modeling Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Bosque River Watershed is located in the Brazos River Basin in central Texas and is facing a suite of water quality issues resulting in sediment, nutrient and bacteria loading. These loadings are potentially derived from improperly managed cropland and grazing land, land-applied dairy waste, and effluent discharge from eight wastewater treatment plants. The first phase of the project developed an effective methodology for determining priority areas in the watershed where best management practice (BMP) implementation would likely yield the greatest improvements in water quality. The objectives of this project (Phase II) are to apply the Soil and Watershed Assessment Tool (SWAT) model to simulate and evaluate the impacts of implementing several best management practices (a) in the entire watershed, and (b) at incremental levels in high, medium, and low priority areas of the watershed, identified using three different impact indices. Initially, the SWAT model was calibrated for long-term annual and monthly flow at a USGS gaging station located in the lower portion of the watershed for the period from 1980 through 2005 and was validated at the same location for the period 1960 through 1979. The model was also calibrated, at a monthly time step, for water quality parameters including sediment, organic and mineral nitrogen, and phosphorus at two locations, Hico and Valley Mills. Model performance statistics (coefficient of determination and Nash-Sutcliffe modeling efficiency) indicated that model performance was satisfactory and could be used for evaluating the impacts of alternative management scenarios to reduce nonpoint source pollution. BMPs including streambank stabilization, gully plugs, recharge structures, conservation tillage, terraces, contour farming, grazing management, manure incorporation, edge-of-field filter strips, and PL-566 reservoirs were simulated as being implemented in the watershed areas that met the respective practice’s specific criteria for implementation. These BMPs were simulated individually and the resulting farm level (HRU level), subwatershed level, and watershed outlet level impacts were quantified for each BMP. Reductions in sediment load at the watershed outlet, as a result of implementing these BMPs individually, was as much as 37 percent while reductions in total nitrogen (TN) ranged from 1 percent to 24 percent and total phosphorus (TP) varied from a 3 percent increase to a 30 percent decrease. The 3 percent increase is indicative of conservation tillage and is likely caused by the lack of soil inversion and mixing, which yields an accumulation of dissolved (mineral) phosphorus in the soil’s surface layer. At subwatershed levels, reductions brought about by implementing the BMPs were relatively greater as compared to the watershed outlet reductions. Reductions in sediment were as high as 47 percent and reductions in TN and TP were 37 percent and 32 percent, respectively. Subwatersheds were categorized into “high,” “medium,” and “low” priority based on calibrated simulation results. Considering sediment, TN, and TP (as pollutants), three types of total impact indices were estimated. The “Concentration Impact Index” is based on pollutant concentrations (SWAT output values extracted from the ‘reach output file’), considers contributions from the subwatershed as well as the entire upstream watershed, and is effective in determining priority areas for addressing localized pollution problems in low and high flow conditions. The “Load Per Unit Area Impact Index” is based on the total pollutant load coming from a specific area (SWAT output values extracted from the ‘subbasin output file’), considers contributions from an individual subwatershed, and is used to effectively assign a priority to each subwatershed. The “Load Impact Index” is based on pollutant loads from subwatersheds and upstream areas (SWAT output values extracted from the ‘reach output file’) and portrays the cumulative effects of pollutant loading throug

Tuppad, Pushpa; Srinivasan, Raghavan

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Improving the design and analysis of superconducting magnets for particle accelerators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High energy particle accelerators are now the primary means of discovering the basic building blocks of matter and understanding the forces between them. In order to minimize the cost of building these machines, superconducting magnets are used in essentially all present day high energy proton and heavy ion colliders. The cost of superconducting magnets is typically in the range of 20--30% of the total cost of building such machines. The circulating particle beam goes through these magnets a large number of times (over hundreds of millions). The luminosity performance and life time of the beam in these machines depends significantly on the field quality in these magnets. Therefore, even a small error in the magnetic field shape may create a large cumulative effect in the beam trajectory to throw the particles of the magnet aperture. The superconducting accelerator magnets must, therefore, be designed and constructed so that these errors are small. In this thesis the research and development work will be described 3which has resulted in significant improvements in the field quality of the superconducting magnets for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The design and the field quality improvements in the prototype of the main collider dipole magnet for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) will also be presented. RHIC will accelerate and collide two counter rotating beams of heavy ions up to 100 GeV/u and protons up to 250 GeV. It is expected that RHIC will create a hot, dense quark-gluon plasma and the conditions which, according to the Big Bang theory, existed in the early universe.

Gupta, R.C. [Univ. of Rajasthan, Jaipur (India). Dept. of Physics]|[Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Magnet Div.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Design of Zinc Oxide Based Solid-State Excitonic Solar Cell with Improved Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Excitonic photovoltaic devices, including organic, hybrid organic/inorganic, and dye-sensitized solar cells, are attractive alternatives to conventional inorganic solar cells due to their potential for low cost and low temperature solution-based processing on flexible substrates in large scale. Though encouraging, they are currently limited by the efficiency from not yet optimized structural and material parameters and poor overall knowledge regarding the fundamental details. This dissertation aims to achieve improved performance of hybrid solar cells by enhancing material property and designing new device architecture. The study begins with the addition of XD-grade single-walled carbon nanotube (XDSWNT) into poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) to improve the current density. By having a weight ratio of XDSWNT and P3HT equaled to 0.1:1, short-circuit current was quadrupled from 0.12 mA cm-2 to 0.48 mA cm-2 and solar cell efficiency was tripled from 0.023% to 0.07%, compared to devices with pure P3HT as a hole transport material. Secondly, a significant improvement in device efficiency with 250 nm long ZnO nanorod arrays as photoanodes has been achieved by filling the interstitial voids of the nanorod arrays with ZnO nanoparticles. The overall power conversion efficiency increased from 0.13% for a nanorod-only device to 0.34% for a device with combined nanoparticles and nanorod arrays. The higher device efficiency in solid-state DSSCs with hybrid nanorod/nanoparticle photoanodes is originated from both large surface area provided by nanoparticles for dye adsorption and efficient charge transport provided by the nanorod arrays to reduce the recombinations of photogenerated carriers. Followed by the novel layer-by-layer self-assembly deposition process, the hybrid photoanode study was extended to the longer ZnO nanorod arrays. The best performance, 0.64%, was achieved when the thickness of the photoanodes equaled to 1.2 ?m. Finally, the photovoltaic devices were modified by adding ZnO nanoarpticles into P3HT to increase interfacial area between ZnO and P3HT. The efficiency was enhanced from 0.18% to 0.45% when the ZnO nanorod arrays were 625 nm in length. Our successful design of the device morphology significantly contributes to the performance of solid-state hybrid solar cells.

Lee, Tao Hua

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Direct Nyquist array design of PID controllers for boiler-turbine units based on gain and phase margins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a direct Nyquist array (DNA) method for the design of PID controllers for multivariable boiler-turbine units with specifications of gain and phase margins is proposed. The essential objective is to propose a method for the design and auto-tuning ...

Hui Pan; Minrui Fei; Ling Wang; Kang Li; Lin Qian

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Interactive Computer-Enhanced Remote Viewing System (ICERVS): Subsystem design report - Phase 2  

SciTech Connect

This ICERVS Phase II Subsystem Design Report describes the detailed software design of the Phase II Interactive Computer-Enhanced Remote Viewing System (ICERVS). ICERVS is a computer-based system that provides data acquisition, data visualization, data analysis, and model synthesis to support robotic remediation of hazardous environments. Due to the risks associated with hazardous environments, remediation must be conducted remotely using robotic systems, which, in turn, must rely on 3D models of their workspace to support both task and path planning with collision avoidance. Tools such as ICERVS are vital to accomplish remediation tasks in a safe, efficient manner. The 3D models used by robotic systems are based on solid modeling methods, in which objects are represented by enclosing surfaces (polygons, quadric surfaces, patches, etc.) or collections of primitive solids (cubes, cylinders, etc.). In general, these 3D models must be created and/or verified by actual measurements made in the robotics workspace. However, measurement data is empirical in nature, with typical output being a collection of xyz triplets that represent sample points on some surface(s) in the workspace. As such, empirical data cannot be readily analyzed in terms of geometric representations used in robotic workspace models. The primary objective of ICERVS is to provide a reliable description of a workspace based on dimensional measurement data and to convert that description into 3D models that can be used by robotic systems. ICERVS will thus serve as a critical factor to allow robotic remediation tasks to be performed more effectively (faster, safer) and economically than with present systems.

Smith, D.A.

1994-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

133

An overview of the DC wiring system design issues in the SMUD Phase I photovoltaic power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DC wiring system of a photovoltaic power requires a number of safety features that result from the unique aspects of photovoltaic devices. This paper presents an overview of the DC wiring system design developed for the Sacramento Municipal Utilities District (SMUD) Phase I photovoltaic power plant. The specific challenges that photovoltaic devices present to a power plant designer are identified along with the specific solutions adopted in the SMUD design.

Rosen, D.; Simburger, E.J.; Sugimura, R.S.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Improved  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Improved cache performance in Monte Carlo transport calculations using energy banding A. Siegel a , K. Smith b , K. Felker c,∗ , P . Romano b , B. Forget b , P . Beckman c a Argonne National Laboratory, Theory and Computing Sciences and Nuclear Engineering Division b Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering c Argonne National Laboratory, Theory and Computing Sciences Abstract We present an energy banding algorithm for Monte Carlo (MC) neutral parti- cle transport simulations which depend on large cross section lookup tables. In MC codes, read-only cross section data tables are accessed frequently, ex- hibit poor locality, and are typically much too large to fit in fast memory. Thus, performance is often limited by long latencies to RAM, or by off-node communication latencies when the data footprint is very large and must be decomposed on

135

ITER Core Imaging X-Ray Spectrometer Conceptual Design and Performance Assessment - Phase 2  

SciTech Connect

During Phase 2 of our study of the CIXS conceptual design we have tackled additional important issues that are unique to the ITER environment. These include the thermal control of the crystal and detector enclosures located in an environment with a 100-250 C ambient temperature, tritium containment, and the range of crystal and detector movement based on the need for spectral adjustments and the desire to make measurements of colder plasmas. In addressing these issues we have selected a ''Dewar''-type enclosure for the crystals and detectors. Applying realistic view factors for radiant heat and making allowance for conduction we have made engineering studies of this enclosure and showed that the cooling requirements can be solved and the temperature can be kept sufficiently constant without compromising the specification parameters of the CIXS. We have chosen a minimum 3 mm combined thickness of the six beryllium windows needed in a Dewar-type enclosure and showed that a single window of 0.5 mm thickness satisfies tritium containment requirements. For measuring the temperature in cooler ITER plasmas, we have chosen to use the K-shell lines of Fe24+. Iron is the preferred choice because its radiation can be analyzed with the identical CIXS settings used for analyzing the tungsten radiation, i.e., essentially no adjustments besides a simple crystal rotation need to be made. We have, however, included an xy{theta}-drive motor arrangement in our design for fine adjustments and full rotation of the crystal mounts.

Beiersdorfer, P; Wen, J; Dunn, J; Morris, K

2011-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

136

Speed binning aware design methodology to improve profit under parameter variations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Designing high-performance systems with high yield under parameter variations has raised serious design challenges in nanometer technologies. In this paper, we propose a profit-aware yield model, based on which we present a statistical design methodology ...

Animesh Datta; Swarup Bhunia; Jung Hwan Choi; Saibal Mukhopadhyay; Kaushik Roy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Improved Cobalt Removal: Field Testing Phase: Effects of Normally Encountered Plant Impurities on Removal Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examined the effects of plant impurities on cobalt removal from liquid radioactive waste. Improved process knowledge is critical to utilities that are continually working to increase the performance of their low-level waste (LLW) treatment systems. This report provides predictive chemistry information for improved cobalt removal obtained from test work at Catawba Nuclear Station. It also provides test methodologies for performing similar evaluations at other member plants.

2001-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

138

Ecosystem and Wildlife Implications of Brush: Management System Designed to Improve Water Runoff and Percolation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the settlement of Texas and establishment of ranchers to produce cattle, there was an effort to maximize beef production. This caused serious overgrazing. In addition, there was a reduced incidence of fires across the landscape to clear out brush. These factors led to deterioration of the grazing lands and provided an opportunity for invasive intrusion by brush and other species onto the land and riparian zones. There has been a large-scale conversion from grasslands and savannahs to wildlands over the last 150 years (Scholes and Archer, 1997). The overall impacts are significantly impaired uplands and reduced percolation and surface flow of water from rainfall which caused changes and loss in basic aquatic and terrestrial habitat. The State of Texas adopted a program to study and implement brush management systems across the state to improve the water availability in streams, rivers, reservoirs and aquifers, as well as to improve the rangelands. The feasibility studies have shown great promise for improving ranchland and improving the water situation. However, there is less known about the aquatic and wildlife species response implications of brush management. Certainly, there are opportunities for improving the viability of an ecosystem through brush management strategies and continuing management practices. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes in hydrology and biological diversity associated with brush management in two watersheds where significant data was already available. This study focused on assessing the aquatic and terrestrial species implications related to specified brush management strategies over time. This involved an integrated analysis including modeling of the landscape, assessing biological diversity and developing economic implications for the two watersheds (Twin Buttes and Edwards regions). Thus, this study is comprised of three parts: modeling of brush management strategies temporally, assessing biological diversity (aquatic and terrestrial) and estimating economic implications. This represents a complex analysis involving variable units and multiple disciplines. Previous feasibility studies of brush removal have been targeted at maximizing water runoff. This analysis is an extension that is designed to examine the implications of brush management under a more restrictive set of brush removal criteria that were chosen based upon wildlife considerations. To achieve the integration of hydrologic modeling, range ecology, and economic implications, there were three team meetings bringing together all components to review status and set priorities for the remainder of the work. In addition, scientists in the three basic groups of specialization interacted daily along with representatives of the Corps of Engineers to assure that each decision was reflected in other parts of the analyses. The major addition of this analysis to brush management feasibility studies being conducted as part of the Texas brush management plan is the consideration of wildlife and aquatic biota and assessing changes in biological diversity likely to result from alternative brush management scenarios.

Arrington, D. Albrey; Conner, Richard; Dugas, William; Hejl, Sallie; Magness, Dawn; Muttiah, Ranjan; Olenick, Keith; Rosenthal, Wes; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Winemiller, Kirk O.; Zinn, Michele; Wilkins, Neal; Amonett, Carl; Bednarz, Steve; Dybala, Tim; Griffith, Rebecca; Jarboe, Hank

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Ford/ERDA continuously variable transmission. Phase I. Transmission design. Progress report No. 9, January 1--March 31, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported for a research program to analyze and design a Forster traction drive infinitely variable transmission for improving passenger car fuel economy. Many disc configurations were analyzed using a finite element analysis computer program, and performance and fuel economy estimates were made from a simulation model. An initial transmission layout design was completed, and test rig components were inspected and assembled. (PMA)

Stockton, T.R.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

A procedure for finding an improved upper bound on the number of optimal design points  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Knowing an upper bound on the number of optimal design points greatly simplifies the search for an optimal design. Caratheodory's Theorem is commonly used to identify an upper bound. However, the upper bound from Caratheodory's Theorem is relatively ... Keywords: Carathéodory's theorem, Cardinality of design, Experimental design, Nonlinear regression

Seung Won Hyun; Min Yang; Nancy Flournoy

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design improvement phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

A Swiss Study on the WTC Collapse for Improving Design and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Expec ted life cycle benefit Decision variables Reconstruction strategy, decommissioning, replacement Structural design Inspection & maintenance ...

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

142

Solar Pilot Plant Phase I, detailed design report: thermal storage subsystem research experiment. CDRL Item No. 8 (Approved)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Thermal Storage Subsystem Research Experiment is designed to give maximum information for evaluating the design, performance, and operating parameters of the Barstow Solar Pilot Plant. The experiment is summarized, and the experiment components detail design and integration are described. The experiment test and operation is described which is designed to collect engineering data to allow the design, performance, and operational characteristics to be specified for the Pilot Plant. Appended are: design documentation; pressure drop calculations; materials studies for thermal energy storage; flow charts for data acquisition and control; condenser detail design; instrumentation error analysis; logic diagrams for the control system; literature survey to evaluate the two-phase forced convection heat transfer; and the vaporizer performance model. (LEW)

Not Available

1976-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

143

Considerations in the Design of Treatment Best Management Practices (BMPs) to Improve Water Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document has been reviewed in accordance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency=s peer and administrative review policies and approved for publiction. Mention of trade names, commercial products, or design procedures does not constitute endorsement or recommendation for use. ii Foreword The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is charged by Congress with protecting the Nation’s land, air, and water resources. Under a mandate of national environmental laws, the Agency strives to formulate and implement actions leading to a compatible balance between human activities and the ability of natural systems to support and nurture life. To meet this mandate, EPA’s research program is providing data and technical support for solving environmental problems today and building a science knowledge base necessary to manage our ecological resources wisely, understand how pollutants affect our health, and prevent or reduce environmental risks in the future. The National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) is the Agency’s center for investigation of technological and management approaches for preventing and reducing risks from pollution that threaten human health and the environment. The focus of the Laboratory’s research program is on methods and their cost-effectiveness for prevention and control of pollution to air, land, water, and subsurface resources; protection of water quality in public water systems; remediation of contaminated sites, sediments and ground water; prevention and control of indoor air pollution; and restoration of ecosystems. NRMRL collaborates with both public and private sector partners to foster technologies that reduce the cost of compliance and to anticipate emerging problems. NRMRL’s research provides solutions to environmental problems by: developing and promoting technologies that protect and improve the environment; advancing

unknown authors

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Electronic screw-in ballast and improved circline lamp phase I. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A solid state ballast has been designed for the efficient operation of a 10 in circline fluorescent lamp. The circuit can be manufactured using power hybrid technology. Eight discrete component versions of the ballasts have been delivered to LBL for testing. The results show the solid state fluorescent ballast system is more efficient than the core-coil ballasted systems on the market.

Kohler, T.P.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Assessing Climate to Improve Solar Design. Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Clearinghouse (EREC) Brochure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet complements the fact sheet on passive solar design, and provides information on how sunlight, weather patterns, and microclimates affect the performance of solar energy systems and designs.

Phillips, J., J.A. Phillips and Associates

2001-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

146

IMPROVEMENT TO PIPELINE COMPRESSOR ENGINE RELIABILITY THROUGH RETROFIT MICRO-PILOT IGNITION SYSTEM -- PHASE III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the third year's effort towards a 3-year program conducted by the Engines & Energy Conversion Laboratory (EECL) at Colorado State University (CSU) to develop micropilot ignition systems for existing pipeline compressor engines. Research activities for the overall program were conducted with the understanding that the efforts are to result in a commercial product to capture and disseminate the efficiency and environmental benefits of this new technology. Commercially-available fuel injection products were identified and applied to the program where appropriate. This approach will minimize the overall time-to-market requirements, while meeting performance and cost criteria. Two earlier phases of development precede this report. The objective for Phase I was to demonstrate the feasibility of retrofit micropilot ignition (RMI) systems for large bore, slow speed engines operating at low compression ratios under laboratory conditions at the EECL. The objective for Phase II was to further develop and optimize the micropilot ignition system at the EECL for large bore, slow speed engines operating at low compression ratios. These laboratory results were enhanced, then verified via a field demonstration project during Phase III of the Micropilot Ignition program. An Implementation Team of qualified engine retrofit service providers was assembled to install the retrofit micropilot ignition system for an engine operated by El Paso Pipeline Group at a compressor station near Window Rock, Arizona. Testing of this demonstration unit showed that the same benefits identified by laboratory testing at CSU, i.e., reduced fuel consumption and exhaust emissions (NOx, THC, CO, and CH2O). Installation efforts at Window Rock were completed towards the end of the budget period, which did not leave sufficient time to complete the durability testing. These efforts are ongoing, with funding provided by El Paso Pipeline Group, and the results will be documented in a report. Commercialization of the retrofit micropilot ignition (RMI) technology is awaiting a ''market pull'', which is expected to materialize as the results of the field demonstration become known and accepted. The Implementation Team, comprised of Woodward Governor Company, Enginuity LLC, Hoerbiger Corporation of America, and DigiCon Inc., has direct experience with the technology development and implementation, and stands ready to promote and commercialize the RMI system.

Scott Chase; Daniel Olsen; Ted Bestor

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

SID-GA: An evolutionary approach for improving observability and redundancy analysis in structural instrumentation design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the core of a genetic algorithm designed to define a sensor network for instrumentation design (ID) is presented. The tool has been incorporated into a decision support system (DSS) that assists the engineer during the ID process. The algorithm ... Keywords: Combinatorial optimization problem, Decision support system, Genetic algorithms, Instrumentation design

Jessica A. Carballido; Ignacio Ponzoni; Nélida B. Brignole

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Resource utilization efficiency improvement of geothermal binary cycles, Phase II. Final report, June 15, 1976--December 31, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During Phase II of this research program, the following elements of research have been performed: (1) improvement in the conventional geothermal binary cycle simulation computer program, (2) development of a direct contact brine heat exchanger algorithm for the cycle simulation program, (3) development of a preheater algorithm for the cycle simulation program, (4) modification of the basic simulation program to incorporate the staged flash binary cycle, (5) development of a parameter optimization algorithm to aid cycle evaluation studies, (6) sensitivity analysis of cost factors, (7) comparison of pure hydrocarbon and binary mixture cycles.

Starling, K.E.; West, H.; Iqbal, K.Z.; Hsu, C.C.; Malik, Z.I.; Fish, L.W.; Lee, C.O.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Fabrication and characterization of the source grating for visibility improvement of neutron phase imaging with gratings  

SciTech Connect

The fabrication of gratings including metal deposition processes for highly neutron absorbing lines is a critical issue to achieve a good visibility of the grating-based phase imaging system. The source grating for a neutron Talbot-Lau interferometer is an array of Gadolinium (Gd) structures that are generally made by sputtering, photo-lithography, and chemical wet etching. However, it is very challenging to fabricate a Gd structure with sufficient neutron attenuation of approximately more than 20 {mu}m using a conventional metal deposition method because of the slow Gd deposition rate, film stress, high material cost, and so on. In this article, we fabricated the source gratings for neutron Talbot-Lau interferometers by filling the silicon structure with Gadox particles. The new fabrication method allowed us a very stable and efficient way to achieve a much higher Gadox filled structure than a Gd film structure, and is even more suitable for thermal polychromatic neutrons, which are more difficult to stop than cold neutrons. The newly fabricated source gratings were tested at the polychromatic thermal neutron grating interferometer system of HANARO at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, and the visibilities and images from the neutron phase imaging system with the new source gratings were compared with those fabricated by a Gd deposition method.

Kim, Jongyul [Neutron Science Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Nuclear and Quantum Engineering Department, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kye Hong; Lim, Chang Hwy; Kim, Taejoo [Neutron Science Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Chi Won [Nano Fusion Technology Division, National Nanofab Center, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Gyuseong [Nuclear and Quantum Engineering Department, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Wook [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Pusan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

150

Molten carbonate fuel cell product design & improvement - 2nd quarter, 1995. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project is to establish, by 1998, the commercial readiness of MW-class molten carbonate fuel cell power plants for distributed power generation, cogeneration, and compressor station applications. Tasks include system design and analysis, manufacturing, packaging and assembly, test facility development, and technology development, improvement, and verification.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Molten carbonate fuel cell product design & improvement - 2nd quarter, 1996. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main objective of this project is to establish the commercial readiness of a molten carbonate fuel cell power plant for distributed power generation, cogeneration, and compressor station applications. This effort includes marketing, systems design and analysis, packaging and assembly, test facility development, and technology development, improvement, and verification.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

4.2: Design of an Improved Pixel for a Polysilicon Active Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode Display  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4.2: Design of an Improved Pixel for a Polysilicon Active Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) pixel with high pixel to pixel luminance uniformity such as organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) are presently of great interest due to their potential application

153

Partial oxidation for improved cold starts in alcohol-fueled engines: Phase 2 topical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Alcohol fuels exhibit poor cold-start performance because of their low volatility. Neat alcohol engines become difficult, if not impossible, to start at temperatures close to or below freezing. Improvements in the cold-start performance (both time to start and emissions) are essential to capture the full benefits of alcohols as an alternative transportation fuel. The objective of this project was to develop a neat alcohol partial oxidation (POX) reforming technology to improve an alcohol engine`s ability to start at low temperatures (as low as {minus}30 C) and to reduce its cold-start emissions. The project emphasis was on fuel-grade ethanol (E95) but the technology can be easily extended to other alcohol fuels. Ultimately a compact, on-vehicle, ethanol POX reactor was developed as a fuel system component to produce a hydrogen-rich, fuel-gas mixture for cold starts. The POX reactor is an easily controllable combustion device that allows flexibility during engine startup even in the most extreme conditions. It is a small device that is mounted directly onto the engine intake manifold. The gaseous fuel products (or reformate) from the POX reactor exit the chamber and enter the intake manifold, either replacing or supplementing the standard ethanol fuel consumed during an engine start. The combustion of the reformate during startup can reduce engine start time and tail-pipe emissions.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Molten carbonate fuel cell product design improvement. Annual report, December 20, 1996--December 20, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program is designed to advance the carbonate fuel cell technology from the current full-size field test to the commercial design by the turn of the century. The specific objectives selected to attain the overall program goal are: Define power plant requirements and specifications; Establish the design for a multifuel, low-cost, modular, market-responsive power plant; Resolve power plant manufacturing issues and define the design for the commercial-scale manufacturing facility; Define the stack and balance-of-plant (BOP) equipment packaging arrangement and module designs; Acquire capability to support developmental testing of stacks and critical BOP equipment to prepare for commercial design; and Resolve stack and BOP equipment technology issues, and design, build, and field test a modular prototype power plant to demonstrate readiness for commercial entry. ERC is currently in the third year of the multiyear program for development and demonstration of a MW-class power plant. The product definition and specification have been derived with input from potential users, including the Fuel Cell Commercialization Group (FCCG). The baseline power plant final design has been completed. Detailed power plant system and packaging designs are being developed using stack and BOP development results. A MW-scale prototype modular power plant representative of the commercial design is planned. Based on the experience and data generated in the current program, ERC also plans to acquire manufacturing capability for market-entry products through expansion of the existing Torrington production facility.

Maru, H.C.; Farooque, M.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Demonstration plant engineering and design. Phase I: the pipeline gas demonstration plant. Volume 7. Plant Section 500 - shift/methanation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contract No. EF-77-C-01-2542 between Conoco Inc. and the US Department of Energy provides for the design, construction, and operation of a demonstration plant capable of processing bituminous caking coals into clean pipeline quality gas. The project is currently in the design phase (Phase I). This phase is scheduled to be completed in June 1981. One of the major efforts of Phase I is the completion of the process design and the project engineering design of the Demonstration Plant. A report of the design effort is being issued in 24 volumes. This is Volume 7 which reports the design of Plant Section 500 - Shift/Methanation. The shift/methanation process is used to convert the purified synthesis gas from the Rectisol unit (Plant Section 400) into the desired high-Btu SNG product. This is accomplished in a series of fixed-bed adiabatic reactors. Water is added to the feed gas to the reactors to effect the requisite reactions. A nickel catalyst is used in the shift/methanation process, and the only reaction products are methane and carbon dioxide. The carbon dioxide is removed from the SNG in Plant Sectin 600 - CO/sub 2/ Removal. After carbon dioxide removal from the SNG, the SNG is returned to Plant Section 500 for final methanation. The product from the final methanation reactor is an SNG stream having a gross heating value of approximately 960 Btu per standard cubic foot. The shift/methanation unit at design conditions produces 19 Million SCFD of SNG from 60 Million SCFD of purified synthesis gas.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan for Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04, Phase III  

SciTech Connect

The remedial design/remedial action for Operable Unit 6-05 (Waste Area Group 6) and Operable Unit 10-04 (Waste Area Group 10) - collectively called Operable Unit 10-04 has been divided into four phases. Phase I consists of developing and implementing institutional controls at Operable Unit 10-04 sites and developing and implementing Idaho National Laboratory-wide plans for both institutional controls and ecological monitoring. Phase II will remediate sites contaminated with trinitrotoluene and Royal Demolition Explosive. Phase III will remediate lead contamination at a gun range, and Phase IV will remediate hazards from unexploded ordnance. This Phase III remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan addresses the remediation of lead-contaminated soils found at the Security Training Facility (STF)-02 Gun Range located at the Idaho National Laboratory. Remediation of the STF-02 Gun Range will include excavating contaminated soils; physically separating copper and lead for recycling; returning separated soils below the remediation goal to the site; stabilizing contaminated soils, as required, and disposing of the separated soils that exceed the remediation goal; encapsulating and disposing of creosote-contaminated railroad ties and power poles; removing and disposing of the wooden building and asphalt pads found at the STF-02 Gun Range; sampling and analyzing soil to determine the excavation requirements; and when the remediation goals have been met, backfilling and contouring excavated areas and revegetating the affected area.

R. P. Wells

2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

157

Improving Sustainability of Buildings Through a Performance-Based Design Approach: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design of most buildings is typically driven by budget, time, safety, and energy codes, producing buildings that just meet these minimum criteria. To achieve better or even exceptional energy performance in buildings, the design team needs to work with the building owner and others involved in the building process toward a focused energy performance goal. This paper describes the performance-based design process for buildings and benefits of this approach.

Deru, M.; Torcellini, P.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Planning and design of additional East Mesa Geothermal Test Facilities. Phase 1B. Volume I. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The planning and design of additions to the ERDA East Mesa Geothermal Component Test Facility are discussed. The ERDA East Mesa Geothermal Component Test Facility will provide moderate temperature/low salinity fluids to facilitate comprehensive testing of conversion systems and components under realistic field conditions. The project objectives included development of designs of new wells and modifications to existing wells to improve definitive reservoir evaluations and design of additional test facilities integrated with the limited-scale facilities to accommodate diverse commercial utilization technology experiments. A reservoir utilization evaluation was conducted to establish locations and design drilling programs for three new wells and modifications to existing wells to improve reservoir definition and provide a comprehensive inventory of geothermal well fluids for testing. Ten test facility additions were developed as individual procurement packages of specifications and drawings to facilitate near term construction activation.

Pearson, R.O.

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Providing the Basis for Innovative Improvements in Advanced LWR Reactor Passive Safety Systems Design: An Educational R&D Project  

SciTech Connect

This project characterizes typical two-phase stratified flow conditions in advanced water reactor horizontal pipe sections, following activation of passive cooling systems. It provides (1) a means to educate nuclear engineering students regarding the importance of two-phase stratified flow in passive cooling systems to the safety of advanced reactor systems and (2) describes the experimental apparatus and process to measure key parameters essential to consider when designing passive emergency core cooling flow paths that may encounter this flow regime. Based on data collected, the state of analysis capabilities can be determined regarding stratified flow in advanced reactor systems and the best paths forward can be identified to ensure that the nuclear industry can properly characterize two-phase stratified flow in passive emergency core cooling systems.

