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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design cooling water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Designated Product: Water-Cooled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FEMP Designated FEMP Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Federal Requirements

2

Designing a 'Near Optimum' Cooling-Water System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling water is expensive to circulate. Reducing its flow - i.e., hiking exchanger outlet temperatures - can cut tower, pump and piping investment as much as one-third and operating cost almost in half. Heat-exchanger-network optimization has been accomplished in large integrated plants, such as petroleum refineries. In many of the chemical process industries, however, a plant contains several individual processes, and network optimization, except on a limited basis, is not feasible. So far, no one has developed similar procedures for designing and optimizing a cooling-water once through-exchanger system. This article attempts to fill the void by presenting a design basis that will produce a 'near optimum' system. A cooling-water system consists of four major components: heat exchangers, cooling towers, circulation piping and pumps. To optimize such a system, one must define the system interactions and apply these relationships to the simultaneous design of the aforementioned equipment. This article develops criteria that for most applications allow one to ignore system interactions, and still design a 'near optimum' system. Cooling-water systems have long been designed by 'rules of thumb' that call for fixing the cool ant temperature-rise across all heat exchangers (usually 20 F) and setting the coolant inlet temperature to the heat exchanger at the site's wet-bulb temperature plus 8 F. These rules produce a workable cooling system; but, by taking the same coolant rise across all exchangers, regardless of the individual process outlet-temperatures, this cannot result in an optimized design. The design method presented in this article replaces the 'rules of thumb' with criteria that are easy to apply and that take into account the effect that the individual exchanger process outlet- temperatures have on cooling-system economics. Economic analyses of actual process have shown that cooling-system investment can be reduced by one third, and cooling-system operating cost by one half, If the proposed design criteria are used instead of the 'rules of thumb.' It has been found that the controlling economic factor for a cooling system is the quantity of water being circulated. Reducing the flow (raising the coolant outlet temperature of heat exchangers) significantly reduces cooling tower, pump and piping investment, and operating cost, and only moderately increases the heat-exchanger investment. The overriding conclusion to be drawn is that cooling water is very expensive, and its conservation can result in significant savings.

Crozier, R. A., Jr.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Design and Operating Guidelines Manual for Cooling-Water Treatment - Treatment of Recirculated Cooling Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This preliminary manual was developed to provide a systematic procedure for evaluating candidate strategies for the treatment of recirculated cooling water. It presents (1) a means of selecting optimal treatment methods and facilities on the basis of technical and economic considerations, and (2) guidelines for proper cooling-water system operation. Descriptions of, and user's manuals for, the cooling-system process and chemical equilibrium computer simulation models are included.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Development and Design of a Cooling Water Intake Structure Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI contracted Alden Laboratories, Inc. to develop an entrainment and impingement database (EIDB) in response to information needs that were identified from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) proposed revisions to Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act (CWA). The original objective for the use of the EIDB was to determine if various environmental and plant operational factors influence entrainment and impingement of fish at cooling water intake structures (CWISs). It was subsequently dete...

2002-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

5

FEMP-Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FEMP-Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines FEMP-Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines FEMP-Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines October 7, 2013 - 11:11am Addthis Federal agencies are required by the National Energy Conservation Policy Act (P.L. 95-619), Executive Order 13423, Executive Order 13514, and Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR) Subpart 23.2 and 53.223 to specify and buy ENERGY STAR® qualified products or, in categories not included in the ENERGY STAR program, FEMP designated products, which are among the highest 25% of equivalent products for energy efficiency. A PDF version of Water-Cooled Ice Machines is also available. Performance Requirements for Federal Purchases Type Ice Harvest Rate (pounds per 24 hours) Energy Usea (per 100 pounds) Potable Water Useb (per 100 pounds)

6

Critical Design Issues of Tokamak Cooling Water System of ITER's Fusion Reactor  

SciTech Connect

U.S. ITER is responsible for the design, engineering, and procurement of the Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS). The TCWS transfers heat generated in the Tokamak to cooling water during nominal pulsed operation 850 MW at up to 150 C and 4.2 MPa water pressure. This water contains radionuclides because impurities (e.g., tritium) diffuse from in-vessel components and the vacuum vessel by water baking at 200 240 C at up to 4.4MPa, and corrosion products become activated by neutron bombardment. The system is designated as safety important class (SIC) and will be fabricated to comply with the French Order concerning nuclear pressure equipment (December 2005) and the EU Pressure Equipment Directive using ASME Section VIII, Div 2 design codes. The complexity of the TCWS design and fabrication presents unique challenges. Conceptual design of this one-of-a-kind cooling system has been completed with several issues that need to be resolved to move to next stage of the design. Those issues include flow balancing between over hundreds of branch pipelines in parallel to supply cooling water to blankets, determination of optimum flow velocity while minimizing the potential for cavitation damage, design for freezing protection for cooling water flowing through cryostat (freezing) environment, requirements for high-energy piping design, and electromagnetic impact to piping and components. Although the TCWS consists of standard commercial components such as piping with valves and fittings, heat exchangers, and pumps, complex requirements present interesting design challenges. This paper presents a brief description of TCWS conceptual design and critical design issues that need to be resolved.

Kim, Seokho H [ORNL; Berry, Jan [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

WATER COOLED RETORT COVER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A retort cover is designed for use in the production of magnesium metal by the condensation of vaporized metal on a collecting surface. The cover includes a condensing surface, insulating means adjacent to the condensing surface, ind a water-cooled means for the insulating means. The irrangement of insulation and the cooling means permits the magnesium to be condensed at a high temperature and in massive nonpyrophoric form. (AEC)

Ash, W.J.; Pozzi, J.F.

1962-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

RAMI Analysis for Designing and Optimizing Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS) for the ITER's Fusion Reactor  

SciTech Connect

U.S.-ITER is responsible for the design, engineering, and procurement of the Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS). TCWS is designed to provide cooling and baking for client systems that include the first wall/blanket, vacuum vessel, divertor, and neutral beam injector. Additional operations that support these primary functions include chemical control of water provided to client systems, draining and drying for maintenance, and leak detection/localization. TCWS interfaces with 27 systems including the secondary cooling system, which rejects this heat to the environment. TCWS transfers heat generated in the Tokamak during nominal pulsed operation - 850 MW at up to 150 C and 4.2 MPa water pressure. Impurities are diffused from in-vessel components and the vacuum vessel by water baking at 200-240 C at up to 4.4 MPa. TCWS is complex because it serves vital functions for four primary clients whose performance is critical to ITER's success and interfaces with more than 20 additional ITER systems. Conceptual design of this one-of-a-kind cooling system has been completed; however, several issues remain that must be resolved before moving to the next stage of the design process. The 2004 baseline design indicated cooling loops that have no fault tolerance for component failures. During plasma operation, each cooling loop relies on a single pump, a single pressurizer, and one heat exchanger. Consequently, failure of any of these would render TCWS inoperable, resulting in plasma shutdown. The application of reliability, availability, maintainability, and inspectability (RAMI) tools during the different stages of TCWS design is crucial for optimization purposes and for maintaining compliance with project requirements. RAMI analysis will indicate appropriate equipment redundancy that provides graceful degradation in the event of an equipment failure. This analysis helps demonstrate that using proven, commercially available equipment is better than using custom-designed equipment with no field experience and lowers specific costs while providing higher reliability. This paper presents a brief description of the TCWS conceptual design and the application of RAMI tools to optimize the design at different stages during the project.

Ferrada, Juan J [ORNL; Reiersen, Wayne T [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Cooling water distribution system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using an interconnected series of radial guide elements, a plurality of circumferential collector elements and collector boxes to collect and feed the cooling water into distribution channels extending along the curved surface of the steel containment vessel. The cooling water is uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weirs in the distribution channels.

Orr, Richard (Pittsburgh, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Cooling Water System Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During summer months, many manufacturing plants have to cut back in rates because the cooling water system is not providing sufficient cooling to support higher production rates. There are many low/no-cost techniques available to improve tower performance. To understand the importance of the optimization techniques, cooling tower theory will be discussed first.

Aegerter, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Condensers for Combined-Cycle Plants: Air-Cooled and Water-Cooled Condensers Design Best Practices and Procurement Specifications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural Gas Combined-Cycle (NGCC) power plants are expected to play an increasing role in the mix of new power generation. Additional guidance is needed for utilities, contracted engineering firms, and suppliers to better specify, design, supply, and operate these next-generation plants. This document focuses on the steam condensers, both wet and air-cooled, which are anticipated to serve these plants. It provides guidance, best practices, and lessons learned in regard to these condensers and offers insi...

2010-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

12

Guidelines for selecting a solar heating, cooling or hot water design  

SciTech Connect

Guidelines are presented for the professional who may have to choose between competing solar heating and cooling designs for buildings. The experience of the National Solar Data Network in monitoring over 100 solar installations are drawn upon. Three basic principles and a design selection checklist are developed which will aid in choosing the most cost effective design.

Kelly, C.J. Jr.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Optimization of Cooling Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A cooling water system can be optimized by operation at the highest possible cycles of concentration without risking sealing and fouling on heat exchanger surfaces. The way to optimize will be shown, with a number of examples of new systems.

Matson, J.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Engineered design of SSC cooling ponds  

SciTech Connect

The cooling requirements of the SSC are significant and adequate cooling water systems to meet these requirements are critical to the project`s successful operation. The use of adequately designed cooling ponds will provide reliable cooling for operation while also meeting environmental goals of the project to maintain streamflow and flood peaks to preconstruction levels as well as other streamflow and water quality requirements of the Texas Water Commission and the Environmental Protection Agency.

Bear, J.B.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Water Cooling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cooling: Cooling: Water cooling is commonly defined as a method of using water as a heat conduction to remove heat from an object, machine, or other substance by passing cold water over or through it. In energy generation, water cooling is typically used to cool steam back into water so it can be used again in the generation process. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Water Cooling Typical water cooled condenser used for condensing steam Water or liquid cooling is the most efficient cooling method and requires the smallest footprint when cold water is readily available. When used in power generation the steam/vapor that exits the turbine is condensed back into water and reused by means of a heat exchanger. Water cooling requires a water resource that is cold enough to bring steam, typically

16

Commercial Cool Storage Design Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This state-of-the-art handbook provides comprehensive guidance for designing ice and chilled-water storage systems for commercial buildings. HVAC engineers can take advantage of attractive rates and incentives offered by utilities to increase the market for cool storage systems.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Water cooled steam jet  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water cooled steam jet for transferring fluid and preventing vapor lock, or vaporization of the fluid being transferred, has a venturi nozzle and a cooling jacket. The venturi nozzle produces a high velocity flow which creates a vacuum to draw fluid from a source of fluid. The venturi nozzle has a converging section connected to a source of steam, a diffuser section attached to an outlet and a throat portion disposed therebetween. The cooling jacket surrounds the venturi nozzle and a suction tube through which the fluid is being drawn into the venturi nozzle. Coolant flows through the cooling jacket. The cooling jacket dissipates heat generated by the venturi nozzle to prevent vapor lock.

Wagner, Jr., Edward P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

The design and evaluation of a water delivery system for evaporative cooling of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An investigation was performed to demonstrate system design for the delivery of water required for evaporative cooling of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The water delivery system uses spray nozzles capable of injecting water directly and uniformly to the nickel metal foam flow-field (element for distributing the reactant gases over the surface of the electrodes) on the anode side from which water can migrate to the cathode side of the cell via electroosmotic drag. For an effective overall cooling, water distribution over the surface of the nickel foam has to be uniform to avoid creation of hotspots within the cell. A prototype PEMFC structure was constructed modeled after a 35 kW electrical output PEMFC stack. Water was sprayed on the nickel metal foam flow-field using two types of nozzle spray, giving conical fog type flow and flat fan type flow. A detailed investigation of the distribution pattern of water over the surface of the nickel metal flow field was conducted. The motive behind the investigation was to determine if design parameters such as type of water flow from nozzles, vertical location of the water nozzles above the flowfield, area of the nozzles, or operating variables such as reactant gas flow had any effect on water distribution over the surface of the Ni-metal foam flow field. It was found that the design parameters (types of flow, area and location of the nozzle) had a direct impact on the distribution of water in the nickel metal foam. However, the operating variable, reactant gas flow, showed no effect on the water distribution pattern in the Ni-foam.

Al-Asad, Dawood Khaled Abdullah

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

HEPTAFLUOROPROPANE WITH WATER SPRAY COOLING ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HEPTAFLUOROPROPANE WITH WATER SPRAY COOLING SYSTEM AS A TOTAL ... and evaluation studies on active and passive fire protection ...

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

20

Open Cooling Water Chemistry Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State-of-the-art chemistry programs help to ensure the continued operation of open cooling water systems while mitigating corrosion and fouling mechanisms. This document, Open Cooling Water Chemistry Guideline, prepared by a committee of industry experts, reflects field and laboratory data on corrosion and fouling issues of open cooling systems.BackgroundService Water System Chemical Addition Guideline (Electric Power Research Institute ...

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design cooling water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

IEP - Water-Energy Interface: Cooling Water Intake Structures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The types of cooling water systems to be evaluated are: Wet Cooling Tower - The condenser is cooled with water recirculated to a mechanical draft cooling tower. Because there...

22

Closed Cooling Water Chemistry Guideline: Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Closed Cooling Water Chemistry Guideline addresses the use of chemicals and monitoring methods to mitigate corrosion, fouling, and microbiological growth in the closed cooling-water (CCW) systems of nuclear and fossil-fueled power plants. The chemical additives used for these purposes depend on plant-design characteristics, water quality, operating parameters, and the specifications of the Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) suppliers. The list of chemicals is not as extensive as that ...

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

23

Flow Stability of Supercritical Water Cooled Systems  

SciTech Connect

Research activities are ongoing worldwide to develop nuclear power plants with supercritical water cooled reactor (SCWR) with the purpose to achieve a high thermal efficiency and to improve their economical competitiveness. However, the strong variation of the thermal-physical properties of water in the vicinity of the pseudo-critical line results in challenging tasks in thermal-hydraulic design of a SCWR. One of the challenging tasks is to understand and to predict the dynamic behavior and flow stability of supercritical water cooled systems. Although extensive thermal-hydraulic research activities have been carried out worldwide, studies on flow stability of SC water cooled systems are scarce. The present study deals with the flow behavior of SC water cooled systems. For this purpose the computer code SASC was developed, which is applied to a simplified cooling system. The effect of various parameters on the flow behavior is investigated. The first results achieved up to now reveals a complicated dynamic performance of a system cooled by supercritical water. (authors)

Cheng, X.; Kuang, B.; Yang, Y.H. [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 1954 Hua Shan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Definition: Water Cooling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Cooling Water Cooling Water cooling is commonly defined as a method of using water as a heat conduction to remove heat from an object, machine, or other substance by passing cold water over or through it. In energy generation, water cooling is typically used to cool steam back into water so it can be used again in the generation process.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Water cooling is a method of heat removal from components and industrial equipment. As opposed to air cooling, water is used as the heat conductor. Water cooling is commonly used for cooling automobile internal combustion engines and large industrial facilities such as steam electric power plants, hydroelectric generators, petroleum refineries and chemical plants. Other uses include cooling the barrels of machine guns, cooling of

25

"Hot" for Warm Water Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

liquid cooling, dry cooler, cooling tower 1. INTRODUCTIONsolutions for cooling. Substituting cooling towers,hybrid cooling towers, or dry coolers that provide warmer

Coles, Henry

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Management of Non-Cooling Water Releases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report assesses the efficacy and cost of water management practices that can be used by power companies to address non-cooling water and stormwater release issues with respect to siting, design, and operation of facilities, including generating stations, substations, and rights-of-way in urban and rural settings. The report will be of value to environmental and generation managers within power companies, as well as regulators, water resource managers, and environmentalists.

2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

27

Optimized Design of a Furnace Cooling System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a case study of manufacturing furnace optimized re-design. The bottleneck in the production process is the cooling of heat treatment furnaces. These ovens are on an approximate 24-hour cycle, heating for 12 hours and cooling for 12 hours. Pressurized argon and process water are used to expedite cooling. The proposed modifications aim to minimize cycling by reducing cooling time; they are grouped into three fundamental mechanisms. The first is a recommendation to modify current operating procedures. This entails opening the furnace doors at higher than normal temperatures. A furnace temperature model based on current parameters is used to show the reduction in cooling time in response to opening the furnace doors at higher temperatures. The second mechanism considers the introduction of forced argon convection. Argon is used in the process to mitigate part oxidation. Cycling argon through the furnace during cooling increases convection over the parts and removes heat from the furnace envelope. Heat transfer models based on convective Nusselt correlations are used to determine the increase in heat transfer rate. The last mechanism considers a modification to the current heat exchanger. By decreasing the temperature of the water jacket and increasing heat exchanger efficiency, heat transfer from the furnace is increased and cooling time is shortened. This analysis is done using the Effectiveness-NTU method.

Morelli, F.; Bretschneider, R.; Dauzat, J.; Guymon, M.; Studebaker, J.; Rasmussen, B. P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Water Cooling Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...coil. Usually, two pumps are provided, one as a standby with an automatic switchover, because it is extremely important to circulate water through the coil continuously to prevent it from being damaged. To protect induction furnace equipment during momentary power interruptions or prolonged power...

29

Water cooling of HVDC thyristor valves  

SciTech Connect

It is generally accepted that water is a very effective medium to remove heat losses from any type of equipment. When used for HVDC thyristor valves, the fundamentals of electrolyte conduction and water chemistry need to be considered in the design of the cooling circuit. The characteristics of the materials used, in conjunction with high voltage stresses and circuit configuration, play an important role to assure longevity and corrosion-free performance.

Lips, H.P. (Siemens AG, Erlangen (Germany))

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Wet cooling towers: rule-of-thumb design and simulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A survey of wet cooling tower literature was performed to develop a simplified method of cooling tower design and simulation for use in power plant cycle optimization. The theory of heat exchange in wet cooling towers is briefly summarized. The Merkel equation (the fundamental equation of heat transfer in wet cooling towers) is presented and discussed. The cooling tower fill constant (Ka) is defined and values derived. A rule-of-thumb method for the optimized design of cooling towers is presented. The rule-of-thumb design method provides information useful in power plant cycle optimization, including tower dimensions, water consumption rate, exit air temperature, power requirements and construction cost. In addition, a method for simulation of cooling tower performance at various operating conditions is presented. This information is also useful in power plant cycle evaluation. Using the information presented, it will be possible to incorporate wet cooling tower design and simulation into a procedure to evaluate and optimize power plant cycles.

Leeper, S.A.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Passive containment cooling water distribution device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using a series of radial guide elements and cascading weir boxes to collect and then distribute the cooling water into a series of distribution areas through a plurality of cascading weirs. The cooling water is then uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weir notches in the face plate of the weir box.

Conway, Lawrence E. (Hookstown, PA); Fanto, Susan V. (Plum Borough, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

IEP - Water-Energy Interface: Advanced Cooling Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cooling Technology Cooling Technology This component of the program is focused on research to develop technologies that improve performance and reduce costs associated with wet cooling, dry cooling, and hybrid cooling technologies. In addition, the research area covers innovative methods to control bio-fouling of cooling water intake structures as well as advances in intake structure systems. Read More! It is technically possible to cool power plants with minimal water use. However, at this time such cooling methods are not as economically feasible as traditional cooling systems. Additional research and development is necessary to develop cooling systems that use as little water as possible, but at a reasonable cost. Water intake structures are also an area of concern, especially considering the Clean Water Act 316(b) regulation which requires that the location, design, construction, and capacity of cooling water intake structures reflect the best technology available for minimizing adverse environmental impact. With plant intake structures, the particular concern is impingement and entrainment of aquatic organisms.

33

Closed Cooling Water Chemistry Guideline, Revision 1: Revision 1 to TR-107396, Closed Cooling Water Chemistry Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This "Closed Cooling Water Chemistry Guideline" addresses the use of chemicals to mitigate corrosion, fouling, and microbiological growth in the closed cooling water (CCW) systems of nuclear power plants. The chemical additives used for these purposes depend on plant design characteristics, water quality, operating parameters, and the specifications of nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) suppliers. The list of chemicals is not as extensive as that for service water systems but can be confusing to utility ...

2004-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

34

Study on Water-Cooled Solar Semiconductor Air Conditioner  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water-cooled solar semiconductor air conditioner was designed. Relevant calculation was made to determine the room's cooling load, which export the solar panels and battery capacity, followed by selection of CNC matcher. Development work also involves ... Keywords: solar energy, peltier effect, semiconductor air conditioner

Dong Zhi-Ming; Chang Ji-Bin; Xiang Li-Juan; Zhou Xue-Bin

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

"Hot" for Warm Water Cooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Published 112011 Conference Location Seattle, WA Call Number LBNL-5128E Abstract Liquid cooling is key to reducing energy consumption for this generation of supercomputers and...

36

Development of Materials for Supercritical-Water-Cooled Reactor |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Development of Materials for Supercritical-Water-Cooled Reactor Development of Materials for Supercritical-Water-Cooled Reactor Development of Materials for Supercritical-Water-Cooled Reactor Supercritical-Water-Cooled Reactor (SCWR) was selected as one of the promising candidates in Generation IV reactors for its prominent advantages; those are the high thermal efficiency, the system simplification, the R&D cost minimization and the flexibility for core design. As the demand for advanced nuclear system increases, Japanese R&D project started in 1999 aiming to provide technical information essential to demonstration of SCPR technologies through three sub-themes of 1. Plant conceptual design, 2. Thermal-hydraulics, and 3. Material. Although the material development is critical issue of SCWR development, previous studies were limited for the screening tests on commercial alloys

37

Complete Muon Cooling Channel Design and Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considerable progress has been made in developing promising subsystems for muon beam cooling channels to provide the extraordinary reduction of emittances required for an energy-frontier muon collider. However, it has not yet been demonstrated that the various proposed cooling subsystems can be consolidated into an integrated end-to-end design. Presented here are concepts to address the matching of transverse emittances between subsystems through an extension of the theoretical framework of the Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), which allows a general analytical approach to guide the transition from one set of cooling channel parameters to another.

Neuffer, D.V.; /Fermilab; Ankenbrandt, C.M.; Johnson, R.P.; Yoshikawa, C.Y.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia; Derbenev, Y.S.; Morozov, V.S.; /Jefferson Lab

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Complete Muon Cooling Channel Design and Simulations  

SciTech Connect

Considerable progress has been made in developing promising subsystems for muon beam cooling channels to provide the extraordinary reduction of emittances required for an energy-frontier muon collider. However, it has not yet been demonstrated that the various proposed cooling subsystems can be consolidated into an integrated end-to-end design. Presented here are concepts to address the matching of transverse emittances between subsystems through an extension of the theoretical framework of the Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), which allows a general analytical approach to guide the transition from one set of cooling channel parameters to another.

C. Y. Yoshikawa, C.M. Ankenbrandt, R.P. Johnson, Y.S. Derbenev, V.S. Morozov, D.V. Neuffer, K. Yonehara

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

"Hot" for Warm Water Cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquid cooling is key to reducing energy consumption for this generation of supercomputers and remains on the roadmap for the foreseeable future. This is because the heat capacity of liquids is orders of magnitude larger than that of air and once heat has been transferred to a liquid, it can be removed from the datacenter efficiently. The transition from air to liquid cooling is an inflection point providing an opportunity to work collectively to set guidelines for facilitating the energy efficiency of liquid-cooled High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities and systems. The vision is to use non-compressor-based cooling, to facilitate heat re-use, and thereby build solutions that are more energy-efficient, less carbon intensive and more cost effective than their air-cooled predecessors. The Energy Efficient HPC Working Group is developing guidelines for warmer liquid-cooling temperatures in order to standardize facility and HPC equipment, and provide more opportunity for reuse of waste heat. This report describes the development of those guidelines.

IBM Corporation; Energy Efficient HPC Working Group; Hewlett Packard Corporation; SGI; Cray Inc.; Intel Corporation; U.S. Army Engineer Research Development Center; Coles, Henry; Ellsworth, Michael; Martinez, David J.; Bailey, Anna-Maria; Banisadr, Farhad; Bates, Natalie; Coghlan, Susan; Cowley, David E.; Dube, Nicholas; Fields, Parks; Greenberg, Steve; Iyengar, Madhusudan; Kulesza, Peter R.; Loncaric, Josip; McCann, Tim; Pautsch, Greg; Patterson, Michael K.; Rivera, Richard G.; Rottman, Greg K.; Sartor, Dale; Tschudi, William; Vinson, Wade; Wescott, Ralph

2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

40

Program on Technology Innovation: Cooling Water Review of the Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Utility Requirements Document (URD) was developed and last revised in 1999 to provide a list of requirements for the design and construction of new nuclear power plants. The objective of this project was to review URD Vol. III. This volume covers passive advanced light water reactors (ALWRs) for plant design requirements with respect to operations and maintenance (O&M) practices of the plant's cooling water systems (not including the circulating water system used for condenser cooling). The revi...

2007-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design cooling water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Water-lithium bromide double-effect absorption cooling analysis  

SciTech Connect

A numerical model was developed for the transient simulation of the double-effect, water-lithium bromide absorption cooling machine, and the use of the model to determine the effect of the various design and input variables on the absorption unit performance. The performance parameters considered were coefficient of performance and cooling capacity. The sensitivity analysis was performed by selecting a nominal condition and determining performance sensitivity for each variable with others held constant. The variables considered in the study include source hot water, cooling water, and chilled water temperatures; source hot water, cooling water, and chilled water flow rates; solution circulation rate; heat exchanger areas; pressure drop between evaporator and absorber; solution pump characteristics; and refrigerant flow control methods. The performance sensitivity study indicated in particular that the distribution of heat exchanger area among the various (seven) heat exchange components is a very-important design consideration. Moreover, it indicated that the method of flow control of the first effect refrigerant vapor through the second effect is a critical design feature when absorption units operate over a significant range of cooling capacity. The model was used to predict the performance of the Trane absorption unit with fairly good accuracy.

Vliet, G.C.; Lawson, M.B.; Lithgow, R.A.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Stability analysis of supercritical water cooled reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor (SCWR) is a concept for an advanced reactor that will operate at high pressure (25MPa) and high temperature (500°C average core exit). The high coolant temperature as it leaves the ...

Zhao, Jiyun, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Conceptual design for a re-entrant type fuel channel for supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Current CANDU-type nuclear reactors use a once-through fuel-channel with an annulus gas insulating it from the moderator. The current reference design for a CANDU-type SuperCritical… (more)

Samuel, Jeffrey

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

New and Underutilized Technology: Water Cooled Oil Free Magnetic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Cooled Oil Free Magnetic Bearing Compressors New and Underutilized Technology: Water Cooled Oil Free Magnetic Bearing Compressors October 4, 2013 - 3:58pm Addthis The...

45

EVAPORATIVE COOLING - CONCEPTUAL DESIGN FOR ATLAS SCT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The conceptual design of an evaporative two-phase flow cooling system for the ATLAS SCT detector is described, using perfluorinated propane (C3F8) as a coolant. Comparison with perfluorinated butane (C4F10) is made, although the detailed design is presented only for C3F8. The two-phase pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient are calculated in order to determine the dimensions of the cooling pipes and module contacts for the Barrel SCT. The region in which the flow is homogeneous is determined. The cooling cycle, pipework, compressor, heat exchangers and other main elements of the system are calculated in order to be able to discuss the system control, safety and reliability. Evaporative cooling appears to be substantially better than the binary ice system from the point of view of safety, reliability, detector thickness, heat transfer coefficient, cost and simplicity.

Niinikoski, T O

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Air and water cooled modulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact high power magnetic compression apparatus and method are disclosed for delivering high voltage pulses of short duration at a high repetition rate and high peak power output which does not require the use of environmentally unacceptable fluids such as chlorofluorocarbons either as a dielectric or as a coolant, and which discharges very little waste heat into the surrounding air. A first magnetic switch has cooling channels formed therethrough to facilitate the removal of excess heat. The first magnetic switch is mounted on a printed circuit board. A pulse transformer comprised of a plurality of discrete electrically insulated and magnetically coupled units is also mounted on said printed board and is electrically coupled to the first magnetic switch. The pulse transformer also has cooling means attached thereto for removing heat from the pulse transformer. A second magnetic switch also having cooling means for removing excess heat is electrically coupled to the pulse transformer. Thus, the present invention is able to provide high voltage pulses of short duration at a high repetition rate and high peak power output without the use of environmentally unacceptable fluids and without discharging significant waste heat into the surrounding air. 9 figs.

Birx, D.L.; Arnold, P.A.; Ball, D.G.; Cook, E.G.

1995-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

47

Air and water cooled modulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact high power magnetic compression apparatus and method for delivering high voltage pulses of short duration at a high repetition rate and high peak power output which does not require the use of environmentally unacceptable fluids such as chlorofluorocarbons either as a dielectric or as a coolant, and which discharges very little waste heat into the surrounding air. A first magnetic switch has cooling channels formed therethrough to facilitate the removal of excess heat. The first magnetic switch is mounted on a printed circuit board. A pulse transformer comprised of a plurality of discrete electrically insulated and magnetically coupled units is also mounted on said printed board and is electrically coupled to the first magnetic switch. The pulse transformer also has cooling means attached thereto for removing heat from the pulse transformer. A second magnetic switch also having cooling means for removing excess heat is electrically coupled to the pulse transformer. Thus, the present invention is able to provide high voltage pulses of short duration at a high repetition rate and high peak power output without the use of environmentally unacceptable fluids and without discharging significant waste heat into the surrounding air.

Birx, Daniel L. (Oakley, CA); Arnold, Phillip A. (Livermore, CA); Ball, Don G. (Livermore, CA); Cook, Edward G. (Livermore, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

An Improved Simple Chilled Water Cooling Coil Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Improved Simple Chilled Water Cooling Coil Model An Improved Simple Chilled Water Cooling Coil Model Title An Improved Simple Chilled Water Cooling Coil Model Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-6031E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Wang, Liping, Philip Haves, and Walter F. Buhl Conference Name SimBuild 2012 IBPSA Conference Date Published 08/2012 Abstract The accurate prediction of cooling and dehumidification coil performance is important in model-based fault detection and in the prediction of HVAC system energy consumption for support of both design and operations. It is frequently desirable to use a simple cooling coil model that does not require detailed specification of coil geometry and material properties. The approach adopted is to match the overall UA of the coil to the rating conditions and to estimate the air-side and water-side components of the UA using correlations developed by Holmes (1982). This approach requires some geometrical information about the coil and the paper investigates the sensitivity of the overall performance prediction to uncertainties in this information, including assuming a fixed ratio of air-side to water-side UA at the rating condition. Finally, simulation results from different coil models are compared, and experimental data are used to validate the improved cooling coil model.

49

Improving the Water Efficiency of Cooling Production System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For most of the time, cooling towers (CTs) of cooling systems operate under partial load conditions and by regulating the air circulation with a variable frequency drive (VFD), significant reduction in the fan power can be achieved. In Kuwait and other counties of Arabian Peninsula, reduced airflow can lead to reduction in water consumption as well, since during the summer season, the dry bulb temperature of the ambient air is higher than the incoming hot water temperature, and the air undergoes sensible cooling. This paper presents the findings of a study conducted in the Avenues mall, Kuwait. Initially, the CTs operated only at high speed, and on a typical summer day nearly one fourth of the make-up water was used for self cooling of air. The study based on measured data revealed that the use of VFD can reduce the water wastage for self-cooling of air by as much as 75% and overall water consumption by 18.6% while keeping the cooling system performance at design level.

Maheshwari, G.; Al-Hadban, Y.; Al-Taqi, H. H.; Alasseri, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Helical Muon Beam Cooling Channel Engineering Design  

SciTech Connect

The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), a novel technique for six-dimensional (6D) ionization cooling of muon beams, has shown considerable promise based on analytic and simulation studies. However, the implementation of this revolutionary method of muon cooling requires new techniques for the integration of hydrogen-pressurized, high-power RF cavities into the low-temperature superconducting magnets of the HCC. We present the progress toward a conceptual design for the integration of 805 MHz RF cavities into a 10 T Nb{sub 3}Sn based HCC test section. We include discussions on the pressure and thermal barriers needed within the cryostat to maintain operation of the magnet at 4.2 K while operating the RF and energy absorber at a higher temperature. Additionally, we include progress on the Nb{sub 3}Sn helical solenoid design.

Kashikhin, V.S.; Lopes, M.L.; Romanov, G.V.; Tartaglia, M.A.; Yonehara, K.; Yu, M.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab; Flanagan, G.; Johnson, R.P.; Kazakevich, G.M.; Marhauser, F.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Prevention of Flow Restrictions in Generator Stator Water Cooling Circuits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Generator stator water cooling systems are designed to operate with dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations of either more than 2 parts per million (ppm) or less than 50 parts per billion (ppb). Large- and small-scale experimental studies and literature surveys show that if the system operates with DO concentration in either design range, copper corrosion-product-particle release rates are low and do not lead to plugging of hollow strands or clogging of strainers. In the range between the extremes -- ...

2002-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

52

Best Management Practices Manual for Preventing Cooling Water Intake Blockages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Blockage of the cooling water intake structure (CWIS) occurs frequently at nuclear and fossil power facilities worldwide, regardless of fuel type or cooling water body source. The loss of cooling water impacts facility safety and reliabilityprincipally at nuclear facilitiesand results in a loss of revenue. This Best Management Practices Manual for Preventing Cooling Water Intake Blockages presents a review of debris management at existing facilities and provides procedural and operation and maintenance (...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

53

Application of upspray type water distribution systems in cooling towers  

SciTech Connect

The efficient and uniform distribution of the warm circulating water on to the filling of cooling towers has been the continuing goal of the tower designer. The final element in the water distribution system, the sprayer, plays an important role in achieving this objective. This paper discusses the performance and operational characteristics of a sprayer utilized in counterflow towers that directs the water leaving the sprayer nozzle in an upward direction and briefly compares its performance with that of downward sprayers. The discussion also covers relative tower economics and application data of the sprayer.

Fay, H.P.; Hesse, G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Best Practice for Energy Efficient Cleanrooms: Cooling tower and condenser water optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cleanrooms: Cooling Tower and Condenser Water OptimizationCleanrooms: Cooling tower and condenser water optimization2 Cooling tower and condenser water

Xu, Tengfang

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Best Practice for Energy Efficient Cleanrooms: Cooling tower and condenser water optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficient Cleanrooms: Cooling Tower and Condenser WaterEfficient Cleanrooms: Cooling tower and condenser water2 Cooling tower and condenser water

Xu, Tengfang

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Computational modeling and design of actively-cooled microvascular materials Soheil Soghrati a,b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

were used for the calibration and validation of the 2D IGFEM model. Water was used as the coolantComputational modeling and design of actively-cooled microvascular materials Soheil Soghrati a a c t The computational modeling and design of an actively-cooled microvascular fin specimen

Braun, Paul

57

Conceptual design description for the tritium recovery system for the US ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) Li sub 2 O/Be water cooled blanket  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The tritium recovery system for the US ITER Li{sub 2}O/Be water cooled blanket processes two separate helium purge streams to recover tritium from the Li{sub 2}O zones and the Be zones of the blanket, to process the waste products, and to recirculate the helium back to the blanket. The components are selected to minimize the tritium inventory of the recovery system, and to minimize waste products. The system is robust to either an increase in the tritium release rate or to an in-leak of water in the purge system. Three major components were used to process these streams, first, 5A molecular sieves at {minus}196{degree}C separate hydrogen from the helium, second, a solid oxide electrolysis unit is used to reduce all molecular water, and third, a palladium/silver diffuser is used to ensure that only hydrogen (H{sub 2}, HT) species reach the cryogenic distillation unit. Other units are present to recover tritium from waste products but the three major components are the basis of the blanket tritium recovery system. 32 refs.

Finn, P.A.; Sze, D.K. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA). Fusion Power Program); Clemmer, R.G. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Water-Cooled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Covered Product Covered Product Category: Water-Cooled Electric Chillers to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Water-Cooled Electric Chillers on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Water-Cooled Electric Chillers on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Water-Cooled Electric Chillers on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Water-Cooled Electric Chillers on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Water-Cooled Electric Chillers on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Water-Cooled Electric Chillers on AddThis.com...

59

Optimization of hybrid-water/air-cooled condenser in an enhanced turbine  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Optimization of hybrid-water/air-cooled condenser in an enhanced turbine Optimization of hybrid-water/air-cooled condenser in an enhanced turbine geothermal ORC system Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Optimization of hybrid-water/air-cooled condenser in an enhanced turbine geothermal ORC system Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Air-Cooling Project Description The technical approaches are: -UTRC shall develop a lab-based analysis of hybrid-water/air-cooled condensers with minimal water consumption, focusing on combined mist evaporative pre-cooling and mist deluge evaporative cooling technology applied to microchannel heat exchangers. Models to predict evaporative cooling performance will be validated by sub-scale testing. The predicted performance will be compared to that of state-of-the-art commercial evaporative coolers. -UTRC shall analyze the interaction of turbine design and cooling needs and specifically address how an enhanced turbine, which features variable nozzles and diffuser boundary layer suction, would further improve the ORC system performance and enable full utilization of the hybrid-cooled system. UTRC shall design, procure and test the enhanced turbine in an existing 200 kW geothermal ORC system for a technology demonstration. -UTRC shall complete a detailed design of the hybrid-cooled geothermal ORC system with an enhanced turbine that complies with its performance, cost, and quality requirements, and use this system design to prescribe subsystem/component technology requirements and interfaces. UTRC shall optimize UTC's PureCycle® geothermal ORC system integrated with a hybrid-water/air-cooled condenser and an enhanced turbine for net power output, efficiency and water consumption. -UTRC shall analyze the feasibility of addressing pure water supply for hybrid-water/aircooled condenser by using geothermal-driven Liquid-Gap-Membrane-Distillation (LGMD) technology, as an alternative to conventional Reverse Osmosis/De-Ionized treatment.

60

The Formation and Fate of Trihalomethanes in Power Plant Cooling Water Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trihalomethanes (THMs) are semi-volatile compounds that form in water when chlorine or bromine reacts with dissolved organic carbon. This report investigates the formation and fate of THM compounds in power plant cooling water systems, THM health risks, a generalized mechanism of THM formation, and the applicability of existing THM research to power plant cooling. The report presents results of a two-site sampling and analytical program designed to identify THM formation potential in cooling towers using...

2004-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design cooling water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: CBE UFAD Cooling Design Tool  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CBE UFAD Cooling Design Tool CBE UFAD Cooling Design Tool CBE UFAD Cooling Design Tool logo The Center for the Built Environment's research team has developed a simplified, practical design procedure and associated software tool to determine cooling load requirements of underfloor air distribution (UFAD) systems. These are provided to improve the accuracy of airflow, thermal decay data, thermal comfort calculations, system design, and the operation of UFAD buildings. Screen Shots Keywords UFAD, underfloor, Cooling load calculator, cooling, stratification, thermal comfort Validation/Testing N/A Expertise Required Knowledge about cooling load calculation and UFAD. Users N/A Audience Practicing architects and engineers involved in the design, specification, and analysis of UFADs. Instructional tool in colleges and universities.

