National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for desert southwest region

  1. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region.

  2. VP of Transmission System Asset Management for Desert Southwest Region (Maintenance Manager)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    (See Frequently Asked Questions for more information). Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration Desert Southwest Region Maintenance (G5000) 615 S. 43rd Avenue Phoenix, AZ 85009...

  3. Southwest Alaska Regional Geothermal Energy Project | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Southwest Alaska Regional Geothermal Energy Project Southwest Alaska Regional Geothermal Energy Project Engineered Geothermal Systems Demonstration Projects. Project objectives: ...

  4. Dramatic Demand Reduction In The Desert Southwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boehm, Robert; Hsieh, Sean; Lee, Joon; Baghzouz, Yahia; Cross, Andrew; Chatterjee, Sarah

    2015-07-06

    This report summarizes a project that was funded to the University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV), with subcontractors Pulte Homes and NV Energy. The project was motivated by the fact that locations in the Desert Southwest portion of the US demonstrate very high peak electrical demands, typically in the late afternoons in the summer. These high demands often require high priced power to supply the needs, and the large loads can cause grid supply problems. An approach was proposed through this contact that would reduce the peak electrical demands to an anticipated 65% of what code-built houses of the similar size would have. It was proposed to achieve energy reduction through four approaches applied to a development of 185 homes in northwest part of Las Vegas named Villa Trieste. First, the homes would all be highly energy efficient. Secondly, each house would have a PV array installed on it. Third, an advanced demand response technique would be developed to allow the resident to have some control over the energy used. Finally, some type of battery storage would be used in the project. Pulte Homes designed the houses. The company considered initial cost vs. long-term savings and chose options that had relatively short paybacks. HERS (Home Energy Rating Service) ratings for the homes are approximately 43 on this scale. On this scale, code-built homes rate at 100, zero energy homes rate a 0, and Energy Star homes are 85. In addition a 1.764 Wp (peak Watt) rated PV array was used on each house. This was made up of solar shakes that were in visual harmony with the roofing material used. A demand response tool was developed to control the amount of electricity used during times of peak demand. While demand response techniques have been used in the utility industry for some time, this particular approach is designed to allow the customer to decide the degree of participation in the response activity. The temperature change in the residence can be decided by the residents by adjusting settings. In a sense the customer can choose between greater comfort and greater money savings during demand response circumstances. Finally a battery application was to be considered. Initially it was thought that a large battery (probably a sodium-sulfur type) would be installed. However, after the contract was awarded, it was determined that a single, centrally-located battery system would not be appropriate for many reasons, including that with the build out plan there would not be any location to put it. The price had risen substantially since the budget for the project was put together. Also, that type of battery has to be kept hot all the time, but its use was only sought for summer operation. Hence, individual house batteries would be used, and these are discussed at the end of this report. Many aspects of the energy use for climate control in selected houses were monitored before residents moved in. This was done both to understand the magnitude of the energy flows but also to have data that could be compared to the computer simulations. The latter would be used to evaluate various aspects of our plan. It was found that good agreement existed between actual energy use and computed energy use. Hence, various studies were performed via simulations. Performance simulations showed the impact on peak energy usage between a code built house of same size and shape compared to the Villa Trieste homes with and without the PV arrays on the latter. Computations were also used to understand the effect of varying orientations of the houses in this typical housing development, including the effect of PV electrical generation. Energy conservation features of the Villa Trieste homes decreased the energy use during peak times (as well as all others), but the resulting decreased peak occurred at about the same time as the code-built houses. Consideration of the PV generation decreases the grid energy use further during daylight hours, but did not extend long enough many days to decrease the peak. Hence, a demand response approach, as planned, was needed. With participation of the residents in the demand response program developed does enable the houses to reduce the peak demand between 66% and 72%, depending on the built years. This was addressed fully in the latter part the study and is described in the latter part of this report.

  5. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline System - Southwest Region

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Southwest Region About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Natural Gas Pipelines in the Southwest Region Overview | Export Transportation | Intrastate | Connection to Gulf of Mexico | Regional Pipeline Companies & Links Overview Most of the major onshore interstate natural gas pipeline companies (see Table below) operating in the Southwest Region (Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas) are primarily

  6. week's Southwest Regional Mine Rescue Competition.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    winning WIPP Blue mine rescue team competes during last week's Southwest Regional Mine Rescue Competition. WIPP UPDATE: April 15, 2016 WIPP Blue Mine Rescue Team Wins Local Competition The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Blue mine rescue team took top honors last week in the Southwest Regional Mine Rescue Contest, held in Carlsbad, NM. The WIPP Blue outdueled five other teams from the region, including the defending national champion WIPP Red team, to win first place overall in the

  7. KAir Battery Wins Southwest Regional Clean Energy Business Plan...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    KAir Battery Wins Southwest Regional Clean Energy Business Plan Competition KAir Battery Wins Southwest Regional Clean Energy Business Plan Competition April 18, 2014 - 12:05pm...

  8. SOUTHWEST REGIONAL PARTNERSHIP ON CARBON SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian McPherson; Rick Allis; Barry Biediger; Joel Brown; Jim Cappa; George Guthrie; Richard Hughes; Eugene Kim; Robert Lee; Dennis Leppin; Charles Mankin; Orman Paananen; Rajesh Pawar; Tarla Peterson; Steve Rauzi; Jerry Stuth; Genevieve Young

    2004-11-01

    The Southwest Partnership Region includes six whole states, including Arizona, Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Utah, roughly one-third of Texas, and significant portions of adjacent states. The Partnership comprises a large, diverse group of expert organizations and individuals specializing in carbon sequestration science and engineering, as well as public policy and outreach. The main objective of the Southwest Partnership project is to achieve an 18% reduction in carbon intensity by 2012. The Partnership made great progress in this first year. Action plans for possible Phase II carbon sequestration pilot tests in the region are almost finished, including both technical and non-technical aspects necessary for developing and carrying out these pilot tests. All partners in the Partnership are taking an active role in evaluating and ranking optimum sites and technologies for capture and storage of CO{sub 2} in the Southwest Region. We are identifying potential gaps in all aspects of potential sequestration deployment issues.

  9. SOUTHWEST REGIONAL PARTNERSHIP ON CARBON SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian McPherson

    2005-08-01

    The Southwest Partnership on Carbon Sequestration completed several more tasks during the period of October 1, 2004--March 31, 2005. The main objective of the Southwest Partnership project is to achieve an 18% reduction in carbon intensity by 2012. Action plans for possible Phase 2 carbon sequestration pilot tests in the region are completed, and a proposal was developed and submitted describing how the Partnership may develop and carry out appropriate pilot tests. The content of this report focuses on Phase 1 objectives completed during this reporting period.

  10. Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian McPherson

    2006-03-31

    The Southwest Partnership on Carbon Sequestration completed its Phase I program in December 2005. The main objective of the Southwest Partnership Phase I project was to evaluate and demonstrate the means for achieving an 18% reduction in carbon intensity by 2012. Many other goals were accomplished on the way to this objective, including (1) analysis of CO{sub 2} storage options in the region, including characterization of storage capacities and transportation options, (2) analysis and summary of CO{sub 2} sources, (3) analysis and summary of CO{sub 2} separation and capture technologies employed in the region, (4) evaluation and ranking of the most appropriate sequestration technologies for capture and storage of CO{sub 2} in the Southwest Region, (5) dissemination of existing regulatory/permitting requirements, and (6) assessing and initiating public knowledge and acceptance of possible sequestration approaches. Results of the Southwest Partnership's Phase I evaluation suggested that the most convenient and practical ''first opportunities'' for sequestration would lie along existing CO{sub 2} pipelines in the region. Action plans for six Phase II validation tests in the region were developed, with a portfolio that includes four geologic pilot tests distributed among Utah, New Mexico, and Texas. The Partnership will also conduct a regional terrestrial sequestration pilot program focusing on improved terrestrial MMV methods and reporting approaches specific for the Southwest region. The sixth and final validation test consists of a local-scale terrestrial pilot involving restoration of riparian lands for sequestration purposes. The validation test will use desalinated waters produced from one of the geologic pilot tests. The Southwest Regional Partnership comprises a large, diverse group of expert organizations and individuals specializing in carbon sequestration science and engineering, as well as public policy and outreach. These partners include 21 state government agencies and universities, five major electric utility companies, seven oil, gas and coal companies, three federal agencies, the Navajo Nation, several NGOs, and the Western Governors Association. This group is continuing its work in the Phase II Validation Program, slated to conclude in 2009.

  11. SOUTHWEST REGIONAL PARTNERSHIP FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian McPherson

    2004-04-01

    The Southwest Partnership Region includes five states (Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Utah) and contiguous areas from three adjacent states (west Texas, south Wyoming, and west Kansas). This energy-rich region exhibits some of the largest growth rates in the nation, and it contains two major CO{sub 2} pipeline networks that presently tap natural subsurface CO{sub 2} reservoirs for enhanced oil recovery at a rate of 30 million tons per year. The ten largest coal-fired power plants in the region produce 50% (140 million tons CO{sub 2}/y) of the total CO{sub 2} from power-plant fossil fuel combustion, with power plant emissions close to half the total CO{sub 2} emissions. The Southwest Regional Partnership comprises a large, diverse group of expert organizations and individuals specializing in carbon sequestration science and engineering, as well as public policy and outreach. These partners include 21 state government agencies and universities, the five major electric utility industries, seven oil, gas and coal companies, three federal agencies, the Navajo Nation, several NGOs including the Western Governors Association, and data sharing agreements with four other surrounding states. The Partnership is developing action plans for possible Phase II carbon sequestration pilot tests in the region, as well as the non-technical aspects necessary for developing and carrying out these pilot tests. The establishment of a website network to facilitate data storage and information sharing, decision-making, and future management of carbon sequestration in the region is a priority. The Southwest Partnership's approach includes (1) dissemination of existing regulatory/permitting requirements, (2) assessing and initiating public acceptance of possible sequestration approaches, and (3) evaluation and ranking of the most appropriate sequestration technologies for capture and storage of CO{sub 2} in the Southwest Region. The Partnership will also identify potential gaps in monitoring and verification approaches needed to validate long-term storage efforts.