Brian G. Williams; Jim C. P. Liou; Hiral Kadakia; Bill Phoenix; Richard R. Schultz

2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

160

Statement of work for conceptual design of solidified high-level waste interim storage system project (phase I)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has embarked upon a course to acquire Hanford Site tank waste treatment and immobilization services using privatized facilities. This plan contains a two phased approach. Phase I is a ``proof-of-principle/commercial demonstration- scale`` effort and Phase II is a full-scale production effort. In accordance with the planned approach, interim storage (IS) and disposal of various products from privatized facilities are to be DOE furnished. The path forward adopted for Phase I solidification HLW IS entails use of Vaults 2 and 3 in the Spent Nuclear Fuel Canister Storage Building, to be located in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. This Statement of Work describes the work scope to be performed by the Architect-Engineer to prepare a conceptual design for the solidified HLW IS System.

Calmus, R.B., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design improvement phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Optimum Piping Design on Offshore Platform Based on Improved Adaptive Genetic Algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For solving the problems of low efficiency and high cost in piping design process on offshore drilling platform, the design of manifold optimum piping was taken as research objective, a mathematical model was established with the controlled objects of ... Keywords: offshore platform, manifold piping, genetic algorithm, encouraging function

Yi Peng; Liu Yancong; Shi Yongjun; Lun Guande

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Evaluating and improving the effectiveness and efficiency of design process communication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Project information management research enables the efficient exchange of information, but does not effectively communicate process. Design process management research effectively communicates processes, but with methods too inefficient to be adopted ... Keywords: Collaboration, Communication, Design process, Information management, Knowledge management, Validation method

Reid R. Senescu, John R. Haymaker

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Integrated microwave and millimeter-wave phased-array designs in silicon technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Varactor-loaded transmission-line phase shifter at C-bandof Broadside-Coupled Transmission Line at a higher Orderphase shifters: (a) transmission line appraches ( 1 :

Koh, Kwang-Jin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Evaluation of design options for improving the energy efficiency of an environmentally safe domestic refrigerator-freezer  

SciTech Connect

In order to reduce greenhouse emissions from power plants and respond to regulatory actions arising from the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act (NAECA), several design options were investigated for improving the energy efficiency of a conventionally designed, domestic refrigerator-freezer. The options, such as improved cabinet insulation and high-efficiency compressor and fans, were incorporated into a prototype refrigerator-freezer cabinet and refrigeration system to produce a unit that is superior from an environmental viewpoint due to its lower energy consumption and the use of refrigerant HFC-134a as a replacement for CFC-12. Baseline energy performance of the original 1993 production refrigerator-freezer, along with cabinet heat load and compressor calorimeter test results, were extensively documented to provide a firm basis for experimentally measured energy savings. A detailed refrigerator system computer model was used to evaluate the energy savings for several design modifications that, collectively, could achieve a targeted energy consumption of 1.00 kWh/d for a 20 ft{sup 3} (570 l) top-mount, automatic-defrost, refrigerator-freezer. The energy consumption goal represents a 50% reduction in the 1993 NAECA standard for units of this size. Following the modeling simulation, laboratory prototypes were fabricated and tested to experimentally verify the analytical results and aid in improving the model in those areas where discrepancies occurred. While the 1.00 kWh/d goal was not achieved with the modifications, a substantial energy efficiency improvement of 22% (1.41 kWh/d) was demonstrated using near-term technologies. It is noted that each improvement exacts a penalty in terms of increased cost or system complexity/reliability. Further work on this project will analyze cost-effectiveness of the design changes and investigate alternative, more-elaborate, refrigeration system changes to further reduce energy consumption.

Vineyard, E.A.; Sand, J.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Bohman, R.H.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

An improved powertrain attributes development process with the use of design structure matrix  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automobiles are becoming increasingly complicated and are creating more of a challenge for the engineering teams working on them. This thesis focuses on improving the methods of managing powertrain attributes and the ...

Rinkevich, Daniel J. (Daniel Joseph), 1960-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

150 kWe solar-powered deep-well irrigation facility. Phase I. Preliminary design study. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of a preliminary design study for a solar-powered irrigation facility to be located on a farm between Phoenix and Tucson, Arizona, are presented. The ERDA-specified generic design criteria are detailed. A detailed systems analysis is presented, and preliminary designs of the thermal storage system, organic Rankine cycle power system, cooling water system, power distribution system, and collector foundation are given. Site layout and improvements are described, and a cost analysis of prototype and production units is included. Engineering drawings are included. (WHK)

Not Available

1977-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

167

Kilowatt isotope power system phase II plan. Volume II: flight System Conceptual Design (FSCD)  

SciTech Connect

The Kilowatt Isotope Power System (KIPS) Flight System Conceptual Design (FSCD) is described. Included are a background, a description of the flight system conceptual design, configuration of components, flight system performance, Ground Demonstration System test results, and advanced development tests.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Designing customizable end user applications using semantic technologies to improve information management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Personalization capabilities in computer applications attempt to better meet the needs of individuals. The more traditional and widespread paradigm in application design is that the user should adapt to the available ...

Watugala, Sumudu Weerakoon

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

3D design tools improve efficiency and accuracy of a Hanford site nuclear waste storage project  

SciTech Connect

The complex effort of cleaning up the Hanford K Basins is separated into several individual projects. Fluor Hanford and Fluor Federal Services modeled key elements using a 3D parametric modeling program for mechanical design with training animations.

NIELSEN, B.L.

2003-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

170

Improving the manufacturing yield of investment cast turbine blades through robust design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The manufacturing of turbine blades is often outsourced to investment casting foundries by aerospace companies that design and build jet engines. Aerospace companies have found that casting defects are an important cost ...

Margetts, David (David Lawrence)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Case studies in DSM : utilizing the Design Structure Matrix to improve New Product Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes a project that applies the Design Structure Matrix (DSM) in support of the Manufacturing Excellence (MX) program at Cisco Systems, Inc to reduce the cycle time of new product development initiatives ...

Go, Julie W

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Ocean thermal energy conversion power system development-I. Phase I. Preliminary design report. Volume 1. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a conceptual and preliminary design study of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) closed loop ammonia power system modules performed by Lockheed Missiles and Space Company, Inc. (LMSC) are presented. This design study is the second of 3 tasks in Phase I of the Power System Development-I Project. The Task 2 objectives were to develop: 1) conceptual designs for a 40 to 50-MW(e) closed cycle ammonia commercial plant size power module whose heat exchangers are immersed in seawater and whose ancillary equipments are in a shirt sleeve environment; preliminary designs for a modular application power system sized at 10-MW(e) whose design, construction and material selection is analogous to the 50 MW(e) module, except that titanium tubes are to be used in the heat exchangers; and 3) preliminary designs for heat exchanger test articles (evaporator and condenser) representative of the 50-MW(e) heat exchangers using aluminum alloy, suitable for seawater service, for testing on OTEC-1. The reference ocean platform was specified by DOE as a surface vessel with the heat exchanger immersed in seawater to a design depth of 0 to 20 ft measured from the top of the heat exchanger. For the 50-MW(e) module, the OTEC 400-MW(e) Plant Ship, defined in the Platform Configuration and Integration study, was used as the reference platform. System design, performance, and cost are presented. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

173

Supplemental design requirements document enhanced radioactive and mixed waste storage: Phase 5, Project W-113  

SciTech Connect

This Supplemental Design Requirements Document (SDRD) is used to communicate Project W-113 specific plant design information from Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the cognizant Architect Engineer (A/E). The SDRD is prepared after the completion of the project Conceptual Design report (CDR) and prior to the initiation of definitive design. Information in the SDRD serves two purposes: to convey design requirements that are too detailed for inclusion in the Functional Design Criteria (FDC) report and to serve as a means of change control for design commitments in the Title I and Title II design. The Solid Waste Retrieval Project (W-113) SDRD has been restructured from the equipment based outline used in previous SDRDs to a functional systems outline. This was done to facilitate identification of deficiencies in the information provided in the initial draft SDRD and aid design confirmation. The format and content of this SDRD adhere as closely as practicable to the requirements of WHC-CM-6-1, Standard Engineering Practices for Functional Design Criteria.

Ocampo, V.P.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Wall collector design analysis: project status report No. 2. Hing/daylighting prototype development, Phase I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design process and energy analyses for the wall (air) collector component for the passive/hybrid system building alternatives for pre-engineered metal buildings are described. A hybrid collector was coupled to the rockbed storage and ceiling plenum of the office and maintenance spaces. A thermosyphon collector was coupled directly to the interior space of the warehouse. The schematic design, design development, and performance analysis are included. (MHR)

Aronson, S.J.; deCampo, R.; Snyder, M.K.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Genetic Algorithms Can Improve the Construction of D-Optimal Experimental Designs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. MITTERER , K. KN¨ODLER and A. ZELL WSI Rechnerarchitektur Universit¨at T¨ubingen Sand 1, D - 72076 T. Different test data sets produced very similar, partly almost identical, output. We show two "tight" designs-exchange detmax k-exchange (bin) detmax (bin) heuristic GA: mean+stddev GA: optimum Fig. 1. Test data set, tight

Zell, Andreas

176

Development of whole-building energy design targets for commercial buildings: Phase 1, Planning: Volume 2, Technical report  

SciTech Connect

This is the second volume of the Phase 1 report and discusses the 10 tasks performed in Phase 1. The objective of this research is to develop a methodology for setting energy design targets to provide voluntary guidelines for the buildings industry. The whole-building energy targets project is being conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) to encourage the construction of energy-efficient buildings by informing designers and owners about cost-effective goals for energy use in new commercial buildings. The outcome of this research will be a flexible methodology for setting such targets. The tasks are listed and discussed in this report as follows: Task 1 - Develop Detailed Project Goals and Objectives; Task 2 - Establish Buildings-Industry Liaison; Task 3 - Develop Approaches to the Energy Targets Model, Building Operations, and Climate; Task 4 - Develop an Approach for Treating Economic Considerations; Task 5 - Develop an Approach for Treating Energy Sources; Task 6 - Collect Energy-Use Data; Task 7 - Survey Energy Expert Opinion; Task 8 - Evaluation Procedure Specification and Integration; Task 9 - Phase 1 Report Development; and Task 10 - Phase 1 Review Planning.

Crawley, D.B.; Briggs, R.S.; Jones, J.W.; Seaton, W.W.; Kaufman, J.E.; Deringer, J.J.; Kennett, E.W.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

A design for improved performance of interior permanent magnet synchronous motor for hybrid electric vehicle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the layout of a magnet shape on the performance of an interior permanent magnet (IPM) synchronous motor. The motor is used in a hybrid electric vehicle. The IPM motor is a pancake shaped motor that has permanent magnets inside the rotor. The motor acts as a rotational electrodynamic machine between the engine and transmission. The main purpose of redesigning the shape of the magnet is to improve the motor performance

Seong Yeop Lim

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Analysis of various designs of a desiccant wheel for improving the performance using a mathematical model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mathematical model for predicting the performance of a desiccant wheel with various wheel designs has been used by considering heat and mass transfer for both moist air and the desiccant material. The model shows good agreement with experimental data. An experimental setup was fabricated using an evacuated tube solar air collector with a desiccant wheel. The hot air needed for regeneration is produced by the evacuated tube solar air collector

Avadhesh Yadav; V. K. Bajpai

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Design and development of Stirling engines for stationary-power-generation applications in the 500- to 3000-horsepower range. Phase I final report  

SciTech Connect

A program plan and schedule for the implementation of the proposed conceptual designs through the remaining four phases of the overall large Stirling engine development program was prepared. The objective of Phase II is to prepare more detailed designs of the conceptual designs prepared in Phase I. At the conclusion of Phase II, a state-of-the-art design will be selected from the candidate designs developed in Phase I for development. The objective of Phase III is to prepare manufacturing drawings of the candidate engine design. Also, detailed manufacturing drawings of both 373 kW (500 hp) and 746 kW (1000 hp) power pack skid systems will be completed. The power pack skid systems will include the generator, supporting skid, controls, and other supporting auxiliary subsystems. The Stirling cycle engine system (combustion system, Stirling engine, and heat transport system) will be mounted in the power pack skid system. The objective of Phase IV is to procure parts for prototype engines and two power pack skid systems and to assemble Engines No. 1 and 2. The objective of Phase V is to perform extensive laboratory and demonstration testing of the Stirling engines and power pack skid systems, to determine the system performance and cost and commercialization strategy. Scheduled over a 6 yr period the cost of phases II through V is estimated at $22,063,000. (LCL)

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Iterative aperture mask design in phase space using a rank constraint  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an iterative camera aperture design procedure, which determines an optimal mask pattern based on a sparse set of desired intensity distributions at different focal depths. This iterative method uses the ambiguity ...

Horstmeyer, Roarke William

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design improvement phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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181

Solar Pilot Plant, Phase I. Preliminary design report. Volume III. Collector subsystem. CDRL item 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Honeywell collector subsystem features a low-profile, multifaceted heliostat designed to provide high reflectivity and accurate angular and spatial positioning of the redirected solar energy under all conditions of wind load and mirror attitude within the design operational envelope. The heliostats are arranged in a circular field around a cavity receiver on a tower halfway south of the field center. A calibration array mounted on the receiver tower provides capability to measure individual heliostat beam location and energy periodically. This information and weather data from the collector field are transmitted to a computerized control subsystem that addresses the individual heliostat to correct pointing errors and determine when the mirrors need cleaning. This volume contains a detailed subsystem design description, a presentation of the design process, and the results of the SRE heliostat test program.

None

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Molten carbonate fuel cell product design improvement tracer tests. Topical report, December 20, 1995--December 20, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

ERC is developing the detailed design of the commercial entry MW-class power plant. The product requirements and specifications have been derived. The planned baseline power plant is rated at 2.85 MW on natural gas and has a heat rate of 6.22 {times} 10{sup 6} J/kWh (5900 Btu/kWh; 58% LHV). Additional optional features will be available to include non-standard site conditions and other fuels. In parallel, the baseline product design has progressed to the final design phase. The preliminary product design, which also included parametric optimization, major component vendor interaction, and cost estimation, has been completed during the past year. The power plant approach consists of several factory-constructed truck-transportable modules. A computer-generated power plant layout is shown in a figure. The proposed power plant is expected to have a gross output of 3.03 MW, providing net 2.85 MW AC. The parasitic power loss is approximately 6%, of which, inverter, step-up transformer, BOP motors, and miscellaneous loads consume 2%, 1%, 2%, and 1%, respectively.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

183

Improvement of Stent Retriever Design and Efficacy of Mechanical Thrombectomy in a Flow Model  

SciTech Connect

In vitro experiments were performed to evaluate the efficacy of mechanical intracranial thrombectomy comparing the newly developed Aperio stent retriever and standard devices for stroke treatment. The Aperio (A), with an increased working length of 4 cm and a special cell design for capturing and withholding clots, was compared to three benchmark devices: the Solitaire retrievable stent (B), the Merci X6 (C), and the Merci L5 retriever (D). In a vascular glass model with pulsatile flow, reminiscent of the M1 segment of the middle cerebral artery, we repeatedly induced occlusion by generating thrombi via a modified Chandler loop system. The numbers of recanalization attempts, peripheral embolizations, and recanalizations at the site of occlusion were recorded during 10 retrieval experiments with each device. Eleven devices were able to remove the blood clots from the occluded branch. In 34 of 40 experiments, restoration of flow was obtained in 1-3 attempts. The main differences between the study devices were observed in terms of clot withholding and fragmentation during retrieval. Although there was only one fragmentation recorded for device A, disengagement of the whole clot or peripheral embolization of fragments occurred more frequently (5-7 times) with devices B, C, and D. In a vascular model, the design of device A was best at capturing and withholding thrombi during retrieval. Further study will be necessary to see whether this holds true in clinical applications.

Wenger, Katharina, E-mail: kwenger@stud.uni-frankfurt.de [Institute of Neuroradiology, University of Frankfurt am Main (Germany)] [Institute of Neuroradiology, University of Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Nagl, Frank, E-mail: fnagl@acandis.com [Acandis GmbH and Co KG (Germany)] [Acandis GmbH and Co KG (Germany); Wagner, Marlies, E-mail: Marlies.Wagner@kgu.de; Berkefeld, Joachim, E-mail: berkefeld@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Institute of Neuroradiology, University of Frankfurt am Main (Germany)] [Institute of Neuroradiology, University of Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

184

Forthcoming, Utilities Policy, 2010. Using Forward Markets to Improve Electricity Market Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forward markets, both medium term and long term, complement the spot market for wholesale electricity. The forward markets reduce risk, mitigate market power, and coordinate new investment. In the medium term, a forward energy market lets suppliers and demanders lock in energy prices and quantities for one to three years. In the long term, a forward reliability market assures adequate resources are available when they are needed most. The forward markets reduce risk for both sides of the market, since they reduce the quantity of energy that trades at the more volatile spot price. Spot market power is mitigated by putting suppliers and demanders in a more balanced position at the time of the spot market. The markets also reduce transaction costs and improve liquidity and transparency. Recent innovations to the Colombia market illustrate the basic elements of the forward markets and their beneficial role. 1

Lawrence M. Ausubel; Peter Cramton

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Photovoltaic Cz Silicon Module Improvements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work focused on reducing the cost per watt of Cz silicon photovoltaic modules under Phase II of Siemens Solar Industries' DOE/NREL PVMaT 4A subcontract is described in this report. New module designs were deployed in this phase of the contract, improvements in yield of over 10% were realized, and further implementation of Statistical Process Control was achieved during this phase. Module configurations representing a 12% cost reduction per watt were implemented in small scale production under Phase II of this contract. Yield improvements are described in detail, yield sensitivity to wafer thickness is quantified, and the deployment of SPC in critical process steps is reported here.

Jester, T. L.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Design requirements document for the phase 1 privatization electrical power system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electrical system for the Phase 1 privatization facilities will support the TWRS mission by providing the electrical power to the Phase 1 privatized facilities. This system will receive power from the Department of Energy-Richland Operations (RL) A4-8 230 kV transmission system powered from Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Ashe and Midway 230 kV Substations. The existing RL 230 kV transmission line will be modified and looped 1021 into the new 230 kV substation bus. The new substation will be located in the vicinity of the privatized facilities, approximately 3.2 km (2 mi) south of the existing RL A4-8 230 kV transmission line. The substation will be capable of providing up to 40 MW of electrical power to support the Phase 1 privatization facilities and has space for accommodating future expansions. The substation will require at least two 230-13.8 kV transformers, 13.8 kV split bus switchgear, switchgear building, grounding transformers, instrument transformers, control and monitoring equipment, associated protection and isolation devices, lightning protection, yard lighting, cable and raceways, and infrastructure needed to provide desired availability and reliability. The power from the 13.8 kV switchgear located in the switchgear building will be delivered at the privatization facilities site boundaries. The 13.8 kV distribution system inside the privatization facilities site boundaries is the responsibility of the privatization contract.

Singh, G.

1997-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

187

Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations: exploratory shaft. Phase I. Conceptual design report  

SciTech Connect

It is proposed that an Exploratory Shaft (ES) be constructed in Yucca Mountain on or near the southwest portion of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) as part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations. This document describes a conceptual design for an ES and a cost estimate based on a set of construction assumptions. Included in this document are appendixes consisting of supporting studies done at NTS by Fenix and Scisson, Inc. and Holmes and Narver, Inc. These appendixes constitute a history of the development of the design and are included as part of the record.

Nelson, D.C.; Merson, T.J.; McGuire, P.L.; Sibbitt, W.L.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Solar Pilot Plant, Phase I. Preliminary design report. Volume V. Thermal storage subsystem. CDRL item 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Design, specifications, and diagrams for the thermal storage subsystem for the 10-MW pilot tower focus power plant are presented in detail. The Honeywell thermal storage subsystem design features a sensible heat storage arrangement using proven equipment and materials. The subsystem consists of a main storage containing oil and rock, two buried superheater tanks containing inorganic salts (Hitec), and the necessary piping, instrumentation, controls, and safety devices. The subsystem can provide 7 MW(e) for three hours after twenty hours of hold. It can be charged in approximately four hours. Storage for the commercial-scale plant consists of the same elements appropriately scaled up. Performance analysis and tradeoff studies are included.

None

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Designing interlayers to improve the mechanical reliability of transparent conductive oxide coatings on flexible substrates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, we investigate the effect of interlayers on the mechanical properties of transparent conductive oxide (TCO) on flexible polymer substrates. Indium tin oxide (ITO), which is the most widely used TCO film, and Ti, which is the most widely used adhesive interlayer, are selected as the coating and the interlayer, respectively. These films are deposited on the polymer substrates using dc-magnetron sputtering to achieve varying thicknesses. The changes in the following critical factors for film cracking and delamination are analyzed: the internal stress ({sigma}{sup i}) induced in the coatings during deposition using a white light interferometer, the crystallinity using a transmission electron microscope, and the surface roughness of ITO caused by the interlayer using an atomic force microscope. The resistances to the cracking and delamination of ITO are evaluated using a fragmentation test. Our tests and analyses reveal the important role of the interlayers, which significantly reduce the compressive {sigma}{sup i} that is induced in the ITO and increase the resistance to the buckling delamination of the ITO. However, the relaxation of {sigma}{sup i} is not beneficial to cracking because there is less compensation for the external tension as {sigma}{sup i} further decreases. Based on these results, the microstructural control is revealed as a more influential factor than {sigma}{sup i} for improving crack resistance.

Kim, Eun-Hye; Yang, Chan-Woo; Park, Jin-Woo [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Transport in shales and the design of improved water-based shale drilling fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transport of water and ions in shales and its impact on shale stability were studied to facilitate the improvement of water-based muds as shale drilling fluids. Transport parameters associated with flows driven by gradients in pressure and chemical potential were quantified in key laboratory and full-scale experiments. The experimental results show that the low-permeability matrices of intact, clay-rich shales can act as imperfect or leaky membranes that will sustain osmotic flow of water. Moreover, the ability of shales to act as osmotic membranes is shown to provide a powerful new means for stabilizing these rocks when exposed to water-based drilling fluids. Guidelines are presented for effective exploitation of shale membrane action and induced osmotic flows through optimized water-based drilling fluid formulation. In addition, special attention is given to induced electro-osmotic water flow in shales driven by electric potential gradients, which may provide an exciting, new, environmentally benign means for stabilizing shale formations.

Oort, E. van; Hale, A.H.; Mody, F.K.; Roy, S.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Improvements in Low-Frequency, Ultrasonic Phased-Array Evaluation for Thick Section Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Piping Components  

SciTech Connect

Research is being conducted for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to assess the effectiveness and reliability of advanced nondestructive examination (NDE) methods for the inspection of light water reactor (LWR) components. A primary objective of this work is to evaluate various NDE methods to assess their ability to detect, localize, and size cracks in coarse-grained steel components. This particular study focused on the evaluation of custom-designed, low-frequency (500 kHz) phased-array (PA) probes for examining welds in thick-section cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) piping. In addition, research was conducted to observe ultrasonic sound field propagation effects from known coarse-grained microstructures found in parent CASS material. The study was conducted on a variety of thick-wall, coarse-grained CASS specimens that were previously inspected by an older generation 500-kHz PA-UT probe and acquisition instrument configuration. This comparative study describes the impact of the new PA probe design on flaw detection and sizing in a low signal-to-noise environment. The set of Pressurized Water Reactor Owners Group (PWROG) CASS specimens examined in this study are greater than 50.8-mm (2.0-in.) thick with documented flaws and microstructures. These specimens are on loan to PNNL from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) NDE Center in Charlotte, North Carolina. The flaws contained within these specimens are thermal fatigue cracks (TFC) or mechanical fatigue cracks (MFC) and range from 13% to 42% in through-wall extent. In addition, ultrasonic signal continuity was evaluated on two CASS parent material ring sections by examining the edge-of-pipe response (corner geometry) for regions of signal loss.

Anderson, Michael T.; Crawford, Susan L.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Moran, Traci L.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Update and Improve Subsection NH - Simplified Elastic and Inelastic Design Analysis Methods  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this subtask is to develop a template for the 'Ideal' high temperature design Code, in which individual topics can be identified and worked on separately in order to provide the detail necessary to comprise a comprehensive Code. Like all ideals, this one may not be attainable as a practical matter. The purpose is to set a goal for what is believed the 'Ideal' design Code should address, recognizing that some elements are not mutually exclusive and that the same objectives can be achieved in different way. Most, if not all existing Codes may therefore be found to be lacking in some respects, but this does not mean necessarily that they are not comprehensive. While this subtask does attempt to list the elements which individually or in combination are considered essential in such a Code, the authors do not presume to recommend how these elements should be implemented or even, that they should all be implemented at all. The scope of this subtask is limited to compiling the list of elements thought to be necessary or at minimum, useful in such an 'Ideal' Code; suggestions are provided as to their relationship to one another. Except for brief descriptions, where these are needed for clarification, neither this repot, nor Task 9 as a whole, attempts to address details of the contents of all these elements. Some, namely primary load limits (elastic, limit load, reference stress), and ratcheting (elastic, e-p, reference stress) are dealt with specifically in other subtasks of Task 9. All others are merely listed; the expectation is that they will either be the focus of attention of other active DOE-ASME GenIV Materials Tasks, e.g. creep-fatigue, or to be considered in future DOE-ASME GenIV Materials Tasks. Since the focus of this Task is specifically approximate methods, the authors have deemed it necessary to include some discussion on what is meant by 'approximate'. However, the topic will be addressed in one or more later subtasks. This report describes work conducted toward developing a template for what might be the 'Ideal' high temperature design Code. While attempting to be as comprehensive as possible as to subject matter, it does not presume to recommend what individual components of a Code should be implemented, some of which is the focus of other Tasks in the DOE-ASME Gen IV/NGNP Materials Projects. This report does serve as a basis for construction of an attribute chart which is being prepared as part of Task 9.2; the intention for which is to provide a uniform format and concise means for summarizing and comparing other high temperature Codes currently in use around the world.

Jeries J. Abou-Hanna; Douglas L. Marriott; Timothy E. McGreevy

2009-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

193

Structural Composites Industries 4-kilowatt wind-system development. Phase I. Design and analysis executive summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 4 kW small wind energy conversion system (SWECS) has been designed for residential applications in which relatively low (10 mph) mean annual wind speeds prevail. The objectives were to develop such a machinee to produce electrical energy at 6 cents per kWh while operating in parallel with a utility grid or auxiliary generator. Extensive trade, optimization and analytical studies were performed in an effort to provide the optimum machine to best meet the objectives. Certain components, systems and manufacturing processes were tested and evaluated and detail design drawings were produced. The resulting design is a 31-foot diameter horizontal axis downwind machine rated 5.7 kW and incorporating composite blades; free-standing composite tower; and torque-actuated blade pitch control. The design meets or exceeds all contract requirements except that for cost of energy. The target 6 cents per kWh will be achieved in a mean wind speed slightly below 12 mph instead of the specified 10 mph.

Malkine, N.; Bottrell, G.; Weingart, O.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Soot and liquid-phase fuel distributions in a newly designed optically accessible D.I. diesel engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two-dimensional (2-D) laser-sheet imaging has been used to examine the soot and liquid-phase fuel distributions in a newly designed, optically accessible, direct-injection Diesel engine of the heavy-duty size class. The design of this engine preserves the intake port geometry and basic dimensions of a Cummins N-series production engine. It also includes several unique features to provide considerable optical access. Liquid-phase fuel and soot distribution studies were conducted at a medium speed (1,200 rpm) using a Cummins closed-nozzle fuel injector. The scattering was used to obtain planar images of the liquid-phase fuel distribution. These images show that the leading edge of the liquid-phase portion of the fuel jet reaches a maximum length of 24 mm, which is about half the combustion bowl radius for this engine. Beyond this point virtually all the fuel has vaporized. Soot distribution measurements were made at a high load condition using three imaging diagnostics: natural flame luminosity, 2-D laser-induced incandescence, and 2-D elastic scattering. This investigation showed that the soot distribution in the combusting fuel jet develops through three stages. First, just after the onset of luminous combustion, soot particles are small and nearly uniformly distributed throughout the luminous region of the fuel jet. Second, after about 2 crank angle degrees a pattern develops of a higher soot concentration of larger sized particles in the head vortex region of the jet and a lower soot concentration of smaller sized particles upstream toward the injector. Third, after fuel injection ends, both the soot concentration and soot particle size increase rapidly in the upstream portion of the fuel jet.

Dec, J.E. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Espey, C. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Preliminary safety calculations to improve the design of Molten Salt Fast Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Molten salt reactors are liquid fuel reactors so that they are flexible in operation but very different in the safety approach from solid fuel reactors. This study bears on the specific concept named Molten Salt Fast Reactor (MSFR). Since this new nuclear technology is in development, safety is an essential point to be considered all along the R and D studies. This paper presents the first step of the safety approach: the systematic description of the MSFR, limited here to the main systems surrounding the core. This systematic description is the basis on which we will be able to devise accidental scenarios. Thanks to the negative reactivity feedback coefficient, most accidental scenarios lead to reactor shut down. Because of the decay heat generated in the fuel salt, it must be cooled. After the description of the tools developed to calculate the residual heat, the different contributions are discussed in this study. The decay heat of fission products in the MSFR is evaluated to be low (3% of nominal power), mainly due to the reprocessing that transfers the fission products to the gas reprocessing unit. As a result, the contribution of the actinides is significant (0.5% of nominal power). The unprotected loss of heat sink transients are studied in this paper. It appears that slow transients are favorable (> 1 min) to minimize the temperature increase of the fuel salt. This work will be the basis of further safety studies as well as an essential parameter for the design of the draining system. (authors)

Brovchenko, M.; Heuer, D.; Merle-Lucotte, E.; Allibert, M.; Capellan, N.; Ghetta, V.; Laureau, A. [LPSC, CNRS/IN2P3, Grenoble INP, 53,rue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble Cedex (France)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Engineering work plan and design basis for 241-SY ventilation improvements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are three tanks in the 241-SY tank farm. Tank 241-SY101 and 241-SY-103 are flammable gas watch list tanks. Tank 241-SY-102 is included in the ventilation improvement process in an effort to further control air flow in the tank farm. This tank farm has only one outlet ventilation port for all three tanks. Flammable gas is released (may be steady and/or periodic) from the waste in the primary tank vapor space. The gas is removed from the tank by an active ventilation system. However, maintaining consistent measurable flow through the tank can be problematic due to the poor control capabilities of existing equipment. Low flow through the tank could allow flammable gas to build up in the tank and possibly exceed the lower flammability limit (LFL), prevent the most rapid removal of flammable gas from the tank after a sudden gas release, and/or cause high vacuum alarms to sound. Using the inlet and outlet down stream butterfly valves performs the current method of controlling flow in tank farm 241-SY. A filter station is installed on the inlet of each tank, but controlling air flow with its 12 inch butterfly valve is difficult. There is also in-leakage through pump and valve pits. Butterfly valves on the downstream side of each tank could also be used to control air flow. However, their large size and the relatively low air velocity make this control method also ineffective. The proposed method of optimizing tank air flow and pressure control capability is to install an air flow controller on the inlet of each existing filter station in SY farm, and seal as best as practical all other air leakage paths. Such air flow controllers have been installed on 241-AN and 241-AW tanks (see drawing H-2-85647).

Andersen, J.A.