62

Forced cooling of underground electric power transmission lines : design manual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The methodology utilized for the design of a forced-cooled pipe-type underground transmission system is presented. The material is divided into three major parts: (1) The Forced-cooled Pipe-Type Underground Transmission ...

Brown, Jay A.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Best Practice for Energy Efficient Cleanrooms: Cooling tower and condenser water optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

condenser water optimization Tengfang Xu Contents HVAC WATERHVAC Water Systems Cooling tower and condenser water optimization

Xu, Tengfang

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Electrochemistry of Water-Cooled Nuclear Reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project developed a comprehensive mathematical and simulation model for calculating thermal hydraulic, electrochemical, and corrosion parameters, viz. temperature, fluid flow velocity, pH, corrosion potential, hydrogen injection, oxygen contamination, stress corrosion cracking, crack growth rate, and other important quantities in the coolant circuits of water-cooled nuclear power plants, including both Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). The model is being used to assess the three major operational problems in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR), which include mass transport, activity transport, and the axial offset anomaly, and provide a powerful tool for predicting the accumulation of SCC damage in BWR primary coolant circuits as a function of operating history. Another achievement of the project is the development of a simulation tool to serve both as a training tool for plant operators and as an engineering test-bed to evaluate new equipment and operating strategies (normal operation, cold shut down and others). The development and implementation of the model allows us to estimate the activity transport or "radiation fields" around the primary loop and the vessel, as a function of the operating parameters and the water chemistry.

Dgiby Macdonald; Mirna Urquidi-Macdonald; John Mahaffy, Amit Jain, Han Sang Kim, Vishisht Gupta; Jonathan Pitt

2006-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

65

Advanced water-cooled phosphoric acid fuel cell development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Advanced Water Cooled Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell Development program is being conducted by International Fuel Cells Corporation (IFC) to improve the performance and minimize the cost of water-cooled, electric utility phosphoric acid fuel cell stacks. The program adapts the existing on-site Configuration B cell design to electric utility operating conditions and introduces additional new design features. Task 1 consists of the conceptual design of a full-scale electric utility cell stack that meets program objectives. Tasks 2 and 3 develop the materials and processes required to fabricate the components that meet the program objective. The design of the small area and two 10-ft[sup 2] short stacks is conducted in Task 4. The conceptual design also is updated to incorporate the results of material and process developments, as well as results of stack tests conducted in Task 6. Fabrication and assembly of the short stacks are conducted in Task 5 and subsequent tests are conducted in Task 6. The Contractor expects to enter into a contract with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to assemble and endurance test the second 10-ft[sup 2] short stack. The management and reporting functions of Task 7 provide DOE/METC with program visibility through required documentation and program reviews. This report describes the cell design and development effort that is being conducted to demonstrate, by subscale stack test, the technical achievements made toward the above program objectives.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Chemical Treatment Fosters Zero Discharge by Making Cooling Water Reusable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the past decade, the water requirements for cooling industrial manufacturing processes have changed dramatically. Once-through cooling has been largely replaced by open recirculating cooling water methods. This approach reduces water consumption by increasing the use of recycled water. Simplistically, the circulating cooling water flows through heat exchanger equipment and is cooled by passing through a cooling tower. The recycled water is cooled by evaporation of some of the circulating water as it passes through the tower. As a result of the evaporation process, the dissolved solids in the water become concentrated. The evaporated water is replaced by fresh makeup water. The dissolved solids content of the water is maintained by the rate of water discharge (blowdown). As the amount of dissolved solids increases, their solubility is exceeded and the solids tend to precipitate from the cooling water. The precipitated scale adheres to heat transfer surfaces and reduces heat transfer efficiency. In order to achieve zero discharge of water, it is paramount that the potential for scale formation and deposition be minimized. This can be accomplished through physical separation of scale-forming ions and particulate matter. Two widely used mechanical methods in this category are lime-soda side stream softening and vapor compression blowdown evaporation. Another approach is chemical treatment to promote scale inhibition and dispersion.

Boffardi, B. P.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Design of a Solar Thermal Powered Cooling System.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Abstract The main objective of the thesis was to design a mechanical structure for a desiccant evaporative cooling, to apply solar thermal powered air conditioning… (more)

Hurri, Olli

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Candidate Materials Evaluation for Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Final technical report on the corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and radiation response of candidate materials for the supercritical water-cooled reactor concept.

T. R. Allen and G. S. Was

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

69

Process Optimization of Cast Alloy 718 for Water Cooled Gas ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FOR WATER COOLED GAS TURBINE APPLICATION. G.K. Bouse+ and P.W. Schilke*. Gene@ Electric Company+ Materials and Processes Laboratory, and.

70

Water-side Economizer for Non-Fan Cooling Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

changes to the commercial provisions of the 2012 IECC: Water-side Economizer for Non-Fan Cooling Systems R Hart Pacific Northwest National Laboratory January 2013 Proposal...

71

System design package for solar heating and cooling system installed at Akron, Ohio  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This package contains information used to evaluate the design of Solaron's solar heating, cooling, and domestic hot water system. A conventional heat pump provides summer cooling and back-up heating (when solar energy is not available). Included in the package are such items as the design data brochure, system performance specification, system hazard analysis, spare parts list, and detailed design drawings. A Solaron solar system is installed in a single-family dwelling at Akron, Ohio, and at Duffield, Virginia.

Not Available

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

A Free Cooling Based Chilled Water System at Kingston  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In efforts to reduce operating costs, the IBM site at Kingston, New York incorporated the energy saving concept of 'free cooling' (direct cooling of chilled water with condenser water) with the expansion of the site chilled water system. Free cooling was employed to satisfy the winter chilled water load of approximately 3000 tons resulting in electrical savings of up to 70% in the winter with wet bulb temperatures below 38 oF. Other energy efficient features included variable speed pumping, high efficiency motors and chillers with reduced entering condenser water limits. This paper will describe the various possible operating modes and their associated savings using computer simulation techniques.

Jansen, P. R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Use of nanofiltration to reduce cooling tower water usage.  

SciTech Connect

Nanofiltration (NF) can effectively treat cooling-tower water to reduce water consumption and maximize water usage efficiency of thermoelectric power plants. A pilot is being run to verify theoretical calculations. A side stream of water from a 900 gpm cooling tower is being treated by NF with the permeate returning to the cooling tower and the concentrate being discharged. The membrane efficiency is as high as over 50%. Salt rejection ranges from 77-97% with higher rejection for divalent ions. The pilot has demonstrated a reduction of makeup water of almost 20% and a reduction of discharge of over 50%.

Sanchez, Andres L.; Everett, Randy L.; Jensen, Richard Pearson; Cappelle, Malynda A.; Altman, Susan Jeanne

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Use of nanofiltration to reduce cooling tower water consumption.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanofiltration (NF) can effectively treat cooling-tower water to reduce water consumption and maximize water usage efficiency of thermoelectric power plants. A pilot is being run to verify theoretical calculations. A side stream of water from a 900 gpm cooling tower is being treated by NF with the permeate returning to the cooling tower and the concentrate being discharged. The membrane efficiency is as high as over 50%. Salt rejection ranges from 77-97% with higher rejection for divalent ions. The pilot has demonstrated a reduction of makeup water of almost 20% and a reduction of discharge of over 50%.

Altman, Susan Jeanne; Ciferno, Jared

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Water-Cooled Ice Machines, Purchasing Specifications for Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ice Makers. b) Measured in accordance with ARI Standard 810-2003. Does not include condenser water use. Buying Energy-Efficient Water-Cooled Ice Machines Several types of...

76

Multifunctional robot to maintain boiler water-cooling tubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A robot has been developed to maintain boiler water-cooling tubes. This robot has a double tracked moving mechanism, an ash cleaning device, a slag purging device, a tubes' thickness measurement device, a marking device, and a control system. This robot ... Keywords: Boiler maintenance, Boiler water-cooling tube, Climbing robot, Mobile robot

Xueshan Gao; Dianguo Xu; Yan Wang; Huanhuan Pan; Weimin Shen

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Best Practices for Energy Efficient Cleanrooms: Cooling Tower and Condenser Water Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-58634 Best Practices for Energy Efficient Cleanrooms: Cooling Tower and Condenser Water Efficient Cleanrooms: Cooling tower and condenser water optimization Tengfang Xu Contents HVAC WATER SYSTEMS.............................................................................................. 2 Cooling tower and condenser water optimization

78

Restaurateur designs and installs passive solar heating/cooling system  

SciTech Connect

An example of the use of passive solar heating and cooling systems by a Wisconsin restaurateur is discussed. The greenhouse effect is used on three sides of the restaurant's exterior walls. A dozen water-to-air electric heat pumps handle the restaurant's heating and cooling chores. The system doesn't require any fossil fuel for heating or cooling.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Air-Cooled Condenser Design, Specification, and Operation Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In contrast to once-through and evaporative cooling systems, use of the air-cooled condenser (ACC) for heat rejection in steam electric power plants has historically been very limited, especially in the United States. However, greater industry focus on water conservation - combined with continued concern over the environmental effects of once-through and evaporative cooling - will almost certainly increase interest in ACC applications. While operating experience and performance data are, to some extent, ...

2005-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

80

Cooling Towers: Understanding Key Components of Cooling Towers and How to Improve Water Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paul Johnston-Knight Introduction Federal laws and regulations require Federal agencies to reduce water use and improve water efficiency. Namely, Executive Order 13514 Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance, requires an annual two percent reduction of water use intensity (water use per square foot of building space) for agency potable water consumption as well as a two percent reduction of water use for industrial, landscaping, and agricultural applica- tions. Cooling towers can be a significant

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design cooling water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Electric Power Plant Cooling Water Intakes and Related Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact of Drought on U.S. Steam Impact of Drought on U.S. Steam Electric Power Plant Cooling Water Intakes and Related Water Resource Management Issues April 2009 DOE/NETL-2009/1364 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement,

82

Effect of Watering and Non-Watering Cooling Rates on the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effect of Watering and Non-Watering Cooling Rates on the Mechanical Properties of an Aluminum Smelter's Potshell · Energy Reduction Technology for  ...

83

COOLING WATER ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES AT U.S. NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

This report has been prepared for the Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), for the purpose of providing a status report on the challenges and opportunities facing the U.S. commercial nuclear energy industry in the area of plant cooling water supply. The report was prompted in part by recent Second Circuit and Supreme Court decisions regarding cooling water system designs at existing thermo-electric power generating facilities in the U.S. (primarily fossil and nuclear plants). At issue in the courts have been Environmental Protection Agency regulations that define what constitutes “Best Technology Available” for intake structures that withdraw cooling water that is used to transfer and reject heat from the plant’s steam turbine via cooling water systems, while minimizing environmental impacts on aquatic life in nearby water bodies used to supply that cooling water. The report was also prompted by a growing recognition that cooling water availability and societal use conflicts are emerging as strategic energy and environmental issues, and that research and development (R&D) solutions to emerging water shortage issues are needed. In particular, cooling water availability is an important consideration in siting decisions for new nuclear power plants, and is an under-acknowledged issue in evaluating the pros and cons of retrofitting cooling towers at existing nuclear plants. Because of the significant ongoing research on water issues already being performed by industry, the national laboratories and other entities, this report relies heavily on ongoing work. In particular, this report has relied on collaboration with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), including its recent work in the area of EPA regulations governing intake structures in thermoelectric cooling water systems.

Gary Vine

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Stratified Chilled-Water Storage Design Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improved load factors for utilities and lower operating costs for users are two of the benefits of chilled-water storage technologies for space cooling in commercial buildings. Among those technologies, the lowest-cost and simplest to operate are the thermally stratified systems treated in this comprehensive, state-of-the-art design handbook.

1988-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

85

Use of Reclaimed Water for Power Plant Cooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CONTENTS Chapter 1 - Introduction .......................................................................................................... 1 Power Plants Need Water .................................................................................................. 1 Meeting Water Demands in a Water-Constrained Environment ....................................... 3 Purpose and Structure of the Report .................................................................................. 3 Chapter 2 - Database of Reclaimed Water Use for Cooling ................................................... 5 Data Collection .................................................................................................................. 5 The Database...................................................................................................................... 7

86

Preliminary design package for prototype solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary is presented of the preliminary analysis and design activity on solar heating and cooling systems. The analysis was made without site specific data other than weather; therefore, the results indicate performance expected under these special conditions. Major items in this report include a market analysis, design approaches, trade studies and other special data required to evaluate the preliminary analysis and design. The program calls for the development and delivery of eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems for installation and operational test. Two heating and six heating and cooling units will be delivered for Single Family Residences (SFR), Multiple-Family Residences (MFR), and commerical applications.

Not Available

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Water-lithium bromide double-effect absorption cooling analysis. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This investigation involved the development of a numerical model for the transient simulation of the double-effect, water-lithium bromide absorption cooling machine, and the use of the model to determine the effect of the various design and input variables on the absorption unit performance. The performance parameters considered were coefficient of performance and cooling capacity. The sensitivity analysis was performed by selecting a nominal condition and determining performance sensitivity for each variable with others held constant. The variables considered in the study include source hot water, cooling water, and chilled water temperatures; source hot water, cooling water, and chilled water flow rates; solution circulation rate; heat exchanger areas; pressure drop between evaporator and absorber; solution pump characteristics; and refrigerant flow control methods. The performance sensitivity study indicated in particular that the distribution of heat exchanger area among the various (seven) heat exchange components is a very important design consideration. Moreover, it indicated that the method of flow control of the first effect refrigerant vapor through the second effect is a critical design feature when absorption units operate over a significant range of cooling capacity. The model was used to predict the performance of the Trane absorption unit with fairly good accuracy. The dynamic model should be valuable as a design tool for developing new absorption machines or modifying current machines to make them optimal based on current and future energy costs.

Vliet, G.C.; Lawson, M.B.; Lithgow, R.A.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Use of Degraded Water Sources as Cooling Water in Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In electricity production, nearly all thermal power plants reject heat either to a large body of water (once-through cooling) or to the atmosphere via wet cooling towers — the predominant form of cooling in California. These towers, however, use considerable quantities of water. Competing state demands for freshwater have forced California thermal power plants to consider alternative cooling water supplies, though the availability of such supplies and data on their use and impact is limited. In fac...

2003-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

89

A Semi-Passive Containment Cooling System Conceptual Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to investigate a passive containment cooling system (PCCS) for the double concrete containment of the Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR). Two conceptual PCCS designs: the thermosyphon ...

Liu, H.

90

Reactor physics design of supercritical CO?-cooled fast reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors (GFRs) are among the GEN-IV designs proposed for future deployment. Driven by anticipated plant cost reduction, the use of supercritical CO? (S-CO?) as a Brayton cycle working fluid in a direct ...

Pope, Michael A. (Michael Alexander)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Design Considerations for Economically Competitive Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The technological viability of sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR) has been established by various experimental and prototype (demonstration) reactors such as EBR-II, FFTF, Phénix, JOYO, BN-600 etc. However, the economic competitiveness of SFR has not been proven yet. The perceived high cost premium of SFRs over LWRs has been the primary impediment to the commercial expansion of SFR technologies. In this paper, cost reduction options are discussed for advanced SFR designs. These include a hybrid loop-pool design to optimize the primary system, multiple reheat and intercooling helium Brayton cycle for the power conversion system and the potential for suppression of intermediate heat transport system. The design options for the fully passive decay heat removal systems are also thoroughly examined. These include direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS), reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system (RVACS) and the newly proposed pool reactor auxiliary cooling system (PRACS) in the context of the hybrid loop-pool design.

Hongbin Zhang; Haihua Zhao

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Advanced water-cooled phosphoric acid fuel cell development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program was conducted to improve the performance and minimize the cost of existing water-cooled phosphoric acid fuel cell stacks for electric utility and on-site applications. The goals for the electric utility stack technology were a power density of at least 175 watts per square foot over a 40,000-hour useful life and a projected one-of-a-kind, full-scale manufactured cost of less than $400 per kilowatt. The program adapted the existing on-site Configuration-B cell design to electric utility operating conditions and introduced additional new design features. Task 1 consisted of the conceptual design of a full-scale electric utility cell stack that meets program objectives. The conceptual design was updated to incorporate the results of material and process developments in Tasks 2 and 3, as well as results of stack tests conducted in Task 6. Tasks 2 and 3 developed the materials and processes required to fabricate the components that meet the program objectives. The design of the small area and 10-ft{sup 2} stacks was conducted in Task 4. Fabrication and assembly of the short stacks were conducted in Task 5 and subsequent tests were conducted in Task 6. The management and reporting functions of Task 7 provided DOE/METC with program visibility through required documentation and program reviews. This report describes the cell design and development effort that was conducted to demonstrate, by subscale stack test, the technical achievements made toward the above program objectives.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Advanced Water-Cooled Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program is being conducted to improve the performance and minimize the cost of water cooled, electric utility phosphoric acid fuel cell stacks. The program adapts the existing on-site Configuration B cell design to electric utility operating conditions and introduces additional new design features. Task 1 consists of the conceptual design of a full-scale electric utility cell stack that meets program objectives. Tasks 2 and 3 develop the materials and processes requested to fabricate the components that meet the program objective. The design of the small area and two 10-ft[sup 2] short stacks is conducted in Task 4. The conceptual design also is updated to incorporate the results of material and process developments, as well as results of stack tests conducted in Task 6. Fabrication and assembly of the short stacks are conducted in Task 5 and subsequent tests are conducted in Task 6. The Contractor expects to enter into a contract with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to assemble and endurance test the second 10-ft[sup 2] short stack. The management and reporting functions of Task 7 provide DOE/METC with program visibility through required documentation and program reviews. This report describes the cell design and development effort that is being conducted to demonstrate, by subscale stack test, the technical achievements made toward the above program objectives.

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Performance of a hotel chilled water plant with cool storage  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive monitoring suite was installed at a large convention hotel located in San Francisco, CA. The instrumentation was used for a research project to evaluate the effectiveness of electricity price based controls that automate response to real time pricing and to characterize the operation and performance of the hotel's chilled water plant that included a newly installed ice cool storage system. The hotel operates under real-time electricity rates. To date, over four years of data have been collected. Data included electricity use for all chillers, secondary coolant, chilled water, condenser pumps, and the cooling tower fans. Thermal flow data were also collected for the storage system, ice chiller, direct cooling chillers, and chilled water load loops. This paper (1) describes the chilled water plant, (2) defines the performance measurement objectives for the project, (3) discusses operational experience with the plant, focusing on the cool storage system, (4) analyzes chilled water plant and cool storage system operation by examining the charge/discharge heat flow data, and (5) evaluates how well the plant as a whole and the cool storage system specifically met cooling loads of the facility, and how this affected their use.

Gillespie, K.L.; Blanc, S.L.; Parker, S.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Thermal and flow design of helium-cooled reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book continues the American Nuclear Society's series of monographs on nuclear science and technology. Chapters of the book include information on the first-generation gas-cooled reactors; HTGR reactor developments; reactor core heat transfer; mechanical problems related to the primary coolant circuit; HTGR design bases; core thermal design; gas turbines; process heat HTGR reactors; GCFR reactor thermal hydraulics; and gas cooling of fusion reactors.

Melese, G.; Katz, R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Cogeneration of cooling energy and fresh water.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A design simulation of the cogeneration system allowed to chose the best HD unit configuration, while a TRNSYS off-design simulation revealed the main design variables… (more)

PICINARDI, ALBERTO

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Use of Alternate Water Sources for Power Plant Cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report lays out a framework developed to evaluate the potential use of non-traditional water supplies for cooling new or existing power plants. The report will be of value to environment, generation, and planning managers within power companies.

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

Water Cooling of High Power Light Emitting Diode Henrik Srensen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Cooling of High Power Light Emitting Diode Henrik Sørensen Department of Energy Technology and product lifetime. The high power Light Emitting Diodes (LED) belongs to the group of electronics

Sørensen, Henrik

99

SOLERAS - Saudi University Solar Cooling Laboratories Project: King Faisal University. Design and analysis study. Volume 2. Appendixes I-VI  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Documents supporting the proposed construction of a passively cooled house at King Faisal University in Saudi Arabia are presented. The papers include the following topics: comfort measurements; cooling methods and strategies for hot/arid climates; ventilation design; solar hot water heaters; backup HVAC equipment specifications; and computer printouts for design review and analysis. (BCS)

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Property:CoolingTowerWaterUseWinterConsumed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Property Name CoolingTowerWaterUseWinterConsumed Property Type Number Description Cooling Tower Water use (winter average) (afday) Consumed. Retrieved from "http:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design cooling water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Property:CoolingTowerWaterUseSummerConsumed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name CoolingTowerWaterUseSummerConsumed Property Type Number Description Cooling Tower Water use (summer average) (afday) Consumed. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

102

Property:CoolingTowerWaterUseAnnlAvgConsumed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name CoolingTowerWaterUseAnnlAvgConsumed Property Type Number Description Cooling Tower Water use (annual average) (afday) Consumed. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

103

Property:CoolingTowerWaterUseSummerGross | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Name CoolingTowerWaterUseSummerGross Property Type Number Description Cooling Tower Water use (summer average) (afday) Gross. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

104

Purification of water from cooling towers and other heat exchange systems  

SciTech Connect

The amount of silica in cooling tower water is reduced by passing cooling tower water through a column of silica gel.

Sullivan; Enid J. (Los Alamos, NM), Carlson; Bryan J. (Ojo Caliente, NM), Wingo; Robert M. (Los Alamos, NM), Robison; Thomas W. (Stilwell, KS)

2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

105

Heat Transfer Performance and Piping Strategy Study for Chilled Water Systems at Low Cooling Loads  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The temperature differential of chilled water is an important factor used for evaluating the performance of a chilled water system. A low delta-T may increase the pumping energy consumption and increase the chiller energy consumption. The system studied in this thesis is the chilled water system at the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (DFW Airport). This system has the problem of low delta-T under low cooling loads. When the chilled water flow is much lower than the design conditions at low cooling loads, it may lead to the laminar flow of the chilled water in the cooling coils. The main objective of this thesis is to explain the heat transfer performance of the cooling coils under low cooling loads. The water side and air side heat transfer coefficients at different water and air flow rates are calculated. The coefficients are used to analyze the heat transfer performance of the cooling coils at conditions ranging from very low loads to design conditions. The effectiveness-number of transfer units (NTU) method is utilized to analyze the cooling coil performance under different flow conditions, which also helps to obtain the cooling coil chilled water temperature differential under full load and partial load conditions. When the water flow rate drops to 1ft/s, laminar flow occurs; this further decreases the heat transfer rate on the water side. However, the cooling coil effectiveness increases with the drop of water flow rate, which compensates for the influence of the heat transfer performance under laminar flow conditions. Consequently, the delta-T in the cooling coil decreases in the transitional flow regime but increases in the laminar flow regime. Results of this thesis show that the laminar flow for the chilled water at low flow rate is not the main cause of the low delta-T syndrome in the chilled water system. Possible causes for the piping strategy of the low delta-T syndrome existing in the chilled water system under low flow conditions are studied in this thesis: (1) use of two way control valves; and (2) improper tertiary pump piping strategy.

Li, Nanxi 1986-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION STAFF COOLING WATER MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

maintenance includes having effective drift eliminators, periodically cleaning the system if appropriate, minimization of process leads into the cooling system that provide nutrients for bacteria, maintenance management plan shall describe how the system will be returned to normal microbial control following an upset

107

DUSEL Facility Cooling Water Scaling Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precipitation (crystal growth) in supersaturated solutions is governed by both kenetic and thermodynamic processes. This is an important and evolving field of research, especially for the petroleum industry. There are several types of precipitates including sulfate compounds (ie. barium sulfate) and calcium compounds (ie. calcium carbonate). The chemical makeup of the mine water has relatively large concentrations of sulfate as compared to calcium, so we may expect that sulfate type reactions. The kinetics of calcium sulfate dihydrate (CaSO4 {center_dot} 2H20, gypsum) scale formation on heat exchanger surfaces from aqueous solutions has been studied by a highly reproducible technique. It has been found that gypsum scale formation takes place directly on the surface of the heat exchanger without any bulk or spontaneous precipitation in the reaction cell. The kinetic data also indicate that the rate of scale formation is a function of surface area and the metallurgy of the heat exchanger. As we don't have detailed information about the heat exchanger, we can only infer that this will be an issue for us. Supersaturations of various compounds are affected differently by temperature, pressure and pH. Pressure has only a slight affect on the solubility, whereas temperature is a much more sensitive parameter (Figure 1). The affect of temperature is reversed for calcium carbonate and barium sulfate solubilities. As temperature increases, barium sulfate solubility concentrations increase and scaling decreases. For calcium carbonate, the scaling tendencies increase with increasing temperature. This is all relative, as the temperatures and pressures of the referenced experiments range from 122 to 356 F. Their pressures range from 200 to 4000 psi. Because the cooling water system isn't likely to see pressures above 200 psi, it's unclear if this pressure/scaling relationship will be significant or even apparent. The most common scale minerals found in the oilfield include calcium carbonates (CaCO3, mainly calcite) and alkaline-earth metal sulfates (barite BaSO4, celestite SrSO4, anhydrite CaSO4, hemihydrate CaSO4 1/2H2O, and gypsum CaSO4 2H2O or calcium sulfate). The cause of scaling can be difficult to identify in real oil and gas wells. However, pressure and temperature changes during the flow of fluids are primary reasons for the formation of carbonate scales, because the escape of CO2 and/or H2S gases out of the brine solution, as pressure is lowered, tends to elevate the pH of the brine and result in super-saturation with respect to carbonates. Concerning sulfate scales, the common cause is commingling of different sources of brines either due to breakthrough of injected incompatible waters or mixing of two different brines from different zones of the reservoir formation. A decrease in temperature tends to cause barite to precipitate, opposite of calcite. In addition, pressure drops tend to cause all scale minerals to precipitate due to the pressure dependence of the solubility product. And we can expect that there will be a pressure drop across the heat exchanger. Weather or not this will be offset by the rise in pressure remains to be seen. It's typically left to field testing to prove out. Progress has been made toward the control and treatment of the scale deposits, although most of the reaction mechanisms are still not well understood. Often the most efficient and economic treatment for scale formation is to apply threshold chemical inhibitors. Threshold scale inhibitors are like catalysts and have inhibition efficiency at very low concentrations (commonly less than a few mg/L), far below the stoichiometric concentrations of the crystal lattice ions in solution. There are many chemical classes of inhibitors and even more brands on the market. Based on the water chemistry it is anticipated that there is a high likelihood for sulfate compound precipitation and scaling. This may be dependent on the temperature and pressure, which vary throughout the system. Therefore, various types and amounts of scaling may occur at different

Daily, W D

2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

108

Influence of raised floor on zone design cooling load in commercial buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

design day zone cooling load profile is evaluated for anThe zone cooling load profiles and the thermal performanceaffects the zone cooling load profile and the peak cooling

Schiavon, Stefano; Lee, Kwang Ho; Bauman, Fred; Webster, Tom

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Evaluation of models for predicting evaporative water loss in cooling impoundments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling impoundments can offer a number of advantages over cooling towers for condenser water cooling at steam electric power plants. However, a major disadvantage of cooling ponds is a lack of confidence in the ability ...

Helfrich, Karl Richard

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Super Cool Appliance Design Wins Student Competition | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cool Appliance Design Wins Student Competition Cool Appliance Design Wins Student Competition Super Cool Appliance Design Wins Student Competition August 23, 2012 - 2:44pm Addthis The winners of the Max Tech and Beyond competition -- a team of University of Maryland students -- designed and built a prototype for a wall unit air conditioner that showed more than 30 percent energy savings when tested in a lab. | Photo courtesy of Yunho Hwang, University of Maryland. The winners of the Max Tech and Beyond competition -- a team of University of Maryland students -- designed and built a prototype for a wall unit air conditioner that showed more than 30 percent energy savings when tested in a lab. | Photo courtesy of Yunho Hwang, University of Maryland. Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs

111

Use of reclaimed water for power plant cooling.  

SciTech Connect

Freshwater demands are steadily increasing throughout the United States. As its population increases, more water is needed for domestic use (drinking, cooking, cleaning, etc.) and to supply power and food. In arid parts of the country, existing freshwater supplies are not able to meet the increasing demands for water. New water users are often forced to look to alternative sources of water to meet their needs. Over the past few years, utilities in many locations, including parts of the country not traditionally water-poor (e.g., Georgia, Maryland, Massachusetts, New York, and North Carolina) have needed to reevaluate the availability of water to meet their cooling needs. This trend will only become more extreme with time. Other trends are likely to increase pressure on freshwater supplies, too. For example, as populations increase, they will require more food. This in turn will likely increase demands for water by the agricultural sector. Another example is the recent increased interest in producing biofuels. Additional water will be required to grow more crops to serve as the raw materials for biofuels and to process the raw materials into biofuels. This report provides information about an opportunity to reuse an abundant water source -- treated municipal wastewater, also known as 'reclaimed water' -- for cooling and process water in electric generating facilities. The report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Innovations for Existing Plants research program (Feeley 2005). This program initiated an energy-water research effort in 2003 that includes the availability and use of 'nontraditional sources' of water for use at power plants. This report represents a unique reference for information on the use of reclaimed water for power plant cooling. In particular, the database of reclaimed water user facilities described in Chapter 2 is the first comprehensive national effort to identify and catalog those plants that are using reclaimed water for cooling.

Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

112

Licensing topical report: interpretation of general design criteria for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors  

SciTech Connect

This Licensing Topical Report presents a set of General Design Criteria (GDC) which is proposed for applicability to licensing of graphite-moderated, high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). Modifications as necessary to reflect HTGR characteristics and design practices have been made to the GDC derived for applicability to light-water-cooled reactors and presented in Appendix A of Part 50, Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, including the Introduction, Definitions, and Criteria. It is concluded that the proposed set of GDC affords a better basis for design and licensing of HTGRs.

Orvis, D.D.; Raabe, P.H.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Cooling airflow design tool for displacement ventilation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with Equation  7.4 of the ASHRAE Design Guidelines for efficiency air diffusers. The ASHRAE method does not takeVentilation” Atlanta: ASHRAE. Jiang, Z. , Chen, Q. , and

Schiavon, Stefano; Bauman, Fred

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Coherent electron cooling proof of principle instrumentation design  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the Coherent Electron Cooling Proof-of-Principle (CeC PoP) experiment being designed at RHIC is to demonstrate longitudinal (energy spread) cooling before the expected CD-2 for eRHIC. The scope of the experiment is to longitudinally cool a single bunch of 40 GeV/u gold ions in RHIC. This paper will describe the instrumentation systems proposed to meet the diagnostics challenges. These include measurements of beam intensity, emittance, energy spread, bunch length, position, orbit stability, and transverse and temporal alignment of electron and ion beams.

Gassner D. M.; Litvinenko, V.; Michnoff, R.; Miller, T.; Minty, M.; Pinayev, I.

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

Introduction to solar heating and cooling design and sizing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This manual is designed to introduce the practical aspects of solar heating/cooling systems to HVAC contractors, architects, engineers, and other interested individuals. It is intended to enable readers to assess potential solar heating/cooling applications in specific geographical areas, and includes tools necessary to do a preliminary design of the system and to analyze its economic benefits. The following are included: the case for solar energy; solar radiation and weather; passive solar design; system characteristics and selection; component performance criteria; determining solar system thermal performance and economic feasibility; requirements, availability, and applications of solar heating systems; and sources of additional information. (MHR)

Not Available

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Cooling Water Systems - Energy Savings/Lower Costs By Reusing Cooling Tower Blowdown  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reuse of cooling tower blow down cannot only provide energy conservation, but can provide water conservation and chemical conservation. To be effective, it is critical that the water treatment program be coordinated with the treatment of the blow down for reuse into the cooling tower system. Several plants have been built and operated with considerable difficulty regarding effective operation of the softener due to improper chemical selection. However, other plants have utilized the proper chemicals which not only improve the softener's performance and operation, but also effectively reduces the size of the softener. Thus, initial capital and operating savings are obtained. Detailed information is provided on guidelines and case histories of operating units.

Puckorius, P. R.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Development of a simplified cooling load design tool for underfloor air distribution (UFAD) systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in design day cooling load profiles for OH and UFAD systems;in design day cooling load profiles for OH and UFAD systems;showed that the cooling load profiles for UFAD and OH are

Schiavon, Stefano; Lee, Kwang Ho; Bauman, Fred; Webster, Tom

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Water-Cooled Electric Chillers, Purchasing Specifications for Energy-Efficient Products (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy efficiency purchasing specifications for federal procurements of water-cooled electric chillers.

Not Available

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Assessment of a water-cooled gas-turbine concept. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A program for development of Ultra-High Temperature (UHT) 2800/sup 0/F firing temperature, water-cooled turbine technology began in 1967. In 1973 it was decided to design and build a full-scale gas turbine to demonstrate the feasibility and evaluate the performance and economics of a complete utility-size machine. The preliminary design phase, performed from June 1974 to March 1975 is reported here with information on the definition of the baseline cycle for the UHT machine in a combined cycle power plant; turbine aerodynamics; design of turbine, its cooling system, and the combustor; materials selection; controls; cost estimates; heat flux experiments, and program planning. (LCL)

1975-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Modeling cooling water discharges from the Burrard Generating Station  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract-A three-dimensional numerical model was applied to examine the impact of the Burrard Generating Station cooling water on the circulation patterns and thermal regime in the receiving water of Port Moody Arm. A key aspect of this study involved properly incorporating the submerged cooling water buoyant jet into the 3D model. To overcome the scale and interface barriers between the near-field and far-field zones of the buoyant jet, a sub-grid scheme was applied, and the coupled system of equations of motion, heat conservation and state are solved with a single modeling procedure over the complete field. Special care was taken with the diffusion and jet entrainment by using a second order turbulence closure model for vertical diffusion and the Smagorinsky formula for horizontal diffusion as well as jet entrainment. The model was calibrated and validated in terms of buoyant jet trajectory, centerline dilution, and temperature and velocity profiles. Extensive modeling experiments without and with the Burrard Generating Station in operation were then carried out to investigate the receiving water circulations and thermal processes under the influence of the cooling water discharge. The model results reveal that under the influence of the cooling water discharge, peak ebb currents are stronger than peak flood currents in the near-surface layer, and the reverse is true in the near-bottom layer. Meanwhile, the model revealed a well-developed eddy at the southeast side of the buoyant jet in the near-surface layer. It is also found that the warmer water released from the cooling water discharge is mainly confined to the upper layer of the Arm, which is largely flushed out of the Arm through tidal mixing processes, and a corresponding inflow of colder water into the Arm occurs within the lower layer. I.

J. Jiang; D. B. Fissel; D. D. Lemon

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design cooling water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Keeping Cool, Saving Water and Money | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Keeping Cool, Saving Water and Money Keeping Cool, Saving Water and Money Keeping Cool, Saving Water and Money July 2, 2010 - 2:25pm Addthis The Orlando Science Center has installed a new energy efficient HVAC unit. | Photo courtesy of Orlando Science Center The Orlando Science Center has installed a new energy efficient HVAC unit. | Photo courtesy of Orlando Science Center In the summer of 2009, the Orlando Science Center (OSC) was full of hot air, literally. The museum's heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system - which had been an operational challenge for several years - was running at 30 percent capacity. That meant the building's interior temperature was often at a toasty 80 degrees, subjecting patrons to miserable conditions. "To keep visitors happy, the museum had to reduce admission prices and

122

Keeping Cool, Saving Water and Money | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cool, Saving Water and Money Cool, Saving Water and Money Keeping Cool, Saving Water and Money July 2, 2010 - 2:25pm Addthis The Orlando Science Center has installed a new energy efficient HVAC unit. | Photo courtesy of Orlando Science Center The Orlando Science Center has installed a new energy efficient HVAC unit. | Photo courtesy of Orlando Science Center In the summer of 2009, the Orlando Science Center (OSC) was full of hot air, literally. The museum's heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system - which had been an operational challenge for several years - was running at 30 percent capacity. That meant the building's interior temperature was often at a toasty 80 degrees, subjecting patrons to miserable conditions. "To keep visitors happy, the museum had to reduce admission prices and

123

Program on Technology Innovation: Review of Advanced Cooling Tower Technologies with Reduced Cooled Water Temperature and Evaporatio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews current technologies and solutions for advanced cooling towers with reduced cooled water temperature and evaporation losses. This is the first report for the dew-point cooling tower fill development project, funded by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Program on Technology Innovation, Water Conservation program. It is prepared by the Gas Technology Institute (GTI).This review is based on a literature and patent survey; it summarizes advancements in cooling ...

2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

124

Preliminary design package for residential heating/cooling system--Rankine air conditioner redesign  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains a summary of the preliminary redesign and development of a marketable single-family heating and cooling system. The objectives discussed are the interim design and schedule status of the Residential (3-ton) redesign, problem areas and solutions, and the definition of plans for future design and development activities. The proposed system for a single-family residential heating and cooling system is a single-loop, solar-assisted, hydronic-to-warm-air heating subsystem with solar-assisted domestic water heating and a Rankine-driven expansion air-conditioning subsystem.

Not Available

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Program on Technology Innovation: New Concepts of Water Conservation Cooling and Water Treatment Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes 114 proposals received as a result of Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) worldwide solicitations that were distributed in February 2011 and June 2012. The solicitations sought early-stage concepts for innovative power plant water-conserving technologies for cooling, waste heat utilization, and water treatment. The report also highlights 18 cooling proposals from 2011, including 5 funded projects. In addition, it describes current cooling ...

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

126

Field Evaluation of Wedgewire Screens for Protecting Early Life Stages of Fish at Cooling Water Intake Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wedgewire screens are designed to minimize entrainment and impingement of aquatic organisms at power plant cooling water intake structures (CWIS). This report presents the results of a field study evaluating the effectiveness of cylindrical wedgewire screens for protecting the early life stages (eggs and larvae) of fish at cooling water intakes. The study examines multiple screen design parameters and hydraulic conditions in the Chesapeake Bay with a variety of estuarine species. Information in this repo...

2006-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

127

Field Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Strobe Lights for Preventing Impingement of Fish at Cooling Water Intakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act requires that the location, design, construction, and capacity of a cooling water intake structure reflect the "best technology available" for minimizing adverse environmental impacts, such as impingement of fish on intake screens. In the Southeast U.S., over 90% of fish impinged on cooling-water intake screens of thermal power stations are threadfin shad (Dorosoma petenense) or gizzard shad (D. cepedianum). Much of this impingement occurs in winter coincident with c...

2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

128

Double-Sided Cooling Design for Novel Planar Module  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel packaging structure for medium power modules featuring power semiconductor switches sandwiched between two symmetric substrates that fulfill electrical conduction and insulation functions is presented. Large bonding areas between dies and substrates allow this packaging technology to offer significant improvements in electrical, thermal performance. Double-sided cooling system was dedicatedly analyzed and designed for different applications.

Ning, Puqi [ORNL; Liang, Zhenxian [ORNL; Marlino, Laura D [ORNL; Wang, Fei [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Technology to Facilitate the Use of Impaired Water in Cooling...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Research Circle Niskayuna, NY 12309-1027 518-387-5055 whisenhunt@crd.ge.com Technology To FaciliTaTe The Use oF impaired WaTers in cooling ToWers promisprojecT no.:...

