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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desiccant salt solutions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Electrochromic Salts, Solutions, and Devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrochromic salts. Electrochromic salts of dicationic viologens such as methyl viologen and benzyl viologen associated with anions selected from bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide, and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide are produced by metathesis with the corresponding viologen dihalide. They are highly soluble in molten quarternary ammonium salts and together with a suitable reductant provide electrolyte solutions that are used in electrochromic windows.

Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); McClesky, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

2

Electrochromic salts, solutions, and devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrochromic salts. Electrochromic salts of dicationic viologens such as methyl viologen and benzyl viologen associated with anions selected from bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide, and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide are produced by metathesis with the corresponding viologen dihalide. They are highly soluble in molten quarternary ammonium salts and together with a suitable reductant provide electrolyte solutions that are used in electrochromic windows.

Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); McClesky,7,064,212 T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

3

Electrochromic Salts, Solutions, and Devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrochromic salts. Electrochromic salts of dicationic viologens such as methyl viologen and benzyl viologen associated with anions selected from bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide, and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide are produced by metathesis with the corresponding viologen dihalide. They are highly soluble in molten quarternary ammonium salts and together with a suitable reductant provide electrolyte solutions that are used in electrochromic windows.

Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); McClesky, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

4

New and Underutilized Technology: Liquid Desiccant Air Conditioner |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Liquid Desiccant Air Conditioner Liquid Desiccant Air Conditioner New and Underutilized Technology: Liquid Desiccant Air Conditioner October 4, 2013 - 4:40pm Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for liquid desiccant air conditioners (LDACs) within the Federal sector. Benefits Liquid desiccant air conditioners deeply dry air using natural gas, solar energy, waste heat, bio-fuel, or other fossil fuels to drive the system. By providing mostly latent cooling, the LDAC controls indoor humidity without overcooling and reheating. This unit is supplemented by an electric chiller or DX air conditioner that sensibly cools the building's recirculation air. The liquid desiccant is a concentrated salt solution that directly absorbs moisture. Application LDACs are applicable in hospital, office, prison, school, and service

5

SEPARATION OF INORGANIC SALTS FROM ORGANIC SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for recovering the nitrates of uranium and plutonium from solution in oxygen-containing organic solvents such as ketones or ethers. The solution of such salts dissolved in an oxygen-containing organic compound is contacted with an ion exchange resin whereby sorption of the entire salt on the resin takes place and then the salt-depleted liquid and the resin are separated from each other. The reaction seems to be based on an anion formation of the entire salt by complexing with the anion of the resin. Strong base or quaternary ammonium type resins can be used successfully in this process.

Katzin, L.I.; Sullivan, J.C.

1958-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

6

Desiccant contamination in desiccant cooling systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of a desiccant contamination experiment and the impact of the obtained silica gel degradation data on the performance of a desiccant cooling system. A test apparatus was used to thermally cycle several desiccant samples and expose them to ambient'' humid air or contaminated'' humid air. The source of contamination was cigarette smoke. The exposed desiccant samples were removed after 0.5, 1, 2, or 4 months of exposure and their moisture capacities were measured. The silica get samples thermally cycled with ambient air showed a 5% to 30% to 70% of their moisture capacity. Using the obtained degradation data in a system, the impact of desiccant degradation on the performance of a desiccant cooling cycle was estimated. Depending on the degree of desiccant degradation, the decrease in thermal coefficient of performance (COP) and cooling capacity of the system was 10% to 35%. It was found that the COP and the cooling capacity of a system after desiccant degradation can be improved by increasing the rotational speed of the dehumidifier. This indicates that a simple engineering solution may exist to alleviate some type of degradations. 9 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Pesaran, A.A.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Method for preparing salt solutions having desired properties  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The specification discloses a method for preparing salt solutions which exhibit desired thermodynamic properties. The method enables prediction of the value of the thermodynamic properties for single and multiple salt solutions over a wide range of conditions from activity data and constants which are independent of concentration and temperature. A particular application of the invention is in the control of salt solutions in a process to provide a salt solution which exhibits the desired properties.

Ally, Moonis R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Braunstein, Jerry (Clinton, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

SOLUTION MINING IN SALT DOMES OF THE GULF COAST EMBAYMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following a description of salt resources in the salt domes of the gulf coast embayment, mining, particularly solution mining, is described. A scenario is constructed which could lead to release of radioactive waste stored in a salt dome via inadvertent solution mining and the consequences of this scenario are analyzed.

Griswold, G. B.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Impact of desiccant degradation on desiccant cooling system performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of open-cycle desiccant cooling systems depends on several factors, some of which can change beyond manufacturers' specifications. For example, the desiccant sorption process may degrade with time on exposure to airborne contaminants and thermal cycling. Desiccant degradation can reduce the performance of a dehumidifier and thus the performance of desiccant cooling systems. Using computer simulations and recent experimental data on silica gel, the impact of degradation was evaluated. Hypothetical degradations of desiccants with Type 1 moderate isotherms were also simulated. Depending on the degree and type of desiccant degradation, the decrease in thermal coefficient of performance (COP) and cooling capacity of the system was 10% to 35%. The 35% loss in system performance occurs when desiccant degradation is considered worst case. The simulations showed that the COP, and to a lesser degree the cooling capacity of these degraded systems, could be improved by increasing the rotational speed of the dehumidifier. It is shown that easy engineering solutions might be available for some types of degradations. 9 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Pesaran, A.A.; Penney, T.R.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Desiccant dehumidification analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Desiccant dehumidification has been given increasing interest in the air conditioning industry. Compared with conventional vapor compression air conditioning systems, desiccant dehumidification saves energy by separating ...

Xing, Hai-Yun Helen, 1976-

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Lab Breakthrough: Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air Conditioning |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air Conditioning Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air Conditioning Lab Breakthrough: Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air Conditioning May 29, 2012 - 5:22pm Addthis This breakthrough combines desiccant materials, which remove moisture from the air using heat, and advanced evaporative technologies to develop a cooling unit that uses 90 percent less electricity and up to 80 percent less total energy than traditional air conditioning. This solution, called the desiccant enhanced evaporative air conditioner (DEVAP), also controls humidity more effectively to improve the comfort of people in buildings. View the entire Lab Breakthrough playlist. What are the key facts? Recent materials advances and liquid desiccant advances to design the compact and cost-effective DEVAP system. DEVAP uses 90 percent less electricity and up to 80 percent less

12

Lab Breakthrough: Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air Conditioning |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lab Breakthrough: Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air Conditioning Lab Breakthrough: Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air Conditioning Lab Breakthrough: Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air Conditioning May 29, 2012 - 5:22pm Addthis This breakthrough combines desiccant materials, which remove moisture from the air using heat, and advanced evaporative technologies to develop a cooling unit that uses 90 percent less electricity and up to 80 percent less total energy than traditional air conditioning. This solution, called the desiccant enhanced evaporative air conditioner (DEVAP), also controls humidity more effectively to improve the comfort of people in buildings. View the entire Lab Breakthrough playlist. What are the key facts? Recent materials advances and liquid desiccant advances to design the compact and cost-effective DEVAP system.

13

CRITICALITY SAFETY OF PROCESSING SALT SOLUTION AT SRS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High level radioactive liquid waste generated as a result of the production of nuclear material for the United States defense program at the Savannah River Site has been stored as 36 million gallons in underground tanks. About ten percent of the waste volume is sludge, composed of insoluble metal hydroxides primarily hydroxides of Mn, Fe, Al, Hg, and most radionuclides including fission products. The remaining ninety percent of the waste volume is saltcake, composed of primarily sodium (nitrites, nitrates, and aluminates) and hydroxides. Saltcakes account for 30% of the radioactivity while the sludge accounts for 70% of the radioactivity. A pilot plant salt disposition processing system has been designed at the Savannah River Site for interim processing of salt solution and is composed of two facilities: the Actinide Removal Process Facility (ARPF) and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Data from the pilot plant salt processing system will be used for future processing salt at a much higher rate in a new salt processing facility. Saltcake contains significant amounts of actinides, and other long-lived radioactive nuclides such as strontium and cesium that must be extracted prior to disposal as low level waste. The extracted radioactive nuclides will be mixed with the sludge from waste tanks and vitrified in another facility. Because of the presence of highly enriched uranium in the saltcake, there is a criticality concern associated with concentration and/or accumulation of fissionable material in the ARP and MCU.

Stephens, K; Davoud Eghbali, D; Michelle Abney, M

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

BLENDING OF RADIOACTIVE SALT SOLUTIONS IN MILLION GALLON TANKS  

SciTech Connect

Research was completed at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to investigate processes related to the blending of radioactive, liquid waste, salt solutions in 4920 cubic meter, 25.9 meter diameter storage tanks. One process was the blending of large salt solution batches (up to 1135 – 3028 cubic meters), using submerged centrifugal pumps. A second process was the disturbance of a settled layer of solids, or sludge, on the tank bottom. And a third investigated process was the settling rate of sludge solids if suspended into slurries by the blending pump. To investigate these processes, experiments, CFD models (computational fluid dynamics), and theory were applied. Experiments were performed using simulated, non-radioactive, salt solutions referred to as supernates, and a layer of settled solids referred to as sludge. Blending experiments were performed in a 2.44 meter diameter pilot scale tank, and flow rate measurements and settling tests were performed at both pilot scale and full scale. A summary of the research is presented here to demonstrate the adage that, “One good experiment fixes a lot of good theory”. Experimental testing was required to benchmark CFD models, or the models would have been incorrectly used. In fact, CFD safety factors were established by this research to predict full-scale blending performance. CFD models were used to determine pump design requirements, predict blending times, and cut costs several million dollars by reducing the number of required blending pumps. This research contributed to DOE missions to permanently close the remaining 47 of 51 SRS waste storage tanks.

Leishear, R.

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

15

Blending Of Radioactive Salt Solutions In Million Gallon Tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research was completed at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to investigate processes related to the blending of radioactive, liquid waste, salt solutions in 4920 cubic meter, 25.9 meter diameter storage tanks. One process was the blending of large salt solution batches (up to 1135 ? 3028 cubic meters), using submerged centrifugal pumps. A second process was the disturbance of a settled layer of solids, or sludge, on the tank bottom. And a third investigated process was the settling rate of sludge solids if suspended into slurries by the blending pump. To investigate these processes, experiments, CFD models (computational fluid dynamics), and theory were applied. Experiments were performed using simulated, non-radioactive, salt solutions referred to as supernates, and a layer of settled solids referred to as sludge. Blending experiments were performed in a 2.44 meter diameter pilot scale tank, and flow rate measurements and settling tests were performed at both pilot scale and full scale. A summary of the research is presented here to demonstrate the adage that, ?One good experiment fixes a lot of good theory?. Experimental testing was required to benchmark CFD models, or the models would have been incorrectly used. In fact, CFD safety factors were established by this research to predict full-scale blending performance. CFD models were used to determine pump design requirements, predict blending times, and cut costs several million dollars by reducing the number of required blending pumps. This research contributed to DOE missions to permanently close the remaining 47 of 51 SRS waste storage tanks.

Leishear, Robert A.; Lee, Si Y.; Fowley, Mark D.; Poirier, Michael R.

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

16

Solar Desiccant Cooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Desiccant Cooling Solar Desiccant Cooling Speaker(s): Paul Bourdoukan Date: December 6, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Ashok Gadgil The development of HVAC systems is a real challenge regarding its environmental impact. An innovative technique operating only by means of water and solar energy, is desiccant cooling. The principle is evaporative cooling with the introduction of a dehumidification unit, the desiccant wheel to control the humidity levels. The regeneration of the desiccant wheel requires a preheated airstream. A solar installation is a very interesting option for providing the preheated airstream. In France, at the University of La Rochelle, and at the National Institute of Solar Energy (INES), the investigation of the solar desiccant cooling technique has been

17

Using liquid desiccant as a regenerable filter for capturing and deactivating contaminants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method, and systems for implementing such method, for purifying and conditioning air of weaponized contaminants. The method includes wetting a filter packing media with a salt-based liquid desiccant, such as water with a high concentration of lithium chloride. Air is passed through the wetted filter packing media and the contaminants in are captured with the liquid desiccant while the liquid desiccant dehumidifies the air. The captured contaminants are then deactivated in the liquid desiccant, which may include heating the liquid desiccant. The liquid desiccant is regenerated by applying heat to the liquid desiccant and then removing moisture. The method includes repeating the wetting with the regenerated liquid desiccant which provides a regenerable filtering process that captures and deactivates contaminants on an ongoing basis while also conditioning the air. The method may include filtration effectiveness enhancement by electrostatic or inertial means.

Slayzak, Steven J. (Denver, CO); Anderson, Ren S. (Broomfield, CO); Judkoff, Ronald D. (Golden, CO); Blake, Daniel M. (Golden, CO); Vinzant, Todd B. (Golden, CO); Ryan, Joseph P. (Golden, CO)

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

18

Advanced desiccant materials research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The long-range goal of this task is to understand the role of surface phenomena in desiccant cooling materials. The background information includes a brief introduction to desiccant cooling systems (DCS) and the role of the desiccant as a system component. The purpose, background, rationale, and long-term technical approach for studying advanced desiccant materials are then treated. Experimental methods for measuring water vapor sorption by desiccants are described, and the rationale is then given for choosing a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) for measuring sorption isotherms, rates, and cyclic stability. Background information is given about the QCM, including the quartz crystal resonator itself, the support structure for the quartz crystal, and the advantages and limitations of a QCM. The apparatus assembled and placed into operation during CY 1985 is described. The functions of the principal components of the equipment, i.e., the QCM, vacuum system, pressure gauges, residual gas analyzer, constant temperature bath, and data acquisition system, are described as they relate to the water vapor sorption measurements now under way. The criteria for narrowing the potential candidates as advanced desiccant materials for the initial studies are given. Also given is a list of 20 principal candidate materials identified based on the criteria and data available in the literature.

Czanderna, A.W.; Thomas, T.M.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Polymers as advanced materials for desiccant applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research is concerned with solid materials used as desiccants for desiccant cooling systems (DCSs) that process water vapor in an atmosphere to produce cooling. Background information includes an introduction to DCSs and the role of the desiccant as a system component. The water vapor sorption performance criteria used for screening the modified polymers prepared include the water sorption capacity from 5% to 80% relative humidity (R.H.), isotherm shape, and rate of adsorption and desorption. Measurements are presented for the sorption performance of modified polymeric advanced desiccant materials with the quartz crystal microbalance. Isotherms of polystyrene sulfonic acid (PSSA) taken over a 5-month period show that the material has a dramatic loss in capacity and that the isotherm shape is time dependent. The adsorption and desorption kinetics for PSSA and all the ionic salts of it studied are easily fast enough for commercial DCS applications with a wheel rotation speed of 6 min per revolution. Future activities for the project are addressed, and a 5-year summary of the project is included as Appendix A. 34 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

Czanderna, A.W.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Polymers as advanced materials for desiccant applications, 1988  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents work to identify a next-generation, low-cost material with which solar energy or heat from another low-cost energy source can be used for regenerating the water vapor sorption activity of the desiccant. The objective of the work is to determine how the desired sorption performance of advanced desiccant materials can be predicted by understanding the role of the material modifications and material surfaces. The work concentrates on solid materials to be used for desiccant cooling systems and which process water vapor in an atmosphere to produce cooling. The work involved preparing modifications of polystyrene sulfonic acid sodium salt, synthesizing a hydrogel, and evaluating the sorption performances of these and similar commercially available polymeric materials; all materials were studied for their potential application in solid commercial desiccant cooling systems. Background information is also provided on desiccant cooling systems and the role of a desiccant material within such a system, and it includes the use of polymers as desiccant materials. 31 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs.

Czanderna, A.W.; Neidlinger, H.H.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desiccant salt solutions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Salt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Salt Salt Nature Bulletin No. 340-A April 12, 1969 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation SALT It is fortunate that Salt -- common salt, known to chemists as sodium chloride and to mineralogists as Halite -- is one of the most abundant substances on earth, because most of us crave it and must have it. Eskimos get along without salt because they live mostly on the uncooked flesh of fish and mammals. A few nomad tribes never eat it and do not need it because their diet contains so much milk cheese, and meat eaten raw or roasted. We people who eat boiled meat and many vegetables must have salt. Of the millions of tons produced commercially each year, only about three percent is used as table salt. Large quantities are required for refrigeration meat packing, curing and preserving fish, pickles, sauerkraut, and for other foods prepared in brine. A lot of it is needed for livestock. Salt is spread on sidewalks, streets and highways to melt ice in winter. It is used to glaze pottery, sewer pipe and other ceramics. It is required in many metallurgical processes, chemical industries, and the manufacture of such products as leather, glass, soap, bleaching powder and photographic supplies. It has about 14,000 uses.

22

Solar Desiccant Laboratory experiments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first validation attempts with experimental data on SERI's in-house absorption computer model are reported. The SERI Desiccant Test Loop design is shown. Some experimental runs were made to extend the validation over a wide range of inlet (temperature/humidity) conditions. (MHR)

Kutscher, C.F.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Studies on Refining Cobalt Salt Solution by Extraction ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cobalt sulfate solution was refined by PC88A levextrel Resins which produced from HPD-100 type of ethylene benzene -divinylbenzene porous adsorption resin  ...

24

Composite desiccant structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composite formed of small desiccant particles retained in a dark matrix composed of a porous binder containing a transition metal oxide with pores to provide moisture transport with respect to the particles, and metallic fibers to remove the heat of condensation during dehumidification and provide heat for the removal of moisture during regeneration. The moisture absorbing properties of the composite may be regenerated by exposure of the dark matrix to solar radiation with dehumidification occurring at night.

Fraioli, Anthony V. (Hawthorn Woods, IL); Schertz, William W. (Batavia, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Composite desiccant structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent discloses a composite formed of small desiccant particles retained in a dark matrix composed of a porous binder containing a transition metal oxide with pores to provide moisture transport with respect to the particles, and metallic fibers to remove the heat of condensation during dehumidification and provide heat for the removal of moisture during regeneration. The moisture absorbing properties of the composite may be regenerated by exposure of the dark matrix to solar radiation with dehumidification occurring at night.

Fraioli, A.V.; Schertz, W.W.

1984-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

26

Statistical mechanics of sum frequency generation spectroscopy for the liquid-vapor interface of dilute aqueous salt solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. Chem. Phys. [18] J. Noah-Vanhoucke, J. D. Smith, and P.aqueous salt solutions Joyce Noah-Vanhoucke, 1 Jared D.

Noah-Vanhoucke, Joyce

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Desiccant degradation in desiccant cooling systems: A system study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors predict the impact of desiccant degradation on the performance of an open-cycle desiccant cooling system in ventilation mode using the degradation data on silica gel obtained from a previous study. The degradation data were based on thermal cycling desiccant samples and exposing them to ambient or contaminated air. Depending on the degree of desiccant degradation, the decrease in the thermal coefficient of performance (COP) and the cooling capacity of the system for low-temperature regeneration was 10 percent to 35 percent. The 35 percent loss occurred based on the worst-case desiccant degradation scenario. Under more realistic conditions the loss in system performance is expected to be lower.

Pesaran, A.A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Desiccant Cooling Systems - A Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Desiccant cooling systems have been investigated extensively during the past decade as alternatives to electrically driven vapor compression systems because regeneration temperatures of the desiccant - about 160°F, can be achieved using natural gas or by solar systems. Comfort is achieved by reducing the moisture content of air by a solid or liquid desiccant and then reducing the temperature in an evaporative cooler (direct or indirect). Another system is one where the dehumidifier removes enough moisture to meet the latent portion of the load while the sensible portion is met by a vapor compression cooling system; desiccant regeneration is achieved by using the heat rejected from the condenser together with other thermal sources. At present, residential desiccant cooling systems are in actual operation but are more costly than vapor compression systems, resulting in relatively long payback periods. Component efficiencies need to be improved, particularly the efficiency of the dehumidifier.

Kettleborough, C. F.; Ullah, M. R.; Waugaman, D. G.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Modeling Solute Thermokinetics in LiCI-KCI Molten Salt for Nuclear Waste Separation  

SciTech Connect

Recovery of actinides is an integral part of a closed nuclear fuel cycle. Pyrometallurgical nuclear fuel recycling processes have been developed in the past for recovering actinides from spent metallic and nitride fuels. The process is essentially to dissolve the spent fuel in a molten salt and then extract just the actinides for reuse in a reactor. Extraction is typically done through electrorefining, which involves electrochemical reduction of the dissolved actinides and plating onto a cathode. Knowledge of a number of basic thermokinetic properties of salts and salt-fuel mixtures is necessary for optimizing present and developing new approaches for pyrometallurgical waste processing. The properties of salt-fuel mixtures are presently being studied, but there are so many solutes and varying concentrations that direct experimental investigation is prohibitively time consuming and expensive (particularly for radioactive elements like Pu). Therefore, there is a need to reduce the number of required experiments through modeling of salt and salt-fuel mixture properties. This project will develop first-principles-based molecular modeling and simulation approaches to predict fundamental thermokinetic properties of dissolved actinides and fission products in molten salts. The focus of the proposed work is on property changes with higher concentrations (up to 5 mol%) of dissolved fuel components, where there is still very limited experimental data. The properties predicted with the modeling will be density, which is used to assess the amount of dissolved material in the salt; diffusion coefficients, which can control rates of material transport during separation; and solute activity, which determines total solubility and reduction potentials used during electrorefining. The work will focus on La, Sr, and U, which are chosen to include the important distinct categories of lanthanides, alkali earths, and actinides, respectively. Studies will be performed using LiCl-KCl salt at the eutectic composition (58 mol% LiCl, 42 mol% KCl), which is used for treating spent EBR-II fuel. The same process being used for EBRII fuel is currently being studied for widespread international implementation. The methods will focus on first-principles and first- principles derived interatomic potential based simulations, primarily using molecular dynamics. Results will be validated against existing literature and parallel ongoing experimental efforts. The simulation results will be of value for interpreting experimental results, validating analytical models, and for optimizing waste separation by potentially developing new salt configurations and operating conditions.

Morgan, Dane; Eapen, Jacob

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Desiccant degradation in desiccant cooling systems: An experimental study  

SciTech Connect

The authors conducted experiments to quantify the effects of thermal cycling and exposure to contamination on solid desiccant materials that may be used in desiccant cooling systems. The source of contamination was cigarette smoke, which is considered one of the worst pollutants in building cooling applications. The authors exposed five different solid desiccants to ``ambient`` and ``contaminated`` humid air: silica gel, activated alumina, activated carbon, molecular sieves, and lithium chloride. They obtained the moisture capacity of samples as a function of exposure time. Compared to virgin desiccant samples, the capacity loss caused by thermal cycling with humid ambient air was 10 percent to 30 percent for all desiccants. The capacity loss because of combined effect of thermal cycling with ``smoke-filled`` humid air was between 30 percent to 70 percent. The higher losses occurred after four months of experiment time, which is equivalent to four to eight years of field operation. Using a system model and smoke degradation data on silica gel, the authors predicted that, for low-temperature regeneration, the loss in performance of a ventilation-cycle desiccant cooling system would be between 10 percent to 35 percent, in about eight years, with higher value under worst conditions.

Pesaran, A.A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Review of Desiccant Dehumidification Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper overviews applications of desiccant technology for dehumidifying commercial and institutional buildings. Because of various market, policy, and regulatory factors, this technology is especially attractive for dehumidification applications in the I990s.

Pesaran, A. A.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

THE PREPARATION OF URANIUM DIOXIDE FROM A MOLTEN SALT SOLUTION OF URANYL CHLORIDE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Uranium oxides in a molten eutectic mixture of NaClKCl were chlorinated by bubbling chlorine gas through the mixture. The reaction product, uranyl chloride. was soluble in the molten salt. Although UO/sub 2/ was the most common oxide used, the reaction was similar in the other oxides. Phosgene and aluminum chloride were also used as chlorinating agents. A dense, crystalline precipitate of pure UO/sub 2/ was prepared by the reduction of the uranyl chloride contained in the molten salt solution. The reduction was accomplished by contacting the salt solution with any of several metals, by reaction with hydrogen or dry ammonia gas, or by electrolysis. Several kilograms of UO/sub 2/ were prepared by electrolysis using graphite electrodes. The physical properties of the material made it potentially useful as a ceramic fuel material. The initial high particle density of the "as-produced" UO/sub 2/ was considered of great potential advantage for adapting this process to the refabrication of irradiated UO/sub 2/ into recycle fuel elements. (M.C.G.)

Lyon, W.L.; Voiland, E.E.

1959-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

33

Desiccant contamination research: Report on the desiccant contamination test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The activity in the cooling systems research involves research on high performance dehumidifiers and chillers that can operate efficiently with the variable thermal outputs and delivery temperatures associated with solar collectors. It also includes work on advanced passive cooling techniques. This report describes the work conducted to improve the durability of solid desiccant dehumidifiers by investigating the causes of degradation of desiccant materials from airborne contaminants and thermal cycling. The performance of a dehumidifier strongly depends on the physical properties and durability of the desiccant material. To make durable and reliable dehumidifiers, an understanding is needed of how and to what degree the performance of a dehumidifier is affected by desiccant degradation. This report, an account of work under Cooling Systems Research, documents the efforts to design and fabricate a test facility to investigate desiccant contamination based on industry and academia recommendations. It also discusses the experimental techniques needed for obtaining high-quality data and presents plans for next year. Researchers of the Mechanical and Industrial Technology Division performed this work at the Solar Energy Research Institute in FY 1988 for DOE's Office of Solar Heat Technologies. 7 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

Pesaran, A.A.; Bingham, C.E.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Desiccant contamination research: Report on the desiccant contamination test facility  

SciTech Connect

The activity in the cooling systems research involves research on high performance dehumidifiers and chillers that can operate efficiently with the variable thermal outputs and delivery temperatures associated with solar collectors. It also includes work on advanced passive cooling techniques. This report describes the work conducted to improve the durability of solid desiccant dehumidifiers by investigating the causes of degradation of desiccant materials from airborne contaminants and thermal cycling. The performance of a dehumidifier strongly depends on the physical properties and durability of the desiccant material. To make durable and reliable dehumidifiers, an understanding is needed of how and to what degree the performance of a dehumidifier is affected by desiccant degradation. This report, an account of work under Cooling Systems Research, documents the efforts to design and fabricate a test facility to investigate desiccant contamination based on industry and academia recommendations. It also discusses the experimental techniques needed for obtaining high-quality data and presents plans for next year. Researchers of the Mechanical and Industrial Technology Division performed this work at the Solar Energy Research Institute in FY 1988 for DOE's Office of Solar Heat Technologies. 7 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

Pesaran, A.A.; Bingham, C.E.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Performance predictions of silica-gel desiccant dehumidifiers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The analysis of a cross-cooled desiccant dehumidifier using silica gel in the form of sheets is described. This unit is the principal component of solar powered desiccant air conditioning system. The mathematical model has first been formulated describing the dynamics of the dehumidifier. The model leads to a system of nonlinear coupled heat and mass transfer equations for the sorption processes and linear heat transfer equations for the purging processes. The model accounts for the gas film resistance and for the moisture diffusion in the desiccant. The governing equations are solved by a finite difference scheme to obtain periodic steady state solutions. The accuracy of the theoretical predictions is ascertained by comparing them with the experimental results. The performance of the dehumidifier, for a chosen set of initial conditions and dehumidifier parameters, has also been given.

Mathiprakasam, B.; Lavan, Z.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Seminar 14 - Desiccant Enhanced Air Conditioning: Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air Conditioning (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation explains how liquid desiccant based coupled with an indirect evaporative cooler can efficiently produce cool, dry air, and how a liquid desiccant membrane air conditioner can efficiently provide cooling and dehumidification without the carryover problems of previous generations of liquid desiccant systems. It provides an overview to a liquid desiccant DX air conditioner that can efficiently provide cooling and dehumidification to high latent loads without the need for reheat, explains how liquid desiccant cooling and dehumidification systems can outperform vapor compression based air conditioning systems in hot and humid climates, explains how liquid desiccant cooling and dehumidification systems work, and describes a refrigerant free liquid desiccant based cooling system.

Kozubal, E.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

A Preliminary Evaluation of Alternative Liquid Desiccants for a Hybrid Desiccant Air Conditioner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a preliminary investigation at The University of Texas at Austin of alternative liquid desiccants for use in a hybrid desiccant air-conditioning system in which a desiccant is circulated between the evaporator and the condenser of a vapor-compression air conditioner. The liquid desiccants studied were lithium chloride, lithium bromide, calcium chloride, and triethylene glycol. Each candidate desiccant was subjected to a screening process which weighed the merits of the desiccant in terms of selected characteristics. The best liquid desiccant for the anticipated application was found to be calcium chloride.

Studak, J. W.; Peterson, J. L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Application of Desiccant Drying in Plastic Molding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Desiccants are materials that have an affinity, after heating, for water vapor. Desiccant materials have long been applied in industrial processes requiring low humidity environments. A gas-fired desiccant system improved the productivity of one blowmolding process by reducing the number of defects and allowing an increase in line speed. The environmental impact of the operation improved because electrical usage did not increase incrementally and CFC usage did not change. A comparison of the efficiency of desiccant and refrigeration dehumidification is presented.

Brown, M.; Connors, G.; Moore, D.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

New Adsorbent Materials for Desiccant Cooling  

dehumidification systems. ... as having superior performance to the primary commercial ... The majority of desiccant dehumidification systems used for ...

40

A desiccant dehumidifier for electric vehicle heating  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vehicle heating requires a substantial amount of energy. Engines in conventional cars produce enough waste heat to provide comfort heating and defogging/defrosting, even under very extreme conditions. Electric vehicles (EVs), however, generate little waste heat. Using battery energy for heating may consume a substantial fraction of the energy storage capacity, reducing the vehicle range, which is one of the most important parameters in determining EV acceptability. Water vapor generated by the vehicle passengers is in large part responsible for the high heating loads existing in vehicles. In cold climates, the generation of water vapor inside the car may result in water condensation on the windows, diminishing visibility. Two strategies are commonly used to avoid condensation on windows: windows are kept warm, and a large amount of ambient air is introduced in the vehicle. Either strategy results in a substantial heating load. These strategies are often used in combination, and a trade-off exists between them. If window temperature is decreased, ventilation rate has to be increased. Reducing the ventilation rate requires an increase of the temperature of the windows to prevent condensation. An alternative solution is a desiccant dehumidifier, which adsorbs water vapor generated by the passengers. Window temperatures and ventilation rates can then be reduced, resulting in a substantially lower heating load. This paper explores the dehumidifier heating concept. The first part shows the energy savings that could be obtained by using this technology. The second part specifies the required characteristics and dimensions of the system. The results indicate that the desiccant system can reduce the steady-state heating load by 60% or more under typical conditions. The reduction in heating load is such that waste heat may be enough to provide the required heating under most ambient conditions. Desiccant system dimensions and weight appear reasonable for packaging in an EV.

Aceves, S.M.; Smith, J.R.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desiccant salt solutions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A review of desiccant cooling systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes recent published design advances that have been made in desiccant cooling systems. In desiccant cooling cycles, the desiccant reduces the humidity of the air by removing moisture from the air. Then the temperature is reduced by other components such as heat exchangers, evaporative coolers, or conventional cooling coils. The main advantage that desiccant cooling systems offer is the capability of using low-grade thermal energy. Desiccant cooling systems for residential and commercial applications are now being used to reduce energy-operating costs. However, the initial costs are comparatively high. The focus of research for the past decade has been to develop desiccant systems with a high coefficient of performance. Recent studies have emphasized computer modeling and hybrid systems that combine desiccant dehumidifiers with conventional systems.

Waugaman, D.G.; Kini, A.; Kettleborough, C.F. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station (United States))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Concentrating aqueous volatile fatty acid salt solutions using a tertiary amine mixture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lee (1993) has shown that tertiary amines are able to hics. extract water from low-concentration calcium acetate and sodium acetate solutions. This thesis extends the previous work to include calcium propionate and butyrate. Amine extraction may be used to selectively remove water from a fermentation broth thus concentrating calcium acetate, propionate, and butyrate. Compared to competing technologies that extract undissociated acids from a volatile fatty acid fermentation broth, extracting water with tertiary amines allows for higher pH levels in the broth resulting in greater productivity. Specifically, triethylamine and N,N-diethyl-methylamine in a 1:2 volumetric mixture are superior to any other examined mixture or single amine for extracting water at 40[]C, the proposed fermentation temperature (Lee, 1993; Davison et al., 1966, 1967). Once the acid salts have been concentrated, a variety of techniques are available to convert the concentrated salts into other products such as ketones, alcohols, and acids. At low temperatures, the low-molecular-weight amine mixture has a high affinity for water. By raising the temperature 20 to 25[]C, the water separates from the amine allowing for convenient solvent regeneration of the amine. The distribution coefficients, [] , measure the selectivity of concentrating calcium salts in the aqueous phase. The distribution coefficients generally vary as follows: [] thus, there is less selectivity as the aliphatic group increases in size. The amine mixture was used to extract water from actual fermentation broth to determine whether possible surfactants in the broth interfere with the extraction. Prior to extraction, the fermentation broth was adjusted to pH 11.5 by adding a small amount of lime. The high pH precipitate protein which can be recycled to the fermentor or collected for animal feed. Through 15 extraction runs, no degradation of the amine was observed.

Gaskin, David J

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Analysis of solar desiccant systems and concepts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new approach to modeling desiccant systems has been developed. Computer programs for predicting the performance silica gel beds in single-blow situations and in cyclically operating desiccant cooling systems have been written (DESSIM). The single-blow model has been validated and shows excellent agreement with experimental data from SERI's desiccant test lab. Experimental data published by Koh are shown along with the corresponding prediction using DESSIM.

Barlow, R.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Liquid Desiccant Drying of Thermoreversibly Gelcast Bodies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Liquid Desiccant Drying of Thermoreversibly Gelcast Bodies. Author(s), Noah O Shanti, Katherine T Faber. On-Site Speaker (Planned), Noah ...

45

STANDARDS CONTROLLING AIR EMISSIONS FOR THE SOIL DESICCATION PILOT TEST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This air emissions document supports implementation of the Treatability Test Plan for Soil Desiccation as outlined in the Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test Plan for the Hanford Central Plateau (DOE/RL-2007-56). Treatability testing supports evaluation of remedial technologies for technetium-99 (Tc-99) contamination in the vadose zone at sites such as the BC Cribs and Trenches. Soil desiccation has been selected as the first technology for testing because it has been recommended as a promising technology in previous Hanford Site technology evaluations and because testing of soil desiccation will provide useful information to enhance evaluation of other technologies, in particular gas-phase remediation technologies. A soil desiccation pilot test (SDPT) will evaluate the desiccation process (e.g., how the targeted interval is dried) and the long-term performance for mitigation of contaminant transport. The SDPT will dry out a moist zone contaminated by Tc-99 and nitrate that has been detected at Well 299-E13-62 (Borehole C5923). This air emissions document applies to the activities to be completed to conduct the SDPT in the 200-BC-1 operable unit located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. Well 299-E13-62 is planned to be used as an injection well. This well is located between and approximately equidistant from cribs 216-B-16, 216-B-17, 216-B-18. and 216-B-19. Nitrogen gas will be pumped at approximately 300 ft{sup 3}/min into the 299-EI3-62 injection well, located approximately 12 m (39 ft) away from extraction well 299-EI3-65. The soil gas extraction rate will be approximately 150 ft{sup 3}/min. The SDPT will be conducted continuously over a period of approximately six months. The purpose of the test is to evaluate soil desiccation as a potential remedy for protecting groundwater. A conceptual depiction is provided in Figure 1. The soil desiccation process will physically dry, or evaporate, some of the water from the moist zone of interest. As such, it is expected that Tc-99 and nitrate will remain with the water residual that is not removed, or remain as a salt bound to the soil particles. In addition, the SDPT will be conducted at lower extraction velocities to preclude pore water entrainment and thus, the extracted air effluent should be free of the contaminant residual present in the targeted moist zone. However, to conservatively bound the planned activity for potential radionuclide air emissions, it is assumed, hypothetically, that the Tc-99 does not remain in the zone of interest, but that it instead travels with the evaporated moisture to the extraction well and to the test equipment at the land surface. Thus, a release potential would exist from the planned point source (powered exhaust) for Tc-99 in the extracted moist air. In this hypothetical bounding case there would also be a potential for very minor fugitive emissions to occur due to nitrogen injection into the soil. The maximum value for Tc-99, measured in the contaminated moist zone, is used in calculating the release potential described in Section 2.3. The desiccation mechanism will be evaporation. Nitrate is neither a criteria pollutant nor a toxic air pollutant. It would remain nitrate as a salt adhered to sand and silt grains or as nitrate dissolved in the pore water. Nitrogen, an inert gas, will be injected into the ground during the test. Tracer gasses will also be injected near the beginning, middle, and the end of the test. The tracer gasses are sulfur hexafluoride, trichlorofluoromethane, and difluoromethane.

BENECKE MW

2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

46

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE INCIPIENT SLUDGE MIXING IN RADIOACTIVE LIQUID WASTE STORAGE TANKS DURING SALT SOLUTION BLENDING  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper is the second in a series of four publications to document ongoing pilot scale testing and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of mixing processes in 85 foot diameter, 1.3 million gallon, radioactive liquid waste, storage tanks at Savannah River Site (SRS). Homogeneous blending of salt solutions is required in waste tanks. Settled solids (i.e., sludge) are required to remain undisturbed on the bottom of waste tanks during blending. Suspension of sludge during blending may potentially release radiolytically generated hydrogen trapped in the sludge, which is a safety concern. The first paper (Leishear, et. al. [1]) presented pilot scale blending experiments of miscible fluids to provide initial design requirements for a full scale blending pump. Scaling techniques for an 8 foot diameter pilot scale tank were also justified in that work. This second paper describes the overall reasons to perform tests, and documents pilot scale experiments performed to investigate disturbance of sludge, using non-radioactive sludge simulants. A third paper will document pilot scale CFD modeling for comparison to experimental pilot scale test results for both blending tests and sludge disturbance tests. That paper will also describe full scale CFD results. The final paper will document additional blending test results for stratified layers in salt solutions, scale up techniques, final full scale pump design recommendations, and operational recommendations. Specifically, this paper documents a series of pilot scale tests, where sludge simulant disturbance due to a blending pump or transfer pump are investigated. A principle design requirement for a blending pump is UoD, where Uo is the pump discharge nozzle velocity, and D is the nozzle diameter. Pilot scale test results showed that sludge was undisturbed below UoD = 0.47 ft{sup 2}/s, and that below UoD = 0.58 ft{sup 2}/s minimal sludge disturbance was observed. If sludge is minimally disturbed, hydrogen will not be released. Installation requirements were also determined for a transfer pump which will remove tank contents, and which is also required to not disturb sludge. Testing techniques and test results for both types of pumps are presented.

Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Lee, S.; Steeper, T.; Fowley, M.; Parkinson, K.

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

47

Polymers as Advanced Materials for Desiccant Applications: 1987  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research is concerned with solid materials used as desiccants for desiccant cooling systems that process water vapor in an atmosphere to produce net cooling.

Czanderna, A. W.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Thermally Activated Desiccant Technology for Heat Recovery and Comfort  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Desiccant cooling is an important part of the diverse portfolio of Thermally Activated Technologies (TAT) designed for conversion of heat for the purpose of indoor air quality control. Thermally activated desiccant cooling incorporates a desiccant material that undergoes a cyclic process involving direct dehumidification of moist air and thermal regeneration. Desiccants fall into two categories: liquid and solid desiccants. Regardless of the type, solid or liquid, the governing principles of desiccant dehumidification systems are the same. In the dehumidification process, the vapor pressure of the moist air is higher than that of the desiccant, leading to transfer of moisture from the air to the desiccant material. By heating the desiccant, the vapor pressure differential is reversed in the regeneration process that drives the moisture from the desiccant. Figure 1 illustrates a rotary solid-desiccant dehumidifier. A burner or a thermally compatible source of waste heat can provide the required heat for regeneration.

Jalalzadeh, A. A.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Improvements in solid desiccant cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DINC (Direct-Indirect Evaporative Cooling) cycle was proposed in 1986 by Texas A and M researchers. The idea was to combine the benefits of direct and indirect evaporative cooling with desiccant dehumidifying using a rotating solid silica-gel dehumidifier. Recent parametric studies completed for the Texas Energy Research in Applications Program have developed a computer design for a nominal 3-ton system that would minimize the energy consumption (both thermal and electric) while maintaining a sensible heat ratio of 75% or less. That optimum design for the original 1986 DINC cycle was modified to improve its energy efficiency. The modifications described in this paper were: (1) staging the desiccant regeneration air and (2) recirculation of the primary air to the secondary side of the indirect evaporative cooling. Computer simulations were run to study the effect of the modifications on the performance of the system. American Refrigeration Institute (AIR) standard conditions (Ambient air at 35C, 40% R.H. and Room air at 26.7C, 50% R.H.) were used for all the modifications. Results were also compared to the familiar Pennington (ventilation) cycle. The study indicated that recirculating the indirect evaporative cooler air only degenerated the performance. However, staging a portion of the regeneration air could improve the thermal coefficient of Performance by 25% over the non-staged DINC cycle. Compared to a similar staged-regeneration Pennington cycle it is a 16% improvement in thermal COP and the sensible heat ratio was 70%.

Waugaman, D.; Kini, A.; Kettleborough, C.F. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Experiments on sorption hysteresis of desiccant materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solid desiccant cooling systems take advantage of solar energy for air conditioning. The process involves passing air through a desiccant bed for drying and subsequent evaporative cooling to provide the air conditioning. The desiccant is then regenerated with hot air provided by a gas burner or solar collectors. This performance is limited by the capacity of the desiccant, its sorption properties, and the long-term stability of the desiccant material under cyclic operation conditions. Therefore, we have developed a versatile test facility to measure the sorption properties of candidate solid desiccant materials under dynamic conditions, under different geometrical configurations, and under a broad range of process air stream conditions, characteristic of desiccant dehumidifer operation. We identified a dependence of the sorption processes on air velocity and the test cell aspect ratio and the dynamic hysteresis between adsorption and desorption processes. These experiments were geared to provide data on the dynamic performance of silica gel in a parallel-passage configuration to prepare for tests with a rotary dehumidifier that will be conducted at SERI in late FY 1984. We also recommend improving the accuracy of the isotopic perturbation technique.