1997-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

197

Field test of Six-Phase Soil Heating and evaluation of engineering design code  

SciTech Connect

A field test was conducted to evaluate the performance of Six-Phase Soil Heating to enhance the removal of contaminants. The purpose of the test was to determine the scale-up characteristics of the Six-Phase Soil Heating technology and to evaluate a computer process simulator developed for the technology. The test heated a 20-ft diameter cylinder of uncontaminated soil to a 10-ft depth. Six-phase ac power was applied at a rate of 30--35 kW using a power system built from surplus electrical components. The test ran unattended, using a computer-based system to record data, alert staff of any excursions in operating conditions via telephone, and provide automatic shut-off of power depending on the type of excursion. The test data included in situ soil temperatures, voltage profiles, and moisture profiles (using a neutron-probetechnique). After 50 days of heating, soil in the center of the array at the 6-ft depth reached 80[degrees]C. Soil temperatures between the two electrodes at this depth reached approximately 75[degrees]C. Data from this test were compared with those predicted by a computer process simulator. The computer process simulator is a modified version of the TOUGH2 code, a thermal porous media code that can be used to determine the movement of air and moisture in soils. The code was modified to include electrical resistive heating and configured such that an application could be run quickly on a workstation (approximately 5 min for 1 day of field operation). Temperature and soil resistance data predicted from the process simulations matched actual data fairly closely. A series of parametric studies was performed to assess the affect of simulation assumptions on predicted parameters.

Bergsman, T.M.; Roberts, J.S.; Lessor, D.L.; Heath, W.O.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Field test of Six-Phase Soil Heating and evaluation of engineering design code  

SciTech Connect

A field test was conducted to evaluate the performance of Six-Phase Soil Heating to enhance the removal of contaminants. The purpose of the test was to determine the scale-up characteristics of the Six-Phase Soil Heating technology and to evaluate a computer process simulator developed for the technology. The test heated a 20-ft diameter cylinder of uncontaminated soil to a 10-ft depth. Six-phase ac power was applied at a rate of 30--35 kW using a power system built from surplus electrical components. The test ran unattended, using a computer-based system to record data, alert staff of any excursions in operating conditions via telephone, and provide automatic shut-off of power depending on the type of excursion. The test data included in situ soil temperatures, voltage profiles, and moisture profiles (using a neutron-probetechnique). After 50 days of heating, soil in the center of the array at the 6-ft depth reached 80{degrees}C. Soil temperatures between the two electrodes at this depth reached approximately 75{degrees}C. Data from this test were compared with those predicted by a computer process simulator. The computer process simulator is a modified version of the TOUGH2 code, a thermal porous media code that can be used to determine the movement of air and moisture in soils. The code was modified to include electrical resistive heating and configured such that an application could be run quickly on a workstation (approximately 5 min for 1 day of field operation). Temperature and soil resistance data predicted from the process simulations matched actual data fairly closely. A series of parametric studies was performed to assess the affect of simulation assumptions on predicted parameters.

Bergsman, T.M.; Roberts, J.S.; Lessor, D.L.; Heath, W.O.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Advanced Start of Combustion Sensor Phases I and II-A: Feasibility Demonstration, Design and Optimization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Homogeneous Compressed Charge Ignition (HCCI) has elevated the need for Start of Combustion (SOC) sensors. HCCI engines have been the exciting focus of engine research recently, primarily because HCCI offers higher thermal efficiency than the conventional Spark Ignition (SI) engines and significantly lower NOx and soot emissions than conventional Compression Ignition (CI) engines, and could be fuel neutral. HCCI has the potential to unify all the internal combustion engine technology to achieve the high-efficiency, low-emission goal. However, these advantages do not come easy. It is well known that the problems encountered with HCCI combustion center on the difficulty of controlling the Start of Combustion. TIAX has an SOC sensor under development which has shown promise. In previous work, including a DOE-sponsored SBIR project, TIAX has developed an accelerometer-based method which was able to determine SOC within a few degrees crank angle for a range of operating conditions. A signal processing protocol allows reconstruction of the combustion pressure event signal imbedded in the background engine vibration recorded by the accelerometer. From this reconstructed pressure trace, an algorithm locates the SOC. This SOC sensor approach is nonintrusive, rugged, and is particularly robust when the pressure event is strong relative to background engine vibration (at medium to high engine load). Phase I of this project refined the previously developed technology with an engine-generic and robust algorithm. The objective of the Phase I research was to answer two fundamental questions: Can the accelerometer-based SOC sensor provide adequate SOC event capture to control an HCCI engine in a feedback loop? And, will the sensor system meet cost, durability, and software efficiency (speed) targets? Based upon the results, the answer to both questions was 'YES'. The objective of Phase II-A was to complete the parameter optimization of the SOC sensor prototype in order to reach a juncture where plans can be and are discussed with an industry partner for how best to perform a more detailed implementation of the TIAX SOC technology on an HCCI engine system. This occurred, as evidenced the number of potential commercialization partners shown in Table 4. Potential Commercialization Partners Contacted (up to date as of January 31, 2010). During the two phases, a robust, engine-generic algorithm was developed that met the desired targets and was shown to work extremely well for HCCI engine operation.

Chad Smutzer

2010-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

200

STE-QUEST Mission and System Design - Overview after completion of Phase-A  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STE-QUEST is a fundamental science mission which is considered for launch within the Cosmic Vision programme of the European Space Agency (ESA). Its main scientific objectives relate to probing various aspects of Einstein's theory of general relativity by measuring the gravitational red-shift of the earth, the moon and the sun as well as testing the weak equivalence principle to unprecedented accuracy. In order to perform the measurements, the system features a spacecraft equipped with two complex instruments, an atomic clock and an atom interferometer, a ground-segment encompassing several ground-terminals collocated with the best available ground atomic clocks, and clock comparison between space and ground via microwave and optical links. The baseline orbit is highly eccentric and exhibits strong variations of incident solar flux, which poses challenges for thermal and power subsystems in addition to the difficulties encountered by precise-orbit-determination at high altitudes. The mission assessment and definition phase (Phase-A) has recently been completed and this paper gives a concise overview over some system level results.

Gerald Hechenblaikner; Marc-Peter Hess; Marianna Vitelli; Jan Beck

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design improvement phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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201

Building Design and Operation for Improving Thermal Comfort in Naturally Ventilated Buildings in a Hot-Humid Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this research was to develop new techniques for designing and operating unconditioned buildings in a hot-humid climate that could contribute to an improvement of thermal performance and comfort condition. The recommendations proposed in this research will also be useful for facility managers on how to maintain unconditioned buildings in this climate. This study investigated two unconditioned Thai Buddhist temples located in the urban area of Bangkok, Thailand. One is a 100-year-old, high-mass temple. The other is a 5-year-old, lower-mass temple. The indoor measurements revealed that the thermal condition inside both temples exceed the ASHRAE-recommended comfort zone. Surprisingly, the older temple maintained a more comfortable indoor condition due to its thermal inertia, shading, and earth contacts. A baseline thermal and airflow model of the old temple was established using a calibrated computer simulation method. To accomplish this, HEATX, a 3-D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code, was coupled with the DOE-2 thermal simulation program. HEATX was used to calculate the airflow rate and the surface convection coefficients for DOE-2, and DOE-2 was used to provide physical input variables to form the boundary conditions for HEATX. In this way calibrated DOE-2/CFD simulation model was accomplished, and the baseline model was obtained. To investigate an improved design, four design options were studied: 1) a reflective or low-solar absorption roof, 2) R-30 ceiling insulation, 3) shading devices, and 4) attic ventilation. Each was operated using three modes of ventilation. The low-absorption roof and the R-30 ceiling insulation options were found to be the most effective options, whereas the shading devices and attic ventilation were less effective options, regardless of which ventilation mode was applied. All design options performed much better when nighttime-only ventilation was used. Based on this analysis, two prototype temples was proposed (i.e., low-mass and high-mass temples). From the simulation results of the two prototypes, design and operation guidelines are proposed, which consist of: 1) increased wall and ceiling insulation, 2) white-colored, low-absorption roof, 3) slab-on-ground floor, 4) shading devices, 5) nighttime-only ventilation, 6) attic ventilation, and 7) wider openings to increase the natural ventilation air flow windows, wing walls, and vertical fins.

Sreshthaputra, Atch

2007-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

202

PV Inverter Products Manufacturing and Design Improvements for Cost Reduction and Performance Enhancements: Final Subcontract Report, November 2003 (Revised)  

SciTech Connect

The specific objectives of this subcontracted development work by Xantrex Technology Inc. were to: (1) Capture the newest digital signal processor (DSP) technology to create high-impact,''next generation'' power conversion equipment for the PV industry; (2) Create a common resource base for three PV product lines. This standardized approach to both hardware and software control platforms will provide significant market advantage over foreign competition; (3) Achieve cost reductions through increased volume of common components, reduced assembly labor, and the higher efficiency of producing more products with fewer design, manufacturing, and production test variations; (4) Increase PV inverter product reliability. Reduce inverter size, weight and conversion losses. The contract goals were to achieve an overall cost reduction of 10% to 20% for the three inverters and with no compromise in performance. The cost of the 10-kW inverter was reduced by 56%, and the cost of the 25-kW inverter was reduced by 53%. The 2.5-kW inverter has no basis for comparison, but should benefit equally from this design approach. Not only were the contract cost reduction goals exceeded by a wide margin, but the performance and reliability of the products were also enhanced. The conversion efficiency improvement, as reflected in the 50% conversion loss reduction, adds significant value in renewable energy applications. The size and weight reductions also add value by providing less cumbersome product solutions for system designers.

West, R.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Analysis and Design Significance of A-11 Flow-Induced Vibration Test, Phases I and III  

SciTech Connect

Comparisons of the experimental data on seal pressure distributions obtained from the A-11 Flow Induced Vibration Test, Phases I and III, with analytical results including porous flow through the unimpregnated inner reflector cylinder for the same operating conditions show generally very good agreement. The principal deviations between analysis and experiment occurs when high pressure ratios exist across the last seal. Additional investigation, both in the relationship used in the analytical model and in the experimental area, are required to determine the cause of the deviation found between analysis and experiment when the pressure ratio across the last seal is near critical. As a result of this comparison, it appears that the analytical methods and assumtions made in predicting unheated seal pressure distributions are resonable, and may be used with confidence in the test prediction of the NRX-A1 cold flow test.

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Resource utilization efficiency improvement of geothermal binary cycles, phase I. Semiannual progress report, June 15, 1975--December 15, 1975  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary of the research carried out prior to the start and during the first half of this project is presented. A description of the geothermal binary cycle and procedures for cycle thermodynamic analysis focusing on the question of resource utilization are discussed. General and specific criteria for preliminary selection of working fluids and operating conditions for binary cycles are considered in terms of equipment and working fluid costs and in terms of resource utilization efficiency. Steps are given for preliminary binary cycle design computations. Preliminary evaluations of alternative pure working fluid, ideal thermodynamic cycles are illustrated. The development of the working fluid mixture thermodynamic cycle, GEO 1, using the improved versions of previously developed thermodynamic properties routines was the first of several significant accomplishments during the first half of this project. Documentation of the thermodynamic properties program which can calculate densities, enthalpies, entropies, heat capacities, K-values for vapor and liquid mixtures (limited presently to hydrocarbons), flashes, dew and bubble points, isentropic and isenthalpic state changes, has been completed. Preliminary calculations using GEO 1 have indicated that mixture cycles yield greater net power output than either pure propane, isobutane, or isopentane cycles when equal heat exchanger log mean temperature differences are considered and also when optimized ideal cycles are compared. Steps to upgrade GEO 1 with equipment sizing and economics routines to produce GEO 2 and GEO 3 simulators were begun.

Starling, K.E.; Fish, L.W.; Iqbal, K.Z.; Yieh, D.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

New process modeling [sic], design, and control strategies for energy efficiency, high product quality, and improved productivity in the process industries. Final project report  

SciTech Connect

This project was concerned with the development of process design and control strategies for improving energy efficiency, product quality, and productivity in the process industries. In particular, (i) the resilient design and control of chemical reactors, and (ii) the operation of complex processing systems, was investigated. Specific topics studied included new process modeling procedures, nonlinear controller designs, and control strategies for multiunit integrated processes. Both fundamental and immediately applicable results were obtained. The new design and operation results from this project were incorporated into computer-aided design software and disseminated to industry. The principles and design procedures have found their way into industrial practice.

Ray, W. Harmon

2002-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

206

NATURAL GAS HYDRATES STORAGE PROJECT PHASE II. CONCEPTUAL DESIGN AND ECONOMIC STUDY  

SciTech Connect

DOE Contract DE-AC26-97FT33203 studied feasibility of utilizing the natural-gas storage property of gas hydrates, so abundantly demonstrated in nature, as an economical industrial process to allow expanded use of the clean-burning fuel in power plants. The laboratory work achieved breakthroughs: (1) Gas hydrates were found to form orders of magnitude faster in an unstirred system with surfactant-water micellar solutions. (2) Hydrate particles were found to self-pack by adsorption on cold metal surfaces from the micellar solutions. (3) Interstitial micellar-water of the packed particles were found to continue forming hydrates. (4) Aluminum surfaces were found to most actively collect the hydrate particles. These laboratory developments were the bases of a conceptual design for a large-scale process where simplification enhances economy. In the design, hydrates form, store, and decompose in the same tank in which gas is pressurized to 550 psi above unstirred micellar solution, chilled by a brine circulating through a bank of aluminum tubing in the tank employing gas-fired refrigeration. Hydrates form on aluminum plates suspended in the chilled micellar solution. A low-grade heat source, such as 110 F water of a power plant, circulates through the tubing bank to release stored gas. The design allows a formation/storage/decomposition cycle in a 24-hour period of 2,254,000 scf of natural gas; the capability of multiple cycles is an advantage of the process. The development costs and the user costs of storing natural gas in a scaled hydrate process were estimated to be competitive with conventional storage means if multiple cycles of hydrate storage were used. If more than 54 cycles/year were used, hydrate development costs per Mscf would be better than development costs of depleted reservoir storage; above 125 cycles/year, hydrate user costs would be lower than user costs of depleted reservoir storage.

R.E. Rogers

1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

207

Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan for Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04, Phase IV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Phase IV Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan addresses the remediation of areas with the potential for UXO at the Idaho National Laboratory. These areas include portions of the Naval Proving Ground, the Arco High-Altitude Bombing Range, and the Twin Buttes Bombing Range. Five areas within the Naval Proving Ground that are known to contain UXO include the Naval Ordnance Disposal Area, the Mass Detonation Area, the Experimental Field Station, The Rail Car Explosion Area, and the Land Mine Fuze Burn Area. The Phase IV remedial action will be concentrated in these five areas. For other areas, such as the Arco High-Altitude Bombing Range and the Twin Buttes Bombing Range, ordnance has largely consisted of sand-filled practice bombs that do not pose an explosion risk. Ordnance encountered in these areas will be addressed under the Phase I Operations and Maintenance Plan that allows for the recovery and disposal of ordnance that poses an imminent risk to human health or the environment.

R. P. Wells

2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

208

SolarOil Project, Phase I preliminary design report. [Solar Thermal Enhanced Oil Recovery project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The preliminary design of the Solar Thermal Enhanced Oil Recovery (SolarOil) Plant is described in this document. This plant is designed to demonstrate that using solar thermal energy is technically feasible and economically viable in enhanced oil recovery (EOR). The SolarOil Plant uses the fixed mirror solar concentrator (FMSC) to heat high thermal capacity oil (MCS-2046) to 322/sup 0/C (611/sup 0/F). The hot fluid is pumped from a hot oil storage tank (20 min capacity) through a once-through steam generator which produces 4.8 MPa (700 psi) steam at 80% quality. The plant net output, averaged over 24 hr/day for 365 days/yr, is equivalent to that of a 2.4 MW (8.33 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/hr) oil-fired steam generator having an 86% availability. The net plant efficiency is 57.3% at equinox noon, a 30%/yr average. The plant will be demonstrated at an oilfield site near Oildale, California.

Baccaglini, G.; Bass, J.; Neill, J.; Nicolayeff, V.; Openshaw, F.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

FPB: Fine-grained Power Budgeting to Improve Write Throughput of Multi-level Cell Phase Change Memory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a promising nonvolatile memory technology, Phase Change Memory (PCM) has many advantages over traditional DRAM. Multi-level Cell PCM (MLC) has the benefit of increased memory capacity with low fabrication cost. Due to high per-cell write power and ... Keywords: Multiple Level Cell, Phase Change Memory, Power Budget

Lei Jiang; Youtao Zhang; Bruce R. Childers; Jun Yang

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Design and development of a test facility to study two-phase steam/water flow in porous media  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The approach taken at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to obtain relative permeability curves and their dependence on fluid and matrix properties is summarized. Thermodynamic studies are carried out to develop the equations governing two-phase steam/water flow in porous media and to analyze the relationship between mass flow rate and flowing enthalpy. These relationships will be verified against experimental results and subsequently will be used to develop a field analysis technique to obtain in-situ relative permeability parameters. Currently our effort is concentrated on thermodynamic analysis and development of an experimental facility. Some of the findings of the theoretical work are presented and also the design and development effort for the experimental facility is described.

Verma, A.K.; Pruess, K.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Tsang, C.F.; Witherspoon, P.A.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Design  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Design Design of a Multithreaded Barnes-Hut Algorithm for Multicore Clusters Technical Report Junchao Zhang and Babak Behzad Department of Computer Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign {jczhang, bbehza2}@illinois.edu Marc Snir Department of Computer Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and MCS Division, Argonne National Laboratory snir@anl.gov Abstract We describe in this paper an implementation of the Barnes-Hut al- gorithm on multicore clusters. Based on a partitioned global ad- dress space (PGAS) library, the design integrates intranode mul- tithreading and internode one-sided communication, exemplifying a PGAS + X programming style. Within a node, the computation is decomposed into tasks (subtasks), and multitasking is used to hide network latency. We study the tradeoffs between locality in private caches and locality in shared caches

212

Report on phase I on the development of improved seals and bearings for downhole drilling motors. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New bearing and seal designs are outlined, as well as the progress made on developing test facilities for full-size bearing and seal assemblies. (MHR)

Black, A.D.; Green, S.J.; Matson, L.W.; Maurer, W.C.; Nielsen, R.R.; Nixon, J.D.; Wilson, J.G.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Semi-annual report on the project to design and experimentally test an improved geothermal drill bit  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Considerable progress has been made in understanding the causes of premature drill-bit failure in the geothermal well drilling environment. Drill-bits of high-temperature steels are being fabricated, as well as a test chamber to simulate the geothermal environment. In addition, several basic properties of the candidate steels and of the conventional drill-bit steels have been gathered from the literature, and provisions have been made for completing the material property picture through a materials testing program at Terra Tek. Considerable background material has been gathered on the drill-bit seal problem and on candidate seal materials. Some seal materials have been selected for further testing, and a seal tester is being designed to provide a very good simulation of the environment experienced by seals in geothermal well drill-bits. Major guidance meetings on the project to develop an improved geothermal drill-bit were held on June 10--11, August 13, and December 10--11. Appendix B includes the reports of these meetings.

Barker, L.M.; Green, S.J.; Maurer, W.C.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Demonstration plant engineering and design. Phase I. The pipeline gas demonstration plant. Volume 9. Plant Section 800: product gas compression and drying  

SciTech Connect

Contract No. EF-77-C-01-2542 between Conoco Inc. and the US Department of Energy provides for the design, construction, and operation of a demonstration plant capable of processing bituminous caking coals into clean pipeline quality gas. The project is currently in the design phase scheduled to be completed in June 1981. One of the major efforts of Phase I is the completion of the process design and the project engineering design of the Demonstration Plant. This design effort has been completed. A report of the design effort is being issued in 24 volumes. This is Volume 9 which reports the design of Plant Section 800 - Product Gas Compression and Drying. Plant Section 800 compresses, cools, and drys the SNG product to conditions and specifications required for pipeline use. A conventional triethylene glycol (TEG) gas drying unit is employed to reduce the moisture content of the SNG to less than 7 pounds per million standard cubic feet. The product SNG has a minimum pressure of 800 psig and a maximum temperature of 100/sup 0/F. This section also includes the product gas analysis, metering, and totalizing instruments. It is designed to remove 3144 pounds of water from 19 million SCFC of SNG product. Volume 9 contains the following design information: process operation; design basis; heat and material balance; stream compositions; utility, chemical and catalyst summary; major equipment and machinery list; major equipment and machinery requisitions; instrument list; instrument requisitions; line lists; process flow diagram; engineering flow diagrams; and section plot plan.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Hypothesis-based research on the causes of sick building symptoms: A design for Phases 2 and 3 of the California Healthy Building Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The California Healthy Building Study (CHBS) is a multidisciplinary research based in 12 office buildings within California. The overall goal the CHBS is to elucidate relationships between occurrences of office worker health symptoms and characteristics of the workers' buildings, ventilation systems, work spaces, jobs, and indoor environments. A Phase-1 study was completed during 1990. The California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE), through its Exploratory Research Program, supported the design of research plans for two future phases of the CHBS. The intent of the CIEE-supported effort was to design research to be conducted in the Phase-1 buildings that capitalizes on the Phase-1 research findings and also on recently-published results of research from other institutions. This report describes the research plans developed with CIEE support and presents the rationale for these research plans.

Fisk, W.J.; Hodgson, A.T.; Daisey, J.M.; Faulkner, D. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Macher, J.M. (California Dept. of Health Services, Berkeley, CA (United States). Air and Industrial Hygiene Lab.); Mendell, M.J. (National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH (United States). Industrywide Studies Branch)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Hypothesis-based research on the causes of sick building symptoms: A design for Phases 2 and 3 of the California Healthy Building Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The California Healthy Building Study (CHBS) is a multidisciplinary research based in 12 office buildings within California. The overall goal the CHBS is to elucidate relationships between occurrences of office worker health symptoms and characteristics of the workers` buildings, ventilation systems, work spaces, jobs, and indoor environments. A Phase-1 study was completed during 1990. The California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE), through its Exploratory Research Program, supported the design of research plans for two future phases of the CHBS. The intent of the CIEE-supported effort was to design research to be conducted in the Phase-1 buildings that capitalizes on the Phase-1 research findings and also on recently-published results of research from other institutions. This report describes the research plans developed with CIEE support and presents the rationale for these research plans.

Fisk, W.J.; Hodgson, A.T.; Daisey, J.M.; Faulkner, D. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Macher, J.M. [California Dept. of Health Services, Berkeley, CA (United States). Air and Industrial Hygiene Lab.; Mendell, M.J. [National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH (United States). Industrywide Studies Branch

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan provides the framework for defining the remedial design requirements, preparing the design documentation, and defining the remedial actions for Waste Area Group 3, Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils, Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory. This plan details the design developed to support the remediation and disposal activities selected in the Final Operable Unit 3-13, Record of Decision.

D. E. Shanklin

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Performance improvement of Ge-Sb-Te material by GaSb doping for phase change memory  

SciTech Connect

Effects of GaSb doping on phase change characteristics of Ge-Sb-Te material are investigated by in situ resistance and x-ray diffraction measurement, optical spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The crystallization temperature and data retention of Ge-Sb-Te material increase significantly by the addition of GaSb, which results from the high thermal stability of amorphous GaSb. In addition, GaSb-doped Ge-Sb-Te material exhibits faster crystallization speed due to the change in electronic states as a result of the formation of chemical bonds with Ga element. Incorporation of GaSb is highly effective way to enhance the comprehensive performance of Ge-Sb-Te material for phase change memory.

Lu, Yegang [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Laboratory of Nanotechnology, Shanghai Institute of Micro-system and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Laboratory of Nanotechnology, Shanghai Institute of Micro-system and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Faculty of Information Science and Engineering, Ningbo University, Ningbo 315211 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Zhonghua; Song, Sannian; Cheng, Limin; Song, Zhitang [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Laboratory of Nanotechnology, Shanghai Institute of Micro-system and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Laboratory of Nanotechnology, Shanghai Institute of Micro-system and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Shen, Xiang; Wang, Guoxiang; Dai, Shixun [Faculty of Information Science and Engineering, Ningbo University, Ningbo 315211 (China)] [Faculty of Information Science and Engineering, Ningbo University, Ningbo 315211 (China)

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

219

Improved Hydrogen Gas Getters for TRU Waste Transuranic and Mixed Waste Focus Area - Phase 2 Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Alpha radiolysis of hydrogenous waste and packaging materials generates hydrogen gas in radioactive storage containers. For that reason, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) limits the flammable gas (hydrogen) concentration in the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) containers to 5 vol% of hydrogen in air, which is the lower explosion limit. Consequently, a method is needed to prevent the build up of hydrogen to 5 vol% during the storage and transport of the TRUPACT-II containers (up to 60 days). One promising option is the use of hydrogen getters. These materials scavenge hydrogen from the gas phase and irreversibly bind it in the solid phase. One proven getter is a material called 1,4-bis (phenylethynyl) benzene, or DEB. It has the needed binding rate and capacity, but some of the chemical species that might be present in the containers could interfere with its ability to remove hydrogen. This project is focused upon developing a protective polymeric membrane coating for the DEB getter material, which comes in the form of small, irregularly shaped particles. This report summarizes the experimental results of the second phase of the development of the materials.

Stone, Mark Lee

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Improved methods for achieving the equilibrium number of phases in mixtures suitable for use in battery electrodes e. g. , for lithiating FeS/sub 2/  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for preparing lithiated, particulate FeS/sub 2/ useful as a catholyte material in a lithium thermal battery, whereby the latter's voltage regulation properties are improved. The method comprises admixing FeS/sub 2/ and an amount of a lithium-containing compound, whereby the resultant total composition falls in an invariant region of the metallurgical phase diagram of its constituent components. Said lithium-containing compound and FeS/sub 2/ are admixed together with a solid electrolyte compatible with said catholyte, and the mixture is heated at a temperature above the melting point of said electrolyte and at which said mixture reaches its thermodynamic equilibrium number of phases.

Guidotti, R.A.

1986-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design improvement phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Advanced turbine design for coal-fueled engines. Phase 1, Erosion of turbine hot gas path blading: Final report  

SciTech Connect

The investigators conclude that: (1) Turbine erosion resistance was shown to be improved by a factor of 5 by varying the turbine design. Increasing the number of stages and increasing the mean radius reduces the peak predicted erosion rates for 2-D flows on the blade airfoil from values which are 6 times those of the vane to values of erosion which are comparable to those of the vane airfoils. (2) Turbine erosion was a strong function of airfoil shape depending on particle diameter. Different airfoil shapes for the same turbine operating condition resulted in a factor of 7 change in airfoil erosion for the smallest particles studied (5 micron). (3) Predicted erosion for the various turbines analyzed was a strong function of particle diameter and weaker function of particle density. (4) Three dimensional secondary flows were shown to cause increases in peak and average erosion on the vane and blade airfoils. Additionally, the interblade secondary flows and stationary outer case caused unique erosion patterns which were not obtainable with 2-D analyses. (5) Analysis of the results indicate that hot gas cleanup systems are necessary to achieve acceptable turbine life in direct-fired, coal-fueled systems. In addition, serious consequences arise when hot gas filter systems fail for even short time periods. For a complete failure of the filter system, a 0.030 in. thick corrosion-resistant protective coating on a turbine blade would be eroded at some locations within eight minutes.

Wagner, J.H.; Johnson, B.V.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Design, improvement, and testing of a thermal-electrical analysis application of a multiple beta-tube AMTEC converter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new design AMTEC converter model was developed, and its effectiveness as a design tool was evaluated. To develop the model, requirements of the model were defined, several new design models were successively developed, and finally an optimal new design model was developed. The model was created within Sinda/Fluint, with its graphical interface, Thermal Desktop, a software package that can be used to conduct complex thermal and fluid analyses. Performance predictions were then correlated and compared with actual performance data from the Road Runner II AMTEC converter. Predicted performance results were within 10% of actual performance data for all operating conditions analyzed. This accuracy tended to increase within operating ranges that would be more likely encountered in AMTEC applications. Performance predictions and parametric design studies were then performed on a proposed new design converter model with a variety of annular condenser heights and with potassium as a working fluid to evaluate the effects of various design modifications. Results clearly indicated the effects of the converter design modifications on the converter's power and efficiency, thus simplifying the design optimization process. With the close correlation to actual data and the design information obtained from parametric studies, it was determined that the model could serve as an effective tool for the design of AMTEC converters.

Pavlenko, Ilia V.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Design and analysis of modern three-phase AC/AC power converters for AC drives and utility interface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Significant advances in modern ac/ac power converter technologies and demands of industries have reached beyond standard ac/ac power converters with voltage-source inverters fed from diode rectifiers. Power electronics converters have been matured to stages toward compact realization, increased high-power handling capability, and improving utility interface. Modern ac/ac power converter topologies with various control strategies have been introduced for the further improvements, such as matrix converters, current-fed converters, PWM rectifiers, and active power filters. In this dissertation, several new converter topologies are proposed in conjunction with developed control schemes based on the modern ac/ac converters which enhance performance and solve the drawbacks of conventional converters. In this study, a new fault-tolerant PWM strategy is first proposed for matrix converters. The added fault-tolerant scheme would strengthen the matrix converter technology for aerospace and military applications. A modulation strategy is developed to reshape output currents for continuous operation, against fault occurrence in matrix converter drives. This study designs a hybrid, high-performance ac/ac power converter for high power applications, based on a high-power load commutated inverter and a mediumpower voltage source inverter. Natural commutation of the load commutated inverter is actively controlled by the voltage source inverter. In addition, the developed hybrid system ensures sinusoidal output current/voltage waveforms and fast dynamic response in high power areas. A new topology and control scheme for a six-step current source inverter is proposed. The proposed topology utilizes a small voltage source inverter, to turn off main thyristor switches, transfer reactive load energy, and limit peak voltages across loads. The proposed topology maximizes benefits of the constituent converters: highpower handling capability of large thyristor-based current source inverters as well as fast and easy control of small voltage source inverters. This study analyzes, compares, and evaluates two topologies for unity power factor and multiple ac/ac power conversions. Theoretical analyses and comparisons of the two topologies, grounded on mathematical approaches, are presented from the standpoint of converter kVA ratings, dc-link voltage requirements, switch ratings, semiconductor losses, and reactive component sizes. Analysis, simulation, and experimental results are detailed for each proposed topology.