130

Solar heating/cooling and domestic hot-water systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing awareness of global warming forces policy makers and industries to face two challenges: reducing greenhouse gas emissions and securing stable energy supply against ever-increasing world energy consumption, which is projected to increase by ... Keywords: buildings heating, domestic hot-water, energetical analysis, renewable energy sources, solar cooling technologies, solar energy collection, solar thermal systems

Ioan Sârbu; Marius Adam

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Utilization of Rainwater as a Supplementary Water Source for Cooling Tower Makeup: A Sustainability Strategy for Potable Water Use Reduction.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The use of rainwater as a supplementary water source for cooling water makeup was explored in an effort to reduce the potable water demand… (more)

Costello, Elizabeth Stassun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Simplified calculation method for design cooling loads in underfloor air distribution (UFAD) systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

design day cooling load profiles, (2) impact of a thermallyday peak zone cooling load profile for UFAD and a well-mixedaffects the cooling load profiles, therefore it is possible

Schiavon, Stefano; Lee, Kwang Ho; Bauman, Fred; Webster, Tom

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

No Chemical, Zero Bleed Cooling Tower Water Treatment Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes a process to treat cooling tower water by means of a fully automated and chemical free mechanical water treatment process. This is an alternative to conventional chemical treatment. Beginning with a suction pump to draw water out of the tower sump, water goes through a permanent magnetic descaler to increase the water solubility and begin the scale inhibition process. This also descales existing scale build-up in the system. Ozone is manufactured from ambient air and injected into the bypass system through a venturi type injector. This kills algae, slime and bacteria and enhances the magnetic descaling process. The final stage filter separates solids from the water to prevent corrosion from impingement. These solids are automatically purged to the sanitary drain. Clarified water is returned to the sump where the process repeats on a 10%-20% by volume side stream basis.

Coke, A. L.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Municipal waste water as a source of cooling water for California electric power plants. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses sources of municipal waste water for potential use as cooling water in California power plants. It notes the major factors which affect this practice. Municipal treatment facilities in California with discharge volumes deemed adequate to supply new power plants are identified. Also included is a summary of the experiences of several utilities in California and other western states with existing or planned applications of municipal waste water in power plant cooling towers.

MacDonald, T.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Water cooled scavenged crankcase type otto internal combustion engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a system for a water cooled scavenged crankcase type two-cycle internal combustion engine comprising: a heat reclaimation system for extracting heat from an engine jacket for heating water supplied form an add-on reservoir via a heat exchanger located within the engine cylinder cooling system, the water being subsequently additionally heated by an exhaust pipe type heat exchanger to a superheated steam state and thence conveyed by a conduit to a steam lubricator for adjustably conveying in variably timed spaced succession intervals of regulated droplets of high viscous oil, fortified with adde graphite and tallow enrichment lubricant ingredients, and thence conveying such by steam at atmospheric pressure into an intake manifold which receives a carbureted air/fuel mixture into the crankcase via a manually operated auxiliary air intake device and way check valve and fire screen, due to suction effect of the piston up stroke action of the piston during engine operation.

Bidwell, H.

1988-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

136

USE of mine pool water for power plant cooling.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water and energy production issues intersect in numerous ways. Water is produced along with oil and gas, water runs off of or accumulates in coal mines, and water is needed to operate steam electric power plants and hydropower generating facilities. However, water and energy are often not in the proper balance. For example, even if water is available in sufficient quantities, it may not have the physical and chemical characteristics suitable for energy or other uses. This report provides preliminary information about an opportunity to reuse an overabundant water source--ground water accumulated in underground coal mines--for cooling and process water in electric generating facilities. The report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), which has implemented a water/energy research program (Feeley and Ramezan 2003). Among the topics studied under that program is the availability and use of ''non-traditional sources'' of water for use at power plants. This report supports NETL's water/energy research program.

Veil, J. A.; Kupar, J. M .; Puder, M. G.

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

137

WATER-LITHIUM BROMIDE DOUBLE-EFFECT ABSORPTION COOLING ANALYSIS  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

WATER-LITHIUM BROMIDE DOUBLE-EFFECT WATER-LITHIUM BROMIDE DOUBLE-EFFECT ABSORPTION COOLING ANALYSIS Gary C . V l i e t , Michael B . Lawson, and Rudolf0 A . Lithgow Center f o r Energy Studies The University of Texas a t Austin December 1980 Final Report f o r Contract: DE AC03-79SF10540 (Mu1 tiple-Effect Absorption Cycle Solar Cooling) with the U.S. Department of Energy DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately

138

Property:CoolingTowerWaterUseAnnlAvgGross | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Name CoolingTowerWaterUseAnnlAvgGross Property Type Number Description Cooling Tower Water use (annual average) (afday) Gross. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

139

pH Adjustment of Power Plant Cooling Water with Flue Gas/Fly Ash  

to fossil fuel burning power plants to control mineral precipitation in cooling water. Flue gas, which is 10% CO2, could be diverted into a plant’s cooling water

140

Municipal waste water as a source of cooling water for California electric power plants  

SciTech Connect

The results of an investigation of sources of municipal waste water for potential use as cooling water in California power plants and the major factors which affect this practice are presented. Municipal treatment facilities in California with discharge volumes deemed adequate to supply new power plants are identified. Also included is a summary of the experiences of several utilities in California and other western states with existing or planned applications of municipal waste water in power plant cooling towers. Due to limited supplies of high-quality water, municipal waste water is increasingly viewed as an alternative source of supply for a variety of water uses, including electric power plant evaporative cooling. In California, enough municipal effluent is discharged to the ocean to conceivably supply the total projected cooling water needs of new power plants for the next 20 years or more. A number of existing applications of such waste water for power plant cooling, including several California cases, demonstrate the technical feasibility of its use for this purpose. However, a combination of economic, environmental, and geographic factors reduce the likelihood of widespread use of this alternative for meeting anticipated large increases in power plant water requirements in the state. The most important factors are: the long distances involved; the public health concerns; added costs and environmental effects; and unreliability of supply quality.

McDonald, T.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design cooling water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Cool water demonstration project and its industrial applications  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the 100 MW coal gasification combined cycle demonstration project underway at the ''Cool Water'' site of Southern California Edison Company, including the technology, project participants, schedule and opportunities for future industrial users. Industrial applications with multiple product outputs, termed ''polygeneration'', are illustrated with examples for cogeneration and trigeneration. Finally, actions required for planning large-sized gas turbine installations are suggested for today in order to hold open the future options in coal gasification.

Alger, J.; Ahner, D.J.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

New and Underutilized Technology: Water Cooled Oil Free Magnetic Bearing Compressors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The following information outlines key deployment considerations for water cooled oil free magnetic bearing compressors within the Federal sector.

143

WRI 50: Strategies for Cooling Electric Generating Facilities Utilizing Mine Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power generation and water consumption are inextricably linked. Because of this relationship DOE/NETL has funded a competitive research and development initiative to address this relationship. This report is part of that initiative and is in response to DOE/NETL solicitation DE-PS26-03NT41719-0. Thermal electric power generation requires large volumes of water to cool spent steam at the end of the turbine cycle. The required volumes are such that new plant siting is increasingly dependent on the availability of cooling circuit water. Even in the eastern U.S., large rivers such as the Monongahela may no longer be able to support additional, large power stations due to subscription of flow to existing plants, industrial, municipal and navigational requirements. Earlier studies conducted by West Virginia University (WV 132, WV 173 phase I, WV 173 Phase II, WV 173 Phase III, and WV 173 Phase IV in review) have identified that a large potential water resource resides in flooded, abandoned coal mines in the Pittsburgh Coal Basin, and likely elsewhere in the region and nation. This study evaluates the technical and economic potential of the Pittsburgh Coal Basin water source to supply new power plants with cooling water. Two approaches for supplying new power plants were evaluated. Type A employs mine water in conventional, evaporative cooling towers. Type B utilizes earth-coupled cooling with flooded underground mines as the principal heat sink for the power plant reject heat load. Existing mine discharges in the Pittsburgh Coal Basin were evaluated for flow and water quality. Based on this analysis, eight sites were identified where mine water could supply cooling water to a power plant. Three of these sites were employed for pre-engineering design and cost analysis of a Type A water supply system, including mine water collection, treatment, and delivery. This method was also applied to a ''base case'' river-source power plant, for comparison. Mine-water system cost estimates were then compared to the base-case river source estimate. We found that the use of net-alkaline mine water would under current economic conditions be competitive with a river-source in a comparable-size water cooling system. On the other hand, utilization of net acidic water would be higher in operating cost than the river system by 12 percent. This does not account for any environmental benefits that would accrue due to the treatment of acid mine drainage, in many locations an existing public liability. We also found it likely that widespread adoption of mine-water utilization for power plant cooling will require resolution of potential liability and mine-water ownership issues. In summary, Type A mine-water utilization for power plant cooling is considered a strong option for meeting water needs of new plant in selected areas. Analysis of the thermal and water handling requirements for a 600 megawatt power plant indicated that Type B earth coupled cooling would not be feasible for a power plant of this size. It was determined that Type B cooling would be possible, under the right conditions, for power plants of 200 megawatts or less. Based on this finding the feasibility of a 200 megawatt facility was evaluated. A series of mines were identified where a Type B earth-coupled 200 megawatt power plant cooling system might be feasible. Two water handling scenarios were designed to distribute heated power-plant water throughout the mines. Costs were developed for two different pumping scenarios employing a once-through power-plant cooling circuit. Thermal and groundwater flow simulation models were used to simulate the effect of hot water injection into the mine under both pumping strategies and to calculate the return-water temperature over the design life of a plant. Based on these models, staged increases in required mine-water pumping rates are projected to be part of the design, due to gradual heating and loss of heat-sink efficiency of the rock sequence above the mines. Utilizing pumping strategy No.1 (two mines) capital costs were 25 percent lower a

Joseph J. Donovan; Brenden Duffy; Bruce R. Leavitt; James Stiles; Tamara Vandivort; Paul Ziemkiewicz

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Handbook of experiences in the design and installation of solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A large array of problems encountered are detailed, including design errors, installation mistakes, cases of inadequate durability of materials and unacceptable reliability of components, and wide variations in the performance and operation of different solar systems. Durability, reliability, and design problems are reviewed for solar collector subsystems, heat transfer fluids, thermal storage, passive solar components, piping/ducting, and reliability/operational problems. The following performance topics are covered: criteria for design and performance analysis, domestic hot water systems, passive space heating systems, active space heating systems, space cooling systems, analysis of systems performance, and performance evaluations. (MHR)

Ward, D.S.; Oberoi, H.S.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT OF THE COOLING WATER INTAKE STRUCTURE, TANGUISSON POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

report for the Environmental Effects of Cooling Water Intake Structures project (contract number/or chemicals) and as impingement (where the cooling water intake traps larger organisms against the intake and impingement of aquatic organisms in cooling water intakes.) For rules such as those outlined above

Schupp, Peter

146

Coagulation chemistries for silica removal from cooling tower water.  

SciTech Connect

The formation of silica scale is a problem for thermoelectric power generating facilities, and this study investigated the potential for removal of silica by means of chemical coagulation from source water before it is subjected to mineral concentration in cooling towers. In Phase I, a screening of many typical as well as novel coagulants was carried out using concentrated cooling tower water, with and without flocculation aids, at concentrations typical for water purification with limited results. In Phase II, it was decided that treatment of source or make up water was more appropriate, and that higher dosing with coagulants delivered promising results. In fact, the less exotic coagulants proved to be more efficacious for reasons not yet fully determined. Some analysis was made of the molecular nature of the precipitated floc, which may aid in process improvements. In Phase III, more detailed study of process conditions for aluminum chloride coagulation was undertaken. Lime-soda water softening and the precipitation of magnesium hydroxide were shown to be too limited in terms of effectiveness, speed, and energy consumption to be considered further for the present application. In Phase IV, sodium aluminate emerged as an effective coagulant for silica, and the most attractive of those tested to date because of its availability, ease of use, and low requirement for additional chemicals. Some process optimization was performed for coagulant concentration and operational pH. It is concluded that silica coagulation with simple aluminum-based agents is effective, simple, and compatible with other industrial processes.

Nyman, May Devan; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Stewart, Tom

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Design, fabrication and testing of a model heating and cooling system for a vacuum vessel  

SciTech Connect

A full-size model of a typical cooling and heating system for a vacuum vessel was manufactured and examined in order to clarify and enhance the efficiency and reliability of the designed system. The model consisted of two parts; one of which had the same structure as the other and was located facing each other to simulate the adiabatic condition of the vacuum-side of a vacuum vessel. Its components were rectangular plates, eletric heater units, cooling pipes inside of which water and air flew as cooling fluid. A lot of kinds of tests and measurements were performed to evaluate efficiency and reliability on the model. The numerical and theoretical analyses on the system were also carried out using the dimensional finite difference technique. The analytical results agreed pretty well with the experimental.

Shimizu, M.; Miyauchi, Y.; Nakamura, H.; Kajiura, S.; Koizumi, M.; Hata, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Patterns of fish assemblage structure and dynamics in waters of the Savannah River Plant. Comprehensive Cooling Water Study final report  

SciTech Connect

Research conducted as part of the Comprehensive Cooling Water Study (CCWS) has elucidated many factors that are important to fish population and community dynamics in a variety of habitats on the Savannah River Plant (SRP). Information gained from these studies is useful in predicting fish responses to SRP operations. The overall objective of the CCWS was (1) to determine the environmental effects of SRP cooling water withdrawals and discharges and (2) to determine the significance of the cooling water impacts on the environment. The purpose of this study was to: (1) examine the effects of thermal plumes on anadromous and resident fishes, including overwintering effects, in the SRP swamp and associated tributary streams; (2) assess fish spawning and locate nursery grounds on the SRP; (3) examine the level of use of the SRP by spawning fish from the Savannah River, this objective was shared with the Savannah River Laboratory, E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company; and (4) determine impacts of cooling-water discharges on fish population and community attributes. Five studies were designed to address the above topics. The specific objectives and a summary of the findings of each study are presented.

Aho, J.M.; Anderson, C.S.; Floyd, K.B.; Negus, M.T.; Meador, M.R.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Low-pressure water-cooled inductively coupled plasma torch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An inductively coupled plasma torch is provided which comprises an inner tube, including a sample injection port to which the sample to be tested is supplied and comprising an enlarged central portion in which the plasma flame is confined; an outer tube surrounding the inner tube and containing water therein for cooling the inner tube, the outer tube including a water inlet port to which water is supplied and a water outlet port spaced from the water inlet port and from which water is removed after flowing through the outer tube; and an rf induction coil for inducing the plasma in the gas passing into the tube through the sample injection port. The sample injection port comprises a capillary tube including a reduced diameter orifice, projecting into the lower end of the inner tube. The water inlet is located at the lower end of the outer tube and the rf heating coil is disposed around the outer tube above and adjacent to the water inlet.

Seliskar, C.J.; Warner, D.K.

1984-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

150

Low-pressure water-cooled inductively coupled plasma torch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An inductively coupled plasma torch is provided which comprises an inner tube, including a sample injection port to which the sample to be tested is supplied and comprising an enlarged central portion in which the plasma flame is confined; an outer tube surrounding the inner tube and containing water therein for cooling the inner tube, the outer tube including a water inlet port to which water is supplied and a water outlet port spaced from the water inlet port and from which water is removed after flowing through the outer tube; and an r.f. induction coil for inducing the plasma in the gas passing into the tube through the sample injection port. The sample injection port comprises a capillary tube including a reduced diameter orifice, projecting into the lower end of the inner tube. The water inlet is located at the lower end of the outer tube and the r.f. heating coil is disposed around the outer tube above and adjacent to the water inlet.

Seliskar, Carl J. (Cincinnati, OH); Warner, David K. (Centerville, OH)

1988-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

151

Consumer thermal energy storage costs for residential hot water, space heating and space cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The cost of household thermal energy storage (TES) in four utility service areas that are representative for hot water, space heating, and space cooling systems in the United States is presented. There are two major sections of the report: Section 2.0 is a technology characterization of commercially available and developmental/conceptual TES systems; Section 3.0 is an evaluation of the consumer cost of the three TES systems based on typical designs in four utility service areas.

None

1976-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

152

lullIIlllIllLLLII DESIGN WINDOWS FOR A He COOLED FUSION REACTOR*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

_ ii|l iImMmmm lullIIlllIllLLLII #12;. #12;DESIGN WINDOWS FOR A He COOLED FUSION REACTOR '....."[',":-,_.30 B93 _I_TFIII_31_ONOF THIS DO_.JMENT IS LJNLIMITED 0 S 1" I #12;,l° Design Windows for a He Cooled A design window concept is developed for a He-cooled of a helium cooled reactor are: fusion reactor blanket

Harilal, S. S.

153

Use of Produced Water in Recirculating Cooling Systems at Power Generating Facilities  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to evaluate produced water as a supplemental source of water for the San Juan Generating Station (SJGS). This study incorporates elements that identify produced water volume and quality, infrastructure to deliver it to SJGS, treatment requirements to use it at the plant, delivery and treatment economics, etc. SJGS, which is operated by Public Service of New Mexico (PNM) is located about 15 miles northwest of Farmington, New Mexico. It has four units with a total generating capacity of about 1,800 MW. The plant uses 22,400 acre-feet of water per year from the San Juan River with most of its demand resulting from cooling tower make-up. The plant is a zero liquid discharge facility and, as such, is well practiced in efficient water use and reuse. For the past few years, New Mexico has been suffering from a severe drought. Climate researchers are predicting the return of very dry weather over the next 30 to 40 years. Concern over the drought has spurred interest in evaluating the use of otherwise unusable saline waters. This deliverable describes possible test configurations for produced water demonstration projects at SJGS. The ability to host demonstration projects would enable the testing and advancement of promising produced water treatment technologies. Testing is described for two scenarios: Scenario 1--PNM builds a produced water treatment system at SJGS and incorporates planned and future demonstration projects into the design of the system. Scenario 2--PNM forestalls or decides not to install a produced water treatment system and would either conduct limited testing at SJGS (produced water would have to be delivered by tanker trucked) or at a salt water disposal facility (SWD). Each scenario would accommodate demonstration projects differently and these differences are discussed in this deliverable. PNM will host a demonstration test of water-conserving cooling technology--Wet Surface Air Cooling (WSAC) using cooling tower blowdown from the existing SJGS Unit 3 tower--during the summer months of 2005. If successful, there may be follow-on testing using produced water. WSAC is discussed in this deliverable. Recall that Deliverable 4, Emerging Technology Testing, describes the pilot testing conducted at a salt water disposal facility (SWD) by the CeraMem Corporation. This filtration technology could be a candidate for future demonstration testing and is also discussed in this deliverable.

Kent Zammit; Michael N. DiFilippo

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Yahoo! Compute Coop (YCC): A Next-Generation Passive Cooling Design for Data Centers  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Yahoo! Compute Coop (YCC) project is to research, design, build and implement a greenfield "efficient data factory" and to specifically demonstrate that the YCC concept is feasible for large facilities housing tens of thousands of heat-producing computing servers. The project scope for the Yahoo! Compute Coop technology includes: - Analyzing and implementing ways in which to drastically decrease energy consumption and waste output. - Analyzing the laws of thermodynamics and implementing naturally occurring environmental effects in order to maximize the "free-cooling" for large data center facilities. "Free cooling" is the direct usage of outside air to cool the servers vs. traditional "mechanical cooling" which is supplied by chillers or other Dx units. - Redesigning and simplifying building materials and methods. - Shortening and simplifying build-to-operate schedules while at the same time reducing initial build and operating costs. Selected for its favorable climate, the greenfield project site is located in Lockport, NY. Construction on the 9.0 MW critical load data center facility began in May 2009, with the fully operational facility deployed in September 2010. The relatively low initial build cost, compatibility with current server and network models, and the efficient use of power and water are all key features that make it a highly compatible and globally implementable design innovation for the data center industry. Yahoo! Compute Coop technology is designed to achieve 99.98% uptime availability. This integrated building design allows for free cooling 99% of the year via the building�¢����s unique shape and orientation, as well as server physical configuration.

Robison, AD; Page, Christina; Lytle, Bob

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

155

Preliminary engineering design of sodium-cooled CANDLE core  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CANDLE burning process is characterized by the autonomous shifting of burning region with constant reactivity and constant spacial power distribution. Evaluations of such critical burning process by using widely used neutron diffusion and burning codes under some realistic engineering constraints are valuable to confirm the technical feasibility of the CANDLE concept and to put the idea into concrete core design. In the first part of this paper, it is discussed that whether the sustainable and stable CANDLE burning process can be reproduced even by using conventional core analysis tools such as SLAROM and CITATION-FBR. As a result, it is certainly possible to demonstrate it if the proper core configuration and initial fuel composition required as CANDLE core are applied to the analysis. In the latter part, an example of a concrete image of sodium cooled, metal fuel, 2000MWt rating CANDLE core has been presented by assuming an emerging inevitable technology of recladding. The core satisfies engineering design criteria including cladding temperature, pressure drop, linear heat rate, and cumulative damage fraction (CDF) of cladding, fast neutron fluence and sodium void reactivity which are defined in the Japanese FBR design project. It can be concluded that it is feasible to design CANDLE core by using conventional codes while satisfying some realistic engineering design constraints assuming that recladding at certain time interval is technically feasible.

Takaki, Naoyuki; Namekawa, Azuma; Yoda, Tomoyuki; Mizutani, Akihiko; Sekimoto, Hiroshi [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Tokai University, Kitakaname, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); AISA, Fuchu, Ishioka, Ibaraki 315-0013 (Japan); Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, 152-8550 (Japan)

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

156

GROUND WATER USE FOR COOLING: ASSOCIATED AQUIFER TEMPERATURE CHANGES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

expensive or scarce, cooling towers or ponds are employed.~-1), for dry and wet cooling tower systems, respectively.condenser cooling sys terns such as towers or ponds are

Lippmann, Marcelo J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Optimum hot water temperature for absorption solar cooling  

SciTech Connect

The hot water temperature that maximizes the overall instantaneous efficiency of a solar cooling facility is determined. A modified characteristic equation model is used and applied to single-effect lithium bromide-water absorption chillers. This model is based on the characteristic temperature difference and serves to empirically calculate the performance of real chillers. This paper provides an explicit equation for the optimum temperature of vapor generation, in terms of only the external temperatures of the chiller. The additional data required are the four performance parameters of the chiller and essentially a modified stagnation temperature from the detailed model of the thermal collector operation. This paper presents and discusses the results for small capacity machines for air conditioning of homes and small buildings. The discussion highlights the influence of the relevant parameters. (author)

Lecuona, A.; Ventas, R.; Venegas, M.; Salgado, R. [Dpto. Ingenieria Termica y de Fluidos, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avda. Universidad 30, 28911 Leganes, Madrid (Spain); Zacarias, A. [ESIME UPA, IPN, Av. de las Granjas 682, Col. Santa Catarina, 02550, D.F. Mexico (Mexico)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

Utility of Variable Speed Drives for Fish Protection at Cooling Water Intakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews the utility of a variable frequency drive (VFD) for reducing cooling water flow and potentially the extent of impingement and entrainment of fish and shellfish at power plant cooling water intakes. Reduction of impingement and entrainment at cooling water intakes is the objective of Clean Water Act 316(b) requirements that are being developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

2010-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

159

Effects of evaporative cooling on the regulation of body water and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

building, causing air to be drawn through the cooling pads. The study was conducted during two ...... of gut water in living ruminants. Aust J Agric Res 15:

160

pH Adjustment of Power Plant Cooling Water with Flue Gas/ Fly ...  

The discovery represents a cost-effective way to utilize materials indigenous to fossil fuel burning power platns to control mineral precipitation is cooling water.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design cooling water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Design and evaluation of heat transfer fluids for direct immersion cooling of electronic systems .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Comprehensive molecular design was used to identify new heat transfer fluids for direct immersion phase change cooling of electronic systems. Four group contribution methods for… (more)

Harikumar Warrier, Pramod Kumar Warrier

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Alternative Coolants and Cooling System Designs for Safer Freeze ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2013 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Ni-Co 2013. Presentation Title, Alternative Coolants and Cooling System ...

163

Thermal and hydraulic analyses of TFTR cooling water system and magnetic field coils  

SciTech Connect

The TFTR toroidal field coils, ohmic heating, hybrid and equilibrium field coils are cooled by water from the machine area cooling water system. The system has the following major equipment and capacities: flow rate of 3600 gpm; ballast tank volume of 5500 gal; pumps of 70.4 m head; chiller refrigeration rating of 3300 tons and connecting pipe of 45.7 cm I.D. The performance of the closed loop system was analyzed and found to be adequate for the thermal loads. The field coils were analyzed with detailed thermal and hydraulic models, including a simulation of the complete water cooling loop. Under the nominal operating mode of one second of toroidal field flat top time and 300 seconds of pulse cycle time, the maximum temperature for the TF coils is 53/sup 0/C; for the OH coils 46/sup 0/C and for the EF coils 39/sup 0/C, which are well below the coil design limit of 120/sup 0/C. The maximum TF coil coolant temperature is 33/sup 0/C which is below the coolant design limit of 100/sup 0/C. The overall pressure loss of the system is below 6.89 x 10/sup 5/ Pa (100 psi). With the given chiller refrigeration capacity, the TF coils can be operated to yield up to 4 seconds of flat top time. The TF coils can be operated on a steady state basis at up to 20% of the pulsed duty design current rating of 7.32 kA/coil (36.6 kA/conductor).

Lee, A.Y.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Energy penalty analysis of possible cooling water intake structurerequirements on existing coal-fired power plants.  

SciTech Connect

Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act requires that cooling water intake structures must reflect the best technology available for minimizing adverse environmental impact. Many existing power plants in the United States utilize once-through cooling systems to condense steam. Once-through systems withdraw large volumes (often hundreds of millions of gallons per day) of water from surface water bodies. As the water is withdrawn, fish and other aquatic organisms can be trapped against the screens or other parts of the intake structure (impingement) or if small enough, can pass through the intake structure and be transported through the cooling system to the condenser (entrainment). Both of these processes can injure or kill the organisms. EPA adopted 316(b) regulations for new facilities (Phase I) on December 18, 2001. Under the final rule, most new facilities could be expected to install recirculating cooling systems, primarily wet cooling towers. The EPA Administrator signed proposed 316(b) regulations for existing facilities (Phase II) on February 28, 2002. The lead option in this proposal would allow most existing facilities to achieve compliance without requiring them to convert once-through cooling systems to recirculating systems. However, one of the alternate options being proposed would require recirculating cooling in selected plants. EPA is considering various options to determine best technology available. Among the options under consideration are wet-cooling towers and dry-cooling towers. Both types of towers are considered to be part of recirculating cooling systems, in which the cooling water is continuously recycled from the condenser, where it absorbs heat by cooling and condensing steam, to the tower, where it rejects heat to the atmosphere before returning to the condenser. Some water is lost to evaporation (wet tower only) and other water is removed from the recirculating system as a blow down stream to control the building up of suspended and dissolved solids. Makeup water is withdrawn, usually from surface water bodies, to replace the lost water. The volume of makeup water is many times smaller than the volume needed to operate a once-through system. Although neither the final new facility rule nor the proposed existing facility rule require dry cooling towers as the national best technology available, the environmental community and several States have supported the use of dry-cooling technology as the appropriate technology for addressing adverse environmental impacts. It is possible that the requirements included in the new facility rule and the ongoing push for dry cooling systems by some stakeholders may have a role in shaping the rule for existing facilities. The temperature of the cooling water entering the condenser affects the performance of the turbine--the cooler the temperature, the better the performance. This is because the cooling water temperature affects the level of vacuum at the discharge of the steam turbine. As cooling water temperatures decrease, a higher vacuum can be produced and additional energy can be extracted. On an annual average, once-through cooling water has a lower temperature than recirculated water from a cooling tower. By switching a once-through cooling system to a cooling tower, less energy can be generated by the power plant from the same amount of fuel. This reduction in energy output is known as the energy penalty. If a switch away from once-through cooling is broadly implemented through a final 316(b) rule or other regulatory initiatives, the energy penalty could result in adverse effects on energy supplies. Therefore, in accordance with the recommendations of the Report of the National Energy Policy Development Group (better known as the May 2001 National Energy Policy), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), through its Office of Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), has studied the energy penalty resulting from converting plants with once-through cooling to wet towers or indirect-dry towers. Five l

Veil, J. A.; Littleton, D. J.; Gross, R. W.; Smith, D. N.; Parsons, E.L., Jr.; Shelton, W. W.; Feeley, T. J.; McGurl, G. V.

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

165

Solar heating and cooling systems design and development: quarterly report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program calls for the development and delivery of eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems for installation and operational test. Two heating and six heating and cooling units will be delivered for single-family residences, multiple-family residences and commercial applications. This document describes the progress of the program during the fifth program quarter, 1 July 1977 to 30 September 1977.

Not Available

1977-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

166

Solar heating and cooling systems design and development: quarterly report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress of the program for the development and delivery of eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems for installation and operational test is described for the period, 1 January 1978 through 31 March 1978. Two heating and six heating and cooling units will be delivered for single-family residences, multiple-family residences, and commercial applications.

Not Available

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

District cooling engineering & design program. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

Phoenix, Arizona is located in the Sonoran desert. Daytime temperatures typically rise to over 100 F during the three summer months. Average and peak temperatures have tended to rise over recent decades. This is generally attributed to what is known as the heat island effect, due to an increase in heat absorbing concrete and a decrease in irrigated farmland in the area. Phoenix is the eighth largest city in the US with a population of just over one million (1,000,000). The metropolitan area is one of the fastest growing in the nation. Over the last ten years its population has increased by over 40%. It is not an exaggeration to say the general availability of refrigerated air conditioning, both for buildings and automobiles has been an important factor enabling growth. The cost of operating public buildings has risen significantly in the last decade. In fiscal year 92/93 the City of Phoenix had energy expenses of over thirty four million dollars ($34,000,000). Because the City was planning a major new construction project, a new high-rise City Hall, it was decided to study and then optimize the design and selection of building systems to minimize long term owning and operating costs. The City Hall was to be constructed in downtown Phoenix. Phoenix presently owns other buildings in the area. A number of large cooling systems serving groups of buildings are currently operating in the Phoenix area. The City requested that the design consultants analyze the available options and present recommendations to the City`s engineering staff.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Induced-Draft Cooling Towers and Parallel Wet/Dry Cooling for Combined-Cycle Plants: Design Best Practices and Procurement Specifica tions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains information and examples of best practices for the design and specification of wet and parallel (hybrid) cooling towers for combined-cycle applications. Two reference (template) specifications are includedone for totally wet cooling systems and one for parallel cooling systems with a wet cooling tower and air-cooled condensers (ACC) in parallel. These template specifications are intended to be the starting point from which the utility or developer can "customize" as needed to fit its...

2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

169

Application and numerical simulation on water mist cooling for urban environment regulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fine water mist is a type of sustainable and environment-friendly cooling technology. This paper concerns the use of water mist flow to improve the quality of urban environment in summer. According to the survey and analysis on the potential for ... Keywords: numerical simulation, regulation of microclimate, spray cooling, two-phase flow

Junfeng Wang; Xincheng Tu; Zhentao Wang; Jiwei Huang

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Active cooling for downhole instrumentation: design criteria and conceptual design summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a literature survey that describes successful tests of geophysical instruments and their thermal protection systems. The conditions to which an instrument is subjected are formulated into relevant thermal and mechanical design criteria that have proved useful for improving passive thermal protection systems and selecting the preliminary feasibility of active refrigeration systems. A brief summary of the results of a series of conceptual designs on seven different active refrigeration systems is given. The systems are ranked according to feasibility for use in downhole active cooling applications.

Bennett, G.A.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Thermal hydraulic design of a salt-cooled highly efficient environmentally friendly reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A 1 OOOMWth liquid-salt cooled thermal spectrum reactor was designed with a long fuel cycle, and high core exit temperature. These features are desirable in a reactor designed to provide process heat applications such as ...

Whitman, Joshua (Joshua J.)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Design of passive decay heat removal system for the lead cooled flexible conversion ratio fast reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The lead-cooled flexible conversion ratio fast reactor shows many benefits over other fast-reactor designs; however, the higher power rating and denser primary coolant present difficulties for the design of a passive decay ...

Whitman, Joshua (Joshua J.)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Solar heating and cooling of residential buildings: design of systems, 1980 edition  

SciTech Connect

This manual was prepared primarily for use in conducting a practical training course on the design of solar heating and cooling systems for residential and small office buildings, but may also be useful as a general reference text. The content level is appropriate for persons with different and varied backgrounds, although it is assumed that readers possess a basic understanding of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems of conventional (non-solar) types. This edition is a revision of the manual with the same title, first printed and distributed by the US Government Printing Office in October 1977. The manual has been reorganized, new material has been added, and outdated information has been deleted. Only active solar systems are described. Liquid and air-heating solar systems for combined space and service water heating or service water heating are included. Furthermore, only systems with proven experience are discussed to any extent.

None

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Design of renewable energy powered solar cool research centre.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Solar cooling research center is being developed on CSEM-UAE outdoor research facility in RAK/UAE.  The research center is capable to test system from 1… (more)

Rathnasooriya, Prageeth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Solar heating and cooling systems design and development quarterly report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program calls for the development and delivery of eight (was 12) prototype solar heating and cooling systems for installation and operational test. Two (was 6) heating and six heating and cooling units will be delivered for single-family residences (SFR), multiple-family residences (MFR) and commercial applications. This document describes the progress of the program during the eighth program quarter, 1 April 1978 to 30 June 1978.

Not Available

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Cooling Water Issues and Opportunities at U.S. Nuclear Power Plants,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cooling Water Issues and Opportunities at U.S. Nuclear Power Cooling Water Issues and Opportunities at U.S. Nuclear Power Plants, December 2010 Cooling Water Issues and Opportunities at U.S. Nuclear Power Plants, December 2010 Energy and water are both essential to sustainable development and economic productivity. Ample supplies of water are essential to energy production, and water management is dependent on ample supplies of energy for water treatment and transportation. The critical nexus between energy and water has been recognized in a variety of recent studies, but the policy and regulatory machinery that this nexus depends on is not keeping up with the growing challenges. Population growth and societal demand for improved quality of life will require more clean water for drinking and sanitation, more water for

177

Repair and Replacement Applications Center: Stress Corrosion Cracking in Closed Cooling Water Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of a recent EPRI project "Stress Corrosion Cracking in PWR and BWR Closed Cooling Water Systems," (EPRI Report 1009721, October 2004) indicated that approximately 10 of 143 light water reactor (LWR) plants surveyed had through-wall leaks in carbon steel piping in their closed cooling water (CCW) systems. The root cause of this leakage was intergranular stress corrosion cracking. Since there has not been extensive non-destructive testing in these systems, it is likely that the incidence rate o...

2006-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

178

Assessments of Water Ingress Accidents in a Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Severe water ingress accidents in the 200-MW HTR-module were assessed to determine the safety margins of modular pebble-bed high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTR-module). The 200-MW HTR-module was designed by Siemens under the criteria that no active safety protection systems were necessary because of its inherent safe nature. For simulating the behavior of the HTR-module during severe water ingress accidents, a water, steam, and helium multiphase cavity model was developed and implemented in the dynamic simulator for nuclear power plants (DSNP) simulation system. Comparisons of the DSNP simulations incorporating these models with experiments and with calculations using the time-dependent neutronics and temperature dynamics code were made to validate the simulation. The analysis of the primary circuit showed that the maximum water concentration increase in the reactor core was deaerator to the steam generator. A comprehensive simulation of the HTR-module power plant showed that the water inventory in the primary circuit was limited to {approx}3000 kg. The nuclear reactivity increase caused by the water ingress would lead to a fast power excursion, which would be inherently counterbalanced by negative feedback effects. The integrity of the fuel elements, because the safety-relevant temperature limit of 1600 deg. C is not reached in any case, is not challenged.

Zhang Zuoyi [Tsinghua University (China); Dong Yujie [Tsinghua University (China); Scherer, Winfried [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany)

2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

179

Blue Ridge Mountain Electric Membership Corporation - Water Heater...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heating & Cooling Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Ventilation Manufacturing Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Information Georgia Program Type...

180

Burbank Water & Power - Business Bucks Energy Efficiency Grant...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Cooling Cooling Other Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Insulation Water...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design cooling water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Passive containment cooling system with drywell pressure regulation for boiling water reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A boiling water reactor is described having a regulating valve for placing the wetwell in flow communication with an intake duct of the passive containment cooling system. This subsystem can be adjusted to maintain the drywell pressure at (or slightly below or above) wetwell pressure after the initial reactor blowdown transient is over. This addition to the PCCS design has the benefit of eliminating or minimizing steam leakage from the drywell to the wetwell in the longer-term post-LOCA time period and also minimizes the temperature difference between drywell and wetwell. This in turn reduces the rate of long-term pressure buildup of the containment, thereby extending the time to reach the design pressure limit. 4 figures.

Hill, P.R.

1994-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

182

Passive containment cooling system with drywell pressure regulation for boiling water reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A boiling water reactor having a regulating valve for placing the wetwell in flow communication with an intake duct of the passive containment cooling system. This subsystem can be adjusted to maintain the drywell pressure at (or slightly below or above) wetwell pressure after the initial reactor blowdown transient is over. This addition to the PCCS design has the benefit of eliminating or minimizing steam leakage from the drywell to the wetwell in the longer-term post-LOCA time period and also minimizes the temperature difference between drywell and wetwell. This in turn reduces the rate of long-term pressure buildup of the containment, thereby extending the time to reach the design pressure limit.

Hill, Paul R. (Tucson, AZ)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Options for Shielding Tokamak Cooling Water Electrical Components against High Magnetic Fields  

SciTech Connect

The Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS) Instrumentation and Control (I&C) components of ITER will be located in areas of relatively high magnetic fields. Previous tests on electrical and I&C components have indicated that shielding will be required to protect these components from such magnetic fields. To accomplish this, studies were performed by AREVA Federal Services (AFS) in support of the TCWS Design project with the intent of identifying an optimal solution for shielding I&C components. This report presents a summary of these studies and presents design options for providing magnetic shielding to ITER TCWS I&C components and electrical equipment that are susceptible to the magnetic fields present.

Korsah, Kofi [ORNL; Michael, Smith [AREVA Federal Services LLC; Kim, Seokho H [ORNL; Charles, Neumeyer [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Clean Water Act Section 316(b) Closed-Cycle Cooling Retrofit Research Program Results Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has investigated the implications of a potential U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Clean Water Act 316(b) rulemaking if it establishes closed-cycle cooling retrofits for facilities with once-through cooling as "best technology available" (BTA) for fish protection. This report provides a summary of the results of five studies that comprise EPRI's Closed-Cycle Cooling Retrofit Research Program. These studies evaluated the cost, both financial and econom...