Pesaran, A.; Zangrando, F.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Facilities for testing desiccant materials and geometries of dehumidifiers for solar-regenerated desiccant cooling systems  

SciTech Connect

Four experimental test facilities for characterizing the performance of solid desiccant materials and dehumidifier matrices which have the potential to be used in solar-regenerated desiccant cooling systems are reviewed. The water equilibrium capacity and sorption rates of desiccant materials, depending on their form, can be either measured with a quartz crystal microbalance or a desiccant sorption test facility. Pressure drop, heat- and mass-transfer rates and transient equilibrium dehumidification capacity of a dehumidifier matrices are measured in a desiccant heat and mass transfer test facility. The performance and steady state dehumidification capabilities of prototype dehumidifier components under realistic conditions are measured in a desiccant cyclic test facility. The description of the test apparatus, experimental procedure, measurement errors, and typical results for the four test facilities are presented here. 15 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

Pesaran, A.A.; Bingham, C.E.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Underground-desiccant cooling system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Underground-Desiccant Cooling System relies on the successful coordination of various components. The central feature of the system is a bed of silica gel which will absorb moisture from house air until the gel has become saturated. When this point has been reached, the silica gel must be regenerated by passing hot air through it. For this project, the hot air is produced by air-type solar collectors mounted on the roof and connected with the main air-handling system by means of ducts attached to the outside of the house. As the air is dehumidified its temperature is raised somewhat by the change of state. The dried but somewhat heated air, after leaving the silica gel bed, passes through a rock bin storage area and then past a water coil chiller before being circulated through the house by means of the previously existing ductwork. The cooling medium for both the rock bin and the chiller coil is water which circulates through underground pipes buried beneath the back yard at a depth of about 10 to 12 ft. When the silica gel is being regenerated by the solar collectors, house air bypasses the desiccant bed but still passes through the rock bin and the chiller coil and is cooled continuously. The system is designed for maximum flexibility so that full use can be made of the solar collectors. Ducting is arranged so that the collectors provide heat for the house in the winter and there is also a hot-water capability year-round.

Finney, O.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Advanced Open-Cycle Desiccant Cooling System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The concept of staged regeneration as means of improving the desiccant cooling system performance is the subject of investigation in this study. In the staged regeneration, the regeneration section of desiccant dehumidifier is divided into two parts and only the latter fraction is subjected to the desorption air stream which has been heated to the desired regeneration temperature. In the present work, the mathematical model describing the heat and mass transfer processes that occur during sorption of moisture in the desiccnnt dehumidifier includes both the gas-side (film) and solid-side resistances for heat and mass transports. The moisture diffusion in the desiccant material is expressed by gas-phase diffusion and surface diffusion. Effects of several parameters on the performance of desiccant cooling system with staged regeneration are investigated and the results of present model are compared with those of the lumped-resistance model. Results of this study show that coefficient of perfomnnce of the desiccant cooling system can be substantially improved by using the staged regeneration concept. There is an optimum stage fraction and optimum cycle time for given system parmeters and operating conditions. The results also indicate that the cooling system performance is higher than that predicted by the lumped-resistance model.

Ko, Y. J.; Charoensupaya, D.; Lavan, Z.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Cryptic species within the cosmopolitan desiccation-tolerant moss Grimmia laevigata  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cryptic species within the cosmopolitan desiccation-tolerant moss Grimmia laevigata Catherine C cosmopolitan range. This presents an evolutionary puz- zle, the solution to which lies in understanding phylogeography The broad and, in some cases, cosmopolitan distribution of many moss species suggests

Thompson, John N.

55

Performance predictions of silica-gel desiccant dehumidifiers. Technical report No. 3  

SciTech Connect

The analysis of a cross-cooled desiccant dehumidifier using silica gel in the form of sheets is described. This unit is the principal component of solar powered desiccant air conditioning system. The mathematical model has first been formulated describing the dynamics of the dehumidifier. The model leads to a system of nonlinear coupled heat and mass transfer equations for the sorption processes and linear heat transfer equations for the purging processes. The model accounts for the gas film resistance and for the moisture diffusion in the desiccant. The governing equations are solved by a finite difference scheme to obtain periodic steady state solutions. The accuracy of the theoretical predictions is ascertained by comparing them with the experimental results. The performance of the dehumidifier, for a chosen set of initial conditions and dehumidifier parameters, has also been given.

Mathiprakasam, B.; Lavan, Z.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Parametric Analysis of a Solar Desiccant Cooling System using...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Parametric Analysis of a Solar Desiccant Cooling System using the SimSPARK Environment Title Parametric Analysis of a Solar Desiccant Cooling System using the SimSPARK Environment...

57

Solar air conditioning system using desiccant wheel technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electrical energy consumption in Malaysia has increased sharply in the past few years. Modern energy efficient technologies are desperately needed for the national energy policy. In this paper, a new design of desiccant cooling is being developed ... Keywords: air-conditioning, desiccant cooling, solar thermal energy, solid desiccant

Arfidian Rachman; Sohif Mat; Taib Iskandar; M. Yahya; Azami Zaharim; Kamaruzzaman Sopian

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Experiments on sorption characteristics of solid desiccant materials for solar desiccant cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A test facility for measuring the sorption properties of candidate solid desiccant materials under dynamic conditions as well as equilibrium conditions, those experienced during desiccant dehumidifier operation, was constructed and tested. The theory of perturbation chromatography was initially used to measure the equilibrium properties of a desiccant/water-vapor system for the first time. Silica gel, molecular sieve, and gamma-manganese dioxide were tested. The equilibrium capacity estimated by the perturbation chromatography was lower than those available in literature, which suggests that perturbation chromatography may not be applicable to desiccant/water-vapor systems. The perturbation chromatography was replaced with a gravimetric technique, and satisfactory results were obtained for a water-vapor/molecular-sieve system.

Pesaran, A.A.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Desiccant cooling using unglazed transpired solar collectors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of unglazed solar collectors for desiccant regeneration in a solid desiccant cooling cycle was investigated because these collectors are lower in cost than conventional glazed flat-plate collectors. Using computer models, the performance of a desiccant cooling ventilation cycle integrated with either unglazed transpired collectors or conventional glazed flat-plate collectors was obtained. We found that the thermal performance of the unglazed system was lower than the thermal performance of the glazed system because the unglazed system could not take advantage of the heat of adsorption released during the dehumidification process. For a 3-ton cooling system, although the area required for the unglazed collector was 69% more than that required for the glazed collector, the cost of the unglazed collector array was 44% less than the cost of the glazed collector array. The simple payback period of the unglazed system was half of the payback period of the glazed collector when compared to an equivalent gas-fired system. Although the use of unglazed transpired collectors makes economic sense, some practical considerations may limit their use in desiccant regeneration. 8 refs.

Pesaran, A.A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Wipke, K. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Performance of cross-cooled desiccant dehumidifiers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A cross-cooled silica gel desiccant dehumidifier model was designed, built and tested. The performance of the unit was studied as a function of inlet process stream dew point, process stream and cooling stream flowrates and regeneration stream temperature and dew point. The tests were also simulated by a computer program and were compared to the experimental results.

Mei, V.C.; Lavan, Z.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desiccant salt solutions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Report on variation of electrical conductivity during steam injection in unconsolidated sand saturated with a salt solution  

SciTech Connect

Geophysical electrical methods are useful in evaluating the performance of certain classes of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) operations and also remediation operations for contaminant spills. Electrical resistivity is sensitive to the concentration of ionic species in solution in fluids present in the subsurface zone. Such fluids are displaced during oil recovery operations and contaminant remediation. If the resistivity of the displacing fluid differs from the in situ fluid, then a geophysical method for detecting resistivity variations may be capable of tracking the advance of the displacing fluid. This report presents the results of experiments designed to determine the variations in resistivity that occur when steam is injected into a homogeneous, fully-saturated sand. These experiments were simple, one-dimensional laboratory steam injection experiments. They were performed using a glass tube filled with a tightly-packed sand and fitted with an injection port at one end and an exit port at the other In each experiment, the sand pack was initially saturated with a brine and then steam was introduced at one end of the tube. Analytic solutions for the steam front velocity, steam temperature, steam distribution, salt concentration profile, and liquid saturation are presented and are used with appropriate correlations of electrical conductivity to describe the observed behavior. The results of these experiments should provide experimental justification for the electrical conductivity variations that are calculated from the analytic solutions. In addition, the experiments may yield new information regarding features of the data that may not result from the analytical modelling.

Vaughan, P. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering; Udell, K.S. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Wilt, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Process for preparing chemically modified micas for removal of cesium salts from aqueous solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemically modified mica composite formed by heating a trioctahedral mica in an aqueous solution of sodium chloride having a concentration of at least 1 mole/liter at a temperature greater than 180 degrees Centigrade for at least 20 hours, thereby replacing exchangeable ions in the mica with sodium. Formation is accomplished at temperatures and pressures which are easily accessed by industrial equipment. The reagent employed is inexpensive and non-hazardous, and generates a precipitate which is readily separated from the modified mica.

Yates, Stephen Frederic (1539 S. Kennicott Dr., Arlington Heights, IL 60005); DeFilippi, Irene (208 E. Edgewood La., Palatine, IL 60067); Gaita, Romulus (6646 Davis Rd., Morton Grove, IL 60053); Clearfield, Abraham (Department of Chemistry, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843); Bortun, Lyudmila (Department of Chemistry, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843); Bortun, Anatoly (Department of Chemistry, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843)

2000-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

63

Desiccant cooling: State-of-the-art assessment  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this document are to present an overview of the work accomplished to date on desiccant cooling to provide assessment of the state of the art of desiccant cooling technology in the field of desiccant material dehumidifier components, desiccant systems, and models. The report also discusses the factors that affect the widespread acceptance of desiccant cooling technology. This report is organized as follows. First, a basic description and historical overview of desiccant cooling technology is provided. Then, the recent research and development (R D) program history (focusing on DOE's funded efforts) is discussed. The status of the technology elements (materials, components, systems) is discussed in detail and a preliminary study on the energy impact of desiccant technology is presented. R D needs for advancing the technology in the market are identified. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's unique desiccant test facilities and their typical outputs are described briefly. Finally, the results of a comprehensive literature search on desiccant cooling are presented in a bibliography. The bibliography contains approximately 900 citations on desiccant cooling.

Pesaran, A.A.; Penney, T.R.; Czanderna, A.W.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Desiccant cooling: State-of-the-art assessment  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this document are to present an overview of the work accomplished to date on desiccant cooling to provide assessment of the state of the art of desiccant cooling technology in the field of desiccant material dehumidifier components, desiccant systems, and models. The report also discusses the factors that affect the widespread acceptance of desiccant cooling technology. This report is organized as follows. First, a basic description and historical overview of desiccant cooling technology is provided. Then, the recent research and development (R&D) program history (focusing on DOE`s funded efforts) is discussed. The status of the technology elements (materials, components, systems) is discussed in detail and a preliminary study on the energy impact of desiccant technology is presented. R&D needs for advancing the technology in the market are identified. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory`s unique desiccant test facilities and their typical outputs are described briefly. Finally, the results of a comprehensive literature search on desiccant cooling are presented in a bibliography. The bibliography contains approximately 900 citations on desiccant cooling.

Pesaran, A.A.; Penney, T.R.; Czanderna, A.W.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Experimental Results on Advanced Rotary Desiccant Dehumidifiers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) has developed the Cyclic Test Facility (CTF) to develop and validate analytical methods for evaluating and predicting the performance of advanced rotary dehumidifiers. This paper describes the CTF, the dehumidifiers tested at the CTF, and the analytical methods used. The results reported provide an engineering data base and a design tool for evaluating rotary dehumidifiers for desiccant cooling applications.

Barathan, D.; Parsons, J. M.; MaClaine-Cross, I.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Experimental results on advanced rotary desiccant dehumidifiers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) has developed the Cyclic Test Facility (CTF) to develop and validate analytical methods for evaluating and predicting the performance of advanced rotary dehumidifiers. This paper describes the CTF, the dehumidifiers tested at the CTF, and the analytical methods used. The results reported provide an engineering data base and a design tool for evaluating rotary dehumidifiers for desiccant cooling applications.

Bharathan, D.; Parsons, J.; Maclaine-cross, I.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Analysis of Hybrid Liquid Desiccant Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dehumidification technology is being investigated for potential savings in building air conditioning systems. The potential for savings lies in separating the sensible and latent cooling loads to more efficiently address the combined conditioning needs of the space. Two DuCool liquid desiccant systemsDuTreat and DuHandlingwere tested in the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Knoxville, Tennessee psychrometric chambers. The DuCool uses an internal vapor compression system to regenerate a liquid desi...

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

68

A review of desiccant dehumidification technology  

SciTech Connect

This paper overviews applications of desiccant technology for dehumidifying commercial and institutional buildings. Because of various market, policy, and regulatory factors, this technology is especially attractive for dehumidification applications in the 1990s. After briefly reviewing the principle of operation, the authors present three case studies-for supermarkets, a hotel, and an office building. The authors also discuss recent advances and ongoing research and development activities.

Pesaran, A.A.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Overview of Open-Cycle Desiccant Cooling Systems and Materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper has presented a review of the thermodynamics of three desiccant cooling cycles: the ventilation cycle, the recirculation cycle, and the Dunkle cycle. For the ventilation cycle the qualitative effects of changes in the effectiveness of individual components were analyzed. There are two possible paths to improved dehumidifier performance: changing the design of dehumidifiers using currently available desiccants so as to increase effectiveness without increasing parasitic losses, or developing new desiccants specifically tailored for solar cooling applications. The later part of this paper has considered the second option. A list of desirable desiccant properties was defined, properties of currently used solid and liquid desiccants were compared to this list, and a hypothetical desiccant type that would give improved system performance was discussed.

Collier, R.; Arnold, F.; Barlow, R.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Desiccant dehumidification and cooling systems assessment and analysis  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to provide a preliminary analysis of the principles, sensitivities, and potential for national energy savings of desiccant cooling and dehumidification systems. The report is divided into four sections. Section I deals with the maximum theoretical performance of ideal desiccant cooling systems. Section II looks at the performance effects of non-ideal behavior of system components. Section III examines the effects of outdoor air properties on desiccant cooling system performance. Section IV analyzes the applicability of desiccant cooling systems to reduce primary energy requirements for providing space conditioning in buildings. A basic desiccation process performs no useful work (cooling). That is, a desiccant material drying air is close to an isenthalpic process. Latent energy is merely converted to sensible energy. Only when heat exchange is applied to the desiccated air is any cooling accomplished. This characteristic is generic to all desiccant cycles and critical to understanding their operation. The analyses of Section I show that desiccant cooling cycles can theoretically achieve extremely high thermal CoP`s (>2). The general conclusion from Section II is that ventilation air processing is the most viable application for the solid desiccant equipment analyzed. The results from the seasonal simulations performed in Section III indicate that, generally, the seasonal performance of the desiccant system does not change significantly from that predicted for outdoor conditions. Results from Section IV show that all of the candidate desiccant systems can save energy relative to standard vapor-compression systems. The largest energy savings are achieved by the enthalpy exchange devise.

Collier, R.K. Jr. [Collier Engineering, Reno, NV (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Energy-efficient regenerative liquid desiccant drying process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to the use of desiccants in conjunction with an open oop drying cycle and a closed loop drying cycle to reclaim the energy expended in vaporizing moisture in harvested crops. In the closed loop cycle, the drying air is brought into contact with a desiccant after it exits the crop drying bin. Water vapor in the moist air is absorbed by the desiccant, thus reducing the relative humidity of the air. The air is then heated by the used desiccant and returned to the crop bin. During the open loop drying cycle the used desiccant is heated (either fossil or solar energy heat sources may be used) and regenerated at high temperature, driving water vapor from the desiccant. This water vapor is condensed and used to preheat the dilute (wet) desiccant before heat is added from the external source (fossil or solar). The latent heat of vaporization of the moisture removed from the desiccant is reclaimed in this manner. The sensible heat of the regenerated desiccant is utilized in the open loop drying cycle. Also, closed cycle operation implies that no net energy is expended in heating drying air.

Ko, Suk M. (Huntsville, AL); Grodzka, Philomena G. (Huntsville, AL); McCormick, Paul O. (Athens, AL)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Desiccant cooling and dehumidification opportunities for buildings workshop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Desiccant cooling and dehumidification technology is gaining acceptance as an option for air-conditioning buildings. Over the last few years, significant advances have been made in desiccant cooling and dehumidification in the private and public sectors. market penetration of desiccant systems in the past has been limited to unique applications. This workshop was an open forum for discussing these unique and potential applications. Workshop participants discussed the state of the art of desiccant materials, components, systems, and applications, both theoretically and experimentally. This document is a compilation of the papers presented in the workshop sessions.

Penney, T.R. (comp.)

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Analysis of the seasonal performance of hybrid desiccant cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A simulation model for the liquid desiccant component of a hybrid system was developed. An analysis of experimental test data was conducted. The liquid desiccant component was examined and the sensitivity of its seasonal performance to changes in principal component variables was identified. Seasonal simulations were performed on different operation modes of a hybrid liquid desiccant cooling system. The results were analyzed in terms of estimated operational costs and compared to the equivalent cost estimation of a conventional cooling system. The study showed that the investigated liquid desiccant configuration usually will not lower the costs of operation. A suggestion of an improved system is made.

Sick, F.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Performance analysis of hybrid liquid desiccant solar cooling system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis investigates the coefficient of performance (COP) of a hybrid liquid desiccant solar cooling system. This hybrid cooling system includes three sections: 1) conventional… (more)

Zhou, Zhipeng (Joe Zoe)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Modeling and Simulation of a Solar Assisted Desiccant Cooling...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

system comprises a desiccant wheel containing Lithium Chloride in tandem with a rotating heat exchanger and two humidifiers on both supply and return air. The required...

76

An assessment of desiccant cooling and dehumidification technology  

SciTech Connect

Desiccant systems are heat-actuated cooling and dehumidification technology. With the recent advances in this technology, desiccant systems can now achieve a primary energy coefficient of performance (COP) between 1.3 and 1.5, with potential to go to 1.7 and higher. It is becoming one of the most promising alternatives to conventional cooling systems. Two important and well-known advantages of desiccant cooling systems are that they are CFC free and they can reduce the electricity peak load. Another important but lesser-known advantage of desiccant technology is its potential for energy conservation. The energy impact study in this report indicated that a possible 13% energy saving in residential cooling and 8% in commercial cooling is possible. Great energy saving potential also exists in the industrial sector if industrial waste heat can be used for desiccant regeneration. The latest study on desiccant-integrated building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems indicated that the initial cost for the conventional cooling equipment was greatly reduced by using desiccant technology because of downsized compressors, fans, and ductworks. This cost reduction was more than enough to offset the cost of desiccant equipment. Besides, the system operation cost was also reduced. All these indicate that desiccant systems are also cost effective. This study provides an updated state-of-the-art assessment forsiccant technology in the field of desiccant materials, systems, computer models, and theoretical analyses. From this information the technology options were derived and the future research and development needs were identified. Because desiccant technology has already been applied in the commercial building sector with very encouraging results, it is expected that future market breakthroughs will probably start in this sector. A market analysis for the commercial building application is therefore included.

Mei, V.C.; Chen, F.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Lavan, Z. [Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL (United States); Collier, R.K. Jr. [Collier Engineering Services, Merritt Island, FL (United States); Meckler, G. [Gershon Meckler Associates, P.C., Herndon, VA (United States)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Nuclear criticality safety evaluation of the passage of decontaminated salt solution from the ITP filters into tank 50H for interim storage  

SciTech Connect

This report assesses the nuclear criticality safety associated with the decontaminated salt solution after passing through the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) filters, through the stripper columns and into Tank 50H for interim storage until transfer to the Saltstone facility. The criticality safety basis for the ITP process is documented. Criticality safety in the ITP filtrate has been analyzed under normal and process upset conditions. This report evaluates the potential for criticality due to the precipitation or crystallization of fissionable material from solution and an ITP process filter failure in which insoluble material carryover from salt dissolution is present. It is concluded that no single inadvertent error will cause criticality and that the process will remain subcritical under normal and credible abnormal conditions.

Hobbs, D.T.; Davis, J.R.

1994-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

78

Advanced Desiccant Cooling and Dehumidification Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of dessicant materials for cooling and dehumidification is an effective, economical, environmentally safe method for meeting indoor air quality standards established by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). To maximize the technology's potential for reducing energy consumption and improving indoor air quality, DOE established the Advanced Desiccant Cooling and Dehumidification Program. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory partners with industry to support and educate industry users, as well as to support technology transfer and benchmark current performance.

Slayzak, S.

1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

79

Modeling and Simulation of a Solar Assisted Desiccant Cooling System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling and Simulation of a Solar Assisted Desiccant Cooling System Modeling and Simulation of a Solar Assisted Desiccant Cooling System Speaker(s): Chadi Maalouf Date: December 2, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Peng Xu Increased living standards and high occupants comfort demands lead to a growth in air conditioning market. This results in high energy consumption and high CO2 emissions. For these reasons, the solar desiccant cooling system is proposed as an alternative to traditional air conditioning systems. This system comprises a desiccant wheel containing Lithium Chloride in tandem with a rotating heat exchanger and two humidifiers on both supply and return air. The required regeneration temperature for the desiccant wheel varies between 40oC and 70oC which makes possible the use

80

Investigation of manganese dioxide as an improved solid desiccant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the preparation of a series of manganese oxides and an analysis of their sorptive, structural, and surface characteristics as low-energetic desiccants for passive dehumidification and active desiccant cooling systems. A cusped Type III isotherm for the adsorption of water is reported for the first time. The data are interpreted as evidence of a first-order phase change from a two-dimensional gas to a liquid film in the first reversibly adsorbed layer. It appears that the water adsorption characteristics of MnO/sub 2/ compared to standard desiccants which exhibit Type II isotherms are due at least in part to differences in the physical topography and electronic properties of the desiccant substrates: MnO/sub 2/ is a p-type semiconductor with essentially-flat, monoenergetic surface structures, while standard desiccants like silica gel are electronic insulators with irregular, heteroenergetic surfaces.

Fraioli, A.V.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desiccant salt solutions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Ion Partitioning at the liquid/vapor interface of a multi-component alkali halide solution: A model for aqueous sea salt aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

model for aqueous sea salt aerosols Sutapa Ghosal, 1 Matthewwith sea salt ice and aerosols has been implicated in theof aqueous sea salt aerosols and particles have been

Ghosal, Sutapa

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Experimental performance verification of a coil-type liquid desiccant system at part-load operation  

SciTech Connect

An experimental study was conducted to compare the predicted performance of a commercially available coil type liquid desiccant cooling and dehumidification system with the experimental results at part-load conditions. A mathematical model was used to predict the performance of coil type liquid desiccant system. This model was based mostly on the manufacturer's catalog data. The coil type system used in the experimental study was a system manufactured in the US. The system is commercially available as 200-10 KXCb, 10-row deep conditioner unit with a design air flow rate of 1180 1/s(2500 scfm). For regeneration of the solution, a packed type 3.0-P regenerator unit with a design air flow rate of 448.4 1/s(950 scfm) was used.

Khan, A.Y. (Univ. of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez (Puerto Rico)); Ball, H.D. (Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States))

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Dessicant materials screening for backfill in a salt repository  

SciTech Connect

Maintaining an anhydrous environment around nuclear waste stored in a salt repository is a concern which can be alleviated by using a desiccant material for backfilling. Such a desiccant should desiccate a brine yet be non deliquescent, the hydrated product should have moderate thermal stability, and the desiccant should have a high capacity and be readily available. From a literature search MgO and CaO were identified for detailed study. These oxides, and an intimate mixture of the two obtained by calcining dolomite, were used in experiments to further determine their suitability. They proved to be excellent desiccants with a high water capacity. The hydrates of both have moderate thermal stability and a high water content. Both MgO and CaO react in an alkaline chloride brine forming oxychloride compounds with different waters of crystallization. Some of these compounds are the Sorel Cements. CaO hydrates to Ca(OH)/sub 2/ which carbonates with CO/sub 2/ in air to form CaCO/sub 3/ and release the hydrated water. Thus the intimate mixture of CaO and MgO from calcined dolomite may serve as a desiccant and remove CO/sub 2/ from the repository atmosphere.

Simpson, D.R.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Analysis of advanced solar hybrid desiccant cooling systems for buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes an assessment of the energy savings possible from developing hybrid desiccant/vapor-compression air conditioning systems. Recent advances in dehumidifier design for solar desiccant cooling systems have resulted in a dehumidifier with a low pressure drop and high efficiency in heat and mass transfer. A recent study on hybrid desiccant/vapor compression systems showed a 30%-80% savings in resource energy when compared with the best conventional systems with vapor compression. A system consisting of a dehumidifier with vapor compression subsystems in series was found to be the simplest and best overall performer.

Schlepp, D.; Schultz, K.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Regeneration characteristics of adsorbent in the integrated desiccant/collector  

SciTech Connect

This study presents a solar desiccant system using an adsorbent in an integrated desiccant/solar collector that uses direct solar energy as a heat source for efficient regeneration of the adsorbent. The objective of this study is to investigate an integrated desiccant/collector in which the adsorbent absorbs solar radiation fully and is heated for regeneration. Another objective is to obtain the regeneration characteristics in the equipment proposed by both experiments and simulations. Throughout this study, silica gel is used as the adsorbent.

Saito, Y. (Osaka Inst. of Technology (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Design for a gas chromatograph for characterizing desiccant material  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To characterize solar desiccant cooling materials, a gas chromatograph has been designed. The chromatograph can record breakthrough curves and equilibrium data under widely varying conditions so that the rates and heats of sorption may be determined. This information may then be used in analyzing models for the construction of desiccant cooling systems which use solar heating for the drying cycle. The effects of desiccant geometry upon bed packing are minimal. However, the effects of desiccant geometry upon the pressure differential across the bed and upon the rate controlling processes may be strong, and these must be investigated thoroughly. Ranges for flow rates and for control of the physical parameters have been selected to encompass those that may be encountered in practical systems. A list of equipment and materials of construction is presented together with a brief description of the operation of the equipment.

Pitts, R.; Czanderna, A.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Development of a solar desiccant dehumidifier. Third technical progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program is aimed at the development of a solar desiccant dehumidifier featuring a rotary bed of granular silica gel and a rotary regenerator. Design, fabrication, performance, commercialization studies, and test stand development are described in detail. (WHK)

Gunderson, M.E.

1979-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

88

Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air Conditioning: Parametric Analysis and Design; Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a parametric analysis using a numerical model of a new concept in desiccant and evaporative air conditioning. The concept consists of two stages: a liquid desiccant dehumidifier and a dew-point evaporative cooler. Each stage consists of stacked air channel pairs separated by a plastic sheet. In the first stage, a liquid desiccant film removes moisture from the process (supply-side) air through a membrane. An evaporatively-cooled exhaust airstream on the other side of the plastic sheet cools the desiccant. The second-stage indirect evaporative cooler sensibly cools the dried process air. We analyze the tradeoff between device size and energy efficiency. This tradeoff depends strongly on process air channel thicknesses, the ratio of first-stage to second-stage area, and the second-stage exhaust air flow rate. A sensitivity analysis reiterates the importance of the process air boundary layers and suggests a need for increasing airside heat and mass transfer enhancements.

Woods, J.; Kozubal, E.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Efficiency of a liquid desiccant dehumidification system regenerated by using solar collectors/regenerators with photovoltaic fans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hybrid solar dehumidification air-conditioning system was used to study the absorption of water vapor from moist air by contacting the air with aqueous solutions that contained from 90 to 94% triethylene glycol (TEG). For the packings of 2-inch polypropylene Jaeger Tri-Packs, which have a surface-to-volume ratio of 157 m{sup 2}/m{sup 3} (48 ft{sup 2}/ft{sup 3}), the efficiency of dehumidification can reach 93.3%. The environmental air was introduced into the dehumidifier cocurrently flowing with the liquid desiccant, and the liquid desiccant was sprayed on the top of the packing material. The air-to-liquid mass flow ratio was controlled in a range of 0.46 to 1.36. As the moisture was absorbed from air by the TEG solution, the solution was diluted. The regeneration of the solution was carried out in 20-piece (38.8 m{sup 2}) basin-type solar collectors/regenerators whose regeneration coefficients of performance are above 0.2. Air generated by photovoltaic fans was blown into the solar collectors/regenerators and carried away the water vapor from the evaporation of the aqueous desiccant solution. On the basis of the experimental results, the system performance is acceptable for most applications.

Tsair-Wang Chung; Wei-Yih Wu; Wen-Jih Yan; Ching-Lin Huang [Industrial Technology Research Institute, Taiwan (China)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Liquid-desiccant systems for cooling/drying applications  

SciTech Connect

Thermally-driven desiccant cooling systems have been investigated extensively during the past decade as economically competitive alternatives to vapor-compression cooling systems. A differential formulation is used to model the commercial Kathabar System to describe the heat and mass transfer for a control volume in both the conditioner and the generator. These differential equations depend on parameters, depending on the flow rate of the fluids (water, air and solution), the physical properties of these fluids, the geometry of the transfer surfaces and the heat and mass transfer coefficients. The flat-plate solar collector does not give a satisfactory results if it is used to heat the generator outlet water, because the water coming out from the generator is at about 80 C which is too high to be heated again by a flat-plate collector. The air coming from the conditioner is used for drying corn. The use of the Kathabar System for drying applications is infeasible. The Kathabar system mathematical model was modified by running the conditioner adiabatically. The governing equations became 4 first-order partial differential equations instead of 6 equations. The same numerical scheme is used to solve these equations. The air coming from the new system conditioner is used for drying corn.

Mahmoud, K.G.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Metals removal from spent salts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for removing metal contaminants from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents may be added to precipitate the metal oxide and/or the metal as either metal oxide, metal hydroxide, or as a salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as waste or can be immobilized as ceramic pellets. More than about 90% of the metals and mineral residues (ashes) present are removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be spray-dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 1.0 ppm of contaminants.

Hsu, Peter C. (Pleasanton, CA); Von Holtz, Erica H. (Livermore, CA); Hipple, David L. (Livermore, CA); Summers, Leslie J. (Livermore, CA); Brummond, William A. (Livermore, CA); Adamson, Martyn G. (Danville, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Actinide removal from spent salts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for removing actinide contaminants (uranium and thorium) from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents are added to precipitate the thorium as thorium oxide and/or the uranium as either uranium oxide or as a diuranate salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as radioactive waste. About 90% of the thorium and/or uranium present is removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 0.1 ppm of thorium or uranium.

Hsu, Peter C. (Pleasanton, CA); von Holtz, Erica H. (Livermore, CA); Hipple, David L. (Livermore, CA); Summers, Leslie J. (Livermore, CA); Adamson, Martyn G. (Danville, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Hydraulic conductivity of desiccated geosynthetic clay liners  

SciTech Connect

Large-scale tests were performed to determine the effect of a cycle of wetting and drying on the hydraulic conductivity of several geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs). The GCLs were covered with 0.6 m of pea gravel and permeated with water. After steady seepage had developed, the water was drained away, and the GCL was desiccated by circulating heated air through the overlying gravel. The drying caused severe cracking in the bentonite component of the GCLs. The GCLs were again permeated with water. As the cracked bentonite hydrated and swelled, the hydraulic conductivity slowly decreased from an initially high value. The long-term, steady value of hydraulic conductivity after the wetting and drying cycle was found to be essentially the same as the value for the undesiccated GCL. It is concluded that GCLs possess the ability to self-heal after a cycle of wetting and drying, which is important for applications in which there may be alternate wetting and drying of a hydraulic barrier (e.g. within a landfill final cover).

Boardman, B.T. [CH2M Hill, Oakland, CA (United States); Daniel, D.E. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

High Efficiency Liquid-Desiccant Regenerator for Air Conditioning and Industrial Drying  

SciTech Connect

Over 2 quads of fossil fuels are used each year for moisture removal. This includes industrial and agricultural processes where feedstocks and final products must be dried, as well as comfort conditioning of indoor spaces where the control of humidity is essential to maintaining healthy, productive and comfortable working conditions. Desiccants, materials that have a high affinity for water vapor, can greatly reduce energy use for both drying and dehumidification. An opportunity exists to greatly improve the competitiveness of advanced liquid-desiccant systems by increasing the efficiency of their regenerators. It is common practice within the chemical process industry to use multiple stage boilers to improve the efficiency of thermal separation processes. The energy needed to regenerate a liquid desiccant, which is a thermal separation process, can also be reduced by using a multiple stage boiler. In this project, a two-stage regenerator was developed in which the first stage is a boiler and the second stage is a scavenging-air regenerator. The only energy input to this regenerator is the natural gas that fires the boiler. The steam produced in the boiler provides the thermal energy to run the second-stage scavenging-air regenerator. This two-stage regenerator is referred to as a 1?-effect regenerator. A model of the high-temperature stage of a 1?-effect regenerator for liquid desiccants was designed, built and successfully tested. At nominal operating conditions (i.e., 2.35 gpm of 36% lithium chloride solution, 307,000 Btu/h firing rate), the boiler removed 153 lb/h of water from the desiccant at a gas-based efficiency of 52.9 % (which corresponds to a COP of 0.95 when a scavenging-air regenerator is added). The steam leaving the boiler, when condensed, had a solids concentration of less than 10 ppm. This low level of solids in the condensate places an upper bound of about 6 lb per year for desiccant loss from the regenerator. This low loss will not create maintenance problems nor will it significantly increase operating expenses. An energy balance on the boiler showed that heat loss through the insulated jacket was 10%. This value is much higher than the 2% to 5% that is typical of most boilers and indicates a need to better insulate the unit. With insulation that brings jacket losses down to 5%, a 1?-effect regenerator that uses this boiler as its high-temperature stage will have a gas-based COP of 1.05. The estimated cost to manufacture a 300-lb/h, 1?-effect regenerator at 500 units per year is $17,140. Unfortunately, the very high cost for natural gas that now prevails in the U.S. makes it very difficult for a gas-fired LDAC to compete against an electric vapor-compression air conditioner in HVAC applications. However, there are important industrial markets that need very dry air where the high price of natural gas will encourage the sale of a LDAC with the 1?-effect regenerator since in these markets it competes against less efficient gas-fired desiccant technologies. A manufacturer of industrial dehumidification equipment is now negotiating a sales agreement with us that would include the 1?-effect regenerator.

Andrew Lowenstein

2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

95

Analysis of a Flat-Plate, Liquid-Desiccant, Dehumidifier and Regenerator.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A numerical model for isothermal and non-isothermal flat-plate liquid-desiccant dehumidifiers and regenerators was developed and implemented. The two-dimensional model takes into account the desiccant, water… (more)

Mesquita, Lucio Cesar De Souza

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

The Effects of Desiccation and Climatic Change on the Hydrology of the Aral Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anthropogenic desiccation of the Aral Sea between 1960 and the mid-1990s resulted in a substantial modification of the land surface that changed air temperature in the surrounding region. During the desiccation interval, the net annual rate of ...

Eric E. Small; Filippo Giorgi; Lisa Cirbus Sloan; Steven Hostetler

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Zero Carryover Liquid-Desiccant Air Conditioner for Solar Applications: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A novel liquid-desiccant air conditioner that dries and cools building supply air will transform the use of direct-contact liquid-desiccant systems in HVAC applications, improving comfort, air quality, and providing energy-efficient humidity control.

Lowenstein, A.; Slayzak, S.; Kozubal, E.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Experimental investigation of a solar desiccant cooling installation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Desiccant cooling is a technique based on evaporative cooling and air dehumidification using desiccant regenerated by thermal energy. It is particularly interesting when it is driven by waste or solar heat making this technique environmentally friendly. In this paper, an experimental investigation is carried on a desiccant air handling unit powered by vacuum-tube solar collectors. First, the components are studied under various operating conditions. Then overall performance of the installation is evaluated over a day for a moderately humid climate with regeneration solely by solar energy. In these conditions the overall efficiency of the solar installation is 0.55 while the thermodynamic coefficient of performance is 0.45 and the performance indicator based on the electrical consumption is 4.5. Finally, the impact of outside and regeneration conditions on the performance indicators is studied. (author)

Bourdoukan, P.; Wurtz, E. [LOCIE Laboratoire Optimisation de la Conception et Ingenierie de l'Environnement, Campus Scientifique Universite de Savoie, 73376 Le Bourget du Lac (France); Joubert, P. [LEPTIAB Laboratoire d'Etude des Phenomenes de Transfert et de l'Instantaneite Agro-Industrie et Batiment Pole Sciences et Technologies, Universite La Rochelle, Avenue Marillac 17000 La Rochelle (France)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

Synthesis of Cyclic Aza-Ether Compounds and Studies of Their Use as Anion Receptors in Non-Aqueous Lithium Halide Salt Solutions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of new anion receptors, based on cyclic aza-ether compounds, have been synthesized. In all of these cyclic aza-ether compounds, the electron-withdrawing group CF{sub 3}SO{sub 2} was attached to each of the nitrogen atoms. When used as additives, all of them can significantly increase the ionic conductivity of lithium halide salts in THF solutions. This is due to the complexation between these compounds and halide anions. Ionic conductivity studies show that the complexation behavior is related to both the ring structure of the cyclic compounds and the characteristics of the halide anions. X-ray diffraction data show that the diffraction patterns of the complex crystals are different from the pure cyclic aza-ether compounds. New Bragg peaks representing a large d-spacing ({approx}15 {angstrom}) are observed for the complex crystals which provides a clear evidence for complexation.

Lee, H. S.; Sun, X.; Yang, X. Q.; McBreen, J.; Callahan, J. H.; Choi, L. S.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Advances in open-cycle solid desiccant cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Of the solar cooling options available open cycle solid desiccant cooling looks very promising. A brief review of the experimental and analytical efforts to date shows that within the last 10 years thermal performance has doubled. Research centers have been developed to explore new materials and geometry options and to improve and validate mathematical models that can be used by design engineers to develop new product lines. Typical results from the Solar Energy Research Institute's (SERI) Desiccant Cooling Research Program are shown. Innovative ideas for new cycles and spinoff benefits provide incentives to continue research in this promising field.

Penney, T.R.; Maclaine-cross, I.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desiccant salt solutions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Dehumidification and simultaneous removal of selected pollutants from indoor air by a desiccant wheel using a 1M type desiccant  

SciTech Connect

Solid-desiccant dehumidifiers are increasingly becoming an integral part of desiccant based air-conditioning systems because of their effective handling of latent heat loads compared to conventional vapor compression units. In these units, either a silica gel or a molecular sieve is used for dehumidification of air. Both of them have the capability to co-adsorb various chemical pollutants during dehumidification of air. However, the shape of the isotherm for water vapor on these materials is not favorable for desiccant cooling applications. A mixture (1M desiccant) containing a silica gel, a molecular sieve, and a hydrophobic molecular sieve that was coated on an aluminum foil was studied for its capability for simultaneous removal of moisture and some selected pollutants from air. Experimental data were obtained in a fixed bed adsorber that simulated the operation of a rotary desiccant wheel. Air to be dehumidified and cleaned and the hot regeneration air were cycled in a specific time interval through this bed. The shape of the water isotherm on 1M desiccant was found to be in between that of silica gel and molecular sieve 13{times}, but its uptake capacity was significantly lower than that of either silica gel or molecular sieve. A flow rate of about 100 L/min that provided a face velocity of about 132 cm/s was used in the adsorption step. The flow rate during regeneration was about 50 L/min. The temperature of the inlet air was about 23 C and its relative humidity was varied between 20% and 80%. The concentrations of pollutants were as follows; carbon dioxide: 1050 and 2300 ppm; toluene: 32 ppm; 1,1,1-trichloroethane: 172 ppm, and formaldehyde: 0.35 ppm. A complete breakthrough of all the pollutants was observed during an adsorption cycle.

Popescu, M.; Ghosh, T.K. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Performance investigation on a novel two-stage solar driven rotary desiccant cooling system using composite desiccant materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, a two-stage solar driven rotary desiccant cooling (TSRDC) system with novel configuration and newly developed silica gel-haloid composite desiccant is proposed aiming to reduce regeneration temperature and to achieve high energy performance. Simulated results show that there also exists an optimal rotation speed for TSRDC system. Compared with one-stage system, it is found that for the similar supply air state, the required regeneration temperature of TSRDC system is lower and for the same regeneration temperature, the cooling capacity of TSRDC is bigger. (author)

Ge, T.S.; Li, Y.; Dai, Y.J.; Wang, R.Z. [Institute of Refrigeration and Cryogenics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

Development of a solar desiccant dehumidifier. Second technical progress report  

SciTech Connect

Research and development of a solar desiccant dehumidifier featuring a rotary bed of granular silica gel and a rotary regenerator for air conditioning is described. The results of the system optimization studies are presented. The studies involved an extensive investigation of the energy saving potential and economic viability of the solar desiccant dehumidifier in different locations in the United States. Conventional electric vapor compression, and solar absorption and Rankine systems also were investigated for comparison. In general, it was found that the solar desiccant equipment, either by itself or in a hybrid system with an electric vapor compression air conditioner, is economically viable for all three locations considered. Substantial energy savings can be effected as well. Seal tests done at AiResearch to develop practical dynamic air seals are described. Leakage and friction tests were performed on a variety of material combinations and configurations. Dacron felt and silicone rubber were found to give an acceptable combination of leakage, friction, and cost characteristics. As part of the commercialization studies for the desiccant equipment, a questionnaire was sent to residential air conditioning equipment distributors. The results of the questionnaire are presented. The specifications and drawings for the 1.5-ton prototype are included. (WHK)

Gunderson, M.E.; Hwang, K.C.; Railing, S.M.; Rousseau, J.

1978-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

104

Energymaster Desiccant System Application to Light Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Desiccant cooling systems offer unique advantages over conventional equipment in certain applications. AskCorp's Energymaster unit has been applied in several commercial situations where these advantages are most significant. The magnitude of operating cost savings and improved control is greatest in humid climates where both ambient enthalpy levels and space latent loads are highest.

Blanpied, M. C.; Coellner, J. A.; Macintosh, D. S.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

High-performance dehumidifier for solar desiccant cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An advanced-design, one-tenth-scale dehumidifier for use in residential solar desiccant-cooling systems has been built and tested. The new dehumidifier was designed using a parallel-passage geometry, where air flows through channels formed by walls coated with fine-ground silica gel desiccant. This concept has a high heat and mass transfer effectiveness and promises to double the coefficient of performance of the desiccant cooling system to 1.1 kW cooling output/kW thermal input. The parallel-passage design was found to have very low pressure drop, typically 20 Pa (.08 in. water) at design conditions. The low fan power required to drive such low pressure drop components indicates that electrical COP's in the range of 8.0 to 8.2 kW cooling output/kW electrical input are possible. Results presented include parametric studies of the effect of conditions such as temperature and humidity and design parameters such as desiccant particle size and channel spacing on dehumidifier performance.