Kwak, Sangshin

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Proceedings of ITC-CSCC 97 Okinawa, Japan Design of Charge-Pumped L oop Filter for GHz-Range Phase-L ocked L oops w ith Ga s  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of ITC-CSCC ¯97 Okinawa, Japan Design of Charge-Pumped L oop Filter for GHz-Range Phase

Choi, Woo-Young

225

The influence of the instruction of visual design principles on improving pre-service teachers' visual literacy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigated whether the instruction of visual design principles had an influence on pre-service teachers' perception and analysis (interpretation) of visual materials. In addition, the relationships between pre-service teachers' visual intelligence ... Keywords: Educational technology course, Pre-service teachers, Visual design principles, Visual literacy, Visual literacy training

Hsin-Te Yeh; Yi-Chia Cheng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Design and development of Stirling engines for stationary-power-generation applications in the 500- to 3000-hp range. Phase I final report  

SciTech Connect

The first phase of the design and development of Stirling engines for stationary power generation applications in the 373 kW (500 hp) to 2237 kW (3000 hp) range was completed. The tasks in Phase I include conceptual designs of large Stirling cycle stationary engines and program plan for implementing Phases II through V. Four different heater head designs and five different machine designs were prepared in sufficient detail to select a design recommended for development in the near future. A second order analysis was developed for examining the various loss mechanisms in the Stirling engine and for predicting the thermodynamic performance of these engines. The predicted engine thermal brake efficiency excluding combustion efficiency is approximately 42% which exceeds the design objective of 40%. The combustion system designs were prepared for both a clean fuel combustion system and a two-stage atmospheric fluidized bed combustion system. The calculated combustion efficiency of the former is 90% and of the latter is 80%. Heat transport systems, i.e., a heat exchanger for the clean fuel combustion system and a sodium heat pipe system for coal and other nonclean fuel combustion systems were selected. The cost analysis showed that for clean fuels combustion the proposed 2237 kW (3000 hp) system production cost is $478,242 or $214/kW ($159/hp) which is approximately 1.86 times the cost of a comparable size diesel engine. For solid coal combustion the proposed 2237 kW (3000 hp) system production cost is approximately $2,246,242 which corresponds to a cost to power capacity ratio of $1004/kW ($749/hp). The two-stage atmospheric fluidized bed combustion system represents 81% of the total cost; the engine represents 14% depending on the future price differential between coal and conventional clean fuels, a short payback period of the proposed Stirling cycle engine/FBC system may justify the initial cost. (LCL)

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Solar Pilot Plant, Phase I. Preliminary design report. Volume II. System description and system analysis. CDRL item 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Honeywell conducted a parametric analysis of the 10-MW(e) solar pilot plant requirements and expected performance and established an optimum system design. The main analytical simulation tools were the optical (ray trace) and the dynamic simulation models. These are described in detail in Books 2 and 3 of this volume under separate cover. In making design decisions, available performance and cost data were used to provide a design reflecting the overall requirements and economics of a commercial-scale plant. This volume contains a description of this analysis/design process and resultant system/subsystem design and performance.

None

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Molted carbonate fuel cell product design and improvement - 4th quarter, 1995. Quarterly report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project is to establish the commercial readiness of MW-class IMHEX Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell power plants. Progress is described on marketing, systems design and analysis, product options and manufacturing.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Pre-physical data base design heuristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: data base, data base design, data base management, data model, denormalization, design improvement, design refinement, physical design, system design

Narciso Cerpa

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

An algorithm designed for improving diagnostic efficiency by setting multi-cutoff values of multiple tumor markers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Currently, tumor markers have been effectively applied for colorectal cancer (CRC) diagnosis. In order to decrease the information loss caused by single cutoff value and improve diagnosis efficiency (DE), we explore the integrative application of multiple ... Keywords: Colorectal cancer (CRC), Cutoff values, Diagnostic efficiency (DE), Genetic algorithm (GA), Rough set theory (RST), Tumor markers

Qiang Su; Jinghua Shi; Ping Gu; Gang Huang; Yan Zhu

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Fresnel/photovoltaic concentrator application experiment for the Dallas-Fort Worth airport. Phase 1: system design, final technical report, 1 June 1978-28 February 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Phase I Final Report summarizes the analytical, experimental, design, and specification efforts for the first nine months of the Dallas/Fort Worth Airport Fresnel/Photovoltaic Concentrator Application Experiment. The overall objective of the complete three-phase program is to develop and demonstrate a unique photovoltaic concentrator total energy system which, when mass-produced, will provide electrical and thermal energy at costs competitive with conventional energy sources. Toward this objective, the Phase I - System Design contract has been completed, resulting in a final system design, analytical definition of system performance and economics, and a successfully tested prototype collector which fully verified performance predictions. The proposed system will utilize 245 m/sup 2/ of E-Systems linear Fresnel photovoltaic collectors to provide 25 kW/sub e/ (AC) of power and 140 kW/sub t/ of heat to the Central Utility Facility of Dallas/Fort Worth Airport. The electric power will be used to meet a continuous lighting load, while the thermal energy will be used to preheat boiler feedwater. Peak system efficiencies will be 10.2% electric (insolation to net AC output) and 56% thermal (insolation to net heat delivered). Annual efficiencies will be 8.4% electric and 49% thermal. Production system economics are attractive in the near term: 7 cents/kWh electricity and $7/MMBtu heat (1975 $) could be achieved by 1981 with limited production. With higher production, these costs could be halved by 1990.

O'Neill, M.J.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Improvement of Vertical Diode Properties by N-type Plasma Doping for Low-Power Phase Change Non-Volatile Memory (NVM)  

SciTech Connect

Using PH{sub 3} N-type plasma doing (PLAD), the device characteristics of high performance vertical switch diode for 50 nm phase-change NVM have been studied. Compared to the conventional beam line ion implantation, there are improvements of diode breakdown voltage (B.V.) and isolation B.V., respectively 20% and 41% by N-type PLAD doping due to the higher doping level and shallower profile in N+ region. It also shows excellent off-leakage properties less than 10 pA/cell without decreasing the Ion. From the results of this study, N-type PLAD has been demonstrated to be effective for vertical diode electrical properties as well as for high productivity.

Lee, Min Yong; Lee, H. S.; Ki, Y. J.; Sohn, Y. S.; Kang, H. S. [R and D Division, Hynix Semiconductor Inc., San 136-1, Ami-ri, Bubal-eub, Ichon-si, kyoungki-do 467-701 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, C. Y.; Park, J. W. [Varian Korea Ltd., 433-1 Mogok-dong Pyeongtaek-si Kyoungki-do 459-040 (Korea, Republic of); Jo, S. H. [Varian Semiconductor Equipment Associates Inc., 35 Dory Road, Gloucester, MA 01930 (United States)

2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

233

Improved performance of PSO with self-adaptive parameters for computing the optimal design of Water Supply Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with a new variant of Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) in which no a priori parameter tuning is necessary. PSO, as an efficient and powerful problem-solving technique, has been widely used, but, as in other Evolutionary Algorithms (EA), ... Keywords: Evolutionary Algorithm, Optimal design, Particle Swarm Optimization, Self-adaptive parameters, Water Supply System

Idel Montalvo; Joaquín Izquierdo; Rafael Pérez-García; Manuel Herrera

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

A Mobile Nursing Information System Based on Human-Computer Interaction Design for Improving Quality of Nursing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conventional Nursing Information System (NIS), which supports the role of nurse in some areas, is typically deployed as an immobile system. However, the traditional information system can't response to patients' conditions in real-time, causing delays ... Keywords: Human-computer interaction, Nursing information system, Personal digital assistant, Small-screen interface design

Kuo-Wei Su; Cheng-Li Liu

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Development of a 2-kilowatt high-reliability wind machine. Phase I. Design and analysis. Volume II. Technical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high reliability wind machine rated for 2 kW at 9 m/s has been designed to be cost-effective for remote site use. To meet or exceed environmental conditions as specified in Contract PF64410F, the resulting design defines a rugged, relatively simple wind machine. Rigorous fatigue analysis for structural components and development of redundant systems for electrical components led to an expected mean time between failures of 12.35 years. Approximately one year into the research and development program a completed design meeting contract stipulations is being submitted to the contract buyer. The design is for a horizontal axis, down-wind machine with two wooden blades spanning 5 meters diameter. Positive rotor speed control is accomplished through a centrifugally governed variable pitch stalling rotor. Design merits have been confirmed through dynamic truck testing.

Drake, W.; Clews, H.; Cordes, J.; Johnson, B.; Murphy, P.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Development of a 2-kilowatt high-reliability wind machine. Phase I. Design and analysis. Volume I. Executive summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high reliability wind machine rated for 2 kW at 9 m/s has been designed to be cost-effective for remote site use. To meet or exceed environmental conditions as specified in Contract PF64410F, the resulting design defines a rugged, relatively simple wind machine. Rigorous fatigue analysis for structural components and development of redundant systems for electrical components led to an expected mean time between failures of 12.35 years. Approximately one year into the research and development program, a completed design meeting contract stipulations is being submitted to the contract buyer. The design is for a horizontal axis, down-wind machine with two wooden blades spanning 5 meters diameter. Positive rotor speed control is accomplished through a centrifugally governed variable pitch, stalling rotor. Design merits have been confirmed through dynamic truck testing.

Drake, W.; Clews, H.; Cordes, J.; Johnson, B.; Murphy, P.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Development of improved processing and evaluation methods for high reliability structural ceramics for advanced heat engine applications Phase II. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The research program had as goals the development and demonstration of significant improvements in processing methods, process controls, and nondestructive evaluation (NDE) which can be commercially implemented to produce high reliability silicon nitride components for advanced heat engine applications at temperatures to 1370{degrees}C. In Phase I of the program a process was developed that resulted in a silicon nitride - 4 w% yttria HIP`ed material (NCX 5102) that displayed unprecedented strength and reliability. An average tensile strength of 1 GPa and a strength distribution following a 3-parameter Weibull distribution were demonstrated by testing several hundred buttonhead tensile specimens. The Phase II program focused on the development of methodology for colloidal consolidation producing green microstructure which minimizes downstream process problems such as drying, shrinkage, cracking, and part distortion during densification. Furthermore, the program focused on the extension of the process to gas pressure sinterable (GPS) compositions. Excellent results were obtained for the HIP composition processed for minimal density gradients, both with respect to room-temperature strength and high-temperature creep resistance. Complex component fabricability of this material was demonstrated by producing engine-vane prototypes. Strength data for the GPS material (NCX-5400) suggest that it ranks very high relative to other silicon nitride materials in terms of tensile/flexure strength ratio, a measure of volume quality. This high quality was derived from the closed-loop colloidal process employed in the program.

Pujari, V.J.; Tracey, D.M.; Foley, M.R. [and others

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Field Demonstration of Active Desiccant Modules Designed to Integrate with Standard Unitary Rooftop Package Equipment - Final Report: Phase 3  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the investigation of two active desiccant module (ADM) pilot site installations initiated in 2001. Both pilot installations were retrofits at existing facilities served by conventional heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems that had encountered frequent humidity control, indoor air quality (IAQ), and other operational problems. Each installation involved combining a SEMCO, Inc., ADM (as described in Fischer and Sand 2002) with a standard packaged rooftop unit built by the Trane Company. A direct digital control (DDC) system integral to the ADM performed the dual function of controlling the ADM/rooftop combination and facilitating data collection, trending, and remote performance monitoring. The first installation involved providing preconditioned outdoor air to replace air exhausted from the large kitchen hood and bathrooms of a Hooters restaurant located in Rome, Georgia. This facility had previously added an additional rooftop unit in an attempt to achieve occupant comfort without success. The second involved conditioning the outdoor air delivered to each room of a wing of the Mountain Creek Inn at the Callaway Gardens resort. This hotel, designed in the ''motor lodge'' format with each room opening to the outdoors, is located in southwest Georgia. Controlling the space humidity always presented a serious challenge. Uncomfortable conditions and musty odors had caused many guests to request to move to other areas within the resort. This is the first field demonstration performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory where significant energy savings, operating cost savings, and dramatically improved indoor environmental conditions can all be claimed as the results of a retrofit desiccant equipment field installation. The ADM/rooftop combination installed at the restaurant resulted in a reduction of about 34% in the electricity used by the building's air-conditioning system. This represents a reduction of approximately 15% in overall electrical energy consumption and a 12.5-kW reduction in peak demand. The cost of gas used for regeneration of the desiccant wheel over this period of time is estimated to be only $740, using a gas cost of $0.50 per therm--the summer rate in 2001. The estimated net savings is $5400 annually, resulting in a 1-2 year payback. It is likely that similar energy/cost savings were realized at the Callaway Gardens hotel. In this installation, however, a central plant supplied the chilled water serving fan coil units in the hotel wing retrofitted with the ADM, so it was not metered separately. Consequently, the owner could not provide actual energy consumption data specific to the facility. The energy and operating cost savings at both sites are directly attributable to higher cooling-season thermostat settings and decreased conventional system run times. These field installations were selected as an immediate and appropriate response to correct indoor humidity and fresh air ventilation problems being experienced by building occupants and owners, so no rigorous baseline-building vs. test-building energy use/operating cost savings results can be presented. The report presents several simulated comparisons between the ADM/roof HVAC approach and other equipment combinations, where both desiccant and conventional systems are modeled to provide comparable fresh air ventilation rates and indoor humidity levels. The results obtained from these simulations demonstrate convincingly the energy and operating cost savings obtainable with this hybrid desiccant/vapor-compression technology, verifying those actually seen at the pilot installations. The ADM approach is less expensive than conventional alternatives providing similar performance and indoor air quality and provides a very favorable payback (1 year or so) compared with oversized rooftop units that cannot be operated effectively with the necessary high outdoor air percentages.

Fischer, J

2004-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

239

Solar Pilot Plant, Phase I. Preliminary design report. Volume IV. Receiver subsystem (CDRL item 2). [Contains engineering drawings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Honeywell receiver subsystem design uses well established fossil technology and consists of a cavity receiver housing, a steam generator, a cavity barrier, piping, and a support tower. The steam generator absorbs the redirected solar energy from the collector subsystem and converts it to superheated steam which drives the turbine. The receiver is adequately shielded to protect personnel and equipment. A cavity barrier is lowered at night to conserve heat and expedite startup the following day. This volume contains the subsystem design and methodology and the correlation with the design and performance characteristics of the SRE steam generator which was fabricated and successfully tested during the program.

None

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Design and Development of a Test Facility to Study Two-Phase Steam/Water Flow in Porous Media  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The concept of relative permeability is the key concept in extending Darcy's law for single phase flow through porous media to the two-phase flow regime. Relative permeability functions are needed for simulation studies of two-phase geothermal reservoirs. These are poorly known inspite of considerable theoretical and experimental investigations during the last decade. Since no conclusive results exist, many investigators use ad hoc parametrization, or adopt results obtined from flow of oil and gas (Corey, 1954). It has been shown by Reda and Eaton (1980) that this can lead to serious deficiencies. Sensitivity of the relative permeability curves for prediction of mass flow rate and flowing enthalpy into geothermal wells has been studied by many investigators (e.g. Eaton and Reda (1980), Bodvarsson et al (1980), Sun and Ershagi (1979) etc.). It can be concluded from these studies that the beehavior of a two-phase steam/water reservoir depends greatly on the relative permeability curves used. Hence, there exists a need for obtaining reliable relative permeability functions.

Verma, Ashok K.; Pruess, Karsten; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Tsang, C.F.; Witherspoon, Paul A.

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design improvement phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Design of a single-phase grid-connected photovoltaic systems based on Fuzzy-PID controller  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The output power of photovoltaic (PV) module varies with module temperature, solar isolation and 1oads changes etc. In order to control the output power of single-phase grid-connected PV system according to the output power PV arrays. In this paper a ... Keywords: DC/AC inverter, fuzzy-PID control, grid-connected, photovoltaic system

Fengwen Cao; Yiwang Wang

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Enertech 15-kW wind-system development: Phase I. Design and analysis. Volume I. Executive summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A utility interfaced wind machine rated for 15 kW at 9 m/s (20.1 mph) has been designed to be cost effective in 5.4 m/s (12 mph) average wind sites. Approximately 18 months into the research and development program a completed design meeting contract specifications was submitted to the buyer. The design is for a horizontal axis, down wind machine which features three fixed pitch wood-epoxy blades and free yaw. Rotor diameter is 44 feet (13.4 meters). Unit shutdown is provided by an electrohydraulic brake. Blade tip brakes provide back-up rotor overspeed protection. Design merits have been verified through dynamic truck testing of a prototype unit.

Not Available

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Enertech 15-kW wind-system development. Phase I. Design and Analysis. Volume II. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

A utility interfaced wind machine rated for 15 kW at 9 m/s (20.1 mph) has been designed to be cost effective in 5.4 m/s (12 mph) average wind sites. Approximately 18 months into the research and development program a completed design meeting contract specifications was submitted to the buyer. The design is for a horizontal axis, down wind machine which features three fixed pitch wood-epoxy blades and free yaw. Rotor diameter is 44 feet (13.4 meters). Unit shutdown is provided by an electrohydraulic brake. Blade tip brakes provide back-up rotor overspeed protection. Design merits have been verified through dynamic truck testing of a prototype unit.

Dodge, D.M. (ed.)

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Near Term Hybrid Passenger Vehicle Development Program. Phase I, Final report. Appendix C: preliminary design data package. Volume I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The assumptions made, analysis methods used, and preliminary results of research to determine the design specifications for a hybrid electric-powered and internal combustion engine-powered vehicle that would optimize the fuel economy of passenger automobiles are described. Information is included on body and component design, selection of spark-ignition engine and Ni-Zn batteries, life-cycle costs and life-cycle fuel consumption. (LCL)

Piccolo, R.

1979-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

245

Design study of a two-phase turbine bottoming cycle. Final report. [Therminol 66 heated in diesel exhaust  

SciTech Connect

The use of a biphase turbine system to recover waste heat from diesel engines was examined and found to have many favorable attributes. Among these were low rpm, high torque, low heat exchanger cost, and simplicity. Several candidate working fluid combinations were tested at temperatures of interest. The contact heat exchanger concept was substantiated by large scale experiment. The program includes subscale tests of key hardware components of a biphase turbine bottoming system. These are the two-phase nozzle, two-phase turbine, and direct contact heat exchanger. A comprehensive cost analysis was completed. A three-year program leading to a full-size system field demonstration has been planned. Progress in the first year of this program and the effort started on the second year program are reported.

Studhalter, W R

1979-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Georgetown University Integrated Community Energy System (GU-ICES). Phase III, Stage II. Preliminary design. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented for two elements in the Georgetown University ICES program - the installation of a 2500-kW backpressure steam-turbine generator within a new extension to the heating and cooling plant (cogeneration) and the provision of four additional ash silos for the university's atmospheric fluidized-bed boiler plant (added storage scheme). The preliminary design and supporting documentation for the work items and architectural drawings are presented. Section 1 discusses the basis for the report, followed by sections on: feasibility analysis update; preliminary design documents; instrumentation and testing; revised work management plan; and appendices including outline constructions, turbine-generator prepurchase specification, design calculations, cost estimates, and Potomac Electric Company data. (MCW)

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

rf modulator design and phase amplitude control for a high-power free-electron-laser linac  

SciTech Connect

The continued interest for building tunable lasers using an electron accelerator as the source of primary energy has resulted in the design of a new accelerator. Earlier work by other members of the Los Alamos team has demonstrated that this design does work in an amplifier mode. The accelerator is to be upgraded for use in an oscillator experiment and the new rf power amplifier system must meet some of the very stringent demands for power and stability placed on the electron beam for the free-electron laser (FEL) interaction to be observed. These demands are particularly stringent because the electron beam energy ultimately will be circulated back through the accelerator so that the electron beam energy not used in the FEL interaction is not wasted. These considerations have to some measure been incorporated into the design of the second FEL system at Los Alamos and are discussed.

Hoeberling, R.F.; Tallerico, P.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

A review of potential turbine technology options for improving the off-design performance of direct coal-fired gas turbines in base load service. Second topical report  

SciTech Connect

The January, 1988 draft topical report, entitled ``An Assessment of Off-Design Particle Control Performance on Direct Coal-Fired Gas Turbine Systems`` [Ref.1.1], identified the need to assess potential trade-offs in turbine aerodynamic and thermodynamic design which may offer improvements in the performance, operational and maintenance characteristics of open-cycle, direct coal-fired, combustion gas turbines. In this second of a series of three topical reports, an assessment of the technical options posed by the above trade-offs is presented. The assessment is based on the current status of gas turbine technology. Several industry and university experts were contacted to contribute to the study. Literature sources and theoretical considerations are used only to provide additional background and insight to the technology involved.

Thomas, R.L.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

A review of potential turbine technology options for improving the off-design performance of direct coal-fired gas turbines in base load service  

SciTech Connect

The January, 1988 draft topical report, entitled An Assessment of Off-Design Particle Control Performance on Direct Coal-Fired Gas Turbine Systems'' (Ref.1.1), identified the need to assess potential trade-offs in turbine aerodynamic and thermodynamic design which may offer improvements in the performance, operational and maintenance characteristics of open-cycle, direct coal-fired, combustion gas turbines. In this second of a series of three topical reports, an assessment of the technical options posed by the above trade-offs is presented. The assessment is based on the current status of gas turbine technology. Several industry and university experts were contacted to contribute to the study. Literature sources and theoretical considerations are used only to provide additional background and insight to the technology involved.

Thomas, R.L.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Near Term Hybrid Passenger Vehicle Development Program. Phase I, Final report. Appendix C: preliminary design data package. Volume II. Appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This appendix to the final report on the Hybrid Passenger Vehicle Development Program contans data on Na-S batteries, Ni-Zn batteries; vehicle body design; tire characteristics; and results of computer simulations of vehicle yaw, pitch, and roll under various driving and aerodynamic conditions. (LCL)

Piccolo, R.

1979-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

251

Grid connected integrated community energy system. Phase II: final stage 2 report. Preliminary design of cogeneration plant  

SciTech Connect

The preliminary design of a dual-purpose power plant to be located on the University of Minnesota is described. This coal-fired plant will produce steam and electric power for a grid-connected Integrated Community Energy System. (LCL)

1978-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

252

Solar Pilot Plant, Phase I. Preliminary design report. Volume I. Executive overview (approved). CDRL item 2. [10 MW; Barstow, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project goals, program schedules, and preliminary design for the 10 MW central receiver pilot plant at Barstow, California are presented. Details of the collector field, receiver/tower, thermal storage system, electrical power conversion subsystem, and control systems are given. (WHK)

None

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Development of an ultra-safe, ultra-low emissions natural gas-fueled bus. Phase 1: Systems design -- Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) contracted with Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) to develop an ultra-safe, ultra-low emissions natural gas-fueled school bus. To develop the bus, SwRI teamed with Blue Bird, Incorporated, a school bus manufacturer, Deere Power Systems Group, an engine manufacturer, and CNG Cylinder Company, a supplier of compressed natural gas storage and handling systems. The primary focus of work for Phase 1 was the design of the component systems, i.e. vehicle, engine, and fuel storage systems. The bus chassis prototype is expected to be completed by the middle of July, 1995. A complete prototype vehicle body and chassis should be delivered to SwRI by the beginning of December, 1995. This prototype vehicle will include the new compressed natural gas cylinders and associated fuel storage system hardware which has been designed by CNG Cylinder Company.

Kubesh, J. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Design of a Fractional Order Phase Shaper for Iso-damped Control of a PHWR under Step-back Condition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phase shaping using fractional order (FO) phase shapers has been proposed by many contemporary researchers as a means of producing systems with iso-damped closed loop response due to a stepped variation in input. Such systems, with the closed loop damping remaining invariant to gain changes can be used to produce dead-beat step response with only rise time varying with gain. This technique is used to achieve an active step-back in a Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) where it is desired to change the reactor power to a pre-determined value within a short interval keeping the power undershoot as low as possible. This paper puts forward an approach as an alternative for the present day practice of a passive step-back mechanism where the control rods are allowed to drop during a step-back action by gravity, with release of electromagnetic clutches. The reactor under a step-back condition is identified as a system using practical test data and a suitable Proportional plus Integral plus Derivative (PID) contro...

Saha, Suman; Ghosh, Ratna; Goswami, Bhaswati; Balasubramanian, R; Chandra, A K; Das, Shantanu; Gupta, Amitava; 10.1109/TNS.2010.2047405

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Grid-Connected Integrated Community Energy System. Phase II: detailed feasibility analysis and preliminary design. Final report, Stage 2  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to determine the economic and environmental feasibility of a Grid-Connected Integrated Community Energy System (ICES) based on a multifuel (gas, oil, treated solid wastes, and coal) design with which to serve any or all the institutions within the Louisiana Medical Complex in cooperation with the Health Education Authority of Louisiana (HEAL). In this context, a preliminary design is presented which consists of ICES plant description and engineering analyses. This demonstration system is capable of meeting 1982 system demands by providing 10,000 tons of air conditioning and, from a boiler plant with a high-pressure steam capacity of 200,000 lb/h, approximately 125,000 lb/h of 185 psig steam to the HEAL institutions, and at the same time generating up to 7600 kW of electrical power as byproduct energy. The plant will consist of multiple-fuel steam boilers, turbine generator, turbine driven chillers and necessary auxiliaries and ancillary systems. The preliminary design for these systems and for the building to house the central plant systems are presented along with equipment and instrumentation schedules and outline specifications for major components. Costs were updated to reflect revised data. The final preliminary cost estimate includes allowances for contingencies and escalation, as well as cost for the plant site and professional fees. This design is for a facility specifically with coal burning capability, recognizing that it is more capital-intensive than a gas/oil facility. In the opinion of the Louisiana Department of Natural Resources (DNR), the relatively modest allocations made for scrubbing and ash removal involve less than is implied in standard industry (EPRI) cost increments of over 30% for these duties. The preliminary environmental assessment is included. (LCL)

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Design, Fabrication, and Operation of Innovative Microalgae Culture Experiments for the Purpose of Producing Fuels: Final Report, Phase I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A conceptual design was developed for a 1000-acre (water surface) algae culture facility for the production of fuels. The system is modeled after the shallow raceway system with mixing foils that is now being operated at the University of Hawaii. A computer economic model was created to calculate the discounted breakeven price of algae or fuels produced by the culture facility. A sensitivity analysis was done to estimate the impact of changes in important biological, engineering, and financial parameters on product price.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Phase 1: conceptual design. Ocean thermal energy conversion power system development. Volume 2 of 3. Technical details. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Westinghouse has completed the conceptual design of the Power System for the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Demonstration Plant project. This study included the development of a conceptual design for the following three items: first, a full-size power system module for the 100 MWe Demonstration Plant; second, a scaled proof of concept power system; and third, a heat exchanger test article. The study was limited to a closed cycle ammonia power system module, using a water temperature difference of 40/sup 0/F., and a surface platform/ship reference hull. Two power module of 50 MWe each are recommended for the demonstration plant. The 50 MWe module was selected since it has the lowest cost, and since it is of a size which convincingly demonstrates that future economically viable commercial plants, having reliable operation with credible anticipated costs, are possible. A modular, tube bundle approach to heat exchanger design makes large heat exchangers practical and economical. Other power module elements are considered to be within state-of-practice. Technological assessments of all subsystems indicate requirements for verification only, rather than continued research. A complete test program, which will verify the mechanical reliability as well as thermal performance, is recommended.

Not Available

1978-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

258

Trans-Pecos Photovoltaic Concentration Experiment. Final report for Phase-I system design, 6 June 1978-28 February 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Trans-Pecos Photovoltaic Concentrating Experiment is the design of a 200 kWe peak photovoltaic concentrating system applied to deep well irrigation in the Trans-Pecos region of Texas. The site selected is typical of deep well irrigation in arid regions of Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona. The existing well utilizes a 200 horse power, three phase, 480 volt induction motor to lift water 540 feet to irrigate 380 acres. The Trans-Pecos Photovoltaic Concentration (PVC) system employs a two axis (azimuth-elevation) tracking parabolic concentrator module that focuses sunlight at 38X concentration on two strings of actively cooled silicon solar cells. The direct current from a field of 102 collector modules is converted by a maximum power point electric power conditioning system to three phase alternating current. The power from the power conditioning system is connected through appropriate switchgear in parallel with the utility grid to the well's induction motor. The operational philosophy of the experiment is to displace daytime utility power with solar generated electric power. The solar system is sized to provide approximately 50 percent of the 24 hour energy demand of the motor. This requires an energy exchange with the utility since peak solar power (200 kWe) generated exceeds the peak motor demand (149.2 kWe). The annual energy production is projected to be 511 Mwh using El Paso, Texas solar TMY data. System electrical power production efficiency is projected to be 7.4 percent at the design point, and 7.0 percent on an annual electrical energy production basis. The system is projected to provide 37.8 percent of the 24 hour energy demand of the motor at the design point of March 10, excluding energy delivered to the grid in excess of motor demand. The total energy produced is projected to be 39.0 percent of the 24 hour energy demand of the motor at the design point of March 10.

Marcy, W.M.; Dudek, R.A.

1979-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

259

Final Report: Design & Evaluation of Energy Efficient Modular Classroom Structures Phase II / Volume I-VII, January 17, 1995 - October 30, 1999  

SciTech Connect

We are developing innovations to enable modular builders to improve the energy performance of their classrooms with no increase in first cost. The Modern Building Systems' (MBS) classroom building conforms to the stringent Oregon energy code, and at $18/ft{sup 2} ($1.67/m{sup 2}) (FOB the factory) it is at the low end of the cost range for modular classrooms. We have investigated daylighting, cross-ventilation, solar preheat of ventilation air, air-to-air heat exchanger, electric lighting controls, and down-sizing HVAC systems as strategies to improve energy performance. We were able to improve energy performance with no increase in first cost in all climates examined. Two papers and a full report on Phase I of this study are available. The work described in this report is from the second phase of the project. In the first phase we redesigned the basic modular classroom to incorporate energy strategies including daylighting, cross-ventilation, solar preheating of ventilation air, and insulation. We also explored thermal mass but determined that it was not a cost-effective strategy in the five climates we examined. Energy savings ranged from 6% to 49% with an average of 23%. Paybacks ranged from 1.3 years to 23.8 years, an average of 12.1 years. In Phase II the number of baseline buildings was expanded by simulating buildings that would be typical of those produced by Modern Building Systems, Inc. (MBS) for each of the seven locations/climates. A number of parametric simulations were performed for each energy strategy. Additionally we refined our previous algorithm for a solar ventilation air wall preheater and developed an algorithm for a roof preheater configuration. These algorithms were coded as functions in DOE 2.1E. We were striving for occupant comfort as well as energy savings. We performed computer analyses to verify adequate illumination on vertical surfaces and acceptable glare levels when using daylighting. We also used computational fluid dynamics software to determine air distribution from cross-ventilation and used the resulting interior wind speeds to calculate occupant comfort and allowable outside air temperatures for cross-ventilation.

NONE

1999-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

260

Ocean thermal energy conversion power system development-I. Preliminary design report. Volume 3. Appendixes D, E, and F. Phase I. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The conceptual design of a 40 to 50 MW closed cycle ammonia OTEC commercial plant, the preliminary design of a 10 MW OTEC module analogous to the 50 MW module, and the preliminary design of heat exchanger test articles (evaporator and condenser) representative of the 50 MW heat exchangers for testing in OTEC-1 are presented. This volume includes the appendices: D) system equipment (hardware breakdown structure; 10-MW hardware listing; list of support and maintenance equipment, tools and spare parts; sacrificial anodes; M.A.N. brush; and Alclad 3004 data); E) heat exchanger supporting data (analyses/configuration, contract tooling, manufacturing plan, specification, and evaporator ammonia liquid distribution system); and F) rotating machinery (performance characteristics, radial inflow turbine; item descriptions; weight calculation-rotor; producibility analysis; long lead-time items; spares; support equipment; non recurring costs; performance characteristics-axial flow turbine; Worthington pump data; and American M.A.N. Corporation data). Also included is attachment 1 to the phase I final report which presents details of the system modeling; design, materials considerations, and systems analysis of the baseline module; system cost analysis; and supporting data. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design improvement phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Development of a methodology for defining whole-building energy design targets for commercial buildings: Phase 2, Development concept stage report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1985, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has managed the Whole-Building Energy Design Targets project for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Building Technologies (formerly the Office of Buildings and Community Systems). The primary focus of the Targets project is to develop a flexible methodology for buildings industry use in setting energy performance guidelines for commercial buildings and for determining compliance with those guidelines. The project is being conducted as a two-phase effort. In Phase 1, Planning, the project team determined the research that was necessary for developing the Targets methodology. In the concept stage of Phase 2, Development, the team sought to define the technical and software development concepts upon which the overall Targets methodology will be based. The concept stage work is documented in four volumes, of which this summary volume is the first. The three other volumes are Volume 2: Technical Concept Development Task Reports, Volume 3: Workshop Summaries, and Volume 4: Software Concept Development Task Reports. 8 refs., 14 figs.