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

185

Advanced water-cooled phosphoric acid fuel cell development. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program was conducted to improve the performance and minimize the cost of existing water-cooled phosphoric acid fuel cell stacks for electric utility and on-site applications. The goals for the electric utility stack technology were a power density of at least 175 watts per square foot over a 40,000-hour useful life and a projected one-of-a-kind, full-scale manufactured cost of less than $400 per kilowatt. The program adapted the existing on-site Configuration-B cell design to electric utility operating conditions and introduced additional new design features. Task 1 consisted of the conceptual design of a full-scale electric utility cell stack that meets program objectives. The conceptual design was updated to incorporate the results of material and process developments in Tasks 2 and 3, as well as results of stack tests conducted in Task 6. Tasks 2 and 3 developed the materials and processes required to fabricate the components that meet the program objectives. The design of the small area and 10-ft{sup 2} stacks was conducted in Task 4. Fabrication and assembly of the short stacks were conducted in Task 5 and subsequent tests were conducted in Task 6. The management and reporting functions of Task 7 provided DOE/METC with program visibility through required documentation and program reviews. This report describes the cell design and development effort that was conducted to demonstrate, by subscale stack test, the technical achievements made toward the above program objectives.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Sustained Recycle in Light Water and Sodium-Cooled Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From a physics standpoint, it is feasible to sustain recycle of used fuel in either thermal or fast reactors. This paper examines multi-recycle potential performance by considering three recycling approaches and calculating several fuel cycle parameters, including heat, gamma, and neutron emission of fresh fuel; radiotoxicity of waste; and uranium utilization. The first recycle approach is homogeneous mixed oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies in a light water reactor (LWR). The transuranic portion of the MOX was varied among Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, or all-TRU. (All-TRU means all isotopes through Cf-252.) The Pu case was allowed to go to 10% Pu in fresh fuel, but when the minor actinides were included, the transuranic enrichment was kept below 8% to satisfy the expected void reactivity constraint. The uranium portion of the MOX was enriched uranium. That enrichment was increased (to as much as 6.5%) to keep the fuel critical for a typical LWR irradiation. The second approach uses heterogeneous inert matrix fuel (IMF) assemblies in an LWR - a mix of IMF and traditional UOX pins. The uranium-free IMF fuel pins were Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, or all-TRU. The UOX pins were limited to 4.95% U-235 enrichment. The number of IMF pins was set so that the amount of TRU in discharged fuel from recycle N (from both IMF and UOX pins) was made into the new IMF pins for recycle N+1. Up to 60 of the 264 pins in a fuel assembly were IMF. The assembly-average TRU content was 1-6%. The third approach uses fast reactor oxide fuel in a sodium-cooled fast reactor with transuranic conversion ratio of 0.50 and 1.00. The transuranic conversion ratio is the production of transuranics divided by destruction of transuranics. The FR at CR=0.50 is similar to the CR for the MOX case. The fast reactor cases had a transuranic content of 33-38%, higher than IMF or MOX.

Steven J. Piet; Samuel E. Bays; Michael A. Pope; Gilles J. Youinou

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

A solar thermal cooling and heating system for a building: Experimental and model based performance analysis and design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A solar thermal cooling and heating system at Carnegie Mellon University was studied through its design, installation, modeling, and evaluation to deal with the question of how solar energy might most effectively be used in supplying energy for the operation of a building. This solar cooling and heating system incorporates 52 m{sup 2} of linear parabolic trough solar collectors; a 16 kW double effect, water-lithium bromide (LiBr) absorption chiller, and a heat recovery heat exchanger with their circulation pumps and control valves. It generates chilled and heated water, dependent on the season, for space cooling and heating. This system is the smallest high temperature solar cooling system in the world. Till now, only this system of the kind has been successfully operated for more than one year. Performance of the system has been tested and the measured data were used to verify system performance models developed in the TRaNsient SYstem Simulation program (TRNSYS). On the basis of the installed solar system, base case performance models were programmed; and then they were modified and extended to investigate measures for improving system performance. The measures included changes in the area and orientation of the solar collectors, the inclusion of thermal storage in the system, changes in the pipe diameter and length, and various system operational control strategies. It was found that this solar thermal system could potentially supply 39% of cooling and 20% of heating energy for this building space in Pittsburgh, PA, if it included a properly sized storage tank and short, low diameter connecting pipes. Guidelines for the design and operation of an efficient and effective solar cooling and heating system for a given building space have been provided. (author)

Qu, Ming [School of Civil Engineering, Purdue University, 550 Stadium Mall Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2051 (United States); Yin, Hongxi [School of Engineering Education, Purdue University, 701 W. Stadium Ave., West Lafayette, IN 47907-2061 (United States); Archer, David H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

MIT Electric Vehicle Team Porsche designing a cooling system for the AC24 electric motor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis I worked on the design and analysis of a cooling system for the electric motor of the MIT Electric Vehicle Team's Porsche 914 Battery Electric Vehicle. The vehicle's Azure Dynamics AC24 motor tended to ...

Meenen, Jordan N

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Design of Air-cooled Microchannel Condensers for Mal-distributed Air Flow Conditions .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Air-cooled condensers are routinely designed for a variety of applications, including residential air-conditioning systems. Recent attempts at improving the performance of these heat exchangers have… (more)

Subramaniam, Vishwanath

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Design data brochure for the Owens-Illinois Sunpak Air-Cooled Solar Collector  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains the information necessary to evaluate the design and installation of the Owens-Illinois Sunpak Air-Cooled Solar Collector. Information includes collector features, fluid flow, thermal performance, installation and system tips.

Not Available

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

A Numerical Modeling Study of Warm Offshore Flow over Cool Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulations of boundary layer evolution in offshore flow of warm air over cool water are conducted and compared with aircraft observations of mean and turbulent fields made at Duck, North Carolina. Two models are used: a two-dimensional,...

Eric D. Skyllingstad; Roger M. Samelson; Larry Mahrt; Phil Barbour

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Use of Produced Water in Recirculated Cooling Systems at Power Generating Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tree ring studies indicate that, for the greater part of the last three decades, New Mexico has been relatively 'wet' compared to the long-term historical norm. However, during the last several years, New Mexico has experienced a severe drought. Some researchers are predicting a return of very dry weather over the next 30 to 40 years. Concern over the drought has spurred interest in evaluating the use of otherwise unusable saline waters to supplement current fresh water supplies for power plant operation and cooling and other uses. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored three related assessments of water supplies in the San Juan Basin area of the four-corner intersection of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. These were (1) an assessment of using water produced with oil and gas as a supplemental supply for the San Juan Generating Station (SJGS); (2) a field evaluation of the wet-surface air cooling (WSAC) system at SJGS; and (3) the development of a ZeroNet systems analysis module and an application of the Watershed Risk Management Framework (WARMF) to evaluate a range of water shortage management plans. The study of the possible use of produced water at SJGS showed that produce water must be treated to justify its use in any reasonable quantity at SJGS. The study identified produced water volume and quality, the infrastructure needed to deliver it to SJGS, treatment requirements, and delivery and treatment economics. A number of produced water treatment alternatives that use off-the-shelf technology were evaluated along with the equipment needed for water treatment at SJGS. Wet surface air-cooling (WSAC) technology was tested at the San Juan Generating Station (SJGS) to determine its capacity to cool power plant circulating water using degraded water. WSAC is a commercial cooling technology and has been used for many years to cool and/or condense process fluids. The purpose of the pilot test was to determine if WSAC technology could cool process water at cycles of concentration considered highly scale forming for mechanical draft cooling towers. At the completion of testing, there was no visible scale on the heat transfer surfaces and cooling was sustained throughout the test period. The application of the WARMF decision framework to the San Juan Basis showed that drought and increased temperature impact water availability for all sectors (agriculture, energy, municipal, industry) and lead to critical shortages. WARMF-ZeroNet, as part of the integrated ZeroNet decision support system, offers stakeholders an integrated approach to long-term water management that balances competing needs of existing water users and economic growth under the constraints of limited supply and potential climate change.

C. McGowin; M. DiFilippo; L. Weintraub

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

193

CALIOP: a multichannel design code for gas-cooled fast reactors. Code description and user's guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CALIOP is a design code for fluid-cooled reactors composed of parallel fuel tubes in hexagonal or cylindrical ducts. It may be used with gaseous or liquid coolants. It has been used chiefly for design of a helium-cooled fast breeder reactor and has built-in cross section information to permit calculations of fuel loading, breeding ratio, and doubling time. Optional cross-section input allows the code to be used with moderated cores and with other fuels.

Thompson, W.I.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Ohio River Ecological Research Program: Economic Valuation of Impingement Losses at Cooling Water Intakes on the Ohio River  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides estimates of the economic value of fish impinged at 13 intake structures withdrawing cooling water from the Ohio River. The information is designed for permit applicants, environmental staff, and facility managers seeking to increase their understanding of the economic value of fish impinged at these intakes for comparison to the costs of installing intake alternatives that could reduce impingement mortality. This report is a companion to EPRI reports 1014337 and 1008473, which provi...

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

195

Comparative Study Between Air-Cooled and Water-Cooled Condensers of the Air-Conditioning Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The weather in Kuwait is very dry where the dry-bulb temperature exceeds the wet-bulb temperature more than 20oC in most of the summer months. Thus, the air-conditioning (A/C) system with the water-cooled (WC) condensers is expected to perform more efficiently than with the air-cooled (AC) condensers. This fact was behind the idea of a field study conducted in one of the major hospital in Kuwait during a summer season to investigate the performance of WC and AC systems in terms of peak power and energy consumptions. The cooling capacities for WC and AC systems were 373 and 278 tons-of- refrigeration, respectively. It was found that for the same cooling production, the peak power demand and the daily energy consumption of the WC system were 45 and 32% less than that of the AC system, respectively. The maximum reduction in the power demand coincided with the peak power demand period of the utilities i.e. between 14:00 and 17:00 hr, thereby offering a maximum advantage of peak power saving.

Maheshwari, G. P.; Mulla Ali, A. A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Wetland Water Cooling Partnership: The Use of Restored Wetlands to Enhance Thermoelectric Power Plant Cooling and Mitigate the Demand on Surface Water Use  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pierina noceti Pierina noceti Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-5428 pierina.noceti@netl.doe.gov steven I. apfelbaum Principal Investigator Applied Ecological Services, Inc. 17921 Smith Road P.O. Box 256 Brodhead, WI 53520 608-897-8641 steve@appliedeco.com Wetland Water Cooling PartnershiP: the Use of restored Wetlands to enhanCe thermoeleCtriC PoWer Plant Cooling and mitigate the demand on sUrfaCe Water Use Background Thermoelectric power plants require a significant volume of water to operate, accounting for 39 percent of freshwater (136 billion gallons per day) withdrawn in the United States in 2000, according to a U.S. Geological Survey study. This significant use of water ranks second only to the agricultural sector

197

Design Windows for a He Cooled Fusion Reactor* Dai-Kai Sze and Ahmed Hassanein  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design Windows for a He Cooled Fusion Reactor* Dai-Kai Sze and Ahmed Hassanein Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 EQUATIONDERIVATION ABSTRACT A design window concept by this design window concept. INTRODUCTION Helium is an attractive coolant for both fusion and fission reactors

Harilal, S. S.

198

Fluidized bed heat exchanger with water cooled air distributor and dust hopper  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fluidized bed heat exchanger is provided in which air is passed through a bed of particulate material containing fuel. A steam-water natural circulation system is provided for heat exchange and the housing of the heat exchanger has a water-wall type construction. Vertical in-bed heat exchange tubes are provided and the air distributor is water-cooled. A water-cooled dust hopper is provided in the housing to collect particulates from the combustion gases and separate the combustion zone from a volume within said housing in which convection heat exchange tubes are provided to extract heat from the exiting combustion gases.

Jukkola, Walfred W. (Westport, CT); Leon, Albert M. (Mamaroneck, NY); Van Dyk, Jr., Garritt C. (Bethel, CT); McCoy, Daniel E. (Williamsport, PA); Fisher, Barry L. (Montgomery, PA); Saiers, Timothy L. (Williamsport, PA); Karstetter, Marlin E. (Loganton, PA)

1981-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

199

Cooling Configuration Design Considerations for Long-Length HTS Cables  

SciTech Connect

Recent successes in demonstrating high temperature superconducting (HTS) cable systems hundreds of meters in length have inspired even longer length projects. A compact and energy efficient cooling configuration can be achieved using a counterflow-cooling arrangement. This is particularly attractive when all three phases are contained in a single cryostat because of the elimination of the space and thermal requirements of a separate liquid nitrogen return line. Future cable projects will utilize second generation (2G) wire which is expected to become lower in cost but may have different thermal requirements than first generation (1G) BSCCO wire due to the lower critical temperature and to a lesser extent, the lower thermal conductivity of the wire. HTS cable configurations will be studied with a numerical model to assess thermal hydraulic performance with AC and thermal losses; a summary of the results from the analysis will be presented. An analysis of the cable thermal- hydraulic response to over-current faults will be presented.

Demko, Jonathan A [ORNL; Duckworth, Robert C [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Testing and design of solar cooling systems employing liquid dessicants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An open cycle liquid desiccant cooling system with cooling capacity of 3 tons (10.5 kW) a subject of research at Colorado State University. The system comprises two main units: the dehumidifier and the regenerator. Lithium bromide is the desiccant solution that dehumidifies the air stream during a counter-current, liquid-gas contacting in the packed tower. The regenerator concentrates the lithium bromide solution during a similar gas-liquid contacting using solar heated air with the only difference being that the direction of heat and mass transfer are reversed in this unit. The earlier studies conducted on the dehumidifier revealed significant departures from an energy balance closure. An attempt has been made to provide a realistic energy balance closure to the dehumidifier side. This has resulted in substantial re-calibration of the major instruments involved. Performance data of the entire system with the regenerator and dehumidifier operated in coupled mode have been presented. An optimization scheme to predict operating conditions suited for best performance of the two units, for varying ambient temperature and humidity to the dehumidifier, has been devised. 15 refs., 20 figs., 8 tabs.

Lenz, T.; Loef, G.O.G.; Flaherty, M.; Misra, S.; Patnaik, S.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design cooling water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Safety Issues and Approach to Meet the Safety Requirements in Tokamak Cooling Water System of ITER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ITER (Latin for 'the way') tokamak cooling water system (TCWS) consists of several separate systems to cool the major ITER components - the divertor/limiter, the first wall blanket, the neutral beam injector and the vacuum vessel. The ex-vessel part of the TCWS systems provides a confinement function for tritium and activated corrosion products in the cooling water. The Vacuum Vessel System also has a functional safety requirement regarding the residual heat removal from in-vessel components. A preliminary hazards assessment (PHA) was performed for a better understanding of the hazards, initiating events, and defense in depth mechanisms associated with the TCWS. The PHA was completed using the following steps. (1) Hazard Identification. Hazards associated with the TCWS were identified including radiological/chemical/electromagnetic hazards and physical hazards (e.g., high voltage, high pressure, high temperature, falling objects). (2) Hazard Categorization. Hazards identified in step (1) were categorized as to their potential for harm to the workers, the public, and/or the environment. (3) Hazard Evaluation. The design was examined to determine initiating events that might occur and that could expose the public, environment, or workers to the hazard. In addition the system was examined to identify barriers that prevent exposure. Finally, consequences to the public or workers were qualitatively assessed, should the initiating event occur and one or more of the barriers fail. Frequency of occurrence of the initiating event and subsequent barrier failure was qualitatively estimated. (4) Accident Analysis. A preliminary hazards analysis was performed on the conceptual design of the TCWS. As the design progresses, a detailed accident analysis will be performed in the form of a failure modes and effects analysis. The results of the PHA indicated that the principal hazards associated with the TCWS were those associated with radiation. These were low compared to hazards associated with nuclear fission reactors and were limited to potential exposure to the on-site workers if appropriate protective actions were not used. However, the risk to the general public off-site was found to be negligible even under worst case accident conditions.

Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Reyes, Susana [ITER Organization, Saint Paul Lez Durance, France; Chang, Keun Pack [ITER Organization, Saint Paul Lez Durance, France; Berry, Jan [ORNL; Kim, Seokho H [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Effect of Ambient Design Temperature on Air-Cooled Binary Plant Output  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air-cooled binary plants are designed to provide a specified level of power production at a particular air temperature. Nominally this air temperature is the annual mean or average air temperature for the plant location. This study investigates the effect that changing the design air temperature has on power generation for an air-cooled binary plant producing power from a resource with a declining production fluid temperature and fluctuating ambient temperatures. This analysis was performed for plants operating both with and without a geothermal fluid outlet temperature limit. Aspen Plus process simulation software was used to develop optimal air-cooled binary plant designs for specific ambient temperatures as well as to rate the performance of the plant designs at off-design operating conditions. Results include calculation of annual and plant lifetime power generation as well as evaluation of plant operating characteristics, such as improved power generation capabilities during summer months when electric power prices are at peak levels.

Dan Wendt; Greg Mines

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Turbine cooling configuration selection and design optimization for the high-reliability gas turbine. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The potential of advanced turbine convectively air-cooled concepts for application to the Department of Energy/Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Advanced Liquid/Gas-Fueled Engine Program was investigated. Cooling of turbine airfoils is critical technology and significant advances in cooling technology will permit higher efficiency coal-base-fuel gas turbine energy systems. Two new airfoil construction techniques, bonded and wafer, were the principal designs considered. In the bonded construction, two airfoil sections having intricate internal cooling configurations are bonded together to form a complete blade or vane. In the wafer construction, a larger number (50 or more) of wafers having intricate cooling flow passages are bonded together to form a complete blade or vane. Of these two construction techniques, the bonded airfoil is considered to be lower in risk and closer to production readiness. Bonded airfoils are being used in aircraft engines. A variety of industrial materials were evaluated for the turbine airfoils. A columnar grain nickel alloy was selected on the basis of strength and corrosion resistance. Also, cost of electricity and reliability were considered in the final concept evaluation. The bonded airfoil design yielded a 3.5% reduction in cost-of-electricity relative to a baseline Reliable Engine design. A significant conclusion of this study was that the bonded airfoil convectively air-cooled design offers potential for growth to turbine inlet temperatures above 2600/sup 0/F with reasonable development risk.

Smith, M J; Suo, M

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Optimizing Cooling Tower Performance Refrigeration Systems, Chemical Plants, and Power Plants All Have A Resource Quietly Awaiting Exploitation-Cold Water!!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling towers, because of their seeming simplicity, are usually orphans of the facilities operation. We are all aware that cooling towers are the step-children of the chemical process plant, electric power generating station, and refrigeration system. While engineers are pretty well convinced of the importance of their sophisticated equipment, and rightly so, they take the cooling towers and the cold water returning from them for granted. Design Conditions are specified for the particular requirements before a cooling tower is purchased. This relates to the volume of circulating water, hot water temperature on the tower, cold water discharge, and wet bulb temperature (consisting of ambient temperature and relative humidity). After the tower is put on the line and the cold water temperature or volume becomes inadequate, engineers look to solutions other than the obvious. While all cooling towers are purchased to function at 100% of capability in accordance with the required Design Conditions, in actual on-stream employment, the level of operation many times is lower, downwards to as much as 50% due to a variety of reasons: 1. The present service needed is now greater than the original requirements which the tower was purchased for. 2. “Slippage” due to usage and perhaps deficient maintenance has reduced the performance of the tower over years of operation. 3. The installation could have been originally undersized due to the low bidder syndrome. 4. New plant expansion needs additional water volume and possibly colder temperatures off the tower.

Burger, R.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Optimizing Cooling Tower Performance- Refrigeration Systems, Chemical Plants, and Power Plants all Have A Resource Quietly Awaiting Exploitation-Cold Water!!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling towers, because of their seeming simplicity, are usually orphans of the facilities operation. We are all aware that cooling towers are the step-children of the chemical process plant, electric power generating station, and refrigeration system. While engineers are pretty well convinced of the importance of their sophisticated equipment, and rightly so, they take the cooling towers and the cold water returning from them for granted. Design Conditions are specified for the particular requirements before a cooling tower is purchased. This relates to the volume of circulatlng water, hot water temperature on the tower, cold water temperature discharge, and wet bulb temperature (consisting of ambient temperature and relative humidity). After the tower is put on the line and the cold water temperature or volume becomes inadequate, engineers look to solutions other than the obvious. While all cooling towers are purchased to function at 100% of capability in accordance with the required Design Conditions, in actual on-stream employment, the level of operation many times is lower, downwards to as much as 50% due to a variety of reasons: 1. The present service needed is now greater than the original requirements which the tower was purchased for. 2. "Slippage" due to usage and perhaps deficient maintenance has reduced the performance of the tower over years of operation. 3. The installation could have been originally undersized due to the low bidder syndrome (1). 4. New plant expansion needs additional water volume and possibly colder temperatures off the tower.

Burger, R.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Ingredients for energy conservation: water cooled luminaires and the heat pump  

SciTech Connect

The energy crisis has focused attention on all aspects of building energy usage--particularly heating and cooling energy. The possibility of utilizing water-cooled luminaires in an area of high relative humidity is explored. Heating is done by a water source heat pump utilizing the water from the luminaires as source for the heat pump. The energy usage of the heat pump system is then compared with the energy usage of other heat reclaim systems thereby demonstrating the energy conservation capabilities of the system.

Dowless, E.C.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Cool-down and frozen start-up behavior of a grooved water heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

A grooved water heat pipe was tested to study its characteristics during the cool-down and start-up periods. The water heat pipe was cooled down from the ambient temperature to below the freezing temperature of water. During the cool-down, isothermal conditions were maintained at the evaporator and adiabatic sections until the working fluid was frozen. When water was frozen along the entire heat pipe, the heat pipe was rendered inactive. The start-up of the heat pipe from this state was investigated under several different operating conditions. The results show the existence of large temperature gradients between the evaporator and the condenser, and the moving of the melting front of the working fluid along the heat pipe. Successful start-up was achieved for some test cases using partial gravity assist. The start-up behavior depended largely on the operating conditions.

Jang, J.H.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water. Quarterly reports  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The activities conducted by Solaron Corporation from November 1977 through September 1978 are summarized and the progress made in the development, delivery and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water is covered. The system consists of the following subsystems: solar collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition.

Williamson, R.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water. Quarterly reports, November 1976--June 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the progress made in the development, delivery and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water. The system consists of the following subsystems: collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition.

Not Available

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Advanced water-cooled phosphoric acid fuel cell development. Quarterly technical progress report No. 50, April--June 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Advanced Water Cooled Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell Development program is being conducted by International Fuel Cells Corporation (IFC) to improve the performance and minimize the cost of water-cooled, electric utility phosphoric acid fuel cell stacks. The program adapts the existing on-site Configuration B cell design to electric utility operating conditions and introduces additional new design features. Task 1 consists of the conceptual design of a full-scale electric utility cell stack that meets program objectives. Tasks 2 and 3 develop the materials and processes required to fabricate the components that meet the program objective. The design of the small area and two 10-ft{sup 2} short stacks is conducted in Task 4. The conceptual design also is updated to incorporate the results of material and process developments, as well as results of stack tests conducted in Task 6. Fabrication and assembly of the short stacks are conducted in Task 5 and subsequent tests are conducted in Task 6. The Contractor expects to enter into a contract with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to assemble and endurance test the second 10-ft{sup 2} short stack. The management and reporting functions of Task 7 provide DOE/METC with program visibility through required documentation and program reviews. This report describes the cell design and development effort that is being conducted to demonstrate, by subscale stack test, the technical achievements made toward the above program objectives.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Design of a 2400MW liquid-salt cooled flexible conversion ratio reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A 2400MWth liquid-salt cooled flexible conversion ratio reactor was designed, utilizing the ternary chloride salt NaCl-KCl-MgCI2 (30%-20%-50%) as coolant. The reference design uses a wire-wrapped, hex lattice core, and is ...

Petroski, Robert C

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Radiation-cooled Dew Water Condensers Studied by Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Harvesting condensed atmospheric vapour as dew water can be an alternative or complementary potable water resource in specific arid or insular areas. Such radiation-cooled condensing devices use already existing flat surfaces (roofs) or innovative structures with more complex shapes to enhance the dew yield. The Computational Fluid Dynamic - CFD - software PHOENICS has been programmed and applied to such radiation cooled condensers. For this purpose, the sky radiation is previously integrated and averaged for each structure. The radiative balance is then included in the CFD simulation tool to compare the efficiency of the different structures under various meteorological parameters, for complex or simple shapes and at various scales. It has been used to precise different structures before construction. (1) a 7.32 m^2 funnel shape was studied; a 30 degree tilted angle (60 degree cone half-angle) was computed to be the best compromise for funnel cooling. Compared to a 1 m^2 flat condenser, the cooling efficienc...

Clus, O; Muselli, M; Nikolayev, Vadim; Sharan, Girja; Beysens, D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Heat exchanger and water tank arrangement for passive cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water storage tank in the coolant water loop of a nuclear reactor contains a tubular heat exchanger. The heat exchanger has tubesheets mounted to the tank connections so that the tubesheets and tubes may be readily inspected and repaired. Preferably, the tubes extend from the tubesheets on a square pitch and then on a rectangular pitch therebetween. Also, the heat exchanger is supported by a frame so that the tank wall is not required to support all of its weight.

Gillett, James E. (Greensburg, PA); Johnson, F. Thomas (Baldwin Boro, PA); Orr, Richard S. (Pittsburgh, PA); Schulz, Terry L. (Murrysville Boro, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Evaluation of Strobe Lights for Reducing Fish Impingement at Cooling Water Intakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents results of a two-year effort that examined the effectiveness for reducing impingement of freshwater fish at cooling water intake structures at two of the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) power plants. This research project also was supported by a Water Quality Cooperative Grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Research results advance our understanding on the utility of strobe lights as a fish protection technology for meeting Clean Water Act 316(b) requirements.

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

215

Design requirements for the supercritical water oxidation test bed  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the design requirements for the supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) test bed that will be located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The test bed will process a maximum of 50 gph of waste plus the required volume of cooling water. The test bed will evaluate the performance of a number of SCWO reactor designs. The goal of the project is to select a reactor that can be scaled up for use in a full-size waste treatment facility to process US Department of Energy mixed wastes. EG&G Idaho, Inc. will design and construct the SCWO test bed at the Water Reactor Research Test Facility (WRRTF), located in the northern region of the INEL. Private industry partners will develop and provide SCWO reactors to interface with the test bed. A number of reactor designs will be tested, including a transpiring wall, tube, and vessel-type reactor. The initial SCWO reactor evaluated will be a transpiring wall design. This design requirements report identifies parameters needed to proceed with preliminary and final design work for the SCWO test bed. A flow sheet and Process and Instrumentation Diagrams define the overall process and conditions of service and delineate equipment, piping, and instrumentation sizes and configuration Codes and standards that govern the safe engineering and design of systems and guidance that locates and interfaces test bed hardware are provided. Detailed technical requirements are addressed for design of piping, valves, instrumentation and control, vessels, tanks, pumps, electrical systems, and structural steel. The approach for conducting the preliminary and final designs and environmental and quality issues influencing the design are provided.

Svoboda, J.M.; Valentich, D.J.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Microsoft Word - INL_EXT-10-20208 DOE-Cooling Water Issues & Opportunities-Main Report-Rev.1.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Report to the U.S. Department of Energy A Report to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy December 2010 INL/EXT-10-20208 Revision 1 ii iii COOLING WATER ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES AT U.S. NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS A Report to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Revision 1 December 2010 iv v PURPOSE This report has been prepared for the Department of Energy, Office of Light Water Reactor Technologies within DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), for the purpose of providing a status report on the challenges and opportunities facing the U.S. commercial nuclear energy industry in the area of plant cooling water supply. The report was prompted in part by recent Second Circuit and Supreme Court decisions regarding cooling water system designs at existing thermo-electric power generating facilities

217

Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Designated Product: Water...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ice Makers. b Measured in accordance with ARI Standard 810-2003. Does not include condenser water use. Back to Top Buying Energy-Efficient Water-Cooled Ice Machines Several...

218

Heat exchanger and water tank arrangement for passive cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water storage tank in the coolant water loop of a nuclear reactor contains a tubular heat exchanger. The heat exchanger has tube sheets mounted to the tank connections so that the tube sheets and tubes may be readily inspected and repaired. Preferably, the tubes extend from the tube sheets on a square pitch and then on a rectangular pitch there between. Also, the heat exchanger is supported by a frame so that the tank wall is not required to support all of its weight. 6 figures.

Gillett, J.E.; Johnson, F.T.; Orr, R.S.; Schulz, T.L.

1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

219

Prototype solar heating and cooling systems, including potable hot water. Quarterly report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress made in the development, delivery and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water is reported. The system consists of the following subsystems: collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition. Included is a comparison of the proposed Solaron-Heat Pump and Solaron-Desiccant Heating and Cooling Systems, Installation Drawings, data on the Akron House at Akron, Ohio, and other program activities from July 1, 1977 through November 9, 1977.

Not Available

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Development of Modeling Capabilities for the Analysis of Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics and Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Develop an experimental and theoretical data base for heat transfer in tubes and channels cooled by water and CO2 at supercritical pressures.

Dr. Michael Z. Podowski

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design cooling water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Enhancement Strategies for Mitigating Potential Operational Impacts of Cooling Water Intake Structures: Approaches for Enhancing Env ironmental Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes environmental enhancement or restoration approaches that may be applicable for mitigating impingement and entrainment impacts associated with cooling water intake structures (CWISs).

2003-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

222

Computation of Infrared Cooling Rates in the Water Vapor Bands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fast but accurate method for calculating the infrared radiative terms due to water vapor has been developed. It makes use of the behavior in the far wings of absorption lines to scale transmission along an inhomogencous path to an equivalent ...

Ming Dah Chou; Albert Arking

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Development of flaw evaluation and acceptance procedures for flaw indications in the cooling water system at the Savannah River Site K Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the methodology used in determining the criteria for acceptance of inspection indications in the K-Reactor Cooling Water System at the Savannah River Plant. These criteria have been developed in a manner consistent with the development of similar criteria in the ASME Code Section 11 for commercial light water reactors, but with a realistic treatment of the operating conditions in the cooling water system. The technical basis for the development of these criteria called {open_quotes}Acceptance Standards{close_quotes} is contained in this paper. A second portion of this paper contains the methodology used in the construction of flaw evaluation charts which have been developed for each specific line size in the cooling water system. The charts provide the results of detailed fracture mechanics calculations which have been completed to determine the largest flaw which can be accepted in the cooling water system without repair. These charts are designed for use in conjunction with inservice inspections of the cooling water system, and only require inspection results to determine acceptability.

Tandon, S.; Bamford, W.H. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (US); Cowfer, C.D.; Ostrowski, R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (US)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Development of flaw evaluation and acceptance procedures for flaw indications in the cooling water system at the Savannah River Site K Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the methodology used in determining the criteria for acceptance of inspection indications in the K-Reactor Cooling Water System at the Savannah River Plant. These criteria have been developed in a manner consistent with the development of similar criteria in the ASME Code Section 11 for commercial light water reactors, but with a realistic treatment of the operating conditions in the cooling water system. The technical basis for the development of these criteria called [open quotes]Acceptance Standards[close quotes] is contained in this paper. A second portion of this paper contains the methodology used in the construction of flaw evaluation charts which have been developed for each specific line size in the cooling water system. The charts provide the results of detailed fracture mechanics calculations which have been completed to determine the largest flaw which can be accepted in the cooling water system without repair. These charts are designed for use in conjunction with inservice inspections of the cooling water system, and only require inspection results to determine acceptability.

Tandon, S.; Bamford, W.H. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Cowfer, C.D.; Ostrowski, R. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Reliable water supply system design under uncertainty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given the natural variability and uncertainties in long-term predictions, reliability is a critical design factor for water supply systems. However, the large scale of the problem and the correlated nature of the involved uncertainties result in models ... Keywords: Data uncertainty, Robust optimization, Spatially correlated data, Water supply system

G. Chung; K. Lansey; G. Bayraksan

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Hydronic rooftop cooling systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A roof top cooling unit has an evaporative cooling section that includes at least one evaporative module that pre-cools ventilation air and water; a condenser; a water reservoir and pump that captures and re-circulates water within the evaporative modules; a fan that exhausts air from the building and the evaporative modules and systems that refill and drain the water reservoir. The cooling unit also has a refrigerant section that includes a compressor, an expansion device, evaporator and condenser heat exchangers, and connecting refrigerant piping. Supply air components include a blower, an air filter, a cooling and/or heating coil to condition air for supply to the building, and optional dampers that, in designs that supply less than 100% outdoor air to the building, control the mixture of return and ventilation air.

Bourne, Richard C. (Davis, CA); Lee, Brian Eric (Monterey, CA); Berman, Mark J. (Davis, CA)

2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

227

Core design and reactor physics of a breed and burn gas-cooled fast reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to fulfill the goals set forth by the Generation IV International Forum, the current NERI funded research has focused on the design of a Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) operating in a Breed and Burnm (B&B) fuel cycle ...

Yarsky, Peter

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

514 ASHRAE Transactions: Symposia Design cooling load calculation methods are, by the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

514 ASHRAE Transactions: Symposia ABSTRACT Design cooling load calculation methods are test. In the tests proposed here, the ASHRAE heat balance method is used as a reference model. Details of confidence in load calculation methods and the computer implementations that they use. ASHRAE has a long

229

Design and Performance Verification of KSTAR Cooling Water System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safety, Environment, and Tritium Handling / Proceedings of the Twentieth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE-2012) (Part 1), Nashville, Tennessee, August 27-31, 2012

Young-Jin Kim; Sang-Tae Kim; Dong-Seok Im; Nam-Yong Jung; Yaung-Su Kim; Seong-Yeon Yoo

230

Impact of drought on U.S. steam electric power plant cooling water intakes and related water resource management issues.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements their overall research effort by evaluating water availability at power plants under drought conditions. While there are a number of competing demands on water uses, particularly during drought conditions, this report focuses solely on impacts to the U.S. steam electric power plant fleet. Included are both fossil-fuel and nuclear power plants. One plant examined also uses biomass as a fuel. The purpose of this project is to estimate the impact on generation capacity of a drop in water level at U.S. steam electric power plants due to climatic or other conditions. While, as indicated above, the temperature of the water can impact decisions to halt or curtail power plant operations, this report specifically examines impacts as a result of a drop in water levels below power plant submerged cooling water intakes. Impacts due to the combined effects of excessive temperatures of the returned cooling water and elevated temperatures of receiving waters (due to high ambient temperatures associated with drought) may be examined in a subsequent study. For this study, the sources of cooling water used by the U.S. steam electric power plant fleet were examined. This effort entailed development of a database of power plants and cooling water intake locations and depths for those plants that use surface water as a source of cooling water. Development of the database and its general characteristics are described in Chapter 2 of this report. Examination of the database gives an indication of how low water levels can drop before cooling water intakes cease to function. Water level drops are evaluated against a number of different power plant characteristics, such as the nature of the water source (river vs. lake or reservoir) and type of plant (nuclear vs. fossil fuel). This is accomplished in Chapter 3. In Chapter 4, the nature of any compacts or agreements that give priority to users (i.e., which users must stop withdrawing water first) is examined. This is examined on a regional or watershed basis, specifically for western water rights, and also as a function of federal and state water management programs. Chapter 5 presents the findings and conclusions of this study. In addition to the above, a related intent of this study is to conduct preliminary modeling of how lowered surface water levels could affect generating capacity and other factors at different regional power plants. If utility managers are forced to take some units out of service or reduce plant outputs, the fuel mix at the remaining plants and the resulting carbon dioxide emissions may change. Electricity costs and other factors may also be impacted. Argonne has conducted some modeling based on the information presented in the database described in Chapter 2 of this report. A separate report of the modeling effort has been prepared (Poch et al. 2009). In addition to the U.S. steam electric power plant fleet, this modeling also includes an evaluation of power production of hydroelectric facilities. The focus of this modeling is on those power plants located in the western United States.

Kimmell, T. A.; Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

231

Influence of Cooling Circulating Water Flow on Back Pressure Variation of Thermal Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under certain conditions, condenser pressure can be considered as back pressure of the steam turbine, which has great influence on the unit power. Based on the back pressure calculation model, influence on back pressure variation by adjusting circulating ... Keywords: Cold-end system, back pressure, cooling water flow, unit power

Nian Zhonghua, Liu Jizhen, Liu Guangjian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Energy Consumption and Demand as Affected by Heat Pumps that Cool, Heat and Heat Domestic Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Products or systems that heat, cool and heat domestic water, which are also referred to as integrated systems, have been available for several years. The concept is simple and appeals to consumers. This paper presents methods for evaluating the potential savings by using an integrated system that heats water by desuperheating discharge gas in the refrigeration cycle. The methods may be applied for any specific location, and their accuracy will depend on the accuracy of building loads and water usage estimates. Power demand can also be affected by electric water heaters. The methods presented demonstrate how integrated systems can be of value in reducing daily summertime peaks.

Cawley, R.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Design guide for category VI reactors: air-cooled graphite reactors  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Design Guide is to provide additional guidance to aid the DOE facility contractor in meeting the requirement that the siting, design, construction, modification, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning of DOE-owned air-cooled graphite reactors be in accordance with generally uniform standards, guides, and codes which are comparable to those applied to similar reactors licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).

Brynda, W.J.; Karol, R.; Powell, R.W.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Performance Evaluation of Behavioral Deterrents for Reducing Impingement at Cooling Water Intakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents results of an examination into the effectiveness of behavioral fish deterrents (light and sound) for reducing impingement of freshwater fish at a cooling water intake structure (CWIS) located at an Alabama Power Company (APC) power plant. This research project also was supported and performed by APC. Research results advance our understanding of the effectiveness of strobe lights and sound as a fish protection technology for meeting Clean Water Act §316(b) requirements.

2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

235

Performance of an air-cooled ammonia-water absorption air conditioner at low generator temperatures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An ammonia--water absorption air conditioning system has been tested to investigate the stability of operation near the cut-off conditions. Circulation ratios were from 8 to 30. Relations for the estimation of the coefficient of performance and for the prediction of operating temperatures were derived and verified experimentally. Possible operating conditions for an air-cooled ammonia--water air conditioning system were concluded.

Dao, K.; Simmons, M.; Wolgast, R.; Wahlig, M.

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Combined cooling and purification system for nuclear reactor spent fuel pit, refueling cavity, and refueling water storage tank  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The spent fuel pit of a pressured water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant has sufficient coolant capacity that a safety rated cooling system is not required. A non-safety rated combined cooling and purification system with redundant branches selectively provides simultaneously cooling and purification for the spent fuel pit, the refueling cavity, and the refueling water storage tank, and transfers coolant from the refueling water storage tank to the refueling cavity without it passing through the reactor core. Skimmers on the suction piping of the combined cooling and purification system eliminate the need for separate skimmer circuits with dedicated pumps.

Corletti, Michael M. (New Kensington, PA); Lau, Louis K. (Monroeville, PA); Schulz, Terry L. (Murrysville Boro, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Combined cooling and purification system for nuclear reactor spent fuel pit, refueling cavity, and refueling water storage tank  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The spent fuel pit of a pressured water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant has sufficient coolant capacity that a safety rated cooling system is not required. A non-safety rated combined cooling and purification system with redundant branches selectively provides simultaneously cooling and purification for the spent fuel pit, the refueling cavity, and the refueling water storage tank, and transfers coolant from the refueling water storage tank to the refueling cavity without it passing through the reactor core. Skimmers on the suction piping of the combined cooling and purification system eliminate the need for separate skimmer circuits with dedicated pumps. 1 figures.