  12. State and Local Code Implementation: Southwest Region - 2014 BTO Peer

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Review | Department of Energy Southwest Region - 2014 BTO Peer Review State and Local Code Implementation: Southwest Region - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Jim Meyers, Southwest Energy Efficiency Project View the Presentation PDF icon State and Local Code Implementation: Southwest Region - 2014 BTO Peer Review More Documents & Publications State and Local Code Implementation: Southeast Region - 2014 BTO Peer Review DOE Codes Program Overview - 2015 Peer Review Energy Code Compliance

  13. 2011 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy Southwest Region Workshop Materials 2011 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Southwest Region Workshop, held in San Jose, California, August 25--26, 2011. Presentations and Materials Workshop Agenda San Jose's "Smart" LED Streetlight Program Laura Stuchinsky, City of San Jose Department of Transportation San Jose Story Nancy Clanton, Clanton

  14. KAir Battery Wins Southwest Regional Clean Energy Business Plan...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    KAir Battery Wins Southwest Regional Clean Energy Business Plan Competition KAir Battery Wins ... According to KAir, these batteries store generated electricity and return 98% of the ...

  15. Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian McPherson

    2006-04-01

    The Southwest Partnership on Carbon Sequestration completed several more tasks during the period of April 1, 2005-September 30, 2005. The main objective of the Southwest Partnership project is to evaluate and demonstrate the means for achieving an 18% reduction in carbon intensity by 2012. While Phase 2 planning is well under way, the content of this report focuses exclusively on Phase 1 objectives completed during this reporting period. Progress during this period was focused in the three areas: geological carbon storage capacity in New Mexico, terrestrial sequestration capacity for the project area, and the Integrated Assessment Model efforts. The geologic storage capacity of New Mexico was analyzed and Blanco Mesaverde (which extends into Colorado) and Basin Dakota Pools were chosen as top two choices for the further analysis for CO{sub 2} sequestration in the system dynamics model preliminary analysis. Terrestrial sequestration capacity analysis showed that the four states analyzed thus far (Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Utah) have relatively limited potential to sequester carbon in terrestrial systems, mainly due to the aridity of these areas, but the large land area offered could make up for the limited capacity per hectare. Best opportunities were thought to be in eastern Colorado/New Mexico. The Integrated Assessment team expanded the initial test case model to include all New Mexico sinks and sources in a new, revised prototype model in 2005. The allocation mechanism, or ''String of Pearls'' concept, utilizes potential pipeline routes as the links between all combinations of the source to various sinks. This technique lays the groundwork for future, additional ''String of Pearls'' analyses throughout the SW Partnership and other regions as well.

  16. Southwest Region Experiment Station - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenthal, A

    2011-08-19

    Southwest Technology Development Institute (SWTDI), an independent, university-based research institute, has been the operator of the Southwest Region Photovoltaic Experiment Station (SWRES) for almost 30 years. The overarching mission of SWTDI is to position PV systems and solar technologies to become cost-effective, major sources of energy for the United States. Embedded in SWTDI's general mission has been the more-focused mission of the SWRES: to provide value added technical support to the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program (SETP) to effectively and efficiently meet the R&D needs and targets specified in the SETP Multi-Year Technical Plan. : The DOE/SETP goals of growing U.S. PV manufacturing into giga-watt capacities and seeing tera-watt-hours of solar energy production in the U.S. require an infrastructure that is under development. The staff of the SWRES has supported DOE/SETP through a coherent, integrated program to address infrastructural needs inhibiting wide-scale PV deployment in three major technical categories: specialized engineering services, workforce development, and deployment facilitation. The SWRES contract underwent three major revisions during its five year period-of- performance, but all tasks and deliverables fell within the following task areas: Task 1: PV Systems Assistance Center 1. Develop a Comprehensive multi-year plan 2. Provide technical workforce development materials and workshops for PV stakeholder groups including university, professional installers, inspectors, state energy offices, Federal agencies 3. Serve on the NABCEP exam committee 4. Provide on-demand technical PV system design reviews for U.S. PV stakeholders 5. Provide PV system field testing and instrumentation, technical outreach (including extensive support for the DOE Market Transformation program) Task 2: Design-for-Manufacture PV Systems 1. Develop and install 18 kW parking carport (cost share) and PV-thermal carport (Albuquerque) deriving and publishing lessons learned Task 3: PV Codes and Standards 1. Serve as the national lead for development and preparation of all proposals (related to PV) to the National Electrical Code 2. Participate in the Standards Technical Panels for modules (UL1703) and inverters (UL1741) Task 4: Assess Inverter Long Term Reliability 1. Install and monitor identical inverters at SWRES and SERES 2. Operate and monitor all inverters for 5 years, characterizing all failures and performance trends Task 5: Test and Evaluation Support for Solar America Initiative 1. Provide test and evaluation services to the National Laboratories for stage gate and progress measurements of SAI TPP winners

  17. Southwest

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Southwest Climate C hange a nd t he U .S. E nergy S ector: Regional v ulnerabilities a nd r esilience s olutions Summary i n B rief The l arge a nd g eographically d iverse S outhwest r egion i ncludes mild c oastal c limates, a n a rid i nterior, a nd m ountain r anges t hat store c ritical w ater s upplies a s s now. T he r egion i s h ome t o a large a nd g rowing p opulation. K ey e nergy i nfrastructure i ncludes oil a nd g as r efineries a nd l arge a mounts o f p ower p lant c apacity.

  18. KAir Battery Wins Southwest Regional Clean Energy Business Plan Competition

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    KAir Battery, a student team from Ohio State University, won the Southwest region of the Energy Department’s National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition for their innovative potassium-air stationary batteries that could be used for renewable energy systems.

  19. Southwest

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    say climate change could cause a 'massive' tree die-off in the U.S. Southwest December 24, 2015 Scientists say climate change could cause a 'massive' tree die-off in the U.S....

  20. Southwest Alaska Regional Geothermal Energy Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holdmann, Gwen

    2015-04-30

    The village of Elim, Alaska is 96 miles west of Nome, on the Seward Peninsula. The Darby Mountains north of the village are rich with hydrothermal systems associated with the Darby granitic pluton(s). In addition to the hot springs that have been recorded and studied over the last 100 years, additional hot springs exist. They are known through a rich oral history of the region, though they are not labeled on geothermal maps. This research primarily focused on Kwiniuk Hot Springs, Clear Creek Hot Springs and Molly’s Hot Springs. The highest recorded surface temperatures of these resources exist at Clear Creek Hot Springs (67°C). Repeated water sampling of the resources shows that maximum temperatures at all of the systems are below boiling.

  1. Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Rutledge

    2011-02-01

    The Southwest Regional Partnership (SWP) on Carbon Sequestration designed and deployed a medium-scale field pilot test of geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in the Aneth oil field. Greater Aneth oil field, Utah's largest oil producer, was discovered in 1956 and has produced over 455 million barrels of oil (72 million m3). Located in the Paradox Basin of southeastern Utah, Greater Aneth is a stratigraphic trap producing from the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation. Because it represents an archetype oil field of the western U.S., Greater Aneth was selected as one of three geologic pilots to demonstrate combined enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and CO2 sequestration under the auspices of the SWP on Carbon Sequestration, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy. The pilot demonstration focuced on the western portion of the Aneth Unit as this area of the field was converted from waterflood production to CO2 EOR starting in late 2007. The Aneth Unit is in the northwestern part of the field and has produced 149 million barrels (24 million m3) of the estimated 450 million barrels (71.5 million m3) of the original oil in place - a 33% recovery rate. The large amount of remaining oil makes the Aneth Unit ideal to demonstrate both CO2 storage capacity and EOR by CO2 flooding. This report summarizes the geologic characterization research, the various field monitoring tests, and the development of a geologic model and numerical simulations conducted for the Aneth demonstration project. The Utah Geological Survey (UGS), with contributions from other Partners, evaluated how the surface and subsurface geology of the Aneth Unit demonstration site will affect sequestration operations and engineering strategies. The UGS-research for the project are summarized in Chapters 1 through 7, and includes (1) mapping the surface geology including stratigraphy, faulting, fractures, and deformation bands, (2) describing the local Jurassic and Cretaceous stratigraphy, (3) mapping the Desert Creek zone reservoir, Gothic seal, and overlying aquifers, (4) characterizing the depositional environments and diagenetic events that produced significant reservoir heterogeneity, (5) describing the geochemical, petrographic, and geomechanical properties of the seal to determine the CO2 or hydrocarbon column it could support, and (6) evaluating the production history to compare primary production from vertical and horizontal wells, and the effects of waterflood and wateralternating- gas flood programs. The field monitoring demonstrations were conducted by various Partners including New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, University of Utah, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan, Los Alamos National Laboratory and Cambridge Geosciences. The monitoring tests are summarized in Chapters 8 through 12, and includes (1) interwell tracer studies during water- and CO2-flood operations to characterize tracer behavoirs in anticipation of CO2-sequestration applications, (2) CO2 soil flux monitoring to measure background levels and variance and assess the sensitivity levels for CO2 surface monitoring, (3) testing the continuous monitoring of self potential as a means to detect pressure anomalies and electrochemical reaction due to CO2 injection, (4) conducting time-lapse vertical seismic profiling to image change near a CO2 injection well, and (5) monitoring microseismicity using a downhole string of seismic receivers to detect fracture slip and deformation associated with stress changes. Finally, the geologic modeling and numerical simulation study was conducted by researcher at the University of Utah. Chapter 13 summarizes their efforts which focused on developing a site-specific geologic model for Aneth to better understand and design CO2 storage specifically tailored to oil reservoirs.

  2. PLUTONIUM UPTAKE AND BEHAVIOR IN PLANTS OF THE DESERT SOUTHWEST: A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, E.; Duff, M.; Ferguson, C.