Schlepp, D.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Solar powered desiccant air conditioning system. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A solar-powered desiccant air conditioning system using silica gel has been developed, and modifications to the existing unit and additional testing are proposed to demonstrate the feasibility of the unit. Conversion from a rotating bed to a fixed bed of silica gel is proposed. Some general plans for commercialization are briefly discussed. (LEW)

Not Available

1981-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

107

Use of unglazed transpired solar collectors for desiccant cooling  

SciTech Connect

The use of unglazed transpired solar collectors for desiccant regeneration in a solid desiccant cooling cycle was investigated because these collectors are less expensive than conventional glazed flat-plate collectors. Using computer models, we studied the performance of a desiccant cooling ventilation cycle integrated with either unglazed transpired collectors or conventional glazed flat-plate collectors. We found that the thermal coefficient of performance of the cooling system with unglazed collectors was lower than that of the cooling system with glazed collectors because the former system did not use the heat of adsorption released during the dehumidification process. Although the area required for the unglazed collector array was 70% more than that required for the glazed collector array in a 10.56 kW (3 ton) solar cooling system, the cost of the unglazed array was 45% less than the cost of the glazed array. The simple payback period of the unglazed collector was half of the payback period of the glazed collector when replacing an equivalent gas-fired air heater. Although the use of unglazed transpired collectors seems to make economic sense relative to use of glazed conventional collectors, some practical considerations may limit their use for desiccant regeneration.

Pesaran, A.A.; Wipke, K.B. (National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States))

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Facility design for cyclic testing of advanced solid desiccant dehumidifiers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of high performance components is required to reach the goal of desiccant cooling system cost-competitiveness with conventional vapor compensation air conditioning systems. SERI has designed a laminar flow, parallel passage dehumidifier that has this potential. The goal of SERI's desiccant cooling research program is to fully characterize experimentally the performance of the parallel passage dehumidifier under a wide range of operating conditions, investigate improvements in design, and verify existing models of dehumidifier performance against experimental results. This report documents the design of the SERI Desiccant Cooling Test Facility for performing the above testing. With slight modifications, the testing can be used for testing other desiccant cooling system components. The dehumidifier processes and the parameters and variables needed to control and characterize its performance are presented. The physical layout of the test loop and instrumentation for monitoring the operating conditions and dehumidifer performance and the controls for maintaining the operating conditions are specified. The computerized data acquisition system conversion equations and an error analysis of measurement variables are also presented.

Schlepp, D.; Schultz, K.; Zangrando, F.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Statistical mechanics of sum frequency generation spectroscopy for the liquid-vapor interface of dilute aqueous salt solutions  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate a theoretical description of vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) at the boundary of aqueous electrolyte solutions. This approach identifies and exploits a simple relationship between SFG lineshapes and the statistics of molecular orientation and electric field. Our computer simulations indicate that orientational averages governing SFG susceptibility do not manifest ion-specific shifts in local electric field, but instead, ion-induced polarization of subsurface layers. Counterbalancing effects are obtained for monovalent anions and cations at the same depth. Ions held at different depths induce an imbalanced polarization, suggesting that ion-specific effects can arise from weak, long ranged influence on solvent organization.

Noah-Vanhoucke, Joyce; Smith, Jared D.; Geissler, Phillip L.

2009-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

110

Performance of a cross-cooled desiccant dehumidifier prototype  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The cross-cooled dehumidifier prototype was constructed in the form of a cube with a side dimension of 0.6 m. The cross-cooling was achieved by passing air through rectangular channels perpendicular to process channels which are lined with desiccant sheets consisting of 9..mu..m Syloid 63/sup TM/ silica gel held in a Teflon web. The process for the manufacture of the silica gel sheets was developed at the Illinois Institute of Technology. The dehumidifier prototype was installed in a test system that simulated the performance of a cross-cooled desiccant cooling system and monitored the performance of the prototype. The dehumidifier prototype was operated over a wide range of operating conditions which would be typically encountered in the field installation of such a system. Variables measured were the moisture cycled, cooling capacity, total cooling capacity and coefficient of performance.

Worek, W.M.; Lavan, Z.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Desiccant grain applied to the storage of solar drying potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sorption storage of solar heat using a layer of wheat as the desiccant was analyzed by means of a deep-bed model. Intended to be applied to solar-assisted in-storage drying of agricultural bulk materials, the probability of the persistence of unfavorable weather periods was quantified statistically for Potsdam for the month of August, as an example. Simulation results demonstrate that a relative humidity of the drying air of 65% can be maintained day and night for weeks without combustion of fossil fuels. Using a simple strategy of control, periods with insufficient solar radiation can be bridged over. The desiccant grain is not endangered by mold growth as a matter of principle. Simple solar air heaters can be used to avoid economic losses due to overdrying and to reduce the danger of decay to a minimum even at unfavorable climatic conditions.

Ziegler, T.; Richter, I.G.; Pecenka, R.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Test and Evaluation of a Hybrid Desiccant Dehumidifier  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dehumidification technology is being investigated for potential savings in building air conditioning systems. The potential for savings lies in separating the sensible and the latent cooling loads to more efficiently address the combined conditioning needs of the space. The Munters DryCool HD combined desiccant/vapor compression system was tested in the EPRI Knoxville psychrometric chambers. The system was tested in the laboratory for a host of indoor and outdoor conditions. The system provides cooling a...

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

113

Development and Analysis of Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air Conditioner Prototype  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the design of a desiccant enhanced evaporative air conditioner (DEVAP AC) prototype and the testing to prove its performance. Previous numerical modeling and building energy simulations indicate a DEVAP AC can save significant energy compared to a conventional vapor compression AC (Kozubal et al. 2011). The purposes of this research were to build DEVAP prototypes, test them to validate the numerical model, and identify potential commercialization barriers.

Kozubal, E.; Woods, J.; Judkoff, R.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Analysis of a Fabric/Desiccant Window Cavity Dehumidifier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of an exploratory study of a fabric/desiccant window cavity dehumidifier system for possible use in commercial buildings. The objective was to evaluate fabrics commonly used in buildings, and system concepts that employ these fabrics, which can be used to dehumidify room air. We developed a first-order energy/mass balance model to determine the performance of a window cavity dehumidifier that uses silica gel encapsulated in a fabric matrix rotating on a belt alternately through dehumidification and regeneration chambers; the modeling effort was supplemented by environmental chamber measurements of the moisture absorption characteristics of 16 fabric/desiccant combinations. We ran the model for a typical office building module, for outside air design conditions characteristic of the most difficult humidity regime in Texas. Two flow configurations, outside air and return air, were evaluated to determine the capability of such a system to dehumidify the air streams under consideration. Issues addressed included the physical limitations on the amount of desiccant that can be included in this configuration and the degree of dehumidification achievable.

Hunn, B. D.; Grasso, M. M.; Vadlamani, V.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Development of an Energy Efficient Desiccant Dehumidifier : Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

Humidity control in space conditioning has received a good deal of attention in the past twenty or so years. Perhaps the most familiar application is the use of humidifiers in the winter months. Of equal concern is the use of air conditions and dehumidifiers in the summer months. High humidity levels in summer months require lower coil temperatures in order to achieve human comfort levels, and may result in significant product and property damage if humidity levels are not controlled at appropriate level. This study addresses the solid desiccant dehumidifier using IR heaters as an energy efficient desiccant dehumidifier (EEDD). The study is divided into two phases; Phase 1 -- Application assessment; and Phase 2: Prototype design, manufacture, and testing. Phase 1 addresses the total electrical energy usage by all possible applications of the EEDD and evaluates the energy performance of the EEDD in terms of its percentage energy savings compared to the conventional vapor compression cooling and also with the state-of-the-art desiccant dehumidifiers. During Phase 2, a functional EEDD prototype unit was designed and manufactured. The work of Phase 2 was divided into four tasks: Task 1, conceptual design; Task 2, mechanical (blueprint) design; Task 3, manufacture and factory testing; and Task 4, performance testing. 17 refs., 21 figs., 30 tabs.

Relwani, Suresh M.; Moschandreas, Demetrios J.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Active Humidity Control Through Gas-Fired Desiccant Humidity Pump  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High equipment first cost and high operating costs, if electricity is used to drive such a system, have prohibited the application of active humidity control equipment in comfort conditioning in the past. Instead, passive techniques have been applied. A comparison of passive capacity control methods to control humidity shows that only the combined face and bypass and variable air volume system shows improved performance with respect to space humidity control, dew point depression, and response to perturbations. A gas-fired desiccant humidity pump will provide economical humidity control in existing and new construction using VAV or constant volume air distribution systems. The humidity pump is designed as a packaged make-up air module. It is coupled to new or existing conventional air-conditioning system via a duct. It consists of a triple integrated heat-exchanger combining (liquid) desiccant dehumidification with indirect evaporative cooling, a brine interchanger, and a gas-fired brine heater to regenerate the desiccant. Field experiments of two humidity pumps on existing commercial buildings have been initiated. Each system dehumidifies 5000 scfm of make-up air to meet all the latent loads, which is then fed to conventional, electric-driven HVAC equipment which meet all the sensible loads.

Novosel, D.; Griffiths, W. C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Active Desiccant Dehumidification Module Integration with Rooftop Packaged HVAC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes a research and development program that produced a stand-alone active desiccant module (ADM) that can be easily integrated with new or existing packaged cooling equipment. The program also produced a fully integrated hybrid system, combining the active desiccant section with a conventional direct expansion air-conditioning unit, that resulted in a compact, low-cost, energy-efficient end product. Based upon the results of this investigation, both systems were determined to be highly viable products for commercialization. Major challenges--including wheel development, compact packaging, regeneration burner development, control optimization, and low-cost design--were all successfully addressed by the final prototypes produced and tested as part of this program. Extensive laboratory testing was completed in the SEMCO laboratory for each of the two ADM system approaches. This testing confirmed the performance of the ADM systems to be attractive compared with that of alternate approaches currently used to precondition outdoor air, where a return air path is not readily available for passive desiccant recovery or where first cost is the primary design criterion. Photographs, schematics, and performance maps are provided for the ADM systems that were developed; and many of the control advantages are discussed. Based upon the positive results of this research and development program, field tests are under way for fully instrumented pilot installations of ADM systems in both a hotel/motel and a restaurant.

Fischer, J

2002-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

118

High performance solar desiccant cooling system: performance evaluations and research recommendations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents an assessment of the current status of solar desiccant cooling and makes recommendations for continued research to develop high performance systems competitive with conventional cooling systems. Solid desiccant, liquid desiccant, and hybrid systems combining desiccant dehumidifiers with vapor compressor units are considered. Currently, all desiccant systems fall somewhat short of being competitive with conventional systems. Hybrid systems appear to have the greatest potential in the short term. Solid systems are close to meeting performance goals. Development of high performance solid desiccant dehumidifiers based on parallel passage designs should be pursued. Liquid system collector/generators and efficient absorbers should receive attention. Model development is also indicated. Continued development by hybrid systems is directly tied to the above work.

Schlepp, D.R.; Schultz, K.J.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Analysis of various designs of a desiccant wheel for improving the performance using a mathematical model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mathematical model for predicting the performance of a desiccant wheel with various wheel designs has been used by considering heat and mass transfer for both moist air and the desiccant material. The model shows good agreement with experimental data. An experimental setup was fabricated using an evacuated tube solar air collector with a desiccant wheel. The hot air needed for regeneration is produced by the evacuated tube solar air collector

Avadhesh Yadav; V. K. Bajpai

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Method and composition for molding low density desiccant syntactic foam articles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and a composition are provided for molding low density desiccant syntactic foam articles. A low density molded desiccant article may be made as a syntactic foam by blending a thermosetting resin, microspheres and molecular sieve desiccant powder, molding and curing. Such articles have densities of 0.2-0.9 g/cc, moisture capacities of 1-12% by weight, and can serve as light weight structural supports.

Lula, James W. (Bonner Springs, KS); Schicker, James R. (Lee' s Summit, MO)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desiccant salt solutions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

On the use of the parabolic concentration profile assumption for a rotary desiccant dehumidifier  

SciTech Connect

The current work describes a model for a desiccant dehumidifier which uses a parabolic concentration profile assumption to model the diffusion resistance inside the desiccant particle. The relative merits of the parabolic concentration profile model compared with widely utilized rotary desiccant wheel models are discussed. The periodic steady-state parabolic concentration profile model developed is efficient and can accommodate a variety of materials. These features make it an excellent tool for design studies requiring repetitive desiccant wheel simulations. A quartic concentration profile assumption was also investigated which yielded a 2.8 percent average improvement in prediction error over the parabolic model.

Chant, E.E. [Univ. of Turabo, Gurabo (Puerto Rico); Jeter, S.M. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Analytical investigation of the desiccant enhanced nocturnal radiation cooling concept. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new concept in desiccant cooling called desiccant enhanced nocturnal radiation is proposed. The concept employs the roof of a typical residential building to act as a heat dissipator for the energy of sorption produced by a desiccant bed during a nightly adsorption cycle. During the day ambient air and solar radiation absorbed by the roof are used to regenerate the desiccant. The residence is assumed to contain the necessary thermal and moisture storage capacity to take advantage of the daily cycle. This report presents results of an analytical investigation of the adsorption and desorption cycles of the proposed concept using detailed finite element and boundary element modeling techniques.

Fairey, P.; Kerestecioglu, A.; Vieira, R.

1986-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

123

An evaluation of membrane materials for the treatment of highly concentrated suspended salt solutions in reverse osmosis and nanofiltration processes for desalination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a study to enhance and improve a zero liquid discharge (ZLD) reverse osmosis process that uses seed crystals to promote crystallization of the dissolved salts in the residual brine while it is being treated by identifying those membrane materials that are most suitable for the process. In the study, a one plate SEPA Cell module by GE Osmonics was used to determine which membranes were most susceptible to fouling and/or membrane hydrolysis. A cellulose acetate (CA), polyamide (PA) low MWCO, and PA high MWCO membrane were tested under reverse osmosis conditions. The CA and thin film (TF) membranes were also tested for nanofiltration. The cell was operated under conditions that were determined to be optimum for each membrane by the manufacturer, GE Osmonics. A high pressure, low flow, positive displacement diaphragm pump circulated the saturated calcium sulfate solution with 2 % suspended solids through the cell while the reject and permeate were recycled back to the feed, thereby preserving a saturated solution to promote crystal growth and simulate the seeded reverse osmosis process. The temperature was maintained constant by adding an ice pack to the feed vessel when necessary. The transmembrane pressure differential was maintained constant by adjusting a back pressure valve on the concentrate outlet. The results illustrate that if potable drinking water is the intended use, then the nanofiltration cellulose acetate membrane should be used. If irrigation is the desired use, then the nanofiltration thin film membrane should be used. Overall, the reverse osmosis cellulose acetate membrane was observed to outperform all membranes when all performance parameters were normalized. However, this membrane was observed to be prone to degradation in a seeded slurry and therefore its lifetime should be analyzed further. The polyamide membrane initially had a high water transport coefficient, but fouling led to its rapid decline which was attributed to the membrane’s rough and protrusive surface. A lifetime test on the thin film and cellulose acetate revealed that when operated at their maximum pressure specified by GE Osmonics for a duration of 8 hours that no decrease in rejection occurred.

Hughes, Trenton Whiting

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Schools resolve IAQ/humidity problems with desiccant preconditioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes how desiccant-based total energy recovery systems were retrofitted to the mechanical systems at Willis Foreman Elementary and Spirit Creek Middle Schools to decouple the outdoor air latent load from the existing 3-ton packaged rooftop HVAC units. The resulting hybrid system maintains 50 to 52 percent relative humidity in the space while continuously providing 15 cfm per student of outdoor air to the facility (a three-fold increase of the original 5 cfm per student design) and does so in a very energy-efficient manner.

Smith, J.C. [James C. Smith and Associates, Augusta, GA (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Disposal in Salt Caverns  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Salt Caverns Salt Caverns Fact Sheet - Disposal in Salt Caverns Introduction to Salt Caverns Underground salt deposits are found in the continental United States and worldwide. Salt domes are large, fingerlike projections of nearly pure salt that have risen to near the surface. Bedded salt formations typically contain multiple layers of salt separated by layers of other rocks. Salt beds occur at depths of 500 to more than 6,000 feet below the surface. Schematic Drawing click to view larger image Schematic Drawing of a Cavern in Domal Salt Schematic Drawing click to view larger image Schematic Drawing of a Cavern in Bedded Salt Salt caverns used for oil field waste disposal are created by a process called solution mining. Well drilling equipment is used to drill a hole

126

Preliminary study of the potential for performance improvements in solar desiccant cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The basic operation of the desiccant cooling system is reviewed, and a preliminary evaluation of the potential for improving desiccant cooling system performance to COPs of 1.0 to 1.2 is performed. A second-law thermodynamic system analysis was carried out, demonstrating that present desiccant systems only achieve 10% to 15% of theoretical maximum performance and that a large potential for improvement exists. Computer simulations have been used to study the effects of improving desiccant properties and increasing the effectiveness of some components of the system. Results have shown that modification of desiccant properties can only produce a limited (10%) increase in COP. Larger increases can be achieved by increasing the effectiveness of the sensible heat exchanger. However, this study indicates that the key to obtaining higher COPs is in the design of the dehumidifier. One design that shows promise is the parallel passage dehumidifier.

Schlepp, D.R.; Barlow, R.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Fundamental Properties of Salts  

SciTech Connect

Thermal properties of molten salt systems are of interest to electrorefining operations, pertaining to both the Fuel Cycle Research & Development Program (FCR&D) and Spent Fuel Treatment Mission, currently being pursued by the Department of Energy (DOE). The phase stability of molten salts in an electrorefiner may be adversely impacted by the build-up of fission products in the electrolyte. Potential situations that need to be avoided, during electrorefining operations, include (i) fissile elements build up in the salt that might approach the criticality limits specified for the vessel, (ii) electrolyte freezing at the operating temperature of the electrorefiner due to changes in the liquidus temperature, and (iii) phase separation (non-homogenous solution). The stability (and homogeneity) of the phases can be monitored by studying the thermal characteristics of the molten salts as a function of impurity concentration. Simulated salt compositions consisting of the selected rare earth and alkaline earth chlorides, with a eutectic mixture of LiCl-KCl as the carrier electrolyte, were studied to determine the melting points (thermal characteristics) using a Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC). The experimental data were used to model the liquidus temperature. On the basis of the this data, it became possible to predict a spent fuel treatment processing scenario under which electrorefining could no longer be performed as a result of increasing liquidus temperatures of the electrolyte.

Toni Y Gutknecht; Guy L Fredrickson

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Iodized Salt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iodized Salt Iodized Salt Name: Theresa Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Why do they put iodine in salt? Replies: Iodine was introduced into salt at earlier this century when it was discovered that certain areas of the US had a mark deficiency in iodine in the diet of people, and people developed a neck swelling (goiter). The Great Lakes region is one of these areas where the soil is lacking iodine. Goiter can be caused when the thyroid gland swells because of a lack of iodine in the diet. Most medical advise now states that iodine in salt is no longer necessary due to our food sources arising from all over the world. Steve Sample Hi Theresa...see, there are a variety of elements and compounds that are necessary for the proper maintenance of our life. One of these is iodine, since a small quantity of iodine is needed for the adequate functioning of the thyroid gland. A deficiency of iodine produces dire effects, as goiter, where the thyroid gland swollens due to the lack of iodine traces in the diet. The iodine affects directly the tyrhoid gland secretions, which themselves, to a great extent, control heart action, nerve response to stimuli, rate of body growth and metabolism.

129

Dynamic performance characterization of bound, porous silica gel desiccant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Drying of air with silica gel is a well established procedure. However, for the specific use of silica gel in a novel desiccant air conditioning system, which continually cools the silica gel and utilizes solar energy for silica gel regeneration, conventional packed bed devices are not suitable. For this system to operate effectively the silica gel must not rise in its temperature or its capacity will be greatly diminished. Dynamic dehumidificatuion performance was investigted for a silica gel desiccant fabricated in bound, porous paper-like sheets. Sheets of various thickness (0.7 to 3 mm) were fabricated and tested under several dynamic flow conditions in a flat rectangular channel apparatus. During each experiment conditions of inlet moisture, air flowrate, and sheet temperature were maintained constant. Comparisons were also made with conventional silica gel pellets and with other forms of bound silica gel. The sheets show superior utilization of silica gel in short times (30 minutes or less). Tests were also made to examine the sheet structure in order to explore the effect of temperature on the porous structure, and to obtain pore size distributions.

Onischak, M.; Gidaspow, D.; Perkari, S.; Sasaki, T.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Photovoltaic-electrodialysis regeneration method for liquid desiccant cooling system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquid desiccant cooling system (LDCS) is an (a novel) air-conditioning system with good energy saving potential. Regenerator is the power centre for LDCS. Currently, the regeneration process is always fuelled by thermal energy. Nevertheless, this regeneration pattern has some disadvantages in that its performance will become poor when the surrounding atmosphere is of high humidity, and the heat provided for regeneration will be unfavourable to the following dehumidification process. To ameliorate that, a new regeneration method is proposed in this paper: a membrane regenerator is employed to regenerate the liquid desiccant in an electrodialysis way; while solar photovoltaic generator is adopted to supply electric power for this process. Analysis has been made about this new regeneration method and the result reveals: this new manner achieves good stability with the immunity against the adverse impact from the outside high humidity; its performance is much higher than that of the thermal regeneration manner while putting aside the low efficiency of the photovoltaic system. Besides, purified water can be obtained in company with the regeneration process. (author)

Li, Xiu-Wei [College of Power Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Zhang, Xiao-Song [School of Energy and Environment, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

131

Simulations and economic analyses of desiccant cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress to date in the development and analysis of computer simulations of solar-powered desiccant cooling using an axial-flow disc-type dehumidifier wheel, solar-powered space heating, and electrically driven, standard vapor-compression air-conditioning systems for residential use is documented. Computer simulations for both solar and conventional heating and cooling systems were performed for 12-month heating and cooling seasons. Annual thermal performance and the resulting life cycle costs for both types of systems were analyzed and compared. The heating/cooling season simulations were run for five U.S. cities representing a wide range of climatic conditions and insolation. With the informaion resulting from these simulations, the optimum air-conditioning system was chosen to maximize the conservation of fossil fuels and minimize operating costs. Because of the increasing use of residential air conditioning employing electrically driven vapor-compression coolers, the five locations were studied to determine if it would be beneficial (in terms of both economics and fossil fuel displacement) to displace fossil-fuel-powered vapor-compression coolers and natural gas space heaters with solar-powered heating and desiccant cooling systems.

Shelpuk, B. C.; Hooker, D. W.; Jorgensen, G. J.; Bingham, C. E.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Plutonium and americium separation from salts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Salts or materials containing plutonium and americium are dissolved in hydrochloric acid, heated, and contacted with an alkali metal carbonate solution to precipitate plutonium and americium carbonates which are thereafter readily separable from the solution.

Hagan, Paul G. (Northglenn, CO); Miner, Frend J. (Boulder, CO)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Solar-powered saline sorbent-solution heat pump/storage system. [Coastal Energy Laboratory-Chemical Heat Pump (CEL-CHEAP)  

SciTech Connect

Coastal Energy Laboratory Chemical Heat Pump (CEL-CHEAP) is a redesigned open-cycle liquid desiccant air conditioner. Heat is discharged to shallow-well water by dehumidification-humidification for cooling and extracted by humidification-dehumidification for heating. Direct solar radiation concentrates the desiccant. For continuous operation, a small uninsulated tank stores concentrated solution. 6 refs.

Robison, H.; Houston, S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Field-Scale Assessment of Desiccation Implementation for Deep Vadose Zone Contaminants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Desiccation of the vadose zone has the potential to reduce the flux of contaminants to underlying groundwater by removing moisture and decreasing the aqueous-phase permeability of the desiccated zone. However, data to evaluate implementation of desiccation are needed to enable consideration of desiccation as a potential remedy. Implementation of desiccation was field tested by injecting dry nitrogen gas to a target treatment zone and monitoring the spatial and temporal progress of the drying process. Aqueous waste discharges to disposal cribs approximately 50 years ago distributed water and contaminants, including primarily technetium-99 and nitrate, within the 100-m deep vadose zone at the test site. A field test location was selected adjacent to one of the former disposal cribs. The test was conducted in a contaminated portion of the vadose zone dominated by fine sands with lenses of silt material. Desiccation reduced volumetric moisture content to as low as 0.01. The lateral and vertical distribution of drying from the injection well was influenced by the subsurface heterogeneity. However, over time, desiccation occurred in the initially wetter, lower permeability lenses.

Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Strickland, Christopher E.; Chronister, Glen B.; Benecke, Mark W.; Johnson, Christian D.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Method and apparatus for extracting water from air using a desiccant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a method and apparatus for extracting liquid water from moist air using minimal energy input. The method can be considered as four phases: (1) adsorbing water from air into a desiccant, (2) isolating the water-laden desiccant from the air source, (3) desorbing water as vapor from the desiccant into a chamber, and (4) isolating the desiccant from the chamber, and compressing the vapor in the chamber to form liquid condensate. The liquid condensate can be removed for use. Careful design of the dead volumes and pressure balances can minimize the energy required. The dried air can be exchanged for fresh moist air and the process repeated. An apparatus comprises a first chamber in fluid communication with a desiccant, and having ports to intake moist air and exhaust dried air. The apparatus also comprises a second chamber in fluid communication with the desiccant. The second chamber allows variable internal pressure, and has a port for removal of liquid condensate. Each chamber can be configured to be isolated or in communication with the desiccant. The first chamber can be configured to be isolated or in communication with a course of moist air. Various arrangements of valves, pistons, and chambers are described.

Spletzer, Barry L. (Albuquerque, NM); Callow, Diane Schafer (Albuquerque, NM)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Study of parameters affecting the performance of solar desiccant cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of a solar desiccant cooling system depends on the performance of its components, particularly the desiccant dehumidifier and solar collectors. The desiccant dehumidifier performance is affected by the properties of the desiccant, particularly the shape of the isotherm and the regeneration temperature. The performance of a solar collector, as one would expect, depends on its operating temperature, which is very close to the desiccant regeneration temperature. The purpose of this study was to identify the desiccant isotherm shape (characterized by separation factor) that would result in the optimum performance - based on thermal coefficient of performance and cooling capacity - of a desiccant cooling cycle operating in ventilation mode. Different regeneration temperatures ranging from 65[degree]C to 160[degree]C were investigated to identify the corresponding optimum isotherm shape at each. Thermal COP dictates the required area of the solar collectors, and the cooling capacity is an indication of the size and cost of the cooling equipment. Staged and no-staged regeneration methods were studied.

Pesaran, A.A.; Hoo, E.A.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Study of parameters affecting the performance of solar desiccant cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of a solar desiccant cooling system depends on the performance of its components, particularly the desiccant dehumidifier and solar collectors. The desiccant dehumidifier performance is affected by the properties of the desiccant, particularly the shape of the isotherm and the regeneration temperature. The performance of a solar collector, as one would expect, depends on its operating temperature, which is very close to the desiccant regeneration temperature. The purpose of this study was to identify the desiccant isotherm shape (characterized by separation factor) that would result in the optimum performance - based on thermal coefficient of performance and cooling capacity - of a desiccant cooling cycle operating in ventilation mode. Different regeneration temperatures ranging from 65{degree}C to 160{degree}C were investigated to identify the corresponding optimum isotherm shape at each. Thermal COP dictates the required area of the solar collectors, and the cooling capacity is an indication of the size and cost of the cooling equipment. Staged and no-staged regeneration methods were studied.

Pesaran, A.A.; Hoo, E.A.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Zero Energy Communities with Central Solar Plants using Liquid Desiccants and Local Storage: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The zero energy community considered here consists of tens to tens-of-thousands of residences coupled to a central solar plant that produces all the community's electrical and thermal needs. A distribution network carries fluids to meet the heating and cooling loads. Large central solar systems can significantly reduce cost of energy vs. single family systems, and they enable economical seasonal heat storage. However, the thermal distribution system is costly. Conventional district heating/cooling systems use a water/glycol solution to deliver sensible energy. Piping is sized to meet the peak instantaneous load. A new district system introduced here differs in two key ways: (i) it continuously distributes a hot liquid desiccant (LD) solution to LD-based heating and cooling equipment in each home; and (ii) it uses central and local storage of both LD and heat to reduce flow rates to meet average loads. Results for piping sizes in conventional and LD thermal communities show that the LD zero energy community reduces distribution piping diameters meeting heating loads by {approx}5X and meeting cooling loads by {approx}8X for cooling, depending on climate.

Burch, J.; Woods, J.; Kozubal, E.; Boranian, A.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank, Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank, And Caustic Wash Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 4 Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), and Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) samples from several of the ?microbatches? of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (?Macrobatch?) 4 have been analyzed for {sup 238}Pu, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and by inductively-coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICPES). Furthermore, samples from the CWT have been analyzed by a variety of methods to investigate a decline in the decontamination factor (DF) of the cesium observed at MCU. The results indicate good decontamination performance within process design expectations. While the data set is sparse, the results of this set and the previous set of results for Macrobatch 3 samples indicate generally consistent operations. There is no indication of a disruption in plutonium and strontium removal. The average cesium DF and concentration factor (CF) for samples obtained from Macrobatch 4 are slightly lower than for Macrobatch 3, but still well within operating parameters. The DSSHT samples show continued presence of titanium, likely from leaching of the monosodium titanate in Actinide Removal Process (ARP).

Peters, T. B.; Fink, S. D.

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

140

Optimizing the performance of desiccant beds for solar-regenerated cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed computer simulations as well as a simplified psychrometric analysis are used to determine the increase in cooling system performance that can be realized through the use of nonhomogeneous or staged desiccant beds. A staged bed of four hypothetical desiccants is shown to give a 10% higher cooling capacity than a silica gel bed of the same thickness. Alternatively, the same cooling capacity is produced by a staged bed 37% thinner than the silica gel bed. These effects could be employed to reduce the parasitic power requirements of desiccant cooling systems.

Barlow, R.; Collier, K.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desiccant salt solutions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Laboratory and Modeling Evaluations in Support of Field Testing for Desiccation at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

The Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test Plan for the Hanford Central Plateau includes testing of the desiccation technology as a potential technology to be used in conjunction with surface infiltration control to limit the flux of technetium and other contaminants in the vadose zone to the groundwater. Laboratory and modeling efforts were conducted to investigate technical uncertainties related to the desiccation process and its impact on contaminant transport. This information is intended to support planning, operation, and interpretation of a field test for desiccation in the Hanford Central Plateau.

Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Freedman, Vicky L.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Tartakovsky, Guzel D.; Ward, Anderson L.

2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

142

Performance comparison of absorption and desiccant solar cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cooling systems are required to operate over a wide range of outdoor and load conditions; however, the performance of solar cooling components is often specified and compared at a typical design point such as ARI conditions. A method is presented to directly compare the performance of different desiccant and absorption cooling systems by using psychrometric analysis of air distribution cycles under a range of outdoor conditions that systems encounter over a year. Using analysis of cooling load distributions for a small commercial office building in Miami and Phoenix a seasonal COP is calculated for each system. The heat input can be provided by solar or by an auxiliary heat source, such as natural gas.

Warren, M.L.; Wahlig, M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Heat and mass transfer analysis of a desiccant dehumidifier matrix  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the SERI Single-Blow Test Facility's design, fabrication, and testing for characterizing desiccant dehumidifiers for solar cooling applications. The first test article, a silica-gel parallel-plate dehumidifier with highly uniform passages, was designed and fabricated. Transient heat and mass transfer data and pressure drop data across the dehumidifier were obtained. Available heat and mass transfer models were extended to the parallel-place geometry, and the experimental data were compared with model predictions. Pressure drop measurements were also compared with model predictions of the fully developed laminar flow theory. The comparisons between the lumped-capacitance model and the experimental data were satisfactory. The pressure drop data compared satisfactorily with the theory (within 15%). A solid-side resistance model that is more detailed and does not assume symmetrical diffusion in particles was recommended for performance. This study has increased our understanding of the heat and mass transfer in silica gel parallel-plate dehumidifiers.

Pesaran, A.A.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Desiccant-Based Combined Systems: Integrated Active Desiccant Rooftop Hybrid System Development and Testing Final Report- Phase 4  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of a research and development (R&D) program to design and optimize an active desiccant-vapor compression hybrid rooftop system. The primary objective was to combine the strengths of both technologies to produce a compact, high-performing, energy-efficient system that could accommodate any percentage of outdoor air and deliver essentially any required combination of temperature and humidity, or sensible heat ratio (SHR). In doing so, such a product would address the significant challenges imposed on the performance capabilities of conventional packaged rooftop equipment by standards 62 and 90.1 of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers. The body of work completed as part of this program built upon previous R&D efforts supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and summarized by the Phase 3b report ''Active Desiccant Dehumidification Module Integration with Rooftop Packaged HVAC Units'' (Fischer and Sand 2002), in addition to Fischer, Hallstrom, and Sand 2000; Fischer 2000; and Fischer and Sand 2004. All initial design objectives established for this development program were successfully achieved. The performance flexibility desired was accomplished by a down-sized active desiccant wheel that processes only a portion of the supply airflow, which is pre-conditioned by a novel vapor compression cycle. Variable-speed compressors are used to deliver the capacity control required by a system handling a high percentage of outdoor air. An integrated direct digital control system allows for control capabilities not generally offered by conventional packaged rooftop systems. A 3000-cfm prototype system was constructed and tested in the SEMCO engineering test laboratory in Columbia, MO, and was found to operate in an energy-efficient fashion relative to more conventional systems. Most important, the system offered the capability to independently control the supply air temperature and humidity content to provide individual sensible and latent loads required by an occupied space without over-cooling and reheating air. The product was developed using a housing construction similar to that of a conventional packaged rooftop unit. The resulting integrated active desiccant rooftop (IADR) is similar in size to a currently available conventional rooftop unit sized to provide an equivalent total cooling capacity. Unlike a conventional rooftop unit, the IADR can be operated as a dedicated outdoor air system processing 100% outdoor air, as well as a total conditioning system capable of handling any ratio of return air to outdoor air. As part of this R&D program, a detailed investigation compared the first cost and operating cost of the IADR with costs for a conventional packaged approach for an office building located in Jefferson City, MO. The results of this comparison suggest that the IADR approach, once commercialized, could be cost-competitive with existing technology--exhibiting a one-year to two-year payback period--while simultaneously offering improved humidity control, indoor air quality, and energy efficiency.

Fischer, J

2005-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

145

Overview of developing programs in solar desiccant cooling for residential buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An overview is provided of the ongoing work in desiccant cooling under the national solar heating and cooling research program. Open cycle adsorption and absorption systems are examined. The different dehumidifier bed configurations are the distinguishing features of these systems. The basic operating principles of each dehumidifier concept are explained along with some discussion of their comparative features. Performance predictions developed by SERI for a solar desiccant solar system employing an axial-flow desiccant wheel dehumidifier are presented. In terms of life-cycle cost and displaced fossil-fuel energy, the results indicate that it should be beneficial to use solar desiccant coolers in residential applications. Although no prototype testing of any of these concepts is currently underway, test results are expected and will be reported within one year.

Not Available

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test for the Hanford Central Plateau: Soil Desiccation Pilot Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes results of a pilot test of soil desiccation conducted as part of the Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test program. The report is written in CERCLA treatabilty test report format.

Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Strickland, Christopher E.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Johnson, Christian D.; Greenwood, William J.; Ward, Anderson L.; Clayton, Ray E.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Peterson, John E.; Hubbard, Susan; Chronister, Glen B.; Benecke, Mark W.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Experimental and Numerical Investigations of Soil Desiccation for Vadose Zone Remediation: Report for Fiscal Year 2007  

SciTech Connect

Apart from source excavation, the options available for the remediation of vadose zone metal and radionuclide contaminants beyond the practical excavation depth (0 to 15 m) are quite limited. Of the available technologies, very few are applicable to the deep vadose zone with the top-ranked candidate being soil desiccation. An expert panel review of the work on infiltration control and supplemental technologies identified a number of knowledge gaps that would need to be overcome before soil desiccation could be deployed. The report documents some of the research conducted in the last year to fill these knowledge gaps. This work included 1) performing intermediate-scale laboratory flow cell experiments to demonstrate the desiccation process, 2) implementing a scalable version of Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases–Water-Air-Energy (STOMP-WAE), and 3) performing numerical experiments to identify the factors controlling the performance of a desiccation system.

Ward, Andy L.; Oostrom, Mart; Bacon, Diana H.

2008-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

148

Electromarking solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is directed to an aqueous halogen-free electromarking solution which possesses the capacity for marking a broad spectrum of metals and alloys selected from different classes. The aqueous solution comprises basically the nitrate salt of an amphoteric metal, a chelating agent, and a corrosion-inhibiting agent.

Bullock, Jonathan S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Harper, William L. (Wartburg, TN); Peck, Charles G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1976-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

149

The Salt Finger Experiments of Jevons (1857) and Rayleigh (1880)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over a century before Melvin Stern discovered salt fingers, W. Stanley Jevons performed the first salt finger experiment in an attempt to model cirrus clouds. Remarkably, he seemed to realize that a more rapid diffusion of heat relative to solute ...

Raymond W. Schmitt

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

A desiccant/steam-injected gas-turbine industrial cogeneration system  

SciTech Connect

An integrated desiccant/steam-injected gas-turbine system was evaluated as an industrial cogenerator for the production of electricity and dry, heated air for product drying applications. The desiccant can be regenerated using the heated, compressed air leaving the compressor. The wet stream leaves the regenerator at a lower temperature than when it entered the desiccant regenerator, but with little loss of energy. The wet stream returns to the combustion chamber of the gas-turbine system after preheating by exchanging heat with the turbine exhaust strewn. Therefore, the desiccant is regenerated virtually energy-free. In the proposed system, the moisture-laden air exiting the desiccant is introduced into the combustion chamber of the gas-turbine power system. This paper discusses various possible design configurations, the impact of increased moisture content on the combustion process, the pressure drop across the desiccant regenerator, and the impact of these factors on the overall performance of the integrated system. A preliminary economic analysis including estimated potential energy savings when the system is used in several drying applications, and equipment and operating costs are also presented.

Jody, B.J.; Daniels, E.J.; Karvelas, D.E.; Teotia, A.P.S.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

151

A desiccant/steam-injected gas-turbine industrial cogeneration system  

SciTech Connect

An integrated desiccant/steam-injected gas-turbine system was evaluated as an industrial cogenerator for the production of electricity and dry, heated air for product drying applications. The desiccant can be regenerated using the heated, compressed air leaving the compressor. The wet stream leaves the regenerator at a lower temperature than when it entered the desiccant regenerator, but with little loss of energy. The wet stream returns to the combustion chamber of the gas-turbine system after preheating by exchanging heat with the turbine exhaust strewn. Therefore, the desiccant is regenerated virtually energy-free. In the proposed system, the moisture-laden air exiting the desiccant is introduced into the combustion chamber of the gas-turbine power system. This paper discusses various possible design configurations, the impact of increased moisture content on the combustion process, the pressure drop across the desiccant regenerator, and the impact of these factors on the overall performance of the integrated system. A preliminary economic analysis including estimated potential energy savings when the system is used in several drying applications, and equipment and operating costs are also presented.

Jody, B.J.; Daniels, E.J.; Karvelas, D.E.; Teotia, A.P.S.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Experimental study of the heat and mass transfer in a packed bed liquid desiccant air dehumidifier  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Desiccant cooling systems have the ability to provide efficient humidity and temperature control while reducing the electrical energy requirement for air conditioning as compared to a conventional system. Naturally, the desiccant air dehumidification process greatly influences the overall performance of the desiccant system. Therefore, the effects of variables such as air and desiccant flow rates, air temperature and humidity, desiccant temperature and concentration, and the area available for heat and mass transfer are of great interest. Due to the complexity of the dehumidification process, theoretical modeling relies heavily upon experimental studies. However, a limited number of experimental studies are reported in the literature. This paper presents results from a detailed experimental investigation of the heat and mass transfer between a liquid desiccant (triethylene glycol) and air in a packed bed absorption tower using high liquid flow rates. A high performance packing that combines good heat and mass transfer characteristics with low pressure drop is used. The rate of dehumidification, as well as the effectiveness of the dehumidification process are assessed based on the variables listed above. Good agreement is shown to exist between the experimental findings and predictions from finite difference modeling. In addition, a comparison between the findings in the present study and findings previously reported in the literature is made. The results obtained from this study make it possible to characterize the important variables which impact the system design.

Oeberg, V.; Goswami, D.Y. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Method and composition for molding low-density desiccant syntactic-foam articles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

These and other objects of the invention are achieved by a process for molding to size a desiccant syntactic foam article having a density of 0.2 to 0.9 g/cc and a moisture capacity of 1 to 12% by weight, comprising the steps of: charging a mold with a powdery mixture of an activated desiccant, microspheres and a thermosetting resin, the amount of the desiccant being sufficient to provide the required moisture capacity, and the amounts of the microspheres and resin being such that the microspheres/desiccant volume fraction exceeds the packing factor by an amount sufficient to substantially avoid shrinkage without causing excessively high molding pressures; covering the mold and heating the covered mold to a temperature and for an amount of time sufficient to melt the resin; and tightly closing the mold and heating the closed mold to a temperature and for an amount of time sufficient to cure the resin, and removing the resultant desiccant syntactic foam article from the mold. In a composition of matter aspect, the present invention provides desiccant syntactic foam articles, and a composition of matter for use in molding the same.

Not Available

1981-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

154

Research and development needs for desiccant cooling technology 1992--1997. (Supplement to the NREL report, Desiccant Cooling: State-of-the-Art Assessment)  

SciTech Connect

This report is a supplement to Desiccant Cooling: State-of-the-Art Assessment (NREL/TP-254-4147, DE93000013). In this supplement document we have described a detailed program assuming sufficient funding to implement the R&D activities needed. Desiccant dehumidification is a mature technology for industrial applications, and in recent years the technology has been used for air conditioning a number of institutional and commercial buildings. Our proposal is based on argumentative discussions at various national meetings with leaders of the technology. The goal is the penetration of the broad air conditioning market. This work is funded by the Buildings technology Office of the US Department of Energy.