Jones, J.W. (American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc., Atlanta, GA (USA)); Deringer, J.J. (American Inst. of Architects, Washington, DC (USA)); McKay, H.N. (Illuminating Engineering Society of North America, New York, NY (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Grid-connected integrated community energy system. Phase II, Stage 1, final report. Conceptual design: pyrolysis and waste management systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The University of Minnesota is studying and planning a grid-connected integrated community energy system to include disposal of wastes from health centers and utilizing the heat generated. Following initial definition of the 7-county metropolitan region for which the solid waste management system is to be planned, information is then necessary about the nature of the waste generated within this region. Estimates of the quantities generated, generation rates, and properties of the waste to be collected and disposed of are required in order to determine the appropriate size and capacity of the system. These estimates are designated and subsequently referred to as ''system input''. Institutional information is also necessary in designing the planned system, to be compatible with existing institutional operations and procedures, or to offer a minimum amount of problems to the participating institution in the region. Initial considerations of health care institutions generating solid waste within the defined region are made on a comprehensive basis without any attempt to select out or include feasible candidate institutions, or institutional categories. As the study progresses, various criteria are used in selecting potential candidate institutional categories and institutions within the 7-county region as offering the most feasible solid waste system input to be successfully developed into a centralized program; however, it is hoped that such a system if developed could be maintained for the entire 7-county region, and remain comprehensive to the entire health care industry. (MCW)

Not Available

1978-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

263

Grid connected integrated community energy system. Phase II: final state 2 report. Preliminary design waste management and institutional analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Preliminary Design of a Regional, Centralized Solid Waste Management System for the Twin Cities Metropolitan Region in Minnesota is presented. The concept has been developed for the sound environmental and safe disposal of solid waste generated from its health care industry, although some additional waste supplements are included as economic assistance in order to approach a competitive alternative to current health care solid waste disposal costs. The system design focuses on a 132 tons per day high-temperature, slagging pyrolysis system manufactured by Andco Incorporated, Andco-Torrax Division Design criteria are given. A Collection and Transportation System (CTS) has been planned for the movements of solid waste (General and Special) from the generating HHC facilities within a 10-mile waste-shed zone, for municipal solid waste from a local transfer station currently processing municipal solid waste, and for pyrolysis residue to final disposal. Each of these facilities is now considered as service contract operations. Approximately 15 vehicle trips per day are estimated as vehicle traffic delivering the refuse to the pyrolysis facility. Cost estimates for the CTS have been determined in conjunction with current municipal refuse haulers in the TCMR, and valued at the following: HHC General Solid Waste (HHC/GSW) at 6.00 $/T; HHC Special Solid Waste (HHC/SSW) at 20.00 $/T; Municipal Transfer at 4.00 to be paid the pyrolysis system as a drop charge. Special box-bag containers are to be required in handling the HHC/SSW at a cost of 30.19 $/T estimate. The total operating cost for the pyrolysis system has been estimated to be 13.73 $/T, with a steam credit of 11.70 $/T, to yield a net cost of 2.03 $/T. Capital cost has been estimated to be 7,700,800 dollars, 1978. A back-up facility capital investment of $163,000 dollars, 1978 has been estimated, which should be applied to the existing University of Minnesota incinerator.

1978-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

264

Design and development of a continuously variable ratio transmission for an automotive vehicle. Phase IV. Quarterly progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress in the design and development of a continuously variable ratio transmission for an automotive vehicle is reported. The Major automotive hydromechanical transmission development problem continues to be the reduction of hydrostatic noise and the project plan, therefore, concentrated on the new hydrostatic module. The potential for achieving acceptably low noise levels in the second generation hydromechanical transmission is to be assessed by comparing the noise levels of the hydrostatic modules for the first and second generation transmissions. A set of twelve test points was selected comprising of road load steady state and wide-open-throttle acceleration at 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 mph. The module operating conditions for the two transmissions at each of these twelve points were calculated. Baseline noise data was measured on the first generation module. The results are given testing of co-axial hydrostatic module for second generation hydromechanical transmission will be emphasized. (LCL)

None

1978-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

265

Solar Pilot Plant Phase I, detailed design report: collector subsystem research experiment. CDRL Item No. 6 (Approved)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The configurations of the experimental heliostat, power and control system, and support elements for the Barstow Solar Pilot Plant are described, and the analytical and experimental determination of performance parameters is discussed. A system analysis is presented, including demonstration of pointing accuracy by error analysis, and demonstration of loop performance by simulation. Engineering model test plans are given that are to evaluate subassemblies, processes, and procedures as well as provide insight into best tests for heliostat subsystem testing. Mirror module test data are analyzed. A comprehensive test plan for the experimental model is presented. Appended are: a heliostat power consumption analysis; collector subsystem research experiment detail specification; structural analysis; solar image analysis; computer and software information; breadboard test data; simulation of the heliostat control loop; mirror module reflectance measurements; plywood frame fixed focus mirror module test data; techniques for redirected image characterization; performance of a meteorological measuring system; and heliostat design data. (LEW)

Not Available

1976-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

Photovoltaic manufacturing cost and throughput improvements for thin-film CIGS-based modules: Phase 1 technical report, July 1998--July 1999  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objectives of the Global Solar Energy (GSE) Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) subcontract are directed toward reducing cost and expanding the production rate of thin-film CuInGaSe{sub 2} (CIGS)-based PV modules on flexible substrates. Improvements will be implemented in monolithic integration, CIGS deposition, contact deposition, and in-situ CIGS control and monitoring. In Phase 1, GSE has successfully attacked many of the highest risk aspects of each task. All-laser, selective scribing processes for CIGS have been developed, and many end-of-contract goals for scribing speed have been exceeded in the first year. High-speed ink-jet deposition of insulating material in the scribes now appears to be a viable technique, again exceeding some end-of-contract goals in the first year. Absorber deposition of CIGS was reduced corresponding to throughput speeds of up to 24-in/min, also exceeding an end-of-contract goal. Alternate back-contact materials have been identified that show potential as candidates for replacement of higher-cost molybdenum, and a novel, real-time monitoring technique (parallel-detector spectroscopic ellipsometry) has shown remarkable sensitivity to relevant properties of the CIGS absorber layer for use as a diagnostic tool. Currently, one of the bilayers has been baselined by GSE for flexible CIGS on polymeric substrates. Resultant back-contacts meet sheet-resistance goals and exhibit much less intrinsic stress than Mo. CIGS has been deposited, and resultant devices are comparable in performance to pure Mo back-contacts. Debris in the chamber has been substantially reduced, allowing longer roll-length between system cleaning.

Wiedeman, S.; Wendt, R.G.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Multi-Megawatt Organic Rankine Engine power plant (MORE). Phase IA final report: system design of MORE power plant for industrial energy conservation emphasizing the cement industry  

SciTech Connect

The Multi-Megawatt Organic Rankine Engine (MORE) program is directed towards the development of a large, organic Rankine power plant for energy conservation from moderate temperature industrial heat streams. Organic Rankine power plants are ideally suited for use with heat sources in the temperature range below 1100/sup 0/F. Cement manufacture was selected as the prototype industry for the MORE system because of the range of parameters which can be tested in a cement application. This includes process exit temperatures of 650/sup 0/F to 1110/sup 0/F for suspension preheater and long dry kilns, severe dust loading, multi-megawatt power generation potential, and boiler exhaust gas acid dew point variations. The work performed during the Phase IA System Design contract period is described. The System Design task defines the complete MORE system and its installation to the level necessary to obtain detailed performance maps, equipment specifications, planning of supporting experiments, and credible construction and hardware cost estimates. The MORE power plant design is based upon installation in the Black Mountain Quarry Cement Plant near Victorville, California.

Bair, E.K.; Breindel, B.; Collamore, F.N.; Hodgson, J.N.; Olson, G.K.

1980-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

268

Central Receiver Solar Thermal Power System, Phase 1: CDRL Item 2, Pilot plant preliminary design report. Volume 1. Executive overview  

SciTech Connect

This summary introduces the McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company (MDAC) Central Receiver System Preliminary Design and reports the results of the Subsystem Research Experiments (SRE) recently completed. The baseline central receiver concept defined by the MDAC team consists of the following features: (A) An external receiver mounted on a tower, and located in a 360-deg array of sun-tracking heliostats which comprise the collector subsystem. (B) Feedwater from the electrical power generation subsystem is pumped through a riser to the receiver, where the feedwater is converted to superheated steam in a single pass through the tubes of the receiver panels. (C) The steam from the receiver is routed through a downcomer to the ground and introduced to a turbine directly for expansion and generation of electricity, and/or to a thermal storage subsystem, where the steam is condensed in charging heat exchangers to heat a dual-medium oil and rock thermal storage unit (TSU). (D) Extended operation after daylight hours is facilitated by discharging the TSU to generate steam for feeding the admission port of the turbine. (E) Overall control of the system is provided by a master control unit, which handles the interactions between subsystems that take place during startup, shutdown, and transitions between operating modes.

Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

SUBJECT: Amendment No. 0003 to Request for Proposal Solicitation Package for Design and Construction of REPLACE FAMILY HOUSING, PHASE 3,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. The specifications and drawings for subject project are hereby modified as follows (revise all specification indices, attachment lists, and drawing indices accordingly). a. Specifications. (Descriptive Changes.) (1) Section 01000, Part 4, Page 4-17, paragraph 4.4.17, line 4, delete “Any wood must be pressure treated ” and substitute the following: “Any exposed wood members used on porches, patios, decks, etc. shall be pressured treated and coated with a clear U.V. protectant and sealer such as Sherwin Williams “Cuprinol, UV SunBlock Deck and Wood Seal ” or approved equal.” (2) Section 01000, Part 6, Page 6-8, a. Paragraph 6.5.3, at the end of this paragraph add the following sentence: “Silt fences may be constructed of filter fabric or straw bales.” b. Delete Paragraph 6.5.4 in its entirety. (3) Section 01000, Part 7: a. Page 7-2, paragraph 7.2, to the end of this paragraph add the following sentence: “The Design-Build Contractor shall avoid the removal of existing trees, as much as possible.”

Ellsworth Afb; Sd. Daca--r

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Evaluation of effervescent atomizer internal design on the spray unsteadiness using a phase/Doppler particle analyzer  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research was to investigate the dependence of effervescent spray unsteadiness on operational conditions and atomizer internal design by the ideal spray theory of Edwards and Marx. The convergent-divergent effervescent atomizer spraying water with air as atomizing medium in the ''outside-in'' gas injection was used in this study. Results demonstrated that droplet formation process at various air to liquid ratio (ALR) led to the spray unsteadiness and all droplet size classes exhibited unsteadiness behavior in spray. The spray unsteadiness reduced quickly at ALR of 3% and decreased moderately at ALR of other values as the axial distance increased. When the axial distance was 200 mm, the spray unsteadiness reduced dramatically with the increase in radial distance, but lower spray unsteadiness at the center of spray and higher spray unsteadiness at the edge of spray were shown as the axial distance increased. The spray unsteadiness at the center region of spray increased with the injection pressure. Low spray unsteadiness and good atomization performance can be obtained when the diameter of incline aeration holes increased at ALR of 10%. Although short mixing chamber with large discharge orifice diameter for convergent-divergent effervescent atomizer produced good atomization, the center region of spay showed high spray unsteadiness and maybe formed the droplet clustering. (author)

Liu, Meng; Duan, YuFeng; Zhang, TieNan [School of Energy and Environment, Southeast University, Sipailou 2, Nanjing 210096 (China)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

Guidance for the design and management of a maintenance plan to assure safety and improve the predictability of a DOE nuclear irradiation facility. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A program is recommended for planning the maintenance of DOE nuclear facilities that will help safety and enhance availability throughout a facility`s life cycle. While investigating the requirements for maintenance activities, a major difference was identified between the strategy suitable for a conventional power reactor and one for a research reactor facility: the latter should provide a high degree of predicted availability (referred to hereafter as ``predictability``) to its users, whereas the former should maximize total energy production. These differing operating goals necessitate different maintenance strategies. A strategy for scheduling research reactor facility operation and shutdown for maintenance must balance safety, reliability,and predicted availability. The approach developed here is based on three major elements: (1) a probabilistic risk analysis of the balance between assured reliability and predictability (presented in Appendix C), (2) an assessment of the safety and operational impact of maintenance activities applied to various components of the facility, and (3) a data base of historical and operational information on the performance and requirements for maintenance of various components. These factors are integrated into a set of guidelines for designing a new highly maintainable facility, for preparing flexible schedules for improved maintenance of existing facilities, and for anticipating the maintenance required to extend the life of an aging facility. Although tailored to research reactor facilities, the methodology has broader applicability and may therefore be used to improved the maintenance of power reactors, particularly in anticipation of peak load demands.

Booth, R.S.; Kryter, R.C.; Shepard, R.L.; Smith, O.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Upadhyaya, B.R. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Rowan, W.J.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Engineer, design construct, test, and evaluate a pressurized fluidized-bed pilot plant using high-sulfur coal for production of electric power: Phase I. Preliminary engineering; Phase II. Final design; Phase III. Construction. Annual report, March 1, 1979-February 29, 1980  

SciTech Connect

The extended test program on the SGT/PFB Technology Unit, previously placed in operation, was completed. Total operating time is 3378 which includes 2681 h burning coal and 1205 h total turbine engine operation. Significant performance and operational milestones, completed during the past year, included: over 2000 h on candidate heat exchanger tube materials at design temperature during which durability of iron-base alloy for PFB heat exchanger tubes was demonstrated; generated electric power with gas turbine operating on PFB coal combustion gas for 1000 h with no appreciable erosion or corrosion of turbine rotor blades and stator vanes; evaluated and improved hot gas cleanup system during which mean particle size of 1.3 Microns and a loading of 0.054 grains/Scf was achieved; and durability of hot/ash solids lock hopper valves for over 1000 h without leakage and stellite coated butterfly gas valve operating successfully for over 900 h in a highly erosive environment was demonstrated. Details of materials evolutions and corrosion rates, component performances and gaseous emission levels are presented.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Designing Coatings for Improved Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthesis and Characterization of Plasma Polymerized Thin Films Deposited from Benzene and Hexamethyldisiloxane Using (PECVD) Method · Synthesis of ...

274

Paste Plant Design and Improvement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 12, 2012 ... Increased butt thickness due to lower carbon consumption provides opportunity for amperage creep in Reduction lines. ALBA has unique ...

275

Improved high speed maglev design  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This report discusses a propulsion and stabilization system for an inductive repulsion type magnetically levitated vehicle which is propelled and suspended by a system which includes dividing the superconducting magnets into two types: a strong field magnet which is located vertically below the vehicle for propulsion and guidance and a weak field superconducting magnet located at the ends of the vehicle for levitation and added guidance. Several proposed embodiments exist for the placement of the magnetic field shielding: locating the shielding on the vehicle, locating the shielding on the guideway, and locating the shielding on the guideway and adding shielding to the vertical undercarriage. In addition, the separation between the be vehicle and the guideway can be controlled to reduce the exposure of the passenger cabin to magnetic fields.

Rote, D.M.; He, Jianliang; Coffey, H.T.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Trenton ICES: demonstration of a grid-connected integrated community energy system. Phase II. Volumes 1 and 2. Preliminary design of ICES system and analysis of community ownership  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary design and evaluation for the system has been carried out. The findings of this study are: (1) it is technically feasible, utilizing commercially available hardware; (2) under utility ownership and operation, it will not be economically competitive with conventional alternatives for heating and cooling buildings (analysis contained in companion report under separate cover); (3) under utility ownership and operation, no restrictions have been identified that would prevent the project from proceeding; (4) under community ownership, preliminary analysis indicates that thermal energy produced by Trenton ICES will be approximately 12 percent less expensive than thermal energy produced by oil-fired boilers; and (5) a review and update of institutional analyses performed during Phase 2 has identified no factors that would preclude community ownership and operation of the Trenton ICES. The background data produced for the analysis of the Trenton ICES based on utility ownership and operation can, in large part, be used as the bases for a detailed analysis of community ownership.

1978-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

277

Development of an 8 kW wind turbine generator for residential type applications. Phase I: design and analysis. Volume II. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

This Phase I summary report contains a description of the 8 kW wind energy conversion system developed by the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) for the Department of Energy. The wind turbine employs the UTRC Bearingless Rotor Concept in conjunction with a passive pendulum control system which controls blade pitch for start-up, efficient power generation, and high-speed survivability. The report contains a summary of the experimental and analytical programs in support of design efforts. These supporting programs include materials tests, a wind tunnel program, and aeroelastic analyses to evaluate system stability. An estimate is also made of the projected manufacturing cost of the system if produced in quantity.

Cheney, M.C.

1979-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

278

Development of improved processing and evaluation methods for high reliability structural ceramics for advanced heat engine applications, Phase 1. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program goals were to develop and demonstrate significant improvements in processing methods, process controls and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) which can be commercially implemented to produce high reliability silicon nitride components for advanced heat engine applications at temperatures to 1,370{degrees}C. The program focused on a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-4% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} high temperature ceramic composition and hot-isostatic-pressing as the method of densification. Stage I had as major objectives: (1) comparing injection molding and colloidal consolidation process routes, and selecting one route for subsequent optimization, (2) comparing the performance of water milled and alcohol milled powder and selecting one on the basis of performance data, and (3) adapting several NDE methods to the needs of ceramic processing. The NDE methods considered were microfocus X-ray radiography, computed tomography, ultrasonics, NMR imaging, NMR spectroscopy, fluorescent liquid dye penetrant and X-ray diffraction residual stress analysis. The colloidal consolidation process route was selected and approved as the forming technique for the remainder of the program. The material produced by the final Stage II optimized process has been given the designation NCX 5102 silicon nitride. According to plan, a large number of specimens were produced and tested during Stage III to establish a statistically robust room temperature tensile strength database for this material. Highlights of the Stage III process demonstration and resultant database are included in the main text of the report, along with a synopsis of the NCX-5102 aqueous based colloidal process. The R and D accomplishments for Stage I are discussed in Appendices 1--4, while the tensile strength-fractography database for the Stage III NCX-5102 process demonstration is provided in Appendix 5. 4 refs., 108 figs., 23 tabs.

Pujari, V.K.; Tracey, D.M.; Foley, M.R.; Paille, N.I.; Pelletier, P.J.; Sales, L.C.; Wilkens, C.A.; Yeckley, R.L. [Norton Co., Northboro, MA (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Economics of a 75-MW(e) hot-dry-rock geothermal power station based upon the design of the Phase II reservoir at Fenton Hill  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Based upon EE-2 and EE-3 drilling costs and the proposed Fenton Hill Phase II reservoir conditions the break-even cost of producing electricity is 4.4 cents per kWh at the bus bar. This cost is based upon a 9-well, 12-reservoir hot dry rock (HDR) system producing 75 MW(e) for 10 yr with only 20% drawdown, and an assumed annual finance charge of 17%. Only one-third of the total, potentially available heat was utilized; potential reuse of wells as well as thermal stress cracking and augmentation of heat transfer was ignored. Nearly half the bus bar cost is due to drilling expenses, which prompted a review of past costs for wells GT-2, EE-1, EE-2, and EE-3. Based on comparable depth and completion times it is shown that significant cost improvements have been accomplished in the last seven years. Despite these improvements it was assumed for this study that no further advancements in drilling technology would occur, and that even in commercially mature HDR systems, drilling problems would continue nearly unabated.

Murphy, H.; Drake, R.; Tester, J.; Zyvoloski, G.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Quality through Managed Improvement and Measurement (QMIM): Towards a Phased Development and Implementation of a Quality Management System for a Software Company  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper describes results of a longitudinal study of developments in the area of software product and process quality improvement within a Hungarian software company, IQSOFT Ltd. This company has been active in this area since 1993, trying to build, ... Keywords: improvement, longitudinal case study, measurement, product and process quality, quality management system

Katalin Balla; Theo Bemelmans; Rob Kusters; Jos Trienekens

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design improvement phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Building Design | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Design Design Building Design October 16, 2013 - 4:41pm Addthis Planning, Programming & Budgeting Building Design Project Construction Integrating renewable energy within Federal new construction or major renovations is critical at each phase of the design process. This overview covers considerations for renewable energy in the design phases of a construction project, including choosing the design team, the design team charrette, preliminary design, schematic design, design development, and construction documents. Information on this page introduces each of the design phases and provides a link to deeper-level information. Key Actions in Building Design Require specific renewable energy experience and skills for design team. Prioritize energy-related program

282

Improved Measurement of B[superscript +]-->rho[superscript +]rho[superscript 0] and Determination of the Quark-Mixing Phase Angle alpha  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present improved measurements of the branching fraction B, the longitudinal polarization fraction fL, and the direct CP asymmetry ACP in the B meson decay channel B+-->?+?0. The data sample was collected with the BABAR ...

Cowan, Ray Franklin

283

Grid-connected integrated community energy system. Phase II, Stage 1, final report. Conceptual design, demand and fuel projections and cost analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Phase I Report, Grid ICES, presented the broad alternatives and implications for development of an energy system satisfying thermal demand with the co-generation of electric power, all predicated on the use of solid fuels. Participants of the system are the University of Minnesota, operator and primary thermal user, and Northern States Power Company, primary electrical user; with St. Mary's Hospital, Fairview Hospital, and Augsburg College as Add-on Customers for the thermal service (Option I). Included for consideration are the Options of (II) solid waste disposal by the Pyrolysis Method, with heat recovery, and (III) conversion of a portion of the thermal system from steam to hot water distribution to increase co-generation capability and as a demonstration system for future expansion. This report presents the conceptual design of the energy system and each Option, with the economic implications identified so that selection of the final system can be made. Draft outline of the Environmental Assessment for the project is submitted as a separate report.

Not Available

1978-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

284

Manufacturing Process Optimization to Improve Stability, Yield and Efficiency of CdS/CdTe PV Devices: Phase II, Annual Technical Report, January 2006 - February 2007  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We designed, fabricated, installed, and tested a fixture for automated cooling of a substrate in vacuum for optimum processing of the back contact. Large-area devices have 10.9% efficiency.

Sampath, W. S.; Enzenroth, A.; Barth, K.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Refractory Improvement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Refractory Improvement Refractory Improvement NETL Office of Research and Development Project Number: FWP-2012.03.03 Task 2 Project Description Industry would like gasifier on-line availability of 85-95% for utility applications and 95% for applications such as chemical production. Gasification facilities' are currently unable to meet these requirements, which have created a potential roadblock to widespread acceptance and commercialization of gasification technologies. Refractory liners and syngas coolers are among key components of the gasification process previously identified as negatively impacting gasifier availability. Ash originating from impurities in the gasifier's carbon feedstock is the root cause of many problems impacting gasifier RAM (Reliability Availability Maintainability). At the high temperatures of gasification, ash changes to liquid, gas, and solid phases which wear down refractory materials and can cause fouling, either of which can lead to unplanned shutdowns for system repair, replacement, or cleaning.

286

Total System Performance Assessment-License Application Design Selection (LADS) Phase 1 Analysis of Surface Modification Consisting of Addition of Alluvium (Feature 23a)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to document the analysis that was conducted to evaluate the effect of a potential change to the TSPA-VA base case design that could improve long-term repository performance. The design feature evaluated in this report is a modification of the topographic surface of Yucca Mountain. The modification consists of covering the land surface immediately above the repository foot-print with a thick layer of unconsolidated material utilizing rip-rap and plants to mitigate erosion. This surface modification is designated as Feature 23a or simply abbreviated as F23a. The fundamental aim of F23a is to reduce the net infiltration into the unsaturated zone by enhancing the potential for evapotranspiratiration at the surface; such a change would, in turn, reduce the seepage flux and the rate of radionuclide releases from the repository. Field and modeling studies of water movement in the unsaturated zone have indicated that shallow infiltration at the surface is almost negligible in locations where the bedrock is covered by a sufficiently thick soil layer. In addition to providing storage for meteoric water, a thick soil layer would slow the downward movement of soil moisture to such an extent that evaporation and transpiration could easily transfer most of the soil-water back to the atmosphere. Generic requirements for the effectiveness of this design feature are two-fold. First, the soil layer above the repository foot-print must be thick enough to provide sufficient storage of meteoric water (from episodic precipitation events) and accommodate plant roots. Second, the added soil layer must be engineered so as to mitigate thinning by erosional processes and have sufficient thickness to accommodate the roots of common desert plants. Under these two conditions, it is reasonable to expect that modification would be effective for a significant time period and the net infiltration and deep percolation flux would be reduced by orders of magnitude lower than the present levels. Conceptually, the topographic surface above the repository foot-print would be re-contoured to make it more suitable for placement of unconsolidated materials (e.g., alluvium). Figure 1 shows the region of the surface modification in relation to the location of the repository foot-print. The surface contours in this region after modification are shown in the plot presented in Figure 2. Basically, the surface modification would be accomplished by applying cuts to the ridges slopes on the east flank of Yucca Mountain to produce a relatively uniform slope of about 10%. The alluvium would be covered with rock fragments (to imitate the desert pavement) to reduce erosion. This report documents the modeling assumptions and performance analysis conducted to estimate the long-term performance for Feature 23a. The performance measure for this evaluation is dose-rate. Results are presented that compare the dose-rate time histories for the new design feature to those of the TSPA-VA base case calculation (CRWMS M&O 1998a).

N. Erb

1999-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

287

Design and installation of continuous flow and water quality monitoring stations to improve water quality forecasting in the lower San Joaquin River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

improve water quality forecasting in the lower San Joaquinimprove water quality forecasting in the lower San Joaquinan important real-time forecasting station for water quality

Quinn, Nigel W.T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Probabilistic risk assessment for the construction phases of a bridge construction based on finite element analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To develop a design, engineering, and construction management information sharing system that allow the project participants to effectively share the information throughout the construction life cycle with the support of 3D, design and building information, ... Keywords: Construction phases, Finite element analysis, Improved response surface method, Risk assessment, Virtual construction

Taejun Cho; Tae Soo Kim

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Central receiver solar thermal power system. Phase 1. CDRL item 2; Pilot Plant preliminary design report. Volume II. System decription and system analysis  

SciTech Connect

An active system analysis and integration effort has been maintained. These activities have included the transformation of initial program requirements into a preliminary system design, the evolution of subsystem requirements which lay the foundation for subsystem design and test activity, and the overseeing of the final preliminary design effort to ensure that the subsystems are operationally compatible and capable of producing electricity at the lowest possible cost per unit of energy. Volume II of the Preliminary Design Report presents the results of the overall system effort that went on during this contract. The effort is assumed to include not only the total system definition and design but also all subsystem interactions.

Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Improving efficiency of high-concentrator photovoltaics by cooling with  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving efficiency of high-concentrator photovoltaics by cooling with Improving efficiency of high-concentrator photovoltaics by cooling with two-phase forced convection Title Improving efficiency of high-concentrator photovoltaics by cooling with two-phase forced convection Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2010 Authors Ho, Tony, Samuel S. Mao, and Ralph Greif Journal International Journal of Energy Research Volume 34 Start Page 1257 Issue 14 Pagination 1257-1271 Date Published 11/2010 Keywords high-concentrator photovoltaic efficiency, two-phase flow cooling applications Abstract The potential of increasing high-concentrator photovoltaic cell efficiency by cooling with two-phase flow is analyzed. The governing energy equations were used to predict cell temperature distributions and cell efficiencies for a photovoltaic cell under 100 suns' concentration. Several design conditions were taken into consideration in the analysis, including cooling channel height, working fluid type (between water and R134a), working fluid inlet temperature, pressure, and mass flow rate. It was observed that the dominant parameter for increasing cell efficiency was the working fluid saturation temperature, which itself is affected by a number of the aforementioned design parameters. The results show R134a at low inlet pressures to be highly effective in this two-phase cooling design.

291

Design and installation of continuous flow and water quality monitoring stations to improve water quality forecasting in the lower San Joaquin River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sites did not have 110 volt power available and a digital to140. Solar Panel with 12-volt battery Campbell ScientificReservoir. Solar Panel with 12-volt battery Design Analysis

Quinn, Nigel W.T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Photovoltaic Manufacturing Cost and Throughput Improvements for Thin-Film CIGS-Based Modules; Phase II Annual Subcontract Technical Report, July 1999 - August 2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thin-film photovoltaics (PV) has expanded dramatically in the last five years, but commercial use remains limited by performance, cost, and reliability. Of all the thin-film systems, copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) has demonstrated the greatest potential for achieving high performance at a low cost. The highest-quality CIGS has been formed by multi-source co-evaporation, a technique pioneered in this country by researchers at NREL. Multi-source co-evaporation is also potentially the fastest and most cost-effective method of CIGS absorber deposition. Global Solar Energy (GSE) has adapted multi-source co-evaporation of CIGS to large-area, roll-to-roll processing on flexible substrates, enabling several manufacturing and product capability advantages. Roll-to-roll processing enables a low-cost, automated continuous manufacturing process. Flexible substrates enable product application in unique, as well as traditional, areas. The primary objectives of the GSE Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) subcontract are to reduce cost and expand the production rate of thin-film CIGS-based PV modules on flexible substrates. Improvements will be implemented in monolithic integration, CIGS deposition, contact deposition, and in-situ CIGS control and monitoring. Specific goals of the three-year contract are: - Monolithic Integration - Increase integration speed by developing high-speed, all-laser scribing processes that are more than 100% faster than the baseline process and offer clean, selective scribing; increase capacity and substantially reduce module area losses by insulating materials with high accuracy into laser scribes. - Absorber Deposition - Increase absorber-layer deposition rate by 75% in the large-area, continuous GSE process, increasing throughput and reducing labor and capital costs. Integrate a parallel detector spectroscopic ellipsometer (PDSE) with mathematical algorithms for in-situ control of the CIGS absorber, enabling runs of over 300 meters of moving substrate, while ensuring uniform properties; enhance health and safety by reducing selenium waste generation through modifications to the reactor and Se delivery method. - Back Contact Deposition - Reduce back-contact cost and increase operation yield by using improved back-contact materials.

Wendt, T.G.; Wiedeman, S. (Global Solar Energy, L.L.C.)