    2011-03-01

    Eight species of desert vegetation and associated soils were collected from the Nevada National Security Site (N2S2) and analyzed for 238Pu and 239+240Pu concentrations. Amongst the plant species sampled were: atmospheric elemental accumulators (moss and lichen), the very slow growing, long-lived creosote bush and the rapidly growing, short-lived cheatgrass brome. The diversity of growth strategies provided insight into the geochemical behavior and bio-availability of Pu at the N2S2. The highest concentrations of Pu were measured in the onion moss (24.27 Bq kg-1 238Pu and 52.78 Bq kg-1 239+240Pu) followed by the rimmed navel lichen (8.18 Bq kg-1 and 18.4 Bq kg-1 respectively), pointing to the importance of eolian transport of Pu. Brome and desert globemallow accumulated between 3 and 9 times higher concentrations of Pu than creosote and sage brush species. These results support the importance of species specific elemental accumulation strategies rather than exposure duration as the dominant variable influencing Pu concentrations in these plants. Total vegetation elemental concentrations of Ce, Fe, Al, Sm and others were also analyzed. Strong correlations were observed between Fe and Pu. This supports the conclusion that Pu was accumulated as a consequence of the active accumulation of Fe and other plant required nutrients. Cerium and Pu are considered to be chemical analogs. Strong correlations observed in plants support the conclusion that these elements displayed similar geochemical behavior in the environment as it related to the biochemical uptake process of vegetation. Soils were also sampled in association with vegetation samples. This allowed for the calculation of a concentration ratio (CR). The CR values for Pu in plants were highly influenced by the heterogeneity of Pu distribution among sites. Results from the naturally occurring elements of concern were more evenly distributed between sample sites. This allowed for the development of a pattern of plant species that accumulated Ce, Sm, Fe and Al. The highest accumulators of these elements were onion moss, lichen flowed by brome. The lowest accumulators were creosote bush and fourwing saltbush. This ranked order corresponds to plant accumulations of Pu.

  3. MIE Regional Climate Change Impact Webinar Series: Southwest

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Minorities in Energy Initiative is hosting a webinar on Southwest impacts of climate change on minority and tribal communities featuring presentations by...

  4. MIE Regional Climate Change Impact Webinar Series: Southwest

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Minorities in Energy Initiative is hosting a webinar on Southwest impacts of climate change on minority and tribal communities featuring presentations by nationally recognized policymakers, researchers, and educators

  5. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 9. The Southwest Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, R.L.; Norman, G.T.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1980-11-01

    This atlas of the wind energy resource is composed of introductory and background information, a regional summary of the wind resource, and assessments of the wind resource in Nevada and California. Background on how the wind resource is assessed and on how the results of the assessment should be interpreted is presented. A description of the wind resource on a regional scale is then given. The results of the wind energy assessments for each state are assembled into an overview and summary of the various features of the regional wind energy resource. An introduction and outline to the descriptions of the wind resource given for each state are given. Assessments for individual states are presented as separate chapters. The state wind energy resources are described in greater detail than is the regional wind energy resource, and features of selected stations are discussed.

  6. Photovoltaics Program: utility interface southwest regional workshop proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-04-01

    This was the first of a series of regional workshops that will focus on the photovoltaic and utility interface, and the use of photovoltaics as a cogeneration option by utilities. The needs and constraints of the utilities are defined and an understanding is established of the capabilities and limitations of photovoltaic systems as an alternative electricity generation option by utilities. Utilities' viewpoints regarding large-scale central systems and small-scale, interconnected, distributed systems are given. The Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act and other economic, legislative, and regulatory factors affecting photovoltaic systems are discussed. Current status of photovoltaic systems with respect to the Department of Energy Photovoltaic Program is given. (LEW)

  7. Communal spaces: aggregation and integration in the Mogollon Region of the United States Southwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nisengard, Jennifer E.

    2006-12-01

    Aggregation and integration are processes that occur in human societies throughout the globe. An informative example of population aggregation and social integration can be observed in the North American desert borderlands from A.D. 250 to 1450 in the area known as the Mogollon region. In fact, Mogollon communities oscillated from smaller social groups into larger ones and dispersed into smaller groups only to form larger ones again. For this reason, examining the groups of people living in the Mogollon region provides a magnified view of social change over a substantial period. Understanding patterns of aggregation and integration provides researchers with the promise for research into the nature of these phenomena. In general, the Mogollon region is characterized by limited water supplies and low average annual precipitation. However, pockets of the Mogollon area, including the Mimbres valley and the Gila River valley, represent oases, where permanent rivers and their associated tributaries allowed for the pursuit of agricultural endeavors and access to a wide variety of wild plant and animal resources. The areas with these kinds of potential became population centers for previously dispersed groups of people living in the region. These people exploited natural resources and practiced agriculture in areas surrounding their communities. Over time, more organized aggregated and socially integrated communities were established throughout the region. Using ancient Mogollon communal architecture, commonly called kivas, this study examines issues of, and evidence for, population aggregation and social integration.

  8. Carbon Sequestration Atlas and Interactive Maps from the Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McPherson, Brian

    In November of 2002, DOE announced a global climate change initiative involving joint government-industry partnerships working together to find sensible, low cost solutions for reducing GHG emissions. As a result, seven regional partnerships were formed; the Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP) is one of those. These groups are utilizing their expertise to assess sequestration technologies to capture carbon emissions, identify and evaluate appropriate storage locations, and engage a variety of stakeholders in order to increase awareness of carbon sequestration. Stakeholders in this project are made up of private industry, NGOs, the general public, and government entities. There are a total of 44 current organizations represented in the partnership including electric utilities, oil and gas companies, state governments, universities, NGOs, and tribal nations. The SWP is coordinated by New Mexico Tech and encompasses New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado, Oklahoma, Utah, and portions of Kansas, Nevada, Texas, and Wyoming. Field test sites for the region are located in New Mexico (San Juan Basin), Utah (Paradox Basin), and Texas (Permian Basin).[Taken from the SWP C02 Sequestration Atlas] The SWP makes available at this website their CO2 Sequestration Atlas and an interactive data map.

  9. Desert Queen Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ,"group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Hide Map Location Fernley, NV County Churchill County, NV Geothermal Area Desert Queen Geothermal Area Geothermal Region Northwest...

  10. Integrated Vulnerability and Impacts Assessment for Natural and Engineered Water-Energy Systems in the Southwest and Southern Rocky Mountain Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tidwell, Vincent C.; Wolfsberg, Andrew; Macknick, Jordan; Middleton, Richard

    2015-01-01

    In the Southwest and Southern Rocky Mountains (SWSRM), energy production, energy resource extraction, and other high volume uses depend on water supply from systems that are highly vulnerable to extreme, coupled hydro-ecosystem-climate events including prolonged drought, flooding, degrading snow cover, forest die off, and wildfire. These vulnerabilities, which increase under climate change, present a challenge for energy and resource planners in the region with the highest population growth rate in the nation. Currently, analytical tools are designed to address individual aspects of these regional energy and water vulnerabilities. Further, these tools are not linked, severely limiting the effectiveness of each individual tool. Linking established tools, which have varying degrees of spatial and temporal resolution as well as modeling objectives, and developing next-generation capabilities where needed would provide a unique and replicable platform for regional analyses of climate-water-ecosystem-energy interactions, while leveraging prior investments and current expertise (both within DOE and across other Federal agencies).

  11. Desert Peak EGS Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Desert Peak EGS Project presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

  12. EFFECTS OF ELEVATED CO2 ON ROOT FUNCTION AND SOIL RESPIRATION IN A MOJAVE DESERT ECOSYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nowak, Robert S.

    2007-12-19

    Increases in atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration during the last 250 years are unequivocal, and CO{sub 2} will continue to increase at least for the next several decades (Houghton et al. 2001, Keeling & Whorf 2002). Arid ecosystems are some of the most important biomes globally on a land surface area basis, are increasing in area at an alarming pace (Dregne 1991), and have a strong coupling with regional climate (Asner & Heidebrecht 2005). These water-limited ecosystems also are predicted to be the most sensitive to elevated CO{sub 2}, in part because they are stressful environments where plant responses to elevated CO{sub 2} may be amplified (Strain & Bazzaz 1983). Indeed, all C{sub 3} species examined at the Nevada Desert FACE Facility (NDFF) have shown increased A{sub net} under elevated CO{sub 2} (Ellsworth et al. 2004, Naumburg et al. 2003, Nowak et al. 2004). Furthermore, increased shoot growth for individual species under elevated CO{sub 2} was spectacular in a very wet year (Smith et al. 2000), although the response in low to average precipitation years has been smaller (Housman et al. 2006). Increases in perennial cover and biomass at the NDFF are consistent with long term trends in the Mojave Desert and elsewhere in the Southwest, indicating C sequestration in woody biomass (Potter et al. 2006). Elevated CO{sub 2} also increases belowground net primary production (BNPP), with average increases of 70%, 21%, and 11% for forests, bogs, and grasslands, respectively (Nowak et al. 2004). Although detailed studies of elevated CO{sub 2} responses for desert root systems were virtually non-existent prior to our research, we anticipated that C sequestration may occur by desert root systems for several reasons. First, desert ecosystems exhibit increases in net photosynthesis and primary production at elevated CO{sub 2}. If large quantities of root litter enter the ecosystem at a time when most decomposers are inactive, significant quantities of carbon may be stored belowground in relatively recalcitrant forms. Indeed, a model-based analysis predicted that the arid/semiarid southwestern bioclimatic region had one of the highest rates of net carbon storage in the United States over the past century (Schimel et al. 2000). Second, root systems of desert plants are often extensive (Foxx et al. 1984, Hartle et al. 2006) with relatively large proportions of roots deep in the soil (Schenk & Jackson 2002). Thus, an understanding of belowground processes in desert ecosystems provides information on the potential for terrestrial carbon sequestration in desert ecosystems.

  13. Southwest Area Corridor Map | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Southwest Area Corridor Map Southwest Area Corridor Map A map of the southwest area corridor. PDF icon Southwest Area Corridor Map More Documents & Publications Southwest Area ...

  14. DESERT SUNLIGHT | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DESERT SUNLIGHT DESERT SUNLIGHT PDF icon DOE-LPO_Project-Posters_PV_Desert-Sunlight.pdf More Documents & Publications DESERT SUNLIGHT Powering New Markets: Utility-scale Photovoltaic Solar GENESIS DOE-LPO_Email-Update_001_Through_11

  15. DESERT SUNLIGHT | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DESERT SUNLIGHT DESERT SUNLIGHT DESERT SUNLIGHT DESERT SUNLIGHT PROJECT SUMMARY In September 2011, the Department of Energy issued two partial loan guarantees of $1.5 billion in total under the Financial Institution Partnership Program (FIPP) to finance Desert Sunlight, a 550-MW photovoltaic (PV) solar generation plant. The facility is jointly owned by NextEra, General Electric, and Sumitomo of America and reached full commercial operations in January 2015. Desert Sunlight is one of the largest

  16. Desert Peak Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Desert Peak Geothermal Area (Redirected from Desert Peak Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Desert Peak Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2...