Corletti, M.M.; Lau, L.K.; Schulz, T.L.

1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

238

Effect of makeup water properties on the condenser fouling in power planr cooling system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermoelectric power industry in the U.S. uses a large amount of fresh water. As available freshwater for use in thermoelectric power production becomes increasingly limited, use of nontraditional water sources is of growing interest. Utilization of nontraditional water, in cooling systems increases the potential for mineral precipitation on heat exchanger surfaces. In that regard, predicting the accelerated rate of scaling and fouling in condenser is crucial to evaluate the condenser performance. To achieve this goal, water chemistry should be incorporated in cooling system modeling and simulation. This paper addresses the effects of various makeup water properties on the cooling system, namely pH and aqueous speciation, both of which are important factors affecting the fouling rate in the main condenser. Detailed modeling of the volatile species desorption (i.e. CO{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}), the formation of scale in the recirculating system, and the relationship between water quality and the corresponding fouling rates is presented.

Safari, I.; Walker, M.; Abbasian, J.; Arastoopour, H.; Hsieh, M-K.; Dzombak, D.; Miller, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Boiling water neutronic reactor incorporating a process inherent safety design  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A boiling-water reactor core is positioned within a prestressed concrete reactor vessel of a size which will hold a supply of coolant water sufficient to submerge and cool the reactor core by boiling for a period of at least one week after shutdown. Separate volumes of hot, clean (nonborated) water for cooling during normal operation and cool highly borated water for emergency cooling and reactor shutdown are separated by an insulated wall during normal reactor operation with contact between the two water volumes being maintained at interfaces near the top and bottom ends of the reactor vessel. Means are provided for balancing the pressure of the two water volumes at the lower interface zone during normal operation to prevent entry of the cool borated water into the reactor core region, for detecting the onset of excessive power to coolant flow conditions in the reactor core and for detecting low water levels of reactor coolant. Cool borated water is permitted to flow into the reactor core when low reactor coolant levels or excessive power to coolant flow conditions are encountered.

Forsberg, C.W.

1985-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

240

Advanced intake technology for cooling-water intakes: current status and future direction  

SciTech Connect

A synthesis of a meeting on research and developments related to cooling water intake structures and a critical analysis of the current status of the screening technology are presented. Among the conclusions and recommendations of this workshop were the following: there is a very definite shift towards fine mesh screening for the protection of larval forms; because of the biological variability and site related factors, a single screening technology cannot be expected to solve entrainment/impingement problems at all sites; variations are highly likely in the degree of success in safely screening organisms under laboratory conditions or in prototype and full scale testing, therefore tests conducted under field conditions should have more weight than lab tests in final decision making; selection of the intake design should be based on a comprehensive total system optimization including cost, plant reliability, importance of species to be screened, ecological impacts, demonstrated necessity for larval exclusion etc.; and tests should be standardized as much as possible in order to obtain comparable results at various sites. (LCL)

Sharma, R.K.; Fritz, E.S.; Murarka, I.P.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design cooling water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Assessment of Ice Plugging of the Cooling Water Intake at American Electric Power's Conesville Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The American Electrical Power (AEP) Conesville power plant is shutting down the last unit that uses a once-through cooling system. Currently, warm water from the existing cooling system is routed to the intake area to control ice buildup. After the last unit is shut down, there will be no control of the ice buildup in the trash racks, making complete blockage of the intake facility a possibility. A sediment-control structure was built in 2000 to prevent sediment buildup at the intake facility. The sedime...

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

242

Payback Analysis of Design Options for Residential Water Heaters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Payback Analysis of Design Options for Residential Water Heaters Title Payback Analysis of Design Options for Residential Water Heaters Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number...

243

Designated Ground Water Basin Map | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Designated Ground Water Basin Map Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Designated Ground Water Basin Map Details Activities (0) Areas...

244

Simple strategies for minimization of cooling water usage in binary power plants  

SciTech Connect

The geothermal resources which could be used for the production of electrical power in the United States are located for the most part in the semi-arid western regions of the country. The availability of ground or surface water in the quantity or quality desired for a conventional wet'' heat rejections system represents a barrier to the development of these resources with the binary cycle technology. This paper investigates some simple strategies to minimize the cooling water usage of binary power plants. The cooling water usage is reduced by increasing the thermal efficiency of the plant. Three methods of accomplishing this are considered here: increasing the average source temperature, by increasing the geofluid outlet temperature; decreasing pinch points on the heat rejection heat exchangers, increasing their size; and using internal recuperation within the cycle. In addition to the impact on water usage, the impact on cost-of-electricity is determined. The paper shows that some of these strategies can reduce the cooling water requirements 20 to 30% over that for a plant similar to the Heber Binary Plant, with a net reduction in the cost-of-electricity of about 15%. 13 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Bliem, C.J.; Mines, G.L. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Simple strategies for minimization of cooling water usage in binary power plants  

SciTech Connect

The geothermal resources which could be used for the production of electrical power in the United States are located for the most part in the semi-arid western regions of the country. The availability of ground or surface water in the quantity or quality desired for a conventional wet'' heat rejections system represents a barrier to the development of these resources with the binary cycle technology. This paper investigates some simple strategies to minimize the cooling water usage of binary power plants. The cooling water usage is reduced by increasing the thermal efficiency of the plant. Three methods of accomplishing this are considered here: increasing the average source temperature, by increasing the geofluid outlet temperature; decreasing pinch points on the heat rejection heat exchangers, increasing their size; and using internal recuperation within the cycle. In addition to the impact on water usage, the impact on cost-of-electricity is determined. The paper shows that some of these strategies can reduce the cooling water requirements 20 to 30% over that for a plant similar to the Heber Binary Plant, with a net reduction in the cost-of-electricity of about 15%. 13 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Bliem, C.J.; Mines, G.L. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Boiling water neutronic reactor incorporating a process inherent safety design  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A boiling-water reactor core is positioned within a prestressed concrete reactor vessel of a size which will hold a supply of coolant water sufficient to submerge and cool the reactor core by boiling for a period of at least one week after shutdown. Separate volumes of hot, clean (non-borated) water for cooling during normal operation and cool highly borated water for emergency cooling and reactor shutdown are separated by an insulated wall during normal reactor operation with contact between the two water volumes being maintained at interfaces near the top and bottom ends of the reactor vessel. Means are provided for balancing the pressure of the two volumes at the lower interface zone during normal operation to prevent entry of the cool borated water into the reactor core region, for detecting the onset of excessive power to coolant flow conditions in the reactor core and for detecting low water levels of reactor coolant. Cool borated water is permitted to flow into the reactor core when low reactor coolant levels or excessive power to coolant flow conditions are encountered.

Forsberg, Charles W. (Kingston, TN)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Preliminary Neutronics Design and Analysis of D2O Cooled High Conversion PWRs  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a neutronics analysis of tight-pitch D2O-cooled PWRs loaded with MOX fuel and focuses essentially on the Pu breeding potential of such reactors as well as on an important safety parameter, the void coefficient, which has to be negative. It is well known that fast reactors have a better neutron economy and are better suited than thermal reactors to breed fissile material from neutron capture in fertile material. Such fast reactors (e.g. sodium-cooled reactors) usually rely on technologies that are very different from those of existing water-cooled reactors and are probably more expensive. This report investigates another possibility to obtain a fast neutron reactor while still relying mostly on a PWR technology by: (1) Tightening the lattice pitch to reduce the water-to-fuel volume ratio compared to that of a standard PWR. Water-to-fuel volume ratios of between 0.45 and 1 have been considered in this study while a value of about 2 is typical of standard PWRs, (2) Using D2O instead of H2O as a coolant. Indeed, because of its different neutron physics properties, the use of D2O hardens the neutron spectrum to an extent impossible with H2O when used in a tight-pitch lattice. The neutron spectra thus obtained are not as fast as those in sodium-cooled reactor but they can still be characterized as fast compared to that of standard PWR neutron spectra. In the phase space investigated in this study we did not find any configurations that would have, at the same time, a positive Pu mass balance (more Pu at the end than at the beginning of the irradiation) and a negative void coefficient. At this stage, the use of radial blankets has only been briefly addressed whereas the impact of axial blankets has been well defined. For example, with a D2O-to-fuel volume ratio of 0.45 and a core driver height of about 60 cm, the fissile Pu mass balance between the fresh fuel and the irradiated fuel (50 GWd/t) would be about -7.5% (i.e. there are 7.5% fewer fissile Pu isotopes at the end than at the beginning of the irradiation) and the void coefficient would be negative. The addition of 1 cm of U-238 blanket at the top and bottom of the fuel would bring the fissile Pu mass balance from -7.5% to -6.5% but would also impact the void coefficient in the wrong way. In fact, it turns out that the void coefficient is so sensitive to the presence of axial blanket that it limits its size to only a few cm for driver fuel height of about 50-60 cm. For reference, the fissile Pu mass balance is about -35% in a standard PWR MOX fuel such as those used in France. In order to reduce the fissile Pu deficit and potentially reach a true breeding regime (i.e. a positive Pu mass balance), it would be necessary to make extensive use of radial blankets, both internal and external. Even though this was not addressed in detail here, it is reasonable to believe that at least as much U-238 blanket subassemblies as MOX driver fuel subassemblies would be necessary to breed enough Pu to compensate for the Pu deficit in the driver fuel. Hence, whereas a relatively simple D2O-cooled PWR core design makes it possible to obtain a near-breeder core, it may be necessary to more than double the mass of heavy metal in the core as well as the mass of heavy metal to reprocess per unit of energy produced in order to breed the few percents of Pu missing to reach a true breeding regime. It may be interesting to quantify these aspects further in the future.

Hikaru Hiruta; Gilles Youinou

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Passive decay heat removal system for water-cooled nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive decay-heat removal system for a water-cooled nuclear reactor employs a closed heat transfer loop having heat-exchanging coils inside an open-topped, insulated box located inside the reactor vessel, below its normal water level, in communication with a condenser located outside of containment and exposed to the atmosphere. The heat transfer loop is located such that the evaporator is in a position where, when the water level drops in the reactor, it will become exposed to steam. Vapor produced in the evaporator passes upward to the condenser above the normal water level. In operation, condensation in the condenser removes heat from the system, and the condensed liquid is returned to the evaporator. The system is disposed such that during normal reactor operations where the water level is at its usual position, very little heat will be removed from the system, but during emergency, low water level conditions, substantial amounts of decay heat will be removed.

Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Water cooling of shocks in protostellar outflows: Herschel-PACS map of L1157  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the framework of the Water in Star-forming regions with Herschel (WISH) key program, maps in water lines of several outflows from young stars are being obtained, to study the water production in shocks and its role in the outflow cooling. This paper reports the first results of this program, presenting a PACS map of the o-H2O 179 um transition obtained toward the young outflow L1157. The 179 um map is compared with those of other important shock tracers, and with previous single-pointing ISO, SWAS, and Odin water observations of the same source that allow us to constrain the water abundance and total cooling. Strong H2O peaks are localized on both shocked emission knots and the central source position. The H2O 179 um emission is spatially correlated with emission from H2 rotational lines, excited in shocks leading to a significant enhancement of the water abundance. Water emission peaks along the outflow also correlate with peaks of other shock-produced molecular species, such as SiO and NH3. A strong H2O ...

Nisini, B; Codella, C; Giannini, T; Liseau, R; Neufeld, D; Tafalla, M; van Dishoeck, E F; Bachiller, R; Baaudry, A; Benz, O A; Bergin, E; Bjerkeli, P; Blake, G; Bontemps, S; Braine, J; Bruderer, S; Caselli, P; Cernicharo, J; Daniel, F; Encrenaz, P; di Giorgio, A M; Dominik, C; Doty, S; Fich, M; Fuente, A; Goicoechea, J R; de Graaw, Th; Helmich, F; Herczeg, G; Herpin, F; Hogerheijde, M; Jacq, T; Johnstone, D; Jorgensen, J; Kaufman, M; Kirstensen, L; Larsson, B; Lis, D; Marseille, M; McCoey, C; Melnick, G; Olberg, M; Parise, B; Pearson, J; Plime, R; Risacher, C; Santiago, J; Saraceno, P; Shipman, R; van Kempen, T A; Visser, R; Viti, S; Wampfler, S; Wyrowski, F; van der Tak, F; Yildiz, U A; Delforge, B; Desbat, J; Hatch, W A; Peron, I; Schieder, R; Stern, J A; Teyssier, D; Whyborn, N

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Heating and cooling of municipal buildings with waste heat from ground water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of using waste heat from municipal water wells to replace natural gas for heating of the City Hall, Fire Station, and Community Hall in Wilmer, Texas was studied. At present, the 120/sup 0/F well water is cooled by dissipating the excess heat through evaporative cooling towers before entering the distribution system. The objective of the study was to determine the pumping cycle of the well and determine the amount of available heat from the water for a specified period. This data were correlated with the heating and cooling demand of the City's buildings, and a conceptual heat recovery system will be prepared. The system will use part or all of the excess heat from the water to heat the buildings, thereby eliminating the use of natural gas. The proposed geothermal retrofit of the existing natural gas heating system is not economical because the savings in natural gas does not offset the capital cost of the new equipment and the annual operating and maintenance costs. The fuel savings and power costs are a virtual trade-off over the 25-year period. The installation and operation of the system was estimated to cost $105,000 for 25 years which is an unamortized expense. In conclusion, retrofitting the City of Wilmer's municipal buildings is not feasible based on the economic analysis and fiscal projections as presented.

Morgan, D.S.; Hochgraf, J.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Performance Evaluation of a 4.5 kW (1.3 Refrigeration Tons) Air-Cooled Lithium Bromide/Water Solar Powered (Hot-Water-Fired) Absorption Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the summer months, air-conditioning (cooling) is the single largest use of electricity in both residential and commercial buildings with the major impact on peak electric demand. Improved air-conditioning technology has by far the greatest potential impact on the electric industry compared to any other technology that uses electricity. Thermally activated absorption air-conditioning (absorption chillers) can provide overall peak load reduction and electric grid relief for summer peak demand. This innovative absorption technology is based on integrated rotating heat exchangers to enhance heat and mass transfer resulting in a potential reduction of size, cost, and weight of the "next generation" absorption units. Rotartica Absorption Chiller (RAC) is a 4.5 kW (1.3 refrigeration tons or RT) air-cooled lithium bromide (LiBr)/water unit powered by hot water generated using the solar energy and/or waste heat. Typically LiBr/water absorption chillers are water-cooled units which use a cooling tower to reject heat. Cooling towers require a large amount of space, increase start-up and maintenance costs. However, RAC is an air-cooled absorption chiller (no cooling tower). The purpose of this evaluation is to verify RAC performance by comparing the Coefficient of Performance (COP or ratio of cooling capacity to energy input) and the cooling capacity results with those of the manufacturer. The performance of the RAC was tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a controlled environment at various hot and chilled water flow rates, air handler flow rates, and ambient temperatures. Temperature probes, mass flow meters, rotational speed measuring device, pressure transducers, and a web camera mounted inside the unit were used to monitor the RAC via a web control-based data acquisition system using Automated Logic Controller (ALC). Results showed a COP and cooling capacity of approximately 0.58 and 3.7 kW respectively at 35 C (95 F) design condition for ambient temperature with 40 C (104 F) cooling water temperature. This is in close agreement with the manufacturer data of 0.60 for COP and 3.9 kW for cooling capacity. This study resulted in a complete performance map of RAC which will be used to evaluate the potential benefits of rotating heat exchangers in making the "next-generation" absorption chillers more compact and cost effective without any significant degradation in the performance. In addition, the feasibility of using rotating heat exchangers in other applications will be evaluated.

Zaltash, Abdolreza [ORNL; Petrov, Andrei Y [ORNL; Linkous, Randall Lee [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

An Innovative Hybrid Loop-Pool Design for Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The existing sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR) have two types of designs – loop type and pool type. In the loop type design, such as JOYO (Japan) [1] and MONJU (Japan), the primary coolant is circulated through intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) external to the reactor tank. The major advantages of loop design include compactness and easy maintenance. The disadvantage is higher possibility of sodium leakage. In the pool type design such as EBR-II (USA), BN-600M(Russia), Superphénix (France) and European Fast Reactor [2], the reactor core, primary pumps, IHXs and direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS) heat exchangers (DHX) all are immersed in a pool of sodium coolant within the reactor vessel, making a loss of primary coolant extremely unlikely. However, the pool type design makes primary system large. In the latest ANL’s Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) design [3], the primary system is configured in a pool-type arrangement. The hot sodium at core outlet temperature in hot pool is separated from the cold sodium at core inlet temperature in cold pool by a single integrated structure called Redan. Redan provides the exchange of the hot sodium from hot pool to cold pool through IHXs. The IHXs were chosen as the traditional tube-shell design. This type of IHXs is large in size and hence large reactor vessel is needed.

Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

PRELIMINARY DESIGN OF A HYDROGEN-COOLED IN-PILE LOOP FOR THE EGCR  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A discussion is presented concerning the preliminary design and hazards evaluation of a H-cooled in-pile experimental loop for operation in the large double-walled through-tube in the Experimental Gas-Cooled Reactor (EGCR) at Oak Ridge. This loop is designed to permit experimentation with full-scale fuel element configurations up to 8 in. OD, at inlet gas temperatures of 600 to 950 deg F at 300 psig, and experimental power levels up to 500 kw. The results of a preliminary hazards evaluation indicate that a loop of this type can be safely operated in the EGCR. The H flammability hazard is controlled by blanketing all H-filled pipes and components with a sufficient quantity of nonreactive gas, such as He or CO/ sup 2/, to produce a noncombustible mixture for all credible H- release situations. (auth)

Michelson, C.; Culp, A.W.; Neill, F.H.

1962-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

254

Ground and Water Source Heat Pump Performance and Design for Southern Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ground and water source heat pump systems have very attractive performance characteristics when properly designed and installed. These systems typically consist of a water-to-air or water-to-water heat pump linked to a closed loop vertical or horizontal ground-coupling, an open groundwater loop, or a surface water loop. This paper discusses system performance characteristics, component selection procedures presently being used, improvements currently being considered and future possibilities for improved efficiency and reliability. Optimum designs require proper matching of the heat pump unit to the water circulation system, the building space heating/cooling load and water heating requirements. General trends resulting from system and component choices will be discussed. Water heating methods with these heat pumps will be considered.

Kavanaugh, S.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

GAS COOLED PEBBLE BED REACTOR FOR A LARGE CENTRAL STATION. Reactor Design and Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect

An optimum econonic design for a high temperature, helium cooled, central station reactor power plant of about 400 Mw of electric power was determined. The core consists of a randomly packed bed of unclad graphite spheres, approximately one in. in diameter, impregnated with U/sup 233/ and thorium such that a conversion ratio of near unity is achieved. The high temperature helium permits steam conditions, at the turbine throttle, of 1000 deg F and 1450 psia. (auth)

Schock, A.; Bruley, D.F.; Culver, H.N.; Ianni, P.W.; Kaufman, W.F.; Schmidt, R.A.; Supp, R.E.

1957-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Progress on Design and Construction of a MuCool Coupling Solenoid Magnet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fixture as well as thermal sink and cooling conduction. Theto be arranged as a thermal siphon cooling system driven by

Wang, L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

AUTOMATED DEAD-END ULTRAFILTRATION FOR ENHANCED SURVEILLANCE OF LEGIONELLA 2 PNEUMOPHILA AND LEGIONELLA SPP. IN COOLING TOWER WATERS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detection of Legionella pneumophila in cooling towers and domestic hot water systems involves concentration by centrifugation or membrane filtration prior to inoculation onto growth media or analysis using techniques such as PCR or immunoassays. The Portable Multi-use Automated Concentration System (PMACS) was designed for concentrating microorganisms from large volumes of water in the field and was assessed for enhancing surveillance of L. pneumophila at the Savannah River Site, SC. PMACS samples (100 L; n = 28) were collected from six towers between August 2010 and April 2011 with grab samples (500 ml; n = 56) being collected before and after each PMACS sample. All samples were analyzed for the presence of L. pneumophila by direct fluorescence immunoassay (DFA) using FITC-labeled monoclonal antibodies targeting serogroups 1, 2, 4 and 6. QPCR was utilized for detection of Legionella spp. in the same samples. Counts of L. pneumophila from DFA and of Legionella spp. from qPCR were normalized to cells/L tower water. Concentrations were similar between grab and PMACS samples collected throughout the study by DFA analysis (P = 0.4461; repeated measures ANOVA). The same trend was observed with qPCR. However, PMACS concentration proved advantageous over membrane filtration by providing larger volume, more representative samples of the cooling tower environment, which led to reduced variability among sampling events and increasing the probability of detection of low level targets. These data highlight the utility of the PMACS for enhanced surveillance of L. pneumophila by providing improved sampling of the cooling tower environment.

Brigmon, R.; Leskinen, S.; Kearns, E.; Jones, W.; Miller, R.; Betivas, C.; Kingsley, M.; Lim, D.

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

258

THE DETECTION OF BOILING IN A WATER-COOLED NUCLEAR REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

Measurements made at ORNL to study the feasibility of boiling detection in a water-cooled nuclear reactor are described. The methods selected for the detection of boiling include measurement of the acoustical noise produced by the generation of bubbles and measurement of changes in the reactor-power spectral density produced by bubbles. Preliminary results indicating that both methods could detect boiling are shown. (auth)

Colomb, A.L.; Binford, F.T.

1962-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

259

Topical report : NSTF facilities plan for water-cooled VHTR RCCS : normal operational tests.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Generation IV roadmapping activity, the gas-cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) has been selected as the principal concept for hydrogen production and other process-heat applications such as district heating and potable water production. On this basis, the DOE has selected the VHTR for additional R&D with the ultimate goal of demonstrating emission-free electricity and hydrogen production with this advanced reactor concept.

Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Tzanos, C. P.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water system installed at Columbia Gas System Service Corp. , Columbus, Ohio. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Energy System located at the Columbia Gas Corporation, Columbus, Ohio, has 2978 ft/sup 2/ of Honeywell single axis tracking, concentrating collectors and provides solar energy for space heating, space cooling and domestic hot water. A 1,200,000 Btu/h Bryan water-tube gas boiler provides hot water for space heating. Space cooling is provided by a 100 ton Arkla hot water fired absorption chiller. Domestic hot water heating is provided by a 50 gallon natural gas domestic storage water heater. Extracts are included from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions.

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design cooling water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Conceptual Design of a Lead-Bismuth Cooled Fast Reactor with In-Vessel Direct-Contact Steam Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The feasibility of a lead-bismuth (Pb-Bi) cooled fast reactor that eliminates the need for steam generators and coolant pumps was explored. The working steam is generated by direct contact vaporization of water and liquid ...

Buongiorno, J.

262

Conceptual design of a lead-bismuth cooled fast reactor with in-vessel direct-contact steam generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The feasibility of a lead-bismuth (Pb-Bi) cooled fast reactor that eliminates the need for steam generators and coolant pumps was explored. The working steam is generated by direct contact vaporization of water and liquid ...

Buongiorno, Jacopo, 1971-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

RELAP5-3D Code for Supercritical-Pressure Light-Water-Cooled Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The RELAP5-3D computer program has been improved for analysis of supercritical-pressure, light-water-cooled reactors. Several code modifications were implemented to correct code execution failures. Changes were made to the steam table generation, steam table interpolation, metastable states, interfacial heat transfer coefficients, and transport properties (viscosity and thermal conductivity). The code modifications now allow the code to run slow transients above the critical pressure as well as blowdown transients (modified Edwards pipe and modified existing pressurized water reactor model) that pass near the critical point.

Riemke, Richard Allan; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Schultz, Richard Raphael

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Thermal analysis and cooling structure design of the primary collimator in CSNS/RCS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) of the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is a high intensity proton ring with beam power of 100 kW. In order to control the residual activation to meet the requirements of hands-on maintenance, a two-stage collimation system has been designed for the RCS. The collimation system consists of one primary collimator made of thin metal to scatter the beam and four secondary collimators as absorbers. Thermal analysis is an important aspect in evaluating the reliability of the collimation system. The calculation of the temperature distribution and thermal stress of the primary collimator with different materials is carried out by using ANSYS code. In order to control the temperature rise and thermal stress of the primary collimator to a reasonable level, an air cooling structure is intended to be used. The mechanical design of the cooling structure is presented, and the cooling effciency with different chin numbers and wind velocity is also analyzed. Finally, the fatigue life...

Zou, Yi-Qing; Kang, Ling; Qu, Hua-Min; He, Zhe-Xi; Yu, Jie-Bing; 10.1088/1674-1137/37/5/057004

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

The Relative Effects of U.S. Population Shifts (1930-80) on Potential Heating, Cooling and Water Demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects on potential heating, cooling and water demand induced by the shift and growth of population from cooler and wetter regions of the country to warmer and drier areas were examined. Heating and cooling degree day totals for each of the ...

Henry F. Diaz; Ronald L. Holle

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Design, construction, and testing of the Colorado State University Solar House I heating and cooling system. United States special format report  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the project is the design, construction, testing, and evaluation of a practical system for utilizing solar energy to drive heating, cooling, and domestic hot water subsystems, supplemented as necessary with auxiliary fuel. System design was accomplished during the first five months (September 1973 to January 1974) and construction completed during the following five month period (February to June 1974). This report details the evaluation of the system's performance during the period 1 September 1974 through 31 August 1975. Efforts are now underway to modify and improve the performance of the solar system, and conduct a comparative evaluation of the original design and the modified system. (WDM)

Loef, G.O.G.; Ward, D.S.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Design, construction, and testing of the Colorado State University Solar House I heating and cooling system. United States special format report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of the project is the design, construction, testing, and evaluation of a practical system for utilizing solar energy to drive heating, cooling, and domestic hot water subsystems, supplemented as necessary with auxiliary fuel. System design was accomplished during the first five months (September 1973 to January 1974) and construction completed during the following five month period (February to June 1974). This report details the evaluation of the system's performance during the period 1 September 1974 through 31 August 1975. Efforts are now underway to modify and improve the performance of the solar system, and conduct a comparative evaluation of the original design and the modified system. (WDM)

Loef, G.O.G.; Ward, D.S.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Evaluation of cooling performance of thermally activated building system with evaporative cooling source for typical United States climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cooling (TABS) with a cooling tower providing chilled waterevaporative cooling (cooling tower) for radiant ceiling slabradiant cooling with a cooling tower providing chilled water

Feng, Jingjuan; Bauman, Fred

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Advanced Water-Cooled Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell Development. Quarterly technical progress report No. 47, January--March, 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program is being conducted to improve the performance and minimize the cost of water cooled, electric utility phosphoric acid fuel cell stacks. The program adapts the existing on-site Configuration B cell design to electric utility operating conditions and introduces additional new design features. Task 1 consists of the conceptual design of a full-scale electric utility cell stack that meets program objectives. Tasks 2 and 3 develop the materials and processes requested to fabricate the components that meet the program objective. The design of the small area and two 10-ft{sup 2} short stacks is conducted in Task 4. The conceptual design also is updated to incorporate the results of material and process developments, as well as results of stack tests conducted in Task 6. Fabrication and assembly of the short stacks are conducted in Task 5 and subsequent tests are conducted in Task 6. The Contractor expects to enter into a contract with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to assemble and endurance test the second 10-ft{sup 2} short stack. The management and reporting functions of Task 7 provide DOE/METC with program visibility through required documentation and program reviews. This report describes the cell design and development effort that is being conducted to demonstrate, by subscale stack test, the technical achievements made toward the above program objectives.

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Stochastic Cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stochastic Cooling was invented by Simon van der Meer and was demonstrated at the CERN ISR and ICE (Initial Cooling Experiment). Operational systems were developed at Fermilab and CERN. A complete theory of cooling of unbunched beams was developed, and was applied at CERN and Fermilab. Several new and existing rings employ coasting beam cooling. Bunched beam cooling was demonstrated in ICE and has been observed in several rings designed for coasting beam cooling. High energy bunched beams have proven more difficult. Signal suppression was achieved in the Tevatron, though operational cooling was not pursued at Fermilab. Longitudinal cooling was achieved in the RHIC collider. More recently a vertical cooling system in RHIC cooled both transverse dimensions via betatron coupling.

Blaskiewicz, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Solar heating, cooling, and hot water systems installed at Richland, Washington. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project Sunburst is a demonstration system for solar space heating and cooling and solar hot water heating for a 14,400 square foot office building in Richland, Washington. The project is part of the US Department of Energy's solar demonstration program, and became operational in April 1978. The solar system uses 6,000 square feet of flat-plate liquid collectors in a closed loop to deliver solar energy through a liquid--liquid heat exchanger to the building heat-pump duct work or 9,000-gallon thermal energy storage tank. A 25-ton Arkla solar-driven absorption chiller provides the cooling, in conjunction with a 2,000 gallon chilled water storage tank and reflective ponds on three sides of the building to reject surplus heat. A near-by building is essentially identical except for having conventional heat-pump heating and cooling, and can serve as an experimental control. An on-going public relations program has been provided from the beginning of the program and has resulted in numerous visitors and tour groups.

Not Available

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Design Configurations for a Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Designed to Generate Electricity and Hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor is being envisioned that will generate not just electricity, but also hydrogen to charge up fuel cells for cars, trucks and other mobile energy uses. INL engineers studied various heat-transfer working fluids—including helium and liquid salts—in seven different configurations. In computer simulations, serial configurations diverted some energy from the heated fluid flowing to the electric plant and hydrogen production plant. In anticipation of the design, development and procurement of an advanced power conversion system for HTGR, this study was initiated to identify the major design and technology options and their tradeoffs in the evaluation of power conversion system (PCS) coupled to hydrogen plant. In this study, we investigated a number of design configurations and performed thermal hydraulic analyses using various working fluids and various conditions (Oh, 2005). This paper includes a portion of thermal hydraulic results based on a direct cycle and a parallel intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) configuration option.

Conference preceedings

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Spray Cooling Enhancement of Air-Cooled Condensers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dry cooling of power plants may be an attractive alternative to wet cooling, particularly where water conservation and environmental protection pose critical siting issues. However, dry cooling technology may be unable to maintain design plant output during the hottest periods of the year, which are often periods of peak system demand. This study—cosponsored by EPRI, the California Energy Commission, and Crockett Cogeneration Co.—evaluated the use of a low-pressure spray enhancement system to...

2003-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

274

A case history of a coal gasification wastewater cooling tower at the Great Plains coal gasification project  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the conceptual process design of the Great Plains cooling water system, the fouling history of the cooling tower, and the results of the design modifications. In addition, general design guidelines for future wastewater reuse cooling towers are recommended. By following these guidelines, design engineers can minimize the risk of fouling that could impair a wastewater cooling tower's thermal performance.

Crocker, B.R.; Bromel, M.C.; Pontbriand, M.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Safety and core design of large liquid-metal cooled fast breeder reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with burnup of a depleted-uranium fueled sodium-cooled B&Bwith burnup of a depleted-uranium fueled sodium-cooled B&Bbalance integral of a depleted-uranium fueled sodium-cooled

Qvist, Staffan Alexander

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

SOLERAS - Saudi University Solar Cooling Laboratories Project: King Abdulaziz University. Solar cooling systems design report. Phase 1 report  

SciTech Connect

An assessment of the performance and adaptability of solar cooling systems to the Saudi Arabian environment was studied at King Abdulaziz University. Development of a solar research laboratory and the hardware and software available for installation are considered. The university's facilities for solar energy research are briefly described. A budget for the research project is proposed. (BCS)

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

CONCEPTUAL DESIGN AND ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF A STEAM-COOLED FAST BREEDER REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

A conceptual design and economic evaluation of 300 and 40 MW/.sub e/ steam-cooled fast breeder reactor power plants were performed. A reactor core composed of U-Pu oxide rod-type fuel elements clad with Inconel-X and surrounded by a blanket of depleted UO/sub 2/ fuel was studied in some detail. Reactor breeding ratios of from 1.27 to 1.5 and overall system doubling times of from 20 to 30 years are achievable. For the near term (1967) 300 MW/sub e/ plant, an energy cost of 7.6 mills/kwh is estimated, based on AEC ground rules for privately financed plants and utilities. This cost may go down to 5.7 mills/kwh by 1975. For the 40 MW/sub e/ plant corresponding energy costs are 19.5 and 13.7 mills/kwh, r -spectively. The R&D program required for this reactor concept is estimated at million with an additional million for improvements leading to the 1975 reactor. Investigation of the operational and safety aspects of the reactor indicated that satisfactory procedures can be used for startup, shutdown, and emergency cooling of the reactor. An increase in reactivity upon flooding can be prevented by incorprating small amounts of high resonance absorption material in the core. Preliminary calculations indicate a substantial increase in reactivity upon loss of coolant for the 300 MW/sub e/ PuO/sub 2/ fueled reactor. To obtain designs with satisfactory voiding characteristics it may be necessary to provide high neutron leakage as ib a low L/D core or smaller volume core. Acceptable voiding characteristics appear possible with a Pu fueled 40 MWe reactor cooled with H/O steam, a Pu fueled 300MW/sub w/,reactor cooled with D/O steam, and a 300 MW/sub e/ U/sup 233/-Th fueled 300 MW/sub e/ breeder reactor cooled with H/sub 2/O steam. (auth)

Sofer, G.; Hankel, R.; Goldstein, L.; Birman, G.

1961-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

Best Management Practice: Cooling Tower Management | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Best Management Practice: Cooling Tower Management Best Management Practice: Cooling Tower Management Best Management Practice: Cooling Tower Management October 8, 2013 - 9:39am Addthis Cooling towers regulate temperature by dissipating heat from recirculating water used to cool chillers, air-conditioning equipment, or other process equipment. Heat is rejected from the tower primarily through evaporation. Therefore, by design, cooling towers consume significant amounts of water. Overview The thermal efficiency and longevity of the cooling tower and equipment used to cool depend on the proper management of water recirculated through the tower. Water leaves a cooling tower system in any one of four ways: Evaporation: This is the primary function of the tower and is the method that transfers heat from the cooling tower system to the

279

Soy-Based, Water-Cooled, TC W-III Two Cycle Engine Oil  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to achieve technical approval and commercial launch for a biodegradable soy oil-based, environmentally safe, TC W-III performance, water-cooled, two cycle engine oil. To do so would: (1) develop a new use for RBD soybean oil; (2) increase soybean utilization in North America in the range of 500 K-3.0 MM bushels; and (3) open up supply opportunities of 1.5-5.0 MM bushels worldwide. These goals have been successfully obtained.

Scharf, Curtis R.; Miller, Mark E.

2003-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

280

The Design and Application of the Water Temperature Control System for Large Aquaculture Pond  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because the traditional cooling methods such as ice cooling and natural convection cooling can not meet the special requirements of ornamental fish breeding, the way based on mechanical refrigeration, heat exchange system, water supply system and automatic ... Keywords: aquaculture pond for ornamental fish, water temperature automatic control, mechanical refrigeration, plate exchanger, water supply system

Chen Shuai; Zhong Ke; Cai Yingling

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design cooling water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Fabrication of gas turbine water-cooled composite nozzle and bucket hardware employing plasma spray process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the method for fabrication of water-cooled composite nozzle and bucket hardware for high temperature gas turbines, a high thermal conductivity copper alloy is applied, employing a high velocity/low pressure (HV/LP) plasma arc spraying process, to an assembly comprising a structural framework of copper alloy or a nickel-based super alloy, or combination of the two, and overlying cooling tubes. The copper alloy is plamsa sprayed to a coating thickness sufficient to completely cover the cooling tubes, and to allow for machining back of the copper alloy to create a smooth surface having a thickness of from 0.010 inch (0.254 mm) to 0.150 inch (3.18 mm) or more. The layer of copper applied by the plasma spraying has no continuous porosity, and advantageously may readily be employed to sustain a pressure differential during hot isostatic pressing (HIP) bonding of the overall structure to enhance bonding by solid state diffusion between the component parts of the structure.

Schilke, Peter W. (4 Hempshire Ct., Scotia, NY 12302); Muth, Myron C. (R.D. #3, Western Ave., Amsterdam, NY 12010); Schilling, William F. (301 Garnsey Rd., Rexford, NY 12148); Rairden, III, John R. (6 Coronet Ct., Schenectady, NY 12309)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

How to solve materials and design problems in solar heating and cooling. Energy technology review No. 77  

SciTech Connect

A broad range of difficulties encountered in active and passive solar space heating systems and active solar space cooling systems is covered. The problems include design errors, installation mistakes, inadequate durability of materials, unacceptable reliability of components, and wide variations in performance and operation of different solar systems. Feedback from designers and manufacturers involved in the solar market is summarized. The designers' experiences with and criticisms of solar components are presented, followed by the manufacturers' replies to the various problems encountered. Information is presented on the performance and operation of solar heating and cooling systems so as to enable future designs to maximize performance and eliminate costly errors. (LEW)

Ward, D.S.; Oberoi, H.S.; Weinstein, S.D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

How to solve materials and design problems in solar heating and cooling. Energy technology review No. 77  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A broad range of difficulties encountered in active and passive solar space heating systems and active solar space cooling systems is covered. The problems include design errors, installation mistakes, inadequate durability of materials, unacceptable reliability of components, and wide variations in performance and operation of different solar systems. Feedback from designers and manufacturers involved in the solar market is summarized. The designers' experiences with and criticisms of solar components are presented, followed by the manufacturers' replies to the various problems encountered. Information is presented on the performance and operation of solar heating and cooling systems so as to enable future designs to maximize performance and eliminate costly errors. (LEW)

Ward, D.S.; Oberoi, H.S.; Weinstein, S.D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Passive decay heat removal system for water-cooled nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This document describes passive decay-heat removal system for a water-cooled nuclear reactor which employs a closed heat transfer loop having heat-exchanging coils inside an open-topped, insulated evaporator located inside the reactor vessel, below its normal water level, in communication with a condenser located outside of containment and exposed to the atmosphere. The heat transfer loop is located such that the evaporator is in a position where, when the water level drops in the reactor, it will become exposed to steam. Vapor produced in the evaporator passes upward to the condenser above the normal water level. In operation, condensation in the condenser removes heat from the system, and the condensed liquid is returned to the evaporator. The system is disposed such that during normal reactor operations where the water level is at its usual position, very little heat will be removed from the system, but during emergency, low water level conditions, substantial amounts of decay heat will be removed.

Forseberg, C.W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Passive decay heat removal system for water-cooled nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This document describes passive decay-heat removal system for a water-cooled nuclear reactor which employs a closed heat transfer loop having heat-exchanging coils inside an open-topped, insulated evaporator located inside the reactor vessel, below its normal water level, in communication with a condenser located outside of containment and exposed to the atmosphere. The heat transfer loop is located such that the evaporator is in a position where, when the water level drops in the reactor, it will become exposed to steam. Vapor produced in the evaporator passes upward to the condenser above the normal water level. In operation, condensation in the condenser removes heat from the system, and the condensed liquid is returned to the evaporator. The system is disposed such that during normal reactor operations where the water level is at its usual position, very little heat will be removed from the system, but during emergency, low water level conditions, substantial amounts of decay heat will be removed.