Pesaran, A.A.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

A new family of anion receptors and their effects on ion pair dissociation and conductivity of lithium salts in non-aqueous solutions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new family of anion receptors based on aza-ether compounds have been synthesized. Since the anion complexation of these compounds is not based on either positively charged sites or hydrogen bonding, they have a potential to be used in lithium batteries as electrolyte additives. When these compounds are added into nonaqueous electrolytes using lithium salts, such as LiCl/BF or LiBr/THF, the ionic conductivity can be dramatically increased. Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NF-XAFS) spectroscopy studies show that Cl{sup {minus}} anions are completed with the nitrogen groups in these compounds. The increase in ionic conductivity and the degree of complexation, are both related to the number of R=CF{sub 3}SO{sub 2} groups that are used to substitute the amine hydrogen atoms in these aza-ether compounds.

Lee, H.S.; Yang, X.Q.; McBreen, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Okamoto, Y. [Polytechnic Univ., Brooklyn, NY (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Laboratory And Field Investigations To Address Erosion, Volume Change And Desiccation Cracking Of Compost Amended Expansive Subsoils.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Puppala, Anand Desiccations cracks are formed during drying process of fine grained cohesive soils in summer and these cracks often appear on unpaved subgrades due… (more)

Intharasombat, Napat

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Heat and mass transfer in packed bed liquid desiccant regenerators -- An experimental investigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquid desiccant cooling can provide control of temperature and humidity, while at the same time lowering the electrical energy requirement for air conditioning. Since the largest energy requirement associated with desiccant cooling is low temperature heat for desiccant regeneration, the regeneration process greatly influences the overall system performance. Therefore, the effects of variables such as air and desiccant flow rates, air temperature and humidity, desiccant temperature and concentration, and the area available for heat and mass transfer on the regeneration process are of great interest. Due to the complexity of the regeneration process, which involves simultaneous heat and mass transfer, theoretical modeling must be verified by experimental studies. However, a limited number of experimental studies are reported in the literature. This paper presents results from a detailed experimental investigation of the heat and mass transfer between a liquid desiccant (triethylene glycol) and air in a packed bed regenerator using high liquid flow rates. To regenerate the desiccant, it is heated to temperatures readily obtainable from flat-plate solar collectors. A high performance packing that combines good heat and mass transfer characteristics with low pressure drop is used. The rate of water evaporation, as well as the effectiveness of the regeneration process is assessed based on the variables listed above. Good agreement is shown to exist between the experimental findings and predictions from finite difference modeling. In addition, the findings in the present study are compared to findings previously reported in the literature. Also, the results presented here characterize the important variables that impact the system design.

Martin, V.; Goswami, D.Y.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Vapor pressure measurements on non-aqueous electrolyte solutions. Part 2. Tetraalkylammonium salts in methanol. Activity coefficients of various 1-1 electrolytes at high concentrations  

SciTech Connect

Precise vapor pressure data for solutions of Et/sub 4/NBr, Bu/sub 4/NBr, Bu/sub 4/Nl, Bu/sub 4/NClO/sub 4/, and Am/sub 4/NBr in methanol at 25/sup 0/C in the concentration range 0.04 < m(mol-(kg of solvent)/sup -1/) < 1.6 are communicated and discussed. Polynomials in molalities are given which may be used for calculating precise vapor pressure depressions of these solutions. Osmotic coefficients are calculated by taking into account the second virial coefficient of methanol vapor. Discussion of the data at low concentrations is based on the chemical model of electrolyte solutions taking into account non-coulombic interactions; ion-pair association constants are compared to those of conductance measurements. Pitzer equations are used to reproduce osmotic and activity coefficient at high concentrations; the set of Pitzer parameters b = 3.2, ..cap alpha../sub 1/ = 2.0 and ..cap alpha../sub 2/ = 20.0 is proposed for methanol solutions.

Barthel, J.; Lauermann, G.; Neueder, R.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Factors influencing algal biomass in hydrologically dynamic salt ponds in a subtropical salt marsh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The interface between land and water is often a dynamic zone that responds to relatively short-term climatic and hydrologic forces. Coastal salt marshes occupy this zone between land and sea and typically are comprised of vegetated marsh intersected by channels and shallow ponds that are subject to flooding by winds, tides, and storm surges. Coastal salt marshes are widely regarded as zones of high macrophyte productivity. However, microalgae may contribute more to salt marsh productivity than previously realized, underscoring the importance of understanding algal dynamics in such systems. Benthic and planktonic chlorophyll-a (surrogate for total algal biomass), sediment AFDW, total suspended solids, salinity, and nutrients were examined in marsh ponds in the subtropical Guadalupe Estuary, TX, USA to determine the effects of hydrologic connections on algal biomass in this system. From May 2005 – May 2006 there were several pond connection, disconnection, and desiccation events. During periods of disconnection, algal biomass was higher in both the benthos and the water column than during connection events when supposed flushing occurred. Connection events also flushed out high NH4 accumulating in pond surface waters, but did not increase NOx. Therefore, the primary source of DIN seemed to be nutrient cycling within the ponds. There was a temporal effect on surface water salinity, which increased throughout the sampling period as bay water levels and subsequent pond connections decreased, demonstrating interannual variability and the link between seasons (wet vs. dry) and marsh inundation patterns (high water periods vs. low water periods) in this estuary.

Miller, Carrie J.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Performance Assessment of a Desiccant Cooling System in a CHP Application with an IC Engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Performance of a desiccant cooling system was evaluated in the context of combined heat and power (CHP). The baseline system incorporated a desiccant dehumidifier, a heat exchanger, an indirect evaporative cooler, and a direct evaporative cooler. The desiccant unit was regenerated through heat recovery from a gas-fired reciprocating internal combustion engine. The system offered sufficient sensible and latent cooling capacities for a wide range of climatic conditions, while allowing influx of outside air in excess of what is typically required for commercial buildings. Energy and water efficiencies of the desiccant cooling system were also evaluated and compared with those of a conventional system. The results of parametric assessments revealed the importance of using a heat exchanger for concurrent desiccant post cooling and regeneration air preheating. These functions resulted in enhancement of both the cooling performance and the thermal efficiency, which are essential for fuel utilization improvement. Two approaches for mixing of the return air and outside air were examined, and their impact on the system cooling performance and thermal efficiency was demonstrated. The scope of the parametric analyses also encompassed the impact of improving the indirect evaporative cooling effectiveness on the overall cooling system performance.

Jalalzadeh-Azar, A. A.; Slayzak, S.; Judkoff, R.; Schaffhauser, T.; DeBlasio, R.

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desiccant salt solutions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

SOIL DESICCATION TECHNIQUES STRATEGIES FOR IMMOBILIZATION OF DEEP VADOSE CONTAMINANTS AT THE HANFORD CENTRAL PLATEAU  

SciTech Connect

Deep vadose zone contamination poses some of the most difficult remediation challenges for the protection of groundwater at the Hanford Site where processes and technologies are being developed and tested for use in the on-going effort to remediate mobile contamination in the deep vadose zone, the area deep beneath the surface. Historically, contaminants were discharged to the soil along with significant amounts of water, which continues to drive contaminants deeper in the vadose zone toward groundwater. Soil desiccation is a potential in situ remedial technology well suited for the arid conditions and the thick vadose zone at the Hanford Site. Desiccation techniques could reduce the advance of contaminants by removing the pore water to slow the rate of contaminants movement toward groundwater. Desiccation technologies have the potential to halt or slow the advance of contaminants in unsaturated systems, as well as aid in reduction of contaminants from these same areas. Besides reducing the water flux, desiccation also establishes capillary breaks that would require extensive rewetting to resume pore water transport. More importantly, these techniques have widespread application, whether the need is to isolate radio nuclides or address chemical contaminant issues. Three different desiccation techniques are currently being studied at Hanford.

BENECKE MW; CHRONISTER GB; TRUEX MJ

2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

162

SEPARATION OF METAL SALTS BY ADSORPTION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It has been found that certain metal salts, particularly the halides of iron, cobalt, nickel, and the actinide metals, arc readily absorbed on aluminum oxide, while certain other salts, particularly rare earth metal halides, are not so absorbed. Use is made of this discovery to separate uranium from the rare earths. The metal salts are first dissolved in a molten mixture of alkali metal nitrates, e.g., the eutectic mixture of lithium nitrate and potassium nitrate, and then the molten salt solution is contacted with alumina, either by slurrying or by passing the salt solution through an absorption tower. The process is particularly valuable for the separation of actinides from lanthanum-group rare earths.

Gruen, D.M.

1959-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

163

Performance characteristics of open-flow liquid desiccant solar collector/regenerator for solar cooling applications. Part 2. System simulation and performance measurements. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research focussed on the performance and system simulation of an open-flow liquid desiccant solar collector/regenerator.

Wood, B.D.; Siebe, D.A.; Applebaum, M.A.; Novak, K.S.; Ballew, L.M.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Improving Gas-Fired Heat Pump Capacity and Performance by Adding a Desiccant Dehumidification Subsystem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines the merits of coupling a desiccant dehumidification subsystem to a gas-engine- driven vapor compression air conditioner. A system is identified that uses a rotary, silica gel, parallel-plate dehumidifier. Dehumidifier data and analysis are based on recent tests. The dehumidification subsystem processes the fresh air portion and handles the latent portion of the load. Adding the desiccant subsystem increases the gas-based coefficient of performance 40% and increases the cooling capacity 50%. Increased initial manufacturing costs are estimated at around $500/ton ($142/kW) for volume production. This cost Level is expected to reduce the total initial cost per ton compared to a system without the desiccant subsystem.

Parsons, B. K.; Pesaran, A. A.; Bharathan, D.; Shelpuk, B. C.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Contract No. EG-77-C-01-4042OPTIMIZING 'l%E PERFORWANCE OF DESICCANT BEDS FOB SOLAR RJXENEXATED COOLING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lavan and Lunde have recognized this problem and have advocated nonadiabatic drying of the air; Lavan (4) investigating a crosscooled desiccant bed, and Lunde (5> propos-Ing a series of desiccant beds and heat exchangers. The purpose in both concepts is to keep the temperature of the silica gel low during adsorption so that the moisture capacity remains high. 1.

Kirk Collier; Robert Barlow; Kirk Collier

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Advanced Dehumidification and Humidity Control Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical brief explains the foundation of conventional, advanced, and emerging technologies for humidity control in air-conditioned buildings in easy-to-understand language for utility executives as well as end-users. It also describes new packaged solutions that integrate vapor compression cooling and desiccant dehumidification technologies in creative ways to offer more energy efficient solutions for applications in existing or new construction, especially in humid climates.

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

167

Desiccant solar air conditioning in tropical climates: II-field testing in Guadeloupe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of the experimental investigation of a solar desiccant air conditioning device exposed to the sun in Guadeloupe to test that adaptability of a silicagel compact bed, the most simple technology, in a tropical climate. It has been shown that it is possible to make use of solar flat plate collectors with a balancing water tank, to produce heat for the regeneration of a solid desiccant as silicagel, with solar energy. Second, the compact bed system proposed gives the foreseen cooling power, but considerable losses appear, particularly in the sorption process, which is not close enough to the reversible adiabatic one.

Dupont, M.; Celestine, B.; Beghin, B. (Solar Energy Lab., Pointe-a-Pitre (Guadeloupe))

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Modeling of solid-side mass transfer in desiccant particle beds  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A model is proposed for heat and mass transfer in a packed bed of desiccant particles and accounts for both Knudsen and surface diffusion within the particles. Using the model, predictions are made for the response of thin beds of silica gel particles to a step change in air inlet conditions compared to mental results. The predictions are found to be satisfactory and, in general, superior to those of pseudogas-side controlled models commonly used for the design of desiccant dehumidifiers for solar air conditioning application.

Pesaran, A.A.; Mills, A.F.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Research and development needs for desiccant cooling technology 1992--1997  

SciTech Connect

This report is a supplement to Desiccant Cooling: State-of-the-Art Assessment (NREL/TP-254-4147, DE93000013). In this supplement document we have described a detailed program assuming sufficient funding to implement the R D activities needed. Desiccant dehumidification is a mature technology for industrial applications, and in recent years the technology has been used for air conditioning a number of institutional and commercial buildings. Our proposal is based on argumentative discussions at various national meetings with leaders of the technology. The goal is the penetration of the broad air conditioning market. This work is funded by the Buildings technology Office of the US Department of Energy.

Pesaran, A.A.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Theoretical and experimental analysis of desiccant wheel performance for low humidity drying system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The drying process is influenced by three main factors temperature, flow rate and humidity, resulting in the drying process of hot air required in accordance with the character of materials with low humidity, so it can speed up the drying process. Malaysia ... Keywords: desiccant wheel, temperature and humidity, water evaporation

Tri Suyono; Sohif Mat; Muhammad Yahya; Muhd. Hafiz Ruslan; Azami Zaharim; Kamaruzzaman Sopian

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Analysis and comparison of active solar desiccant and absorption cooling systems. Part 1; Model description  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comparative analysis has been performed to compare the cooling and dehumidification performance of future ventilation-mode desiccant systems, proposed advanced absorption systems, and conventional vapor compression systems. A common framework has been developed for direct comparison of these different cooling technologies; this method is described in this paper.

Warren, M.L. (ASI Controls, San Ramon, CA (US)); Wahlig, M. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA). Applied Science Div.)

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Sensor and numerical simulator evaluation for porous medium desiccation and rewetting at the intermediate laboratory scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil desiccation, in conjunction with surface infiltration control, is considered at the Hanford Site as a potential technology to limit the flux of technetium and other contaminants in the vadose zone to the groundwater. An intermediate-scale experiment was conducted to test the response of a series of instruments to desiccation and subsequent rewetting of porous media. The instruments include thermistors, thermocouple psychrometers, dual-probe heat pulse sensors, heat dissipation units, and humidity probes. The experiment was simulated with the multifluid flow simulator STOMP, using independently obtained hydraulic and thermal porous medium properties. All instrument types used for this experiment were able to indicate when the desiccation front passed a certain location. In most cases the changes were sharp, indicating rapid changes in moisture content, water potential, or humidity. However, a response to the changing conditions was recorded only when the drying front was very close to a sensor. Of the tested instruments, only the heat dissipation unit and humidity probes were able to detect rewetting. The numerical simulation results reasonably match the experimental data, indicating that the simulator captures the pertinent gas flow and transport processes related to desiccation and rewetting and may be useful in the design and analysis of field tests.

Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Truex, Michael J.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Sorption and desorption characteristics of a packed bed of clay-CaCl{sub 2} desiccant particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Desiccants can be used in conjunction with solar energy to provide a viable alternative to traditional air conditioning techniques. A desiccant consisting of clay and calcium chloride was developed and tested using multiple sorption and desorption cycles. During sorption, inlet air temperatures from 23 to 36 C with corresponding relative humidities of 42-66% were tested. Additionally, superficial air velocities from 0.17 to 0.85 m/s were tested. During desorption, inlet air temperatures from 50 to 57 C and superficial air velocities of approximately 0.30 and 0.60 m/s were tested. A regression equation was determined for the mass of water sorbed by the clay-CaCl2 desiccant with a R{sup 2} value of 0.917. The desorption data was regressed to an exponential function and significant k-values were determined. An equation for pressure drop through the desiccant was determined and compared to existing models. The desiccant was found to perform well during the repeated test cycles though small masses of desiccant were lost due to surface disintegration of the desiccant spheres. (author)

Tretiak, C.S.; Abdallah, N. Ben [Department of Process Engineering and Applied Science, Dalhousie University, P.O. Box 1000, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

Molten salt electrolyte separator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A molten salt electrolyte/separator for battery and related electrochemical systems including a molten electrolyte composition and an electrically insulating solid salt dispersed therein, to provide improved performance at higher current densities and alternate designs through ease of fabrication.

Kaun, Thomas D. (New Lenox, IL)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air-Conditioning (DEVap): Evaluation of a New Concept in Ultra Efficient Air Conditioning  

SciTech Connect

NREL has developed the novel concept of a desiccant enhanced evaporative air conditioner (DEVap) with the objective of combining the benefits of liquid desiccant and evaporative cooling technologies into an innovative 'cooling core.' Liquid desiccant technologies have extraordinary dehumidification potential, but require an efficient cooling sink. DEVap's thermodynamic potential overcomes many shortcomings of standard refrigeration-based direct expansion cooling. DEVap decouples cooling and dehumidification performance, which results in independent temperature and humidity control. The energy input is largely switched away from electricity to low-grade thermal energy that can be sourced from fuels such as natural gas, waste heat, solar, or biofuels.

Kozubal, E.; Woods, J.; Burch, J.; Boranian, A.; Merrigan, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Design and testing a solar cooling system employing liquid desiccants: Dehumidifier experiments in Colorado State University Solar House II: Final report, 1986--1987  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A nominal 3-ton (10.5-kW) lithium bromide, open-cycle desiccant cooling system has been designed, installed, and operated. This experimental system dehumidifies ambient air in a packed bed utilizing an aqueous solution of lithium bromide. The absorbent solution is distributed by spray nozzles and flows countercurrent to the air. The dilute solution exiting the dehumidifier is concentrated in a packed bed regenerator by solar heated air. The strong solution is cooled by two heat exchangers before reentering the dehumidifier. Provisions to simulate conditions of high ambient humidity and temperature have been made. Experiments on the dehumidifier operating in a decoupled mode (without countercurrent regenerator operation) have been carried out. Cooling capacities in the range of 1.0--4.0 refrigeration tons have been achieved, depending upon the operating conditions. The effect of different independent variables on the capacity of the dehumidifier has been studied. An empirical equation correlating the variables have been obtained by statistical analysis of the data. The equation obtained indicates that the capacity of the dehumidifier depends strongly on the solution concentration, solution flow rate, air inlet temperature and the air humidity. Two other variables studied, the solution inlet temperature and the air flow rate, did not affect the cooling capacity greatly. The dependence of condensation rate on each of the variables is analyzed. 22 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

Lenz, T.G.; Loef, G.O.G.; Patnaik, S.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Experimental Investigation on the Operation Performance of a Liquid Desiccant Air-conditioning System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A large share of energy consumption is taken by an air-conditioning system. It worsens the electricity load of the power network. Therefore, more and more scholars are paying attention to research on new types of air-conditioning systems that are energy- saving and environment-friendly. A liquid desiccant air conditioning system is among them, as it has a tremendous ability for power storage and low requirements for heat resources. Heat with low temperatures, such as excess heat, waste heat, and solar power, is suitable for the liquid desiccant air-conditioning system. The feasibility and economical efficiency of the system are studied in this experimental research. The result shows that when the temperature of the regeneration is about 80?, the thermodynamic coefficient of the system is about 0.6, and the supply air temperature of the air-conditioning system remains stable at 21?, the air-conditioning system can meet human comfort levels.

Liu, J.; Wang, J.; Wu, Z.; Gu, W.; Zhang, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Development of a solar-desiccant dehumidifier. Phase II second technical progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The solar desiccant air conditioner (SODAC) system and its operation are described, including the characteristics of the major components, the performance at design conditions, and the control schemes for optimum operation in various climates. The system uses granular silica gel as a desiccant. It may operate in either a recirculated mode (no air exchange between the outside and the conditioned space) or a ventilated mode (air exchanged between outside and conditioned space). The test data in the ventilated mode at design flow rates are presented. Data include outdoor and indoor inlet wet and dry bulb temperatures, indoor outlet dry and wet bulb temperatures, capacity, coefficient of performance, air flow rates, hot water temperature, and solar heat used. The effects of indoor, outdoor, and hot water temperatures on the capacity and coefficient of performance are shown graphically, and the recirculated and ventilated modes, performances are compared. (LEW)

Rousseau, J.

1981-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

179

Comparison of the performance of open cycle air conditioners utilizing rotary desiccant dehumidifiers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of an investigation of open cycle cooling systems using rotary desiccant dehumidifiers. Three systems, the ventilation, recirculation, and Dunkle cycles have been modeled. The performance of these systems coupled with an air-based solar system has been determined using TRNSYS simulations of system operation in four representative US climates. The system COP, fraction of the total cooling load met by the desiccant system, and fraction of the thermal energy provided by solar energy are compared. An assessment of the effect of climate and system parameters on the relative performance of the three system configurations is made. It is shown that in order to meet residential loads of 7 to 11 kW with a COP on the order of unity, systems with high effectiveness must be employed. These systems were also found to perform well when operated solely with a solar thermal input.

Jurinak, J.J.; Beckman, W.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Simulation and study of thermal performance of liquid desiccant cooling cycle configurations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Five configurations of a 3-ton liquid desiccant cooling cycle were simulated and analyzed on a digital computer. Algebraic equations were developed for the dry bulbtemperatures and humidity ratios at different locations in the systems and solved using a finite difference scheme. The simulations were done at steady state and standard ASHRAE indoor and outdoor conditions. The study compared thermal performance of these five system configurations consisting of a direct evaporative cooler, indirect evaporative cooler(s), liquid desiccant packed dehumidifying tower, and air-to-air heat exchanger. Constant effectiveness of 0.85 and 0.9 were assumed for the direct evaporative cooler and air-to-air heat exchanger respectively. The performance of these five cycles is judged by the thermal Coefficient of Performance (COP). The Sensible Heat Ratio (SHR) is used to quantify the ratio of sensible cooling provided to the total cooling done (sensible plus latent).

Dhir, Rajesh

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desiccant salt solutions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Development of a solar-desiccant dehumidifier. Phase II. Final summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The solar desiccant air conditioner (SODAC), its operation, characteristics of the major components, performance at design conditions, and the control schemes for optimum operation in various climates are described for both recirculated and ventilated configurations, with greater emphasis on the recirculated configuration. The development testing and the determination of the SODAC performance in both configurations over the entire range of interfacing parameters are reported. (LEW)

Rousseau, J.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Analysis and comparison of active solar desiccant and absorption cooling systems. Part 2; Annual simulation results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comparative analysis has been performed to compare the cooling and dehumidification performance of future ventilation mode desiccant systems, proposed advanced absorption systems, and conventional vapor compression systems. A common framework has been developed for direct comparison of these different cooling technologies; this method is described in a companion paper. This paper presents the application of this method to annual simulations of cooling system performance in five cities.

Warren, M.L. (ASI Controls, San Ramon, CA (US)); Wahlig, M. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA). Applied Science Div.)

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Effects of Porous Medium Heterogeneity on Vadose Zone Desiccation: Intermediate-scale Laboratory Experiments and Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil desiccation (drying), involving water evaporation induced by dry gas injection, is a potentially robust vadose zone remediation process to limit contaminant transport through the vadose zone. A series of four intermediate-scale flow cell experiments was conducted in homogeneous and simple layered heterogeneous porous medium systems to investigate the effects of heterogeneity on desiccation of unsaturated porous media. The permeability ratios of porous medium layers ranged from about five to almost two orders of magnitude. The insulated flow cell was equipped with twenty humidity and temperature sensors and a dual-energy gamma system was used to determine water saturations at various times. The multiphase code STOMP was used to simulate the desiccation process. Results show that injected dry gas flowed predominantly in the higher permeability layer and delayed water removal from the lower permeability material. For the configurations tested, water vapor diffusion from the lower to the higher permeability zone was considerable over the duration of the experiments, resulting in much larger relative humidity values of the outgoing air than based on permeability ratios alone. Acceptable numerical matches with the experimental data were obtained when an extension of the saturation-capillary pressure relation below the residual water saturation was used. The agreements between numerical and experimental results suggest that the correct physics are implemented in the simulator and that the thermal and hydraulic properties of the porous media, flow cell wall and insulation materials were properly represented.

Oostrom, Martinus; Freedman, Vicky L.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Dane, Jacob H.; Truex, Michael J.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Printed on recycled paperPERFORMANCE OF A COMBINED SOLAR DESICCANT FILTRATION AIR-CONDITIONING SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A solar desiccant filtration system and conventional system were compared by simulating their performance over a cooling season using TRNSYS and Typic,aI Meteorological Year (TMY) weather data for a r,a.nge of system p‘arameters. The desiccant dehumidifier was modeled as a heat ‘and m,ass exe hanger with moisture and temperature effectivenesses based on the equilibrium intersection point. The activated carbon filter was modeled as a reduction of required ventilation tlow rate to m,aintain acceptable contamirmnt levels in the space. Several locations were investigated. The desiccant isotherm shape was varied from a moderate Brunauer Type I to silica gel (line,%) and the solar collector a-ea wxs varied from 0 to 4,000 ft2 to see its effect on the savings per season. The isotherm shape ‘and location had little effect on the resulting savings. The savings were between $2,800 and!S4,800 per season depending on the amount of collector carea. 1.

S. M. Burley; M. E. Arden; R. Campbell-howe; B. Wilkins-crowder; T. B. Jekel; J. W. Mitchell; S. A. Klein; W. A. Beckman

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular Salt Consolidation, Constitutive Model and Micromechanics Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular Salt Consolidation, Constitutive Model and Micromechanics The report addresses granular salt reconsolidation from three vantage points: laboratory testing, modeling, and petrofabrics. The experimental data 1) provide greater insight and understanding into the role of elevated temperature and pressure regimes on physical properties of reconsolidated crushed salt, 2) can supplement an existing database used to develop a reconsolidation constitutive model and 3) provide data for model evaluation. The constitutive model accounts for the effects of moisture through pressure solution and dislocation creep, with both terms dependent

186

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular Salt Consolidation, Constitutive Model and Micromechanics Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular Salt Consolidation, Constitutive Model and Micromechanics The report addresses granular salt reconsolidation from three vantage points: laboratory testing, modeling, and petrofabrics. The experimental data 1) provide greater insight and understanding into the role of elevated temperature and pressure regimes on physical properties of reconsolidated crushed salt, 2) can supplement an existing database used to develop a reconsolidation constitutive model and 3) provide data for model evaluation. The constitutive model accounts for the effects of moisture through pressure solution and dislocation creep, with both terms dependent

187

Salt Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salt Wells Geothermal Area (Redirected from Salt Wells Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Salt Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 9.1 Regional Setting 9.2 Stratigraphy 9.3 Structure 10 Hydrothermal System 11 Heat Source 12 Geofluid Geochemistry 13 NEPA-Related Analyses (9) 14 Exploration Activities (28) 15 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

188

Salts of alkali metal anions and process of preparing same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Compounds of alkali metal anion salts of alkali metal cations in bicyclic polyoxadiamines are disclosed. The salts are prepared by contacting an excess of alkali metal with an alkali metal dissolving solution consisting of a bicyclic polyoxadiamine in a suitable solvent, and recovered by precipitation. The salts have a gold-color crystalline appearance and are stable in a vacuum at -10.degree. C. and below.

Dye, James L. (East Lansing, MI); Ceraso, Joseph M. (Lansing, MI); Tehan, Frederick J. (Utica, NY); Lok, Mei Tak (Urbana, IL)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Amine salts of nitroazoles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Compositions of matter, a method of providing chemical energy by burning said compositions, and methods of making said compositions. These compositions are amine salts of nitroazoles.

Lee, Kien-yin (Los Alamos, NM); Stinecipher, Mary M. (Los Alamos, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Molten salt electrolyte separator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The patent describes a molten salt electrolyte/separator for battery and related electrochemical systems including a molten electrolyte composition and an electrically insulating solid salt dispersed therein, to provide improved performance at higher current densities and alternate designs through ease of fabrication. 5 figs.

Kaun, T.D.

1996-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

191

Solar liquid-desiccant air-conditioning system. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A design for a closed, diurnal, intermittent absorption chiller for passive solar air-conditioning using liquid sorbents has been constructed and tested. LiBr-H/sub 2/O will not work with this design because of its low vapor pressure at the temperature available. The approach has possibilities using the 2 LiBr-ZrBr-CH/sub 3/OH or H/sub 2/O-NH/sub 3/ sorbent refrigerant pairs. The use of H/sub 2/O-NH/sub 3/ appears to be the better candidate because of the lower solution viscosity and less cycle weight, through tank volumes and collector requirements are similar. Further study of other refrigerant pairs such as S-Thiocyanate-ammonia is indicated, however, the difficulties encountered in construction and low potential coefficient of performance, and thus large collection area needed, makes commercialization of such a system doubtful in the foreseeable future.

Not Available

192

Analysis and design of a solar-powered liquid-desiccant air conditioner for use in hot and humid climates  

SciTech Connect

An experimental and theoretical investigation of the feasibility of a solar-powered liquid-desiccant air conditioner, for use in hot and humid climates, was carried out at the Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Florida. The proposed liquid desiccant system used nonadiabatic contactors, packed with finned-tube coils, for both moist air dehumidification and liquid-desiccant regeneration. A theoretical model was developed to analyze the complex phenomena of simultaneous heat and mass transfer in nonadiabatic contactors, as well as the continuous interaction between the dehumidification and regeneration processes. A computer code was written to assist in the analysis of the dehumidification and regeneration processes separately and coupled, for continuous operation. It was used to investigate the interaction between the different controlling parameters and their effects on the overall performance of the desiccant system. A fully solar-powered liquid-desiccant air-conditioner, with three tons of capacity was designed and optimized including economical criteria. The overall coefficient of performance (COP) of the optimized system was determined to be 0.312.

Chebbah, A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

EnergySolutions Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Place Salt Lake City, Utah Zip 84101 Sector Services Product Utah-based international nuclear services company that provides services and solutions to the nuclear industry....

194

Removal of radioisotopes from waste solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention comprises removing radioisotopes from waste liquids or solutions by passing these through filters and through a column containing a suitable salt of phosphoric acid. (Official Gazette)

Kirby, H.W.

1973-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Molten salt test loop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the Molten Salt Test Loop Project was to design, construct, and demonstrate operation of an outdoor high temperature molten salt test facility. This facility is operational, and can now be used to evaluate materials and components, and the design features and operating procedures required for molten salt heat transport systems. The initial application of the loop was to demonstrate the feasibility of using molten salt as the heat transport medium for a high temperature distributed collector system. A commercially available eutectic salt blend is used as the heat transfer fluid. This salt has a composition of 40% NaNO/sub 2/, 7% NaNO/sub 3/, and 53% KNO/sub 3/ and is marketed under the trade name Hitec. It has a freezing (solidifying) point of 142/sup 0/C (288/sup 0/F) and has been satisfactorily used at temperatures as high as 594/sup 0/C (1100/sup 0/F). General Atomic (GA) installed a row of Fixed Mirror Solar Concentrators (FMSC's) in the loop. The system was started up and a test program conducted. Startup went smoothly, with the exception of some burned-out trace heaters. Salt temperatures as high as 571/sup 0/C (1060/sup 0/F) were achieved.

Schuster, J.R.; Eggers, G.H.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Brines formed by multi-salt deliquescence  

SciTech Connect

The FY05 Waste Package Environment testing program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory focused on determining the temperature, relative humidity, and solution compositions of brines formed due to the deliquescence of NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} and NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3}-Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} salt mixtures. Understanding the physical and chemical behavior of these brines is important because they define conditions under which brines may react with waste canister surfaces. Boiling point experiments show that NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} and NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3}-Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} salt mixtures form brines that transform to hydrous melts that do not truly 'dry out' until temperatures exceed 300 and 400 C, respectively. Thus a conducting solution is present for these salt assemblages over the thermal history of the repository. The corresponding brines form at lower relative humidity at higher temperatures. The NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} salt mixture has a mutual deliquescence relative humidity (MDRH) of 25.9% at 120 C and 10.8% at 180 C. Similarly, the KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} salt mixture has MDRH of 26.4% at 120 C and 20.0% at 150 C. The KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} salt mixture salts also absorb some water (but do not appear to deliquesce) at 180 C and thus may also contribute to the transfer of electrons at interface between dust and the waste package surface. There is no experimental evidence to suggest that these brines will degas and form less deliquescent salt assemblages. Ammonium present in atmospheric and tunnel dust (as the chloride, nitrate, or sulfate) will readily decompose in the initial heating phase of the repository, and will affect subsequent behavior of the remaining salt mixture only through the removal of a stoichiometric equivalent of one or more anions. Although K-Na-NO{sub 3}-Cl brines form at high temperature and low relative humidity, these brines are dominated by nitrate, which is known to inhibit corrosion at lower temperature. Nitrate to chloride ratios of the NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} salt mixture are about NO{sub 3}:Cl = 19:1. The role of nitrate on corrosion at higher temperatures is addressed in a companion report (Dixit et al., 2005).

Carroll, S; Rard, J; Alai, M; Staggs, K

2005-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

197

Simple predictive model for performance of desiccant beds for solar dehumidification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computer model is outlined for the absorption/desorption process that can be used to predict the performance of desiccant beds for solar regenerated dehumidification of passively cooled buildings. Instead of solving a set of coupled differential equations, the model uses simple algebraic equations for steady-state heat and mass exchangers. A comparison of computer predictions and experimental data demonstrate the validity and accuracy of the model. The physics of the adsorption process is discussed in terms of two psychrometric process lines, and planned research efforts at SERI are described.

Barlow, R.S.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Gas-fired desiccant dehumidification system field evaluation in a quick-service restaurant. Final report, October 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a field evaluation of state-of-art desiccant dehumidification equipment in Houston, TX. The evaluation demonstrated that comfort control in a quick-service restaurant could be improved dramatically. However, available gas-fired desiccant dehumidification equipment is too expensive, inefficient, and unreliable to be considered for wide application in the restaurant industry. Results of a technical and economic analysis of four HVAC options in four U.S. cities indicated that improved comfort control could be achieved with only a modest increase in operating costs with an advanced system. This, coupled with the economic benefits achieved through lower indoor humidity such as improved crew performance and reduced maintenance costs, could justify the introduction of an advanced, integrated, HVAC system using desiccant technology which has an installed cost similar to current equipment.

Koopman, R.N.; Marciniak, T.J.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Bases, Assumptions, and Results of the Flowsheet Calculations for the Decision Phase Salt Disposition Alternatives  

SciTech Connect

The HLW salt waste (salt cake and supernate) now stored at the SRS must be treated to remove insoluble sludge solids and reduce the soluble concentration of radioactive cesium radioactive strontium and transuranic contaminants (principally Pu and Np). These treatments will enable the salt solution to be processed for disposal as saltstone, a solid low-level waste.

Elder, H.H.

2001-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

200

Salt Waste Processing Initiatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Patricia Suggs Patricia Suggs Salt Processing Team Lead Assistant Manager for Waste Disposition Project Office of Environmental Management Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Initiatives 2 Overview * Current SRS Liquid Waste System status * Opportunity to accelerate salt processing - transformational technologies - Rotary Microfiltration (RMF) and Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) - Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (ARP/MCU) extension with next generation extractant - Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) performance enhancement - Saltstone enhancements * Life-cycle impacts and benefits 3 SRS Liquid Waste Total Volume >37 Million Gallons (Mgal) Total Curies 183 MCi (51% ) 175 MCi (49% ) >358 Million Curies (MCi) Sludge 34.3 Mgal (92% ) 3.0 Mgal (8%)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desiccant salt solutions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Amine salts of nitroazoles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Compositions of matter, a method of providing chemical energy by burning said compositions, and methods of making said compositions are described. These compositions are amine salts of nitroazoles. 1 figure.

Kienyin Lee; Stinecipher, M.M.

1993-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

202

Salt Selected (FINAL)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WHY SALT WAS SELECTED AS A DISPOSAL MEDIUM WHY SALT WAS SELECTED AS A DISPOSAL MEDIUM Waste Isolation Pilot Plant U.S. Department Of Energy Government officials and scientists chose the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site through a selection process that started in the 1950s. At that time, the National Academy of Sciences conducted a nationwide search for geological formations stable enough to contain radioactive wastes for thousands of years. In 1955, after extensive

203

Salt Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salt Wells Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Salt Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 9.1 Regional Setting 9.2 Stratigraphy 9.3 Structure 10 Hydrothermal System 11 Heat Source 12 Geofluid Geochemistry 13 NEPA-Related Analyses (9) 14 Exploration Activities (28) 15 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

204

Brine flow in heated geologic salt.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the physical processes, primary governing equations, solution approaches, and historic testing related to brine migration in geologic salt. Although most information presented in this report is not new, we synthesize a large amount of material scattered across dozens of laboratory reports, journal papers, conference proceedings, and textbooks. We present a mathematical description of the governing brine flow mechanisms in geologic salt. We outline the general coupled thermal, multi-phase hydrologic, and mechanical processes. We derive these processes' governing equations, which can be used to predict brine flow. These equations are valid under a wide variety of conditions applicable to radioactive waste disposal in rooms and boreholes excavated into geologic salt.

Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Malama, Bwalya

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Investigations on Vapour Compression Air Conditioner with Direct Contact Desiccant Loop over Condenser and Evaporator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Perceived air quality increases when relative humidity is decreased till about 30% in the range of comfort temperature. In the present scenario, humidity is considered as a pollutant. Hence, a controlled environment not only at low temperature but also at low humidity is desired for many applications such as archives, data centers, etc. Either a separate dehumidifier or a precision air conditioning (AC) system needs to be employed for such an application. In fact, the latter forms a reheat AC system which happens to be energy inefficient. In view of this, a vapor compression window air conditioner is investigated with a superimposed liquid desiccant loop harnessing the advantages of both the compression system (high COP) and desiccant system (low humidity). Operation of such a novel system is explained, elucidating the operational feasibility. The results presented consider the characteristics of such a system with respect to changes in the evaporator inlet air temperature and humidity. The change in the specific humidity of air is compared for vapor compression system and the direct contact hybrid system for different values of inlet air temperature.

Maiya, M. P.; Ravi, J.; Tiwari, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Indoor Humidity Analysis of an Integrated Radiant Cooling and Desiccant Ventilation System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiant cooling is credited with improving energy efficiency and enhancing the comfort level as an alternative method of space cooling in mild and dry climates, according to recent research. Since radiant cooling panels lack the capability to remove latent heat, they normally are used in conjunction with an independent ventilation system, which is capable of decoupling the space sensible and latent loads. Condensation concerns limit the application of radiant cooling. This paper studies the dehumidification processes of solid desiccant systems and investigates the factors that affect the humidity levels of a radiantly cooled space. Hourly indoor humidity is simulated at eight different operating conditions in a radiantly cooled test-bed office. The simulation results show that infiltration and ventilation flow rates are the main factors affecting indoor humidity level and energy consumption in a radiantly cooled space with relatively constant occupancy. It is found that condensation is hard to control in a leaky office operated with the required ventilation rate. Slightly pressurizing the space is recommended for radiant cooling. The energy consumption simulation shows that a passive desiccant wheel can recover about 50% of the ventilation load.

Gong, X.; Claridge, D. E.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Dynamic performance of packed-bed dehumidifiers: experimental results from the SERI desiccant test loop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discussed are the design and construction of a desiccant test loop and results of tests with a silica-gel-packed bed. The test loop consists of two centrifugal fans, two duct heaters, a steam humidifier, 24.4m (80 ft) of 30-cm (12-in.) circular duct, instrumentation, and a test section. The loop is capable of testing adsorption and desorption modes at flow rates up to 0.340 kg/s (600 scfm) and at regeneration temperatures up to 120/sup 0/C (248/sup 0/F). Tests of a 74-cm(29-in.)-diameter, 3.2-cm(1.25-in.)-thick silica gel bed indicated that mass transfer occurs more readily in the adsorption direction than in the desorption direction. Pressure drop data indicated that the resistance of each of the two screens that hold the silica gel in place was equivalent to 2.5-cm(1-in.) of silica gel due to plugging. Results of the tests were also used to validate a SERI desiccant computer model, DESSIM.

Kutscher, C F; Barlow, R S

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Solar-Powered, Liquid-Desiccant Air Conditioner for Low-Electricity Humidity Control: Report and Summary Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project was to demonstrate the capabilities of a new high-performance, liquid-desiccant dedicated outdoor air system (DOAS) to enhance cooling efficiency and comfort in humid climates while substantially reducing electric peak demand at Tyndall Air Force Base (AFB), which is 12 miles east of Panama City, Florida.

Dean, J.; Kozubal, E.; Herrmann, L.; Miller, J.; Lowenstein, A.; Barker, G.; Slayzak, S.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Salt Creek Student Homepage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Salt Creek Investigation Salt Creek Investigation</2> "Whales Dying in the Pacific Ocean" "Fish Dying in Lake Michigan" Recent headlines remind us of environmental problems near and far away. Scientists have been wondering if these problems could be due to the warmer temperatures this past spring and summer or could there be other reasons? Lack of rain and near drought conditions have forced many areas to restrict water use. We know from past history that pollution affects our drinking water and marine life. Remember what we read about Lake Erie and from reading A River Ran Wild by Lynne Cherry. There are many factors affecting the environment around us . . . even in Salt Creek which runs through our area. We may not be able to investigate the Pacific Ocean and Lake Michigan

210

Gas releases from salt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The occurrence of gas in salt mines and caverns has presented some serious problems to facility operators. Salt mines have long experienced sudden, usually unexpected expulsions of gas and salt from a production face, commonly known as outbursts. Outbursts can release over one million cubic feet of methane and fractured salt, and are responsible for the lives of numerous miners and explosions. Equipment, production time, and even entire mines have been lost due to outbursts. An outburst creates a cornucopian shaped hole that can reach heights of several hundred feet. The potential occurrence of outbursts must be factored into mine design and mining methods. In caverns, the occurrence of outbursts and steady infiltration of gas into stored product can effect the quality of the product, particularly over the long-term, and in some cases renders the product unusable as is or difficult to transport. Gas has also been known to collect in the roof traps of caverns resulting in safety and operational concerns. The intent of this paper is to summarize the existing knowledge on gas releases from salt. The compiled information can provide a better understanding of the phenomena and gain insight into the causative mechanisms that, once established, can help mitigate the variety of problems associated with gas releases from salt. Outbursts, as documented in mines, are discussed first. This is followed by a discussion of the relatively slow gas infiltration into stored crude oil, as observed and modeled in the caverns of the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve. A model that predicts outburst pressure kicks in caverns is also discussed.