  17. Geologic setting, petrophysical characteristics, and regional heterogeneity patterns of the Smackover in southwest Alabama. Draft topical report on Subtasks 2 and 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Mann, S.D.; Tew, B.H.

    1992-06-01

    This is the draft topical report on Subtasks 2 and 3 of DOE contract number DE-FG22-89BC14425, entitled ``Establishment of an oil and gas database for increased recovery and characterization of oil and gas carbonate reservoir heterogeneity.`` This volume constitutes the final report on Subtask 3, which had as its primary goal the geological modeling of reservoir heterogeneity in Smackover reservoirs of southwest Alabama. This goal was interpreted to include a thorough analysis of Smackover reservoirs, which was required for an understanding of Smackover reservoir heterogeneity. This report is divided into six sections (including this brief introduction). Section two, entitled ``Geologic setting,`` presents a concise summary of Jurassic paleogeography, structural setting, and stratigraphy in southwest Alabama. This section also includes a brief review of sedimentologic characteristics and stratigraphic framework of the Smackover, and a summary of the diagenetic processes that strongly affected Smackover reservoirs in Alabama. Section three, entitled ``Analytical methods,`` summarizes all nonroutine aspects of the analytical procedures used in this project. The major topics are thin-section description, analysis of commercial porosity and permeability data, capillary-pressure analysis, and field characterization. ``Smackover reservoir characteristics`` are described in section four, which begins with a general summary of the petrographic characteristics of porous and permeable Smackover strata. This is followed by a more-detailed petrophysical description of Smackover reservoirs.

  18. UNLV DESERT SUNRISE DESERT SUNRISE HOME Project Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of the Competition Desert Sunrise was designed using a rigorous research approach to understand how advanced building technologies fit across a spectrum of efficiency and cost. ...

  19. Desert Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Desert Solar Place: Apple Valley, California Zip: 92308 Sector: Renewable Energy, Solar Product: Selling and installing commercial renewable energy projects, mainly...

  20. Desert Wind Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind Power Jump to: navigation, search Name Desert Wind Power Facility Desert Wind Power Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status Proposed Developer...

  1. Southwest Photovoltaic Systems Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Southwest Photovoltaic Systems Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Southwest Photovoltaic Systems Inc Place: Tomball, Texas Zip: 77375 Product: Distributor of small scale PV...

  2. Southwest Wind Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power Jump to: navigation, search Name: Southwest Wind Power Place: Flagstaff, AZ Website: www.windenergy.com References: Southwest Wind Power1 Information About Partnership...

  3. Southwest Transmission Cooperative, Inc. Smart Grid Project ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    syntax: * Display map References ARRA Smart Grid Investment Grants1 Southwest Transmission Cooperative Award2 Southwest Transmission Cooperative, Inc., located in Benson,...

  4. Supersymmetry without the Desert

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nomura, Yasunori; Poland, David

    2006-09-26

    Naturalness of electroweak symmetry breaking in weak scale supersymmetric theories may suggest the absence of the conventional supersymmetric desert. We present a simple, realistic framework for supersymmetry in which (most of) the virtues of the supersymmetric desert are naturally reproduced without having a large energy interval above the weak scale. The successful supersymmetric prediction for the low-energy gauge couplings is reproduced due to a gauged R symmetry present in the effective theory at the weak scale. The observable sector superpotential naturally takes the form of the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model, but without being subject to the Landau pole constraints up to the conventional unification scale. Supersymmetry breaking masses are generated by the F-term and D-term VEVs of singlet and U(1){sub R} gauge fields, as well as by anomaly mediation, at a scale not far above the weak scale. We study the resulting pattern of supersymmetry breaking masses in detail, and find that it can be quite distinct. We construct classes of explicit models within this framework, based on higher dimensional unified theories with TeV-sized extra dimensions. A similar model based on a non-R symmetry is also presented. These models have a rich phenomenology at the TeV scale, and allow for detailed analyses of, e.g., electroweak symmetry breaking.

  5. Southwest Alaska Regional Geothermal Energy Projec

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holdmann, Gwen

    2015-04-30

    Drilling and temperature logging campaigns between the late 1970's and early 1980’s measured temperatures at Pilgrim Hot Springs in excess of 90°C. Between 2010 and 2014 the University of Alaska used a variety of methods including geophysical surveys, remote sensing techniques, heat budget modeling, and additional drilling to better understand the resource and estimate the available geothermal energy.

  6. Desert Sky Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sky Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Desert Sky Wind Farm Facility Desert Sky Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service...

  7. Southwest Electric Cooperative- Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southwest Electric Cooperative offers rebates to its customers for a variety of energy efficiency improvements, including: 

  8. State and Regional Policy Assistance - Program Activities | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Review | Department of Energy and Local Code Implementation: Southwest Region - 2014 BTO Peer Review State and Local Code Implementation: Southwest Region - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Jim Meyers, Southwest Energy Efficiency Project View the Presentation PDF icon State and Local Code Implementation: Southwest Region - 2014 BTO Peer Review More Documents & Publications State and Local Code Implementation: Southeast Region - 2014 BTO Peer Review DOE Codes Program Overview - 2015 Peer

  9. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- Operation Clean Desert

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ZONE > Operation Clean Desert NNSA/NFO Language Options U.S. DOE/NNSA - Nevada Field Office Operation Clean Desert FUN FOR ALL AGES! Dr. Proton Graphic Adam - Smiling Operation Clean Desert is a set of activities following the adventures of Dr. Proton and Adam the Atom as they learn about the Nevada National Security Site. The activities are geared toward teaching about ongoing efforts to address environmental challenges, such as contaminated groundwater and radioactive waste disposal. The

  10. Southwest Michigan Community Action Agency … Weatherization...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... 1 Report on Examination Level Attestation Engagement Of ... The Weatherization Program helps eligible low-income ... to Southwest's management as an opportunity for improvement. ...

  11. Southwest Wind Consulting LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Consulting LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Southwest Wind Consulting, LLC Place: Tyler, Minnesota Zip: MN 56178 Sector: Wind energy Product: Minnesota based wind project...

  12. Tribal Leader Forum: Solar Energy Development in the Southwest

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    TRIBAL LEADER FORUM: SOLAR ENERGY DEVELOPMENT IN THE SOUTHWEST December 19-20, 2011 SPA RESORT CASINO HOTEL IN PALM SPRINGS, CA 100 North Indian Canyon Drive Palm Springs, CA 92262 (888) 999-1995 The first of a series of planned DOE Office of Indian Energy-sponsored strategic energy development & investment forums, this Forum will provide an opportunity for Tribal leaders and executives to get real-time, regional market snapshots of: solar power purchasing, project financing options and

  13. BLM California Desert District Office | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Desert District Office Jump to: navigation, search Name: California Desert District Office Address: 22835 Calle San Juan De Los Lagos Place: Moreno Valley, CA Zip: 92553...

  14. Desert Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Desert Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Desert Hot...

  15. Desert Sunlight Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sunlight Solar Power Plant Facility Desert Sunlight Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer First Solar Location Desert Center, California Coordinates 33.7541038,...

  16. Core Analysis At Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration...

  17. Gas Flux Sampling At Desert Peak Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Desert Peak Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh, 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Desert Peak Area (Lechler And...

  18. Cuttings Analysis At Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Cuttings Analysis At Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration...

  19. EIS-0448: First Solar Desert Sunlight Project in Riverside County...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8: First Solar Desert Sunlight Project in Riverside County, CA EIS-0448: First Solar Desert Sunlight Project in Riverside County, CA June 24, 2011 EIS-0448: Final Environmental ...

  20. California Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name California Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  1. Geothermometry At Desert Queen Area (Garchar & Arehart, 2008...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Desert Queen Area (Garchar & Arehart, 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Desert Queen Area (Garchar &...

  2. Reflection Survey At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP)...

  3. Refraction Survey At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Refraction Survey At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP)...

  4. Thermal Gradient Holes At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP)...

  5. Southwest

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    published by Los Alamos researchers in Earth System Observations (EES-14) and collaborators describe the conditions leading up to the catastrophic Las Conchas Fire and...

  6. Regional Standards Enforcement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Central air conditioners are now subject to a base national standard in the North and different, regional standards in the Southeast and Southwest. This page provides information about those standards and how DOE enforces them.

  7. Southwest U.S. undergoes megadroughts lasting hundreds of years

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Southwest U.S. undergoes megadroughts lasting hundreds of years Southwest U.S. undergoes megadroughts lasting hundreds of years Sediment core 260-feet long peers back in ...

  8. Southwest Wind Farm Private Limited ESS ARR Group | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Southwest Wind Farm Private Limited ESS ARR Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Southwest Wind Farm Private Limited (ESS ARR Group) Place: Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India Zip:...

  9. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- News & Views Camp Desert Rock

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Camp Desert Rock Photo - Camp Desert Rock Camp Desert Rock, also known as Desert Atom Camp, Nevada, was home to the U.S. Army's Atomic Maneuver Battalion in the 1950s. More than 2,300 soldiers were trained here in 1955. The 100 semi-permanent buildings and more than 500 tents often were filled to the 6,000 personnel capacity. Desert Rock Airport, with its 7,500 foot runway, was built on the former Camp Desert Rock. At peak operation Camp Desert Rock comprised of 100 semi-permanent buildings,

  10. Brighter than a Hundred Suns: Solar Power for the Southwest....

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Colorado Brighter than a Hundred Suns: Solar Power for the Southwest Period of ......... 8 Solar ......

  11. TAP Report - Southwest Idaho Juniper Working Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gresham, Garold Linn

    2015-09-01

    There is explicit need for characterization of the materials for possible commercialization as little characterization data exists. Pinyon-juniper woodlands are a major ecosystem type found in the Southwest and the Intermountain West regions of the United States including Nevada, Idaho and Oregon. These widespread ecosystems are characterized by the presence of several different species of pinyon and juniper as the dominant plant cover. Since the 1800s, pinyon-juniper woodlands have rapidly expanded their range at the expense of existing ecosystems. Additionally, existing woodlands have become denser, progressively creating potential fire hazards as seen in the Soda Fire, which burned more than 400 sq. miles. Land managers responsible for these areas often desire to reduce pinyon-juniper coverage on their lands for a variety of reasons, as stated in the Working Group objectives. However, the cost of clearing thinning pinyon-juniper stands can be prohibitive. One reason for this is the lack of utilization options for the resulting biomass that could help recover some of the cost of pinyon-juniper stand management. The goal of this TAP effort was to assess the feedstock characteristics of biomass from a juniper harvested from Owyhee County to evaluate possible fuel and conversion utilization options.