Forseberg, C.W.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

286

Emerging Issues and Needs in Power Plant Cooling Systems,” presented at the Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The majority of the electricity generated in the United States is produced by steamdriven turbine-generators. A very important step in this power generation process is the condensation of exhaust steam from the final, low-pressure turbine. When the steam condenses, the rapid decrease in vapor-to-liquid specific volumes creates a vacuum at the turbine outlet (monitored as turbine backpressure) that increases power generation efficiency. The conventional low-pressure steam turbine-generator can operate over a modest backpressure range (typically 1.0 to 5.0 or 5.5 in. Hga), but the design point for optimum efficiency is usually at the lower end of this range (2.0 to 3.5 in. Hga). Operating at backpressures greater than the design point reduces generation efficiency, and operating beyond a maximum backpressure limit is prohibited by warranty terms specified by the turbine manufacturer. Because lower turbine backpressures are achieved when the steam condensate temperatures are lower, designing and operating a cooling system that can consistently and continually remove the heat of condensation at those low temperatures is essential. Therefore, the cooling system should be considered an integral part of the power generation process that can have a major

Wayne C. Micheletti; Wayne C. Micheletti; John M. Burns

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

ITER's Tokamak Cooling Water System and the the Use of ASME Codes to Comply with French Regulations of Nuclear Pressure Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During inductive plasma operation of ITER, fusion power will reach 500 MW with an energy multiplication factor of 10. The heat will be transferred by the Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS) to the environment using the secondary cooling system. Plasma operations are inherently safe even under the most severe postulated accident condition a large, in-vessel break that results in a loss-of-coolant accident. A functioning cooling water system is not required to ensure safe shutdown. Even though ITER is inherently safe, TCWS equipment (e.g., heat exchangers, piping, pressurizers) are classified as safety important components. This is because the water is predicted to contain low-levels of radionuclides (e.g., activated corrosion products, tritium) with activity levels high enough to require the design of components to be in accordance with French regulations for nuclear pressure equipment, i.e., the French Order dated 12 December 2005 (ESPN). ESPN has extended the practical application of the methodology established by the Pressure Equipment Directive (97/23/EC) to nuclear pressure equipment, under French Decree 99-1046 dated 13 December 1999, and Order dated 21 December 1999 (ESP). ASME codes and supplementary analyses (e.g., Failure Modes and Effects Analysis) will be used to demonstrate that the TCWS equipment meets these essential safety requirements. TCWS is being designed to provide not only cooling, with a capacity of approximately 1 GW energy removal, but also elevated temperature baking of first-wall/blanket, vacuum vessel, and divertor. Additional TCWS functions include chemical control of water, draining and drying for maintenance, and facilitation of leak detection/localization. The TCWS interfaces with the majority of ITER systems, including the secondary cooling system. U.S. ITER is responsible for design, engineering, and procurement of the TCWS with industry support from an Engineering Services Organization (ESO) (AREVA Federal Services, with support from Northrop Grumman, and OneCIS). ITER International Organization (ITER-IO) is responsible for design oversight and equipment installation in Cadarache, France. TCWS equipment will be fabricated using ASME design codes with quality assurance and oversight by an Agreed Notified Body (approved by the French regulator) that will ensure regulatory compliance. This paper describes the TCWS design and how U.S. ITER and fabricators will use ASME codes to comply with EU Directives and French Orders and Decrees.

Berry, Jan [ORNL; Ferrada, Juan J [ORNL; Curd, Warren [ITER Organization, Saint Paul Lez Durance, France; Dell Orco, Dr. Giovanni [ITER Organization, Saint Paul Lez Durance, France; Barabash, Vladimir [ITER Organization, Saint Paul Lez Durance, France; Kim, Seokho H [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

The ultra-high lime with aluminum process for removing chloride from recirculating cooling water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chloride is a deleterious ionic species in cooling water systems because it is important in promoting corrosion. Chloride can be removed from cooling water by precipitation as calcium chloroaluminate using ultra-high lime with aluminum process (UHLA). The research program was conducted to study equilibrium characteristics and kinetics of chloride removal by UHLA process, study interactions between chloride and sulfate or silica, and develop a model for multicomponent removal by UHLA. Kinetics of chloride removal with UHLA was investigated. Chloride removal was found to be fast and therefore, removal kinetics should not be a limitation to applying the UHLA process. Equilibrium characteristics of chloride removal with UHLA were characterized. Good chloride removal was obtained at reasonable ranges of lime and aluminum doses. However, the stoichiometry of chloride removal with UHLA deviated from the theoretical stoichiometry of calcium chloroaluminate precipitation. Equilibrium modeling of experimental data and XRD analysis of precipitated solids indicated that this deviation was due to the formation of other solid phases such as tricalcium hydroxyaluminate and tetracalcium hydroxyaluminate. Effect of pH on chloride removal was characterized. Optimum pH for maximum chloride removal was pH 12 ± 0.2. Results of equilibrium experiments at different temperatures indicated that final chloride concentrations slightly increased when water temperature increased at temperatures below 40oC. However, at temperatures above 40oC, chloride concentration substantially increased with increasing water temperature. An equilibrium model was developed to describe chemical behavior of chloride removal from recycled cooling water using UHLA. Formation of a solid solution of calcium chloroaluminate, tricalcium hydroxyaluminate, and tetracalcium hydroxyaluminate was found to be the best mechanism to describe the chemical behavior of chloride removal with UHLA. Results of experiments that studied interactions between chloride and sulfate indicated that sulfate is preferentially removed over chloride. Final chloride concentration increased with increasing initial sulfate concentration. Silica was found to have only a small effect on chloride removal. The equilibrium model was modified in order to include sulfate and silica reactions along with chloride in UHLA process and it was able to accurately predict the chemical behavior of simultaneous removal of chloride, sulfate, and silica with UHLA.

Abdel-wahab, Ahmed Ibraheem Ali

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

MANAGEMENT OF BLOWDOWN FROM CLOSED LOOP COOLING SYSTEMS USING IMPAIRED WATERS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Management of cooling tower blowdown is one of the key components in cooling tower operation and usually requires treatment to meet local, state or federal… (more)

Feng, Yinghua

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Locating of leaks in water-cooled generator stator bars using perfluorocarbon tracers  

SciTech Connect

Water cooled stator bars in power plant generators often fail during the maintenance cycle due to water leakage. After the hydrogen pressure in the generator shell has been released water can leak through cracks in the copper and through the insulation. Leaking bars, but not the leaks themselves, are detected with so-called ``hi-pot`` (high potential) tests where direct electrical current is applied to the stator bar windings. A study initiated by ConEd and Brookhaven`s Tracer Technology Center to explore the cause of these leakage problems to determine if the failures originate in the manufacturing process or are created in service by phase related torque stresses. To this purpose bars that had failed the hi-pot test were investigated first with the insulation in place and then stripped to the bare copper. The bars were pressurized with gases containing perfluorocarbon tracers and the magnitude and location of the leaks was detected by using tracers technology principles and instruments such as the ``double source`` method and the Dual Trap Analyzer. In the second part of the project the windings within a generator were tested in-situ for leaks during an outage using tracer principles. Recommendations are given suggesting the shut down of stator bar cooling water before hydrogen bleeding during outages and a revision of the current vent flow rate. The new standard should establish a reasonable leak rate for the stator bar windings proper and exclude leakage of pump seals and connections. Testing during the maintenance cycle in generators should include routine tracer leak detection following the hi-pot test.

Loss, W.M.; Dietz, R.N.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Locating of leaks in water-cooled generator stator bars using perfluorocarbon tracers  

SciTech Connect

Water cooled stator bars in power plant generators often fail during the maintenance cycle due to water leakage. After the hydrogen pressure in the generator shell has been released water can leak through cracks in the copper and through the insulation. Leaking bars, but not the leaks themselves, are detected with so-called hi-pot'' (high potential) tests where direct electrical current is applied to the stator bar windings. A study initiated by ConEd and Brookhaven's Tracer Technology Center to explore the cause of these leakage problems to determine if the failures originate in the manufacturing process or are created in service by phase related torque stresses. To this purpose bars that had failed the hi-pot test were investigated first with the insulation in place and then stripped to the bare copper. The bars were pressurized with gases containing perfluorocarbon tracers and the magnitude and location of the leaks was detected by using tracers technology principles and instruments such as the double source'' method and the Dual Trap Analyzer. In the second part of the project the windings within a generator were tested in-situ for leaks during an outage using tracer principles. Recommendations are given suggesting the shut down of stator bar cooling water before hydrogen bleeding during outages and a revision of the current vent flow rate. The new standard should establish a reasonable leak rate for the stator bar windings proper and exclude leakage of pump seals and connections. Testing during the maintenance cycle in generators should include routine tracer leak detection following the hi-pot test.

Loss, W.M.; Dietz, R.N.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Design Of A Hybrid Jet Impingement / Microchannel Cooling Device For Densely Packed PV Cells Under High Concentration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hybrid jet impingement / microchannel cooling scheme was designed and applied to densely packed PV cells under high concentration. An experimental study allows validating the principles of the design and confirming its applicability to the cited system. In order to study the characteristics of the device in a wide range of conditions

Jérôme Barrau; Joan Rosell; Manel Ibañez

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

"Hot" for Warm Water Cooling Henry Coles, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to set guidelines for facilitating the energy efficiency of liquid- cooled High Performance Computing

294

The Binary Cooling Tower Process: An Energy Conserving Water Reuse Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Binary Cooling Tower (BCT) harnesses cooling system waste heat to accomplish concentration of waste and process streams. The BCT can also be integrated to isolate and improve the efficiency of critical cooling loops. This paper describes the BCT, its integration into a cooling system, and some energy saving applications

Lancaster, R. L.; Sanderson, W. G.; Cooke, R. L., Jr.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

A STUDY ON LEGIONELLA PNEUMOPHILA, WATER CHEMISTRY, AND ATMOSPHERIC CONDITIONS IN COOLING TOWERS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect

Legionnaires disease is a pneumonia caused by the inhalation of the bacterium Legionella pneumophila. The majority of illnesses have been associated with cooling towers since these devices can harbor and disseminate the bacterium in the aerosolized mist generated by these systems. Historically, Savannah River Site (SRS) cooling towers have had occurrences of elevated levels of Legionella in all seasons of the year and in patterns that are difficult to predict. Since elevated Legionella in cooling tower water are a potential health concern a question has been raised as to the best control methodology. In this work we analyze available chemical, biological, and atmospheric data to determine the best method or key parameter for control. The SRS 4Q Industrial Hygiene Manual, 4Q-1203, 1 - G Cooling Tower Operation and the SRNL Legionella Sampling Program, states that 'Participation in the SRNL Legionella Sampling Program is MANDATORY for all operating cooling towers'. The resulting reports include L. pneumophila concentration information in cells/L. L. pneumophila concentrations >10{sup 7} cells/L are considered elevated and unsafe so action must be taken to reduce these densities. These remedial actions typically include increase biocide addition or 'shocking'. Sometimes additional actions are required if the problem persists including increase tower maintenance (e.g. cleaning). Evaluation of 14 SRS cooling towers, seven water quality parameters, and five Legionella serogroups over a three-plus year time frame demonstrated that cooling tower water Legionella densities varied widely though out this time period. In fact there was no one common consistent significant variable across all towers. The significant factors that did show up most frequently were related to suspended particulates, conductivity, pH, and dissolved oxygen, not chlorine or bromine as might be expected. Analyses of atmospheric data showed that there were more frequent significant elevated Legionella concentrations when the dew point temperature was high--a summertime occurrence. However, analysis of the three years of Legionella monitoring data of the 14 different SRS Cooling Towers demonstrated that elevated concentrations are observed at all temperatures and seasons. The objective of this study is to evaluate the ecology of L. pneumophila including serogroups and population densities, chemical, and atmospheric data, on cooling towers at SRS to determine whether relationships exist among water chemistry, and atmospheric conditions. The goal is to more fully understand the conditions which inhibit or encourage L. pneumophila growth and supply this data and associated recommendations to SRS Cooling Tower personnel for improved management of operation. Hopefully this information could then be used to help control L. pneumophila growth more effectively in SRS cooling tower water.

Smith, C.; Brigmon, R.

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

296

What is "Normative" at Cooling Water Intakes? Defining Normalcy Before Judging Adverse  

SciTech Connect

Judgments of adverse environmental impact from cooling water intake structures need to be preceded by an appreciation of what is normal. In its repo~ Return to the River, the Independent Scientd5c Group (now called the Independent Scientfilc Advisory Board) --the scientific peer review arm of the Northwest Power Planning Council-- advanced the notion of a "normative river ecosystem" as a new conceptual foundation for salrnonid recovery in the Columbia River basin. With this perspective, the sum of the best scientific understanding of how organisms and aquatic ecosystems function should be the norm or standard of measure for how we judge the effects of human activities on aquatic systems. ,For the best likelihood of recovery, key aspects of altered systems should be brought back toward nonnative (although not necessarily fully back to the historical or pristine state); new alterations should be judged for adversity by how much they move key attributes away from normative or what might be considered normal. In this presentation, I ask what "normative" is for the setting of cooling water intake structures and how this concept could help resolve long-standing disputes between groups interested in avoiding darnage to all organisms that might be entrained or impinged and those who take a more population or community perspective for judging adverse environmental impact. In essence, I suggest that if a water intake does not move the aquatic ecosystem outside the "normative" range, based on expressions of norrrdcy such as those discussed, then no adverse impact has occurred. Having an explicit baseline in normal or normative would place 316(b) analyses on the same conceptual foundation as 316(a) analyses, which strive to demonstrate the continuation of a balanced, indigenous community of aquatic organisms at the power station Iocation.

Coutant, C.C.

1998-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

297

Energy Basics: Evaporative Cooling  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

absorbent material. Evaporative cooling uses evaporated water to naturally and energy-efficiently cool. How Evaporative Coolers Work There are two types of evaporative...

298

Optimized core design of a supercritical carbon dioxide-cooled fast reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spurred by the renewed interest in nuclear power, Gas-cooled Fast Reactors (GFRs) have received increasing attention in the past decade. Motivated by the goals of the Generation-IV International Forum (GIF), a GFR cooled ...

Handwerk, Christopher S. (Christopher Stanley), 1974-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

SOLERAS - Solar Cooling Engineering Field Tests Project: United Technologies Research Center. Design guidelines for solar heating/cooling/power generation systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the methodology, design guidelines and analytical tools for the preliminary technical/economic evaluation of solar heating/cooling/power generation systems. In particular, it provides the theoretical framework, data bases and software tools for: determining the preliminary economic feasibility of solar-powered configurations compared with grid-supplied electric power and/or competing fossil fuels; selecting the optimum system configuration with respect to solar collector area and ''solar-side'' thermal storage capacity. Implementation of the methodology described in this report can be facilitated by the use of the accompanying IBM PC-compatible computer program ''SOLERAS''. This report represents the final task of the multi-year SOLERAS Program -- jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology -- which involved the development and field-testing of a solar-powered cooling system in Phoenix, AZ. 11 refs., 37 figs.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Enhanced Natural Convection in a Metal Layer Cooled by Boiling Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental study is performed to investigate the natural convection heat transfer characteristics and the solidification of the molten metal pool concurrently with forced convective boiling of the overlying coolant to simulate a severe accident in a nuclear power plant. The relationship between the Nusselt number (Nu) and the Rayleigh number (Ra) in the molten metal pool region is determined and compared with the correlations in the literature and experimental data with subcooled water. Given the same Ra condition, the present experimental results for Nu of the liquid metal pool with coolant boiling are found to be higher than those predicted by the existing correlations or measured from the experiment with subcooled boiling. To quantify the observed effect of the external cooling on the natural convection heat transfer rate from the molten pool, it is proposed to include an additional dimensionless group characterizing the temperature gradients in the molten pool and in the external coolant region. Starting from the Globe and Dropkin correlation, engineering correlations are developed for the enhancement of heat transfer in the molten metal pool when cooled by an overlying coolant. The new correlations for predicting natural convection heat transfer are applicable to low-Prandtl-number (Pr) materials that are heated from below and solidified by the external coolant above. Results from this study may be used to modify the current model in severe accident analysis codes.

Cho, Jae-Seon [Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Kune Y. [Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Chang-Hyun [Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of); Park, Rae-Joon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang-Baik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design cooling water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Hybrid Cooling Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water consumption by power plants has become an increasingly contentious siting issue. In nearly all fossil-fired and nuclear plants, water for plant cooling is by far the greatest water requirement. Therefore, the use of water-conserving cooling systems such as dry or hybrid cooling is receiving increasing attention. This technology overview from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) provides a brief introduction to hybrid cooling systems. As defined in the report, the term "hybrid cooling" refer...

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

302

Water protection in coke-plant design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wastewater generation, water consumption, and water management at coke plants are considered. Measures to create runoff-free water-supply and sewer systems are discussed. Filters for water purification, corrosion inhibitors, and biocides are described. An integrated single-phase technology for the removal of phenols, thiocyanides, and ammoniacal nitrogen is outlined.

G.I. Alekseev [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

Helium turbine design for a 1000 MWe gas-cooled fast breeder reactor with closed gas turbine cycle  

SciTech Connect

This report deals exclusively with the preliminary design of a double-flooded helium turbine for a 1000 MWe gas-cooled fast breeder reactor. The influence is studied of several parameters, such as hub ratio, exit angle of the turbine wheel and inlet angle of the guide wheel, on the designed size of the turbine and the centrifugal stress of the blading, in order to get a survey which is helpful in the preliminary design.

Savatteri, C.

1973-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Candidate chemical systems for air cooled, solar powered, absorption air conditioner design. Part III. Lithium salts with anti-freeze additives  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The two most promising anti-solidification additives which have been identified are ethanolamine and ethylene glycol. Considerations of viscosity, corrosion, crystallization temperature and vapor pressure have led to a selection of lithium bromide - ethylene glycol - water as the basis of a prototype air-cooled machine, with the lithium bromide; ethylene glycol ratio being 4.5. Using what appear to be reasonable heat exchanger approach temperatures, cycle thermal COP's of 0.7/sup +/ appear possible at the specified design point, based on solution properties which were determined with qualification accuracy. The prototype, delivering 10,000 watts of cooling, has a calculated parasitical electrical load of about 175 watts (theoretical) to drive the internal fans and pumps, equivalent to about a 0.5 horsepower motor.

Biermann, W.J.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Proprties of the Carrol system and a machine design for solar-powered, air-cooled, absorption space cooling. Phase I and Phase II. Final report, September 1977-March 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The name Carrol has been selected as a convenient short-hand designation for a prime candidate chemical system comprising ethylene glycol-lithium bromide as an absorbent mixture with water as a refrigerant. The instrumentation, methods of handling data and numerical results from a systematic determination of Carrol property data required to design an air cooled absorption machine based on this chemical system are described. These data include saturation temperature, relative enthalpy, density, specific heat capacity, thermal conductivity, viscosity and absorber film heat transfer coefficient as functions of solution temperature and Carrol concentration over applicable ranges. For each of the major components of the absorption chiller, i.e., generator, chiller, absorber, condenser, heat exchanger, purge and controls, the report contains an assembly drawing and the principal operating characteristics of that component.

Biermann, W.J.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

A helium-cooled blanket design of the low aspect ratio reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An aggressive low aspect ratio scoping fusion reactor design indicated that a 2 GW(e) reactor can have a major radius as small as 2.9 m resulting in a device with competitive cost of electricity at 49 mill/kWh. One of the technology requirements of this design is a high performance high power density first wall and blanket system. A 15 MPa helium-cooled, V-alloy and stagnant LiPb breeder first wall and blanket design was utilized. Due to the low solubility of tritium in LiPb, there is the concern of tritium migration and the formation of V-hydride. To address these issues, a lithium breeder system with high solubility of tritium has been evaluated. Due to the reduction of blanket energy multiplication to 1.2, to maintain a plant Q of > 4, the major radius of the reactor has to be increased to 3.05 m. The inlet helium coolant temperature is raised to 436 C in order to meet the minimum V-alloy temperature limit everywhere in the first wall and blanket system. To enhance the first wall heat transfer, a swirl tape coolant channel design is used. The corresponding increase in friction factor is also taken into consideration. To reduce the coolant system pressure drop, the helium pressure is increased from 15 to 18 MPa. Thermal structural analysis is performed for a simple tube design. With an inside tube diameter of 1 cm and a wall thickness of 1.5 mm, the lithium breeder can remove an average heat flux and neutron wall loading of 2 and 8 MW/m(2), respectively. This reference design can meet all the temperature and material structural design limits, as well as the coolant velocity limits. Maintaining an outlet coolant temperature of 650 C, one can expect a gross closed cycle gas turbine thermal efficiency of 45%. This study further supports the use of helium coolant for high power density reactor design. When used with the low aspect ratio reactor concept a competitive fusion reactor can be projected at 51.9 mill/kWh.

Wong, C.P.; Baxi, C.B.; Reis, E.E. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Cerbone, R.; Cheng, E.T. [TSI Research, Solana Beach, CA (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Potential of thermal insulation and solar thermal energy in domestic hot water and space heating and cooling sectors in Lebanon in the period 2010 - 2030.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The potential of thermal insulation and solar thermal energy in domestic water heating, space heating and cooling in residential and commercial buildings Lebanon is studied… (more)

Zaatari, Z.A.R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

PEP Conceptual Design Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling tower water system. . . . .Utilities LCW Systems Cooling Towers TQTAL NOTES: aprojectsreject follows: heat to cooling tower water systems. Heat

Various

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Evaluation on Cooling Energy Load with Varied Envelope Design for High-Rise Residential Buildings in Malaysia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the development of the economy in the recent years, Malaysia is maintaining a high economic growth and therefore, its energy consumption increases dramatically. Residential buildings are characterized by being envelope-load dominated buildings, hence are greatly influenced by the outside climatic conditions. Due to the hot humid climate of Malaysia, air conditioning system accounts for more than 45% of the total electricity used in the residential sector which is required to remove substantial amount of gained heat due to poor thermal envelope performance. This paper uses Ecotect software to analyze the impact of building envelope design on energy cooling load for residential building in Penang, Malaysia, which include area ratio of window to floor, exterior wall thermal insulation, and several kinds of shading system. This paper describes an integrated passive design approach to reduce the cooling requirement for high-rise apartments through an improved building envelope design. Comparing with the other passive strategies investigated in this paper, the results indicated that exterior wall thermal insulation is the best strategy to decrease both annual cooling energy load and peak cooling load which achieved a reduction of 10.2% and 26.3% respectively. However, the other passive strategies applied also have some marginal effect on decreasing the cooling load.

Al-Tamimi, N.; Fadzil, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

The absorption chiller in large scale solar pond cooling design with condenser heat rejection in the upper convecting zone  

SciTech Connect

The possibility of using solar ponds as low-cost solar collectors combined with commercial absorption chillers in large scale solar cooling design is investigated. The analysis is based on the combination of a steady-state solar pond mathematical model with the operational characteristics of a commercial absorption chiller, assuming condenser heat rejection in the upper convecting zone (U.C.Z.). The numerical solution of the nonlinear equations involved leads to results which relate the chiller capacity with pond design and environmental parameters, which are also employed for the investigation of the optimum pond size for a minimum capital cost. The derived cost per cooling kW for a 350 kW chiller ranges from about 300 to 500 $/kW cooling. This is almost an order of magnitude lower than using a solar collector field of evacuated tube type.

Tsilingiris, P.T. (Commercial Bank of Greece, Athens (Greece))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

LBNL's Novel Approach to Cooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

systems department, chilled water, cooling water tower, double exchanger cooling, dual heat exchanger, high tech and industrial systems group, inrow, lawrence berkeley national...

312

Solar heating and cooling system design and development. Status summary, April--June 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information is provided on the development of eight prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems. This effort includes development, manufacture, test, installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and monitoring the operation of prototype systems. The program currently consists of development of heating and cooling equipment for single-family residential and commercial applications and eight operational test sites (four heating and four heating and cooling). Four are single-family residences and four are commercial buildings.

Not Available

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Solar heating and cooling system design and development (status summay through December 1977)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program scope is to develop, fabricate, install, and monitor the operation of prototype solar heating and cooling systems. Application studies have been completed for three application categories: single-family residential, multi-family residential, and commercial. The program currently consists of development of heating and cooling euipment for single-family residential and commercial applications and eight operational test sites (four heating and four heating and cooling). Four are single-family residences and four are commercial buildings.

Not Available

1978-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

314

Impact of Solar Heat Gain on Radiant Floor Cooling System Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Y. Chen, The effect of solar radiation on dynamic thermaldependant upon solar radiation, ASHRAE Transactions, (2006)M. Filippi, B.W. Olesen, Solar radiation and cooling load

Feng, Jingjuan Dove; Schiavon, Stefano; Bauman, Fred

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Design and power management of a solar-powered “Cool Robot” for polar instrument networks: Research Articles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Cool Robot is a four-wheel-drive, solar-powered, autonomous robot designed to support summertime science campaigns in Antarctica and Greenland over distances exceeding 500 km. This paper provides an overview of key features of the robot, including ...

Laura E. Ray; James H. Lever; Alexander D. Streeter; Alexander D. Price

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

SOLERAS - Saudi University Solar Cooling Laboratories Project: King Faisal University. Design analysis study. Volume 3. Appendixes VII-X  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Documentation supporting the proposed construction of a passively cooled house at King Faisal University in Saudi Arabia is presented. The documents include: computer printouts for comparisons of design; landscapes analysis; field station study for Al Batin, Saudi Arabia; data acquisition systems; and performance evaluation. (BCS)

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Enhancement Strategies for Mitigating Potential Operational Impacts of Cooling Water Intake Structures: Approaches for Enhancing Env ironmental Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report describes environmental enhancement or restoration approaches that may be applicable for mitigating impingement and entrainment impacts associated with cooling water intake structures (CWISs). These approaches are described with respect to their underlying objectives, implementation and operational requirements, costs, current use by government and the private sector, and advantages and limitations for potentially mitigating CWIS operational impacts.

2002-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

318

Evaluation of two concepts for protection of fish larvae at cooling water intakes. Final report May 75-Mar 80  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report gives results of a laboratory evaluation of 'impinge-release' and 'fish-avoidance' concepts for protecting fish larvae at cooling water intakes. Impinge-release requires a vertical-traveling screen that limits impingement time to several minutes, the maximum time depending on the species to be protected. A stationary slotted screen in flowing water was used to evaluate the ability of fish to avoid entrapment. Both concepts showed high potential for protecting larvae as well as older life stages.

Tomljanovich, D.A.; Heuer, J.H.; Brellenthin, J.B.; Johnson, J.T.; Magliente, S.H.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Storing carbon dioxide in saline formations : analyzing extracted water treatment and use for power plant cooling.  

SciTech Connect

In an effort to address the potential to scale up of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture and sequestration in the United States saline formations, an assessment model is being developed using a national database and modeling tool. This tool builds upon the existing NatCarb database as well as supplemental geological information to address scale up potential for carbon dioxide storage within these formations. The focus of the assessment model is to specifically address the question, 'Where are opportunities to couple CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water use for existing and expanding power plants, and what are the economic impacts of these systems relative to traditional power systems?' Initial findings indicate that approximately less than 20% of all the existing complete saline formation well data points meet the working criteria for combined CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water treatment systems. The initial results of the analysis indicate that less than 20% of all the existing complete saline formation well data may meet the working depth, salinity and formation intersecting criteria. These results were taken from examining updated NatCarb data. This finding, while just an initial result, suggests that the combined use of saline formations for CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water use may be limited by the selection criteria chosen. A second preliminary finding of the analysis suggests that some of the necessary data required for this analysis is not present in all of the NatCarb records. This type of analysis represents the beginning of the larger, in depth study for all existing coal and natural gas power plants and saline formations in the U.S. for the purpose of potential CO{sub 2} storage and water reuse for supplemental cooling. Additionally, this allows for potential policy insight when understanding the difficult nature of combined potential institutional (regulatory) and physical (engineered geological sequestration and extracted water system) constraints across the United States. Finally, a representative scenario for a 1,800 MW subcritical coal fired power plant (amongst other types including supercritical coal, integrated gasification combined cycle, natural gas turbine and natural gas combined cycle) can look to existing and new carbon capture, transportation, compression and sequestration technologies along with a suite of extracting and treating technologies for water to assess the system's overall physical and economic viability. Thus, this particular plant, with 90% capture, will reduce the net emissions of CO{sub 2} (original less the amount of energy and hence CO{sub 2} emissions required to power the carbon capture water treatment systems) less than 90%, and its water demands will increase by approximately 50%. These systems may increase the plant's LCOE by approximately 50% or more. This representative example suggests that scaling up these CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration technologies to many plants throughout the country could increase the water demands substantially at the regional, and possibly national level. These scenarios for all power plants and saline formations throughout U.S. can incorporate new information as it becomes available for potential new plant build out planning.

Dwyer, Brian P.; Heath, Jason E.; Borns, David James; Dewers, Thomas A.; Kobos, Peter Holmes; Roach, Jesse D.; McNemar, Andrea; Krumhansl, James Lee; Klise, Geoffrey T.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Thermal-Structural Design of a Water Shield For Surface Reactor Missions  

SciTech Connect

Water shielding is an attractive option for an affordable lunar surface fission reactor program. The attractiveness of the water shielding option arises from the relative ease of proto-typing and ground testing, the relatively low development effort needed, as well as the fabrication and operating experience with stainless steel and water. The most significant limitation in using a water shield is temperature: to prevent the formation of voids and the consequent loss of cooling, the water temperature has to be maintained below the saturation temperature corresponding to the shield pressure. This paper examines natural convection for a prototypic water shield design using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code CFX-5 as well as analytical modeling. The results show that natural convection is adequate to keep the water well-mixed. The results also show that for the above-ground configuration, shield surface and water temperatures during lunar day conditions are high enough to require shield pressures up to 2.5 atm to prevent void formation. For the buried configuration, a set of ammonia heat pipes attached to the shield outer wall can be used to maintain water temperatures within acceptable limits. Overall the results show that water shielding is feasible for lunar surface applications. The results of the CFD analyses can also be used to guide development of testing plans for shield thermal testing. (authors)

Sadasivan, Pratap; Kapernick, Richard J.; Poston, David I. [D-5 Nuclear Systems Design Group MS K575, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, 87545 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design cooling water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Design of Hard Water Stable Emulsifier Systems for Petroleum-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design of Hard Water Stable Emulsifier Systems for Petroleum- and Bio-based Semi for petroleum and bio-based MWFs that improve fluid lifetime by providing emulsion stability under hard water provide improved hard water stability for both mineral oil- and vegetable oil-based formulations, even

Clarens, Andres

322

Improvement to Air2Air Technology to Reduce Fresh-Water Evaporative Cooling Loss at Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This program was undertaken to enhance the manufacturability, constructability, and cost of the Air2Air{TM} Water Conservation and Plume Abatement Cooling Tower, giving a validated cost basis and capability. Air2Air{TM} water conservation technology recovers a portion of the traditional cooling tower evaporate. The Condensing Module provides an air-to-air heat exchanger above the wet fill media, extracting the heat from the hot saturated moist air leaving in the cooling tower and condensing water. The rate of evaporate water recovery is typically 10% - 25% annually, depending on the cooling tower location (climate). This program improved the efficiency and cost of the Air2Air{TM} Water Conservation Cooling Tower capability, and led to the first commercial sale of the product, as described.

Ken Mortensen

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

323

Conceptual Design study of Small Long-life Gas Cooled Fast Reactor With Modified CANDLE Burn-up Scheme  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, conceptual design study of Small Long-life Gas Cooled Fast Reactors with Natural Uranium as Fuel Cycle Input has been performed. In this study Gas Cooled Fast Reactor is slightly modified by employing modified CANDLE burn-up scheme so that it can use Natural Uranium as fuel cycle input. Due to their hard spectrum, GCFR in this study showed very good performance in converting U-238 to plutonium in order to maintain the operation condition requirement of long-life reactors. Due to the limitation of thermal hydraulic aspects, the average power density of the proposed design is selected about 70 W/cc. With such condition we got an optimal design of 325 MWt reactors which can be operated 10 years without refueling and fuel shuffling and just need natural uranium as fuel cycle input. The average discharge burn-up is about 290 GWd/ton HM.

Nur Asiah, A.; Su'ud, Zaki [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Ferhat, A. [National Nuclear Energ Agency of Indonesia (BATAN) (Indonesia); Sekimoto, H. [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

324

Use of fish larva morphometry to predict exclusion capabilities of small-mesh screens at cooling-water intakes  

SciTech Connect

A relationship between total lengths and body depths of certain fish larvae was used to predict the effectiveness of small-mesh screens in limiting entrainment of fish larvae at cooling-water intakes. Total length-body depth regressions were linear for eight species (293 larvae) common to Lake Michigan near the J. H. Campbell Power Plant at Port Sheldon, Michigan. Regressions indicated that 35 to 100% (depending on species) of the fish larvae that had been entrained by the J. H. Campbell Plant in 1978 would have been excluded if 0.5-mm mesh screening had been employed in the plant's cooling water intake system instead of 9.5-mm bar mesh vertical traveling screens. These calculations do not take into consideration approach velocities of intake water, larva avoidance behavior, or mortality due to impingement on or extrusion through the screens.

Schneeberger, P.J.; Jude, D.J.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Optimization of hybrid-water/air-cooled condenser in an enhanced...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Optimization of hybrid-waterair-cooled condenser in an enhanced turbine geothermal ORC system Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011....

326

Absorption cooling in district heating network: Temperature difference examination in hot water circuit.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Absorption cooling system driven by district heating network is relized as a smart strategy in Sweden. During summer time when the heating demand is… (more)

Yuwardi, Yuwardi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Evaporative Cooling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evaporative Cooling Evaporative Cooling (Redirected from Hybrid Cooling) Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Evaporative Cooling: An evaporative cooler is a device that cools air through the evaporation of water. Evaporative cooling works by employing water's large enthalpy of vaporization. The temperature of dry air can be dropped significantly through the phase transition of liquid water to water vapor (evaporation), which can cool air using much less energy than refrigeration. Evaporative cooling requires a water source, and must continually consume water to operate. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Evaporative Cooling Evaporative Cooling Tower Diagram of Evaporative Cooling Tower Evaporative cooling technologies take advantage of both air and water to extract heat from a power plant. By utilizing both water and air one can

328

Air-cooled condenser steam flow distribution and related dephlegmator design considerations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ENGLISH ABSTRACT: The steam-side side operation of a practical air-cooled steam condenser is investigated using a combination of CFD, numerical, analytical and experimental methods. Particular… (more)

Owen, Michael Trevor Foxwell

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

A passive cooling design for multifamily residences [sic] in hot, humid climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

People living in hot, humid climates suffer either from extremely uncomfortable weather conditions or from the great cost of air-conditioning systems for maintaining comfort. Most of the available passive cooling techniques ...

Tang, Joseph C

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Design and Transient Analysis of Passive Safety Cooling Systems for Advanced Nuclear Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

H. G. MacPherson The molten salt adventure Nuclear Scienceand P.F. Peterson, Molten-Salt-Cooled Advanced High-Clarno Assessment of candidate molten salt coolants for the

Galvez, Cristhian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Design, construction, and testing of a residential solar heating and cooling system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The NSF/CSU Solar House I solar heating and cooling system became operational on 1 July 1974. During the first months of operation the emphasis was placed on adjustment, ''tuning,'' and fault correction in the solar collection and the solar/fuel/cooling subsystems. Following this initial check out period, analysis and testing of the system utilizing a full year of data were accomplished. This report discusses the results of this analysis of the full year of operation. (WDM)

Ward, D.S.; Loef, G.O.G.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Operating experience of natural circulation core cooling in boiling water reactors  

SciTech Connect

General Electric (GE) has proposed an advanced boiling water reactor, the Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR), which will utilize passive, gravity-driven safety systems for emergency core coolant injection. The SBWR design includes no recirculation loops or recirculation pumps. Therefore the SBWR will operate in a natural circulation (NC) mode at full power conditions. This design poses some concerns relative to stability during startup, shutdown, and at power conditions. As a consequence, the NRC has directed personnel at several national labs to help investigate SBWR stability issues. This paper will focus on some of the preliminary findings made at the INEL. Because of the broad range of stability issues this paper will mainly focus on potential geysering instabilities during startup. The two NC designs examined in detail are the US Humboldt Bay Unit 3 BWR-1 plant and Dodewaard plant in the Netherlands. The objective of this paper will be to review operating experience of these two plants and evaluate their relevance to planned SBWR operational procedures. For completeness, experimental work with early natural circulation GE test facilities will also be briefly discussed.

Kullberg, C.; Jones, K.; Heath, C.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Design and installation package for solar hot water system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains the design and installation procedure for the Solar Engineering and Manufacturing Company's solar hot water system. Included are the system performance specifications, system design drawings, hazard analysis and other information necessary to evaluate the design and instal the system.

Not Available

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Energy Basics: Absorption Cooling  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

cooling. Other potential heat sources include propane, solar-heated water, or geothermal-heated water. Although mainly used in industrial or commercial settings, absorption...

335

Economic analysis of wind-powered refrigeration cooling/water-heating systems in food processing. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Potential applications of wind energy include not only large central turbines that can be utilized by utilities, but also dispersed systems for farms and other applications. The US Departments of Energy (DOE) and Agriculture (USDA) currently are establishing the feasibility of wind energy use in applications where the energy can be used as available, or stored in a simple form. These applications include production of hot water for rural sanitation, heating and cooling of rural structures and products, drying agricultural products, and irrigation. This study, funded by USDA, analyzed the economic feasibility of wind power in refrigeration cooling and water heating systems in food processing plants. Types of plants included were meat and poultry, dairy, fruit and vegetable, and aquaculture.

Garling, W.S.; Harper, M.R.; Merchant-Geuder, L.; Welch, M.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Evaluation of Factors Affecting Juvenile and Larval Fish Survival in Fish Return Systems at Cooling Water Intakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has funded laboratory studies on biological efficacy of fine-mesh screens for safely collecting larval and juvenile fish. However, little information exists on effects of fish return systems on larval or early juvenile survival. This report presents results of two years of laboratory evaluations on factors affecting larval fish survival in fish return systems at cooling water intake structures (CWISs). This project is generating additional data necessary to de...

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

337

Program on Technology Innovation: Feasibility Study of Using a Thermosyphon Cooler Hybrid System to Reduce Cooling Tower Water Consu mption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update describes the initial work accomplished by a feasibility study for using a newly developed Thermosyphon Cooler (TSC) Hybrid System to reduce cooling-tower water consumption at steam power plants. The report outlines the overall project and then details the applicable codes and standards that would apply to this technology. It also briefly touches on the literature and patents relating to this field. It describes the rationale and constraints involved in setting up the ...