Ehgartner, B.; Neal, J.; Hinkebein, T.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Fabricating of Lithium-Battery-Grade Precursor Salt Cobaltous Carbonate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some factors affect precursor capability, for example: raw material CoCl2 solution impurity?feeding methods of reactants?solutions’ pH value of deposition reaction?washing conditions, etc.. Cobalt chloride is chosen as raw ... Keywords: Salt Cobalt Carbonate, Cobalt Chloride, battery-grade Precursor, Shape

Jian Zhou; Li-jun Li; Gong-xiu He; Ke Chen

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Zero Carryover Liquid-Desiccant Air Conditioner for Solar Applications: Preprint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Zero Carryover A Zero Carryover Liquid-Desiccant Air Conditioner for Solar Applications Preprint A. Lowenstein AIL Research, Inc. S. Slayzak and E. Kozubal National Renewable Energy Laboratory To be presented at ASME International Solar Energy Conference (ISEC2006) Denver, Colorado July 8-13, 2006 Conference Paper NREL/CP-550-39798 July 2006 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Midwest Research Institute (MRI), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-99GO10337. Accordingly, the US Government and MRI retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

213

Development of a solar desiccant dehumidifier. Phase II. Technical progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effort reported is a continuation of the development testing of the 1.5-ton solar desiccant air conditioner (SODAC) and is concerned with determination of the SODAC performance in the recirculated and ventilated mode configuration. Test data in the recirculated mode are presented. As originally conceived, the SODAC features two-speed indoor and outdoor fans to permit more efficient operation at reduced capacity. In both full-flow and half-flow cases, the experimental data are compared to computer predictions. The system and its operation are described, as are the system test facility and procedures. The system description includes the characteristics of the major components, the performance at design conditions, and the control schemes for optimum operation in various climates. (LEW)

Rousseau, J.

1981-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

214

Testing of a solar powered cooling system using cross-cooled desiccant dehumidifiers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A solar powered desiccant cooling system using two fixed bed silica gel dehumidifiers has been designed, built and is being tested. The dehumidifiers, 0.6 x 0.6 x 0.6 m each, are constructed of 80 channels lined with 64 m/sup 2/ of 1.5 mm thick silica gel sheets. The bed is cooled by air flowing in an equal number of perpendicular channels. Both sets of channels are two mm wide, the dehumidifiers undergo adsorption, preheating, desorption and precooling in a cyclic fashion. The cooling capacity of the experimental system is one ton at ARI design conditions. The system has a high cooling capacity, high COP, low parasitic power consumption and requires low regeneration temperatures.

Monnier, J.B.; Worek, W.M.; Lavan, Z.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Heated muds solve squeezing-salt problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Squeezing salts have been responsible for major drilling problems in many areas of the world for over half a century. In NAM's area of operations, they occur primarily in the Zechstein group of evaporites. They are responsible for problems such as stuck pipe during drilling and casing failure during both drilling and casing failure during both drilling and production, sometimes as much as 12 years after drilling. Since 1960, some US $170 million (at 1992 drilling costs) have been spent redrilling wells with failed casing strings. In 1991, NAM was associated with a Billiton project to drill 2 wells for the solution mining of magnesium and potassium salts. Gauge holes were a prerequisite to identify the objective salts by electric logging. Excellent results were achieved by drilling with a heated salt mud that had been saturated on surface to downhole conditions. The heating requirements for the Billiton project were modest, as the top of the squeezing salt occurred at approximately 1,500 m (4,920 ft), requiring a circulating temperature of 45 C (113 F) to achieve the necessary saturation level. However, in NAM's operations, the top of the squeezing salt generally occurs between 2.500 m and 3,000 m (8,200 ft and 9,850 ft), requiring temperatures on the order of 70 C (158 F). Despite the need for higher temperatures, the success of the Billiton project prompted NAM to introduce the heating system on a trial basis. To date eight wells have been drilled using the system, resulting in the drilling of a virtual gauge hole with successful cementations being achieved in each case.

Muecke, N.B. (Nederlandse Aardolie, Maatschappij (Netherlands))

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

RECHARGEABLE MOLTEN-SALT CELLS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

KC! /FeS 2 cell lithium-silicon magnesium oxide molten-saltmolten-salt cells Na/Na glass/Na:z.Sn-S cell Na/NazO•xA!Symposium on Molten Salts, Physical Electrochemistry

Cairns, Elton J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

The Thorium Molten Salt Reactor Moving on from the MSBR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A re-evaluation of the Molten Salt Breeder Reactor concept has revealed problems related to its safety and to the complexity of the reprocessing considered. A reflection is carried out anew in view of finding innovative solutions leading to the Thorium Molten Salt Reactor concept. Several main constraints are established and serve as guides to parametric evaluations. These then give an understanding of the influence of important core parameters on the reactor's operation. The aim of this paper is to discuss this vast research domain and to single out the Molten Salt Reactor configurations that deserve further evaluation.

Mathieu, L; Brissot, R; Le Brun, C; Liatard, E; Loiseaux, J M; Méplan, O; Merle-Lucotte, E; Nuttin, A; Wilson, J; Garzenne, C; Lecarpentier, D; Walle, E

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

The Thorium Molten Salt Reactor : Moving on from the MSBR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A re-evaluation of the Molten Salt Breeder Reactor concept has revealed problems related to its safety and to the complexity of the reprocessing considered. A reflection is carried out anew in view of finding innovative solutions leading to the Thorium Molten Salt Reactor concept. Several main constraints are established and serve as guides to parametric evaluations. These then give an understanding of the influence of important core parameters on the reactor's operation. The aim of this paper is to discuss this vast research domain and to single out the Molten Salt Reactor configurations that deserve further evaluation.

L. Mathieu; D. Heuer; R. Brissot; C. Le Brun; E. Liatard; J. M. Loiseaux; O. Méplan; E. Merle-Lucotte; A. Nuttin; J. Wilson; C. Garzenne; D. Lecarpentier; E. Walle; the GEDEPEON Collaboration

2005-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

219

Salt Creek Scenario  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scenario Scenario HELP Index Summary Scenario References Student Pages Two branches of Salt Creek run through the city of Rolling Meadows, Illinois, not far from our school. Five members of our team of eighth grade teachers from different subject areas (science, language arts, bilingual education and special education), decided to develop an interdisciplinary study of Salt Creek as a way of giving our students authentic experiences in environmental studies. The unit begins when students enter school in August, running through the third week of September, and resuming for three weeks in October. Extension activities based on using the data gathered at the creek continue throughout the school year, culminating in a presentation at a city council meeting in the spring.

220

Experimental studies of heat and mass exchange in parallel-passage rotary desiccant dehumidifiers for solar cooling applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents results of work done to experimentally characterize the performance of rotary desiccant dehumidifiers and to develop and validate analytical methods for evaluating their performance in air-conditioning systems. A facility, the Cyclic Test Facility, and a test-and-analysis procedure were developed to evaluate the performance of the rotary dehumidifiers. Experiments were performed to develop a basic understanding of the simultaneous heat- and mass-transfer processes in the dehumidifiers. Two test articles were tested under cyclic operation to characterize their performance. Detailed accounts of the Cyclic Test Facility, its hardware and instrumentation, the two test articles, and data reduction and analysis methods are provided. The data provide an engineering data base for evaluating rotary desiccant dehumidifiers for cooling applications. 46 refs., 26 figs., 3 tabs.

Bharathan, D.; Parsons, J.M.; Maclaine-cross, I.L.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desiccant salt solutions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The Experimentation System Design and Experimental Study of the Air-Conditioning by Desiccant Type Using Solar Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a special solar air heater to gain heat power for regenerating an adsorption desiccant wheel made by composite silica gel, a desiccant air-conditioning experimentation system was designed and manufactured. Combining the advantage of measure and control by “PLC” and the software of “Kingview”, the whole year's operating results of this system was tested and analysed. The results indicate this system can keep the indoor air temperature range at 26±2°C and the relative humidity range being 50-70% under the low electricity cost on the whole year in the south of China region when the special solar air heater can offer flux air heating up to 60°C. In this paper some ideas are offered in order to facilitate the availability for air-conditioning using low grade energy, for example, solar energy and surplus or waste heat energy in the industrial process.

Zhuo, X.; Ding, J.; Yang, X.; Chen, S.; Yang, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Field Evaluation of Desiccant-Integrated HVAC Systems: A Review of Case Studies in Multiple Commercial/Institutional Building Types  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An independent field research effort co-funded by the Gas Research Institute and The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory is documenting the performance and energy usage characteristics of active desiccant-integrated HVAC systems at a variety of commercial and institutional facilities. The tests comprise the instrumentation and one-year-plus monitoring of two or more nearly identical sites, one serving as the test site and the others as base-case or control sites. While the research program is ongoing, work completed in two market sectors, retail and lodging, indicates that there are significant comfort control, energy usage and equipment efficiency benefits to be derived from integrating desiccant units into HVAC system design to handle latent and sensible loads independently. In some cases, installed first costs associated with including desiccant units may be lower if the HVAC system is optimized to take advantage of reduced conventional cooling equipment requirements and downsized ductwork In most cases, lower energy consumption and/or reduced energy costs may provide reasonable payback of first cost premiums.

Yborra, S. C.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Summary - Salt Waste Processing Facility Design at the Savannah River Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Salt Waste Processing Facility Salt Waste Processing Facility ETR Report Date: November 2006 ETR-4 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Salt Waste Processing Facility Design at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) is intended to remove and concentrate the radioactive strontium (Sr), actinides, and cesium (Cs) from the bulk salt waste solutions in the SRS high-level waste tanks. The sludge and strip effluent from the SWPF that contain concentrated Sr, actinide, and Cs wastes will be sent to the SRS Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), where they will be vitrified. The decontaminated salt solution (DSS) that is left after removal of the highly

224

Molten salt lithium cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400 to 500/sup 0/C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell which may be operated at temperatures between about 100 to 170/sup 0/C. The cell is comprised of an electrolyte, which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode.

Raistrick, I.D.; Poris, J.; Huggins, R.A.

1980-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

225

Molten salt lithium cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell (10) which may be operated at temperatures between about 100.degree.-170.degree. C. Cell (10) comprises an electrolyte (16), which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode (12).

Raistrick, Ian D. (Menlo Park, CA); Poris, Jaime (Portola Valley, CA); Huggins, Robert A. (Stanford, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Molten salt lithium cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell (10) which may be operated at temperatures between about 100.degree.-170.degree. C. Cell (10) comprises an electrolyte (16), which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode (12).

Raistrick, Ian D. (Menlo Park, CA); Poris, Jaime (Portola Valley, CA); Huggins, Robert A. (Stanford, CA)

1982-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

227

salt lake city.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Locations of the Salt Lake City Processing and Disposal Sites Locations of the Salt Lake City Processing and Disposal Sites This fact sheet provides information about the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 Title I processing site and disposal site at Salt Lake City, Utah. These sites are managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Salt Lake City, Utah, Processing and Disposal Sites Site Descriptions and History Regulatory Setting The former Salt Lake City processing site is located about 4 miles south-southwest of the center of Salt Lake City, Utah, at 3300 South and Interstate 15. The Vitro Chemical Company processed uranium and vanadium ore at the site from 1951 until 1968. Milling operations conducted at the processing site created radioactive tailings, a predominantly sandy material.

228

Electrolyte salts for nonaqueous electrolytes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal complex salts may be used in lithium ion batteries. Such metal complex salts not only perform as an electrolyte salt in a lithium ion batteries with high solubility and conductivity, but also can act as redox shuttles that provide overcharge protection of individual cells in a battery pack and/or as electrolyte additives to provide other mechanisms to provide overcharge protection to lithium ion batteries. The metal complex salts have at least one aromatic ring. The aromatic moiety may be reversibly oxidized/reduced at a potential slightly higher than the working potential of the positive electrode in the lithium ion battery. The metal complex salts may also be known as overcharge protection salts.

Amine, Khalil; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Chen, Zonghai

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

229

Development of a laminar flow desiccant bed for solar air conditioning application  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mass transfer in silica gel beds of different configurations is reviewed in connection with use in the Solar-Desiccant-Evaporative Cooling System. A laminar flow, coated-sheet concept is proposed since it ensures a low pressure drop and minimal solid side mass transfer resistance. A preliminary bed design gives 1/3 the pressure drop of a previous packed particle bed design and a large reduction in volume and silica gel inventory. The construction of a packing module and test rig is described, and test results reported for a particle size of 0.12 mm (60 to 200 mesh) with a passage width of about 1.5 mm. In order to compare theory and experiment, an existing code, NUMINT, which solves the partial differential equations governing heat and mass transfer in silica gel beds, was revised to include the effects of substrate heat capacity, and non-adiabatic operation. Comparisons between theory and experiment were found to be generally satisfactory, though it was found that specification of the bed initial water content for adsorption tests presented some difficulties. The effect of solid side mass transfer resistance was found to be small, which suggests that an optimum design may incorporate a larger particle size. Topics for further work are suggested.

Kim, S.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Batteries using molten salt electrolyte  

SciTech Connect

An electrolyte system suitable for a molten salt electrolyte battery is described where the electrolyte system is a molten nitrate compound, an organic compound containing dissolved lithium salts, or a 1-ethyl-3-methlyimidazolium salt with a melting temperature between approximately room temperature and approximately 250.degree. C. With a compatible anode and cathode, the electrolyte system is utilized in a battery as a power source suitable for oil/gas borehole applications and in heat sensors.

Guidotti, Ronald A. (Albuquerque, NM)

2003-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

231

Molten Salts, Magnesium and Aluminum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 1, 2011 ... Chloride 2011: Practice and Theory of Chloride-Based Metallurgy: Molten Salts, Magnesium and Aluminum Sponsored by: The Minerals, ...

232

Salt effects on isotope partitioning and their geochemical implications: An overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Essential to the use of stable isotopes as natural tracers and geothermometers is the knowledge of equilibrium isotope partitioning between different phases and species, which is usually a function of temperature only. The one exception known to date is oxygen and hydrogen isotope fractionation between liquid water and other phases (steam, gases, minerals), which changes upon the addition of salts to water, i.e., the isotope salt salt effect. Our knowledge of this effect, the difference between activity and composition (a-X) of isotopic water molecules in salt solutions, is very limited and controversial, especially at elevated temperatures. For the last several years, we have been conducting a detailed, systematic experimental study at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the isotope salt effects from room temperature to elevated temperatures (currently to 500{degree}C). From this effort, a simple, coherent picture of the isotope salt effect is emerging, that differs markedly from the complex results reported in the literature. In this communication, we present an overview on the isotope salt effect, obtained chiefly from our study. Observed isotope salt effects in salt solutions are significant even at elevated temperatures. The importance and implications of the isotope salt effect for isotopic studies of brine-dominated systems are also discussed in general terms.

Horita, J.; Cole, D.R.; Fortier, S.M. [and others

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Developments in Molten Salt and Liquid-Salt-Cooled Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the last 5 years, there has been a rapid growth in interest in the use of high-temperature (700 to 1000 deg C) molten and liquid fluoride salts as coolants in nuclear systems. This renewed interest is a consequence of new applications for high-temperature heat and the development of new reactor concepts. Fluoride salts have melting points between 350 and 500 deg C; thus, they are of use only in high-temperature systems. Historically, steam cycles with temperature limits of {approx}550 deg C have been the only efficient method to convert heat to electricity. This limitation produced few incentives to develop high-temperature reactors for electricity production. However, recent advances in Brayton gas turbine technology now make it possible to convert higher-temperature heat efficiency into electricity on an industrial scale and thus have created the enabling technology for more efficient nuclear reactors. Simultaneously, there is a growing interest in using high-temperature nuclear heat for the production of hydrogen and shale oil. Five nuclear-related applications are being investigated: (1) liquid-salt heat-transport systems in hydrogen and shale oil production systems; (2) the advanced high-temperature reactor, which uses a graphite-matrix coated-particle fuel and a liquid salt coolant; (3) the liquid-salt-cooled fast reactor which uses metal-clad fuel and a liquid salt coolant; (4) the molten salt reactor, with the fuel dissolved in the molten salt coolant; and (5) fusion energy systems. The reasons for the new interest in liquid salt coolants, the reactor concepts, and the relevant programs are described. (author)

Forsberg, Charles W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6165 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Solvent wash solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Process for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 volume percent of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

Neace, James C. (Blackville, SC)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Solvent wash solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is claimed for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 vol % of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

Neace, J.C.

1984-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

236

Analysis and development of a solar energy regenerated desiccant crop drying facility: Phase I. Final report, July 1976--April 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a study to verify the technical feasibility of the regenerated desiccant crop drying concept, characterize its performance, investigate design requirements, and define a pilot facility for further evaluating the operational and energy-conservative characteristics of the drying system are documented. The pilot facility defined in this study will be a use R and D tool of sufficient size to permit a meaningful evaluation of the system and to provide the necessary criteria for development of full-scale systems. The principal finding of the study is that the regenerated desiccant crop drying concept is technically feasible and has the capability to achieve a drying efficiency of approximately twice that of conventional crop drying systems. When using a fossil fuel energy source, energy savings will be approximately 40 to 50%. With solar energy input, the total fossil fuel savings could be 70 to 90%. The economic feasibility of the system appears promising. As with other new energy conserving systems that are presently capital-intensive, the economic viability of the system will be dependent on future capital cost reductions, on the future price of fossil fuels, and on the specific application of the system. Regarding system applications, it was concluded that the regenerated desiccant drying system, with or without the use of solar energy, will be economically best suited for a large central processing application, where it can receive a maximum amount of use and will benefit from economy-of-scale cost considerations. The basic study recommendations are: (1) additional R and D activities should be conducted to identify and evaluate means for achieving system cost reductions, and (2) the Mobile Pilot Facility program should be initiated.

Ko, S.M.; Merrifield, D.V.; Fletcher, J.W.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Extracting information from the molten salt database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Molten salt technology is a catchall phrase that includes some very diverse ... nologies are linked by the general characteristics of molten salts that can function

238

Characterization of bedded salt for storage caverns -- A case study from the Midland Basin, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The geometry of Permian bedding salt in the Midland Basin is a product of interaction between depositional facies and postdepositional modification by salt dissolution. Mapping high-frequency cycle patterns in cross section and map view using wireline logs documents the salt geometry. Geologically based interpretation of depositional and dissolution processes provides a powerful tool for mapping and geometry of salt to assess the suitability of sites for development of solution-mined storage caverns. In addition, this process-based description of salt geometry complements existing data about the evolution of one of the best-known sedimentary basins in the world, and can serve as a genetic model to assist in interpreting other salts.

Hovorka, Susan D.; Nava, Robin

2000-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

239

EIS-0082-S2: Savannah River Site Salt Processing, Savannah River Site,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

082-S2: Savannah River Site Salt Processing, Savannah River 082-S2: Savannah River Site Salt Processing, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina EIS-0082-S2: Savannah River Site Salt Processing, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina SUMMARY This SEIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of alternatives for separating the high-activity fraction from the low-activity fraction of the high-level radioactive waste salt solutions now stored in underground tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. The high-activity fraction of the high-level waste (HLW) salt solution would then be vitrified in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and stored until it could be disposed of as HLW in a geologic repository. The low activity fraction would be disposed of as low-level waste (saltstone)

240

BLENDING ANALYSIS FOR RADIOACTIVE SALT WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) evaluated methods to mix and blend the contents of the blend tanks to ensure the contents are properly blended before they are transferred from the blend tank such as Tank 21 and Tank 24 to the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) feed tank. The tank contents consist of three forms: dissolved salt solution, other waste salt solutions, and sludge containing settled solids. This paper focuses on developing the computational model and estimating the operation time of submersible slurry pump when the tank contents are adequately blended prior to their transfer to the SWPF facility. A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics approach was taken by using the full scale configuration of SRS Type-IV tank, Tank 21H. Major solid obstructions such as the tank wall boundary, the transfer pump column, and three slurry pump housings including one active and two inactive pumps were included in the mixing performance model. Basic flow pattern results predicted by the computational model were benchmarked against the SRNL test results and literature data. Tank 21 is a waste tank that is used to prepare batches of salt feed for SWPF. The salt feed must be a homogeneous solution satisfying the acceptance criterion of the solids entrainment during transfer operation. The work scope described here consists of two modeling areas. They are the steady state flow pattern calculations before the addition of acid solution for tank blending operation and the transient mixing analysis during miscible liquid blending operation. The transient blending calculations were performed by using the 95% homogeneity criterion for the entire liquid domain of the tank. The initial conditions for the entire modeling domain were based on the steady-state flow pattern results with zero second phase concentration. The performance model was also benchmarked against the SRNL test results and literature data.

Lee, S.

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desiccant salt solutions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Field Demonstration of Active Desiccant Modules Designed to Integrate with Standard Unitary Rooftop Package Equipment - Final Report: Phase 3  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the investigation of two active desiccant module (ADM) pilot site installations initiated in 2001. Both pilot installations were retrofits at existing facilities served by conventional heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems that had encountered frequent humidity control, indoor air quality (IAQ), and other operational problems. Each installation involved combining a SEMCO, Inc., ADM (as described in Fischer and Sand 2002) with a standard packaged rooftop unit built by the Trane Company. A direct digital control (DDC) system integral to the ADM performed the dual function of controlling the ADM/rooftop combination and facilitating data collection, trending, and remote performance monitoring. The first installation involved providing preconditioned outdoor air to replace air exhausted from the large kitchen hood and bathrooms of a Hooters restaurant located in Rome, Georgia. This facility had previously added an additional rooftop unit in an attempt to achieve occupant comfort without success. The second involved conditioning the outdoor air delivered to each room of a wing of the Mountain Creek Inn at the Callaway Gardens resort. This hotel, designed in the ''motor lodge'' format with each room opening to the outdoors, is located in southwest Georgia. Controlling the space humidity always presented a serious challenge. Uncomfortable conditions and musty odors had caused many guests to request to move to other areas within the resort. This is the first field demonstration performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory where significant energy savings, operating cost savings, and dramatically improved indoor environmental conditions can all be claimed as the results of a retrofit desiccant equipment field installation. The ADM/rooftop combination installed at the restaurant resulted in a reduction of about 34% in the electricity used by the building's air-conditioning system. This represents a reduction of approximately 15% in overall electrical energy consumption and a 12.5-kW reduction in peak demand. The cost of gas used for regeneration of the desiccant wheel over this period of time is estimated to be only $740, using a gas cost of $0.50 per therm--the summer rate in 2001. The estimated net savings is $5400 annually, resulting in a 1-2 year payback. It is likely that similar energy/cost savings were realized at the Callaway Gardens hotel. In this installation, however, a central plant supplied the chilled water serving fan coil units in the hotel wing retrofitted with the ADM, so it was not metered separately. Consequently, the owner could not provide actual energy consumption data specific to the facility. The energy and operating cost savings at both sites are directly attributable to higher cooling-season thermostat settings and decreased conventional system run times. These field installations were selected as an immediate and appropriate response to correct indoor humidity and fresh air ventilation problems being experienced by building occupants and owners, so no rigorous baseline-building vs. test-building energy use/operating cost savings results can be presented. The report presents several simulated comparisons between the ADM/roof HVAC approach and other equipment combinations, where both desiccant and conventional systems are modeled to provide comparable fresh air ventilation rates and indoor humidity levels. The results obtained from these simulations demonstrate convincingly the energy and operating cost savings obtainable with this hybrid desiccant/vapor-compression technology, verifying those actually seen at the pilot installations. The ADM approach is less expensive than conventional alternatives providing similar performance and indoor air quality and provides a very favorable payback (1 year or so) compared with oversized rooftop units that cannot be operated effectively with the necessary high outdoor air percentages.

Fischer, J

2004-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

242

Molten salt thermal energy storage systems: salt selection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A research program aimed at the development of a molten salt thermal energy storage system commenced in June 1976. This topical report describes Work performed under Task I: Salt Selection is described. A total of 31 inorganic salts and salt mixtures, including 9 alkali and alkaline earth carbonate mixtures, were evaluated for their suitability as heat-of-fusion thermal energy storage materials at temperatures of 850 to 1000/sup 0/F. Thermophysical properties, safety hazards, corrosion, and cost of these salts were compared on a common basis. We concluded that because alkali carbonate mixtures show high thermal conductivity, low volumetric expansion on melting, low corrosivity and good stability, they are attractive as heat-of-fusion storage materials in this temperature range. A 35 wt percent Li/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-65 wt percent K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ (50 mole percent Li/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-50 mole percent K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/) mixture was selected as a model system for further experimental work. This is a eutectoid mixture having a heat of fusion of 148 Btu/lb (82 cal/g) that forms an equimolar compound, LiKCO/sub 3/. The Li/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ mixture is intended to serve as a model system to define heat transfer characteristics, potential problems, and to provide ''first-cut'' engineering data required for the prototype system. The cost of a thermal energy storage system containing this mixture cannot be predicted until system characteristics are better defined. However, our comparison of different salts indicated that alkali and alkaline earth chlorides may be more attractive from a salt cost point of view. The long-term corrosion characteristics and the effects of volume change on melting for the chlorides should be investigated to determine their overall suitability as a heat-of-fusion storage medium.

Maru, H.C.; Dullea, J.F.; Huang, V.S.

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

LIFE Materails: Molten-Salt Fuels Volume 8  

SciTech Connect

The goals of the Laser Inertial Fusion Fission Energy (LIFE) is to use fusion neutrons to fission materials with no enrichment and minimum processing and have greatly reduced wastes that are not of interest to making weapons. Fusion yields expected to be achieved in NIF a few times per day are called for with a high reliable shot rate of about 15 per second. We have found that the version of LIFE using TRISO fuel discussed in other volumes of this series can be modified by replacing the molten-flibe-cooled TRISO fuel zone with a molten salt in which the same actinides present in the TRISO particles are dissolved in the molten salt. Molten salts have the advantage that they are not subject to radiation damage, and hence overcome the radiation damage effects that may limit the lifetime of solid fuels such as TRISO-containing pebbles. This molten salt is pumped through the LIFE blanket, out to a heat exchanger and back into the blanket. To mitigate corrosion, steel structures in contact with the molten salt would be plated with tungsten or nickel. The salt will be processed during operation to remove certain fission products (volatile and noble and semi-noble fission products), impurities and corrosion products. In this way neutron absorbers (fission products) are removed and neutronics performance of the molten salt is somewhat better than that of the TRISO fuel case owing to the reduced parasitic absorption. In addition, the production of Pu and rare-earth elements (REE) causes these elements to build up in the salt, and leads to a requirement for a process to remove the REE during operation to insure that the solubility of a mixed (Pu,REE)F3 solid solution is not exceeded anywhere in the molten salt system. Removal of the REE will further enhance the neutronics performance. With molten salt fuels, the plant would need to be safeguarded because materials of interest for weapons are produced and could potentially be removed.

Moir, R; Brown, N; Caro, A; Farmer, J; Halsey, W; Kaufman, L; Kramer, K; Latkowski, J; Powers, J; Shaw, H; Turchi, P

2008-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

244

Energy and economic performance analysis of an open cycle solar desiccant dehumidification air-conditioning system for application in Hong Kong  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article, a transient simulation model and the EnergyPlus were used to study the energy performance and economical feasibility for integrating a solar liquid desiccant dehumidification system with a conventional vapor compression air-conditioning system for the weather condition of Hong Kong. The vapor compression system capacity in the solar assisted air-conditioning system can be reduced to 19 kW from original 28 kW of a conventional air-conditioning system as a case study due to the solar desiccant cooling. The economical performance of the solar desiccant dehumidification system is compared with that of the conventional air-conditioning system. The results show that the energy saving potentials due to incorporation of the solar desiccant dehumidification system in a traditional air-conditioning system is significant for the hot wet weather in Hong Kong due to higher COP resulted from higher supply chilled water temperature from chiller plants. The annual operation energy savings for the hybrid system is 6760 kWh and the payback period of the hybrid system is around 7 years. The study shows that the solar assisted air-conditioning is a viable technology for utilizations in subtropical areas. (author)

Li, Yutong; Lu, Lin; Yang, Hongxing [Renewable Energy Research Group (RERG), Department of Building Services Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom (China)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

245

Freshwater fish in salt water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Freshwater fish in salt water Freshwater fish in salt water Name: Shannon Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What would actually happen if a fresh water fish had to live in salt water? Replies: For most fish, they would die. But some, like eels and salmon, can move freely between the two at certain stages of their lives. To do this they have special mechanisms of excretion and absorption of salt and water. --ProfBill If you put a freshwater fish into saltwater, most fish would lose weight (from losing water from its body) and eventually die. Approximately 2% of all 21000 species of fish actually move from freshwater to saltwater or from salt to fresh at some point in their lives, the move would kill any other fish. But even with these special varieties of fish, the move must be gradual so their bodies can adjust, or they too, will die from the change. If you want to learn more about why the freshwater fish will lose water, (or why a saltwater fish in freshwater would gain water), look up the words "diffusion" and "osmosis"

246

Fracture and Healing of Rock Salt Related to Salt Caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, serious investigations of potential extension of the useful life of older caverns or of the use of abandoned caverns for waste disposal have been of interest to the technical community. All of the potential applications depend upon understanding the reamer in which older caverns and sealing systems can fail. Such an understanding will require a more detailed knowledge of the fracture of salt than has been necessary to date. Fortunately, the knowledge of the fracture and healing of salt has made significant advances in the last decade, and is in a position to yield meaningful insights to older cavern behavior. In particular, micromechanical mechanisms of fracture and the concept of a fracture mechanism map have been essential guides, as has the utilization of continuum damage mechanics. The Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture (MDCF) model, which is summarized extensively in this work was developed specifically to treat both the creep and fracture of salt, and was later extended to incorporate the fracture healing process known to occur in rock salt. Fracture in salt is based on the formation and evolution of microfractures, which may take the form of wing tip cracks, either in the body or the boundary of the grain. This type of crack deforms under shear to produce a strain, and furthermore, the opening of the wing cracks produce volume strain or dilatancy. In the presence of a confining pressure, microcrack formation may be suppressed, as is often the case for triaxial compression tests or natural underground stress situations. However, if the confining pressure is insufficient to suppress fracture, then the fractures will evolve with time to give the characteristic tertiary creep response. Two first order kinetics processes, closure of cracks and healing of cracks, control the healing process. Significantly, volume strain produced by microfractures may lead to changes in the permeability of the salt, which can become a major concern in cavern sealing and operation. The MDCF model is used in three simulations of field experiments in which indirect measures were obtained of the generation of damage. The results of the simulations help to verify the model and suggest that the model captures the correct fracture behavior of rock salt. The model is used in this work to estimate the generation and location of damage around a cylindrical storage cavern. The results are interesting because stress conditions around the cylindrical cavern do not lead to large amounts of damage. Moreover, the damage is such that general failure can not readily occur, nor does the extent of the damage suggest possible increased permeation when the surrounding salt is impermeable.

Chan, K.S.; Fossum, A.F.; Munson, D.E.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Modeled Salt Density for Nuclear Material Estimation in the Treatment of Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

Spent metallic nuclear fuel is being treated in a pyrometallurgical process that includes electrorefining the uranium metal in molten eutectic LiCl-KCl as the supporting electrolyte. We report a model for determining the density of the molten salt. Inventory operations account for the net mass of salt and for the mass of actinides present. It was necessary to know the molten salt density but difficult to measure, and it was decided to model the salt density for the initial treatment operations. The model assumes that volumes are additive for the ideal molten salt solution as a starting point; subsequently a correction factor for the lanthanides and actinides was developed. After applying the correction factor, the percent difference between the net salt mass in the electrorefiner and the resulting modeled salt mass decreased from more than 4.0% to approximately 0.1%. As a result, there is no need to measure the salt density at 500 C for inventory operations; the model for the salt density is found to be accurate.

DeeEarl Vaden; Robert. D. Mariani

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Why Sequence Great Salt Lake?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Great Salt Lake? Great Salt Lake? On average, the Great Salt Lake is four times saltier than the ocean and also has heavy metals, high concentrations of sulfur and petroleum seeps. In spite of all this, the lake is the saltiest body of water to support life. The lake hosts brine shrimp, algae and a diverse array of microbes, not to mention the roughly 5 million birds that migrate there annually. The secret to these microbes' ability to survive under such harsh conditions might be revealed in their genes. Researchers expect the genetic data will provide insight into how the microorganisms tolerate pollutants such as sulfur and detoxify pollutants such as sulfur and heavy metals like mercury. The information could then be used to develop bioremediation techniques. Researchers also expect that sequencing microorganisms sampled

249

Modeling of Sulfate Double-salts in Nuclear Wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to limited tank space at Hanford and Savannah River, the liquid nuclear wastes or supernatants have been concentrated in evaporators to remove excess water prior to the hot solutions being transferred to underground storage tanks. As the waste solutions cooled, the salts in the waste exceeded the associated solubility limits and precipitated in the form of saltcakes. The initial step in the remediation of these saltcakes is a rehydration process called saltcake dissolution. At Hanford, dissolution experiments have been conducted on small saltcake samples from five tanks. Modeling of these experimental results, using the Environmental Simulation Program (ESP), are being performed at the Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) at Mississippi State University. The River Protection Project (RPP) at Hanford will use these experimental and theoretical results to determine the amount of water that will be needed for its dissolution and retrieval operations. A comprehensive effort by the RPP and the Tank Focus Area continues to validate and improve the ESP and its databases for this application. The initial effort focused on the sodium, fluoride, and phosphate system due to its role in the formation of pipeline plugs. In FY 1999, an evaluation of the ESP predictions for sodium fluoride, trisodium phosphate dodecahydrate, and natrophosphate clearly indicated that improvements to the Public database of the ESP were needed. One of the improvements identified was double salts. The inability of any equilibrium thermodynamic model to properly account for double salts in the system can result in errors in the predicted solid-liquid equilibria (SLE) of species in the system. The ESP code is evaluated by comparison with experimental data where possible. However, data does not cover the range of component concentrations and temperatures found in many tank wastes. Therefore, comparison of ESP with another code is desirable, and may illuminate problems with both. For this purpose, the SOLGASMIX code was used in conjunction with a small private database developed at ORNL. This code calculates thermodynamic equilibria through minimization of Gibbs Energy, and utilizes the Pitzer model for activity coefficients. The sodium nitrate-sulfate double salt and the sodium fluoride-sulfate double salt were selected for the FY 2000 validation study of ESP. Even though ESP does not include the sulfate-nitrate double salt, this study found that this omission does not appear to be a major consequence. In this case, the solubility predictions with and without the sulfate-nitrate double salt are comparable. In contrast, even though the sulfate-fluoride double salt is included within the ESP databank, comparison to previous experimental results indicates that ESP underestimates solubility. Thus, the prediction for the sulfate-fluoride system needs to be improved. A main consequence of the inability to accurately predict the SLE of double salts is its impact on the predicted ionic strength of the solution. The ionic strength has been observed to be an important factor in the formation of pipeline plugs. To improve the ESP prediction, solubility tests on the sulfate-fluoride system are underway at DIAL, and these experimental results will be incorporated into the Public database by OLI System, Inc. Preliminary ESP simulations also indicated difficulties with the SLE prediction for anhydrous sodium sulfate. The Public database for the ESP does not include fundamental parameters for this solid in mixed solutions below 32.4 C. The limitation, in the range of anhydrous sodium sulfate, leads to convergence problems in ESP and to inaccurate predictions of solubility near the invariant point when sodium sulfate decahydrate and other salts, such as sodium nitrate, were present. These difficulties were partially corrected through the use of an additional database. In conclusion, these results indicate the need for experimental data at temperatures above 25 C and in solutions containing both nitrate and hydroxide. Furthermore, the validation and do

Toghiani, B.

2000-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

250

Salt Lake Community College | .EDUconnections  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SLCC Partners with DOE's Rocky Mountain Solar Training Program This program is a joint partnership between DOE's Solar Energy Technogies Program, Salt Lake Community College, Solar Energy International, and the Utah Solar Energy Association that works to accelerate use of solar electric technologies, training and facilities at community and technical college solar training programs within a 15 western United States region. DOE Solar Instructor Training Network Salt Lake City, Utah DOE Applauds SLCC's Science and Technical Programs Architectural Technology Biology Biotechnology Biomanufacturing Chemistry Computer Science Electric Sector Training Energy Management Engineering Geographic Information Sciences Geosciences InnovaBio Manufacturing & Mechanical Engineering Technology

251

Development of a solar desiccant dehumidifier. Volume 1. Summary. Volume 2. Detailed technical information. Technical progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research and development work aimed at the development of a solar desiccant dehumidifier is described in detail. The system features a rotary bed of granular silica gel and a rotary regenerator. The dehumidifier can be used for air conditioning through adiabatic saturation of the process airstream. Detailed technical information is presented in the appendices: (A) management, (B) review of the literature: state-of-the-art survey and SERI meeting, (C) review of the literature: adsorbent survey, (D) design requirements and evaluation criteria, (E) design requirements and evaluation criteria, single-family house model, (F) design requirements and evaluation criteria, economic model, (G) design requirements and evaluation criteria: conventional system models for comparison, (H) candidate cooling subsystems, (I) subsystem computer model, (J) subsystem performance map, and (K) subsystem preliminary design. (WHK)

Gunderson, M.E.; Hwang, K.C.; Railing, S.M.

1978-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

252

Retrofitting of Conditioning Systems for Existing Small Commercial Buildings - Analysis and Design of Liquid Desiccant - Vapor Compression Hybrid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The combination of several concepts of new energy technologies may make it possible to reduce the energy needs for thermal comfort, especially cooling and dehumidification, in small sized, single-story commercial buildings. The potentials and limitations of retrofit technology for these characteristic structures have been the focus of the experience gained through the design and installation of a system adapted to a building constructed in the early 1960's. The existing split package air conditioning system was combined with a desiccant air-conditioning unit with a waste heat and solar heat reclaim component. While this retrofit system is feasible, a number of questions remain to be considered regarding the design, installation and operation of the total system. This paper focuses on the practical applications of such a hybrid system - both architectural/construction issues and the mechanical components/system considerations.

Arnas, O. A.; McQueen, T. M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Production of chlorine from chloride salts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for converting chloride salts and sulfuric acid to sulfate salts and elemental chlorine is disclosed. A chloride salt and sulfuric acid are combined in a furnace where they react to produce a sulfate salt and hydrogen chloride. Hydrogen chloride from the furnace contacts a molten salt mixture containing an oxygen compound of vanadium, an alkali metal sulfate and an alkali metal pyrosulfate to recover elemental chlorine. In the absence of an oxygen-bearing gas during the contacting, the vanadium is reduced, but is regenerated to its active higher valence state by separately contacting the molten salt mixture with an oxygen-bearing gas.

Rohrmann, Charles A. (Kennewick, WA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

EM Gains Insight from Germany on Salt-Based Repositories | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gains Insight from Germany on Salt-Based Repositories Gains Insight from Germany on Salt-Based Repositories EM Gains Insight from Germany on Salt-Based Repositories December 14, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Participants in the workshops in Germany toured Asse II, one of Germany’s two salt-based repositories, to gain insights into that facility’s technical challenges and proposed solutions. Pictured, left to right, are an Asse II employee, Bernhard Kienzler of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, CBFO Chief Scientist Roger Nelson, CBFO International Programs Manager Dr. Abraham Van Luik, and Andrew Wolfsberg, Acting Deputy Division Leader for Earth and Environmental Sciences at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Participants in the workshops in Germany toured Asse II, one of Germany's two salt-based repositories, to gain insights into that facility's

255

Disposal of oil field wastes into salt caverns: Feasibility, legality, risk, and costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Salt caverns can be formed through solution mining in the bedded or domal salt formations that are found in many states. Salt caverns have traditionally been used for hydrocarbon storage, but caverns have also been used to dispose of some types of wastes. This paper provides an overview of several years of research by Argonne National Laboratory on the feasibility and legality of using salt caverns for disposing of oil field wastes, the risks to human populations from this disposal method, and the cost of cavern disposal. Costs are compared between the four operating US disposal caverns and other commercial disposal options located in the same geographic area as the caverns. Argonne`s research indicates that disposal of oil field wastes into salt caverns is feasible and legal. The risk from cavern disposal of oil field wastes appears to be below accepted safe risk thresholds. Disposal caverns are economically competitive with other disposal options.

Veil, J.A. [Argonne National Lab., Washington, DC (United States). Water Policy Program

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Cathode for molten salt batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A molten salt electrochemical system for battery applications comprises tetravalent sulfur as the active cathode material with a molten chloroaluminate solvent comprising a mixture of AlCl.sub.3 and MCl having a molar ratio of AlCl.sub.3 /MCl from greater than 50.0/50.0 to 80/20.

Mamantov, Gleb (Knoxville, TN); Marassi, Roberto (Camerino, IT)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Preconceptual design of a salt splitting process using ceramic membranes  

SciTech Connect

Inorganic ceramic membranes for salt splitting of radioactively contaminated sodium salt solutions are being developed for treating U. S. Department of Energy tank wastes. The process consists of electrochemical separation of sodium ions from the salt solution using sodium (Na) Super Ion Conductors (NaSICON) membranes. The primary NaSICON compositions being investigated are based on rare- earth ions (RE-NaSICON). Potential applications include: caustic recycling for sludge leaching, regenerating ion exchange resins, inhibiting corrosion in carbon-steel tanks, or retrieving tank wastes; reducing the volume of low-level wastes volume to be disposed of; adjusting pH and reducing competing cations to enhance cesium ion exchange processes; reducing sodium in high-level-waste sludges; and removing sodium from acidic wastes to facilitate calcining. These applications encompass wastes stored at the Hanford, Savannah River, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sites. The overall project objective is to supply a salt splitting process unit that impacts the waste treatment and disposal flowsheets and meets user requirements. The potential flowsheet impacts include improving the efficiency of the waste pretreatment processes, reducing volume, and increasing the quality of the final waste disposal forms. Meeting user requirements implies developing the technology to the point where it is available as standard equipment with predictable and reliable performance. This report presents two preconceptual designs for a full-scale salt splitting process based on the RE-NaSICON membranes to distinguish critical items for testing and to provide a vision that site users can evaluate.

Kurath, D.E.; Brooks, K.P.; Hollenberg, G.W.; Clemmer, R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Balagopal, S.; Landro, T.; Sutija, D.P. [Ceramatec, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Cleanup of plutonium oxide reduction black salts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work describes pyrochemical processes employed to convert direc oxide reduction (DOR) black salts into discardable white salt and plutonium metal. The DOR process utilizes calcium metal as the reductant in a molten calcium chloride solvent salt to convert plutonium oxide to plutonium metal. An insoluble plutonium-rich dispersion called black salt sometimes forms between the metal phase and the salt phase. Black salts accumulated for processing were treated by one of two methods. One method utilized a scrub alloy of 70 wt % magnesium/30 wt % zinc. The other method utilized a pool of plutonium metal to agglomerate the metal phase. The two processes were similar in that calcium metal reductant and calcium chloride solvent salt were used in both cases. Four runs were performed by each method, and each method produced greater than 93% conversion of the black salt.

Giebel, R.E.; Wing, R.O.

1986-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

259

Dysprosium Extraction Using Molten Salt Electrolysis Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AlCl3 was used as a chlorinating agent in order to enable an efficient dissolution of metal in the molten salt phase in the salt bath. The metal chloride which is ...