  12. Southwest Windpower Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Product: US-based, developer and manufacturer of low cost, reliable, micro wind turbines in the range of 400 watts to 3kW. References: Southwest Windpower Inc1 This article...

  13. Observed 20th Century Desert Dust Variability: Impact on Climate and Biogeochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahowald, Natalie; Kloster, Silvia; Engelstaedter, S.; Moore, Jefferson Keith; Mukhopadhyay, S.; McConnell, J. R.; Albani, S.; Doney, Scott C.; Bhattacharya, A.; Curran, M. A. J.; Flanner, Mark G.; Hoffman, Forrest M; Lawrence, David M.; Lindsay, Keith; Mayewski, P. A.; Neff, Jason; Rothenberg, D.; Thomas, E.; Thornton, Peter E; Zender, Charlie S.

    2010-01-01

    Desert dust perturbs climate by directly and indirectly interacting with incoming solar and outgoing long wave radiation, thereby changing precipitation and temperature, in addition to modifying ocean and land biogeochemistry. While we know that desert dust is sensitive to perturbations in climate and human land use, previous studies have been unable to determine whether humans were increasing or decreasing desert dust in the global average. Here we present observational estimates of desert dust based on paleodata proxies showing a doubling of desert dust during the 20th century over much, but not all the globe. Large uncertainties remain in estimates of desert dust variability over 20th century due to limited data. Using these observational estimates of desert dust change in combination with ocean, atmosphere and land models, we calculate the net radiative effect of these observed changes (top of atmosphere) over the 20th century to be -0.14 {+-} 0.11 W/m{sup 2} (1990-1999 vs. 1905-1914). The estimated radiative change due to dust is especially strong between the heavily loaded 1980-1989 and the less heavily loaded 1955-1964 time periods (-0.57 {+-} 0.46 W/m{sup 2}), which model simulations suggest may have reduced the rate of temperature increase between these time periods by 0.11 C. Model simulations also indicate strong regional shifts in precipitation and temperature from desert dust changes, causing 6 ppm (12 PgC) reduction in model carbon uptake by the terrestrial biosphere over the 20th century. Desert dust carries iron, an important micronutrient for ocean biogeochemistry that can modulate ocean carbon storage; here we show that dust deposition trends increase ocean productivity by an estimated 6% over the 20th century, drawing down an additional 4 ppm (8 PgC) of carbon dioxide into the oceans. Thus, perturbations to desert dust over the 20th century inferred from observations are potentially important for climate and biogeochemistry, and our understanding of these changes and their impacts should continue to be refined.

  14. Fire Impacts on the Mojave Desert Ecosystem: Literature Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenstermaker Lynn

    2012-01-01

    The Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) is located within the Mojave Desert, which is the driest region in North America. Precipitation on the NNSS varies from an annual average of 130 millimeters (mm; 5.1 inches) with a minimum of 47 mm (1.9 inches) and maximum of 328 mm (12.9 inches) over the past 15 year period to an annual average of 205 mm (8.1 inches) with an annual minimum of 89 mm (3.5 inches) and maximum of 391 mm (15.4 inches) for the same time period; for a Frenchman Flat location at 970 meters (m; 3182 feet) and a Pahute Mesa location at 1986 m (6516 feet), respectively. The combination of aridity and temperature extremes has resulted in sparsely vegetated basins (desert shrub plant communities) to moderately vegetated mountains (mixed coniferous forest plant communities); both plant density and precipitation increase with increasing elevation. Whereas some plant communities have evolved under fire regimes and are dependent upon fire for seed germination, plant communities within the Mojave Desert are not dependent on a fire regime and therefore are highly impacted by fire (Brown and Minnich, 1986; Brooks, 1999). As noted by Johansen (2003) natural range fires are not prevalent in the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts because there is not enough vegetation present (too many shrub interspaces) to sustain a fire. Fire research and hence publications addressing fires in the Southwestern United States (U.S.) have therefore focused on forest, shrub-steppe and grassland fires caused by both natural and anthropogenic ignition sources. In the last few decades, however, invasion of mid-elevation shrublands by non-native Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens and Bromus tectorum (Hunter, 1991) have been highly correlated with increased fire frequency (Brooks and Berry, 2006; Brooks and Matchett, 2006). Coupled with the impact of climate change, which has already been shown to be playing a role in increased forest fires (Westerling et al., 2006), it is likely that the fire frequency will further increase in the Mojave Desert (Knapp 1998; Smith et al., 1987; Smith et al., 2000).

  15. Erosion Resistance Index (ERI) to Assess Site Stability in Desert Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamada, Yuki; Grippo, Mark A.

    2015-11-01

    A new spectral indexerosion resistance index (ERI)was developed to assess erosion risks in desert landscapes. The index was developed by applying trigonometry to the combination of the green/red band-ratio and the red/near infrared band-ratio from very high spatial resolution imagery. The resultant ERI maps showed spatially cohesive distributions of high and low index values across the study areas. High index values were observed over areas that were resistant to erosion (such as desert pavement and dense vegetation), while low index values overlapped with areas likely dominated by loose sandy soils, such as stream beds and access roads. Although further investigation is warranted, this new index, ERI, shows promise for the assessment of erosion risks in desert regions.

  16. Ronald E. Moulton

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ronald E. Moulton, P.E. serves as the Transmission Services Manager for Western Area Power Administration's Rocky Mountain Region, Desert Southwest Region and Colorado River Storage Project...

  17. BLM West Desert District Office | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    West Desert District Office Jump to: navigation, search Name: BLM West Desert District Office Place: Salt Lake City, Utah Phone Number: (801) 977-4300 ParentHolding Organization:...

  18. Desert Sunlight is Shining Example of How DOE Loan Guarantees...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LPO issued a 1.46 billion loan guarantee to Desert Sunlight, a 550-MW photovoltaic solar ... LPO issued a 1.46 billion loan guarantee to Desert Sunlight, a 550-MW photovoltaic solar ...

  19. California Desert Native Plants Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Desert Native Plants Act Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: California Desert Native Plants ActLegal...

  20. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Desert Peak Area (Wisian & Blackwell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Desert Peak Area (Wisian & Blackwell, 2004) Exploration Activity...

  1. Geothermal Studies in Southwest New Mexico | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Studies in Southwest New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geothermal Studies in Southwest New Mexico Author Swanberg Published New...

  2. Solar Energy Development in the Southwest | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development in the Southwest Solar Energy Development in the Southwest December 19-20, 2011 Palm Springs, California Spa Resort Casino Hotel The Office of Indian Energy hosted a ...

  3. Southwest Alaska Economic Summit and Business Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Southwest Alaska Economic Summit and Business Meeting (SWAMC) highlights the need for Alaska communities to pull together and make a way through challenging fiscal times. Panels and discussion will focus on providing conference attendees with the knowledge they need to pursue new opportunities.

  4. Reservoir Characterization of the Lower Green River Formation, Southwest Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, Craig D.; Chidsey, Jr., Thomas C.; McClure, Kevin P.; Bereskin, S. Robert; Deo, Milind D.

    2002-12-02

    The objectives of the study were to increase both primary and secondary hydrocarbon recovery through improved characterization (at the regional, unit, interwell, well, and microscopic scale) of fluvial-deltaic lacustrine reservoirs, thereby preventing premature abandonment of producing wells. The study will encourage exploration and establishment of additional water-flood units throughout the southwest region of the Uinta Basin, and other areas with production from fluvial-deltaic reservoirs.

  5. 2010 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy 0 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report DOE Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review PDF icon 2010_gtp_peer_review_report_final.pdf More Documents & Publications Detecting Fractures Using Technology at High Temperatures and Depths - Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager (GUFI); 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Fielding of HT-seismic Tools and Evaluation of HT-FPGA Module - Development of a

  6. BIA Southwest Region - Wood Energy Assessment for BIA Schools...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pueblo - Tribal Facility Centralized Heating System (feasibilityassessment) * Zuni Furniture Co.- Modular biomass energy system (system testing) * Jemez Pueblo - Renewable Energy ...

  7. Southwest Regional Partnership for Carbon Sequestration--Validation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Blue Source, LLC Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Center for ... (EPRI) En Tech Strategies Gas Technology Institute (GTI) ... Questar Gas Resolute Natural Resources Company Rocky ...

  8. Western Regional Partnership Overview

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Regional Partnership Overview June 2013 Briefing Overview  WRP Background  Importance of Region  WRP Tribal Relations Committee  WRP Energy Committee WRP Region's Uniqueness  5 states stretching from the Great Plains to the Pacific Ocean  Diverse terrain ranging from desert valleys to forested mountains  Significant State Trust Landholdings  Approximately 188 Federally recognized Tribes  Significant amounts of Federally managed land  According to GSA 2004 study, WRP

  9. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    LBNL-1470E Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool Ranjit Bharvirkar, Grayson Heffner and Charles Goldman Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environmental Energy Technologies Division January 2009 The work described in this report was funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Permitting, Siting and Analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Disclaimer This document was

  10. USAJobs Search | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Desert Southwest Region Engineering and Construction (G5600) 615 S. 43rd Avenue Phoenix, AZ 85009 Find out more about living conditions at this duty station . Search the...

  11. USAJobs Search | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Asked Questions for more information). Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region, Maintenance, Transmission Lines and Substations,...

  12. USAJobs Search | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for more information). Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region, Power Marketing, Rates and Alternative Financing, Phoenix, AZ...

  13. CX-003196: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2010 Location(s): Pima County, Arizona Office(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region Western Area Power Administration proposes to conduct Emergency...

  14. USAJobs Search | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for more information). Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration Desert Southwest Region Budget and Alternative Finance (G8100) 615 S. 43rd Avenue Phoenix, AZ...

  15. USAJobs Search | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for more information). Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration Desert Southwest Region Power Marketing Contracts and Energy Services (G6200) 615 S. 43rd...

  16. USAJobs Search | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    VP of Transmission System Asset Management for Desert Southwest Region (Maintenance Manager) Job Summary: (See Frequently Asked Questions for more information). Where would I be...

  17. USAJobs Search | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for more information). Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration Desert Southwest Region Environmental Office (G0400) 615 S. 43rd Avenue Phoenix, AZ 85009...