2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

338

Design, construction, and testing of a residential solar heating and cooling system  

SciTech Connect

The NSF/CSU Solar House I solar heating and cooling system became operational on 1 July 1974. During the first months of operation the emphasis was placed on adjustment, ''tuning,'' and fault correction in the solar collection and the solar/fuel/cooling subsystems. Following this initial check out period, analysis and testing of the system utilizing a full year of data were accomplished. This report discusses the results of this analysis of the full year of operation. (WDM)

Ward, D.S.; Loef, G.O.G.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Cooling System Functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...size Flow restrictions Heat exchanger size and design All of these factors must be considered. Every component in the cooling

340

Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Techniques to Define the Hydraulic Zone of Influence of Cooling Water Intake Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the past, the hydraulic zone of influence (HZI) of a cooling water intake structure (CWIS) has been inferred from the results of field sampling programs. Today, however, advanced hydraulic modeling techniques can be used to define the HZI of a CWIS using personal computers. This report provides information that can be used to quantitatively or qualitatively describe the "area of influence" or HZI of a power plant CWIS, as required under new U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Clean Water Act (C...

2004-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design cooling water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

A new soil water content sensor with temperature compensation design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design and construction of a soil water content sensor with temperature compensation using the piecewise linear interpolation method was presented in this paper. The sensor out put often influenced by temperature, so temperature compensation must ... Keywords: circuitry system, geological disaster, interpolation method, piecewise linear, soil water content sensor, temperature compensation

Shi Ge; Li Qing

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Design and Application of Solar Water Heater Intelligent Control System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar water heater intelligent control system is made up of four modules which are data acquisition module, single-chip control module, the implementation and regulation module and human- machine interaction module. The problems of automatic detection ... Keywords: Solar Water Heater, Hardware Design, Detection and Control

Yu Gui Yin

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Evaporative Cooling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evaporative Cooling: Evaporative Cooling: An evaporative cooler is a device that cools air through the evaporation of water. Evaporative cooling works by employing water's large enthalpy of vaporization. The temperature of dry air can be dropped significantly through the phase transition of liquid water to water vapor (evaporation), which can cool air using much less energy than refrigeration. Evaporative cooling requires a water source, and must continually consume water to operate. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Evaporative Cooling Evaporative Cooling Tower Diagram of Evaporative Cooling Tower Evaporative cooling technologies take advantage of both air and water to extract heat from a power plant. By utilizing both water and air one can reduce the amount of water required for a power plant as well as reduce the

344

SOLERAS - Saudi University Solar Cooling Laboratories Project: King Faisal University. Design analysis study. Volume 1. Design review report, data acquisition plan and experimental plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four preliminary passive solar dwelling design concepts were developed based upon previously established climatic design criteria and an identification of applicable passive cooling strategies was made. These were quantitatively compared for their thermal performance based upon a computer program. The selected concept was optimized and preliminary construction drawings and details were submitted for review by SOLERAS. This report deals with the further refinement and development of the design concept and improvements of the performance of the selected passive elements. The final design has been detailed for actual construction and monitoring at the King Faisal University Dammam Campus. In addition this report addresses the comparative evaluation of the previous design concepts utilizing more rigorous computer simulation methods.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

FOCUS COOLING  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

www.datacenterdynamics.com www.datacenterdynamics.com FOCUS COOLING Issue 28, March/April 2013 LBNL'S NOVEL APPROACH TO COOLING Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and APC by Schneider Electric test a unique double-exchanger cooling system LBNL program manager Henry Coles says can cut energy use by half A s part of a demonstration sponsored by the California Energy Commission in support of the Silicon Valley Leadership Group's data center summit, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) collaborated with APC by Schneider Electric to demonstrate a novel prototype data center cooling device. The device was installed at an LBNL data center in Berkeley, California. It included two air-to-water heat exchangers. Unlike common single-heat-exchanger configurations, one of these was supplied with

346

Preliminary neutronics design of china lead-alloy cooled demonstration reactor (CLEAR-III) for nuclear waste transmutation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

China Lead-Alloy cooled Demonstration Reactor (CLEAR-III), which is the concept of lead-bismuth cooled accelerator driven sub-critical reactor for nuclear waste transmutation, was proposed and designed by FDS team in China. In this study, preliminary neutronics design studies have primarily focused on three important performance parameters including Transmutation Support Ratio (TSR), effective multiplication factor and blanket thermal power. The constraint parameters, such as power peaking factor and initial TRU loading, were also considered. In the specific design, uranium-free metallic dispersion fuel of (TRU-Zr)-Zr was used as one of the CLEAR-III fuel types and the ratio between MA and Pu was adjusted to maximize transmutation ratio. In addition, three different fuel zones differing in the TRU fraction of the fuel were respectively employed for this subcritical reactor, and the zone sizes and TRU fractions were determined such that the linear powers of these zones were close to each other. The neutronics calculations and analyses were performed by using Multi-Functional 4D Neutronics Simulation System named VisualBUS and nuclear data library HENDL (Hybrid Evaluated Nuclear Data Library). In the preliminary design, the maximum TSRLLMA was {approx}11 and the blanket thermal power was {approx}1000 MW when the effective multiplication factor was 0.98. The results showed that good performance of transmutation could be achieved based on the subcritical reactor loaded with uranium-free fuel. (authors)

Chen, Z. [Inst. of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Southwest Science and Technology Univ., No.350 Shushanhu Road, Shushan District, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Chen, Y.; Bai, Y.; Wang, W.; Chen, Z.; Hu, L.; Long, P. [Inst. of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Univ. of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

A Synergistic Combination of Advanced Separation and Chemical Scale Inhibitor Technologies for Efficient Use of Imparied Water As Cooling Water in Coal-based Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nalco Company is partnering with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in this project to jointly develop advanced scale control technologies that will provide cost-effective solutions for coal-based power plants to operate recirculating cooling water systems at high cycles using impaired waters. The overall approach is to use combinations of novel membrane separations and scale inhibitor technologies that will work synergistically, with membrane separations reducing the scaling potential of the cooling water and scale inhibitors extending the safe operating range of the cooling water system. The project started on March 31, 2006 and ended in August 30, 2010. The project was a multiyear, multi-phase project with laboratory research and development as well as a small pilot-scale field demonstration. In Phase 1 (Technical Targets and Proof of Concept), the objectives were to establish quantitative technical targets and develop calcite and silica scale inhibitor chemistries for high stress conditions. Additional Phase I work included bench-scale testing to determine the feasibility of two membrane separation technologies (electrodialysis ED and electrode-ionization EDI) for scale minimization. In Phase 2 (Technology Development and Integration), the objectives were to develop additional novel scale inhibitor chemistries, develop selected separation processes, and optimize the integration of the technology components at the laboratory scale. Phase 3 (Technology Validation) validated the integrated system's performance with a pilot-scale demonstration. During Phase 1, Initial evaluations of impaired water characteristics focused on produced waters and reclaimed municipal wastewater effluents. Literature and new data were collected and evaluated. Characteristics of produced waters vary significantly from one site to another, whereas reclaimed municipal wastewater effluents have relatively more uniform characteristics. Assessment to date confirmed that calcite and silica/silicate are two common potential cycle-limiting minerals for using impaired waters. For produced waters, barium sulfate and calcium sulfate are two additional potential cycle-limiting minerals. For reclaimed municipal wastewater effluents, calcium phosphate scaling can be an issue, especially in the co-presence of high silica. Computational assessment, using a vast amount of Nalco's field data from coal fired power plants, showed that the limited use and reuse of impaired waters is due to the formation of deposit caused by the presence of iron, high hardness, high silica and high alkalinity in the water. Appropriate and cost-effective inhibitors were identified and developed - LL99B0 for calcite and gypsum inhibition and TX-15060 for silica inhibition. Nalco's existing dispersants HSP-1 and HSP-2 has excellent efficacy for dispersing Fe and Mn. ED and EDI were bench-scale tested by the CRADA partner Argonne National Laboratory for hardness, alkalinity and silica removal from synthetic make-up water and then cycled cooling water. Both systems showed low power consumption and 98-99% salt removal, however, the EDI system required 25-30% less power for silica removal. For Phase 2, the EDI system's performance was optimized and the length of time between clean-in-place (CIP) increased by varying the wafer composition and membrane configuration. The enhanced EDI system could remove 88% of the hardness and 99% of the alkalinity with a processing flux of 19.2 gal/hr/m{sup 2} and a power consumption of 0.54 kWh/100 gal water. Bench tests to screen alternative silica/silicate scale inhibitor chemistries have begun. The silica/silicate control approaches using chemical inhibitors include inhibition of silicic acid polymerization and dispersion of silica/silicate crystals. Tests were conducted with an initial silica concentration of 290-300 mg/L as SiO{sub 2} at pH 7 and room temperature. A proprietary new chemistry was found to be promising, compared with a current commercial product commonly used for silica/silicate control. Additional pilot cooling tower testing confirmed

Jasbir Gill

2010-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

348

A Synergistic Combination of Advanced Separation and Chemical Scale Inhibitor Technologies for Efficient Use of Imparied Water As Cooling Water in Coal-based Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

Nalco Company is partnering with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in this project to jointly develop advanced scale control technologies that will provide cost-effective solutions for coal-based power plants to operate recirculating cooling water systems at high cycles using impaired waters. The overall approach is to use combinations of novel membrane separations and scale inhibitor technologies that will work synergistically, with membrane separations reducing the scaling potential of the cooling water and scale inhibitors extending the safe operating range of the cooling water system. The project started on March 31, 2006 and ended in August 30, 2010. The project was a multiyear, multi-phase project with laboratory research and development as well as a small pilot-scale field demonstration. In Phase 1 (Technical Targets and Proof of Concept), the objectives were to establish quantitative technical targets and develop calcite and silica scale inhibitor chemistries for high stress conditions. Additional Phase I work included bench-scale testing to determine the feasibility of two membrane separation technologies (electrodialysis ED and electrode-ionization EDI) for scale minimization. In Phase 2 (Technology Development and Integration), the objectives were to develop additional novel scale inhibitor chemistries, develop selected separation processes, and optimize the integration of the technology components at the laboratory scale. Phase 3 (Technology Validation) validated the integrated system's performance with a pilot-scale demonstration. During Phase 1, Initial evaluations of impaired water characteristics focused on produced waters and reclaimed municipal wastewater effluents. Literature and new data were collected and evaluated. Characteristics of produced waters vary significantly from one site to another, whereas reclaimed municipal wastewater effluents have relatively more uniform characteristics. Assessment to date confirmed that calcite and silica/silicate are two common potential cycle-limiting minerals for using impaired waters. For produced waters, barium sulfate and calcium sulfate are two additional potential cycle-limiting minerals. For reclaimed municipal wastewater effluents, calcium phosphate scaling can be an issue, especially in the co-presence of high silica. Computational assessment, using a vast amount of Nalco's field data from coal fired power plants, showed that the limited use and reuse of impaired waters is due to the formation of deposit caused by the presence of iron, high hardness, high silica and high alkalinity in the water. Appropriate and cost-effective inhibitors were identified and developed - LL99B0 for calcite and gypsum inhibition and TX-15060 for silica inhibition. Nalco's existing dispersants HSP-1 and HSP-2 has excellent efficacy for dispersing Fe and Mn. ED and EDI were bench-scale tested by the CRADA partner Argonne National Laboratory for hardness, alkalinity and silica removal from synthetic make-up water and then cycled cooling water. Both systems showed low power consumption and 98-99% salt removal, however, the EDI system required 25-30% less power for silica removal. For Phase 2, the EDI system's performance was optimized and the length of time between clean-in-place (CIP) increased by varying the wafer composition and membrane configuration. The enhanced EDI system could remove 88% of the hardness and 99% of the alkalinity with a processing flux of 19.2 gal/hr/m{sup 2} and a power consumption of 0.54 kWh/100 gal water. Bench tests to screen alternative silica/silicate scale inhibitor chemistries have begun. The silica/silicate control approaches using chemical inhibitors include inhibition of silicic acid polymerization and dispersion of silica/silicate crystals. Tests were conducted with an initial silica concentration of 290-300 mg/L as SiO{sub 2} at pH 7 and room temperature. A proprietary new chemistry was found to be promising, compared with a current commercial product commonly used for silica/silicate control. Additional pilot cooling tower testing confirmed

Jasbir Gill

2010-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

349

Case Study of Stratified Chilled Water Storage Utilization for Comfort and Process Cooling in a Hot, Humid Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The advantages of thermal storage are enhanced in hot and humid climates. Year-round cooling loads increase thermal storage operating cost savings. The absence of a long winter during which major maintenance tasks can be accomplished without compromising system reliability increases the importance of thermal storage as back-up capacity. In an industrial setting, operating cost savings due to thermal storage go directly to the bottom line of a manufacturing process and the avoidance of lost production due to process cooling outages can save millions of dollars per year. This paper presents a case study of chilled water storage use at the campus of a major US electronics manufacturer located in Dallas, TX. An overview of the system and its operation is followed by presentation of operating data taken during 1997.

Bahnfleth, W. P.; Musser, A.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Laboratory Evaluation of the Beaudrey Water Intake Protection Screen for Protecting Early Life Stages of Fish at Cooling Water Intak e Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the final results of laboratory evaluations on the performance of a fine-mesh (2.0 mm) water intake protection (WIP) screen manufactured by Beaudrey to protect larval and early juvenile fish at cooling water intake structures (CWISs). This screening technology relies on the use of a vacuum system to collect organisms from the surface of the screen and transport them to a fish return system. This is the first study to investigate the survival of larval and early juvenile fish that hav...

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

351

Vapor cooled lead and stacks thermal performance and design analysis by finite difference techniques  

SciTech Connect

Investigation of the combined thermal performance of the stacks and vapor-cooled leads for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility-B (MFTF-B) demonstrates considerable interdependency. For instance, the heat transfer to the vapor-cooled lead (VCL) from warm bus heaters, environmental enclosure, and stack is a significant additional heat load to the joule heating in the leads, proportionately higher for the lower current leads that have fewer current-carrying, counter flow coolant copper tubes. Consequently, the specific coolant flow (G/sec-kA-lead pair) increases as the lead current decreases. The definition of this interdependency and the definition of necessary thermal management has required an integrated thermal model for the entire stack/VCL assemblies. Computer simulations based on finite difference thermal analyses computed all the heat interchanges of the six different stack/VCL configurations. These computer simulations verified that the heat load of the stacks beneficially alters the lead temperature profile to provide added stability against thermal runaway. Significant energy is transferred through low density foam filler in the stack from warm ambient sources to the vapor-cooled leads.

Peck, S.D.; O' Loughlin, J.M.; Christensen, E.H.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

DESIGN OF A THERMOSIPHON FOR COOLING LOW-BACKGROUND HPGE ARRAYS  

SciTech Connect

ABSTRACT A two-phase nitrogen thermosiphon was developed for the new generation of low-background high-purity germanium (HPGe) arrays. The cooling system for these arrays has to be able to handle the heat load (>20 W) presented by a large detector mass while meeting stringent requirements necessary for low-background systems. The HPGe detector modules should operate as close to liquid nitrogen temperature (<80K) as possible to provide adequate operating conditions for a full range of HPGe impurity concentrations. In addition, exceptional temperature stability (<1 K) is needed to reduce electronic gain shifts due to changes in the front-end electronics operating temperature. In order to meet the background requirements of state-of-the-art systems these arrays are enclosed in passive lead and copper shielding up to 1 m thick. In this paper we present a cooling system for low-background experiments that complies with these stringent geometrical restrictions. Active cooling was integrated via a horizontal thermosiphon that can be fabricated using ultra-pure electroformed copper. It was charged with nitrogen to 434 kPa (63 PSIA) at 292 K, which provided a fill ratio of 10%. The results showed that the thermosiphon can effectively remove in excess of 25 W of heat load.

Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Fast, James E.; Reid, Douglas J.

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

353

Expanding the potential for saline formations : modeling carbon dioxide storage, water extraction and treatment for power plant cooling.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Water, Energy and Carbon Sequestration simulation model (WECSsim) is being developed to address the question, 'Where in the current and future U.S. fossil fuel based electricity generation fleet are there opportunities to couple CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water use, and what are the economic and water demand-related impacts of these systems compared to traditional power systems?' The WECSsim collaborative team initially applied this framework to a test case region in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico. Recently, the model has been expanded to incorporate the lower 48 states of the U.S. Significant effort has been spent characterizing locations throughout the U.S. where CO{sub 2} might be stored in saline formations including substantial data collection and analysis efforts to supplement the incomplete brine data offered in the NatCarb database. WECSsim calculates costs associated with CO{sub 2} capture and storage (CCS) for the power plant to saline formation combinations including parasitic energy costs of CO{sub 2} capture, CO{sub 2} pipelines, water treatment options, and the net benefit of water treatment for power plant cooling. Currently, the model can identify the least-cost deep saline formation CO{sub 2} storage option for any current or proposed coal or natural gas-fired power plant in the lower 48 states. Initial results suggest that additional, cumulative water withdrawals resulting from national scale CCS may range from 676 million gallons per day (MGD) to 30,155 MGD depending on the makeup power and cooling technologies being utilized. These demands represent 0.20% to 8.7% of the U.S. total fresh water withdrawals in the year 2000, respectively. These regional and ultimately nation-wide, bottom-up scenarios coupling power plants and saline formations throughout the U.S. can be used to support state or national energy development plans and strategies.

Not Available

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Expansion and user study of CoolVent : inclusion of thermal comfort models in an early-design natural ventilation tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CoolVent, a software design tool for architects, has been improved. The work of Maria- Alejandra Menchaca-B. and colleagues has been improved to include a more robust and intuitive building and window dimensioning scheme, ...

Rich, Rebecca E. (Rebecca Eileen)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Evaluation of the Impact of Off-Design Operation on an Air-Cooled Binary Power Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal power plants are designed and constructed to provide a rated power output at specific resource and ambient conditions. Due to both diurnal and seasonal changes in the ambient air temperature, as well as a decline in resource productivity over time, plants seldom operate at these ''design'' conditions. This paper examines the impact of ''off- design'' operation of an air-cooled binary geothermal power plant. An available energy analysis is used to evaluate operation at these conditions. This evaluation identifies those portions of the power cycle that are most sensitive to changing resource and ambient conditions, as well as where improvements in cycle component or system performance would have the largest impact in increasing power output.

Mines, G.L.

2002-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

356

Stochastic Optimization Approach to Water Management in Cooling-Constrained Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

constraints and weather conditions on generation capacity. In a pulverized coal power plant study we have source of freshwater withdrawals in the United States [10]. In base-load power plants (i.e., coal of evaporation. A 500 MW coal-fired power plant that employs once-through cooling can use more than 10 million

357

Advanced Cooling Options for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alternative power plant cooling systems exist that offer significant opportunity for reducing the amount of water used in power plant cooling. These systems include direct dry cooling using air-cooled condensers, indirect dry cooling using air-cooled heat exchangers paired with water-cooled surface condensers, and a variety of hybrid systems incorporating both dry and wet cooling elements. The water savings afforded by the use of these systems, however, comes at a price in the form of more expensive ...

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

358

Internet Based, GIS Catalog of Non-Traditional Sources of Cooling Water for Use at America's Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, rising populations and regional droughts have caused coal-fired power plants to temporarily curtail or cease production due to a lack of available water for cooling. In addition, concerns about the availability of adequate supplies of cooling water have resulted in cancellation of plans to build much-needed new power plants. These issues, coupled with concern over the possible impacts of global climate change, have caused industry and community planners to seek alternate sources of water to supplement or replace existing supplies. The Department of Energy, through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is researching ways to reduce the water demands of coal-fired power plants. As part of the NETL Program, ALL Consulting developed an internet-based Catalog of potential alternative sources of cooling water. The Catalog identifies alternative sources of water, such as mine discharge water, oil and gas produced water, saline aquifers, and publicly owned treatment works (POTWs), which could be used to supplement or replace existing surface water sources. This report provides an overview of the Catalog, and examines the benefits and challenges of using these alternative water sources for cooling water.

J. Daniel Arthur

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

359

Preliminary Design Study of Medium Sized Gas Cooled Fast Reactor with Natural Uranium as Fuel Cycle Input  

SciTech Connect

In this study a feasibility design study of medium sized (1000 MWt) gas cooled fast reactors which can utilize natural uranium as fuel cycle input has been conducted. Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) is among six types of Generation IV Nuclear Power Plants. GFR with its hard neuron spectrum is superior for closed fuel cycle, and its ability to be operated in high temperature (850 deg. C) makes various options of utilizations become possible. To obtain the capability of consuming natural uranium as fuel cycle input, modified CANDLE burn-up scheme[1-6] is adopted this GFR system by dividing the core into 10 parts of equal volume axially. Due to the limitation of thermal hydraulic aspects, the average power density of the proposed design is selected about 70 W/cc. As an optimization results, a design of 1000 MWt reactors which can be operated 10 years without refueling and fuel shuffling and just need natural uranium as fuel cycle input is discussed. The average discharge burn-up is about 280 GWd/ton HM. Enough margin for criticality was obtained for this reactor.

Meriyanti; Su'ud, Zaki; Rijal, K. [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Zuhair; Ferhat, A. [National Nuclear Energ Agency of Indonesia (BATAN) (Indonesia); Sekimoto, H. [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

360

FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters Title FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5514E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Lutz, James D. Subsidiary Authors Energy Analysis Department Document Number LBNL-5514E Pagination 8 Date Published April 1 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley ISBN Number LBNL-5514E Abstract None Notes This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technology, State, and Community Programs, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Attachment Size PDF 240.22 KB Google Scholar BibTex RIS RTF XML Alternate URL: http://eetd.lbl.gov/node/50317

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design cooling water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Introduction of a Cooling Fan Efficiency Index  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with four cooling fans of different designs available on thedesign, installation, and use, the performance of cooling fans

Schiavon, Stefano; Melikov, Arsen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Evaluation of an Absorption Heat Pump to Mitigate Plant Capacity Reduction Due to Ambient Temperature Rise for an Air-Cooled Ammonia and Water Cycle: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Air-cooled geothermal plants suffer substantial decreases in generating capacity at increased ambient temperatures. As the ambient temperature rises by 50 F above a design value of 50 F, at low brine-resource temperatures, the decrease in generating capacity can be more than 50%. This decrease is caused primarily by increased condenser pressure. Using mixed-working fluids has recently drawn considerable attention for use in power cycles. Such cycles are more readily amenable to use of absorption ''heat pumps.'' For a system that uses ammonia and water as the mixed-working fluid, this paper evaluates using an absorption heat pump to reduce condenser backpressure. At high ambient temperatures, part of the turbine exhaust vapor is absorbed into a circulating mixed stream in an absorber in series with the main condenser. This steam is pumped up to a higher pressure and heated to strip the excess vapor, which is recondensed using an additional air-cooled condenser. The operating conditions are chosen to reconstitute this condensate back to the same concentration as drawn from the original system. We analyzed two power plants of nominal 1-megawatt capacity. The design resource temperatures were 250 F and 300 F. Ambient temperature was allowed to rise from a design value of 50 F to 100 F. The analyses indicate that using an absorption heat pump is feasible. For the 300 F resource, an increased brine flow of 30% resulted in a net power increase of 21%. For the 250 F resource, the increase was smaller. However, these results are highly plant- and equipment-specific because evaluations must be carried out at off-design conditions for the condenser. Such studies should be carried out for specific power plants that suffer most from increased ambient temperatures.

Bharathan, D.; Nix, G.

2001-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

363

Design of a sodium-cooled epithermal long-term exploration nuclear engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To facilitate the mission to Mars initiative, the current work has focused on conceptual designs for transformational and enabling space nuclear reactor technologies. A matrix of design alternatives for both the reactor ...

Yarsky, Peter

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Water-Cooled Ice Machines, Purchasing Specifications for Energy-Efficient Products (Fact Sheet), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

continued > continued > FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM PURCHASING SPECIFICATIONS FOR ENERGY-EFFICIENT PRODUCTS The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) facilitates the Federal Government's implementation of sound, cost-effective energy management and investment practices to enhance the nation's energy security and environmental stewardship. Water-Cooled Ice Machines Legal Authorities Federal agencies are required by the National Energy Conservation Policy Act (P.L. 95-619), Execu- tive Order 13423, Executive Order 13514, and Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR) Subpart 23.2 and 53.223 to specify and buy ENERGY STAR ® qualified products or, in categories not included in

365

Solar energy as an alternate energy source to mixed oxide fuels in light-water cooled reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Supplemental information pertaining to the generic environmental impact statement on the Pu recycling process for mixed oxide light-water cooled reactors (GESMO) was requested from several sources. In particular, the role of alternate sources of energy was to be explored and the implications of these alternate sources to the question of Pu recycle in LWRs were to be investigated. In this vein, solar energy as an alternate source is the main subject of this report, along with other information related to solar energy. The general conclusion is that solar energy should have little effect on the decisions concerning GESMO.

Bertini, H.W.

1977-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

366

APEX ADVANCED FERRITIC STEEL, FLIBE SELF-COOLED FIRST WALL AND BLANKET DESIGN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OAK-B135 As an element in the US Advanced Power Extraction (APEX) program, they evaluated the design option of using advanced nanocomposite ferritic steel (AFS) as the structural material and Flibe as the tritium breeder and coolant. They selected the recirculating flow configuration as the reference design. Based on the material properties of AFS, they found that the reference design can handle a maximum surface heat flux of 1 MW/m{sup 2}, and a maximum neutron wall loading of 5.4 MW/m{sup 2}, with a gross thermal efficiency of 47%, while meeting all the tritium breeding and structural design requirements. This paper covers the results of the following areas of evaluation: materials selection, first wall and blanket design configuration, materials compatibility, components fabrication, neutronics analysis, thermal hydraulics analysis including MHD effects, structural analysis, molten salt and helium closed cycle power conversion system, and safety and waste disposal of the recirculating coolant design.

WONG,CPC; MALANG,S; SAWAN,M; SVIATOSLAVSKY,I; MOGAHED,E; SMOLENTSEV,S; MAJUMDAR,S; MERRILL,B; MATTAS,R; FRIEND,M; BOLIN,J; SHARAFAT,S

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Safety and core design of large liquid-metal cooled fast breeder reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Nuclear Systems. Tech. rep. Argonne National Laboratory,experiment. Tech. rep. Argonne National Laboratory, 1958. [and Core Design. Tech. rep. Argonne National Labo- ratory.

Qvist, Staffan Alexander

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Pumped Solar Domestic Hot Water (SDHW) system design guidelines  

SciTech Connect

This article provides practical guidelines based on experience gained from the design, installation, and commissioning of a pumped Solar Domestic Hot Water (SDHW) system in Saudi Arabia. The authors believe that such information is not readily available and will be useful to designers and installers of SDHW systems within the region. Since the current motivation for buying SDHW systems in Saudi Arabia is not strictly economic, it is imperative that a professional reference be available, against which the soundness of any technical decisions could be confirmed prior to their implementation. The intent is to ensure that systems designed and installed will operate reliably, therefore enhancing customer satisfaction.

Arshad, K.; Said, S.A.M. (King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Passive containment cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A containment cooling system utilizes a naturally induced air flow and a gravity flow of water over the containment shell which encloses a reactor core to cool reactor core decay heat in two stages. When core decay heat is greatest, the water and air flow combine to provide adequate evaporative cooling as heat from within the containment is transferred to the water flowing over the same. The water is heated by heat transfer and then evaporated and removed by the air flow. After an initial period of about three to four days when core decay heat is greatest, air flow alone is sufficient to cool the containment.

Conway, Lawrence E. (Robinson Township, Allegheny County, PA); Stewart, William A. (Penn Hills Township, Allegheny County, PA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Energy Basics: Cooling Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

or "swamp cooling" provides an experience like air conditioning, but with much lower energy use. An evaporative cooler uses the outside air's heat to evaporate water inside the...

371

Subtask 1.24 - Optimization of Cooling Water Resources for Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has developed an interactive, Web-based decision support system (DSS{copyright} 2007 EERC Foundation) to provide power generation utilities with an assessment tool to address water supply issues when planning new or modifying existing generation facilities. The Web-based DSS integrates water and wastewater treatment technology and water law information with a geographic information system-based interactive map that links to state and federal water quality and quantity databases for North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Wyoming, Montana, Nebraska, Wisconsin, and Iowa.

Daniel Stepan; Richard Shockey; Bethany Kurz; Wesley Peck

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

372

Design and Transient Analysis of Passive Safety Cooling Systems for Advanced Nuclear Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. L. London, Compact Heat Exchangers 3 rd Edition McGraw-A. L. London, Compact Heat Exchangers 3 rd Edition McGraw-that short and compact NDHX heat exchanger designs can be

Galvez, Cristhian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Power conversion system design for supercritical carbon dioxide cooled indirect cycle nuclear reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO?) cycle is a promising advanced power conversion cycle which couples nicely to many Generation IV nuclear reactors. This work investigates the power conversion system design and ...

Gibbs, Jonathan Paul

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Design of compact intermediate heat exchangers for gas cooled fast reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two aspects of an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) for GFR service have been investigated: (1) the intrinsic characteristics of the proposed compact printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE); and (2) a specific design optimizing ...

Gezelius, Knut, 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Municipal water-based heat pump heating and/or cooling systems: Findings and recommendations. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the present work was to determine if existing heat pump systems based on municipal water systems meet existing water quality standards, to analyze water that has passed through a heat pump or heat exchanger to determine if corrosion products can be detected, to determine residual chlorine levels in municipal waters on the inlet as well as the outlet side of such installations, to analyses for bacterial contaminants and/or regrowth due to the presence of a heat pump or heat exchanger, to develop and suggest criteria for system design and construction, to provide recommendations and specifications for material and fluid selection, and to develop model rules and regulations for the installation, operation, and monitoring of new and existing systems. In addition, the Washington State University (WSU) has evaluated availability of computer models that would allow for water system mapping, water quality modeling and system operation.

Bloomquist, R.G. [Washington, State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Wegman, S. [South Dakota Utilities Commission (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Pressure drop, heat transfer, critical heat flux, and flow stability of two-phase flow boiling of water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures - final report for project "Efficent cooling in engines with nucleate boiling."  

SciTech Connect

Because of its order-of-magnitude higher heat transfer rates, there is interest in using controllable two-phase nucleate boiling instead of conventional single-phase forced convection in vehicular cooling systems to remove ever increasing heat loads and to eliminate potential hot spots in engines. However, the fundamental understanding of flow boiling mechanisms of a 50/50 ethylene glycol/water mixture under engineering application conditions is still limited. In addition, it is impractical to precisely maintain the volume concentration ratio of the ethylene glycol/water mixture coolant at 50/50. Therefore, any investigation into engine coolant characteristics should include a range of volume concentration ratios around the nominal 50/50 mark. In this study, the forced convective boiling heat transfer of distilled water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures with volume concentration ratios of 40/60, 50/50, and 60/40 in a 2.98-mm-inner-diameter circular tube has been investigated in both the horizontal flow and the vertical flow. The two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux of the test fluids were determined experimentally over a range of the mass flux, the vapor mass quality, and the inlet subcooling through a new boiling data reduction procedure that allowed the analytical calculation of the fluid boiling temperatures along the experimental test section by applying the ideal mixture assumption and the equilibrium assumption along with Raoult's law. Based on the experimental data, predictive methods for the two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux under engine application conditions were developed. The results summarized in this final project report provide the necessary information for designing and implementing nucleate-boiling vehicular cooling systems.

Yu, W.; France, D. M.; Routbort, J. L. (Energy Systems)

2011-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

377

Cooling Towers, Energy Conservation Strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling towers, because of their seeming simplicity, are usually orphans of the facilities operation. We are all aware that cooling towers are the step-children of the chemical process plant, electric power generating station, and refrigeration system. While our engineers are pretty well convinced of the importance of their sophisticated equipment, and rightly so, they take the cooling towers and the cold water returning from them for granted. Design Conditions are specified for the particular requirements before a cooling tower is purchased. After it is put on the line and the cold water temperature or volume becomes inadequate, they look to solutions other than the obvious. While all cooling towers are purchased to function at 100% of capability in accordance with the required Design Conditions, in actual on stream employment, the level of operation many times is lower, downwards to as much as 50% due to a variety of reasons: (1) The present service needed is now greater than the original requirements which the tower was purchased for; (2) 'Slippage' due to usage and perhaps deficient maintenance has reduced the performance of the tower over years of operation; (3) The installation could have been originally undersized due to the low bidder syndrome; and (4) New plant expansion needs colder temperatures off the tower.

Burger, R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Energy Design Guidelines for High Performance Schools: Cool and Dry Climates  

SciTech Connect

School districts around the country are finding that the smart energy choices can help them save money and provide healthier, more effective learning environments. By incorporating energy improvements into their construction or renovation plans, schools can significantly reduce energy consumption and costs. These savings can be redirected to educational needs such as additional teachers, instructional materials, or new computers. These design guidelines outline high performance principles for the new or retrofit design of your K-12 school. By incorporating these principles, you can create and exemplary building that is both energy and resource efficient.

Not Available

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Energy Design Guidelines for High Performance Schools: Cool and Humid Climates  

SciTech Connect

School districts around the country are finding that the smart energy choices can help them save money and provide healthier, more effective learning environments. By incorporating energy improvements into their construction or renovation plans, schools can significantly reduce energy consumption and costs. These savings can be redirected to educational needs such as additional teachers, instructional materials, or new computers. These design guidelines outline high performance principles for the new or retrofit design of your K-12 school. By incorporating these principles, you can create and exemplary building that is both energy and resource efficient.

Not Available

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

National Benefits of a Closed-Cycle Cooling Retrofit Requirement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has investigated the implications of a potential U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Clean Water Act 316(b) rulemaking if it establishes closed-cycle cooling retrofits for facilities with once-through cooling as best technology available (BTA) for fish protection. This report provides the results of a study to estimate the benefits of reducing impingement and entrainment mortality that would be achieved should EPA designate closed-cycle cooling as BTA.

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design cooling water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Apparatus and method of direct water cooling several parallel circuit cards each containing several chip packages  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cooling apparatus, system and like method for an electronic device includes a plurality of heat producing electronic devices affixed to a wiring substrate. A plurality of heat transfer assemblies each include heat spreaders and thermally communicate with the heat producing electronic devices for transferring heat from the heat producing electronic devices to the heat transfer assemblies. The plurality of heat producing electronic devices and respective heat transfer assemblies are positioned on the wiring substrate having the regions overlapping. A heat conduit thermally communicates with the heat transfer assemblies. The heat conduit circulates thermally conductive fluid therethrough in a closed loop for transferring heat to the fluid from the heat transfer assemblies via the heat spreader. A thermally conductive support structure supports the heat conduit and thermally communicates with the heat transfer assemblies via the heat spreader transferring heat to the fluid of the heat conduit from the support structure.

Cipolla, Thomas M. (Katonah, NY); Colgan, Evan George (Chestnut Ridge, NY); Coteus, Paul W. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Hall, Shawn Anthony (Pleasantville, NY); Tian, Shurong (Mount Kisco, NY)

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

382

Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Reactors for Electric Power Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The supercritical water reactor (SCWR) has been the object of interest throughout the nuclear Generation IV community because of its high potential: a simple, direct cycle, compact configuration; elimination of many traditional LWR components, operation at coolant temperatures much higher than traditional LWRs and thus high thermal efficiency. It could be said that the SWR was viewed as the water counterpart to the high temperature gas reactor.

Philip MacDonald; Jacopo Buongiorno; James Sterbentz; Cliff Davis; Robert Witt; Gary Was; J. McKinley; S. Teysseyre; Luca Oriani; Vefa Kucukboyaci; Lawrence Conway; N. Jonsson: Bin Liu

2005-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

383

Thermal hydraulic design of a 2400 MW t?h? direct supercritical CO?-cooled fast reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The gas cooled fast reactor (GFR) has received new attention as one of the basic concepts selected by the Generation-IV International Forum (GIF) for further investigation. Currently, the reference GFR is a helium-cooled ...

Pope, Michael A. (Michael Alexander)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Transpiring wall supercritical water oxidation test reactor design report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories is working with GenCorp, Aerojet and Foster Wheeler Development Corporation to develop a transpiring wall supercritical water oxidation reactor. The transpiring wall reactor promises to mitigate problems of salt deposition and corrosion by forming a protective boundary layer of pure supercritical water. A laboratory scale test reactor has been assembled to demonstrate the concept. A 1/4 scale transpiring wall reactor was designed and fabricated by Aerojet using their platelet technology. Sandia`s Engineering Evaluation Reactor serves as a test bed to supply, pressurize and heat the waste; collect, measure and analyze the effluent; and control operation of the system. This report describes the design, test capabilities, and operation of this versatile and unique test system with the transpiring wall reactor.

Haroldsen, B.L.; Ariizumi, D.Y.; Mills, B.E.; Brown, B.G. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Engineering for Transportation and Environment Dept.; Rousar, D.C. [GenCorp Aerojet, Sacramento, CA (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Design and technology of heat pipes for cooling and heat exchange  

SciTech Connect

This new book presents a comprehensive account of heat pipe design, technology, and operation. It is based on insights and techniques developed by the author during more than twenty years of investigating high-performance heat pipe systems. The book provides information on a unique device with the capability to transport heat isothermally at high rates with no external power input. Emphasis is on high-performance liquid metal heat pipes, although nonliquid metal heat pipes are treated, as well. The first three chapters deal with the nonmathematical background for understanding heat pipe operation and heat transport capability. Remaining chapters detail heat pipe characteristics and design methods. Of special interest are simplified equations for obtaining heat pipe heat transport limits, heat pipe heat exchangers, heat pipe transient behavior, and inverted (nonwetting) heat pipes. Operational boundaries on heat pipe temperature and heat transport rate are described, and step-by-step procedures are given for involved calculations.

Silverstein, C.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Cooling load estimation methods  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ongoing research on quantifying the cooling loads in residential buildings, particularly buildings with passive solar heating systems, is described. Correlations are described that permit auxiliary cooling estimates from monthly average insolation and weather data. The objective of the research is to develop a simple analysis method, useful early in design, to estimate the annual cooling energy required of a given building.

McFarland, R.D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Economic Evaluation of Alternative Cooling Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water use and conservation at electric power plants are becoming increasingly important siting issues. At most plants, the requirement for condensing exhaust steam from the steam turbine, generically known as power plant cooling, is the major use of water. Alternative cooling systems exist, including once-through cooling, wet-recirculating cooling, dry cooling, and hybrid (or wet/dry cooling), some of which offer significant opportunity for water conservation. These water savings normally, but perhaps no...

2012-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

388

Environmental behavior of transuranic nuclides leaked from water cooled nuclear power plants. Final report, August 1, 1977-December 31, 1978  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Release data are reported for three coastal water-cooled nuclear reactors: Millstone Point No. 1 and No. 2 (for the period January 1977 through April 1978), and Maine Yankee (for the period 20 June 1977 through 25 March 1978); release samples were analyzed for /sup 55/Fe, /sup 60/Co, /sup 134/Cs, /sup 137/Cs, /sup 238/Pu, /sup 239,240/Pu, /sup 241/Am, /sup 242/Cm, and /sup 244/Cm, but not all nuclides on every sample. Radioiron is a major component of the releases measured; the transuranium nuclides are less significant components than was expected, but levels have occasionally reached microcuries per month. Pulses of this size are adequate for tracer studies. Environmental samples (water, sediments, and biota) have been analyzed from about the two reactor sites noted, and that of the Pilgrim No. 1 reactor. No water samples remote from reactor outflows have unequivocally shown reactor contamination. No sediment samples from near Millstone Point or Pilgrim 1 have shown reactor contamination; this has been clearly evident in several sediment collections from near Maine Yankee. Biota so far measured from near Millstone Point show reactor contamination only when taken from the effluent canal. From the Maine Yankee and Plymouth areas, however, biota samples frequently prove to show slight, but definite, reactor contamination.