260

[Polymer-in-salt electrolytes]. Annual report and extension proposal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research proposed for the current grant consisted of five components, of which the authors have made substantial progress on three and have performed some exploratory work on a sixth for which they present here an argument for extending. The components on which they have made progress are: (1) development of and improvement on the basic polymer-in-salt idea. This will be separated into parts dealing with improvements in salt constitution, and improvements in polymer type, emphasizing the role of anionic polymers; (2) modifications of the polymer-in-salt electrolyte to include the addition of solid particulates to the salt-polymer matrix; and (3) physical measurements. The new component on which they have made some preliminary measurements over the summer period concerns the use of electrolytes developed under the present and other programs for improving the performance of photovoltaic cells. The rationale is that hole/electron separation in semiconductors under irradiation is aided by trapping the holes on a redox species in an adjacent electrolyte solution. The efficiency is proportional to a number of factors not fully understood, one of which is determined by the character of the electrolyte. Since the authors have new types of electrolytes under development, and since solar energy via photovoltaic is an environmentally important aspect of the energy sciences, they felt it was a desirable aspect of materials science to study in a laboratory in Arizona. Achievements in the past year are summarized.

Angell, C.A.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desiccant salt solutions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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261

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports Conservation Education, Other Public Initiatives Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports Conservation Education,...

262

Analysis of the adsorption process and of desiccant cooling systems: a pseudo- steady-state model for coupled heat and mass transfer. [DESSIM, DESSIM2, DESSIM4  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computer model to simulate the adiabatic adsorption/desorption process is documented. Developed to predict the performance of desiccant cooling systems, the model has been validated through comparison with experimental data for single-blow adsorption and desorption. A literature review on adsorption analysis, detailed discussions of the adsorption process, and an initial assessment of the potential for performance improvement through advanced component development are included.

Barlow, R.S.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Open cycle liquid desiccant dehumidifier and hybrid solar/electric absorption refrigeration system. Annual report, January 1993--December 1993. Calendar year 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report presents work performed during calendar year 1993 by the Florida Solar Energy Center under contract to the US Department of Energy. Two distinctively different solar powered indoor climate control systems were analyzed: the open cycle liquid desiccant dehumidifier, and an improved efficiency absorption system which may be fired by flat plate solar collectors. Both tasks represent new directions relative to prior FSEC research in Solar Cooling and Dehumidification.

Nimmo, B.G.; Thornbloom, M.D.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Efficacy of backfilling and other engineered barriers in a radioactive waste repository in salt  

SciTech Connect

In the United States, investigation of potential host geologic formations was expanded in 1975 to include hard rocks. Potential groundwater intrusion is leading to very conservative and expensive waste package designs. Recent studies have concluded that incentives for engineered barriers and 1000-year canisters probably do not exist for reasonable breach scenarios. The assumption that multibarriers will significantly increase the safety margin is also questioned. Use of a bentonite backfill for surrounding a canister of exotic materials was developed in Sweden and is being considered in the US. The expectation that bentonite will remain essentially unchanged for hundreds of years for US repository designs may be unrealistic. In addition, thick bentonite backfills will increase the canister surface temperature and add much more water around the canister. The use of desiccant materials, such as CaO or MgO, for backfilling seems to be a better method of protecting the canister. An argument can also be made for not using backfill material in salt repositories since the 30-cm-thick space will provide for hole closure for many years and will promote heat transfer via natural convection. It is concluded that expensive safety systems are being considered for repository designs that do not necessarily increase the safety margin. It is recommended that the safety systems for waste repositories in different geologic media be addressed individually and that cost-benefit analyses be performed.

Claiborne, H.C.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Field Test and Performance Verification: Integrated Active Desiccant Rooftop Hybrid System Installed in a School - Final Report: Phase 4A  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of a field verification pilot site investigation that involved the installation of a hybrid integrated active desiccant/vapor-compression rooftop heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) unit at an elementary school in the Atlanta Georgia area. For years, the school had experienced serious humidity and indoor air quality (IAQ) problems that had resulted in occupant complaints and microbial (mold) remediation. The outdoor air louvers of the original HVAC units had been closed in an attempt to improve humidity control within the space. The existing vapor compression variable air volume system was replaced by the integrated active desiccant rooftop (IADR) system that was described in detail in an Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) report published in 2004 (Fischer and Sand 2004). The IADR system and all space conditions have been monitored remotely for more than a year. The hybrid system was able to maintain both the space temperature and humidity as desired while delivering the outdoor air ventilation rate required by American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers Standard 62. The performance level of the IADR unit and the overall system energy efficiency was measured and found to be very high. A comprehensive IAQ investigation was completed by the Georgia Tech Research Institute before and after the system retrofit. Before-and-after data resulting from this investigation confirmed a significant improvement in IAQ, humidity control, and occupant comfort. These observations were reported by building occupants and are echoed in a letter to ORNL from the school district energy manager. The IADR system was easily retrofitted in place of the original rooftop system using a custom curb adapter. All work was completed in-house by the school's maintenance staff over one weekend. A subsequent cost analysis completed for the school district by the design engineer of record concluded that the IADR system being investigated was actually less expensive to install than other less-efficient options, most of which were unable to deliver the required ventilation while maintaining the desired space humidity levels.

Fischer, J

2005-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

266

Experimental study of the performance of a laminar flow silica gel desiccant packing suitable for solar air conditioning application  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimental study of the performance of a low pressure drop silica gel desiccant packing has been carried out. The packing is in the form of narrow passages lined with a single layer of small silica gel particles. A near optimum particle size of 0.25 mm, and a range of passage widths of 1.46 to 3.75 mm were chosen based on the predictions of a computer simulation model. A test chamber was constructed with sufficient thermal insulation to allow close to adiabatic conditions for the 12 cm x 12 cm cross section of packing. Step change adsorption and desorption tests were performed for various plate spacings, air flow rates, air inlet conditions, and gel initial water contents. Air outlet moisture content and temperature, as well as pressure drop were measured. The experimental results were compared with predictions of the computer simulation model: This model is based on gas side controlled heat and mass transfer, with the small solid side mass transfer resistance incorporated in a crude manner, and heat transfer into the packing handled as a lumped thermal capacitance. Reasonable agreement was obtained between theoretical prediction and experiment. The match was found to improve with increased passage width. The discrepancies are chiefly attributed to an excessive air bypass, and to inaccurate accounting for heat transfer from the sides of the unit. Use of the computer code for prototype scale design purposes is recommended.

Biswas, P.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Cromer Cycle Air Conditioner: A Unique Air-Conditioner Desiccant Cycle to Enhance Dehumidification and Save Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Cromer cycle uses a desiccant to move moisture from the saturated air leaving an air conditioning (AC) cooling coil to the air returning to the AC unit from the conditioned space. This has the thermodynamic effect of reducing the overall energy consumption of the AC unit and also has the side benefit of dramatically increasing the moisture removal capacity of the AC coil. Simulations, engineering analysis and laboratory tests have confirmed the technical feasibility of the thermodynamics of the cycle. This work reports on a test at ARI conditions (95 deg. F outside, 80 deg F, 51% RH inside). The test unit (10 year old, 5 ton Bryant Air Conditioner) without the Cromer cycle, averaged an EER of 7.93 at a latent ratio of 26.2 % (SHR = 0.738). With the Cromer cycle added, the same unit averaged a total cooling EER of 11.82 with a water removal latent ratio of 53.4% (SHR= 0.466). The measured 16.4% reduction in energy use and 47.9 improvement in EER is significant for the tests at the 95% confidence level. This technology represents a major improvement in energy performance for the control of humidity conditions.

Cromer, C. J.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil field waste into salt caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Caverns can be readily formed in salt formations through solution mining. The caverns may be formed incidentally, as a result of salt recovery, or intentionally to create an underground chamber that can be used for storing hydrocarbon products or compressed air or disposing of wastes. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the feasibility, suitability, and legality of disposing of nonhazardous oil and gas exploration, development, and production wastes (hereafter referred to as oil field wastes, unless otherwise noted) in salt caverns. Chapter 2 provides background information on: types and locations of US subsurface salt deposits; basic solution mining techniques used to create caverns; and ways in which salt caverns are used. Later chapters provide discussion of: federal and state regulatory requirements concerning disposal of oil field waste, including which wastes are considered eligible for cavern disposal; waste streams that are considered to be oil field waste; and an evaluation of technical issues concerning the suitability of using salt caverns for disposing of oil field waste. Separate chapters present: types of oil field wastes suitable for cavern disposal; cavern design and location; disposal operations; and closure and remediation. This report does not suggest specific numerical limits for such factors or variables as distance to neighboring activities, depths for casings, pressure testing, or size and shape of cavern. The intent is to raise issues and general approaches that will contribute to the growing body of information on this subject.

Veil, J.; Elcock, D.; Raivel, M.; Caudle, D.; Ayers, R.C. Jr.; Grunewald, B.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

The Salt Defense Disposal Investigations (SDDI)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Salt Defense Disposal Investigations (SDDI) Salt Defense Disposal Investigations (SDDI) will utilize a newly mined Underground Research Lab (URL) in WIPP to perform a cost effective, proof-of-principle field test of the emplacement of heat-generating radioactive waste and validate modeling efforts. The goals of the SDDI Thermal Test are to: * Demonstrate a proof-of-principle concept for in-drift disposal in salt. * Investigate, in a specific emplacement concept, the response of the salt to heat. * Develop a full-scale response for run-of- mine (ROM) salt. * Develop a validated coupled process model for disposal of heat-generating wastes in salt. * Evaluate the environmental conditions of the

270

Electrokinetic behavior of fluoride salts as explained from water structure considerations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unlike the other silver halides, silver fluoride is positively charged in its saturated solution as determined by nonequilibrium electrophoresis measurements. In the absence of surface hydrolysis reactions, other fluoride salts (LiF, CaF{sub 2}, and MgF{sub 2}) also are positively charged in their saturation solutions. Furthermore, the electrokinetic behavior of these fluoride salts is rather insensitive to the fluoride ion activity in neutral or acidic solutions, and reversal of the sign of the surface charge by fluoride addition is not possible. Based on FTIR transmission spectra to describe the water structure of ionic solutions, in situ FTIR/internal reflection spectroscopy (FTIR/IRS) has been used to spectroscopically characterize interfacial water at fluoride salt surfaces. The experimental spectra were examined by consideration of the O-H stretching region (3,000--3,800 cm{sup {minus}1}) associated with the vibrational spectra of interfacial water. These results reveal a unique hydration state for fluorides and explain the anomalous electrokinetic behavior of fluoride salts such as LiF, CaF{sub 2}, and MgF{sub 2}, which show an unexpected insensitivity to the fluoride ion concentration in solution. It appears that this insensitivity is due to the formation of strong hydrogen bonding of the fluoride ions with water molecules. This hydration state prevents the accommodation of excess fluoride ions at surface lattice sites and accounts for the observed electrokinetic behavior.

Hu, Y.; Lu, Y.; Veeramasuneni, S.; Miller, J.D. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Results of Salt Batch Qualification Testing  

• Reviews the past campaigns of salt disposition (Macrobatch 1 and 2). ... • Macrobatch 2 processed a total volume of 730,000 gallons from February ...

272

Electrolytic orthoborate salts for lithium batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Orthoborate salts suitable for use as electrolytes in lithium batteries and methods for making the electrolyte salts are provided. The electrolytic salts have one of the formulae (I). In this formula anionic orthoborate groups are capped with two bidentate chelating groups, Y1 and Y2. Certain preferred chelating groups are dibasic acid residues, most preferably oxalyl, malonyl and succinyl, disulfonic acid residues, sulfoacetic acid residues and halo-substituted alkylenes. The salts are soluble in non-aqueous solvents and polymeric gels and are useful components of lithium batteries in electrochemical devices.

Angell, Charles Austen (Mesa, AZ); Xu, Wu (Tempe, AZ)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Multiphase Flow and Cavern Abandonment in Salt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report will explore the hypothesis that an underground cavity in gassy salt will eventually be gas filled as is observed on a small scale in some naturally occurring salt inclusions. First, a summary is presented on what is known about gas occurrences, flow mechanisms, and cavern behavior after abandonment. Then, background information is synthesized into theory on how gas can fill a cavern and simultaneously displace cavern fluids into the surrounding salt. Lastly, two-phase (gas and brine) flow visualization experiments are presented that demonstrate some of the associated flow mechanisms and support the theory and hypothesis that a cavity in salt can become gas filled after plugging and abandonment

Ehgartner, Brian; Tidwell, Vince

2001-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

274

Molten salt safety study. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The considerations concerning safety in using molten salt (40% potassium nitrate, 60% sodium nitrate) in a solar central receiver plant are addressed. The considerations are of a general nature and do not cover any details of equipment or plant operation. The study includes salt chemical reaction, experiments with molten salt, dry storage and handling constraints, and includes data from the National Fire Protection Association. The contents of this report were evaluated by two utility companies and they concluded that no major safety problems exist in using a molten salt solar system.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Applications of molten salts in plutonium processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plutonium is efficiently recovered from scrap at Los Alamos by a series of chemical reactions and separations conducted at temperatures ranging from 700 to 900/sup 0/C. These processes usually employ a molten salt or salt eutectic as a heat sink and/or reaction medium. Salts for these operations were selected early in the development cycle. The selection criteria are being reevaluated. In this article we describe the processes now in use at Los Alamos and our studies of alternate salts and eutectics.

Bowersox, D.F.; Christensen, D.C.; Williams, J.D.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

,"Natural Gas Salt Caverns Storage Capacity "  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Salt Caverns Storage Capacity " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Natural Gas...

277

Metal salts of alkyl catechol dithiophosphoric acids and oil compositions containing the salts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal salts of alkyl catechol esters of dithiophosphoric acid suitable as additives in oil compositions are disclosed in this patent. Oil compositions containing the salts of such esters show improved extreme pressure/anti-wear and anit-oxidant properties.

Yamaguchi, E.S.; Liston, T.V.

1988-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

278

Noncentrosymmetric salt inclusion oxides: Role of salt lattices and counter ions in bulk polarity  

SciTech Connect

The synthesis and structural features of a newly emerged class of salt-inclusion solids (SISs) are reviewed. The descriptive chemistry with respect to the role of ionic salt and its correlation with bulk noncentrosymmetricity and polarity of the covalent oxide lattice in question is discussed by means of structure analysis. These unprecedented discoveries have opened doors to novel materials synthesis via the utilities of salt-inclusion chemistry (SIC) that are otherwise known as the molten-salt approach. The result of these investigations prove that the bulk acentricity, or cancellation of which, can be accounted for from the perspective of ionic and/or salt lattices. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis and structure of newly emerged salt-inclusion solids are reviewed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Salt lattice and its symmetry correlation with polar framework are discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Preservation of acentricity is accounted for from the perspective of ionic and salt lattices.

West, J. Palmer [Department of Chemistry, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0973 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0973 (United States); Hwu, Shiou-Jyh, E-mail: shwu@clemson.edu [Department of Chemistry, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0973 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0973 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

279

Dilute acid/metal salt hydrolysis of lignocellulosics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A modified dilute acid method of hydrolyzing the cellulose and hemicellulose in lignocellulosic material under conditions to obtain higher overall fermentable sugar yields than is obtainable using dilute acid alone, comprising: impregnating a lignocellulosic feedstock with a mixture of an amount of aqueous solution of a dilute acid catalyst and a metal salt catalyst sufficient to provide higher overall fermentable sugar yields than is obtainable when hydrolyzing with dilute acid alone; loading the impregnated lignocellulosic feedstock into a reactor and heating for a sufficient period of time to hydrolyze substantially all of the hemicellulose and greater than 45% of the cellulose to water soluble sugars; and recovering the water soluble sugars.

Nguyen, Quang A. (Golden, CO); Tucker, Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Concentration of perrhenate and pertechnetate solutions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method of preparing a concentrated solution of a carrier-free radioisotope which includes the steps of: a. providing a generator column loaded with a composition containing a parent radioisotope; b. eluting the generator column with an eluent solution which includes a salt of a weak acid to elute a target daughter radioisotope from the generator column in a first eluate. c. eluting a cation-exchange column with the first eluate to exchange cations of the salt for hydrogen ions and to elute the target daughter radioisotope and a weak acid in a second eluate; d. eluting an anion-exchange column with the second eluate to trap and concentrate the target daughter radioisotope and to elute the weak acid solution therefrom; and e. eluting the concentrated target daughter radioisotope from the anion-exchange column with a saline solution.

Knapp, Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Beets, Arnold L. (Clinton, TN); Mirzadeh, Saed (Knoxville, TN); Guhlke, Stefan (Bonn, DE)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desiccant salt solutions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Regular Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...The structure of a binary solid solution is shown schematically in Fig. 13. Three types of interatomic bonds

282

Transpiring wall supercritical water oxidation reactor salt deposition studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has teamed with Foster Wheeler Development Corp. and GenCorp, Aerojet to develop and evaluate a new supercritical water oxidation reactor design using a transpiring wall liner. In the design, pure water is injected through small pores in the liner wall to form a protective boundary layer that inhibits salt deposition and corrosion, effects that interfere with system performance. The concept was tested at Sandia on a laboratory-scale transpiring wall reactor that is a 1/4 scale model of a prototype plant being designed for the Army to destroy colored smoke and dye at Pine Bluff Arsenal in Arkansas. During the tests, a single-phase pressurized solution of sodium sulfate (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) was heated to supercritical conditions, causing the salt to precipitate out as a fine solid. On-line diagnostics and post-test observation allowed us to characterize reactor performance at different flow and temperature conditions. Tests with and without the protective boundary layer demonstrated that wall transpiration provides significant protection against salt deposition. Confirmation tests were run with one of the dyes that will be processed in the Pine Bluff facility. The experimental techniques, results, and conclusions are discussed.

Haroldsen, B.L.; Mills, B.E.; Ariizumi, D.Y.; Brown, B.G. [and others

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Radiation-induced changes in the cuticular hydrocarbons of the granary weevil and their relationship to desiccation and adult mortality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation from the nuclear waste products, such as Cesium-137, offers a scope and could be used for large scale disinfestation of grain. It is known that 0.15 to 0.20 kGy dose of gamma radiation is sufficient to kill insects in grain and grain products. However, the mode of action (in terms of lethal effects) is not understood. The purpose of this project, therefore, is to study the ways in which gamma radiation causes death in the granary weevil. Sitophilus granarius (L.) is a major and cosmopolitan pest of stored grain all over the world. Radiation damage, in particular the specific effects on the physiology of the insects exposed to radiation has been elucidated. In stored grain insects, conservation of water is a critical factor for their survival. Epicuticular hydrocarbons play an important role in water proofing. The laboratory rearing of the granary weevil was standardized so that large numbers of weevils of known ages could be produced for experimentation. Stock cultures were maintained at 27 {plus minus} 2{degree}C and 65 {plus minus} 5% R.H. Tests with various age groups (adults) and different doses of gamma radiation indicate that lethal effects are both age and dose related. Younger weevils, in general, survive for a longer period after irradiation compared to older weevils. Complete mortality results within about two weeks after exposure to gamma radiation at dose of 0.15 kGy or above. Data on wet and dry weights of the weevils kept at different (low, medium and higher) levels of humidity after irradiation indicate that gamma radiation induces greater water loss leading to desiccation and early death. Low humidity environment (17% R.H.) greatly accelerates lethal effects.

Sriharan, S. (Selma Univ., AL (USA). Div. of Natural and Applied Sciences)

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Metal salt catalysts for enhancing hydrogen spillover  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition for hydrogen storage includes a receptor, a hydrogen dissociating metal doped on the receptor, and a metal salt doped on the receptor. The hydrogen dissociating metal is configured to spill over hydrogen to the receptor, and the metal salt is configured to increase a rate of the spill over of the hydrogen to the receptor.

Yang, Ralph T; Wang, Yuhe

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

285

Assessment of Injection Well Construction and Operation for Water Injection Wells and Salt Water Disposal Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of Injection Well Construction and Operation for Water Injection Wells and Salt Water Disposal Wells in the Nine Township Area ­ 2009 September 2009 Prepared by Delaware Basin Drilling from EPA to DOE dated 7/16/2009) 1 Solution Mining Practices 1 Recent Well Failures 2 The Mechanism

286

Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Abstract No abstract available. Author Bureau of Land Management Published U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada, 09/14/2009 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Citation Bureau of Land Management. Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) [Internet]. 09/14/2009. Carson City, NV. U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management,

287

Evaluation of Salt Coolants for Reactor Applications  

SciTech Connect

Molten fluorides were initially developed for use in the nuclear industry as the high-temperature fluid fuel for the Molten Salt Reactor (MSR). The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy is exploring the use of molten salts as primary and secondary coolants in a new generation of solid-fueled, thermal-spectrum, hightemperature reactors. This paper provides a review of relevant properties for use in evaluation and ranking of salt coolants for high-temperature reactors. Nuclear, physical, and chemical properties were reviewed, and metrics for evaluation are recommended. Chemical properties of the salt were examined to identify factors that affect materials compatibility (i.e., corrosion). Some preliminary consideration of economic factors for the candidate salts is also presented.

Williams, David F [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Solar-MEC development program. Project 9103 third quarter progress report, March 1--May 31, 1978. [Desiccant wheel and regenerative heat exchange wheel performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the third quarter of the Solar-MEC program, work continued on developing the computer model simulating the desiccant wheel behavior (Task 1) and assessing the performance of the regenerative heat exchange wheel (Task 3). This report specifically presents the results obtained using the computer model as an analytical tool to evaluate design and operating conditions to optimize the wheel's performance. It also contains evaluations of two different available heat transfer matrixes: the currently used aluminum honeycomb and a new product, a potentially less-expensive, corrugated aluminum material. The mathematical modeling and diagnostic evaluations and ways of improving the component and machine performance were identified and are described for both tasks.

Wurm, J.; Weil, S.A.; Zawacki, T.S.; Kinast, J.A.; Macriss, R.A.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Energy and economic assessment of desiccant cooling systems coupled with single glazed air and hybrid PV/thermal solar collectors for applications in hot and humid climate  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a detailed analysis of the energy and economic performance of desiccant cooling systems (DEC) equipped with both single glazed standard air and hybrid photovoltaic/thermal (PV/t) collectors for applications in hot and humid climates. The use of 'solar cogeneration' by means of PV/t hybrid collectors enables the simultaneous production of electricity and heat, which can be directly used by desiccant air handling units, thereby making it possible to achieve very energy savings. The present work shows the results of detailed simulations conducted for a set of desiccant cooling systems operating without any heat storage. System performance was investigated through hourly simulations for different systems and load combinations. Three configurations of DEC systems were considered: standard DEC, DEC with an integrated heat pump and DEC with an enthalpy wheel. Two kinds of building occupations were considered: office and lecture room. Moreover, three configurations of solar-assisted air handling units (AHU) equipped with desiccant wheels were considered and compared with standard AHUs, focusing on achievable primary energy savings. The relationship between the solar collector's area and the specific primary energy consumption for different system configurations and building occupation patterns is described. For both occupation patterns, sensitivity analysis on system performance was performed for different solar collector areas. Also, this work presents an economic assessment of the systems. The cost of conserved energy and the payback time were calculated, with and without public incentives for solar cooling systems. It is worth noting that the use of photovoltaics, and thus the exploitation of related available incentives in many European countries, could positively influence the spread of solar air cooling technologies (SAC). An outcome of this work is that SAC systems equipped with PV/t collectors are shown to have better performance in terms of primary energy saving than conventional systems fed by vapour compression chillers and coupled with PV cells. All SAC systems present good figures for primary energy consumption. The best performances are seen in systems with integrated heat pumps and small solar collector areas. The economics of these SAC systems at current equipment costs and energy prices are acceptable. They become more interesting in the case of public incentives of up to 30% of the investment cost (Simple Payback Time from 5 to 10 years) and doubled energy prices. (author)

Beccali, Marco; Finocchiaro, Pietro; Nocke, Bettina [Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Palermo (Italy)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

290

Modeling of Porous Electrodes in Molten-Salt Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Porous Electrodes in Molten-Salt Systems^ John Newmanon High-Temperature Molten Salt B a t - teries, Argonneby the modeling of molten-salt cells, including some

Newman, John

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Direct and Indirect Shortwave Radiative Effects of Sea Salt Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sea salt aerosols play a dual role in affecting the atmospheric radiative balance. Directly, sea salt particles scatter the incoming solar radiation and absorb the outgoing terrestrial radiation. By acting as cloud condensation nuclei, sea salt ...

Tarek Ayash; Sunling Gong; Charles Q. Jia

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Geothermometry At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Area...

293

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Tatum Salt Dome Test Site...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Tatum Salt Dome Test Site - MS 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Tatum Salt Dome Test Site (MS.01) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site...

294

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Salt Cavern Storage Reservoir...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Salt Cavern Underground Natural Gas Storage Reservoir Configuration Salt Cavern Underground Natural Gas Storage Reservoir Configuration Source: PB Energy Storage Services Inc....

295

Notice of Availability of Section 3116 Determination for Salt...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Notice of Availability of Section 3116 Determination for Salt Waste Disposal at the Savannah River Site Notice of Availability of Section 3116 Determination for Salt Waste Disposal...

296

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular Salt Consolidation, Constitutive Model and Micromechanics Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes...

297

Molten Salt Breeder Reactors Academia Sinica, ITRI, NTHU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power 4/8/12 Frank H. Shu Gen IV MSBR/LFTR Liquid fuel (molten salt) Molten salt coolant (unpopulated

Wang, Ming-Jye

298

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Salt Waste...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility - August 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility - August 2013 August 2013 Review...

299

Corrosion of High Temperature Alloys in Molten Salts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluoride and chloride salts are among the candidates for this application. However, materials corrosion is an issue in these molten salts, particularly in molten ...

300

RECOVERY AND SEPARATION OF LITHIUM VALUES FROM SALVAGE SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lithium values can be recovered from an aqueous basic solution by reacting the values with a phosphate salt soluble in the solution, forming an aqueous slurry of the resultant aqueous insoluble lithium phosphate, contacting the slurry with an organic cation exchange resin in the acid form until the slurry has been clarified, and thereafter recovering lithium values from the resin. (AEC)

Hansford, D.L.; Raabe, E.W.

1963-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desiccant salt solutions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Removal of plutonium and americium from alkaline waste solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High salt content, alkaline waste solutions containing plutonium and americium are contacted with a sodium titanate compound to effect removal of the plutonium and americium from the alkaline waste solution onto the sodium titanate and provide an effluent having a radiation level of less than 10 nCi per gram alpha emitters.

Schulz, Wallace W. (Richland, WA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Category:Salt Lake City, UT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UT UT Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Salt Lake City, UT" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVFullServiceRestauran... 57 KB SVHospital Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVHospital Salt Lake C... 57 KB SVLargeHotel Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVLargeHotel Salt Lake... 55 KB SVLargeOffice Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVLargeOffice Salt Lak... 57 KB SVMediumOffice Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVMediumOffice Salt La... 62 KB SVMidriseApartment Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png

303

Integrated Dynamic Electron Solutions, Inc. | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7AC Technologies, Inc. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 498 likes 7AC Technologies, based in Woburn, Massachusetts, is developing Liquid Desiccant HVAC systems for Commercial...

304

Salt Lake City- High Performance Buildings Requirement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Salt Lake City's mayor issued an executive order in July 2005 requiring that all public buildings owned and controlled by the city be built or renovated to meet the requirements of LEED "silver"...

305

Salt Dispersion in the Hudson Estuary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The seaward transport of salt by river discharge through an estuary is balanced under steady conditions by landward dispersion effected by various physical mixing processes. Observations of current and salinity in the lower Hudson estuary provide ...

Kenneth Hunkins

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Molten salt destruction of energetic waste materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A molten salt destruction process is used to treat and destroy energetic waste materials such as high explosives, propellants, and rocket fuels. The energetic material is pre-blended with a solid or fluid diluent in safe proportions to form a fluid fuel mixture. The fuel mixture is rapidly introduced into a high temperature molten salt bath. A stream of molten salt is removed from the vessel and may be recycled as diluent. Additionally, the molten salt stream may be pumped from the reactor, circulated outside the reactor for further processing, and delivered back into the reactor or cooled and circulated to the feed delivery system to further dilute the fuel mixture entering the reactor.

Brummond, William A. (Livermore, CA); Upadhye, Ravindra S. (Pleasanton, CA); Pruneda, Cesar O. (Livermore, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Molten salt destruction of energetic waste materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A molten salt destruction process is used to treat and destroy energetic waste materials such as high explosives, propellants, and rocket fuels. The energetic material is pre-blended with a solid or fluid diluent in safe proportions to form a fluid fuel mixture. The fuel mixture is rapidly introduced into a high temperature molten salt bath. A stream of molten salt is removed from the vessel and may be recycled as diluent. Additionally, the molten salt stream may be pumped from the reactor, circulated outside the reactor for further processing, and delivered back into the reactor or cooled and circulated to the feed delivery system to further dilute the fuel mixture entering the reactor. 4 figs.

Brummond, W.A.; Upadhye, R.S.; Pruneda, C.O.

1995-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

308

PROCESSING OF MOLTEN SALT POWER REACTOR FUEL  

SciTech Connect

ABS> Fuel reprocessing methods are being investigated for molten salt nuclear reactors which use LiF--BeF/sub 2/ salt as a solvent for UF/sub 4/ and ThF/sub 4/. A liquid HF dissolution procedure coupled with fluorination has been developed for recovery of the uranium and LiF- BeF/sub 2/ solvent salt which is highly enriched in Li/sup 7/. The recovered salt is decontaminated in the process from the major reactor poisons; namely, rare earths and neptunium. A brief investigation of alternate methods, including oxide precipitation, partial freezing, and metal reduction, indicated that such methods may give some separation of the solvent salt from reactor poisons, but they do not appear to be sufficiently quantitative for a simple processing operation. Solubilities of LiF and BeF/sub 2/ in aqueous 70t0 100% HF are presented. The BeF/sub 2/ solubility is appreciably increased in the presence of water and large amounts of LiF. Salt solubilities of 150 g/liter are attainable. Tracer experiments indicate that rare earth solubilities, relative to LiF-- BeF/sub 2/ solvent salt solubility, increase from about 10/sup -4/ mole% in 98% HF to 0.003 mole% in 80% HF. Fluorination of uranium from LiF--BeF/sub 2/ salt was demonstrated. This appears feasible also for the recovery of the relatively small ccncentration of uranium produced in the LiF- BeF/sub 2/ThF/sub 4/ blanket. A proposed chemical flowsheet is presented on the basis of this exploratory work as applied to the semicontinuous processing of a 600 Mw power reactor. (auth)

Campbell, D.O.; Cathers, G.I.

1959-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

SEPARATION PROCESS FOR THORIUM SALTS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for the separation of uranium, thorium, and rare earths extracted from monazite by digesting with sulfuric acid. By carefully increasing the pH of the solution, stepwise, over the range 0.8 to 5.5, a series of selective precipitations will be achieved, with the thorium values coming out at lower pH, the rare earths at intermediate pH and the uranium last. Some mixed precipitates will be obtained, and these may be treated by dissolving in HNO/sub 3/ and contacting with dibutyl phosphate, whereby thorium or uranium are taken up by the organic phase while the rare earths preferentially remain in the aqueous solution.

Bridger, G.L.; Whatley, M.E.; Shaw, K.G.

1957-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Thermal Characterization of Molten Salt Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The phase stability of molten salts in an electrorefiner (ER) may be adversely affected by the buildup of sodium, fission products, and transuranics in the electrolyte. Potential situations that need to be avoided are the following: (1) salt freezing due to an unexpected change in the liquidus temperature, (2) phase separation or non-homogeneity of the molten salt due to the precipitation of solids or formation of immiscible liquids, and (3) any mechanism that can result in the separation and concentration of fissile elements from the molten salt. Any of these situations would result in an off-normal condition outside the established safety basis for electrorefiner (ER) operations. The stability (and homogeneity) of the phases can potentially be monitored through the thermal characterization of the salts, which can be a function of impurity concentration. This report describes the experimental results of typical salts compositions, which consist of chlorides of potassium, lithium, strontium, samarium, praseodymium, lanthanum, barium, cerium, cesium, neodymium, sodium and gadolinium chlorides as a surrogate for both uranium and plutonium, used for the processing of used nuclear fuels.

Toni Y. Gutknecht; Guy L. Fredrickson

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Microsoft PowerPoint - S08-05_Leishear_Salt Disposition Initiative.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Blending in Nuclear Waste Tanks Blending in Nuclear Waste Tanks Bob Leishear Savannah River Remediation Salt Disposition Engineering November 17, 2010 Print Close 2 Blending in Nuclear Waste Tanks Volume 37.1 Million Gallons (Mgal) Curies 183 MCi (52%) 169 MCi (48%) 352 Million Curies (MCi) 171 MCi (49%) Sludge 34.2 Mgal (92%) 2.9 Mgal (8%) 18.4 Mgal (49%) Salt Supernate 12 MCi (3%) Saltcake 15.8 Mgal (43%) Print Close 3 Blending in Nuclear Waste Tanks Sample of Vitrified Radioactive Glass Print Close 4 Blending in Nuclear Waste Tanks SDU 3 SDU 3 SDU 2 SDU 2 SDU (Vault) 4 SDU (Vault) 4 SDU (Vault) 1 SDU (Vault) 1 Cell A Cell B Saltstone Production Facility Saltstone Production Facility Print Close 5 Blending in Nuclear Waste Tanks Print Close 6 Blending in Nuclear Waste Tanks Sludge Salt Feed Solutions Print Close 7 Experimental Strategy Scale-

312

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports Conservation Education, Other Public Initiatives Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports Conservation Education, Other Public Initiatives November 14, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Approximately 1.8 million tons of salt have been mined out of the underground at WIPP. Approximately 1.8 million tons of salt have been mined out of the underground at WIPP. Proceeds from the WIPP salt allowed hundreds of southeast New Mexico students to learn about resource conservation. Proceeds from the WIPP salt allowed hundreds of southeast New Mexico students to learn about resource conservation. The crushed salt is used as a supplement in cattle feed. Since the salt from WIPP has been mined from the middle of a large salt formation, its quality is high, according to Magnum Minerals.

313

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports Conservation Education, Other Public Initiatives Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports Conservation Education, Other Public Initiatives November 14, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Approximately 1.8 million tons of salt have been mined out of the underground at WIPP. Approximately 1.8 million tons of salt have been mined out of the underground at WIPP. Proceeds from the WIPP salt allowed hundreds of southeast New Mexico students to learn about resource conservation. Proceeds from the WIPP salt allowed hundreds of southeast New Mexico students to learn about resource conservation. The crushed salt is used as a supplement in cattle feed. Since the salt from WIPP has been mined from the middle of a large salt formation, its quality is high, according to Magnum Minerals.

314

State and Local Solution Center: Financing Solutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technical Assistance Technical Assistance Resources Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to State and Local Solution Center: Financing Solutions to someone by E-mail Share State and Local Solution Center: Financing Solutions on Facebook Tweet about State and Local Solution Center: Financing Solutions on Twitter Bookmark State and Local Solution Center: Financing Solutions on Google Bookmark State and Local Solution Center: Financing Solutions on Delicious Rank State and Local Solution Center: Financing Solutions on Digg Find More places to share State and Local Solution Center: Financing Solutions on AddThis.com... Strategic Energy Planning Energy Policies & Programs Financing Financing Overview Financing Program Market Segments Energy Data Management Energy Technologies

315

Method for cleaning solution used in nuclear fuel reprocessing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nuclear fuel processing solution consisting of tri-n-butyl phosphate and dodecane, with a complex of uranium, plutonium, or zirconium and with a solvent degradation product such as di-n-butyl phosphate therein, is contacted with an aqueous solution of a salt formed from hydrazine and either a dicarboxylic acid or a hydroxycarboxylic acid, thereby removing the aforesaid complex from the processing solution.

Tallent, O.K.; Crouse, D.J.; Mailen, J.C.

1980-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

316

Thermal Analysis of Surrogate Simulated Molten Salts with Metal Chloride Impurities for Electrorefining Used Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

This project is a fundamental study to measure thermal properties (liquidus, solidus, phase transformation, and enthalpy) of molten salt systems of interest to electrorefining operations, which are used in both the fuel cycle research & development mission and the spent fuel treatment mission of the Department of Energy. During electrorefining operations the electrolyte accumulates elements more active than uranium (transuranics, fission products and bond sodium). The accumulation needs to be closely monitored because the thermal properties of the electrolyte will change as the concentration of the impurities increases. During electrorefining (processing techniques used at the Idaho National Laboratory to separate uranium from spent nuclear fuel) it is important for the electrolyte to remain in a homogeneous liquid phase for operational safeguard and criticality reasons. The phase stability of molten salts in an electrorefiner may be adversely affected by the buildup of fission products in the electrolyte. Potential situations that need to be avoided are: (i) build up of fissile elements in the salt approaching the criticality limits specified for the vessel (ii) freezing of the salts due to change in the liquidus temperature and (iii) phase separation (non-homogenous solution) of elements. The stability (and homogeneity) of the phases can potentially be monitored through the thermal characterization of the salts, which can be a function of impurity concentration. This work describes the experimental results of typical salts compositions, consisting of chlorides of strontium, samarium, praseodymium, lanthanum, barium, cerium, cesium, neodymium, sodium and gadolinium (as a surrogate for both uranium and plutonium), used in the processing of used nuclear fuels. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to analyze numerous salt samples providing results on the thermal properties. The property of most interest to pyroprocessing is the liquidus temperature. It was previously known the liquidus temperature of the molten salt would change as spent fuel is processed through the Mk-IV electrorefiner. However, the extent of the increase in liquidus temperature was not known. This work is first of its kind in determining thermodynamic properties of a molten salt electrolyte containing transuranics, fission products and bond sodium. Experimental data concluded that the melting temperature of the electrolyte will become greater than the operating temperature of the Mk-IV ER during current fuel processing campaigns. Collected data also helps predict when the molten salt electrolyte will no longer be able to support electrorefining operations.

Toni Y. Gutknecht; Guy L. Fredrickson; Vivek Utgikar

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Disposal of oil field wastes and NORM wastes into salt caverns.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Salt caverns can be formed through solution mining in the bedded or domal salt formations that are found in many states. Salt caverns have traditionally been used for hydrocarbon storage, but caverns have also been used to dispose of some types of wastes. This paper provides an overview of several years of research by Argonne National Laboratory on the feasibility and legality of using salt caverns for disposing of nonhazardous oil field wastes (NOW) and naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM), the risk to human populations from this disposal method, and the cost of cavern disposal. Costs are compared between the four operating US disposal caverns and other commercial disposal options located in the same geographic area as the caverns. Argonne's research indicates that disposal of NOW into salt caverns is feasible and, in most cases, would not be prohibited by state agencies (although those agencies may need to revise their wastes management regulations). A risk analysis of several cavern leakage scenarios suggests that the risk from cavern disposal of NOW and NORM wastes is below accepted safe risk thresholds. Disposal caverns are economically competitive with other disposal options.

Veil, J. A.

1999-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

318

Plutonium and americium recovery from spent molten-salt-extraction salts with aluminum-magnesium alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development work was performed to determine the feasibility of removing plutonium and americium from spent molten-salt-extraction (MSE) salts using Al-Mg alloys. If the product buttons from this process are compatible with subsequent aqueous processing, the complex chloride-to-nitrate aqueous conversion step which is presently required for these salts may be eliminated. The optimum alloy composition used to treat spent 8 wt % MSE salts in the past yielded poor phase-disengagement characteristics when applied to 30 mol % salts. After a limited investigation of other alloy compositions in the Al-Mg-Pu-Am system, it was determined that the Al-Pu-Am system could yield a compatible alloy. In this system, experiments were performed to investigate the effects of plutonium loading in the alloy, excess magnesium, age of the spent salt on actinide recovery, phase disengagement, and button homogeneity. Experimental results indicate that 95 percent plutonium recoveries can be attained for fresh salts. Further development is required for backlog salts generated prior to 1981. A homogeneous product alloy, as required for aqueous processing, could not be produced.

Cusick, M.J.; Sherwood, W.G.; Fitzpatrick, R.F.

1984-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

319

THE IMPACT OF DISSOLVED SALTS ON PASTES CONTAINING FLY ASH, CEMENT AND SLAG  

SciTech Connect

The degree of hydration of a mixture of cementitious materials (Class F fly ash, blast furnace slag and portland cement) in highly concentrated alkaline salt solutions is enhanced by the addition of aluminate to the salt solution. This increase in the degree of hydration, as monitored with isothermal calorimetry, leads to higher values of dynamic Young's modulus and compressive strength and lower values of total porosity. This enhancement in performance properties of these cementitious waste forms by increased hydration is beneficial to the retention of the radionuclides that are also present in the salt solution. The aluminate ions in the solution act first to retard the set time of the mix but then enhance the hydration reactions following the induction period. In fact, the aluminate ions increase the degree of hydration by {approx}35% over the degree of hydration for the same mix with a lower aluminate concentration. An increase in the blast furnace slag concentration and a decrease in the water to cementitious materials ratio produced mixes with higher values of Young's modulus and lower values of total porosity. Therefore, these operational factors can be fine tuned to enhance performance properties of cementitious waste form. Empirical models for Young modulus, heat of hydration and total porosity were developed to predict the values of these properties. These linear models used only statistically significant compositional and operational factors and provided insight into those factors that control these properties.

Harbour, J.; Edwards, T.; Williams, V.

2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

320

Salt Mechanics Primer for Near-Salt and Sub-Salt Deepwater Gulf of Mexico Field Developments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gulf of Mexico (GoM) is the most active deepwater region in the world and provides some of the greatest challenges in scope and opportunity for the oil and gas industry. The complex geologic settings and significant water and reservoir depths necessitate high development costs, in addition to requiring innovating technology. The investment costs are substantial: because of the extreme water depths (up to 8000 feet) and considerable reservoir depths (to 30,000 feet below mudline), the cost of drilling a single well can be upwards of 50 to 100 million dollars. Central, therefore, to successful economic exploitation are developments with a minimum number of wells combined with a well service lifetime of twenty to thirty years. Many of the wells that are planned for the most significant developments will penetrate thick salt formations, and the combined drilling costs for these fields are estimated in the tens of billions of dollars. In May 2001, Sandia National Laboratories initiated a Joint Industry Project focused on the identification, quantification, and mitigation of potential well integrity issues associated with sub-salt and near-salt deepwater GoM reservoirs. The project is jointly funded by the DOE (Natural Gas and Oil Technology Partnership) and nine oil companies (BHP Billiton Petroleum, BP, ChevronTexaco, Conoco, ExxonMobil, Halliburton, Kerr-McGee, Phillips Petroleum, and Shell). This report provides an assessment of the state of the art of salt mechanics, and identifies potential well integrity issues relevant to deepwater GoM field developments. Salt deformation is discussed and a deformation mechanism map is provided for salt. A bounding steady-state strain rate contour map is constructed for deepwater GoM field developments, and the critical issue of constraint in the subsurface, and resultant necessity for numerical analyses is discussed.