  18. Supervisory Transmission Lines and Substation Maintenance Manager

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    (See Frequently Asked Questions for more information). Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration Desert Southwest Region Transmission Lines and Substation Maintenance (G5200) 615...

  19. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area PowerAdministratio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Western Area Power Administration-Des...

  20. Regional Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of about -196 mgal over the alluvium-covered graben areas. The gravity high over the Raft River Mountains apparently corresponds with the Raft River Mountains anticline. A belt...

  1. Kick-Starting the School Year with Operation Clean Desert

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    September 10, 2012 Kick-Starting the School Year with Operation Clean Desert School is back in session and Operation Clean Desert was there to give it a kick start! On August 21, 2012, the Operation Clean Desert Teacher's Guide made its debut along with the recently revised companion activity book during the 2012 Educator Appreciation Day & Back To School Fair at The Mirage in Las Vegas, NV. Hundreds of teachers attended the event (hosted by MGM Resorts International) and approximately 150

  2. Desert Peak II Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Facility Desert Peak II Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Churchill, Nevada Coordinates 39.753854931241, -118.95378112793 Loading map......

  3. Desert Peak East EGS Project; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    East EGS Project; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Desert Peak East EGS Project; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report DOE 2010 Geothermal...

  4. Structural Analysis of the Desert Peak-Brady Geothermal Fields...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Structures and Geothermal Reservoirs in the Humboldt Structural Zone Citation James E. Faulds,Larry J. Garside,Gary L. Oppliger. 2003. Structural Analysis of the Desert...

  5. City of Palm Desert - Energy Independence Program | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    conditioners Windows Doors Other EE Program Info Sector Name Local Administrator Palm Desert Website http:www.cityofpalmdesert.orgIndex.aspx?page484 State California Program...

  6. Palm Desert, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Desert, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.7222445, -116.3744556 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  7. Desert Hot Springs, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Riverside County, California. It falls under California's 41st congressional district.12 Registered Energy Companies in Desert Hot Springs, California BCL Associates Inc...

  8. America's Atomic Army: The Historical Archaeology of Camp Desert Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan R. Edwards

    2007-11-02

    Established in 1951, Camp Desert Rock served as the training ground for America's 'Atomic Army'. For the next six years, U.S. ground troops traveled to the Nevada desert to participate in military maneuvers during atmospheric atomic weapons testing. Nearly 60,000 soldiers received physical and psychological training in atomic warfare. Abandoned when atmospheric testing ended, Camp Desert Rock was dismantled and its buildings moved to other locations. Today, the camp appears as a sterile expanse of desert marked by rock-lined tent platforms, concrete foundations, and trash scatters. Although visually unimposing, the site is rich with the history of America's nuclear testing program.

  9. Desert Hills, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Desert Hills, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.5538996, -114.3724569 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappin...

  10. Workshop Explores Energy Project Financing Options for Southwest Alaska |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Workshop Explores Energy Project Financing Options for Southwest Alaska Workshop Explores Energy Project Financing Options for Southwest Alaska March 10, 2016 - 2:07pm Addthis Kodiak Island, Alaska. Photo by Andrew Petersen. Kodiak Island, Alaska. Photo by Andrew Petersen. Last week, the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy hosted a Project Development and Finance workshop in conjunction with the Southwest Alaska Municipal Conference (SWAMC) Annual Economic

  11. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool In 2007, the Southwest Power Pool (SPP) formed the Customer Response Task Force (CRTF) to identify barriers to deploying demand response (DR) resources in wholesale markets and develop policies to overcome these barriers. One of the initiatives of this Task Force was to develop more detailed information on existing retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs, program rules, and utility operating

  12. Southwest Alaska Economic Summit and Business Meetup | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Southwest Alaska Economic Summit and Business Meeting (SWAMC) highlights the need for ... providing conference attendees with the knowledge they need to pursue new opportunities.

  13. Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Kilauea Southwest Rift And South...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank Area (Thomas, 1986)...

  14. Magnetotellurics At Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Southwest Rift And South Flank Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Magnetotelluric Imaging, G....

  15. Uncertainty quantification of US Southwest climate from IPCC...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) at LLNL. I have downloaded this data and completed the first steps toward a statistical analysis of these ensembles for the US Southwest. ...

  16. InSAR At Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United States by developing basic measurements and interpretations that will assist reservoir management and expansion at Bradys, Desert Peak and the Desert Peak EGS study...

  17. Ground Magnetics At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Magnetics At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Magnetics At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE...

  18. Field Mapping At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) Exploration...

  19. Ground Gravity Survey At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP)...

  20. Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Coloration in Desert Arroyo Seepage Water

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Coloration in Desert Arroyo Seepage Water

  1. PROJECT PROFILE: Southwest Research Institute | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Southwest Research Institute PROJECT PROFILE: Southwest Research Institute Funding Opportunity: CSP: APOLLO SunShot Subprogram: CSP Location: San Antonio, TX Amount Awarded: $5,350,000 Awardee Cost Share: $3,440,874 SWRI Logo.jpg The Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) will design, manufacture, and test an ultra-high efficiency supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) compressor-expander, or "compander," for power generation at CSP plants. SwRI will collaborate with Samsung Techwin America

  2. Tectonic control of coastal onlap cycles, southwest Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armentrout, J.M.

    1987-05-01

    Local coastal onlap and paleobiobathymetric curves for 14 sections define three Cenozoic depositional onlap-offlap cycles separated by regionally significant unconformities. A paleoclimatic curve for western Oregon and Washington, based on paleoecologic data sets, demonstrates that the local transgressions are coincident with cool climates and the regressions with warm climates, and are therefore not driven by glacioeustatic cycles. Comparison of the local coastal onlap and paleobiobathymetric curves with the global Cenozoic Cycle Chart (modified Exxon Sea Level Chart - May, 1986) further demonstrates the uniqueness of the western Washington curves. The global Cenozoic cycle Chart curve represents coastal onlap and sea level curves based on integration of both climate and tectonic variations. The non-parallel cycle pattern for southwest Washington suggests a unique tectonically forced system. Evidence derived from stratigraphic sequences, igneous rock geochemistry, radiometric dating, remnant magnetic patterns, sandstone provenance studies, and paleogeographic reconstructions is used to identify the tectonic events controlling the local depositional cycles. The principal events are (1) middle Eocene accretion of a seamount chain; (2) early-late Eocene westward relocation of subduction; (3) late Eocene onset of Cascade arc volcanism; (4) late-early Miocene plate readjustment due to back-arc extension in the Columbia River Plateau and Great Basin; and (5) late Pliocene to early Pleistocene northeast compression forced by continued subduction of remnants of the Kula Plate beneath North America.

  3. Desert View Highlands, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Desert View Highlands is a census-designated place in Los Angeles County, California.1...

  4. Desert Shores, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Desert Shores is a census-designated place in Imperial County, California.1 References ...

  5. Southwest Gas Corporation- Home Builder Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southwest Gas Corporation offers rebates to home builders constructing ENERGY STAR homes. Builders receive a $200 rebate for ENERGY STAR certified homes, and a $450 rebate for homes that are ENERGY...

  6. Southwest Mississippi E P A | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    E P A Jump to: navigation, search Name: Southwest Mississippi E P A Place: Mississippi Phone Number: (800) 287-8564 Website: southwestepa.com Outage Hotline: 1-800-287-8564...

  7. Southwest Tennessee E M C | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Southwest Tennessee E M C Place: Tennessee Phone Number: 1.888.440.1990 Website: www.stemc.com Twitter: @stemctn Facebook: https:www.facebook.comstemconline Outage Hotline:...

  8. Southwest Arkansas E C C (Arkansas) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Arkansas E C C (Arkansas) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Southwest Arkansas E C C Place: Arkansas Phone Number: (888) 265-2743 Website: www.swrea.com Twitter: @SWAECC Facebook:...

  9. LPO5-002-Proj-Poster-PV-DesertSunlight

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DESERT SUNLIGHT By working with 14 commercial lending partners, Desert Sunlight helped pave the way for future utility-scale photovoltaic solar deals. INVESTING in AMERICAN ENERGY OWNERS NextEra Energy, General Electric & Sumitomo of America LOCATION Riverside County, California LOAN AMOUNT $1.5 Billion ISSUANCE DATE September 2011 GENERATION CAPACITY 550 MW PROJECTED ANNUAL GENERATION 1,060,000 MWh CLIMATE BENEFIT 614,000 Metric Tons of C0 2 Prevented Annually

  10. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- University of Arizona Southwest

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Experiment Station Buildings - AZ 01 Arizona Southwest Experiment Station Buildings - AZ 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA (SOUTHWEST EXPERIMENT STATION BUILDINGS) (AZ.01) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: U.S. Bureau of Mines AZ.01-1 Location: Tucson , Arizona AZ.01-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 AZ.01-2 AZ.01-3 Site Operations: Conducted research and development work on the processing of uranium ores. AZ.01-1 Site

  11. Uncertainty quantification of US Southwest climate from IPCC projections.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Uncertainty quantification of US Southwest climate from IPCC projections. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Uncertainty quantification of US Southwest climate from IPCC projections. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) made extensive use of coordinated simulations by 18 international modeling groups using a variety of coupled general circulation models (GCMs) with different

  12. DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Kevin M. Kolevar today announced the Department's designation of two National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors (National Corridors) -- the Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric Transmission Corridor, and the Southwest Area National Interest Electric Transmission Corridor. These corridors include areas in two of the Nation's most populous regions with growing electricity congestion problems. The Department based its designations on data and analysis showing that persistent transmission congestion exists in these two areas.

  13. SunLine Tests HHICE Bus in Desert Climate | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tests HHICE Bus in Desert Climate SunLine Tests HHICE Bus in Desert Climate Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration Projects (Fact Sheet). PDF icon 40107.pdf More Documents & Publications...

  14. EA-1912: Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project, near town of Desert...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project, near town of Desert Aire, Benton County, WA EA-1912: Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project, near town of Desert Aire, Benton County, WA...

  15. PSInSAR At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PSInSAR At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: PSInSAR At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP)...