Bowen, V.T.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

On-site production of electrolytic hydrogen for generator cooling  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen produced by water electrolysis could be cost effective over the merchant hydrogen used for generator cooling. Advanced water electrolyzers are being developed specifically for this utility application. These designs are based on solid-polymer-electrolyte and alkaline water electrolysis technologies. This paper describes the status of electrolyzer development and demonstration projects.

Mehta, B.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Hydrodynamic design loads for the OTEC cold water pipe  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ocean current and/or plant motion crossflows induce time dependent hydrodynamic loads on the OTEC cold water pipe due to vortex shedding. Design criteria were established for mean and fluctuating loads based on a review of the literature, analysis of test data acquired by SAI under a previous experimental program and an analytical extension of test results to higher Reynolds number. Baseline loads were specified for rigid cylinders in uniform flows. Modifications to the loads by current shear, stratification and cylinder motion, were investigated and final design criteria established. Limited structural response calculations were performed to demonstrate the use of the design criteria and to investigate briefly the possible structural response mode. Comparisons were made with alternate hydrodynamic loads, and recommendations were made for experimental verification.

Hove, D.; Shih, W.; Albano, E.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Design and Fabrication of the RHIC Electron-Cooling Experiment High Beta Cavity and Cryomodule  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The summary of this report is: (1) A high-current SRF cavity for an Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) has been designed by BNL and AES and fabricated by AES; (2) The cavity was cleaned and tested by JLAB with BNL personnel support; (3) Cavity performance exceeded goal of 20 MV/m at Q{sub 0} > 1 x 10{sup 10} and far exceeded requirement of 15 MV/m at Q{sub 0} > 1 x 10{sup 10}; (4) Hermetic String assembled at JLAB with BNL personnel support and shipped to BNL; and (5) BNL has recently completed Cryomodule assembly and unit is ready for installation in the ERL vault.

Holmes,D.; Calderaro, M.; Cole, M.; Falletta, M.; Peterson, E.; Rathke, J.; Schultheiss, T.; Wong, R.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Calaga, R.; McIntyre, G.

2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

392

Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater as Power Plant Cooling System Makeup Water: Tertiary Treatment versus Expanded Chemical Regimen for Recirculating Water Quality Management  

SciTech Connect

Treated municipal wastewater is a common, widely available alternative source of cooling water for thermoelectric power plants across the U.S. However, the biodegradable organic matter, ammonia-nitrogen, carbonate and phosphates in the treated wastewater pose challenges with respect to enhanced biofouling, corrosion, and scaling, respectively. The overall objective of this study was to evaluate the benefits and life cycle costs of implementing tertiary treatment of secondary treated municipal wastewater prior to use in recirculating cooling systems. The study comprised bench- and pilot-scale experimental studies with three different tertiary treated municipal wastewaters, and life cycle costing and environmental analyses of various tertiary treatment schemes. Sustainability factors and metrics for reuse of treated wastewater in power plant cooling systems were also evaluated. The three tertiary treated wastewaters studied were: secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to acid addition for pH control (MWW_pH); secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to nitrification and sand filtration (MWW_NF); and secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected nitrification, sand filtration, and GAC adsorption (MWW_NFG). Tertiary treatment was determined to be essential to achieve appropriate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control for use of secondary treated municipal wastewater in power plant cooling systems. The ability to control scaling, in particular, was found to be significantly enhanced with tertiary treated wastewater compared to secondary treated wastewater. MWW_pH treated water (adjustment to pH 7.8) was effective in reducing scale formation, but increased corrosion and the amount of biocide required to achieve appropriate biofouling control. Corrosion could be adequately controlled with tolytriazole addition (4-5 ppm TTA), however, which was the case for all of the tertiary treated waters. For MWW_NF treated water, the removal of ammonia by nitrification helped to reduce the corrosivity and biocide demand. Also, the lower pH and alkalinity resulting from nitrification reduced the scaling to an acceptable level, without the addition of anti-scalant chemicals. Additional GAC adsorption treatment, MWW_NFG, yielded no net benefit. Removal of organic matter resulted in pitting corrosion in copper and cupronickel alloys. Negligible improvement was observed in scaling control and biofouling control. For all of the tertiary treatments, biofouling control was achievable, and most effectively with pre-formed monochloramine (2-3 ppm) in comparison with NaOCl and ClO2. Life cycle cost (LCC) analyses were performed for the tertiary treatment systems studied experimentally and for several other treatment options. A public domain conceptual costing tool (LC3 model) was developed for this purpose. MWW_SF (lime softening and sand filtration) and MWW_NF were the most cost-effective treatment options among the tertiary treatment alternatives considered because of the higher effluent quality with moderate infrastructure costs and the relatively low doses of conditioning chemicals required. Life cycle inventory (LCI) analysis along with integration of external costs of emissions with direct costs was performed to evaluate relative emissions to the environment and external costs associated with construction and operation of tertiary treatment alternatives. Integrated LCI and LCC analysis indicated that three-tiered treatment alternatives such as MWW_NSF and MWW_NFG, with regular chemical addition for treatment and conditioning and/or regeneration, tend to increase the impact costs and in turn the overall costs of tertiary treatment. River water supply and MWW_F alternatives with a single step of tertiary treatment were associated with lower impact costs, but the contribution of impact costs to overall annual costs was higher than all other treatment alternatives. MWW_NF and MWW_SF alternatives exhibited moderate external impact costs with moderate infrastructure and chemical conditioner dosing, which makes them (especially

David Dzombak; Radisav Vidic; Amy Landis

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

393

Innovative Miniaturized Heat Pumps for Buildings: Modular Thermal Hub for Building Heating, Cooling and Water Heating  

SciTech Connect

BEETIT Project: Georgia Tech is using innovative components and system design to develop a new type of absorption heat pump. Georgia Tech’s new heat pumps are energy efficient, use refrigerants that do not emit greenhouse gases, and can run on energy from combustion, waste heat, or solar energy. Georgia Tech is leveraging enhancements to heat and mass transfer technology possible in microscale passages and removing hurdles to the use of heat-activated heat pumps that have existed for more than a century. Use of microscale passages allows for miniaturization of systems that can be packed as monolithic full-system packages or discrete, distributed components enabling integration into a variety of residential and commercial buildings. Compared to conventional heat pumps, Georgia Tech’s design innovations will create an absorption heat pump that is much smaller, has higher energy efficiency, and can also be mass produced at a lower cost and assembly time.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Potential Entrainment of Dead or Moribund Fish Eggs and Larvae at Cooling Water Intake Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides evidence for the occurrence of dead or moribund (dying or close to death) fish eggs and larvae (collectively termed ichthyoplankton) in aquatic environments. Descriptions are provided for organisms found in samples displaying these conditions. Methodologies are suggested by which investigators can determine and verify the occurrence of this phenomenon when undertaking entrainment characterization or verification monitoring studies. The information presented here is designed for permi...

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

395

An innovative concept for deep water oil production platform design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As more oil and gas are discovered in deep water, the offshore industry has become increasingly interested in the design of deep water offshore production facilities. A new design concept tentatively called FPSOT (Floating Production, Storage and Off loading Tower) is studied in this thesis. Instead of using a single large cylindrical structure as in the spar configuration, the FPSOT utilizes a jacket-type framed structure supported by a buoyancy/storage tank deep below the ocean surface. This new structure concept is suitable for water depths up to 1000 meters or more. 20000 tons of concrete and 67000 tons of oil, serving as ballast, provide a good stability of the structure. The stored oil, used as a ballast, can also be replaced by sea water. The deck and the drilling/production equipment of 10000 tons are supported by a framed structure made of small cylindrical members. Because of the smallness of these cylindrical members, wave forces on the upper structure is very small. The forces on the lower structure (buoyancy/ballast tank), which is deeply submerged, are also small. Thus, the platform will be very stable even in a very severe sea state, with maximum surge and heave motions are less than two meters and the pitch motion is always smaller than one degree. All the natural frequencies are very small (less than 0.055 rd/sec). All the calculations are performed for regular and random waves. It was found that the platform motions were extremely small even in stormy waves as compared to the other platform configurations. A model with a scale 1:60 of this concept has been built and tested in deep water wave at the Offshore Technology Research Center on campus. The experimental and theoretical results are very close. A comparison is performed between this new concept and a spar buoy of same draft, weight, buoyancy and catenary system. The motions of the FPSOT, specially in pitch, are smaller than the spar buoy. Thus, this new concept is proved to be feasible and to be a very interesting approach for the future offshore platform design.

Racine, Florian

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Design of Complex Systems to Achieve Passive Safety: Natural Circulation Cooling of Liquid Salt Pebble Bed Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

buildings cool. Minarets are tall towers with windows at thetall N ATURAL C IRCULATION - I NTEGRAL E FFECTS T ESTS towers,

Scarlat, Raluca Olga

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Design and Development of an Intelligent Energy Controller for Home Energy Saving in Heating/Cooling System .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Energy is consumed every day at home as we perform simple tasks, such as watching television, washing dishes and heating/cooling home spaces during season of… (more)

Abaalkhail, Rana

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Generation Maintenance Applications Center: Maintenance Guide for Horizontal Split-Casing Closed Cooling Water Pumps in Combined-Cyc le Combustion-Turbine Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report identifies the failure modes and general maintenance requirements for horizontal split-casing closed cooling water pumps used in utility combined-cycle combustion-turbine power plants. Information in this report was provided and reviewed by member utilities. Manufacturers’ information and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) database information was used as a basis for the ...

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

399

Design of Complex Systems to Achieve Passive Safety: Natural Circulation Cooling of Liquid Salt Pebble Bed Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural circulation solar water heater. Energy Conversionas water circulation in solar water heaters 60 , and passivewater circulation in solar water heaters 60 , and passive

Scarlat, Raluca Olga

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Design and Analysis of High-Performance Air-Cooled Heat Exchanger with an Integrated Capillary-Pumped Loop Heat Pipe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the design and analysis of a high-power air-cooled heat exchanger capable of dissipating over 1000 W with 33 W of input electrical power and an overall thermal resistance of less than 0.05 K/W. The novelty of the ...

McCarthy, Matthew

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design cooling water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Natural Circulation in Water Cooled Nuclear Power Plants Phenomena, models, and methodology for system reliability assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years it has been recognized that the application of passive safety systems (i.e., those whose operation takes advantage of natural forces such as convection and gravity), can contribute to simplification and potentially to improved economics of new nuclear power plant designs. In 1991 the IAEA Conference on ''The Safety of Nuclear Power: Strategy for the Future'' noted that for new plants the use of passive safety features is a desirable method of achieving simplification and increasing the reliability of the performance of essential safety functions, and should be used wherever appropriate''.

Jose Reyes

2005-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

402

THE DEVELOPMENT OF COMPOSITE CONTROL RODS FOR WATER-COOLED POWER REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

The phrase "composite control rod" is used to describe a hafnium-tipped titanium-boron control component with a titanium cladding. Blades for such cortrol rods were successfully prepared in cooperation with the Battelle Memorial Institute by a picture-frame rolling technique. The rolling packs, which are machined from type 304 stainless steel, contain slntered titanium boron and wrought hafnium core materials in a commercially pure titanium envelope. Such packs are evacuated, sealod off, and rolled at 16O0 F with a total reduction of 3/1 using 20% reduction per roll setting. Postfabrication treatments include mechanical removal of the stainless steel envelope, flat annealing, machining, and stress relief annealing. Data on the mechanical properties, corrosion performance, thermal cycling resistance, and irradiation damage resistance of composite control rod components are presented. This information strongly indicates that composite control rods will perform satisfactorily in water-coolod reactors. (aut)h

Ray, W.E.

1957-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

RAMI Analysis for Designing and Optimizing ITER Tokamak Cooling Water System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ITER Systems / Proceedings of the Nineteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE) (Part 1)

J. J. Ferrada; W. T. Reiersen

404

Critical Design Issues of the Tokamak Cooling Water System of ITER's Fusion Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ITER Systems / Proceedings of the Nineteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE) (Part 1)

Seokho H. Kim; Jeanette B. Berry

405

WATER QUALITY CONTROL POLICY ON THE USE OF COASTAL AND ESTUARINE WATERS FOR POWER PLANT COOLING Draft Final Substitute Environmental Document State Water Resources Control Board  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State Water Board also contributed to this document’s preparation. The authors also wish to acknowledge previous contributions to this project by Ms. Sheila Vassey (State Water Board), Mr. Adam Laputz (currently

California Environmental; Protection Agency; Ms. Kim Ward; Mr. Michael Gjerde; Mr. Frank Roddy Of The

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Solar heating and cooling systems design and development. Quarterly report, 9 October 1976-9 January 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Honeywell is to develop twelve prototype solar heating/cooling systems. Six of these are to be heating and six are to be heating/cooling systems, two each for single family, multi-family, and commercial applications. Schedules and technical discussions are given, along with illustrations on the progress made from October 9, 1976 through January 9, 1977.

Not Available

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Design report for an indirectly cooled 3-m diameter superconducting solenoid for the Fermilab Collider Detector Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Fermilab Collider Detector Facility (CDF) is a large detector system designed to study anti pp collisions at very high center of mass energies. The central detector for the CDF shown employs a large axial magnetic field volume instrumented with a central tracking chamber composed of multiple layers of cylindrical drift chambers and a pair of intermediate tracking chambers. The purpose of this system is to determine the trajectories, sign of electric charge, and momenta of charged particles produced with polar angles between 10 and 170 degrees. The magnetic field volume required for tracking is approximately 3.5 m long an 3 m in diameter. To provide the desired ..delta..p/sub T/p/sub T/ less than or equal to 1.5% at 50 GeV/c using drift chambers with approx. 200..mu.. resolution the field inside this volume should be 1.5 T. The field should be as uniform as is practical to simplify both track finding and the reconstruction of particle trajectories with the drift chambers. Such a field can be produced by a cylindrical current sheet solenoid with a uniform current density of 1.2 x 10/sup 6/ A/m (1200 A/mm) surrounded by an iron return yoke. For practical coils and return yokes, both central electromagnetic and central hadronic calorimetry must be located outside the coil of the magnet. This geometry requires that the coil and the cryostat be thin both in physical thickness and in radiation and absorption lengths. This dual requirement of high linear current density and minimal coil thickness can only be satisfied using superconducting technology. In this report we describe the design for an indirectly cooled superconducting solenoid to meet the requirements of the Fermilab CDF. The components of the magnet system are discussed in the following chapters, with a summary of parameters listed in Appendix A.

Fast, R.; Grimson, J.; Kephart, R.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Design and analysis of a radiatively-cooled, inertially-driven nuclear generator system for space-based applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The RING (Radiatively-Cooled, Inertially-Driven Nuclear Generator) radiator is proposed as a novel heat rejection system for advanced space reactor power applications in the 1 to 25 MW(t) range. The RING radiator system employs four counter-rotating, hollow, cylindrical, ring-shaped tubes filled with liquid lithium. The rings pass through a cavity heat exchanger, absorb heat, and then re-radiate that absorbed heat to space. Each ring is made of thin-walled, corrugated Nb-1%Zr tubing with external fins, segmented to minimize the consequence of coolant loss. To examine both the system transient and steady-state thermal hydraulic response, a set of detailed, analytical computer codes was developed (RINGSYS-System Thermal Hydraulics and Power Rating/RINGDYN-System Dynamics/RINGRAD-Radiation Damage and Void Gas Formation/RINGDATG-Data Handling). An additional code (TEMPEST) was obtained to examine the impact of augmented, internal ring convective heat transfer on overall system performance. Performance results and a cumulative uncertainty analysis including analytical, computational, property, and environmental condition errors are presented. The optimized radiator configuration at a cavity temperature of 1500 K results in a 3.3 MW(t) heat removal capacity at a minimum radiator weight ratio of 2.1 kg/kW(t); or a radiator weight ratio of 4.0 kg/kW(t) at a maximum achievable capacity of 5.6 MW(t). Despite a higher kg/kW(t) ratio than reported for other comparable temperature radiator designs, the concept is an attractive option for use with high-temperature reactors in high or geosynchronous earth orbit, specifically where the essential design criteria emphasize reliability, safety, and repairability. This dissertation also describes the confirmatory research, especially related to the material and thermal characteristics of key components, necessary to ensure successful RING radiator system deployment.

Apley, W.J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Cooling Towers- Energy Conservation Strategies Understanding Cooling Towers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling towers are energy conservation devices that Management, more often than not, historically overlooks in the survey of strategies for plant operating efficiencies. The utilization of the colder water off the cooling tower is the money maker!

Smith, M.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

SOLERAS solar cooling project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In view of the increasing demand for cooling in both the United States and Saudi Arabia, solar cooling systems are being considered as serious alternatives to the energy intensive conventional systems, especially when confronted with rising fossil fuel costs. Saudi Arabia and the hot, southern regions of the United States, having abundant sunshine and high cooling demand, are obvious candidates for solar active cooling systems and passive cooling design. Solar active cooling has yet to be shown to be either technologically mature or economically feasible, but efforts have been, and are presently being made within the United States National Solar Cooling Program to develop reliable systems which can compete economically with conventional cooling systems. Currently, the program is funding research and development projects in the areas of absorption, Rankine, dessicant, and advanced technologies. Saudi Arabia has a long and successful tradition of building cooling using passive architectural designs. Combining these past achievements with a program of research and development in both active and passive solar cooling should permit an early economical introduction of entirely solar cooled buildings to Saudi Arabia and the southern United States.

Corcoleotes, G.; Williamson, J.S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

District cooling: Phase 2, Direct freeze ice slurry system testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this research are to: extend the range of pressure drop data for ice-water slurry flows, and design and build a prototypical ice slurry distribution system which demonstrates ice slurry handling at an end user's heat exchanger, without sending ice slurry directly through the heat exchanger. The results of Phase 1 work demonstrated a 40% reduction in pump power required to move an ice-water slurry versus the same mass flow of water only. In addition to lower pressure drop, pumping ice slurries is advantageous because of the large latent and sensible heat cooling capacity stored in the ice compared to only sensible heat in chilled water. For example, an ice-water slurry with a 20% ice fraction (by mass) has a mass flow rate that is 70% less than the mass flow rate required for a chilled water system cooling and equivalent load. The greatly reduced mass flow combined with the friction reducing effects of ice-water slurries results in a total savings of 83% in pumping power. Therefore, a substantial savings potential exists for capital costs and system operating costs in ice-water slurry district cooling systems. One potential disadvantage of an ice-slurry district cooling system is the introduction of ice into equipment not so designed, such as air handlers at end user locations. A prototypic ice slurry distribution loop will demonstrate a cooling network which will provide ice slurry to an end user but sends ice free water into the actual heat transfer.

Winters, P.J.

1991-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

412

Cooling load differences between radiant and air systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the effect of thermal mass on cooling loads, and thereforelift radiant cooling using building thermal mass, Departmentlevel thermal modelling are recommended for design cooling

Feng, Jingjuan Dove; Schiavon, Stefano; Bauman, Fred

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Design, Construction, and Field Testing of a Prototype Mobile Vault Water Treatment System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsurface vaults and manholes provide access to underground electric distribution equipment in many areas. These structures can accumulate water through storm water runoff or ground water seepage. The water must be removed before maintenance work can proceed. This report presents results of a project to design, construct, and test a mobile treatment system to manage vault waters.

2001-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

414

Mechanical design of a light water breeder reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a light water reactor system using the thorium-232 -- uranium-233 fuel system in a seed-blanket modular core configuration having the modules arranged in a symmetrical array surrounded by a reflector blanket region, the seed regions are disposed for a longitudinal movement between the fixed or stationary blanket region which surrounds each seed region. Control of the reactor is obtained by moving the inner seed region thus changing the geometry of the reactor, and thereby changing the leakage of neutrons from the relatively small seed region into the blanket region. The mechanical design of the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core includes means for axially positioning of movable fuel assemblies to achieve the neutron economy required of a breeder reactor, a structure necessary to adequately support the fuel modules without imposing penalties on the breeding capability, a structure necessary to support fuel rods in a closely packed array and a structure necessary to direct and control the flow of coolant to regions in the core in accordance with the heat transfer requirements.

Fauth, Jr., William L. (Germantown, MD); Jones, Daniel S. (Pittsburgh, PA); Kolsun, George J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Erbes, John G. (San Jose, CA); Brennan, John J. (Bethel Park, PA); Weissburg, James A. (Pittsburgh, PA); Sharbaugh, John E. (Acme, PA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Sensitivity of Low Sloped Roofs Designs to Initial Water and Air Leakage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid water in low sloped roofs almost always causes problems. Roofs are designed only to control the migration of vapor, if at all. Small amounts of water leakage/penetration, may cause mold growth or catastrophic corrosion in current roofs systems. In a recent paper by the authors the effect of exterior surface emissive and absorptive properties was found to have a significant effect on the moisture performance of a roof that had a leak. Depending on the surface characteristics, roof systems can be designed to effectively manage water penetration, but at an energy cost. In the roofs system examined previously, air leakage was not included. In the present study, the authors reinvestigated the effect of water penetration and the influence of air leakage on the hygrothermal performance of a few selected roofs. The drying potential of a groove ventilated roof is examined. The performance concept is based on the fact that warming up of air in the groove increases it's ability to transport moisture to the outside. Solar radiation raises the temperature of air in the grooves and on average, during a sunny summer day 0.5 L of water can be ventilated out of the roof per 1m width of the roof. In this paper, one climatic condition was investigated; a hot and humid Climate representative of Houston, TX. The specific questions that the paper addresses are: What are the vapor and liquid control dynamic involved in the moisture migration of a roof in Houston TX? and how does airflow influence the performance of a roof that is initially wet ? A state-of-the-art numerical model was used to address these issues. Results showed that the drying potential depends on the ventilation rates. The roof system with ventilation grooves dried out faster from the initially wet stage than the roof without the ventilation grooves. The total increase in heat loss of the roof was found to be between 0 - 5 % depending on the thickness of the insulation. The ventilation can cool down the temperature of the roof in the middle of a hot and sunny day thus reducing the heat load to the inside.

Karagiozis, A.; Desjarlais, A.; Salonvaara, M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

The design of a functionally graded composite for service in high temperature lead and lead-bismuth cooled nuclear reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A material that resists lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) attack and retains its strength at 700°C would be an enabling technology for LBE-cooled reactors. No single alloy currently exists that can economically meet the required ...

Short, Michael Philip

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

GRR/Section 19-CO-c - Designated Ground Water Basin Well Permitting Process  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 19-CO-c - Designated Ground Water Basin Well Permitting Process GRR/Section 19-CO-c - Designated Ground Water Basin Well Permitting Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-CO-c - Designated Ground Water Basin Well Permitting Process 19COCDesignatedGroundWaterBasinWellPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Colorado Division of Water Resources Colorado Ground Water Commission Regulations & Policies CRS 37-90-107 CRS 37-90-108 Ground Water Management District Rules 2 CCR 410-1 - Rules and Regulations for the Management and Control of Designated Ground Water Basins Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19COCDesignatedGroundWaterBasinWellPermit.pdf 19COCDesignatedGroundWaterBasinWellPermit.pdf

418

Effect of thermal barrier coatings on the performance of steam- and water-cooled gas turbine: steam turbine combined cycle systems  

SciTech Connect

An analytical study was made of the performance of air-, steam-, and water-cooled gas-turbine/steam-turbine combined-cycle systems with and without thermal-barrier coatings. For steam cooling, thermal-barrier coatings permit an increase in the turbine inlet temperature from 1205/sup 0/C to 1370/sup 0/C, resulting in an efficiency improvement of 1.9 percentage points. The maximum specific power improvement with thermal barriers is 32.4% when the turbine inlet temperature is increased from 1425/sup 0/C to 1675/sup 0/C and the airfoil temperature is kept the same. For water cooling, the maximum efficiency improvement is 2.2 percentage points at a turbine inlet temperature of 1683/sup 0/C and the maximum specific power improvement is 36.6% by increasing the turbine inlet temperature from 1425/sup 0/C to 1730/sup 0/C and keeping the airfoil temperatures the same. These improvements are greater than that obtained with combined cycles using air-cooling at a turbine inlet temperature of 1205/sup 0/C. The large temperature differences across the thermal barriers at these high temperatures, however, indicate that thermal stresses may present obstacles to the use of coatings at high turbine inlet temperatures.

Nainiger, J.J.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Waterrequirement for FEMP-designated products is generally set at

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Suncatcher and cool pool. Project report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Suncatcher is a simple, conical solar concentrating device that captures light entering clerestory windows and directs it onto thermal storage elements at the back of a south facing living space. The cone shape and inclination are designed to capture low angle winter sunlight and to reflect away higher angle summer sunlight. It is found that winter radiation through a Suncatcher window is 40 to 50% higher than through an ordinary window, and that the average solar fraction is 59%. Water-filled steal culvert pipes used for thermal storage are found to undergo less stratification, and thus to be more effective, when located where sunlight strikes the bottom rather than the top. Five Suncatcher buildings are described. Designs are considered for 32/sup 0/, 40/sup 0/ and 48/sup 0/ north latitude, and as the latitude increases, the inclination angle of the cone should be lowered. The Cool Pool is an evaporating, shaded roof pond which thermosiphons cool water into water-filled columns within a building. Preliminary experiments indicate that the best shade design has unimpeded north sky view, good ventilation, complete summer shading, a low architectural profile, and low cost attic vent lowers work. Another series of experiments established the satisfactory performance of the Cool Pool on a test building using four water-filled cylinders, two cylinders, and two cylinders connected to the Cool Pool through a heat exchanger. Although an unshaded pool cools better at night than a shaded one, daytime heat gain far offsets this advantage. A vinyl waterbag heat exchanger was developed for use with the Cool Pool. (LEW)

Hammond, J.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "design cooling water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

COOLING WATER INTAKES AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Direct-Cooled Power Electronics Substrate  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the Direct-Cooled Power Electronics Substrate project is to reduce the size and weight of the heat sink for power electronics used in hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). The concept proposed in this project was to develop an innovative power electronics mounting structure, model it, and perform both thermal and mechanical finite-element analysis (FEA). This concept involved integrating cooling channels within the direct-bonded copper (DBC) substrate and strategically locating these channels underneath the power electronic devices. This arrangement would then be directly cooled by water-ethylene glycol (WEG), essentially eliminating the conventional heat sink and associated heat flow path. The concept was evaluated to determine its manufacturability, its compatibility with WEG, and the potential to reduce size and weight while directly cooling the DBC and associated electronics with a coolant temperature of 105 C. This concept does not provide direct cooling to the electronics, only direct cooling inside the DBC substrate itself. These designs will take into account issues such as containment of the fluid (separation from the electronics) and synergy with the whole power inverter design architecture. In FY 2008, mechanical modeling of substrate and inverter core designs as well as thermal and mechanical stress FEA modeling of the substrate designs was performed, along with research into manufacturing capabilities and methods that will support the substrate designs. In FY 2009, a preferred design(s) will be fabricated and laboratory validation testing will be completed. In FY 2010, based on the previous years laboratory testing, the mechanical design will be modified and the next generation will be built and tested in an operating inverter prototype.

Wiles, R.; Ayers, C.; Wereszczak, A.

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

423

Department of Energy's team's analyses of Soviet designed VVERs (water-cooled water-moderated atomic energy reactors)  

SciTech Connect

This document contains apprendices A through P of this report. Topics discussed are: a cronyms and technical terms, accident analyses reactivity control; Soviet safety regulations; radionuclide inventory; decay heat; operations and maintenance; steam supply system; concrete and concrete structures; seismicity; site information; neutronic parameters; loss of electric power; diesel generator reliability; Soviet codes and standards; and comparisons of PWR and VVER features. (FI)

Not Available

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Energy resource alternatives competition. Progress report for the period February 1, 1975--December 31, 1975. [Space heating and cooling, hot water, and electricity for homes, farms, and light industry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This progress report describes the objectives and results of the intercollegiate Energy Resource Alternatives competition. The one-year program concluded in August 1975, with a final testing program of forty student-built alternative energy projects at the Sandia Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The goal of the competition was to design and build prototype hardware which could provide space heating and cooling, hot water, and electricity at a level appropriate to the needs of homes, farms, and light industry. The hardware projects were powered by such nonconventional energy sources as solar energy, wind, biologically produced gas, coal, and ocean waves. The competition rules emphasized design innovation, economic feasibility, practicality, and marketability. (auth)

Matzke, D.J.; Osowski, D.M.; Radtke, M.L.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Measure Guideline: Ventilation Cooling  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this measure guideline on ventilation cooling is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for reducing cooling system energy and demand in homes located in hot-dry and cold-dry climates. This guideline provides a prescriptive approach that outlines qualification criteria, selection considerations, and design and installation procedures.

Springer, D.; Dakin, B.; German, A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Candidate chemical systems for air cooled solar powered, absorption air conditioner design. Part I. Organic absorbent systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

All the available experimental evidence suggests that the optimum ''organic'' absorbent/refrigerant combination would be a methane derivative with a single hydrogen atom with chlorine and fluorine atoms in the other sites, as refrigerant. This would be hydrogen bonded to an absorbent molecule containing the group =NC/sup -/O, with the substituent groups being such that no steric hindrance took place. Cycle analyses showed that the ratio of internal heat transfer to cooling would be large, probably impractically so in view of the high coefficient of performance needed for solar driven cooling and the additional handicap of heat rejection to the atmosphere. A more promising approach would be to reduce the internal heat transfer per unit of space cooling by selecting a refrigerant with a high latent heat of vaporization and selecting an absorbent with suitable properties.

Biermann, W.J.

427

Design manual for solar heating of buildings and domestic hot water  

SciTech Connect

This manual presents design and cost analysis methods for sizing and payback estimating of solar heat collectors for augmentation of portable water heaters and space heaters. Sufficient information is presented to enable almost anyone to design solar space and water heating systems or conduct basic feasibility studies preparatory to design of large installations. Both retrofit and new installations are considered. (MOW)

Field, R.L.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Design and testing a solar cooling system employing liquid desiccants: Dehumidifier experiments in Colorado State University Solar House II: Final report, 1986--1987  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A nominal 3-ton (10.5-kW) lithium bromide, open-cycle desiccant cooling system has been designed, installed, and operated. This experimental system dehumidifies ambient air in a packed bed utilizing an aqueous solution of lithium bromide. The absorbent solution is distributed by spray nozzles and flows countercurrent to the air. The dilute solution exiting the dehumidifier is concentrated in a packed bed regenerator by solar heated air. The strong solution is cooled by two heat exchangers before reentering the dehumidifier. Provisions to simulate conditions of high ambient humidity and temperature have been made. Experiments on the dehumidifier operating in a decoupled mode (without countercurrent regenerator operation) have been carried out. Cooling capacities in the range of 1.0--4.0 refrigeration tons have been achieved, depending upon the operating conditions. The effect of different independent variables on the capacity of the dehumidifier has been studied. An empirical equation correlating the variables have been obtained by statistical analysis of the data. The equation obtained indicates that the capacity of the dehumidifier depends strongly on the solution concentration, solution flow rate, air inlet temperature and the air humidity. Two other variables studied, the solution inlet temperature and the air flow rate, did not affect the cooling capacity greatly. The dependence of condensation rate on each of the variables is analyzed. 22 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

Lenz, T.G.; Loef, G.O.G.; Patnaik, S.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Air Cooling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cooling Cooling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Air Cooling: Air cooling is commonly defined as rejecting heat from an object by flowing air over the surface of the object, through means of convection. Air cooling requires that the air must be cooler than the object or surface from which it is expected to remove heat. This is due to the second law of thermodynamics, which states that heat will only move spontaneously from a hot reservoir (the heat sink) to a cold reservoir (the air). Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Air Cooling Air Cooling Diagram of Air Cooled Condenser designed by GEA Heat Exchangers Ltd. (http://www.gea-btt.com.cn/opencms/opencms/bttc/en/Products/Air_Cooled_Condenser.html) Air cooling is limited on ambient temperatures and typically require a

430

Assessment of innovative fuel designs for high performance light water reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To increase the power density and maximum allowable fuel burnup in light water reactors, new fuel rod designs are investigated. Such fuel is desirable for improving the economic performance light water reactors loaded with ...

Carpenter, David Michael

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Improved Design Tools for Surface Water and Standing Column Well...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

up to the level of the water table. Water is circulated from the well through the heat pump in an open-loop pipe circuit. Compared to closed-loop systems, the SCW system...

432

Conceptual design of advanced central receiver power systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Volume 2, Book 1. Commercial plant conceptual design. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The conceptual design of the 100-MW solar tower focus commercial power plant is described in detail. Sodium is pumped up to the top of a tall tower where the receiver is located. The sodium is heated in the receiver and then flows down the tower, through a pressure reducing device, and thence into a large, hot storage tank which is located at ground level and whose size is made to meet a specific thermal energy storage capacity requirement. From this tank, the sodium is pumped by a separate pump, through a system of sodium-to-water steam generators. The steam generator system consists of a separate superheater and reheater operating in parallel and an evaporator unit operating in series with the other two units. The sodium flowing from the evaporator unit is piped to a cold storage tank. From the cold storage tank, sodium is then pumped up to the tip of the tower to complete the cycle. The steam generated in the steam generators is fed to a conventional off-the-shelf, high-efficiency turbine. The steam loop operates in a conventional rankine cycle with the steam generators serving the same purpose as a conventional boiler and water being fed to the evaporator with conventional feedwater pumps. The pressure reducing device (a standard drag valve, for example) serves to mitigate the pressure caused by the static head of sodium and thus allows the large tanks to operate at ambient pressure conditions. (WHK)

Not Available

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

SOLERAS - Solar Energy Water Desalination Project: Catalytic. System design final report. Volume 2. Preliminary pilot plant design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The preliminary design of a solar water desalination pilot plant is presented. Pilot plant drawings and process descriptions are provided. Use of solar and wind energy are discussed. Testing, performance and cost of the pilot plant are studied. (BCS)

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Monitoring peak power and cooling energy savings of shade trees and white surfaces in the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) service area: Project design and preliminary results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Urban areas in warm climates create summer heat islands of daily average intensity of 3--5{degrees}C, adding to discomfort and increasing air-conditioning loads. Two important factors contributing to urban heat islands are reductions in albedo (lower overall city reflectance) and loss of vegetation (less evapotranspiration). Reducing summer heat islands by planting vegetation (shade trees) and increasing surface albedos, saves cooling energy, allows down-sizing of air conditioners, lowers air-conditioning peak demand, and reduces the emission of CO{sub 2} and other pollutants from electric power plants. The focus of this multi-year project, jointly sponsored by SMUD and the California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE), was to measure the direct cooling effects of trees and white surfaces (mainly roofs) in a few buildings in Sacramento. The first-year project was to design the experiment and obtain base case data. We also obtained limited post retrofit data for some sites. This report provides an overview of the project activities during the first year at six sites. The measurement period for some of the sites was limited to September and October, which are transitional cooling months in Sacramento and hence the interpretation of results only apply to this period. In one house, recoating the dark roof with a high-albedo coating rendered air conditioning unnecessary for the month of September (possible savings of up to 10 kWh per day and 2 kW of non-coincidental peak power). Savings of 50% relative to an identical base case bungalow were achieved when a school bungalow`s roof and southeast wall were coated with a high-albedo coating during the same period. Our measured data for the vegetation sites do not indicate conclusive results because shade trees were small and the cooling period was almost over. We need to collect more data over a longer cooling season in order to demonstrate savings conclusively.

Akbari, H.; Bretz, S.; Hanford, J.; Rosenfeld, A.; Sailor, D.; Taha, H. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Bos, W. [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, CA (United States)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Safety problems of water-development works designed for land reclamation  

SciTech Connect

A safety declaration is a fundamental document assuring the safety of water-development works, their correspondence to safety criteria, the design, and active technical regulations and rules.

Shchedrin, V. N. [Russian Academy of Agriculture Sciences (Russian Federation); Kosichenko, Yu. M. [FGNU RocNIIPM, Novocherkassk (Russian Federation)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

436

Procedure for developing biological input for the design, location, or modification of water-intake structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To minimize adverse impact on aquatic ecosystems resulting from the operation of water intake structures, design engineers must have relevant information on the behavior, physiology and ecology of local fish and shellfish. Identification of stimulus/response relationships and the environmental factors that influence them is the first step in incorporating biological information in the design, location or modification of water intake structures. A procedure is presented in this document for providing biological input to engineers who are designing, locating or modifying a water intake structure. The authors discuss sources of stimuli at water intakes, historical approaches in assessing potential/actual impact and review biological information needed for intake design.

Neitzel, D.A.; McKenzie, D.H.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Water | Desire: Design of a Responsible Urban Retreat in Georgetown, Washington, DC.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The design of an urban retreat within an industrial building in Georgetown, DC provides an opportunity to experience water in the built environment. The location… (more)

Zimmerli, Tanya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Experiment study on FLOATING JACKET: a new concept for deep water platform design.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??As more oil and gas are discovered in deeper water than ever before, the offshore industry has become increasingly interested in the design of advanced… (more)

Xu, Yufeng

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

GRR/Section 19-CO-c - Designated Ground Water Basin Well Permitting...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRRSection 19-CO-c - Designated Ground Water Basin Well Permitting Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help...

440

Cool Magnetic Molecules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cool Magnetic Molecules Cool Magnetic Molecules Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Wednesday, 25 May 2011 00:00 Certain materials are known to heat up or cool down when they are exposed to a changing magnetic field. This is known as the magnetocaloric effect. All magnetic materials exhibit this effect, but in most cases, it is too small to be technologically useful. Recently, however, the search for special molecules with a surprisingly large capacity to keep cool has heated up, driven by environmental and cost considerations as well as by recent improvements in our ability to design, assemble, and probe the structure and chemistry of small molecules. An international collaboration of researchers from Spain, Scotland, and the U.S. has utilized ALS Beamline 11.3.1 (small-molecule crystallography) to characterize the design of such "molecular coolers." The work targets the synthesis of molecular cluster compounds containing many unpaired electrons ("nanomagnets") for applications involving enhanced magnetic refrigeration at very low temperatures.

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441

Conceptual Design of a Large, Passive Pressure-Tube Light Water Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A design for a large, passive, light water reactor has been developed. The proposed concept is a pressure tube reactor of similar design to CANDU reactors, but differing in three key aspects. First, a solid SiC-coated ...

Hejzlar, P.

442

Conceptual design of an annular-fueled superheat boiling water reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The conceptual design of an annular-fueled superheat boiling water reactor (ASBWR) is outlined. The proposed design, ASBWR, combines the boiler and superheater regions into one fuel assembly. This ensures good neutron ...

Ko, Yu-Chih, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443