FOSSUM, ARLO F.; FREDRICH, JOANNE T.

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desiccant salt solutions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Corrosion of aluminides by molten nitrate salt  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The corrosion of titanium-, iron-, and nickel-based aluminides by a highly aggressive, oxidizing NaNO{sub 3}(-KNO{sub 3})-Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} has been studied at 650{degree}C. It was shown that weight changes could be used to effectively evaluate corrosion behavior in the subject nitrate salt environments provided these data were combined with salt analyses and microstructural examinations. The studies indicated that the corrosion of relatively resistant aluminides by these nitrate salts proceeded by oxidation and a slow release from an aluminum-rich product layer into the salt at rates lower than that associated with many other types of metallic materials. The overall corrosion process and resulting rate depended on the particular aluminide being exposed. In order to minimize corrosion of nickel or iron aluminides, it was necessary to have aluminum concentrations in excess of 30 at. %. However, even at a concentration of 50 at. % Al, the corrosion resistance of TiAl was inferior to that of Ni{sub 3}Al and Fe{sub 3}Al. At higher aluminum concentrations, iron, nickel, and iron-nickel aluminides exhibited quite similar weight changes, indicative of the principal role of aluminum in controlling the corrosion process in NaNO{sub 3}(-KNO{sub 3})-Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} salts. 20 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Tortorelli, P.F.; Bishop, P.S.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

SERI Desiccant Cooling Test Facility. Status report. Preliminary data on the performance of a rotary parallel-passage silica-gel dehumidifier  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the SERI Desiccant Cooling Test Facility. The facility can test bench-scale rotary dehumidifiers over a wide range of controlled conditions. We constructed and installed in the test loop a prototype parallel-passage rotary dehumidifier that has spirally wound polyester tape coated with silica gel. The initial tests gave satisfactory results indicating that approximately 90% of the silica gel was active and the overall Lewis number of the wheel was near unity. The facility has several minor difficulties including an inability to control humidity satisfactorily and nonuniform and highly turbulent inlet velocities. To completely validate the facility requires a range of dehumidifier designs. Several choices are available including constructing a second parallel-passage dehumidifier with the passage spacing more uniform.

Schultz, K.J.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Salt Wells Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Project Salt Wells Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Salt Wells Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 39.580833333333°, -118.33444444444° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.580833333333,"lon":-118.33444444444,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

324

SEPARATION OF RUTHENIUM FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

>The separation of ruthenium from aqueous solutions containing uranium plutonium, ruthenium, and fission products is described. The separation is accomplished by providing a nitric acid solution of plutonium, uranium, ruthenium, and fission products, oxidizing plutonium to the hexavalent state with sodium dichromate, contacting the solution with a water-immiscible organic solvent, such as hexone, to extract plutonyl, uranyl, ruthenium, and fission products, reducing with sodium ferrite the plutonyl in the solvent phase to trivalent plutonium, reextracting from the solvent phase the trivalent plutonium, ruthenium, and some fission products with an aqueous solution containing a salting out agent, introducing ozone into the aqueous acid solution to oxidize plutonium to the hexavalent state and ruthenium to ruthenium tetraoxide, and volatizing off the ruthenium tetraoxide.

Callis, C.F.; Moore, R.L.

1959-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Anomalous zones in Gulf Coast Salt domes with special reference to Big Hill, TX, and Weeks Island, LA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anomalous features in Gulf Coast Salt domes exhibit deviations from normally pure salt and vary widely in form from one dome to the next, ranging considerably in length and width. They have affected both conventional and solution mining in several ways. Gas outbursts, insolubles, and potash (especially carnallite) have led to the breakage of tubing in a number of caverns, and caused irregular shapes of many caverns through preferential leaching. Such anomalous features essentially have limited the lateral extent of conventional mining at several salt mines, and led to accidents and even the closing of several other mines. Such anomalous features, are often aligned in anomalous zones, and appear to be related to diapiric processes of salt dome development. Evidence indicates that anomalous zones are found between salt spines, where the differential salt intrusion accumulates other materials: Anhydrite bands which are relatively strong, and other, weaker impurities. Shear zones and fault displacement detected at Big Hill and Weeks Island domes have not yet had any known adverse impacts on SPR oil storage, but new caverns at these sites conceivably may encounter some potentially adverse conditions. Seismic reflection profiles at Big Hill dome have shown numerous fractures and faults in the caprock, and verified the earlier recognition of a major shear zone transecting the entire salt stock and forming a graben in the overlying caprock. Casing that is placed in such zones can be at risk. Knowledge of these zones should create awareness of possible effects rather than preclude the future emplacement of caverns. To the extent possible, major anomalous zones and salt stock boundaries should be avoided. Shear zones along overhangs may be particularly hazardous, and otherwise unknown valleys in the top of salt may occur along shear zones. These zones often can be mapped geophysically, especially with high-resolution seismic techniques.

Neal, J.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Magorian, T.R. [Magorian (Thomas R.), Amherst, NY (United States); Thoms, R.L. [AGM, Inc., College Station, TX (United States); Autin, W.J.; McCulloh, R.P. [Louisiana Geological Survey, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Denzler, S.; Byrne, K.O. [Acres International Corp., Amherst, NY (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Molten nitrate salt technology development status report  

SciTech Connect

Recognizing thermal energy storage as potentially critical to the successful commercialization of solar thermal power systems, the Department of Energy (DOE) has established a comprehensive and aggressive thermal energy storage technology development program. Of the fluids proposed for heat transfer and energy storage molten nitrate salts offer significant economic advantages. The nitrate salt of most interest is a binary mixture of NaNO/sub 3/ and KNO/sub 3/. Although nitrate/nitrite mixtures have been used for decades as heat transfer and heat treatment fluids the use has been at temperatures of about 450/sup 0/C and lower. In solar thermal power systems the salts will experience a temperature range of 350 to 600/sup 0/C. Because central receiver applications place more rigorous demands and higher temperatures on nitrate salts a comprehensive experimental program has been developed to examine what effects, if any, the new demands and temperatures have on the salts. The experiments include corrosion testing, environmental cracking of containment materials, and determinations of physical properties and decomposition mechanisms. This report details the work done at Sandia National Laboratories in each area listed. In addition, summaries of the experimental programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the University of New York, EIC Laboratories, Inc., and the Norwegian Institute of Technology on molten nitrate salts are given. Also discussed is how the experimental programs will influence the near-term central receiver programs such as utility repowering/industrial retrofit and cogeneration. The report is designed to provide easy access to the latest information and data on molten NaNO/sub 3//KNO/sub 3/ for the designers and engineers of future central receiver projects.

Carling, R.W.; Kramer, C.M.; Bradshaw, R.W.; Nissen, D.A.; Goods, S.H.; Mar, R.W.; Munford, J.W.; Karnowsky, M.M.; Biefeld, R.N.; Norem, N.J.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Fast Spectrum Molten Salt Reactor Options  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During 2010, fast-spectrum molten-salt reactors (FS-MSRs) were selected as a transformational reactor concept for light-water reactor (LWR)-derived heavy actinide disposition by the Department of Energy-Nuclear Energy Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC) program and were the subject of a preliminary scoping investigation. Much of the reactor description information presented in this report derives from the preliminary studies performed for the ARC project. This report, however, has a somewhat broader scope-providing a conceptual overview of the characteristics and design options for FS-MSRs. It does not present in-depth evaluation of any FS-MSR particular characteristic, but instead provides an overview of all of the major reactor system technologies and characteristics, including the technology developments since the end of major molten salt reactor (MSR) development efforts in the 1970s. This report first presents a historical overview of the FS-MSR technology and describes the innovative characteristics of an FS-MSR. Next, it provides an overview of possible reactor configurations. The following design features/options and performance considerations are described including: (1) reactor salt options-both chloride and fluoride salts; (2) the impact of changing the carrier salt and actinide concentration on conversion ratio; (3) the conversion ratio; (4) an overview of the fuel salt chemical processing; (5) potential power cycles and hydrogen production options; and (6) overview of the performance characteristics of FS-MSRs, including general comparative metrics with LWRs. The conceptual-level evaluation includes resource sustainability, proliferation resistance, economics, and safety. The report concludes with a description of the work necessary to begin more detailed evaluation of FS-MSRs as a realistic reactor and fuel cycle option.

Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Patton, Bruce W [ORNL; Howard, Rob L [ORNL; Harrison, Thomas J [ORNL

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Multimechanism-Deformation Parameters of Domal Salts Using Transient Creep Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Use of Gulf Coast salt domes for construction of very large storage caverns by solution mining has grown significantly in the last several decades. In fact, among the largest developers of storage caverns along the Gulf Coast is the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) which has purchased or constructed 62 crude oil storage caverns in four storage sites (domes). Although SPR and commercial caverns have been operated economically for many years, the caverns still exhibit some relatively poorly understood behaviors, especially involving creep closure volume loss and hanging string damage from salt falls. Since it is possible to postulate that some of these behaviors stem from geomechanical or reformational aspects of the salt, a method of correlating the cavern response to mechanical creep behavior as determined in the laboratory could be of considerable value. Recently, detailed study of the creep response of domal salts has cast some insight into the influence of different salt origins on cavern behavior. The study used a simple graphical analysis of limited non-steady state data to establish an approach or bound to steady state, as an estimate of the steady state behavior of a given salt. This permitted analysis of sparse creep databases for domal salts. It appears that a shortcoming of this steady state analysis method is that it obscures some critical differences of the salt material behavior. In an attempt to overcome the steady state analysis shortcomings, a method was developed based on integration of the Multimechanism-Deformation (M-D) creep constitutive model to obtain fits to the transient response. This integration process permits definition of all the material sensitive parameters of the model, while those parameters that are constants or material insensitive parameters are fixed independently. The transient analysis method has proven more sensitive to differences in the creep characteristics and has provided a way of defining different behaviors within a given dome. Characteristics defined by the transient analysis are related quantitatively to the volume loss creep rate of the SPR caverns. This increase in understanding of the domal material creep response already has pointed to the possibility y of delineating the existence of material spines within a specific dome. Further definition of the domal geology and structure seems possible only through expansion of the creep databases for domal salts.

MUNSON, DARRELL E

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Management Solution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MEMO: Request for proposal for Computer-Aided Facilities and Maintenance Management application software; professional services; development services for interfaces to Financial Management and Human Resources systems; configuration, test, train, maintenance and support services to implement and maintain a CAFM Solution for the California Administrative Office of the Courts, the Trial Courts, the Appellate Courts and the Judicial Council, known as “The AOC Group.” You are invited to review and respond to the attached Request for Proposal (“RFP”):

Rfp Number Isdcafm

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

A MOLTEN SALT NATURAL CONVECTION REACTOR SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

Fuel-salt volumes external to the core of a molten-salt reactor are calculated for a system in which the fuel salt circulates through the core and primary exchanger by free convection. In the calculation of these volumes, the exchanger heights above the core top range from 5 to 20 ft. Coolants considered for the primary exchanger are a second molten salt and helium. External fuel holdup is found to be the same with either coolant. Two sets of terminal temperatures are selected for the helium. The first combination permits steam generation at 850 psia, 900 deg F. The second set is selected for a closed gas turbine cycle with an 1100 deg F turbine inlet temperature. Specific power (thermal kw/kg 235) is found to be about 900 Mv/kg, based on initial, clean conditions and a 60 Mw (thermal) output. A specific power of 1275 kw/kg is estimated for a forced convection system of the same rating. (auth)

Romie, F.E.; Kinyon, B.W.

1958-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Salt repository project closeout status report  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an overview of the scope and status of the US Department of Energy (DOE`s) Salt Repository Project (SRP) at the time when the project was terminated by the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987. The report reviews the 10-year program of siting a geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste in rock salt formations. Its purpose is to aid persons interested in the information developed during the course of this effort. Each area is briefly described and the major items of information are noted. This report, the three salt Environmental Assessments, and the Site Characterization Plan are the suggested starting points for any search of the literature and information developed by the program participants. Prior to termination, DOE was preparing to characterize three candidate sites for the first mined geologic repository for the permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The sites were in Nevada, a site in volcanic tuff; Texas, a site in bedded salt (halite); and Washington, a site in basalt. These sites, identified by the screening process described in Chapter 3, were selected from the nine potentially acceptable sites shown on Figure I-1. These sites were identified in accordance with provisions of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. 196 refs., 21 figs., 11 tabs.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Accelerators for Subcritical Molten-Salt Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Accelerator parameters for subcritical reactors have usually been based on using solid nuclear fuel much like that used in all operating critical reactors as well as the thorium burning accelerator-driven energy amplifier proposed by Rubbia et al. An attractive alternative reactor design that used molten salt fuel was experimentally studied at ORNL in the 1960s, where a critical molten salt reactor was successfully operated using enriched U235 or U233 tetrafluoride fuels. These experiments give confidence that an accelerator-driven subcritical molten salt reactor will work better than conventional reactors, having better efficiency due to their higher operating temperature, having the inherent safety of subcritical operation, and having constant purging of volatile radioactive elements to eliminate their accumulation and potential accidental release in dangerous amounts. Moreover, the requirements to drive a molten salt reactor can be considerably relaxed compared to a solid fuel reactor, especially regarding accelerator reliability and spallation neutron targetry, to the point that much of the required technology exists today. It is proposed that Project-X be developed into a prototype commercial machine to produce energy for the world by, for example, burning thorium in India and nuclear waste from conventional reactors in the USA.

Johnson, Roland (Muons, Inc.)

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

333

Internal Wave Overturns Produced by Salt Fingers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The salt finger fluxes obtained in small-domain direct numerical simulations (DNSs) are used to parameterize the fluxes in a larger domain that resolves internal gravity waves. For the case in which the molecular diffusivity ratio ? = KS/KT < 1 ...

Melvin E. Stern; Julian A. Simeonov

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Energy Efficient Buildings, Salt Lake County, Utah  

SciTech Connect

Executive Summary Salt Lake County's Solar Photovoltaic Project - an unprecedented public/private partnership Salt Lake County is pleased to announce the completion of its unprecedented solar photovoltaic (PV) installation on the Calvin R. Rampton Salt Palace Convention Center. This 1.65 MW installation will be one the largest solar roof top installations in the country and will more than double the current installed solar capacity in the state of Utah. Construction is complete and the system will be operational in May 2012. The County has accomplished this project using a Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) financing model. In a PPA model a third-party solar developer will finance, develop, own, operate, and maintain the solar array. Salt Lake County will lease its roof, and purchase the power from this third-party under a long-term Power Purchase Agreement contract. In fact, this will be one of the first projects in the state of Utah to take advantage of the recent (March 2010) legislation which makes PPA models possible for projects of this type. In addition to utilizing a PPA, this solar project will employ public and private capital, Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants (EECBG), and public/private subsidized bonds that are able to work together efficiently because of the recent stimulus bill. The project also makes use of recent changes to federal tax rules, and the recent re-awakening of private capital markets that make a significant public-private partnership possible. This is an extremely innovative project, and will mark the first time that all of these incentives (EECBG grants, Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds, New Markets tax credits, investment tax credits, public and private funds) have been packaged into one project. All of Salt Lake County's research documents and studies, agreements, and technical information is available to the public. In addition, the County has already shared a variety of information with the public through webinars, site tours, presentations, and written correspondence.

Barnett, Kimberly

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

335

Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology Published Online Nevada Encyclopedia, 2009 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat Citation Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology. Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat [Internet]. 2009. Online Nevada Encyclopedia. [updated 2009/03/24;cited 2013/08/07]. Available from: http://www.onlinenevada.org/articles/salt-wells-eight-mile-flat Related Geothermal Exploration Activities Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Salt Wells Geothermal Area

336

Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Experiments were used to examine water content in Permian salt samples (Salado Formation) collected from the WIPP site. The profile of water release and movement is recognized as a function of temperature from 30 to 275 oC using classical gravimetric methods to measure weight loss as a result of heating. The amount of water released from heating the salt was found to be correlated with the salts accessory mineral content (clay, other secondary minerals lost up to 3 wt % while pure halite salt lost less than 0.5 wt % water). Water released from salt at lower temperature was reversible and is attributed to clay hydration and dehydration processes. The analysis

337

Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Experiments were used to examine water content in Permian salt samples (Salado Formation) collected from the WIPP site. The profile of water release and movement is recognized as a function of temperature from 30 to 275 oC using classical gravimetric methods to measure weight loss as a result of heating. The amount of water released from heating the salt was found to be correlated with the salts accessory mineral content (clay, other secondary minerals lost up to 3 wt % while pure halite salt lost less than 0.5 wt % water). Water released from salt at lower temperature was reversible and is attributed to clay hydration and dehydration processes. The analysis

338

SunShot Initiative: Advanced Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Advanced Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant on Facebook Tweet about SunShot...

339

Similarity measures for spectral discrimination of salt-affected soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper illustrates a pilot study designed to examine the spectral response of soils due to salt variations. The aim of the study includes determining whether salt-affected soils can be discriminated based on their spectral characteristics, by establishing ...

J. Farifteh; F. van der Meer; E. J. M. Carranza

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

DOE Issues Salt Waste Determination for the Savannah River Site...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Salt Waste Determination for the Savannah River Site DOE Issues Salt Waste Determination for the Savannah River Site January 18, 2006 - 10:49am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desiccant salt solutions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Colloidal stability of magnetic nanoparticles in molten salts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molten salts are important heat transfer fluids used in nuclear, solar and other high temperature engineering systems. Dispersing nanoparticles in molten salts can enhance the heat transfer capabilities of the fluid. High ...

Somani, Vaibhav (Vaibhav Basantkumar)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Removal of uranium and salt from the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment  

SciTech Connect

In 1994, migration of {sup 233}U was discovered to have occurred at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This paper describes the actions now underway to remove uranium from the off-gas piping and the charcoal bed, to remove and stabilize the salts, and to convert the uranium to a stable oxide for long-term storage.

Peretz, F.J.; Rushton, J.E.; Faulkner, R.L.; Walker, K.L.; Del Cul, G.D.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Studies on the Effects of Inorganic Salts on Biochemical Treatment ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effects of two inorganic salts (sodium chloride and sodium sulphate) on biochemical ... Numerical Investigation of Heat Transfer Characteristics in Microwave ...

344

Molten Salt Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF) - Energy Innovation Portal  

Solar Thermal Industrial Technologies Energy Storage Molten Salt Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF) Sandia National Laboratories. Contact SNL About This ...

345

CO2 Emission Reduction through Innovative Molten Salt Electrolysis ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrochemical metallurgy especially through high temperature molten salt electrolysis with renewable electricity stands for a great opportunity for producing

346

Laboratory scale vitrification of low-level radioactive nitrate salts and soils from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

INEL has radiologically contaminated nitrate salt and soil waste stored above and below ground in Pad A and the Acid Pit at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Pad A contain uranium and transuranic contaminated potassium and sodium nitrate salts generated from dewatered waste solutions at the Rocky Flats Plant. The Acid Pit was used to dispose of liquids containing waste mineral acids, uranium, nitrate, chlorinated solvents, and some mercury. Ex situ vitrification is a high temperature destruction of nitrates and organics and immobilizes hazardous and radioactive metals. Laboratory scale melting of actual radionuclides containing INEL Pad A nitrate salts and Acid Pit soils was performed. The salt/soil/additive ratios were varied to determine the range of glass compositions (resulted from melting different wastes); maximize mass and volume reduction, durability, and immobilization of hazardous and radioactive metals; and minimize viscosity and offgas generation for wastes prevalent at INEL and other DOE sites. Some mixtures were spiked with additional hazardous and radioactive metals. Representative glasses were leach tested and showed none. Samples spiked with transuranic showed low nuclide leaching. Wasteforms were two to three times bulk densities of the salt and soil. Thermally co-processing soils and salts is an effective remediation method for destroying nitrate salts while stabilizing the radiological and hazardous metals they contain. The measured durability of these low-level waste glasses approached those of high-level waste glasses. Lab scale vitrification of actual INEL contaminated salts and soils was performed at General Atomics Laboratory as part of the INEL Waste Technology Development and Environmental Restoration within the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program.

Shaw, P. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Anderson, B. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States). NRT Div.; Davis, D. [Envitco Inc., Toledo, OH (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Nuclear criticality safety evaluation -- DWPF Late Wash Facility, Salt Process Cell and Chemical Process Cell  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Nuclear Waste will be vitrified in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for long term storage and disposal. This is a nuclear criticality safety evaluation for the Late Wash Facility (LWF), the Salt Processing Cell (SPC) and the Chemical Processing Cell (CPC). of the DWPF. Waste salt solution is processed in the Tank Farm In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) process and is then further washed in the DWPF Late Wash Facility (LWF) before it is fed to the DWPF Salt Processing Cell. In the Salt Processing Cell the precipitate slurry is processed in the Precipitate Reactor (PR) and the resultant Precipitate Hydrolysis Aqueous (PHA) produce is combined with the sludge feed and frit in the DWPF Chemical Process Cell to produce a melter feed. The waste is finally immobilized in the Melt Cell. Material in the Tank Farm and the ITP and Extended Sludge processes have been shown to be safe against a nuclear criticality by others. The precipitate slurry feed from ITP and the first six batches of sludge feed are safe against a nuclear criticality and this evaluation demonstrates that the processes in the LWF, the SPC and the CPC do not alter the characteristics of the materials to compromise safety.

Williamson, T.G.

1994-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

348

Accelerating Solutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solutions From vehicles on the road to the energy that powers them, Oak Ridge National Laboratory innovations are advancing American transportation. Oak Ridge National Laboratory is making an impact on everyday America by enhancing transportation choices and quality of life. Through strong collaborative partnerships with industry, ORNL research and development efforts are helping accelerate the deployment of a new generation of energy efficient vehicles powered by domestic, renewable, clean energy. EPA ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel rule ORNL and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory co-led a comprehensive research and test program to determine the effects of diesel fuel sulfur on emissions and emission control (catalyst) technology. In the course of this program, involving

349

Salt River Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Project Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Salt River Project Place Tempe, Arizona Utility Id 16572 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] SGIC[2] Energy Information Administration Form 826[3] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Salt River Project Smart Grid Project was awarded $56,859,359 Recovery Act Funding with a total project value of $114,003,719.

350

Molten salts database for energy applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The growing interest in energy applications of molten salts is justified by several of their properties. Their possibilities of usage as a coolant, heat transfer fluid or heat storage substrate, require thermo-hydrodynamic refined calculations. Many researchers are using simulation techniques, such as Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) for their projects or conceptual designs. The aim of this work is providing a review of basic properties (density, viscosity, thermal conductivity and heat capacity) of the most common and referred salt mixtures. After checking data, tabulated and graphical outputs are given in order to offer the most suitable available values to be used as input parameters for other calculations or simulations. The reviewed values show a general scattering in characterization, mainly in thermal properties. This disagreement suggests that, in several cases, new studies must be started (and even new measurement techniques should be developed) to obtain accurate values.

Serrano-López, Roberto; Cuesta-López, Santiago

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Performance of a glazed open flow liquid desiccant solar collector for both summer cooling and winter heating: Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the work performed under DOE Contract ACO3-82SF11658, entitled, ''A Research Study to Determine the Heat and Mass Transfer Characteristics of an Open Flow Solar Collector for Both Summer Cooling and Winter Heating.'' Data and computer simulation results are shown for a glazed, open flow collector used for reconcentrating a lithium chloride solution and for thermal energy collection. A comparison of the glazed collector with an unglazed collector from a previous study is also presented.

McCormick, P.O.; Brown, S.R.; Tucker, S.P.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Salt River Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Salt River Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Salt River Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Salt River Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Other Ventilation Heat Pumps Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Varies by technology Provider Salt River Electric Cooperative Salt River Electric serves as the rural electric provider in Kentucky's Bullitt, Nelson, Spencer, and Washington counties. Residential customers are eligible for a variety of cash incentives for energy efficiency. The Touchstone Energy Home Program provides a rebate of up to $250 to customers

353

CATALYTIC GASIFICATION OF COAL USING EUTECTIC SALT MIXTURES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gas Research Institute (GRI) estimates that by the year 2010, 40% or more of U.S. gas supply will be provided by supplements including substitute natural gas (SNG) from coal. These supplements must be cost competitive with other energy sources. The first generation technologies for coal gasification e.g. the Lurgi Pressure Gasification Process and the relatively newer technologies e.g. the KBW (Westinghouse) Ash Agglomerating Fluidized-Bed, U-Gas Ash Agglomerating Fluidized-Bed, British Gas Corporation/Lurgi Slagging Gasifier, Texaco Moving-Bed Gasifier, and Dow and Shell Gasification Processes, have several disadvantages. These disadvantages include high severities of gasification conditions, low methane production, high oxygen consumption, inability to handle caking coals, and unattractive economics. Another problem encountered in catalytic coal gasification is deactivation of hydroxide forms of alkali and alkaline earth metal catalysts by oxides of carbon (CO{sub x}). To seek solutions to these problems, a team consisting of Clark Atlanta University (CAU, a Historically Black College and University, HBCU), the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) and Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) proposed to identify suitable low melting eutectic salt mixtures for improved coal gasification. The research objectives of this project were to: Identify appropriate eutectic salt mixture catalysts for coal gasification; Assess agglomeration tendency of catalyzed coal; Evaluate various catalyst impregnation techniques to improve initial catalyst dispersion; Determine catalyst dispersion at high carbon conversion levels; Evaluate effects of major process variables (such as temperature, system pressure, etc.) on coal gasification; Evaluate the recovery, regeneration and recycle of the spent catalysts; and Conduct an analysis and modeling of the gasification process to provide better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms and kinetics of the process.

Dr. Yaw D. Yeboah; Dr. Yong Xu; Dr. Atul Sheth; Dr. Pradeep Agrawal

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Energy Efficient Buildings, Salt Lake County, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Salt Lake County is pleased to announce the completion of its unprecedented solar photovoltaic (PV) installation on the Calvin R. Rampton Salt Palace Convention Center. This 1.65 MW installation will be one the largest solar roof top installations in the country and will more than double the current installed solar capacity in the state of Utah. Construction is complete and the system will be operational in May 2012. The County has accomplished this project using a Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) financing model. In a PPA model a third-party solar developer will finance, develop, own, operate, and maintain the solar array. Salt Lake County will lease its roof, and purchase the power from this third-party under a long-term Power Purchase Agreement contract. In fact, this will be one of the first projects in the state of Utah to take advantage of the recent (March 2010) legislation which makes PPA models possible for projects of this type. In addition to utilizing a PPA, this solar project will employ public and private capital, Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants (EECBG), and public/private subsidized bonds that are able to work together efficiently because of the recent stimulus bill. The project also makes use of recent changes to federal tax rules, and the recent re-awakening of private capital markets that make a significant public-private partnership possible. This is an extremely innovative project, and will mark the first time that all of these incentives (EECBG grants, Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds, New Markets tax credits, investment tax credits, public and private funds) have been packaged into one project. All of Salt Lake County's research documents and studies, agreements, and technical information is available to the public. In addition, the County has already shared a variety of information with the public through webinars, site tours, presentations, and written correspondence.

Barnett, Kimberly

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

355

Molten salt battery having inorganic paper separator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature secondary battery comprises an anode containing lithium, a cathode containing a chalcogen or chalcogenide, a molten salt electrolyte containing lithium ions, and a separator comprising a porous sheet comprising a homogenous mixture of 2-20 wt.% chrysotile asbestos fibers and the remainder inorganic material non-reactive with the battery components. The non-reactive material is present as fibers, powder, or a fiber-powder mixture.

Walker, Jr., Robert D. (Gainesville, FL)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

SALT-ANL. Systems Analysis Process Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SALT (Systems Analysis Language Translator), a systems- analysis and process-simulation program for steady-state and dynamic systems, can also be used for optimization and sensitivity studies. SALT employs state-of-the-art numerical techniques including a hybrid steepest-descent/quasi-Newtonian multidimensional nonlinear equation solver, sequential quadratic programming methods for optimization, and multistep integration methods for both stiff and nonstiff systems of differential equations. Based on a preprocessor concept where a `new` system driver can be written for each application, SALT-ANL contains precompiled component models, several flow types, and a number of thermodynamic and transport property routines, including a gas chemical-equilibrium code. It has been applied to the study of open-cycle and liquid-metal magnetohydrodynamic systems, fuel cells, ocean thermal energy conversion, municipal solid-waste processing, fusion, breeder reactors, and geothermal and solar-energy systems. Models available include: combustor, compressor, deaerator, gas-diffuser, fuel-dryer, feedwater-heater, flash-tank, gas-turbine, heater, heat-exchanger, flow-initiator, fuel-flow-initiator, molten-carbonate fuel-cell, liquid-metal diffuser, magnetohydrodynamic-generator, liquid-metal magnetohydrodynamic-generator, liquid-metal nozzle, liquid-metal pipe, flow-mixer, gas-nozzle, phosphoric acid fuel-cell, pump, pipe-calculator, steam-condenser, steam-drum, liquid-gas separator, stack, solid-oxide fuel-cell, flow-splitter, steam-turbine, two-phase diffuser, two-phase mixer, and two-phase nozzle. Input data to the SALT program describe the system configuration for the specific problem to be analyzed and provide instructions defining system constraints, objective functions, parameter sweeps, etc. to generate a PL/I program representing the system problem and performing the various analytic tasks.

Berry, G.F.; Geyer, H.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1992-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

357

Reference repository design concept for bedded salt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A reference design concept is presented for the subsurface portions of a nuclear waste repository in bedded salt. General geologic, geotechnical, hydrologic and geochemical data as well as descriptions of the physical systems are provided for use on generic analyses of the pre- and post-sealing performance of repositories in this geologic medium. The geology of bedded salt deposits and the regional and repository horizon stratigraphy are discussed. Structural features of salt beds including discontinuities and dissolution features are presented and their effect on repository performance is discussed. Seismic hazards and the potential effects of earthquakes on underground repositories are presented. The effect on structural stability and worker safety during construction from hydrocarbon and inorganic gases is described. Geohydrologic considerations including regional hydrology, repository scale hydrology and several hydrological failure modes are presented in detail as well as the hydrological considerations that effect repository design. Operational phase performance is discussed with respect to operations, ventilation system, shaft conveyances, waste handling and retrieval systems and receival rates of nuclear waste. Performance analysis of the post sealing period of a nuclear repository is discussed, and parameters to be used in such an analysis are presented along with regulatory constraints. Some judgements are made regarding hydrologic failure scenarios. Finally, the design and licensing process, consistent with the current licensing procedure is described in a format that can be easily understood.

Carpenter, D.W.; Martin, R.W.

1980-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

358

Polymeric salt bridges for conducting electric current in microfluidic devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A "cast-in-place" monolithic microporous polymer salt bridge for conducting electrical current in microfluidic devices, and methods for manufacture thereof is disclosed. Polymeric salt bridges are formed in place in capillaries or microchannels. Formulations are prepared with monomer, suitable cross-linkers, solvent, and a thermal or radiation responsive initiator. The formulation is placed in a desired location and then suitable radiation such as UV light is used to polymerize the salt bridge within a desired structural location. Embodiments are provided wherein the polymeric salt bridges have sufficient porosity to allow ionic migration without bulk flow of solvents therethrough. The salt bridges form barriers that seal against fluid pressures in excess of 5000 pounds per square inch. The salt bridges can be formulated for carriage of suitable amperage at a desired voltage, and thus microfluidic devices using such salt bridges can be specifically constructed to meet selected analytical requirements.

Shepodd, Timothy J. (Livermore, CA); Tichenor, Mark S. (San Diego, CA); Artau, Alexander (Humacao, PR)

2009-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

359

Pyrochemical process for extracting plutonium from an electrolyte salt  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pyrochemical process for extracting plutonium from a plutonium-bearing salt is disclosed. The process is particularly useful in the recovery of plutonium from electrolyte salts which are left over from the electrorefining of plutonium. In accordance with the process, the plutonium-bearing salt is melted and mixed with metallic calcium. The calcium reduces ionized plutonium in the salt to plutonium metal, and also causes metallic plutonium in the salt, which is typically present as finely dispersed metallic shot, to coalesce. The reduced and coalesced plutonium separates out on the bottom of the reaction vessel as a separate metallic phase which is readily separable from the overlying salt upon cooling of the mixture. Yields of plutonium are typically on the order of 95%. The stripped salt is virtually free of plutonium and may be discarded to low-level waste storage.

Mullins, Lawrence J. (Los Alamos, NM); Christensen, Dana C. (Los Alamos, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Aksaray And Ecemis Faults - Diapiric Salt Relationships- Relevance To The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aksaray And Ecemis Faults - Diapiric Salt Relationships- Relevance To The Aksaray And Ecemis Faults - Diapiric Salt Relationships- Relevance To The Hydrocarbon Exploration In The Tuz Golu (Salt Lake) Basin, Central Anatolia, Turkey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Aksaray And Ecemis Faults - Diapiric Salt Relationships- Relevance To The Hydrocarbon Exploration In The Tuz Golu (Salt Lake) Basin, Central Anatolia, Turkey Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Due to activitiy of the Aksaray and Ecemis Faults, volcanic intrusion and westward movement of the Anatolian plate, diapiric salt structures were occurred in the Tuz Golu (Salt Lake) basin in central Anatolia, Turkey. With the collisions of the Arabian and Anatolian plates during the late Cretaceous and Miocene times, prominent ophiolitic

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361

WIPP Shares Expertise with Salt Club Members | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Shares Expertise with Salt Club Members Shares Expertise with Salt Club Members WIPP Shares Expertise with Salt Club Members November 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Carlsbad Field Office’s Abe Van Luik, third from right, examines rock salt taken from the Morsleben mine in Germany. Carlsbad Field Office's Abe Van Luik, third from right, examines rock salt taken from the Morsleben mine in Germany. CARLSBAD, N.M. - EM's Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) participated in the second meeting of the Nuclear Energy Agency's (NEA) Salt Club and the 4th U.S.-German Workshop on Salt Repository Research, Design & Operation in Berlin. CBFO, which has responsibility for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and the National Transuranic (TRU) Program, was represented by International Programs and Policy Advisor Dr. Abe Van Luik.

362

Salt Waste Contractor Reaches Contract Milestone | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Salt Waste Contractor Reaches Contract Milestone Salt Waste Contractor Reaches Contract Milestone Salt Waste Contractor Reaches Contract Milestone April 29, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Robert Brown, SRR tank farm operator, performs daily inspections of a salt disposition process facility. The inspections and improvement upgrades have resulted in continued successful operations. Robert Brown, SRR tank farm operator, performs daily inspections of a salt disposition process facility. The inspections and improvement upgrades have resulted in continued successful operations. AIKEN, S.C. - The liquid waste cleanup contractor for the EM program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) recently surpassed a 2013 contract milestone by processing more than 600,000 gallons of salt waste. Savannah River Remediation (SRR) salt disposition process facilities

363

Cementitious Stabilization of Mixed Wastes with High Salt Loadings  

SciTech Connect

Salt loadings approaching 50 wt % were tolerated in cementitious waste forms that still met leach and strength criteria, addressing a Technology Deficiency of low salt loadings previously identified by the Mixed Waste Focus Area. A statistical design quantified the effect of different stabilizing ingredients and salt loading on performance at lower loadings, allowing selection of the more effective ingredients for studying the higher salt loadings. In general, the final waste form needed to consist of 25 wt % of the dry stabilizing ingredients to meet the criteria used and 25 wt % water to form a workable paste, leaving 50 wt % for waste solids. The salt loading depends on the salt content of the waste solids but could be as high as 50 wt % if all the waste solids are salt.

Spence, R.D.; Burgess, M.W.; Fedorov, V.V.; Downing, D.J.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Pyrochemical process for extracting plutonium from an electrolyte salt  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pyrochemical process for extracting plutonium from a plutonium-bearing salt is disclosed. The process is particularly useful in the recovery of plutonium for electrolyte salts which are left over from the electrorefining of plutonium. In accordance with the process, the plutonium-bearing salt is melted and mixed with metallic calcium. The calcium reduces ionized plutonium in the salt to plutonium metal, and also causes metallic plutonium in the salt, which is typically present as finely dispersed metallic shot, to coalesce. The reduced and coalesced plutonium separates out on the bottom of the reaction vessel as a separate metallic phase which is readily separable from the overlying salt upon cooling of the mixture. Yields of plutonium are typically on the order of 95%. The stripped salt is virtually free of plutonium and may be discarded to low-level waste storage.

Mullins, L.J.; Christensen, D.C.

1982-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

365

Alloy solution hardening with solute pairs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Solution hardened alloys are formed by using at least two solutes which form associated solute pairs in the solvent metal lattice. Copper containing equal atomic percentages of aluminum and palladium is an example.

Mitchell, John W. (Charlottesville, VA)

1976-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

366

Method for regeneration of electroless nickel plating solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electroless nickel(EN)/hypophosphite plating bath is provided employing acetic acid/acetate as a buffer and which is, as a result, capable of perpetual regeneration while avoiding the production of hazardous waste. A regeneration process is provided to process the spent EN plating bath solution. A concentrated starter and replenishment solution is provided for ease of operation of the plating bath. The regeneration process employs a chelating ion exchange system to remove nickel cations from spent EN plating solution. Phosphites are then removed from the solution by precipitation. The nickel cations are removed from the ion exchange system by elution with hypophosphorous acid and the nickel concentration of the eluate adjusted by addition of nickel salt. The treated solution and adjusted eluate are combined, stabilizer added, and the volume of resulting solution reduced by evaporation to form the bath starter and replenishing solution.

Eisenmann, Erhard T. (5423 Vista Sandia, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Method for regeneration of electroless nickel plating solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electroless nickel(EN)/hypophosphite plating bath is provided employing acetic acid/acetate as a buffer and which is, as a result, capable of perpetual regeneration while avoiding the production of hazardous waste. A regeneration process is provided to process the spent EN plating bath solution. A concentrated starter and replenishment solution is provided for ease of operation of the plating bath. The regeneration process employs a chelating ion exchange system to remove nickel cations from spent EN plating solution. Phosphites are then removed from the solution by precipitation. The nickel cations are removed from the ion exchange system by elution with hypophosphorus acid and the nickel concentration of the eluate adjusted by addition of nickel salt. The treated solution and adjusted eluate are combined, stabilizer added, and the volume of resulting solution reduced by evaporation to form the bath starter and replenishing solution. 1 fig.

Eisenmann, E.T.

1997-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

368

An Overview of Liquid Fluoride Salt Heat Transport Technology  

SciTech Connect

Liquid fluoride salts are a leading candidate heat transport medium for high-temperature applications. This report provides an overview of the current status of liquid salt heat transport technology. The report includes a high-level, parametric evaluation of liquid fluoride salt heat transport loop performance to allow intercomparisons between heat-transport fluid options as well as providing an overview of the properties and requirements for a representative loop. Much of the information presented here derives from the earlier molten salt reactor program and a significant advantage of fluoride salts, as high temperature heat transport media is their consequent relative technological maturity. The report also includes a compilation of relevant thermophysical properties of useful heat transport fluoride salts. Fluoride salts are both thermally stable and with proper chemistry control can be relatively chemically inert. Fluoride salts can, however, be highly corrosive depending on the container materials selected, the salt chemistry, and the operating procedures used. The report also provides an overview of the state-of-the-art in reduction-oxidation chemistry control methodologies employed to minimize salt corrosion as well as providing a general discussion of heat transfer loop operational issues such as start-up procedures and freeze-up vulnerability.

Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Salt disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the state of salt repository science, reviews many of the technical issues pertaining to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in salt, and proposes several avenues for future science-based activities to further the technical basis for disposal in salt. There are extensive salt formations in the forty-eight contiguous states, and many of them may be worthy of consideration for nuclear waste disposal. The United States has extensive experience in salt repository sciences, including an operating facility for disposal of transuranic wastes. The scientific background for salt disposal including laboratory and field tests at ambient and elevated temperature, principles of salt behavior, potential for fracture damage and its mitigation, seal systems, chemical conditions, advanced modeling capabilities and near-future developments, performance assessment processes, and international collaboration are all discussed. The discussion of salt disposal issues is brought current, including a summary of recent international workshops dedicated to high-level waste disposal in salt. Lessons learned from Sandia National Laboratories' experience on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and the Yucca Mountain Project as well as related salt experience with the Strategic Petroleum Reserve are applied in this assessment. Disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in a suitable salt formation is attractive because the material is essentially impermeable, self-sealing, and thermally conductive. Conditions are chemically beneficial, and a significant experience base exists in understanding this environment. Within the period of institutional control, overburden pressure will seal fractures and provide a repository setting that limits radionuclide movement. A salt repository could potentially achieve total containment, with no releases to the environment in undisturbed scenarios for as long as the region is geologically stable. Much of the experience gained from United States repository development, such as seal system design, coupled process simulation, and application of performance assessment methodology, helps define a clear strategy for a heat-generating nuclear waste repository in salt.

Leigh, Christi D. (Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, NM); Hansen, Francis D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

ENGINEERING EXPERIENCE AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY IN HANDLING FUSED CHLORIDE SALTS  

SciTech Connect

Two fused chloride salt eutectics, binary LiCl-KCl and ternary NaCl- KCl- MgCl/sub 2/, were used in fuel processing studies as part of the Liquid Metal Fuel Reactor research and development program. Results of engineering work done at Brookhaven since 1950 are summarized. It was demonstrated that fused chloride salt technology is sufficiently developed so that loops and other experimental equipment can be designed and operated at 500 deg C with a high degree of confidence. The equipment, which was operated for many hours, included a large forced-circulation loop and many thermal-convection loops and tanks. The specifications used for the fabrication, cleaning, and testing of equipment for salt service are described. All welded systems, welded by the usual inert-arc procedures, are preferred, but ring type joint stainless-steel flanged connections were found satisfactory, mainly for connecting melt tanks to experimental equipment and for mounting orifice flowmeters. The surfaces of equipment to be used with fused salts were cleaned satisfactorily prior to assembly by several different methods, but sandblasting was found applicable to all types of equipment. Radiography was used to check all welds in contact with fused salt for flaws and, during operation, to locate and determine the cause of any malfunction. Components tested at the normal operating temperature of 500 deg C included pumps, valves, agitators, sightports, samplers, and filtens. Salt samples were usually taken by the thief method. Both stationary and movable resistance type, liquid-level probes were used and were reliable so long as the salt surface remained quiescent; otherwise, splashing and short-circuiting occurred. Nullmatic, pilot-operated pressure transmitters gave good service in conjunction with both orifice and Venturi flowmeters. A procedure is described for preparing pound quantities of pure eutectics, which, in the case of the ternary eutectic, differs from that used in preparing gram quantities. Both eutectics were pretreated with a Bi- Mg-U solution to remove oxidizing impurities before use in corrosion and processing experiments. The results of physical property measurements on the two eutectics are included. (auth)

Raseman, C.J.; Susskind, H.; Farber, G.; McNulty, W.E.; Salzano, F.J.