  16. EIS-0448: First Solar Desert Sunlight Project in Riverside County, CA |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy 8: First Solar Desert Sunlight Project in Riverside County, CA EIS-0448: First Solar Desert Sunlight Project in Riverside County, CA June 24, 2011 EIS-0448: Final Environmental Impact Statement Desert Sunlight Solar Farm Project, California June 24, 2011 EIS-0448: Notice of Adoption of an Environmental Impact Statement First Solar Desert Sunlight Solar Farm Project October 6, 2011 EIS-0448: Record of Decision Issuance of a Loan Guarantee to First Solar, Inc., for the

  17. ARPA-E Sparks Connections at the Southwest Energy Innovation Forum

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The innovative projects on display at the inaugural Southwest Energy Innovation Forum clearly demonstrate that energy innovation isn’t just happening in traditional hubs like Silicon Valley – it’s happening all across the Southwest.

  18. Project Reports for Morongo Band of Cahuilla Mission Indians: Southwest Tribal Energy Consortium- 2006 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Southwest Tribal Energy Consortium, represented by the Morongo Band, is comprised of tribes in California, Arizona and New Mexico.

  19. Morongo Band of Cahuilla Mission Indians: Southwest Tribal Energy Consortium- 2006 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Southwest Tribal Energy Consortium, represented by the Morongo Band, is comprised of tribes in California, Arizona and New Mexico.

  20. EIS-0443: Southwest Intertie Project-South (SWIP-S), White Pine, Nye,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Lincoln, and Clark counties, NV | Department of Energy 3: Southwest Intertie Project-South (SWIP-S), White Pine, Nye, Lincoln, and Clark counties, NV EIS-0443: Southwest Intertie Project-South (SWIP-S), White Pine, Nye, Lincoln, and Clark counties, NV Documents Available for Download October 26, 2010 EIS-0443: Record of Decision Project Financing for Southwest Intertie Project - South February 19, 2010 EIS-0443: Final Environmental Impact Statement Project Financing for Southwest Intertie

  1. Concentrating Solar Power and Water Issues in the U.S. Southwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bracken, N.; Macknick, J.; Tovar-Hastings, A.; Komor, P.; Gerritsen, M.; Mehta, S.

    2015-03-01

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) systems utilize the sun's energy to create heat that is used to generate electrical power. CSP systems in the United States are installed primarily in the Southwest, with 92% of plants that are operational, under construction, or under development located in three western states--Arizona, California, and Nevada. This report provides an overview of CSP development in these states, or the 'Southwest' for the purposes of this discussion, with a particular focus on the water supply issues associated with CSP. The Western Governors' Association (WGA) commissioned staff from the Western States Water Council (WSWC) to collaborate with staff from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to prepare this report. The WGA has long supported the effective management of the West's water resources, as well as the development of a clean, diverse, reliable, and affordable energy supply consisting of traditional and renewable energy resources. This report is specifically intended to help inform these goals, especially as WGA continues to underwrite a Regional Transmission Expansion Planning project, undertaken by the WSWC and the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC), to better understand energy development within the existing and future water resource constraints of the West. This report builds upon earlier research conducted by NREL, the University of Colorado-Boulder, and Stanford University that was supported through the Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) and presents information gathered through extensive research and literature reviews, as well as interviews and outreach with state water administrators and energy regulators, WECC and other experts familiar with CSP development in the Southwest.

  2. Coupled Environmental Processes and Long-term Performance of Landfill Covers in the northern Mojave Desert

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Shafer; Michael Young; Stephen Zitzer; Eric McDonald; Todd Caldwell

    2004-05-12

    Evapotransiration (ET) covers have gained widespread acceptance as a closure feature for waste disposal sites, particularly in the arid and semi-arid regions of the southwestern U.S. But as landforms, ET covers are subject to change over time because of processes such as pedogenesis, hydrologic processes, vegetation establishment and change, and biological processes. To better understand the effects of coupled process changes to ET covers, a series of four primary analog sites in Yucca Flat on the Nevada Test Site, along with measurements and observations from other locations in the Mojave Desert, were selected to evaluate changes in ET covers over time. The analog sites, of varying ages, were selected to address changes in the early post-institutional control period, the 1,000-year compliance period for disposal of low-level and mixed low-level waste, and the 10,000-year compliance period for transuranic waste sites.

  3. The Mystery of the Gun Turret in the Desert

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, R. D.

    2015-11-30

    The mystery of the gun turret in the desert began with an ingenious idea: to develop a reusable open-air line of sight diagnostic device to support LLNL’s early nuclear weapons development efforts. Obtained from the Mare Island Navy Shipyard (MINS) in January 1957, the gun turret traveled by ship to the Naval Construction Battalion base at Port Hueneme, California, and then by truck to Area 2 in the Yucca Flats valley at the Nevada Nuclear Security Site (NNSS).

  4. Stepout-Deepening Wells At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Stepout-Deepening Wells At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location San Emidio...

  5. 2-M Probe At Desert Peak Area (Sladek, Et Al., 2007) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: 2-M Probe At Desert Peak Area (Sladek, Et Al., 2007) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  6. Flow Test At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location San Emidio...

  7. Lehigh Southwest Cement Company: Compressed Air System Improvement Saves Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2003-10-01

    In 2001, Lehigh Southwest Cement Company improved the compressed air system at its cement plant in Tehachapi, California. Consequently, the system was able to operate more efficiently with less compressor capacity and at a lower system pressure. The project yielded total annual savings of 895,000 kWh and $199,000. The initial project cost was $417,000, but Southern California Edison provided a $90,000 incentive payment to reduce the cost to $327,000. Simple payback was about 20 months.

  8. EIS-0448: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to First Solar for the Proposed Desert Sunlight Solar Farm Project, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    First Solar Desert Sunlight Solar Farm (DSSF) Project, proposes to develop a 550-megawatt photovoltaic solar project and proposes to facilitate the construction and operation of the Red Bluff Substation, California Desert Conservation Area (CDCA) Plan, Riverside County, California.

  9. CX-007141: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Electrical District 4 - Electrical District 5 - Structure ReplacementCX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 09/01/2011Location(s): Pinal County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  10. CX-010546: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Liberty Substation Transformer Replacement Project, Maricopa County, Arizona CX(s) Applied: B4.11 Date: 06/06/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  11. CX-007171: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Signal Tap SubstationCX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 09/09/2010Location(s): Pinal County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  12. CX-012741: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Liberty-Westwing 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line Insulator Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41795 Location(s): ArizonaOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  13. CX-004898: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Gila-Wellton-Mohawk (Structure Maintenance)CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 11/05/2010Location(s): Yuma County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  14. CX-011653: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Saguaro-Tucson 115 Kilovolt Transmission Line Structure Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 12/03/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  15. CX-012344: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tucson Substation - Asbestos Abatement CX(s) Applied: B1.16 Date: 06/03/2014 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  16. CX-013771: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mead Substation Stage 15- Foundation Rebuilds and Transformer Connections CX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 04/23/2015 Location(s): NevadaOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  17. CX-011852: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Blythe-Knob 161 Kilovolt Transmission Line, Structure Maintenance Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 01/21/2014 Location(s): California, California Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  18. CX-007800: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Blythe-Knob Guy Wire Anchor Replacement CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 11/14/2011 Location(s): California Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  19. CX-011654: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tucson Substation 162/262 Breaker Replacement CX(s) Applied: B3.1, B4.11 Date: 09/05/2012 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  20. CX-004890: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Coolidge Substation (Septic Tank Cleaning)CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 12/14/2010Location(s): Coolidge, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  1. CX-007169: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Saguaro-Oracle Vegetation RemovalCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 04/07/2011Location(s): Pinal County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  2. CX-008376: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2012 Boulder Canyon Project CX(s) Applied: B4.1 Date: 04/03/2012 Location(s): CX: none Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  3. Reliability Compliance Specialist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    (See Frequently Asked Questions for more information). Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration Desert Southwest Region Maintenance (G5000) 615 S. 43rd Avenue Phoenix, AZ 85009...

  4. CX-011854: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Glen Canyon Substation 345 Kilovolt - Sulfur Hexafluoride and Concrete Pad Installation CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 02/06/2014 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  5. CX-007806: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Glen Canyon Communication Site Geologic Boring CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 11/04/2011 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  6. CX-004897: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Flagstaff-Glen Canyon (Access Road Maintenance)CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 10/01/2010Location(s): Coconino County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  7. CX-007127: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Blythe-KnobCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 03/21/2011Location(s): Imperial County, California, Maricopa County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  8. CX-012087: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Liberty Substation - Vegetation Management CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/01/2014 Location(s): Arizona, Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  9. CX-013770: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Liberty Substation Mowing CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 05/04/2015 Location(s): ArizonaOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  10. CX-012735: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Davis Dam Maintenance Building Installation at the old Davis Dam 69 Kilovolt West Switchyard CX(s) Applied: B4.11Date: 41820 Location(s): ArizonaOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  11. CX-007160: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pinnacle Peak Substation Coupling Capacitor Voltage Transformer InstallationCX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 05/10/2010Location(s): Maricopa County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  12. CX-012736: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ED2-ED4 Transmission Line Rebuild Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41648 Location(s): ArizonaOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  13. CX-010545: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Gila Knob Transmission Line Crossarm Replacement at Structure 18/3 CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 06/03/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  14. CX-013355: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Black Mountain Communications Facility Rebuild Project CX(s) Applied: B1.19Date: 01/16/2015 Location(s): CaliforniaOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  15. CX-012338: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Amargosa Substation (Conduit and Storage Pad Installation) CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/03/2014 Location(s): Nevada Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  16. CX-011719: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cable Trenching in the Gila Substation CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 01/13/2014 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  17. Environmental Protection Specialist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    (See Frequently Asked Questions for more information). Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration Desert Southwest Region Environmental Office (G0400) 615 S. 43rd Avenue Phoenix,...

  18. Meter and Relay Craftsman- Journeyman

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration Desert Southwest Region Protection and Communication Maintenance (G5300) 615 S. 43rd Avenue Phoenix, AZ 85009 Duty Location: Page, AZ...