2001-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

293

INEL cold test pit demonstration of improvements in information derived from non-intrusive geophysical methods over buried waste sites. Phase 1, Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this research project were to lay the foundation for further improvement in the use of geophysical methods for detection of buried wastes, and to increase the information content derived from surveys. Also, an important goal was to move from mere detection to characterization of buried wastes. The technical approach to achieve these objectives consisted of: (1) Collect a data set of high spatial density; (2) Acquire data with multiple sensors and integrate the interpretations inferred from the various sensors; (3) Test a simplified time domain electromagnetic system; and (4) Develop imaging and display formats of geophysical data readily understood by environmental scientists and engineers. The breadth of application of this work is far reaching. Not only are uncontrolled waste pits and trenches, abandoned underground storage tanks, and pipelines found throughout most US DOE facilities, but also at military installations and industrial facilities. Moreover, controlled land disposal sites may contain ``hot spots`` where drums and hazardous material may have been buried. The technologies addressed by the R&D will benefit all of these activities.

Not Available

1993-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

294

The induction of a graphite-like phase on diamond films by a Fe-coating/post-annealing process to improve their electron field emission properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electron field emission (EFE) process for diamond films was tremendously enhanced by Fe-coating and post-annealing processes. Microstructural analysis indicates that the mechanism for the improvement in the EFE process is the formation of nanographites with good crystallinity that surround the Fe (or Fe{sub 3}C) nanoclusters. Presumably the nanographites were formed via the reaction of Fe clusters with diamond films, viz. by the dissolution of carbons into Fe (or Fe{sub 3}C) clusters and the reprecipitation of carbon species to the surface of the clusters, a process similar to the growth of carbon nanotubes via Fe clusters as catalyst. Not only is a sufficiently high post-annealing temperature (900 deg. C) required but also a highly active reducing atmosphere (NH{sub 3}) is needed to give a proper microstructure for enhancing the EFE process. The best EFE properties are obtained by post-annealing the Fe-coated diamond films at 900 deg. C in an NH{sub 3} environment for 5 min. The EFE behavior of the films can be turned on at E{sub 0} = 1.9 V/{mu}m, attaining a large EFE current density of 315 {mu}A/cm{sup 2} at an applied field of 8.8 V/{mu}m (extrapolation using the Fowler-Nordheim model leads to J{sub e} = 40.7 mA/cm{sup 2} at a 20 V/{mu}m applied field).

Huang, Pin-Chang; Shih, Wen-Ching [Graduate Institute in Electro-Optical Engineering, Tatung University, Taipei 104, Taiwan (China); Chen, Huang-Chin; Lin, I-Nan [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui, New-Taipei 251, Taiwan (China)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

Ocean thermal energy conversion power system development: I. Preliminary design report. Phase I. Volume 5. Appendixes H, I, J, and K. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The conceptual design of a 40 to 50 MW closed cycle ammonia OTEC commercial plant, the preliminary design of a 10 MW OTEC module analogous to the 50 MW module, and the preliminary design of heat exchanger test articles (evaporator and condenser) representative of the 50 MW heat exchangers for testing in OTEC-1 are presented. This volume of the report includes the following appendices: H) conceptual design description of the electrical systems; I) control and instrumentation; J) OTEC power module assembly; and K) cost estimates for each of the cost components. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

296

Application of Reservoir Characterization and Advanced Technology to Improve Recovery and Economics in a Lower Quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir, Class II  

SciTech Connect

The Oxy operated Class 2 Project at West Welch Project is designed to demonstrate how the use of advanced technology can improve the economics of miscible CO2 injection projects in lower quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate reservoirs. The research and design phase (Budget Period 1) primarily involved advanced reservoir demonstration characterization. The current demonstration phase (Budget Period 2) is the implementation of the reservoir management plan for an optimum miscible CO2 flood design based on the reservoir characterization.

Hickman, T. Scott; Justice, James J.; Egg, Rebecca

2001-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

297

Follow medical processes in the human body, study safe hydro-gen storage in complex metal structures for car design, follow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Follow medical processes in the human body, study safe hydro- gen storage in complex metal structures for car design, follow the phase transition of foodstuff to improve their taste, detect plastic

298

Progress in photovoltaic system and component improvements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project is a partnership between the US government (through the US Department of Energy [DOE]) and the PV industry. Part of its purpose is to conduct manufacturing technology research and development to address the issues and opportunities identified by industry to advance photovoltaic (PV) systems and components. The project was initiated in 1990 and has been conducted in several phases to support the evolution of PV industrial manufacturing technology. Early phases of the project stressed PV module manufacturing. Starting with Phase 4A and continuing in Phase 5A, the goals were broadened to include improvement of component efficiency, energy storage and manufacturing and system or component integration to bring together all elements for a PV product. This paper summarizes PV manufacturers` accomplishments in components, system integration, and alternative manufacturing methods. Their approaches have resulted in improved hardware and PV system performance, better system compatibility, and new system capabilities. Results include new products such as Underwriters Laboratories (UL)-listed AC PV modules, modular inverters, and advanced inverter designs that use readily available and standard components. Work planned in Phase 5A1 includes integrated residential and commercial roof-top systems, PV systems with energy storage, and 300-Wac to 4-kWac inverters.

Thomas, H.P.; Kroposki, B.; McNutt, P.; Witt, C.E. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Bower, W.; Bonn, R.; Hund, T.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Progress in photovoltaic system and component improvements  

SciTech Connect

The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project is a partnership between the US government (through the US Department of Energy [DOE]) and the PV industry. Part of its purpose is to conduct manufacturing technology research and development to address the issues and opportunities identified by industry to advance photovoltaic (PV) systems and components. The project was initiated in 1990 and has been conducted in several phases to support the evolution of PV industrial manufacturing technology. Early phases of the project stressed PV module manufacturing. Starting with Phase 4A and continuing in Phase 5A, the goals were broadened to include improvement of component efficiency, energy storage and manufacturing and system or component integration to bring together all elements for a PV product. This paper summarizes PV manufacturers` accomplishments in components, system integration, and alternative manufacturing methods. Their approaches have resulted in improved hardware and PV system performance, better system compatibility, and new system capabilities. Results include new products such as Underwriters Laboratories (UL)-listed AC PV modules, modular inverters, and advanced inverter designs that use readily available and standard components. Work planned in Phase 5A1 includes integrated residential and commercial roof-top systems, PV systems with energy storage, and 300-Wac to 4-kWac inverters.

Thomas, H.P.; Kroposki, B.; McNutt, P.; Witt, C.E. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Bower, W.; Bonn, R.; Hund, T.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

High-temperature process-steam application at the Southern Union Refining Company, Hobbs, New Mexico (solar energy in the oil patch). Phase I design. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Southern Union Refining Company's Famariss Energy Refinery has worked diligently with Monument Solar Corporation in the conceptual and detail design for this unique application of solar generated steam. An area closely adjacent to the refinery and fronting New Mexico State Highway No. 18 has been designated for the solar collector array. Space planned for the demonstration parabolic trough array is sufficiently large to handle an array of 25,200 square feet in size - an array more than twice the size of the 10,080 square feet proposed originally. The conceptual design, performance, safety, environmental impact, and economic analysis are described. Engineering drawings are included. (WHK)

Not Available

1979-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design improvement phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Phase Stability, Phase Transformations, and Reactive Phase ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2012 ... New Phase in Stoichiometric Cu6Sn5 and Effect of Ni Addition on Phase Stabilization in Wide Temperature Range · Optical Properties of ...

302

Phase Diagrams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 7, 2013 ... Computational Thermodynamics and Kinetics: Phase Diagrams ... TMS: Alloy Phases Committee, TMS: Chemistry and Physics of Materials ...

303

Secretary's Improvement Award | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Improvement Award Improvement Award Secretary's Improvement Award (from left to right) Johnny Moore; Daniel Poneman; Gordon Fox; Marcus Jones; Daniel Lehman; Gary Bloom; Ingrid Kolb (from left to right) Johnny Moore; Daniel Poneman; Gordon Fox; Marcus Jones; Daniel Lehman; Gary Bloom; Ingrid Kolb Presented to: The Office of Science's Modernization of Laboratory Facilities (MLF) The MLF team successfully used the "Construction Manager at Risk" acquisition strategy at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This strategy allowed the project to separate the design and construction into two phases which allowed construction to start four months early. In addition, the construction manager executed an early build-out of a typical laboratory module. This provided researchers a "hands-on" verification of user

304

Proprties of the Carrol system and a machine design for solar-powered, air-cooled, absorption space cooling. Phase I and Phase II. Final report, September 1977-March 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The name Carrol has been selected as a convenient short-hand designation for a prime candidate chemical system comprising ethylene glycol-lithium bromide as an absorbent mixture with water as a refrigerant. The instrumentation, methods of handling data and numerical results from a systematic determination of Carrol property data required to design an air cooled absorption machine based on this chemical system are described. These data include saturation temperature, relative enthalpy, density, specific heat capacity, thermal conductivity, viscosity and absorber film heat transfer coefficient as functions of solution temperature and Carrol concentration over applicable ranges. For each of the major components of the absorption chiller, i.e., generator, chiller, absorber, condenser, heat exchanger, purge and controls, the report contains an assembly drawing and the principal operating characteristics of that component.

Biermann, W.J.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Engitectural Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traditionally, Architecture and Engineering have been disciplines practiced exclusive of one another's input and collaboration. This seemingly awkward custom is due in part to tradition and to the two distinct perspectives each discipline has concerning the function of a building and it's many components. In the past, collaboration on a project generally occurred out of necessity, and can usually be attributed to a system and design integration problems. In most instances, these issues are related to the mechanical systems of building, and in a hot and humid climate the issues are magnified. Therefore, this paper will discuss the concepts and merits of a new design process called: Engitectural Design. Engitectural Design is the concept of blending the many design and aesthetic concerns of architecture with the more technical aspects of engineering, especially in the area of mechanical HVAC systems. The use of this new design procedure will reduce, if not eliminate, current problems with clearances, mechanical room size and optimal area selection. Merely incorporating the mechanical needs of a building during the schematic phase will reduce communication problems that cause the above mentioned problems, and thus optimize the system. This paper will address the mutual concerns of both professions as it pertains to materials, lighting, surface finishes, passive and active solar and the use of landscaping, focusing on the benefits of mutual agreement in a hot and humid climate. To be successful, the collaboration must begin in pre-design and continue through project completion. During initial implementation of Engitectural Design, a fm can expect each phase of a project to take longer than usual. Lack of established relationships, poor communication and professional territorial rights will exist in the beginning. However, over time a fm can expect a time reduction due to fewer revisions and the elimination of duplicated work. As it pertains to today's more advanced HVAC systems, this new cooperation and understanding of the needs within disciplines will yield a more effective and efficient operating unit for today's hot and humid environment.

Gagliardi, D. R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Absorption chiller optimization and integration for cogeneration and engine-chiller systems. Phase 1 - design. Topical report, April 1985-July 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A market study indicates a significant market potential for small commercial cogeneration (50-500 kW) over the next 20 years. The potential exists for 1500 installations per year, 80% of those would be a system composed of Engine-Generator and Heat Recovery Unit with the remainder requiring the addition of an Absorption Chiller. A preliminary design for an advanced Heat Recovery Unit (HRU) was completed. The unit incorporates the capability of supplementary firing of the exhaust gas from the new generation of natural gas fired lean burn reciprocating engines being developed for cogeneration applications. This gives the Heat Recovery Unit greater flexibility in following the thermal load requirements of the building. An applications and design criteria analysis indicated that this was a significant feature for the HRU as it can replace a standard auxiliary boiler thus affording significant savings to the building owner. A design for an advanced absorption chiller was reached which is 15% lower in cost yet 9% more efficient than current off-the-shelf units. A packaged cogeneration system cost and design analysis indicates that a nominal 254 kW cogeneration system incorporating advanced components and packaging concepts can achieve a selling price of less than $880/kW and $700/kW with and without an absorption chiller.

Kubasco, A.J.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion power system development. Phase I: preliminary design. Final report. [ODSP-3 code; OTEC Steady-State Analysis Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following appendices are included; Dynamic Simulation Program (ODSP-3); sample results of dynamic simulation; trip report - NH/sub 3/ safety precautions/accident records; trip report - US Coast Guard Headquarters; OTEC power system development, preliminary design test program report; medium turbine generator inspection point program; net energy analysis; bus bar cost of electricity; OTEC technical specifications; and engineer drawings. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

308

SOLERAS - Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project. Final report, Volume 3. Battelle Columbus Laboratories pilot plant preliminary design and Phase 2 definition study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A preliminary design for an engineering field test project of a solar controlled environment agriculture system with 0.37 hectare of growing area is presented. Specifications and requirements of system components are outlined as are the instrumentation and control systems. System support facilities are briefly discussed. The program management plan and an economic analysis are included. (BCS)

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Optimization of the design of DC-DC converters for improving the electromagnetic compatibility with the Front-End electronic for the super Large Hadron Collider Trackers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments at CERN sets new challenges for the powering of the detectors. One of the powering schemes under study is based on DC-DC buck converters mounted on the front-end modules. The hard environmental conditions impose strict restrictions to the converters in terms of low volume, radiation and magnetic field tolerance. Furthermore, the noise emission of the switching converters must not affect the performance of the powered systems. A study of the sources and paths of noise of a synchronous buck converter has been made for identifying the critical parameters to reduce their emissions. As proof of principle, a converter was designed following the PCB layout considerations proposed and then used for powering a silicon strip module prototype for the ATLAS upgrade, in order to evaluate their compatibility.

Fuentes Rojas, Cristian Alejandro; Blanchot, G

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Alternative Design Study Report: WindPACT Advanced Wind Turbine Drive Train Designs Study; November 1, 2000 -- February 28, 2002  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the Phase I results of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) WindPACT (Wind Partnership for Advanced Component Technologies) Advanced Wind Turbine Drive Train Designs Study. Global Energy Concepts, LLC performed this work under a subcontract with NREL. The purpose of the WindPACT project is to identify technology improvements that will enable the cost of energy (COE) from wind turbines to be reduced. Other parts of the WindPACT project have examined blade and logistics scaling, balance-of-station costs, and rotor design. This study was designed to investigate innovative drive train designs.

Poore, R.; Lettenmaier, T.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Central receiver solar thermal power system, Phase 1. CRDL Item 2. Pilot plant preliminary design report. Volume III, Book 2. Collector subsystem  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The methods and plans for the manufacture of the 10-MW collector heliostats and associated controls for the pilot plant are detailed. An in-depth description of the production, installation, and verification testing of heliostats for the pilot plant is presented. Specifications for the performance, design, and test requirements for the pilot plant collector subsystem are included. Also, a heliostat location summary report is given. (WHK)

Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Solar Pilot Plant, Phase I: preliminary design report. Volume VII. Pilot plant cost, commercial plant cost and performance. CDRL item 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cost estimates are presented for the Solar Pilot Plant by cost breakdown structure element, with a commitment schedule and an expenditure schedule. Cost estimates are given for a Commercial Plant, including several point costs for plants with various solar multiples and storage times. Specific questions (ERDA) pertaining to commercial plant design and performance data are addressed. The cost estimates are supplemented by two books of vendor and subcontractor cost data.

None

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Development of a methodology for defining whole-building energy design targets for commercial buildings: Phase 2, Development Concept Stage Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents eight tasks performed as part of the Whole-Building Energy Design Targets project, in which detailed conceptual approaches were produced for each element of the proposed Targets model. The eight task reports together describe the important modules proposed for inclusion in the Targets model: input module, energy module, characteristic development moduel, building cost module, analysis control module, energy cost module, search routines module, and economic analysis module. 16 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs.

McKay, H.N. (Illuminating Engineering Society of North America, New York, NY (USA)); Deringer, J.J. (American Inst. of Architects, Washington, DC (USA)); Jones, J.W. (American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc., Atlanta, GA (USA)); Hall, J.D. (Deringer Group, Riva, MD (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

An interactive performancebased expert system for daylighting in architectural design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: Architects are increasingly using digital tools during the design process, particularly as they approach complex problems such as designing for successful daylighting performance. However, while simulation tools may provide the designer with valuable information, they do not necessarily guide the user towards design changes which will improve performance. This paper proposes an interactive, goal-based expert system for daylighting design, intended for use during the early design phase. The expert system consists of two major components: a daylighting knowledge-base which contains information regarding the effects of a variety of design conditions on resultant daylighting performance, and a fuzzy rule-based decision-making logic which is used to determine those design changes most likely to improve performance for a given design. The system gives the user the ability to input an initial model and a set of daylighting performance goals in the form of illuminance and daylighting-specific glare metrics. The system acts as a “virtual daylighting consultant, ” guiding the user towards improved performance while maintaining the integrity of the original design and of the design process itself.

Jaime M. L. Gagne; Marilyne Andersen; Leslie K. Norford

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Phase five  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phase five Phase five 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:November 2013 All Issues » submit Phase five Los Alamos physicists have conclusively demonstrated the existence of a new phase of matter. November 25, 2013 Phase five Scientists still have more to learn about the exotic physics of specialty materials. What makes the cuprates special? How about a new phase of matter. Ceramic metals known as cuprates have mystified physicists for decades. They exhibit a variety of distinct phases of matter, each with its own specific properties, including a phase bearing an exotic type of magnetism, a high-temperature superconducting phase, an ordinary metal phase, a poorly understood and weird metallic phase simply called a strange metal, and an equally poorly understood metallic phase known as the pseudogap. The

316

A Study of Stranding of Juvenile Salmon by Ship Wakes Along the Lower Columbia River Using a Before-and-After Design: Before-Phase Results  

SciTech Connect

Ship wakes produced by deep-draft vessels transiting the lower Columbia River have been observed to cause stranding of juvenile salmon. Proposed deepening of the Columbia River navigation channel has raised concerns about the potential impact of the deepening project on juvenile salmon stranding. The Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers requested that the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory design and conduct a study to assess stranding impacts that may be associated with channel deepening. The basic study design was a multivariate analysis of covariance of field observations and measurements under a statistical design for a before and after impact comparison. We have summarized field activities and statistical analyses for the ?before? component of the study here. Stranding occurred at all three sampling sites and during all three sampling seasons (Summer 2004, Winter 2005, and Spring 2005), for a total of 46 stranding events during 126 observed vessel passages. The highest occurrence of stranding occurred at Barlow Point, WA, where 53% of the observed events resulted in stranding. Other sites included Sauvie Island, OR (37%) and County Line Park, WA (15%). To develop an appropriate impact assessment model that accounted for relevant covariates, regression analyses were conducted to determine the relationships between stranding probability and other factors. Nineteen independent variables were considered as potential factors affecting the incidence of juvenile salmon stranding, including tidal stage, tidal height, river flow, current velocity, ship type, ship direction, ship condition (loaded/unloaded), ship speed, ship size, and a proxy variable for ship kinetic energy. In addition to the ambient and ship characteristics listed above, site, season, and fish density were also considered. Although no single factor appears as the primary factor for stranding, statistical analyses of the covariates resulted in the following equations: (1) Stranding Probability {approx} Location + Kinetic Energy Proxy + Tidal Height + Salmonid Density + Kinetic energy proxy ? Tidal Height + Tidal Height x Salmonid Density. (2) Stranding Probability {approx} Location + Total Wave Distance + Salmonid Density Index. (3) Log(Total Wave Height) {approx} Ship Block + Tidal Height + Location + Ship Speed. (4) Log(Total Wave Excursion Across the Beach) {approx} Location + Kinetic Energy Proxy + Tidal Height The above equations form the basis for a conceptual model of the factors leading to salmon stranding. The equations also form the basis for an approach for assessing impacts of dredging under the before/after study design.

Pearson, Walter H.; Skalski, J R.; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Miller, Martin C.; Johnson, Gary E.; Williams, Greg D.; Southard, John A.; Buchanan, Rebecca A.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Designer Sorghum Combining the High Digestibility and Waxy Grain Traits of Sorghum for Improved Nutrition Bioethanol Beer Feed and Food Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L). Moench) is used for human consumption in parts of Africa and Asia and as an animal feed mainly in the U.S. Though sorghum grain contains higher amounts of protein than other cereal grains such as wheat and corn, it is not as readily available for enzyme degradation in humans and animals. Protein body matrices called kafirins surround the starch granules in sorghum. Because the protein is less digestible, the starch is also less digestible for biofuel production. However variation for this trait exists and the line P850029 has a higher protein digestibility compared to other normal grain sorghum lines. This increase in digestibility of protein is due to the rearrangement of the kafirins in the prolamin protein bodies where, the ?-kafirins are rearranged in the seed endosperm and the amount of ?-kafirin in the grain is also reduced. The assay to phenotype the HD trait is time consuming and unpredictable. So identifying a quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling the protein digestibility trait in sorghum would be beneficial in breeding. A recombinant inbred lines (RILs) population derived from P850029 x ‘Sureno’, were developed and used to map QTL regulating the protein digestibility trait. A single QTL was identified on chromosome 1 between Xtxp43 and Xtxp329. Validation of the identified QTL was done on heterogenous inbred families (HIFs). The results validate the same QTL identified on the RIL population on chromosome 1. Later the high digestibility trait (HD) was integrated with the Waxy trait in sorghum. The Waxy (WX) sorghums have starch completely in the form of amylopectin. The effect of endosperm type on ethanol yield and fermentation efficiencies was studied among HD, WX and HD-WX lines. The HD-WX lines fermented in a shorter time i.e. completed fermentation in 48 h and their fermentation efficiencies were also higher around 90%. The DDGS of the HD-WX lines also had lower residual starch content and 50% higher amino acid lysine content when compared to wildtype sorghum. Moreover, the relation between endosperm traits and grain yield in sorghum has not been fully explored. In this study, we compared the yield and yield components of four unique endosperm phenotypes, HD, WX, HD-WX and wildtype lines. A total of 100 F2:4 derived recombinant inbred lines population from a cross between Tx2907/P850029 were selected with 25 lines from each HD, WX, HD-WX and wild-type line were included in the study. These lines were grown in three replications in College Station and Halfway, Texas in a randomized complete block design. The results show that there are no significant differences in the grain yield.

Jampala, Babitha

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Development of a methodology for defining whole-building energy design targets for commercial buildings: Phase 2, Development Concept Stage Report  

SciTech Connect

The primary focus of the Whole-Building Energy Design Targets project is to develop a flexible methodology for setting target guidelines with which to assess energy efficiency in commercial building design. The proposed methodology has several innovative features. In this report, the authors document their work to define the software development concepts upon which the overall Targets methodology will be based. Three task reports are included here. Development of the user interface--that critical connection through which the human end-user (architect, engineer, planner, owner) will apply the methodology--is described in Section 2. In Section 3, the use of the software engineering process in Targets model development efforts is described. Section 4 provides details on the data and system integration task, in which interactions between and among all the major components, termed modules, of the Targets model were examined to determine how to put them together to create a methodology that is effective and easy to use. 4 refs., 26 figs.

Deringer, J.J. (American Inst. of Architects, Washington, DC (USA)); Hall, J.D. (Deringer Group, Riva, MD (USA)); Jones, J.W. (American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc., New York, NY (USA)); McKay, H.N. (Illuminating Engineering Society of North America, New York, NY (USA)); Alley, P.K. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Photovoltaic concentrator application experiment to be located at Sea World Park, Orlando, Florida. Phase I. System Design. Final report, June 1, 1978-February 28, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The General Electric/Sea World Photovoltaic Concentrator Application Experiment will be located at Sea World's Marine Park near Orlando, Florida. The experiment will consist of nine azimuth-tracking turntable arrays, each containing twenty-four elevation-tracking parabolic trough PV concentrators of a type developed on this contract. The system will produce a peak power output of 330 kW and an annual net electrical energy of 355 MWh corresponding to an annual direct normal insolation of 1375.5 kWh/m/sup 2/. A line-commutated DC/AC inverter controlled to operate at the solar array maximum power point will deliver three-phase power through a bidirectional transformer to a 13-kilovolt line serving the Sea World Park. In addition to generating electrical power, the system will produce 3.56 x 10/sup 5/ ton-hours of cooling for air conditioning a nearby shark exhibit by supplying collected thermal energy to a lithium-bromide absorption chiller. With credit included for the amount of electricity that would be required to produce this cooling by a vapor compression cycle, the overall system efficiency is estimated to be 11.7 percent.

Kirpich, A.S.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Grid-connected integrated community energy system. Phase II, Stage 2, final report. Preliminary design pyrolysis facility. [Andco-Torrax system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The University of Minnesota is studying and planning a grid connected integrated community energy system to include disposal of wastes from health centers and utilizing the heat generated. The University of Minnesota has purchased the so called Southeast Generating Station from the Northern States Power Company. This plant contains two coal-fired boilers that will be retrofitted to burn low-sulfur Montana coal. Building modifications and additions will be made to support the components of the Andco-Torrax system and integrate the system with the rest of the plant. The Andco-Torrax system is a new high-temperature refuse-conversion process known technically as slagging pyrolysis. Although the pyrolysis of solid waste is a relatively new innovation, pyrolysis processes have been used for years by industry. This report covers the preliminary design and operation of the system. (MCW)

Not Available

1978-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design improvement phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Solar Pilot Plant, Phase I. Preliminary design report. Volume VI. Electrical power generation; master control subsystems; balance of plant CDRL item 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Honeywell electrical power generation subsystem centers on a General Electric dual admission, triple extraction turbine generator sized to the output requirements of the Pilot Plant. The turbine receives steam from the receiver subsystem and/or the thermal storage subsystem and supplies those subsystems with feedwater. The turbine condensor is wet cooled. The plant control system consists of a coordinated digital master and subsystem digital/analog controls. The remainder of the plant, work spaces, maintenance areas, roads, and reception area are laid out to provide maximum convenience compatible with utility and safety. Most of the activities are housed in a complex around the base of the receiver tower. This volume contains a description of the relationship of the electrical power generation subsystem to the rest of the plant, the design methodology and evolution, the interface integration and control, and the operation and maintenance procedures.

None

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Gymnastics in Phase Space  

SciTech Connect

As accelerator technology advances, the requirements on accelerator beam quality become increasingly demanding. Facing these new demands, the topic of phase space gymnastics is becoming a new focus of accelerator physics R&D. In a phase space gymnastics, the beam's phase space distribution is manipulated and precision tailored to meet the required beam qualities. On the other hand, all realization of such gymnastics will have to obey accelerator physics principles as well as technological limitations. Recent examples of phase space gymnastics include Emittance exchanges, Phase space exchanges, Emittance partitioning, Seeded FELs and Microbunched beams. The emittance related topics of this list are reviewed in this report. The accelerator physics basis, the optics design principles that provide these phase space manipulations, and the possible applications of these gymnastics, are discussed. This fascinating new field promises to be a powerful tool of the future.

Chao, Alexander Wu; /SLAC

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Faster Phase Estimation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop several algorithms for performing quantum phase estimation based on basic measurements and classical post-processing. We present a pedagogical review of quantum phase estimation and simulate the algorithm to numerically determine its scaling in circuit depth and width. We show that the use of purely random measurements requires a number of measurements that is optimal up to constant factors, albeit at the cost of exponential classical post-processing; the method can also be used to improve classical signal processing. We then develop a quantum algorithm for phase estimation that yields an asymptotic improvement in runtime, coming within a factor of log* of the minimum number of measurements required while still requiring only minimal classical post-processing. The corresponding quantum circuit requires asymptotically lower depth and width (number of qubits) than quantum phase estimation.

Krysta M. Svore; Matthew B. Hastings; Michael Freedman

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

324

Optimization as a Driver for Design Space Exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes an approach toward the use of optimization which is a departure from the traditional role optimization plays in the design process. Traditionally, optimization is used to improve point solutions in the latter phases of design. In this work, optimization is used as an aid for design space exploration, through the integration of optimization and iterative design. Two applications of the concept of optimization-driven design are given: CAD tools for HVAC layout and an assembly design framework. 1 INTRODUCTION The use of optimization in design is becoming increasingly prevalent in industry today. This is due to a variety of factors, including a marketplace that imposes greater competitive pressures to produce higher-quality products at lower costs while reducing product development times, as well as more powerful computer hardware and new optimization techniques, both of which allow the application of optimization to problems where it was not previously possible. Whi...

Simon Szykman Manufacturing; Simon Szykman

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Yakima Basin Fish Passage Project, Phase 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Implementation of the Yakima Basin Fish Passage Project -- Phase 2 would significantly improve the production of anadromous fish in the Yakima River system. The project would provide offsite mitigation and help to compensate for lower Columbia River hydroelectric fishery losses. The Phase 2 screens would allow greater numbers of juvenile anadromous fish to survive. As a consequence, there would be higher returns of adult salmon and steelhead to the Yakima River. The proposed action would play an integral part in the overall Yakima River anadromous fish enhancement program (fish passage improvement, habitat enhancement, hatchery production increases, and harvest management). These would be environmental benefits associated with implementation of the Fish Passage and Protective Facilities Phase 2 Project. Based on the evaluation presented in this assessment, there would be no significant adverse environmental impacts if the proposed action was carried forward. No significant adverse environmental effects have been identified from construction and operation of the Yakima Phase 2 fish passage project. Proper design and implementation of the project will ensure no adverse effects will occur. Based on the information in this environmental analysis, BPA's and Reclamation's proposal to construct these facilities does not constitute a major Federal action that could significantly affect the quality of the human environment. 8 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

CERAMIC MEMBRANE ENABLING TECHNOLOGY FOR IMPROVED IGCC EFFICIENCY  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly technical progress report will summarize work accomplished for Phase 2 Program during the quarter January to March 2004. In task 1 OTM development has led to improved strength and composite design for lower temperatures. In task 2, the measurement system of OTM element dimensions was improved. In task 3, a 10-cycle test of a three-tube submodule was reproduced successfully. In task 5, sizing of several potential heat recovery systems was initiated. In task 7, advanced OTM and cryogenic IGCC cases for near-term integration were developed.