1960-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Supai salt karst features: Holbrook Basin, Arizona  

SciTech Connect

More than 300 sinkholes, fissures, depressions, and other collapse features occur along a 70 km (45 mi) dissolution front of the Permian Supai Formation, dipping northward into the Holbrook Basin, also called the Supai Salt Basin. The dissolution front is essentially coincident with the so-called Holbrook Anticline showing local dip reversal; rather than being of tectonic origin, this feature is likely a subsidence-induced monoclinal flexure caused by the northward migrating dissolution front. Three major areas are identified with distinctive attributes: (1) The Sinks, 10 km WNW of Snowflake, containing some 200 sinkholes up to 200 m diameter and 50 m depth, and joint controlled fissures and fissure-sinks; (2) Dry Lake Valley and contiguous areas containing large collapse fissures and sinkholes in jointed Coconino sandstone, some of which drained more than 50 acre-feet ({approximately}6 {times} 10{sup 4} m{sup 3}) of water overnight; and (3) the McCauley Sinks, a localized group of about 40 sinkholes 15 km SE of Winslow along Chevelon Creek, some showing essentially rectangular jointing in the surficial Coconino Formation. Similar salt karst features also occur between these three major areas. The range of features in Supai salt are distinctive, yet similar to those in other evaporate basins. The wide variety of dissolution/collapse features range in development from incipient surface expression to mature and old age. The features began forming at least by Pliocene time and continue to the present, with recent changes reportedly observed and verified on airphotos with 20 year repetition. The evaporate sequence along interstate transportation routes creates a strategic location for underground LPG storage in leached caverns. The existing 11 cavern field at Adamana is safely located about 25 miles away from the dissolution front, but further expansion initiatives will require thorough engineering evaluation.

Neal, J.T.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

372

Troubleshooting: Strategies and Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... QIAGEN MiniElute reduces salt levels in ... has a big effect (A 1-2 degree shift in temperature of the heat plate can ... Vial caps will transfer low levels ...

2012-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

373

Development of Molten-Salt Heat Transfer Fluid Technology for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants - Public Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

Executive Summary This Final Report for the "Development of Molten-Salt Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF) Technology for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants” describes the overall project accomplishments, results and conclusions. Phase 1 analyzed the feasibility, cost and performance of a parabolic trough solar power plant with a molten salt heat transfer fluid (HTF); researched and/or developed feasible component options, detailed cost estimates and workable operating procedures; and developed hourly performance models. As a result, a molten salt plant with 6 hours of storage was shown to reduce Thermal Energy Storage (TES) cost by 43.2%, solar field cost by 14.8%, and levelized cost of energy (LCOE) by 9.8% - 14.5% relative to a similar state-of-the-art baseline plant. The LCOE savings range met the project’s Go/No Go criteria of 10% LCOE reduction. Another primary focus of Phase 1 and 2 was risk mitigation. The large risk areas associated with a molten salt parabolic trough plant were addressed in both Phases, such as; HTF freeze prevention and recovery, collector components and piping connections, and complex component interactions. Phase 2 analyzed in more detail the technical and economic feasibility of a 140 MWe,gross molten-salt CSP plant with 6 hours of TES. Phase 2 accomplishments included developing technical solutions to the above mentioned risk areas, such as freeze protection/recovery, corrosion effects of applicable molten salts, collector design improvements for molten salt, and developing plant operating strategies for maximized plant performance and freeze risk mitigation. Phase 2 accomplishments also included developing and thoroughly analyzing a molten salt, Parabolic Trough power plant performance model, in order to achieve the project cost and performance targets. The plant performance model and an extensive basic Engineering, Procurement, and Construction (EPC) quote were used to calculate a real levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of 11.50¢/kWhe , which achieved the Phase 2 Go/No Go target of less than 0.12¢/kWhe. Abengoa Solar has high confidence that the primary risk areas have been addressed in the project and a commercial plant utilizing molten salt is economically and technically feasible. The strong results from the Phase 1 and 2 research, testing, and analyses, summarized in this report, led Abengoa Solar to recommend that the project proceed to Phase 3. However, a commercially viable collector interconnection was not fully validated by the end of Phase 2, combined with the uncertainty in the federal budget, forced the DOE and Abengoa Solar to close the project. Thus the resources required to construct and operate a molten salt pilot plant will be solely supplied by Abengoa Solar.

Grogan, Dylan C. P.

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

Independent Oversight Assessment, Salt Waste Processing Facility Project -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Salt Waste Processing Facility Salt Waste Processing Facility Project - January 2013 Independent Oversight Assessment, Salt Waste Processing Facility Project - January 2013 January 2013 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent assessment of nuclear safety culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) Project. The primary objective of the evaluation was to provide information regarding the status of the safety culture at the SWPF Project. The data collection phase of the assessment occurred during August - September 2012. Independent Oversight Assessment, Salt Waste Processing Facility Project -

375

Disposing of nuclear waste in a salt bed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Disposing of nuclear waste in a salt bed Disposing of nuclear waste in a salt bed 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:November 2013 All Issues » submit Disposing of nuclear waste in a salt bed Decades' worth of transuranic waste from Los Alamos is being laid to rest at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in southeastern New Mexico March 25, 2013 Disposing of nuclear waste in a salt bed Depending on the impurities embedded within it, the salt from WIPP can be anything from a reddish, relatively opaque rock to a clear crystal like the one shown here. Ordinary salt effectively seals transuranic waste in a long-term repository Transuranic waste, made of items such as lab coats and equipment that have been contaminated by radioactive elements heavier than uranium, is being shipped from the Los Alamos National Laboratory to a long-term storage

376

Genomic insights into salt adaptation in a desert poplar  

SciTech Connect

Despite the high economic and ecological importance of forests, our knowledge of the genomic evolution of trees under salt stress remains very limited. Here we report the genome sequence of the desert poplar, Populus euphratica, which exhibits high tolerance to sa lt stress. Its genome is very similar and collinear to that of the closely related mesophytic congener, P trichocarpa. However, we find that several gene families likely to be involved in tolerance to salt stress contain significantly more gene copies within the P euphratica lineage. Furthermore, genes showing evidence of positive selection are significantly enriched in functional categories related to salt stress. Some of these genes, and others within the same categories, are significantly upregulated under salt stress relative to their expression in another salt-sensitive poplar. Our results provide an important background for understanding tree adaptation to salt stress and facilitating the genetic improvement of cultivated poplars for saline soils.

Ma, Tao [Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences] [Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences; Wang, Junyi [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Zhou, Gongke [Key laboratory of Biofuels and Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Instit] [Key laboratory of Biofuels and Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Instit; Yue, Zhen [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Hu, Quanjun [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Chen, Yan [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Liu, Bingbing [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Qiu, Qiang [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Wang, Zhuo [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Zhang, Jian [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Wang, Kun [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Jaing, Dechun [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Gou, Caiyun [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Yu, Lili [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Zhan, Dongliang [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Zhou, Ran [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Luo, Wenchun [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Ma, Hui [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Yang, Yongzhi [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Pan, Shengkai [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Fang, Dongming [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Luo, Yadan [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Wang, Xia [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Wang, Gaini [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Wang, Juan [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Wang, Qian [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Lu, Xu [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Chen, Zhe [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Liu, Jinchao [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Lu, Yao [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Yin, Ye [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Yang, Huanming [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Abbott, Richard [School of Biology, University of St. Andrews, St andrews, Fife KY16 9TH, UK] [School of Biology, University of St. Andrews, St andrews, Fife KY16 9TH, UK; Wu, Yuxia [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Wan, Dongshi [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Li, Jia [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Integrated demonstration of molten salt oxidation with salt recycle for mixed waste treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) is a thermal, nonflame process that has the inherent capability of completely destroying organic constituents of mixed wastes, hazardous wastes, and energetic materials while retaining inorganic and radioactive constituents in the salt. For this reason, MSO is considered a promising alternative to incineration for the treatment of a variety of organic wastes. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has prepared a facility and constructed an integrated pilot-scale MSO treatment system in which tests and demonstrations are performed under carefully controlled (experimental) conditions. The system consists of a MSO processor with dedicated off-gas treatment, a salt recycle system, feed preparation equipment, and equipment for preparing ceramic final waste forms. This integrated system was designed and engineered based on laboratory experience with a smaller engineering-scale reactor unit and extensive laboratory development on salt recycle and final forms preparation. In this paper we present design and engineering details of the system and discuss its capabilities as well as preliminary process demonstration data. A primary purpose of these demonstrations is identification of the most suitable waste streams and waste types for MSO treatment.

Hsu, P.C.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Delivery system for molten salt oxidation of solid waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a delivery system for safety injecting solid waste particles, including mixed wastes, into a molten salt bath for destruction by the process of molten salt oxidation. The delivery system includes a feeder system and an injector that allow the solid waste stream to be accurately metered, evenly dispersed in the oxidant gas, and maintained at a temperature below incineration temperature while entering the molten salt reactor.

Brummond, William A. (Livermore, CA); Squire, Dwight V. (Livermore, CA); Robinson, Jeffrey A. (Manteca, CA); House, Palmer A. (Walnut Creek, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area (Redirected from Columbus Salt Marsh Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure

380

Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada, USA, Including Warm Ground, Borate Deposits, and Siliceous Alteration Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desiccant salt solutions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells...

382

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell & Garside, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and...

383

Energy Department Completes Salt Coolant Material Transfer to...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Republic's Ministry of Industry and Trade to complete the transfer of 75 kilograms of fluoride salt from the Department's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to the Czech Nuclear...

384

Electrochemical Behavior of Calcium-Bismuth Alloys in Molten Salt ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The electrochemical properties of calcium-bismuth alloys were investigated to ... Behavior of Silicon Electrodepositing in Fluoride Molten Salts.

385

Natural Convection Fluoride Salt High Temperature Reactor Process ...  

... oil shale processing, hydrogen production, and production of synfuels from coal. The new nuclear reactor design employs a molten salt coolant in a natural ...

386

Regional Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert and Adjacent Areas in Utah, Nevada, and Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Regional Gravity...

387

Synthesis of acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid ...  

A process of preparing an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinc acid comprising: a) dissolving a lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate and hexamethylenetetramine in a ...

388

Haynesville-Bossier Shale Play, Texas-Louisiana Salt Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Haynesville-Bossier Shale Play, Texas-Louisiana Salt Basin Source: Energy Information Administration based on data from HPDI, TX Railroad Commission, ...

389

Method for the production of uranium chloride salt  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the production of UCl.sub.3 salt without the use of hazardous chemicals or multiple apparatuses for synthesis and purification is provided. Uranium metal is combined in a reaction vessel with a metal chloride and a eutectic salt- and heated to a first temperature under vacuum conditions to promote reaction of the uranium metal with the metal chloride for the production of a UCl.sub.3 salt. After the reaction has run substantially to completion, the furnace is heated to a second temperature under vacuum conditions. The second temperature is sufficiently high to selectively vaporize the chloride salts and distill them into a condenser region.

Westphal, Brian R.; Mariani, Robert D.

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

390

Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Safety Basis and Design Development May 2011 August 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement...

391

Savannah River Site (SRS) Experience with Preparing Salt Batches  

• Beneficially reuse existing waste. 6 SRS Liquid Waste System Salt Processing. 7 Background • Tk49 is the feed tank to ARP / MCU facilities

392

Molten salt bath circulation design for an electrolytic cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrolytic cell for reduction of a metal oxide to a metal and oxygen has an inert anode and an upwardly angled roof covering the inert mode. The angled roof diverts oxygen bubbles into an upcomer channel, thereby agitating a molten salt bath in the upcomer channel and improving dissolution of a metal oxide in the molten salt bath. The molten salt bath has a lower velocity adjacent the inert anode in order to minimize corrosion by substances in the bath. A particularly preferred cell produces aluminum by electrolysis of alumina in a molten salt bath containing aluminum fluoride and sodium fluoride.

Dawless, Robert K. (Monroeville, PA); LaCamera, Alfred F. (Trafford, PA); Troup, R. Lee (Murrysville, PA); Ray, Siba P. (Murrysville, PA); Hosler, Robert B. (Sarver, PA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Salt Fluxes for Alkali and Alkaline Earth Element Removal from ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 1, 2001... for Alkali and Alkaline Earth Element Removal from Molten Aluminum ... Solid chloride salts containing MgC2 can be used to remove alkali ...

394

Ion Beam Experiment to Simulate Simultaneous Molten Salt ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experiments to expose candidate materials to simultaneous molten salt corrosion and ion-beam damage are staged at the Ion Beam Materials Laboratory at Los ...

395

Molten Salt Electrolysis for the Synthesis of Elemental Boron  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An alternative method using molten salt electrolysis was developed in this work. The electrolyte system evaluated was MgF2-NaF-LiF with ...

396

Molten salt bath circulation design for an electrolytic cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrolytic cell for reduction of a metal oxide to a metal and oxygen has an inert anode and an upwardly angled roof covering the inert mode. The angled roof diverts oxygen bubbles into an upcomer channel, thereby agitating a molten salt bath in the upcomer channel and improving dissolution of a metal oxide in the molten salt bath. The molten salt bath has a lower velocity adjacent the inert anode in order to minimize corrosion by substances in the bath. A particularly preferred cell produces aluminum by electrolysis of alumina in a molten salt bath containing aluminum fluoride and sodium fluoride. 4 figs.

Dawless, R.K.; LaCamera, A.F.; Troup, R.L.; Ray, S.P.; Hosler, R.B.

1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

397

Sensor Technology for Real Time Monitoring of Molten Salt ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Sensor Technology for Real Time Monitoring of Molten Salt Electrolytes During Nuclear Fuel Electrorefining. Author(s), Michael F. Simpson, ...

398

Evaluation of the Miamsburg Salt-Gradient, Solar Pond  

SciTech Connect

This project is directed toward data collection and evaluation of the performance of the largest working, salt-gradient, solar pond in the world.

Wittenberg, Layton J.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Recovery of plutonium from molten salt extraction residues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Savannah River Laboratory (SRL), Savannah River Plant (SRP), and Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) are jointly developing a process to recover plutonium from molten salt extraction residues. These NaCl, KCl, MgCl/sub 2/ residues, which are generated in the pyrochemical extraction of /sup 241/Am from aged plutonium metal, contain up to 25 wt % dissolved PUCl/sub 3/ and up to 2 wt % AmCl/sub 3/. The objective is to develop a process to convert these residues to plutonium metal product and discardable waste. The first step of the conceptual process is to convert the actinides to a heterogenous scrub alloy with aluminum and magnesium. This step, performed at RFP, effectively separates the actinides from the bulk of the chloride. This scrub alloy will then be dissolved in a HNO/sub 3/-HF solution at SRP. Residual chloride will be removed by precipitation with Hg/sub 2/(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/ followed by centrifugation. Plutonium and americium will be separated using the Purex solvent extraction process. The /sup 241/Am will be diverted to the solvent extraction waste stream where it can either be discarded to the waste farm or recovered. The plutonium will be finished via PuF/sub 3/ precipitation, oxidation to a mixture of PUF/sub 4/ and PuO/sub 2/, followed by reduction to plutonium metal with calcium.

Gray, L.W.; Holcomb, H.P.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Turbidity study of solar ponds utilizing seawater as salt source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of experiments were conducted to study the turbidity reduction in solar ponds utilizing seawater as salt source. The experiment on the turbidity reduction efficiency with chemicals indicates that alum (KAl(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}.12H{sub 2}O) has a better turbidity control property because of its strongly flocculating and also well depressing the growing of algae and bacteria in the seawater. In comparison with bittern and seawater, our experiment shows that the residual brine after desalination can keep limpidity for a long time even without any chemical in it. Experiments were also conducted on the diffusion of turbidity and salinity, which show that the turbidity did not diffuse upwards in the solution. In the experiment on subsidence of soil in the bittern and saline with the same salinity, it was found that soil subsided quite quickly in the pure saline water, but very slowly in the bittern. In this paper we also proposed an economical method to protect the solar pond from the damage of rain. Finally, thermal performance of a solar pond was simulated in the conditions of different turbidities using a thermal diffusion model. (author)

Li, Nan; Sun, Wence; Shi, Yufeng [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Yin, Fang [YLab, 358 South 700 East, Suit B-139, Salt Lake City, UT 84102 (United States); Zhang, Caihong [Dalian Thermoelectric Group Co. Ltd., Dalian 116001 (China)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desiccant salt solutions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Arabidopsis AtSerpin1, Crystal Structure and in Vivo Interaction with Its Target Protease RESPONSIVE TO DESICCATION-21 (RD21)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In animals, protease inhibitors of the serpin family are associated with many physiological processes, including blood coagulation and innate immunity. Serpins feature a reactive center loop (RCL), which displays a protease target sequence as a bait. RCL cleavage results in an irreversible, covalent serpin-protease complex. AtSerpin1 is an Arabidopsis protease inhibitor that is expressed ubiquitously throughout the plant. The x-ray crystal structure of recombinant AtSerpin1 in its native stressed conformation was determined at 2.2 {angstrom}. The electrostatic surface potential below the RCL was found to be highly positive, whereas the breach region critical for RCL insertion is an unusually open structure. AtSerpin1 accumulates in plants as a full-length and a cleaved form. Fractionation of seedling extracts by nonreducing SDS-PAGE revealed the presence of an additional slower migrating complex that was absent when leaves were treated with the specific cysteine protease inhibitor l-trans-epoxysuccinyl-l-leucylamido (4-guanidino)butane. Significantly, RESPONSIVE TO DESICCATION-21 (RD21) was the major protease labeled with the l-trans-epoxysuccinyl-l-leucylamido (4-guanidino)butane derivative DCG-04 in wild type extracts but not in extracts of mutant plants constitutively overexpressing AtSerpin1, indicating competition. Fractionation by nonreducing SDS-PAGE followed by immunoblotting with RD21-specific antibody revealed that the protease accumulated both as a free enzyme and in a complex with AtSerpin1. Importantly, both RD21 and AtSerpin1 knock-out mutants lacked the serpin-protease complex. The results establish that the major Arabidopsis plant serpin interacts with RD21. This is the first report of the structure and in vivo interaction of a plant serpin with its target protease.

Lampl, Nardy; Budai-Hadrian, Ofra; Davydov, Olga; Joss, Tom V.; Harrop, Stephen J.; Curmi, Paul M.G.; Roberts, Thomas H.; Fluhr, Robert (WIS-I); (Macquarie); (New South)

2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

402

Apparatus for adjusting and maintaining humidity of a gas at a constant value within a closed system  

SciTech Connect

An improved apparatus was developed for maintaining the humidity of a gas at a constant value within a closed system for long periods of time by using saturated salt solutions and isolating the sample environment from the salt environment. This apparatus avoids many problems associated with humidity/temperature chambers and off-the-shelf laboratory equipment, such as desiccators, that are being used for environmental studies under controlled conditions of humidity and temperature. 3 refs., 2 figs.

Walters, R.R.; Abernathy, B.

1986-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

403

An Overview of Liquid Fluoride Salt Heat Transport Systems  

SciTech Connect

Heat transport is central to all thermal-based forms of electricity generation. The ever increasing demand for higher thermal efficiency necessitates power generation cycles transitioning to progressively higher temperatures. Similarly, the desire to provide direct thermal coupling between heat sources and higher temperature chemical processes provides the underlying incentive to move toward higher temperature heat transfer loops. As the system temperature rises, the available materials and technology choices become progressively more limited. Superficially, fluoride salts at {approx}700 C resemble water at room temperature being optically transparent and having similar heat capacity, roughly three times the viscosity, and about twice the density. Fluoride salts are a leading candidate heat-transport material at high temperatures. Fluoride salts have been extensively used in specialized industrial processes for decades, yet they have not entered widespread deployment for general heat transport purposes. This report does not provide an exhaustive screening of potential heat transfer media and other high temperature liquids such as alkali metal carbonate eutectics or chloride salts may have economic or technological advantages. A particular advantage of fluoride salts is that the technology for their use is relatively mature as they were extensively studied during the 1940s-1970s as part of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's program to develop molten salt reactors (MSRs). However, the instrumentation, components, and practices for use of fluoride salts are not yet developed sufficiently for commercial implementation. This report provides an overview of the current understanding of the technologies involved in liquid salt heat transport (LSHT) along with providing references to the more detailed primary information resources. Much of the information presented here derives from the earlier MSR program. However, technology has evolved over the intervening years, and this report also describes more recently developed technologies such as dry gas seals. This report also provides a high-level, parametric evaluation of LSHT loop performance to allow general intercomparisons between heat-transport fluid options as well as provide an overview of the properties and requirements for a representative loop. A compilation of relevant thermophysical properties of useful fluoride salts is also included for salt heat transport systems. Fluoride salts can be highly corrosive depending on the container materials selected, the salt chemistry, and the operating procedures used. The report includes an overview of the state-of-the-art in reduction-oxidation chemistry control methodologies employed to minimize corrosion issues. Salt chemistry control technology, however, remains at too low a level of understanding for widespread industrial usage. Loop operational issues such as start-up procedures and system freeze-up vulnerability are also discussed. Liquid fluoride salts are a leading candidate heat transport medium for high-temperature applications. This report provides an overview of the current status of liquid salt heat transport technology. The report includes a high-level, parametric evaluation of liquid fluoride salt heat transport loop performance to allow intercomparisons between heat-transport fluid options as well as providing an overview of the properties and requirements for a representative loop. Much of the information presented here derives from the earlier molten salt reactor program and a significant advantage of fluoride salts, as high temperature heat transport media is their consequent relative technological maturity. The report also includes a compilation of relevant thermophysical properties of useful heat transport fluoride salts. Fluoride salts are both thermally stable and with proper chemistry control can be relatively chemically inert. Fluoride salts can, however, be highly corrosive depending on the container materials selected, the salt chemistry, and the operating procedures used. The report also provides an over

Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit [ORNL

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Savannah River Site - Salt Waste Processing Facility: Briefing on the Salt Waste Processing Facility Independent Technical Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This is a presentation outlining the Salt Waste Processing Facility process, major risks, approach for conducting reviews, discussion of the findings, and conclusions.

405

Structural restoration of Louann Salt and overlying sediments, De Soto Canyon Salt Basin, northeastern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The continental margin of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico is suited for seismic stratigraphic analysis and salt tectonism analysis. Jurassic strata include the Louann Salt on the continental shelf and upper slope of the Destin Dome OCS area, northeastern Gulf of Mexico. These sediments were deposited in a slowly subsiding, stable tectonic environment. Two-dimensional (2-D) seismic data, supplemented with well log, paleontologic and velocity information were used to infer structural and stratigraphic features, especially small faults in the deep part of the De Soto Canyon Salt Basin area. Six sequence boundaries or correlative paleohorizons were interpreted on Landmark seismic interpretation workstation. They are Base of Salt or Equivalent, Top of Salt, Top of Smackover Formation, Top of Cotton Valley Group, Middle Cretaceous sequence boundary, and Top of Upper Cretaceous. Information generated from structural and stratigraphic analysis are used to analyze the evolution of salt movement and salt mechanism in this area. I used a software package Restore (Dan Schultz-Ela and Ken Duncan, 1991) for structural restoration. This program is suitable for extensional terrane. The restoration of one depth section was achieved through steps introduced by Restore. Regional extension, gravity spreading, and gliding are the most important mechanism of salt flow, buoyancy and differential loading mainly contribute to the vertical development of salt structure in this area.

Guo, Mengdong

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Process for separating and recovering an anionic dye from an aqueous solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid/liquid phase process for the separation and recovery of an anionic dye from an aqueous solution is disclosed. The solid phase comprises separation particles having surface-bonded poly(ethylene glycol) groups, whereas the aqueous solution from which the anionic dye molecules are separated contains a poly(ethylene glycol) liquid/liquid biphase-forming amount of a dissolved lyotropic salt. After contact between the aqueous solution and separation particles, the anionic dye is bound to the particles. The bound anionic dye molecules are freed from the separation particles by contacting the anionic dye-bound particles with an aqueous solution that does not contain a poly(ethylene glycol) liquid/liquid biphase-forming amount of a dissolved lyotropic salt to form an aqueous anionic dye solution whose anionic dye concentration is preferably higher than that of the initial dye-containing solution.

Rogers, Robin (DeKalb, IL); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Bond, Andrew H. (Tallahassee, FL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Process for separating and recovering an anionic dye from an aqueous solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid/liquid phase process for the separation and recovery of an anionic dye from an aqueous solution is disclosed. The solid phase comprises separation particles having surface-bonded poly(ethylene glycol) groups, whereas the aqueous solution from which the anionic dye molecules are separated contains a poly(ethylene glycol) liquid/liquid biphase-forming amount of a dissolved lyotropic salt. After contact between the aqueous solution and separation particles, the anionic dye is bound to the particles. The bound anionic dye molecules are freed from the separation particles by contacting the anionic dye-bound particles with an aqueous solution that does not contain a poly(ethylene glycol) liquid/liquid biphase-forming amount of a dissolved lyotropic salt to form an aqueous anionic dye solution whose anionic dye concentration is preferably higher than that of the initial dye-containing solution. 7 figs.

Rogers, R.; Horwitz, E.P.; Bond, A.H.

1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

408

Ketone Production from the Thermal Decomposition of Carboxylate Salts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MixAlco process uses an anaerobic, mixed-culture fermentation to convert lignocellulosic biomass to carboxylate salts. The fermentation broth must be clarified so that only carboxylate salts, water, and minimal impurities remain. Carboxylate salts are concentrated by evaporation and thermally decomposed into ketones. The ketones can then be chemically converted to a wide variety of chemicals and fuels. The presence of excess lime in the thermal decomposition step reduced product yield. Mixtures of calcium carboxylate salts were thermally decomposed at 450 degrees C. Low lime-to-salt ratios (g Ca(OH)2/g salt) of 0.00134 and less had a negligible effect on ketone yield. In contrast, salts with higher lime-to-salt ratios of 0.00461, 0.0190, and 0.272 showed 3.5, 4.6, and 9.4% loss in ketone yield, respectively. These losses were caused primarily by increases in tars and heavy oils; however, a three-fold increase in hydrocarbon production occurred as well. To predict ketone product distribution, a random-pairing and a Gibbs free energy minimization model were applied to thermal decompositions of mixed calcium and sodium carboxylate salts. Random pairing appears to better predict ketone product composition. For sodium and calcium acetate, two types of mixed sodium carboxylate salts, and two types of mixed calcium carboxylate salts, activation energy (EA) was determined using three isoconversional methods. For each salt type, EA varied significantly with conversion. The average EA for sodium and calcium acetate was 226.65 and 556.75 kJ/mol, respectively. The average EA for the two mixed sodium carboxylate salts were 195.61, and 218.18 kJ/mol. The average EA for the two mixed calcium carboxylate salts were 232.78, and 176.55 kJ/mol. In addition, three functions of conversion were employed to see which one best modeled the experimental data. The Sestak-Berggren model was the best overall. Possible reactor designs and configurations that address the challenges associated with the continuous thermal decomposition of carboxylate salts are also presented and discussed. Methods of fermentation broth clarification were tested. Flocculation showed little improvement in broth purity. Coagulation yielded broth of 93.23% purity. Filtration using pore sizes from 1 micrometer to 240 Daltons increased broth purity (90.79 to 98.33%) with decreasing pore size.

Landoll, Michael 1984-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Considerations of Alloy N for Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor Applications  

SciTech Connect

Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactors (FHRs) are a promising new class of thermal-spectrum nuclear reactors. The reactor structural materials must possess high-temperature strength and chemical compatibility with the liquid fluoride salt as well as with a power cycle fluid such as supercritical water while remaining resistant to residual air within the containment. Alloy N was developed for use with liquid fluoride salts and it possesses adequate strength and chemical compatibility up to about 700 C. A distinctive property of FHRs is that their maximum allowable coolant temperature is restricted by their structural alloy maximum service temperature. As the reactor thermal efficiency directly increases with the maximum coolant temperature, higher temperature resistant alloys are strongly desired. This paper reviews the current status of Alloy N and its relevance to FHRs including its design principles, development history, high temperature strength, environmental resistance, metallurgical stability, component manufacturability, ASME codification status, and reactor service requirements. The review will identify issues and provide guidance for improving the alloy properties or implementing engineering solutions.

Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Muralidharan, Govindarajan [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

New information on disposal of oil field wastes in salt caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solution-mined salt caverns have been used for many years for storing hydrocarbon products. This paper summarizes an Argonne National Laboratory report that reviews the legality, technical suitability, and feasibility of disposing of nonhazardous oil and gas exploration and production wastes in salt caverns. An analysis of regulations indicated that there are no outright regulatory prohibitions on cavern disposal of oil field wastes at either the federal level or in the 11 oil-producing states that were studied. There is no actual field experience on the long-term impacts that might arise following closure of waste disposal caverns. Although research has found that pressures will build-up in a closed cavern, none has specifically addressed caverns filled with oil field wastes. More field research on pressure build-up in closed caverns is needed. On the basis of preliminary investigations, we believe that disposal of oil field wastes in salt caverns is legal and feasible. The technical suitability of the practice depends on whether the caverns are well-sited and well-designed, carefully operated, properly closed, and routinely monitored.

Veil, J.A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Risk analyses for disposing nonhazardous oil field wastes in salt caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Salt caverns have been used for several decades to store various hydrocarbon products. In the past few years, four facilities in the US have been permitted to dispose nonhazardous oil field wastes in salt caverns. Several other disposal caverns have been permitted in Canada and Europe. This report evaluates the possibility that adverse human health effects could result from exposure to contaminants released from the caverns in domal salt formations used for nonhazardous oil field waste disposal. The evaluation assumes normal operations but considers the possibility of leaks in cavern seals and cavern walls during the post-closure phase of operation. In this assessment, several steps were followed to identify possible human health risks. At the broadest level, these steps include identifying a reasonable set of contaminants of possible concern, identifying how humans could be exposed to these contaminants, assessing the toxicities of these contaminants, estimating their intakes, and characterizing their associated human health risks. The contaminants of concern for the assessment are benzene, cadmium, arsenic, and chromium. These were selected as being components of oil field waste and having a likelihood to remain in solution for a long enough time to reach a human receptor.

Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Veil, J.; Caudle, D.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Can nonhazardous oil field wastes be disposed of in salt caverns?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solution-mined salt caverns have been used for many years for storing hydrocarbon products. This paper summarizes an Argonne National Laboratory report that reviews the legality, technical suitability, and feasibility of disposing of nonhazardous oil and gas exploration and production wastes in salt caverns. An analysis of regulations indicated that there are no outright regulatory prohibitions on cavern disposal -of oil field wastes at either the federal level or in the 11 oil-producing states that were studied. There is no actual field experience on the long-term impacts that might arise following closure of waste disposal caverns. Although research has found that pressures will build up in a closed cavern, none has specifically addressed caverns filled with oil field wastes. More field research on pressure build up in closed caverns is needed. On the basis of preliminary investigations, we believe that disposal of oil field wastes in salt caverns is legal and feasible. The technical suitability of the practice depends on whether the caverns are well-sited and well-designed, carefully operated, properly closed, and routinely monitored.

Veil, J.A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

The determination of UO/sub 2/ and UF/sub 4/ in fused fluoride salts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The determination of uranium oxide solubilities in fused fluoride salts is important in the electrolytic preparation of uranium metal. This project was initiated to develop a method for the determination of UO/sub 2/ separately from UF/sub 4/ in UF/sub 4/-CaF/sub 2/-LiF fused salts. Previous methods used for the determination of UO/sub 2/ in fused fluoride salts involved inert gas fusions where oxygen was liberated as CO/sub 2/, and hydrofluorination where oxygen was released as H/sub 2/O; but the special equipment used for these procedures was no longer available. These methods assumed that all of the oxygen liberated was due to UO/sub 2/ and does not consider impurities from reagents and other oxygen sources that amount to a bias of approximately 0.3 wt %. This titrimetric method eliminates the bias by selectively extracting the UF/sub 4/ with a Na/sub 2/EDTA-H/sub 3/BO/sub 3/ solution. The remaining uranium oxide residue is treated and titrated gravimetrically to a potentiometric endpoint with NBS standard K/sub 2/Cr/sub 2/O/sub 7/. An aliquot of the Na/sub 2/EDTA-H/sub 3/BO/sub 3/ extract is also titrated gravimetrically to a potentiometric endpoint, this uranium component is determined and calculated as UF/sub 4/. 4 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Batiste, D.J.; Lee, D.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

ANALYSIS OF THE SALT FEED TANK CORE SAMPLE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) immobilizes and disposes of low-level radioactive and hazardous liquid waste (salt solution) remaining from the processing of radioactive material at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Low-level waste (LLW) streams from processes at SRS are stored in Tank 50 until the LLW can be transferred to the SPF for treatment and disposal. The Salt Feed Tank (SFT) at the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) holds approximately 6500 gallons of low level waste from Tank 50 as well as drain water returned from the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) vaults. Over the past several years, Saltstone Engineering has noted the accumulation of solids in the SFT. The solids are causing issues with pump performance, agitator performance, density/level monitoring, as well as taking up volume in the tank. The tank has been sounded at the same location multiple times to determine the level of the solids. The readings have been 12, 25 and 15 inches. The SFT is 8.5 feet high and 12 feet in diameter, therefore the solids account for approximately 10 % of the tank volume. Saltstone Engineering has unsuccessfully attempted to obtain scrape samples of the solids for analysis. As a result, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with developing a soft core sampler to obtain a sample of the solids and to analyze the core sample to aid in determining a path forward for removing the solids from the SFT. The source of the material in the SFT is the drain water return system where excess liquid from the Saltstone disposal vaults is pumped back to the SFT for reprocessing. It has been shown that fresh grout from the vault enter the drain water system piping. Once these grout solids return to the SFT, they settle in the tank, set up, and can't be reprocessed, causing buildup in the tank over time. The composition of the material indicates that it is potentially toxic for chromium and mercury and the primary radionuclide is cesium-137. Qualitative measurements show that the material is not cohesive and will break apart with some force.

Reigel, M.; Cheng, W.

2012-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

415

Disposal of NORM waste in salt caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some types of oil and gas production and processing wastes contain naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). If NORM is present at concentrations above regulatory levels in oil field waste, the waste requires special disposal practices. The existing disposal options for wastes containing NORM are limited and costly. This paper evaluates the legality, technical feasibility, economics, and human health risk of disposing of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes in salt caverns. Cavern disposal of NORM waste is technically feasible and poses a very low human health risk. From a legal perspective, there are no fatal flaws that would prevent a state regulatory agency from approving cavern disposal of NORM. On the basis of the costs charged by caverns currently used for disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste (NOW), NORM waste disposal caverns could be cost competitive with existing NORM waste disposal methods when regulatory agencies approve the practice.

Veil, J.A.; Smith, K.P.; Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Blunt, D.; Williams, G.P.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Technical review of Molten Salt Oxidation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The process was reviewed for destruction of mixed low-level radioactive waste. Results: extensive development work and scaleup has been documented on coal gasification and hazardous waste which forms a strong experience base for this MSO process; it is clearly applicable to DOE wastes such as organic liquids and low-ash wastes. It also has potential for processing difficult-to-treat wastes such as nuclear grade graphite and TBP, and it may be suitable for other problem waste streams such as sodium metal. MSO operating systems may be constructed in relatively small units for small quantity generators. Public perceptions could be favorable if acceptable performance data are presented fairly; MSO will likely require compliance with regulations for incineration. Use of MSO for offgas treatment may be complicated by salt carryover. Figs, tabs, refs.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Visualization of salt-induced stress perturbations.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important challenge encountered during post-processing of finite element analyses is the visualizing of three-dimensional fields of real-valued second-order tensors. Namely, as finite element meshes become more complex and detailed, evaluation and presentation of the principal stresses becomes correspondingly problematic. In this paper, we describe techniques used to visualize simulations of perturbed in-situ stress fields associated with hypothetical salt bodies in the Gulf of Mexico. We present an adaptation of the Mohr diagram, a graphical paper and pencil method used by the material mechanics community for estimating coordinate transformations for stress tensors, as a new tensor glyph for dynamically exploring tensor variables within three-dimensional finite element models. This interactive glyph can be used as either a probe or a filter through brushing and linking.

Crossno, Patricia Joyce; Brannon, Rebecca Moss; Coblentz, David D.; Rogers, David H.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Salt River Project SRP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SRP SRP Jump to: navigation, search Name Salt River Project (SRP) Place Tempe, Arizona Zip 85281-1298 Sector Biomass, Solar Product US utility which sources a percentage of its electricity from biomass plants. It is also involved in the solar power industry. Coordinates 33.42551°, -111.937419° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.42551,"lon":-111.937419,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

419

May 29, 2010 The Hard Sell on Salt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

May 29, 2010 The Hard Sell on Salt By MICHAEL MOSS With salt under attack for its ill effects -- an allure the industry has recognized for decades. "Once a preference is acquired," a top scientist at Frito adopting the lower standard for everyone as part of its review of nutrition standards. The food industry

Bent, Andrew F.

420

Treatment of plutonium process residues by molten salt oxidation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) is a thermal process that can remove more than 99.999% of the organic matrix from combustible {sup 238}Pu material. Plutonium processing residues are injected into a molten salt bed with an excess of air. The salt (sodium carbonate) functions as a catalyst for the conversion of the organic material to carbon dioxide and water. Reactive species such as fluorine, chlorine, bromine, iodine, sulfur, phosphorous and arsenic in the organic waste react with the molten salt to form the corresponding neutralized salts, NaF, NaCl, NaBr, NaI, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and NaAsO{sub 2} or Na{sub 3}AsO4. Plutonium and other metals react with the molten salt and air to form metal salts or oxides. Saturated salt will be recycled and aqueous chemical separation will be used to recover the {sup 238}Pu. The Los Alamos National Laboratory system, which is currently in the conceptual design stage, will be scaled down from current systems for use inside a glovebox.

Stimmel, J.; Wishau, R.; Ramsey, K.B.; Montoya, A.; Brock, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Heslop, M. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (United States). Indian Head Div.; Wernly, K. [Molten Salt Oxidation Corp. (United States)

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desiccant salt solutions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Enhancement of specific heat capacity of high-temperature silica-nanofluids synthesized in alkali chloride salt eutectics for solar thermal-energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chloride salt eutectics for solar thermal-energy storage applications Donghyun Shin, Debjyoti Banerjee solution, resulting in degradation of the thermal properties. Solar energy conversion to electricity is achieved primarily by using (a) photovoltaic technology, or (b) by harnessing solar thermal-energy

Banerjee, Debjyoti

422

Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics At Salt Wells Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics At Salt Wells Area Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics At Salt Wells Area (Montgomery, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics At Salt Wells Area (Montgomery, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Area Exploration Technique Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics Activity Date 2004 - 2004 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis AMP Resource contracted Willowstick Technologies, LLC to conduct a Controlled Source-Frequency Domain Magnetics (CS-FDM) geophysical investigation at Salt Wells in order to characterize and delineate areas showing the greatest concentrations and highest temperatures of geothermal groundwater. The investigation also sought to map blind faults beneath the

423

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Salt Waste Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility - August 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility - August 2013 August 2013 Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Safety Basis and Design Development. This report documents the results of an independent oversight review of the safety basis and design development for the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site. The review was performed February 12-14, 2013 by DOE's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations, which is within the DOE Office of Health, Safety and Security. The purpose of the review was to evaluate the safety basis, design, and the associated technical documents developed for

424

BLM Fact Sheet- Ormat Technologies Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Project |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BLM Fact Sheet- Ormat Technologies Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Project BLM Fact Sheet- Ormat Technologies Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Project Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: BLM Fact Sheet- Ormat Technologies Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Project Abstract No abstract available. Author Bureau of Land Management Organization Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada Published U.S. Department of the Interior, 2011 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for BLM Fact Sheet- Ormat Technologies Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Project Citation Bureau of Land Management (Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada). 2011. BLM Fact Sheet- Ormat Technologies Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Project. Carson City, Nevada: U.S. Department of the

425

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Salt Waste Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility - August 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility - August 2013 August 2013 Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Safety Basis and Design Development. This report documents the results of an independent oversight review of the safety basis and design development for the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site. The review was performed February 12-14, 2013 by DOE's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations, which is within the DOE Office of Health, Safety and Security. The purpose of the review was to evaluate the safety basis, design, and the associated technical documents developed for

426

ENEL Salt Wells Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ENEL Salt Wells Geothermal Facility ENEL Salt Wells Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home ENEL Salt Wells Geothermal Facility General Information Name ENEL Salt Wells Geothermal Facility Facility Salt Wells Geothermal Facility Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Churchill, NV Coordinates 39.651603422063°, -118.49778413773° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.651603422063,"lon":-118.49778413773,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

427

Method for Making a Uranium Chloride Salt Product  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The subject apparatus provides a means to produce UCl3, in large quantities without incurring corrosion of the containment vessel or associated apparatus. Gaseous Cl is injected into a lower layer of Cd where CdCl2 is formed. Due to is lower density, the CdCl2 rises through the Cd layer into a layer of molten LiCl-KCL salt where a rotatable basket containing uranium ingots is suspended. The CdCl2 reacts with the uranium to form UCl, and Cd. Due to density differences, the Cd sinks down to the liquid Cd layer and is reused. The UCl3 combines with the molten salt. During production the temperature is maintained at about 600 degrees C. while after the uranium has been depleted the salt temperature is lowered, the molten salt is pressure siphoned from the vessel, and the salt product LiCl-KCl-30 mol% UCl3 is solidified.

Miller, William F.; Tomczuk, Zygmunt

2004-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

428

Continuous extraction of molten chloride salts with liquid cadmium alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pyrochemical method is being developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to provide contnuous multistage extractions between molten chloride salts and liquid cadmium alloys at 500{degrees}C. The extraction method wi