Ravi Prasad

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

327

BLENDING STUDY FOR SRR SALT DISPOSITION INTEGRATION: TANK 50H SCALE-MODELING AND COMPUTER-MODELING FOR BLENDING PUMP DESIGN, PHASE 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Salt Disposition Integration (SDI) portfolio of projects provides the infrastructure within existing Liquid Waste facilities to support the startup and long term operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). Within SDI, the Blend and Feed Project will equip existing waste tanks in the Tank Farms to serve as Blend Tanks where 300,000-800,000 gallons of salt solution will be blended in 1.3 million gallon tanks and qualified for use as feedstock for SWPF. Blending requires the miscible salt solutions from potentially multiple source tanks per batch to be well mixed without disturbing settled sludge solids that may be present in a Blend Tank. Disturbing solids may be problematic both from a feed quality perspective as well as from a process safety perspective where hydrogen release from the sludge is a potential flammability concern. To develop the necessary technical basis for the design and operation of blending equipment, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) completed scaled blending and transfer pump tests and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. A 94 inch diameter pilot-scale blending tank, including tank internals such as the blending pump, transfer pump, removable cooling coils, and center column, were used in this research. The test tank represents a 1/10.85 scaled version of an 85 foot diameter, Type IIIA, nuclear waste tank that may be typical of Blend Tanks used in SDI. Specifically, Tank 50 was selected as the tank to be modeled per the SRR, Project Engineering Manager. SRNL blending tests investigated various fixed position, non-rotating, dual nozzle pump designs, including a blending pump model provided by the blend pump vendor, Curtiss Wright (CW). Primary research goals were to assess blending times and to evaluate incipient sludge disturbance for waste tanks. Incipient sludge disturbance was defined by SRR and SRNL as minor blending of settled sludge from the tank bottom into suspension due to blending pump operation, where the sludge level was shown to remain constant. To experimentally model the sludge layer, a very thin, pourable, sludge simulant was conservatively used for all testing. To experimentally model the liquid, supernate layer above the sludge in waste tanks, two salt solution simulants were used, which provided a bounding range of supernate properties. One solution was water (H{sub 2}O + NaOH), and the other was an inhibited, more viscous salt solution. The research performed and data obtained significantly advances the understanding of fluid mechanics, mixing theory and CFD modeling for nuclear waste tanks by benchmarking CFD results to actual experimental data. This research significantly bridges the gap between previous CFD models and actual field experiences in real waste tanks. A finding of the 2009, DOE, Slurry Retrieval, Pipeline Transport and Plugging, and Mixing Workshop was that CFD models were inadequate to assess blending processes in nuclear waste tanks. One recommendation from that Workshop was that a validation, or bench marking program be performed for CFD modeling versus experiment. This research provided experimental data to validate and correct CFD models as they apply to mixing and blending in nuclear waste tanks. Extensive SDI research was a significant step toward bench marking and applying CFD modeling. This research showed that CFD models not only agreed with experiment, but demonstrated that the large variance in actual experimental data accounts for misunderstood discrepancies between CFD models and experiments. Having documented this finding, SRNL was able to provide correction factors to be used with CFD models to statistically bound full scale CFD results. Through the use of pilot scale tests performed for both types of pumps and available engineering literature, SRNL demonstrated how to effectively apply CFD results to salt batch mixing in full scale waste tanks. In other words, CFD models were in error prior to development of experimental correction factors determined during this research, which provided a technique to use CFD models fo

Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Fowley, M.

2011-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

328

Thermal battery. [solid metal halide electrolytes with enhanced electrical conductance after a phase transition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The patent describes an improved thermal battery whose novel design eliminates various disadvantages of previous such devices. Its major features include a halide cathode, a solid metal halide electrolyte which has a substantially greater electrical conductance after a phase transition at some temperature, and a means for heating its electrochemical cells to activation temperature.

Carlsten, R.W.; Nissen, D.A.

1973-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

329

Solar total energy: large scale experimental at Shenandoah, Georgia. Phase III. Preliminary design. Final report, October 1, 1977-July 31, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The basic function of the STES at Shenandoah is to supply the electric power, process steam, and space heating and cooling demands of the expanded 3900 square meters (42,000 ft/sup 2/) Bleyle Plant and for the STES Mechanical Building. The Bleyle factory, initially equipped with its own independent (conventional) energy source, will derive at least 60% of its annual energy needs from the sun when the solar energy system becomes operational in the first quarter of 1981. The design and systems analysis of the STES are detailed. The Solar Collection Substation consists of an array of 192 seven meter diameter, parabolic dish collectors which provide a temperature rise to a flow of Syltherm 800 fluid through each collector in a parallel closed, hydraulic circuit. The receiver is a cavity type with the incident concentrated solar flux impinging upon an absorptive surface enclosed within an insulated cylindrical shell. The trickle oil/dual media concept was selected for the high temperature storage system. The Power Conversion Subsystem consists of a three piece pool-type boiler with preheater, boiler, and superheater, a GFE steam turbine-generator set rated at 400kWe supplied by Mechanical Technology, Inc., a condenser and condensate storage tank, make-up demineralizer, deaerating heater, and boiler feed pump. In normal operation, steam at 655/sup 0/K (720/sup 0/F) and 4.8 x 10/sup 6/ N/m/sup 2/ (700 psig) is generated in the boiler-super-heater, heated by Syltherm 800, and delivered to the turbine inlet. The Thermal Utilization Subsystem major components include a 2.1 x 10/sup 10/ Joule (20 MBtu) capacity, sensible heat water, low temperature storage (LTS) subsystem, a 1.25 x 10/sup 6/ Joules/second (354 ton) absorption chiller derated to provide 6.09 x 10/sup 5/ Joules/second (173 tons) with inlet hot water at 372/sup 0/K (210/sup 0/F), and two separate cooling towers for heat rejection from both the absorption chiller and the PCS condenser. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Three-phase power conversion system for utility-interconnected PV applications. Phase 1 technical progress report, 1 October 1995--17 April 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work performed by Omnion Power Corporation under Phase 1 of a two-phase subcontract. During this phase, Omnion researchers: designed an advanced product specification to guide prototype design and development; analyzed field failure data with Omnion`s hard-switched insulated-Gate Bipolar Transistor technology hardware to better understand where design improvements were needed; presented and reviewed product specifications with key customers/users; drafted a working product specification to serve as a baseline in developing the new power conversion system; developed the core-resonant converter technology in conjunction with Soft Switching Technologies Corp.; designed a 100-kW prototype power conversion system; designed a prototype system package; initiated interaction with vendors to optimize component selection and specifications; initiated the preparation of design documentation; built the prototype core-resonant converter and initiated preliminary testing; and initiated the assembly of a 1-kW prototype power conversion system. This work has demonstrated the potential of the soft-switching resonant DC link (RDCL) inverter and its application to a three-phase utility-interconnected PV power conversion system. The RDCL inverter has demonstrated its advantage over hard-switching pulse-width modulated inverters in terms of efficiency and audible noise. With proper package design and manufacturing process design and implementation, the RDCL power conversion system has the potential to be low-cost and reliable with superior performance.

Porter, D.G.; Meyer, H.; Leang, W. [Omnion Power Engineering Corp., East Troy, WI (United States)

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Available Technologies: Improved Phylogenic Microarray Design ...  

Biofuels; Biotechnology & Medicine. Diagnostics and Therapeutics; ... the number of potential cross-hybridizations of a target to competing probes rapidly increases.

332

Improvement in Cell Equipment and Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 2, 2011... three anonymous anode suppliers, how it was measured in the cells and ... A new generation of key energy saving technology for aluminum ...

333

Improved Engine Design Through More Efficient Combustion ...  

Electricity Transmission; Energy Analysis; Energy Storage; Geothermal; Hydrogen and Fuel Cell; Hydropower, Wave and Tidal; Industrial Technologies; Solar Photovoltaic;

334

Research on the MPCG algorithm applied in the three dimensional electric field calculation of SF6 circuit breaker in three-phase-in-one tank GIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the structure miniaturization of SF6 Circuit Breaker in three-phase-in-one-tank GIS, improvement of internal structure design and layout should be taken into account to balance the electric field intensity distribution among phases. By ... Keywords: GIS(gas insulated switchgear), MPCG(modified preconditioned conjugate gradient), circuit breaker, electric field calculation, finite element method, sparse matrix, three dimensional, three-phase-in-one-tank

Ma Ai-qing; Jiang Xiu-chen; Zeng Yi

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Continued Development and Improvement of Pneumatic Heavy Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this applied research effort led by Georgia Tech Research Institute is the application of pneumatic aerodynamic technology previously developed and patented by us to the design of an appropriate Heavy Vehicle (HV) tractor-trailer configuration, and experimental confirmation of this pneumatic configuration's improved aerodynamic characteristics. In Phases I to IV of our previous DOE program (Reference 1), GTRI has developed, patented, wind-tunnel tested and road-tested blown aerodynamic devices for Pneumatic Heavy Vehicles (PHVs) and Pneumatic Sports Utility Vehicles (PSUVs). To further advance these pneumatic technologies towards HV and SUV applications, additional Phase V tasks were included in the first year of a continuing DOE program (Reference 2). Based on the results of the Phase IV full-scale test programs, these Phase V tasks extended the application of pneumatic aerodynamics to include: further economy and performance improvements; increased aerodynamic stability and control; and safety of operation of Pneumatic HVs. Continued development of a Pneumatic SUV was also conducted during the Phase V program. Phase V was completed in July, 2003; its positive results towards development and confirmation of this pneumatic technology are reported in References 3 and 4. The current Phase VI of this program was incrementally funded by DOE in order to continue this technology development towards a second fuel economy test on the Pneumatic Heavy Vehicle. The objectives of this current Phase VI research and development effort (Ref. 5) fall into two categories: (1) develop improved pneumatic aerodynamic technology and configurations on smaller-scale models of the advanced Pneumatic Heavy Vehicle (PHV); and based on these findings, (2) redesign, modify, and re-test the modified full-scale PHV test vehicle. This second objective includes conduct of an on-road preliminary road test of this configuration to prepare it for a second series of SAE Type-U fuel economy evaluations, as described in Ref. 5. Both objectives are based on the pneumatic technology already developed and confirmed for DOE OHVT/OAAT in Phases I-V. This new Phase VI effort was initiated by contract amendment to the Phase V effort using carryover FY02 funds. This were conducted under a new and distinct project number, GTRI Project A-6935, separate from the Phase I-IV program. However, the two programs are closely integrated, and thus Phase VI continues with the previous program and goals.

Robert J. Englar

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

OPTIMIZATION OF THE PHASE ADVANCE BETWEEN RHIC INTERACTION POINTS.  

SciTech Connect

The authors consider a scenario of having two identical Interaction Points (IPs) in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The strengths of beam-beam resonances strongly depend on the phase advance between these two IPs and therefore certain phase advances could improve beam life-time and luminosity. The authors compute the dynamic aperture (DA) as function of the phase advance between these IPs to find the optimum settings.The beam-beam interaction is treated in the weak-strong approximation and a non-linear model of the lattice is used. For the current RHIC proton working point (0.69.0.685) [1] the design lattice is found to have the optimum phase advance. However this is not the case for other working points.

TOMAS, R.; FISCHER, W.

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

337

Advanced heat pump for the recovery of volatile organic compounds. Phase 1, Conceptual design of an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of volatile organic compounds: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) from stationary industrial and commercial sources represent a substantial portion of the total US VOC emissions. The ``Toxic-Release Inventory`` of The US Environmental Protection Agency estimates this to be at about 3 billion pounds per year (1987 estimates). The majority of these VOC emissions are from coating processes, cleaning processes, polymer production, fuel production and distribution, foam blowing,refrigerant production, and wood products production. The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) interest in the recovery of VOC stems from the energy embodied in the recovered solvents and the energy required to dispose of them in an environmentally acceptable manner. This Phase I report documents 3M`s work in close working relationship with its subcontractor Nuclear Consulting Services (Nucon) for the preliminary conceptual design of an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of VOC. Nucon designed Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of methyl ethyl ketone and toluene from coating operations at 3M Weatherford, OK, was used as a base line for the work under cooperative agreement between 3M and ODE. See appendix A and reference (4) by Kovach of Nucon. This cooperative agreement report evaluates and compares an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for solvent recovery with other competing technologies for solvent recovery and reuse. This advanced Brayton cycle heat pump is simple (very few components), highly reliable (off the shelf components), energy efficient and economically priced.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Converging Redundant Sensor Network Information for Improved Building Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project investigated the development and application of sensor networks to enhance building energy management and security. Commercial, industrial and residential buildings often incorporate systems used to determine occupancy, but current sensor technology and control algorithms limit the effectiveness of these systems. For example, most of these systems rely on single monitoring points to detect occupancy, when more than one monitoring point could improve system performance. Phase I of the project focused on instrumentation and data collection. During the initial project phase, a new occupancy detection system was developed, commissioned and installed in a sample of private offices and open-plan office workstations. Data acquisition systems were developed and deployed to collect data on space occupancy profiles. Phase II of the project demonstrated that a network of several sensors provides a more accurate measure of occupancy than is possible using systems based on single monitoring points. This phase also established that analysis algorithms could be applied to the sensor network data stream to improve the accuracy of system performance in energy management and security applications. In Phase III of the project, the sensor network from Phase I was complemented by a control strategy developed based on the results from the first two project phases: this controller was implemented in a small sample of work areas, and applied to lighting control. Two additional technologies were developed in the course of completing the project. A prototype web-based display that portrays the current status of each detector in a sensor network monitoring building occupancy was designed and implemented. A new capability that enables occupancy sensors in a sensor network to dynamically set the 'time delay' interval based on ongoing occupant behavior in the space was also designed and implemented.

Dale Tiller; D. Phil; Gregor Henze; Xin Guo

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

339

OMEGA polar-drive target designs  

SciTech Connect

Low-adiabat polar-drive (PD) [Skupsky et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2763 (2004)] implosion designs for the OMEGA [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] laser are described. These designs for cryogenic deuterium-tritium and warm plastic shells use a temporal laser pulse shape with three pickets followed by a main pulse [Goncharov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 165001 (2010)]. The designs are at two different on-target laser intensities, with different in-flight aspect ratios (IFARs). These designs permit studies of implosion energetics and target performance closer to ignition-relevant intensities ({approx}7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} at the quarter-critical surface, where nonlocal heat conduction and laser-plasma interactions can play an important role) but at lower values of IFAR {approx} 22 or at lower intensity ({approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}) but at a higher IFAR (IFAR {approx} 32, where shell instability can play an important role). PD geometry requires repointing of laser beams to improve shell symmetry. The higher-intensity designs optimize target performance by repointing beams to a lesser extent, compensating for the reduced equatorial drive by increasing the energies of the repointed beams. They also use custom beam profiles that improve equatorial illumination at the expense of irradiation at higher latitudes. These latter designs will be studied when new phase plates for the OMEGA Laser System, corresponding to the custom beam profiles, are obtained.

Radha, P. B.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Shvydky, A.; Collins, T. J. B.; Goncharov, V. N.; McKenty, P. W.; Sangster, T. C.; Skupsky, S. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 E. River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); McCrory, R. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 E. River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Department of Physics, University of Rochester, 250 E. River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

Predicting locality phases for dynamic memory optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dynamic data, cache, and memory adaptation can significantly improve program performance when they are applied on long continuous phases of execution that have dynamic but predictable locality. To support phase-based adaptation, this paper defines the ... Keywords: Dynamic optimization, Locality analysis and optimization, Phase hierarchy, Program phase prediction, Reconfigurable architecture

Xipeng Shen; Yutao Zhong; Chen Ding

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design improvement phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Alloy Design and Phase Stability Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 19, 2011... De Nyago Tafen1; Michael Gao1; Jeffery Hawk2; 1National Energy Technology Lab; URS Coporation; 2National Energy Technology Lab

342

Design Development (65%) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Design Development (65%) Design Development (65%) Design Development (65%) October 16, 2013 - 4:38pm Addthis The design development (65%) phase is a progression where changes from the schematic design phase are incorporated and further details are developed on building systems. In this phase, the architectural and engineering (A&E) firm typically starts to present overall costs associated with the design. As with the each design phase, the current design will be reviewed by the design team, and the agency should ask the A&E firm to substantiate how the included measures meet design requirements for energy. Design development is when the size and design of the specific renewable energy technologies is accomplished. It is important to evaluate the design to ensure that the particular technology can be incorporated into the

343

PHASE DETECTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A phase detector circuit is described for use at very high frequencies of the order of 50 megacycles. The detector circuit includes a pair of rectifiers inverted relative to each other. One voltage to be compared is applied to the two rectifiers in phase opposition and the other voltage to be compared is commonly applied to the two rectifiers. The two result:ng d-c voltages derived from the rectifiers are combined in phase opposition to produce a single d-c voltage having amplitude and polarity characteristics dependent upon the phase relation between the signals to be compared. Principal novelty resides in the employment of a half-wave transmission line to derive the phase opposing signals from the first voltage to be compared for application to the two rectifiers in place of the transformer commonly utilized for such purpose in phase detector circuits for operation at lower frequency.

Kippenhan, D.O.

1959-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

NETL: Gasification - Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in IGCC Plants Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in IGCC Plants General Electric Company Project Number: FE0007859 Project Description General Electric Company (GE) is studying the feasibility of improving plant availability and reducing total installed costs in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants. GE is evaluating the IGCC technology effects of total installed cost and availability through deployment of a multi-faceted approach in technology evaluation, constructability, and design methodology. Eastman Chemical Company will be supporting the GE effort on certain technologies by providing consulting on the evaluations and technology transfer phases of the project. The end result is aimed at reducing the time to technological maturity and enabling plants to reach higher values of availability in a shorter period of time and at a lower installed cost.

345

Considerations for efficient airflow design in cleanrooms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

common recirculating air system designs: fan-tower (FT) withfan-filter unit (FFU) Improving Airflow System Efficiency A high-performance cleanroom airflow designfan motor operation. These results point to opportunities for improving energy efficiency at the design

Xu, Tengfang

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology Project: Phase 1 subcontractors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Phase I portion of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) Project, the problem identification phase, was completed in mid-1991. This work involved competitive bidding that was open to any US firm with existing manufacturing capabilities, regardless of material or module design. In early 1991, subcontracts were awarded to 22 of approximately 40 bidders. Each subcontract was funded at a level of up to $50,000 and a duration of three months. The problems identified by the research in this phase of the program represent opportunities for industrial participants to improve their manufacturing processes, reduce manufacturing costs, increase product performance, or develop a foundation for scaling up US-based manufacturing plant capacities. Many of these opportunities have since been detailed in the approaches that these organizations suggested for Phase 2 (the problem solution phase) research and development (R D). It is not. anticipated that any additional Phase I solicitation will be issued because Phase I was intended to help the US Department of Energy (DOE) characterize the status and needs of the US photovoltaic (PV) industry and encourage the industry to examine and prioritize required manufacturing line improvements. Phase I subcontracted research included five subcontractors working on flat-plate crystalline silicon technology, eleven working on flat-plate thin-film modules (one in thin-film crystalline silicon, six in amorphous silicon. and four in polycrystalline thin films), six working on concentrator systems, and two working on general equipment/production options. (Two of the participants each worked in two areas).

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology Project: Phase 1 subcontractors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Phase I portion of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) Project, the problem identification phase, was completed in mid-1991. This work involved competitive bidding that was open to any US firm with existing manufacturing capabilities, regardless of material or module design. In early 1991, subcontracts were awarded to 22 of approximately 40 bidders. Each subcontract was funded at a level of up to $50,000 and a duration of three months. The problems identified by the research in this phase of the program represent opportunities for industrial participants to improve their manufacturing processes, reduce manufacturing costs, increase product performance, or develop a foundation for scaling up US-based manufacturing plant capacities. Many of these opportunities have since been detailed in the approaches that these organizations suggested for Phase 2 (the problem solution phase) research and development (R&D). It is not. anticipated that any additional Phase I solicitation will be issued because Phase I was intended to help the US Department of Energy (DOE) characterize the status and needs of the US photovoltaic (PV) industry and encourage the industry to examine and prioritize required manufacturing line improvements. Phase I subcontracted research included five subcontractors working on flat-plate crystalline silicon technology, eleven working on flat-plate thin-film modules (one in thin-film crystalline silicon, six in amorphous silicon. and four in polycrystalline thin films), six working on concentrator systems, and two working on general equipment/production options. (Two of the participants each worked in two areas).

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

NEHRP - Earthquake Resistant Design Research Needs ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... report summarizes the recommended tasks, approximate schedule, and order of ... Piece: Improving Seismic Design and Construction Practices (ATC ...

349

IMPROVEMENTS IN POWER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

A power plant for nuclear reactors is designed for improved cycle efficiency. In addition to the usual heat exchanger for heat transfer from gaseous reactor coolant to water for vaporization, a second heat exchanger is provided between the first heat exchanger and a point betwveen the intermediate- pressure and low-pressure turbine stages. In this way, interstage reheating of the steam is obtained without passage of the steam back to the first heat exchanger. (D.L.C.) Research Reactors

Peters, M.C.

1961-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

350

Meta-design: design for designers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One fundamental challenge for the design of the interactive systems of the future is to invent and design environments and cultures in which humans can express themselves and engage in personally meaningful activities. Unfortunately, a large number of ... Keywords: consumer and designer mindsets, designing “out of the box”, domain-oriented design environments, evolutionary growth, impact of new media on design, open evolvable systems, open source, reseeding model, seeding, underdesigned systems

Gerhard Fischer; Eric Scharff

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Phase Transformations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 9, 2013 ... O. Advanced Neutron and Synchrotron Studies of Materials: Phase .... We will describe recent advances at the Advanced Photon Source in ... Finally, we will describe upgrade plans for microdiffraction capabilities at the APS.

352

License Application Design Selection Report, REV 01. August 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In December 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published the ''Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain'' (DOE 1998b). The Viability Assessment described a preliminary design of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, and assessed the probable behavior of that repository design in the Yucca Mountain geologic setting. The report concluded that 'Yucca Mountain remains a promising site for a geologic repository and that work should proceed to support a decision in 2001 on whether to recommend the site to the President for development as a repository'. It also concluded that 'uncertainties remain about key natural processes, the preliminary design, and how the site and design would interact'. Recognizing that the design that was evaluated will be refined before a license application could be submitted, the Viability Aassesment notes that 'DOE is evaluating several design options and alternatives that could reduce existing uncertainty and improve the performance of the repository system'. During the preparation of the Viability Assessment, DOE asked the contractor for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program to study alternative design concepts for a potential geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain. The License Application Design Selection (LADS) project was initiated to conduct that study. The goal of the project was to develop and evaluate a diverse range of conceptual repository designs that work well in concert with the Yucca Mountain site and to recommend an initial design concept for the possible Site Recommendation and License Apllication. This report presents the results of the LADS project. The design process consisted of two phases. In Phase I, a series of basic design concepts (design alternatives) and components (design features) were analyzed for their potential value as elements of a repository design. In Phase II, these enhanced design alternatives were refined, screened for accepatable postclosure performance, and evaluated against a set of criteria addressing four broad aspects of the repository: performance demonstrability; flexibility; construction, operations and maintenance; and cost. Based on this evaluation, a conceptual design was recommended to DOE and could be characterized as a low thermal impact design. Included in the report is more in depth information regarding the basis of the recommendation, performance issues, benefits related to reduced uncertainties, construction/operational benefits, technical and programmatic flexibilty and cost impacts.

Hastings, C.R.

1999-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

353

Tundish Process Performance Improvement: Some Indian Case ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Tundish Process Performance Improvement: Some Indian Case Studies ... Engineering and Human Resource Development: Design as a Common Language ... The Fundamentals of Gas Bubbling into Liquid Metals.

354

Improved Gas Sampling Device - Available Technologies - PNNL  

Summary. This is an improved device for gas sampling and analysis in which the design of the device includes features for maximizing the surface area ...

355

The Building Design Advisor  

SciTech Connect

The Building Design Advisor (BDA) is a software environment that supports the integrated use of multiple analysis and visualization tools throughout the building design process, from the initial, schematic design phases to the detailed specification of building components and systems. Based on a comprehensive design theory, the BDA uses an object-oriented representation of the building and its context, and acts as a data manager and process controller to allow building designers to quickly navigate through the multitude of descriptive and performance parameters addressed by the analysis and visualization tools linked to the BDA. Through the Browser the user can edit the values of input parameters and select any number of input and/or output parameters for display in the Decision Desktop. The Desktop allows building designers to compare multiple design alternatives with respect to any number of parameters addressed by the tools linked to the BDA.

Papamichael, K.; LaPorta, J.; Chauvet, H.; Collins, D.; Trzcinski, T.; Thorpe, J.; Selkowitz, S.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

improve | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

improve improve Home Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(15) Member 17 September, 2013 - 12:39 Are you willing to reply to a text message once a day with information about your comfort level at your indoor location? building comfort design improve incentive indoor message sms text Yes 60% (3 votes) No 0% (0 votes) Maybe if I had an incentive 20% (1 vote) Maybe if my reply is confidential and anonymous 0% (0 votes) Maybe if the data will be used to improve building design 20% (1 vote) Total votes: 5 Buildings account for roughly 40% of all U.S. energy use (70% of all electricity): residential buildings account for 22% of all U.S. energy use and commercial buildings account for 18% of all U.S. energy use[i]. There is an unanswered need for information about buildings in use and how building design affects building occupant comfort, productivity, and, by

357

Positive design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article is focused on the changes needed in design to create positive solutions for all involved in design processes. It draws upon the rich discussion and discourse from a conference focused on positive design involving managers, designers, and ...

Jurgen Faust

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Advanced turbine systems: Studies and conceptual design  

SciTech Connect

The ABB selection for the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) includes advanced developments especially in the hot gas path of the combustion turbine and new state-of-the-art units such as the steam turbine and the HRSG. The increase in efficiency by more than 10% multiplicative compared to current designs will be based on: (1) Turbine Inlet Temperature Increase; (2) New Cooling Techniques for Stationary and Rotating Parts; and New Materials. Present, projected component improvements that will be introduced with the above mentioned issues will yield improved CCSC turbine performance, which will drive the ATS selected gas-fired reference CC power plant to 6 % LHV or better. The decrease in emission levels requires a careful optimization of the cycle design, where cooling air consumption has to be minimized. All interfaces of the individual systems in the complete CC Plant need careful checks, especially to avoid unnecessary margins in the individual designs. This study is an important step pointing out the feasibility of the ATS program with realistic goals set by DOE, which, however, will present challenges for Phase II time schedule of 18 months. With the approach outlined in this study and close cooperation with DOE, ATS program success can be achieved to deliver low emissions and low cost of electricity by the year 2002. The ABB conceptual design and step approach will lead to early component demonstration which will help accelerate the overall program objectives.

van der Linden, S.; Gnaedig, G.; Kreitmeier, F.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Exhaustive Optimization Phase Order Space Exploration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The phase-ordering problem is a long standing issue for compiler writers. Most optimizing compilers typically have numerous different code-improving phases, many of which can be applied in any order. These phases interact by enabling or disabling opportunities ...

Prasad A. Kulkarni; David B. Whalley; Gary S. Tyson; Jack W. Davidson

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Tuba City, Arizona: Phase 2, Construction, Subcontract documents: Appendix E, final report. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This appendix discusses Phase II construction and subcontract documents uranium mill site near Tuba City, Arizona. It contains the bid schedule, special conditions, specifications, and subcontract drawings.

Not Available

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design improvement phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Visualization Design Environment  

SciTech Connect

Improvements in the performance and capabilities of computer software and hardware system, combined with advances in Internet technologies, have spurred innovative developments in the area of modeling, simulation and visualization. These developments combine to make it possible to create an environment where engineers can design, prototype, analyze, and visualize components in virtual space, saving the time and expenses incurred during numerous design and prototyping iterations. The Visualization Design Centers located at Sandia National Laboratories are facilities built specifically to promote the ''design by team'' concept. This report focuses on designing, developing and deploying this environment by detailing the design of the facility, software infrastructure and hardware systems that comprise this new visualization design environment and describes case studies that document successful application of this environment.

Pomplun, A.R.; Templet, G.J.; Jortner, J.N.; Friesen, J.A.; Schwegel, J.; Hughes, K.R.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Achieving the Benefits of Safeguards by Design  

SciTech Connect

The overarching driver for developing a formalized process to achieve safeguards by design is to support the global growth of nuclear power while reducing ‘nuclear security’ risks. This paper discusses an institutional approach to the design process for a nuclear facility, for designing proliferation resistance, international safeguards and U.S. national safeguards and security into new nuclear facilities. In the United States, the need exists to develop a simple, concise, formalized, and integrated approach for incorporating international safeguards and other non-proliferation considerations into the facility design process. An effective and efficient design process is one which clearly defines the functional requirements at the beginning of the project and provides for the execution of the project to achieve a reasonable balance among competing objectives in a cost effective manner. Safeguards by Design is defined as “the integration of international and national safeguards, physical security and non-proliferation features as full and equal partners in the design process of a nuclear energy system or facility,” with the objective to achieve facilities that are intrinsically more robust while being less expensive to safeguard and protect. This Safeguards by Design process has been developed such that it: • Provides improved safeguards, security, and stronger proliferation barriers, while reducing the life cycle costs to the operator and regulatory agencies, • Can be translated to any international context as a model for nuclear facility design, • Fosters a culture change to ensure the treatment of ‘nuclear security’ considerations as “full and equal” partners in the design process, • Provides a useful tool for the project manager responsible for the design, construction, and start-up of nuclear facilities, and • Addresses the key integration activities necessary to efficiently incorporate International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards into the design of nuclear facilities. This paper describes the work that has been completed in the development of a Safeguards by Design process for a project, illustrated by flow diagrams based upon the project phases described in U.S. Department of Energy Order 413.3A, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets. The institutionalization of the Safeguards by Design process directly supports the goals of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative and also aligns with goals and objectives of the International Atomic Energy Agency. Other benefits from institutionalizing this Safeguards by Design process are discussed within this paper.

Trond Bjornard; Robert Bean; David Hebditch; Jim Morgan; Bruce Meppen; Scott DeMuth; Michael Ehinger; John Hockert

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

State-of-the-art review and report on critical aspects and scale-up considerations in the design of fluidized-bed reactors. Final report on Phase 1  

SciTech Connect

Information is given on the design of distributor plates and opening geometry to provide uniform flow over the reactor area. The design of granular bed filters is also considered. Pressure drops and particle size in the bed are discussed. (LTN)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Towards improved CZT crystals.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Past experimental efforts to improve CZT crystals for gamma spectrometer applications have been focused on reducing micron-scale defects such as tellurium inclusions and precipitates. While these micron-scale defects are important, experiments have shown that the micron-scale variations in transport can be caused by the formation and aggregation of atomic-scale defects such as dislocations and point defect clusters. Moreover, dislocation cells have been found to act as nucleation sites that cause the formation of large precipitates. To better solve the uniformity problem of CZT, atomic-scale defects must be understood and controlled. To this end, we have begun to develop an atomistic model that can be used to reveal the effects of small-scale defects and to guide experiments for reducing both atomic- and micron-scale (tellurium inclusions and precipitates) defects. Our model will be based upon a bond order potential (BOP) to enable large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of material structures at a high-fidelity level that was not possible with alternative methods. To establish how BOP improves over existing approaches, we report here our recent work on the assessment of two representative literature CdTe interatomic potentials that are currently widely used: the Stillinger-Weber (SW) potential and the Tersoff-Rockett (TR) potential. Careful examinations of phases, defects, and surfaces of the CdTe system were performed. We began our study by using both potentials to evaluate the lattice constants and cohesive energies of various Cd, Te, and CdTe phases including dimer, trimer, chain, square, rhomboid, tetrahedron, diamond-cubic (dc), simple-cubic (sc), body-centered-cubic (bcc), face-centered cubic (fcc), hexagonal-close-packed (hcp), graphite-sheet, A8, zinc-blende (zb), wurtzite (wz), NaCl, CsCl, etc. We then compared the results with our calculations using the density functional theory (DFT) quantum mechanical method. We also evaluated the suitability of the two potentials to predict the surface reconstructions and surface energies, various defect configurations and defect energies (interstitials and voids), elastic constants, and melting temperatures of different phases. We found that both potentials predicted incorrect energy trends as compared with those predicted by the DFT method. Most seriously, both potentials predicted incorrect lowest energy phases. These studies clearly showed that the existing potentials are not sufficient for correctly predicting the charge transport properties of CdTe demonstrating the need for a new potential. We anticipate that our BOP method will overcome this problem and will accelerate the discovery of a synthesis approach to produce improved CZT crystals.

Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Ward, Donald K.; Doty, F. Patrick; Wong, Bryan Matthew; Zhou, Xiao Wang

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Vibration effects of two-phase cross flow on heat exchangers  

SciTech Connect

Excessive flow-induced vibration in tube bundles causes costly tube failures by fatigue or fretting wear. This is a common condition in many shell-and-tube heat exchangers, such as condensers and reboilers. However, designers can't plan for phenomena that they don't understand. To avoid cross-flow vibration damage, the designer must determine flow-behavior effects on tube bundles under these conditions. And this is very true when discussing two-phase cross-flow vibration. Two-phase cross-flow vibration does cause tube/tube bundle failure. Early research used single-phase flow models, which failed to accurately predict vibration behavior in a two-phase system. Consequently, single-phase models and assumptions don't apply to two-phase systems and don't accurately describe vibration-behavior for exchanger tubes. Improved heat exchanger design requires more emphasis and development on cross-flow vibration parameters. The paper describes tube vibrations; flow conditions; void-fraction effects; vortex-induced vibration; fluid excitation forces; and tube response.

Lian, H.Y.; Kawaji, M. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)); Chan, A.M.C. (Ontario Hydro Research Div., Toronto (Canada))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Nonlinear Discriminant Analysis for Improved Speech Recognition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) has been widely applied to speech recognition resulting in improved recognition performance and improved robustness. LDA designs a linear transformation that projects a n dimensional space on a m dimensional space (m Phonebook database show that NLDA provides a method for designing discriminant features particularly ecient as well for continuous densities HMM as for hybrid HMM/ANN recognizers.

V. Fontaine; C. Ris; J-M. Boite; Multitel Site Initialis

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Two-phase jet loads. [PWR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two-phase jets are currently being studied to improve engineering models for the prediction of loads on pipes and structures during LOCAs. Multi-dimensional computer codes such as BEACON/MOD2, CSQ, and TRAC-P1A are being employed to predict flow characteristics and flow-structure loading. Our ultimate goal is to develop a new approximate engineering model which is superior to the F.J. Moody design model. Computer results are compared with data obtained from foreign sources, and a technique for using the TRAC-P1A vessel component as a containment model is presented. In general, good agreement with the data is obtained for saturated stagnation conditions; however, difficulties are encountered for subcooled stagnation conditions, possibly due to nucleation delay and non-equilibrium effects.

Tomasko, D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Two-phase flow studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The two-phase flow program is directed at understanding the hydrodynamics of two-phase flows. The two-phase flow regime is characterized by a series of flow patterns that are designated as bubble, slug, churn, and annular flow. Churn flow has received very little scientific attention. This lack of attention cannot be justified because calculations predict that the churn flow pattern will exist over a substantial portion of the two-phase flow zone in producing geothermal wells. The University of Houston is experimentally investigating the dynamics of churn flow and is measuring the holdup over the full range of flow space for which churn flow exists. These experiments are being conducted in an air/water vertical two-phase flow loop. Brown University has constructed and is operating a unique two-phase flow research facility specifically designed to address flow problems of relevance to the geothermal industry. An important feature of the facility is that it is dedicated to two-phase flow of a single substance (including evaporation and condensation) as opposed to the case of a two-component two-phase flow. This facility can be operated with horizontal or vertical test sections of constant diameter or with step changes in diameter to simulate a geothermal well profile.

Hanold, R.J.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

New tools for the analysis and design of building envelopes  

SciTech Connect

We describe the integrated development of PowerDOE, a new version of the DOE-2 building energy analysis program, and the Building Design Advisor (BDA), a multimedia-based design tool that assists building designers with the concurrent consideration of multiple design solutions with respect to multiple design criteria. PowerDOE has a windows-based Graphical User Interface (GUI) that makes it easier to use than DOE-2, while retaining DOE-2`s calculation power and accuracy. BDA, with a similar GUI, is designed to link to multiple analytical models and databases. In its first release it is linked to PowerDOE and a Daylighting Analysis Module, as well as to a Case Studies Database and a Schematic Graphic Editor. These allow building designers to set performance goals and address key building envelope parameters from the initial, schematic phases of building design to the detailed specification of building components and systems required by PowerDOE. The consideration of the thermal performance of building envelopes through PowerDOE and BDA is integrated with non-thermal envelope performance aspects, such as daylighting, as well as with the performance of non-envelope building components and systems, such as electric lighting and HVAC. Future versions of BDA will support links to CAD and electronic product catalogs, as well as provide context-dependent design advice to improve performance.

Papamichael, K.; Winkelmann, F.C.; Buhl, W.F.; Chauvet, H. [and others

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Lighting Design | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Design Design Lighting Design July 29, 2012 - 6:28pm Addthis Energy-efficient indoor and outdoor lighting design focuses on ways to improve both the quality and efficiency of lighting. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/chandlerphoto. Energy-efficient indoor and outdoor lighting design focuses on ways to improve both the quality and efficiency of lighting. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/chandlerphoto. How does it work? Buy ENERGY STAR-rated lighting for the highest quality, energy-efficient lighting. Use timers and other controls to turn lights on and off. Use outdoor solar lighting. Energy-efficient indoor and outdoor lighting design focuses on ways to improve both the quality and efficiency of lighting. If you're constructing a new house, consider lighting as part of your whole-house design -- an

371

Biomass power for rural development: Phase 2. Technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1998  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project undertaken by the Salix Consortium is a multi-phased, multi-partner endeavor. Phase-1 focused on initial development and testing of the technology and agreements necessary to demonstrate commercial willow production in Phase-2. The Phase-1 objectives have been successfully completed: preparing final design plans for two utility pulverized coal boilers, developing fuel supply plans for the project, obtaining power production commitments from the power companies for Phase-2, obtaining construction and environmental permits, and developing an experimental strategy for crop production and power generation improvements needed to assure commercial success. The R and D effort also addresses environmental issues pertaining to introduction of the willow energy system. Beyond those Phase-1 requirements the Consortium has already successfully demonstrated cofiring at Greenidge Station and developed the required nursery capacity for acreage scale-up. This past summer 105 acres were prepared in advance for the spring planting in 1998. Having completed the above tasks, the Consortium is well positioned to begin Phase-2. In phase-2 every aspect of willow production and power generation from willow will be demonstrated. The ultimate objective of Phase-2 is to transition the work performed under the Rural Energy for the Future project into a thriving, self-supported energy crop enterprise.

Neuhauser, E.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Improved cycling cryopump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is designed to achieve continuous high efficiency cryopumping of a vacuum vessel by improving upon and combining in a novel way the cryopumping in a novel way the cryopumping methods. The invention consists of a continuous operation cryopump, with movable louvres, with a high efficiency pumping apparatus. The pumping apparatus includes three cryogenic tubes. They are constructed of a substance of high thermal conductivity, such as aluminum and their exterior surfaces are cryogenic condensing surfaces. Through their interior liquid or gaseous helium from two reservoirs can be made to flow, alternately promoting extreme cooling or allowing some warming.

Batzer, T.H.; Call, W.R.

1984-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

373

Reduced Worker Exposure and Improved Energy Efficiency in Industrial Fume-Hoods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the two successful designs: a fan powered airvest with anhose. The fan powered airvest design with an electricalwith an improved design and appropriate fan selection. An

Gadgil, A.J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Comparisons of field performance to closed-door test T ABLE 1 ratings indicate the laboratory procedure is a valid indica-Design Options to Improve the Energy Efficiency of a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;#12;Comparisons of field performance to closed-door test T ABLE 1 ratings indicate commercially manufactured refrigerators were u~ as laboratory test beds, a testing sequence of ..as PHASE I cabinets with an optimized Option 2 Evaporator/condenser size, surface r~frige~tion circuit or cvcle were

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

375

2011 Heat Rate Improvement Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the rising cost of fuel and the strong possibility of CO2 emissions regulations and limitations in the near future, utilities and power generation companies are focusing on power plant heat rate and performance. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) 17th Heat Rate Improvement Conference is the latest in a series of meetings designed to assist attendees in addressing problems with power plant performance and in identifying cost-effective solutions for achieving and sustaining heat rate improve...

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

376

Surveillance Analysis Computer System (SACS) software design document (SDD)  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the Software Design Description for Phase II of the SACS project, and Impact Level 3Q system

Glasscock, J.A.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Self-tuning Fuzzy Control Method Based on the Trajectory Performance of the Phase Plane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The phase plane is already an important method to design fuzzy control systems and analyze their stability. The concept of the real-time response trajectory characteristic vectors and angles between the real-time characteristic vectors on the phase plane are put forward in this paper according to the analysis of the response trajectory performance on the phase plane of a fuzzy control system. The method of rule self-tuning fuzzy control based on the response trajectory performance on phase plane is presented by analyzing the characteristics of angles between the real-time characteristic vectors. The simulation results show that the method is not only capable of increasing greatly the ability to identify and describe the plant in small error, reducing the overshoot, settle time greatly and improving the convergence speed of the fuzzy control system, but also possesses a simple arithmetic and does not require much more storage space and calculation time.

Zhang, J.; Chen, Y.; Xiong, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Designing decommissioning into new reactor designs  

SciTech Connect

One of the lessons learned from decommissioning of existing reactors has been that decommissioning was not given much thought when these reactors were designed some three or four decades ago. Recently, the nuclear power has seen a worldwide resurgence and many new advanced reactor designs are either on the market or nearing design completion. Most of these designs are evolutionary in nature and build on the existing and proven technologies. They also incorporate many improvements and take advantage of the substantial operating experience. Nevertheless, by and large, the main factors driving the design of new reactors are the safety features, safeguards considerations, and the economic factors. With a large decommissioning experience that already exists in the nuclear industry, and with average decommissioning costs at around six hundred million dollars for each reactor in today's dollars, it is necessary that decommissioning factors also be considered as a part of the early design effort. Even though decommissioning may be sixty years down the road from the time they go on line, it is only prudent that new designs be optimized for eventual decommissioning, along with the other major considerations. (authors)

Devgun, J.S.; CHMM, Ph.D. [Nuclear Power Technologies, Sargent and Lundy LLC, Chicago, IL (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Recovery Act: High-Efficiency, Wideband Three-Phase Rectifiers and Adaptive Rectifier Management for Telecomm Central Office and Large Data Center Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lineage Power and Verizon teamed up to address a DOE funding opportunity focused on improving the power conversion chain in telecommunications facilities and data centers. The project had three significant elements: the design and development of high efficiency and high power three-phase rectifiers by Lineage Power, design and development of software to optimize overall plant energy efficiency by Lineage Power, and a field trial in active Verizon telecommunications facilities where energy consumption was measured before and after efficiency upgrades.

Mark A. Johnson

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

380

CERAMIC MEMBRANE ENABLING TECHNOLOGY FOR IMPROVED IGCC EFFICIENCY  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly technical progress report will summarize work accomplished for Phase 2 Program during the quarter July to September 2003. In task 1 OTM development has led to improved strength and composite design. In task 2, the manufacture of robust PSO1d elements has been scaled up. In task 3, operational improvements in the lab-scale pilot reactor have reduced turn-around time and increased product purity. In task 7, economic models show substantial benefit of OTM IGCC over CRYO based oxygen production. The objectives of the first year of phase 2 of the program are to construct and operate an engineering pilot reactor for OTM oxygen. Work to support this objective is being undertaken in the following areas in this quarter: Element reliability; Element fabrication; Systems technology; Power recovery; and IGCC process analysis and economics. The major accomplishments this quarter were Element production at Praxair's manufacturing facility is being scaled up and Substantial improvements to the OTM high temperature strength have been made.

Ravi Prasad

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design improvement phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Cost reduction and manufacture of the SunSine{reg_sign} AC module: Phase I Annual Report : 21 April 1998 -- 31 October 1999  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress made by Ascension Technology in Phase 1 of the cost reduction and manufacturing improvements of the SunSine{reg_sign} AC Module. This work, conducted under NREL subcontract, is a two-phase effort consisting of investigations into improving inverter packaging, soft switching, circuit optimization, design for manufacturing, manufacturing processes, and pilot production manufacturing. The objective of this subcontract is to significantly reduce the cost of the SunSine{reg_sign} inverter, enhance its performance, and streamline and expand the manufacturing process. During Phase 1, the soft-switching topology was designed, then refined to meet stringent cost and performance goals. This design resulted in improved performance, smaller overall footprint, and reduced costs. The aluminum inverter housing was redesigned, and the decision was made to conformal coat the circuit boards, which was verified through the HAST (Highly Accelerated Stress Testing) method. Potential international markets were identified, and the inverter is designed to be easily modified to meet the requirements of other countries. Significant cost reduction and performance improvements have been achieved in Phase I, and accomplishments during Phase I include: (1) SunSine{reg_sign} AC Module costs have been reduced enough to be able to reduce the suggested list price; (2) successful implementation of soft-switching; (3) power circuit-board size reduced 53{percent}; (4) power circuit-board component count reduced 34{percent}; (5) total inverter parts count reduced 49{percent}; (6) anticipated inverter manufacturing cost reduced 57{percent} on a $/Wp rating; (7) transformer efficiency improved 1.4{percent}; and (8) inverter efficiency improved 4.7{percent} to 91.0{percent} at 275 Wac.

Kern, E.; Kern, G.

2000-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

382

Design of high performance frequency synthesizers in communication systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Frequency synthesizer is a key building block of fully-integrated wireless communication systems. Design of a frequency synthesizer requires the understanding of not only the circuit-level but also of the transceiver system-level considerations. This dissertation presents a full cycle of the synthesizer design procedure starting from the interpretation of standards to the testing and measurement results. A new methodology of interpreting communication standards into low level circuit specifications is developed to clarify how the requirements are calculated. A detailed procedure to determine important design variables is presented incorporating the fundamental theory and non-ideal effects such as phase noise and reference spurs. The design procedure can be easily adopted for different applications. A BiCMOS frequency synthesizer compliant for both wireless local area network (WLAN) 802.11a and 802.11b standards is presented as a design example. The two standards are carefully studied according to the proposed standard interpretation method. In order to satisfy stringent requirements due to the multi-standard architecture, an improved adaptive dual-loop phase-locked loop (PLL) architecture is proposed. The proposed improvements include a new loop filter topology with an active capacitance multiplier and a tunable dead zone circuit. These improvements are crucial for monolithic integration of the synthesizer with no off-chip components. The proposed architecture extends the operation limit of conventional integerN type synthesizers by providing better reference spur rejection and settling time performance while making it more suitable for monolithic integration. It opens a new possibility of using an integer-N architecture for various other communication standards, while maintaining the benefit of the integer-N architecture; an optimal performance in area and power consumption.

Moon, Sung Tae

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Beyond Design Basis Events  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beyond Design Basis Events Beyond Design Basis Events Following the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant accident in Japan, DOE embarked upon several initiatives to investigate the safety posture of its nuclear facilities relative to beyond design basis events (BDBEs). These initiatives included issuing Safety Bulletin 2011-01, Events Beyond Design Safety Basis Analysis, and conducting two DOE nuclear safety workshops. DOE also issued two reports documenting the results of these initiatives: Review of Requirements and Capabilities for Analyzing and Responding to BDBEs, August 2011, and Report to the Secretary of Energy on Beyond Design Basis Event Pilot Evaluations, Results and Recommendations for Improvements to Enhance Nuclear Safety at DOE Nuclear Facilities, January 2013.

384

Javascript Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the Publisher:JavaScript Design shows designers how to create interactive JavaScript applications for the Web. It provides detailed descriptions of:JavaScript structures, statements and objectsUsing JavaScript to create different ...

Bill B. Sanders

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Experimental design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Maximizing data information requires careful selection, termed design, of the points at which data are observed. Experimental design is reviewed here for broad classes of data collection and analysis problems, including: fractioning techniques ... Keywords: Key Design Issues in Data Mining, Science and Technology, Statistical Fundamentals

J. P. Morgan; Xinwei Deng

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Multi-Physics Functional Design of HeteroFoaM Nanomaterials for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hierarchical Microporous Materials: Rational and Designable Heterogeneous Catalysts for Renewable Energy · Improved Design of Metal-Organic Framework

387

Emerging Grid Reliability Improvement Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The initial phase of a planned comprehensive Eastern Interconnection (EI) segmentation study is complete. As part of the preparations for completion of the EI study, and to carry out a similar effort for the Western Interconnection (WI), it was necessary to first investigate the potential of other technologies to compete with segmentation. This report discusses emerging grid reliability improvement technologies, providing a perspective on the pros and cons of segmentation, the grid shock absorber concept...

2007-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

388

Inherently Reliable Boiler Component Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the lessons learned during the last decade in efforts to improve the reliability and availability of boilers used in the production of electricity. The information in this report can assist in component modifications and new boiler designs.

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

389

Designing Creativity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Is it possible to design for creativity? This is one of the most important research questions in AI and Design. This paper raises the question whether automated software agent design can be creative. Not only is the artefact dynamic in the sense that it adapts to its environment, it is also autonomous: an agent decides on its own when to be modified and by whom. An agent's functionality may evolve beyond the expectations of its designers and/or users resulting in very new, unique artefacts. Is this type of design creative? Is the process creative? The result? 1.

Frances M. T. Brazier; Niek J. E. Wijngaards

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Phase Relation Studies of Energy Materials for Coated Conductor ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Phase Relation Studies of Energy Materials for Coated ... global energy demand and the need for improved efficiency of energy usage.

391

Integrated system design report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of the integrated system test phase is to demonstrate the commercial potential of a coal fueled diesel engine in its actual operating environment. The integrated system in this project is defined as a coal fueled diesel locomotive. This locomotive, shown on drawing 41D715542, is described in the separate Concept Design Report. The test locomotive will be converted from an existing oil fueled diesel locomotive in three stages, until it nearly emulates the concept locomotive. Design drawings of locomotive components (diesel engine, locomotive, flatcar, etc.) are included.

Not Available

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

A Single-Objective Recovery Phase Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Federal Emergency Management Agency FEMA has identified the four phases of disaster related planning as mitigation, preparation, response, and recovery. The recovery phase is characterized by activity to return life to normal or improved levels. ... Keywords: Disaster Recovery, Disaster Recovery Strategy, Optimization, Recovery, Response, Transportation Model

Sandy Mehlhorn; Michael Racer; Stephanie Ivey; Martin Lipinski

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

System Definition and Analysis: Power Plant Design and Layout  

SciTech Connect

This is the Topical report for Task 6.0, Phase 2 of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program. The report describes work by Westinghouse and the subcontractor, Gilbert/Commonwealth, in the fulfillment of completing Task 6.0. A conceptual design for critical and noncritical components of the gas fired combustion turbine system was completed. The conceptual design included specifications for the flange to flange gas turbine, power plant components, and balance of plant equipment. The ATS engine used in the conceptual design is an advanced 300 MW class combustion turbine incorporating many design features and technologies required to achieve ATS Program goals. Design features of power plant equipment and balance of plant equipment are described. Performance parameters for these components are explained. A site arrangement and electrical single line diagrams were drafted for the conceptual plant. ATS advanced features include design refinements in the compressor, inlet casing and scroll, combustion system, airfoil cooling, secondary flow systems, rotor and exhaust diffuser. These improved features, integrated with prudent selection of power plant and balance of plant equipment, have provided the conceptual design of a system that meets or exceeds ATS program emissions, performance, reliability-availability-maintainability, and cost goals.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Safeguards-By-Design: Guidance and Tools for Stakeholders  

SciTech Connect

Effective implementation of the Safeguards-by-Design (SBD) approach can help meet the challenges of global nuclear energy growth, by designing facilities that have improved safeguardability and reduced safeguards-related life cycle costs. The ultimate goal of SBD is to implement effective and efficient safeguards that reduce the burden to both the facility operator and the International Atomic Energy Agency. Since 2008, the National Nuclear Security Administration's Next Generation Safeguards Initiative's Safeguards By Design Project has initiated multiple studies and workshops with industry and regulatory stakeholders, including the IAEA, to develop relevant documents to support the implementation of SBD. These 'Good Practices Guides' describe facility and process design features that will facilitate implementation of effective nuclear material safeguards starting in the earliest phases of design through to final design. These guides, which are in their final editorial stages, start at a high level and then narrow down to specific nuclear fuel cycle facilities such as Light Water Reactors, Generation III/IV Reactors, High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors, and Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plants. Most recently, NGSI has begun development of a facility safeguardability assessment toolkit to assist the designer. This paper will review the current status of these efforts, provide some examples of these documents, and show some standard IAEA Unattended Instrumentation that is permanently installed in nuclear facilities for monitoring.

Mark Schanfein; Shirley Johnson

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Devices to improve the performance of a conventional two-stroke spark ignition engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents research efforts made in three different phases with the objective of improving the fuel economy of and reducing exhaust emissions from conventional, carbureted, two-stroke spark ignition (SI) engines, which are widely employed in two-wheel transportation in India. A review concerning the existing two-stroke engine technology for this application is included. In the first phase, a new scavenging system was developed and tested to reduce the loss of fresh charge through the exhaust port. In die second phase, the following measures were carried out to improve the combustion process: (1) using an in-cylinder catalyst, such as copper, chromium, and nickel, in the form of coating; (2) providing moderate thermal insulation in the combustion chamber, either by depositing thin ceramic material or by metal inserts; (3) developing a high-energy ignition system; and (4) employing high-octane fuel, such as methanol, ethanol, eucalyptus oil, and orange oil, as a blending agent with gasoline. Based on the effectiveness of the above measures, an optimized design was developed in the final phase to achieve improved performance. Test results indicate that with an optimized two-stroke SI engine, the maximum percentage improvement in brake thermal efficiency is about 31%, together with a reduction of 3400 ppm in hydrocarbons (HC) and 3% by volume of carbon monoxide (CO) emissions over the normal engine (at 3 kW, 3000 rpm). Higher cylinder peak pressures (3-5 bar), lower ignition delay (2-4{degrees}CA){degrees} and shorter combustion duration (4-10 {degrees}CA) are obtained. The knock-limited power output is also enhanced by 12.7% at a high compression ratio (CR) of 9:1. The proposed modifications in the optimized design are simple, low-cost and easy to adopt for both production and existing engines.

Poola, R.B. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Nagalingam, B.; Gopalakrishnan, K.V. [Indian Inst. of Tech., Madras (India)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Phase I Report: DARPA Exoskeleton Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) inaugurated a program addressing research and development for an Exoskeleton for Human Performance Augmentation in FY!2001. A team consisting of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the prime contractor, AeroVironment, Inc., the Army Research Laboratory, the University of Minnesota, and the Virginia Polytechnic Institute has recently completed an 18-month Phase I effort in support of this DARPA program. The Phase I effort focused on the development and proof-of-concept demonstrations for key enabling technologies, laying the foundation for subsequently building and demonstrating a prototype exoskeleton. The overall approach was driven by the need to optimize energy efficiency while providing a system that augmented the operator in as transparent manner as possible (non-impeding). These needs led to the evolution of two key distinguishing features of this team's approach. The first is the ''no knee contact'' concept. This concept is dependent on a unique Cartesian-based control scheme that uses force sensing at the foot and backpack attachments to allow the exoskeleton to closely follow the operator while avoiding the difficulty of connecting and sensing position at the knee. The second is an emphasis on energy efficiency manifested by an energetic, power, actuation and controls approach designed to enhance energy efficiency as well as a reconfigurable kinematic structure that provides a non-anthropomorphic configuration to support an energy saving long-range march/transport mode. The enabling technologies addressed in the first phase were controls and sensing, the soft tissue interface between the machine and the operator, the power system, and actuation. The controller approach was implemented and demonstrated on a test stand with an actual operator. Control stability, low operator fatigue, force amplification and the human interface were all successfully demonstrated, validating the controls approach. A unique, lightweight, low profile, multi-axis foot sensor (an integral element of the controls approach) was designed, fabricated, and its performance verified. A preliminary conceptual design of the human coupling and soft tissue interface, based on biomechanics research has been developed along with a test plan to support an iterative design process. The power system concept, a fuel cell hybrid power supply using chemical generated hydrogen, was successfully demonstrated and shown to be able to efficiently meet both steady-state and transient peak loads. Two actuator approaches, a piezoelectric actuator, with theoretical high power densities and an approach based on a high-performance, high-speed electric motor driving a miniature hydraulic pump have been investigated. The first shows great potential but will require further research before reaching that promise. The other approach has been modeled and simulated and shown to provide the possibility for significant energy savings (>30%) and improved power densities in comparison to conventional hydraulics. Biomechanics analysis and testing were also performed in support of these enabling technologies, to provide a basis for design criteria. An analysis was performed to determine baseline data for initial mechanical design and power supply sizing. Testing conducted to evaluate boot sole thickness found that thickness increases up to two inches could be accommodated without significant impact on human factors issues. This 18-month long Phase I effort has evaluated key enabling technologies and demonstrated advances in these technologies that have significantly increased the likelihood of building a functional prototype exoskeleton.

Jansen, J.F.

2004-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

397

High-Temperature-Turbine Technology Program: Phase II. Technology test and support studies. Design and development of the liquid-fueled high-temperature combustor for the Turbine Spool Technology Rig  

SciTech Connect

The concept selected by Curtiss-Wright for this DOE sponsored High Temperature Turbine Technology (HTTT) Program utilizes transpiration air-cooling of the turbine subsystem airfoils. With moderate quantities of cooling air, this method of cooling has been demonstrated to be effective in a 2600 to 3000/sup 0/F gas stream. Test results show that transpiration air-cooling also protects turbine components from the aggressive environment produced by the combustion of coal-derived fuels. A new single-stage, high work transpiration air-cooled turbine has been designed and fabricated for evaluation in a rotating test vehicle designated the Turbine Spool Technology Rig (TSTR). The design and development of the annular combustor for the TSTR are described. Some pertinent design characteristics of the combustor are: fuel, Jet A; inlet temperature, 525/sup 0/F; inlet pressure, 7.5 Atm; temperature rise, 2475/sup 0/F; efficiency, 98.5%; exit temperature pattern, 0.25; and exit mass flow, 92.7 pps. The development program was conducted on a 60/sup 0/ sector of the full-round annular combustor. Most design goals were achieved, with the exception of the peak gas exit temperature and local metal temperatures at the rear of the inner liner, both of which were higher than the design values. Subsequent turbine vane cascade testing established the need to reduce both the peak gas temperature (for optimum vane cooling) and the inner liner metal temperature (for combustor durability). Further development of the 60/sup 0/ combustor sector achieved the required temperature reductions and the final configuration was incorporated in the TSTR full-annular burner.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Central receiver solar thermal power system, Phase 1. CDRL Item 2. Pilot plant preliminary design report. Volume IV. Receiver subsystem. [10-MW Pilot Plant and 100-MW Commercial Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The conception, design, and testing of the receiver subsystem proposed by the McDonnell Douglas/Rocketdyne Receiver team for the DOE 10-MW Pilot Plant and the 100-MW Commercial Plant are described. The receiver subsystem consists of the receiver unit, the tower on which the receiver unit is mounted above the collector field, and the supporting control and instrumentation equipment. The plans for implementation of the Pilot Plant are given including the anticipated schedule and production plan (procurement, installation, checkout, and maintenance). Specifications for the performance, design, and test requirements for the Pilot Plant receiver subsystem are included. (WHK)

Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Erosion in dual-phase microstructures: Final report  

SciTech Connect

This project was designed to provide a systematic investigation of the effects of microstructural variables on particle impact erosion of two-phase metallic alloys containing large second-phase particles (SPPs). Commercial alloys that contain large hard carbides, such as high Cr-Mo white cast irons and Stellite alloys are known to be highly abrasion resistant. Since there are many similaries between abrasion and erosion, it was felt that a systematic examination of the erosion behavior of such alloys would be useful, especially since existing literature on the subject seemed to indicate that they offered little advantage in erosion. Work was divided into two major sections, on erosion of commercial alloys and of model alloys having artificial SPPs like Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ dispersed in a Cu matrix. The model alloys allowed control of SPP size and second-phase volume fraction (SPVF), and permitted experiments comparing the erosion rates of the dispersed alloys with those of the pure phases. Under the wide range of erosion conditions investigated, this type of alloy offered no significant improvement of erosion resistance over simple, inexpensive low-carbon steels. This was concluded to be the result of the phenomenon of edge spalling from the edges of the SPPs, which was investigated in some detail. 18 refs., 29 figs., 4 tabs.

Kosel, T.H.

1987-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

400

Preparation of Nanostructured Materials Having Improved Ductility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Preparation of Nanostructured Materials Having Improved Ductility Preparation of Nanostructured Materials Having Improved Ductility Preparation of Nanostructured Materials Having Improved Ductility A method for preparing a nanostructured aluminum alloy involves heating an aluminum alloy workpiece at temperature sufficient to produce a single phase coarse grained aluminum alloy. June 20, 2013 Preparation of Nanostructured Materials Having Improved Ductility A method for preparing a nanostructured aluminum alloy involves heating an aluminum alloy workpiece at temperature sufficient to produce a single phase coarse grained aluminum alloy. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center for Innovation (505) 665-9090 Email Preparation of Nanostructured Materials Having Improved Ductility A method for preparing a nanostructured aluminum alloy involves heating an

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design improvement phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Visualizing information to improve building performance: a study of expert users  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

benchmark between buildings, including normalized values and energybenchmark existing or design-phase buildings against a wide array of energy

Lehrer, David; Vasudev, Janani

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Deferring design pattern decisions and automating structural pattern changes using a design-pattern-based programming system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the design phase of software development, the designer must make many fundamental design decisions concerning the architecture of the system. Incorrect decisions are relatively easy and inexpensive to fix if caught during the design process, but the ... Keywords: Design patterns, design decisions, object-oriented frameworks, parallel programming, software maintenance

Steve MacDonald; Kai Tan; Jonathan Schaeffer; Duane Szafron

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Premixer Design for High Hydrogen Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This 21-month project translated DLN technology to the unique properties of high hydrogen content IGCC fuels, and yielded designs in preparation for a future testing and validation phase. Fundamental flame characterization, mixing, and flame property measurement experiments were conducted to tailor computational design tools and criteria to create a framework for predicting nozzle operability (e.g., flame stabilization, emissions, resistance to flashback/flame-holding and auto-ignition). This framework was then used to establish, rank, and evaluate potential solutions to the operability challenges of IGCC combustion. The leading contenders were studied and developed with the most promising concepts evaluated via computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling and using the design rules generated by the fundamental experiments, as well as using GE's combustion design tools and practices. Finally, the project scoped the necessary steps required to carry the design through mechanical and durability review, testing, and validation, towards full demonstration of this revolutionary technology. This project was carried out in three linked tasks with the following results. (1) Develop conceptual designs of premixer and down-select the promising options. This task defined the ''gap'' between existing design capabilities and the targeted range of IGCC fuel compositions and evaluated the current capability of DLN pre-mixer designs when operated at similar conditions. Two concepts (1) swirl based and (2) multiple point lean direct injection based premixers were selected via a QFD from 13 potential design concepts. (2) Carry out CFD on chosen options (1 or 2) to evaluate operability risks. This task developed the leading options down-selected in Task 1. Both a GE15 swozzle based premixer and a lean direct injection concept were examined by performing a detailed CFD study wherein the aerodynamics of the design, tog