  19. CX-012743: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mead Substation Service Building Repairs CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41879 Location(s): NevadaOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  20. CX-007155: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mead-Perkins Avian Nest Removal & Access Road MaintenanceCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 05/10/2010Location(s): Maricopa County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  1. CX-010674: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mead KU2A Emergency Bushing Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/02/2013 Location(s): Nevada Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  2. CX-011648: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Davis-Parker 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line- Marker Ball(s) Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 12/17/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  3. CX-004899: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Gila-Yuma Tap (Transmission Line Reconstruction)CX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 07/19/2010Location(s): Yuma County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  4. CX-007804: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Flagstaff-Pinnacle Peak #2 Conductor Maintenance CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 11/07/2011 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  5. CX-007805: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Gila-Gila Valley Structure Replacement CX(s) Applied: B4.13 Date: 09/29/2011 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  6. CX-007138: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Davis-MKT Kingman Tap Crossarm ReplacementCX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 12/28/2010Location(s): Mohave County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  7. CX-004891: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Coolidge-Oracle (Structure Maintenance)CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 07/29/2010Location(s): Pinal County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  8. CX-007134: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Christmas Tree Pass Communication Site Antenna Re-alignmentCX(s) Applied: B1.7Date: 03/16/2011Location(s): Clark County, NevadaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  9. CX-007126: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Basic Substation Phase 2 Soil RemediationCX(s) Applied: B6.1Date: 03/10/2011Location(s): Henderson, NevadaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  10. CX-007801: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Coolidge Substation Archaeological Testing CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 10/13/2011 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  11. CX-007162: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pinnacle Peak Substation Electrical Equipment RemovalCX(s) Applied: B1.17Date: 05/09/2011Location(s): Maricopa County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  12. CX-004889: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Casa Grande-Empire (Geological Boring)CX(s) Applied: B3.1Date: 08/19/2010Location(s): Pinal County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  13. CX-010095: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Casa Grande Substation, CAG 262 Breaker Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/04/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  14. CX-004888: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Casa Grande-Empire (Double Circuit Upgrade)CX(s) Applied: B4.13Date: 09/15/2010Location(s): Pinal County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  15. CX-007130: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Casa Grande-EmpireCX(s) Applied: B3.1Date: 09/14/2010Location(s): Pinal County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  16. CX-007133: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Casa Grande-Saguaro Structure MaintenanceCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 12/16/2010Location(s): Pinal County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  17. CX-007132: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Casa Grande-Empire Double Circuit Upgrade AmendmentCX(s) Applied: B4.13Date: 04/28/2011Location(s): Pinal County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  18. CX-007146: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Flagstaff & Pinnacle Peak Communication Site Building DemolitionCX(s) Applied: B1.23Date: 08/25/2011Location(s): Coconino and Maricopa Counties, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  19. CX-007136: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Coolidge-Oracle Pole ReplacementCX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 11/13/2009Location(s): Pinal County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  20. CX-007158: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Oracle-Tucson Pole ReplacementCX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 04/16/2010Location(s): Pima County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  1. CX-007168: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rodgers-Cooolidge Structure MaintenanceCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 08/26/2011Location(s): Pinal County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  2. CX-007145: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Empire-Electrical District 5 Double Circuit Upgrade AmendmentCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 05/02/2011Location(s): Pinal County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  3. CX-007144: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Empire-Electrical District 5 Double Circuit Upgrade AmendmentCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 04/28/2011Location(s): Pinal County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  4. CX-010098: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Phoenix to Lone Butte 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line, Bird Diverter Installation CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/08/2013 Location(s): CX: none Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  5. Draft Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for the Cliffrose Solar Interconnection Project DOEEA-1989 PrePared By dePartment of energy Western area PoWer administration desert southWest region May 2015 DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL...

  6. CX-012738: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Gila Substation Geotechnical Study CX(s) Applied: B3.1Date: 41857 Location(s): ArizonaOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  7. CX-011856: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Substation Maintenance and Renovation Activities for 2014 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 01/23/2014 Location(s): Arizona, California, Nevada Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  8. CX-012740: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Insulator Replacements for the Flagstaff to Pinnacle Peak #1 and #2 345 Kilovolt Transmission Lines CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41821 Location(s): ArizonaOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  9. Civil Engineer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    (See Frequently Asked Questions for more information). Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration Desert Southwest Region Engineering and Construction (G5600) 615 S. 43rd Avenue...

  10. CX-004895: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Davis Dam Switchyard (Breaker Cable Replacement)CX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 08/05/2010Location(s): Maricopa County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  11. CX-007808: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mesa Substation Soil Remediation Assessment CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 12/12/2011 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  12. CX-011650: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Parker-Gila 161 Kilovolt Transmission Line - Structure 109-8 Relocation CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 12/18/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  13. CX-007142: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Electrical District 5 - Saguaro Structure MaintenanceCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 02/09/2011Location(s): Pinal County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  14. CX-007159: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Parker-Gila Structure MaintenanceCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 10/07/2010Location(s): La Paz and Yuma Counties, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  15. CX-013357: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bouse Hills Pump Plant-Harcuvar 115 Kilovolt Inset Structure CX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 01/09/2015 Location(s): ArizonaOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  16. CX-007128: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Amendment for Bouse SubstationCX(s) Applied: 0Date: 06/23/2011Location(s): La Paz County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  17. CX-013526: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Herbicide Application at 51 Substations Located in Arizona, California, and Nevada CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 03/23/2015 Location(s): Multiple LocationsOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  18. CX-012734: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bouse Hills Pumping Plant to Harcuvar 115 Kilovolt Transmission Line, Inset Structure Installation CX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 41878 Location(s): ArizonaOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  19. CX-010408: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Emergency Current Transformer Replacement at Gila Substation CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 04/26/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  20. CX-010409: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Installation of Cattle Guard at Western Area power Administration's Oracle Electrical Substation CX(s) Applied: B1.11 Date: 05/09/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  1. CX-013772: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oracle-Saguaro 115 Kilovolt Transmission Line Routine Maintenance Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 05/04/2015 Location(s): ArizonaOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  2. Engineering Technician

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    (See Frequently Asked Questions for more information). Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration Desert Southwest Region Engineering and Construction (G5600) 615 S. 43rd Avenue...

  3. CX-007157: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    North Gila-Senator Wash Pole ReplacementCX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 11/03/2010Location(s): Yuma County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  4. CX-012343: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Metal Mountain Communications Site - Emergency Air Conditioner Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.4 Date: 07/03/2014 Location(s): California Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  5. CX-013359: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Phoenix Service Center, Grant of Access for Fiber Optic Cable Installation CX(s) Applied: A1Date: 01/16/2015 Location(s): ArizonaOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  6. CX-007807: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Griffith Substation Transformer Addition CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 11/14/2011 Location(s): Nevada Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  7. CX-007137: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Davis Dam Lower 230-kilovolt Substation Service Building DemolitionCX(s) Applied: B1.23Date: 03/03/2011Location(s): Mohave County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  8. CX-007152: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Gila-Senator Wash Structure & Access Road MaintenanceCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 11/13/2009Location(s): Imperial County, CaliforniaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  9. CX-010411: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Parker Substation 161 Kilovolt 2013 Breaker Replacement CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 05/17/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  10. CX-011201: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Adams Tap Motor-Operator Interrupters and Control Building Replacement CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 09/11/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  11. CX-007802: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Coolidge Substation Southeast Corner Gate and Fence Relocation Project CX(s) Applied: B1.11 Date: 01/18/2012 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  12. CX-007129: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Buck Boulevard SubstationCX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 11/23/2010Location(s): Ripley, CaliforniaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  13. CX-011227: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bi-Annual "Live Line" Maintenance Training CX(s) Applied: B1.2 Date: 10/08/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  14. CX-007125: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Basic SubstationCX(s) Applied: B4.11Date: 11/30/2010Location(s): Clark County, NevadaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  15. CX-004877: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Borrow at Basic Substation in Clark County, NevadaCX(s) Applied: B4.11Date: 11/30/2010Location(s): Clark County, NevadaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  16. CX-011649: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Hot Crossarm Changeout Training at 6 Structures CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 12/16/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  17. CX-007153: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Glen Canyon substation Transformer AdditionCX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 05/05/2011Location(s): Coconino County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  18. Financial Program Analyst

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    (See Frequently Asked Questions for more information). Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration Desert Southwest Region Budget and Alternative Finance (G8100) 615 S. 43rd Avenue...

  19. CX-012341: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Humboldt Mountain Communication Facility - Asbestos and Lead-based Paint Testing CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 06/19/2014 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  20. CX-007148: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Gila Substation Electrical Equipment ReplacementCX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 05/03/2011Location(s): Yuma County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  1. CX-007161: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pinnacle Peak Substation Conductor & Circuit Breaker ReplacementCX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 12/03/2010Location(s): Maricopa County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  2. CX-011651: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hazard Tree Removal Along the Prescott Peacock 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 11/22/2013 Location(s): Arizona, Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  3. CX-007165: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Prescott-Pinnacle Peak Bird Diversion Equipment AdditionCX(s) Applied: B1.20Date: 12/15/2010Location(s): Yavapai County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  4. CX-007166: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pinnacle Peak-Prescott Danger Tree RemovalCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 03/18/2010Location(s): Maricopa County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  5. CX-007163: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pinnacle Peak-Prescott Access Road ImprovementCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 08/02/2010Location(s): Yavapai County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  6. CX-012744: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Prescott Peacock Transmission Line- Insulator Repair at 3 Structures CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41851 Location(s): ArizonaOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  7. CX-011229: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oracle Substation - Breaker Support Work CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 10/30/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  8. CX-010097: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Herbicide Application at Lone Butte Substation During Fiscal Year 2013 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/24/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  9. CX-012092: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tucson-Apache 115-Kilovolt Transmission Line Structure Stabilization Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 09/06/2013 Location(s): Arizona, Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  10. Protection and Communication Craftsman-Foreman II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration Desert Southwest Region Protection and Communication Maintenance (G5300) 615 S. 43rd Avenue Phoenix, AZ 85009 Duty Location is: Phoenix,...

  11. General Engineer (Project Manager)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    (See Frequently Asked Questions for more information). Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration Desert Southwest Region Engineering and Construction (G5600) 615 S. 43rd Avenue...

  12. CX-011855: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Henderson 230 Kilovolt Switchyard (Erosion Control) CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 02/06/2014 Location(s): Nevada Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  13. CX-007167: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rogers-Coolidge Danger Tree RemovalCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 02/18/2010Location(s): Pinal County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  14. CX-012091: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Substation Temporary Laydown Yard CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03282013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region Western Area...

  15. CX-013443: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Substation Maintenance and Renovation Activities for 2015 CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 02/17/2015 Location(s): Multiple LocationsOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  16. CX-013769: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ground Wire Repair on Transmission Structures CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 05/04/2015 Location(s): Multiple LocationsOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  17. CX-013773: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tucson Substation Rebuild- Stage 02 Project CX(s) Applied: B4.11Date: 03/31/2015 Location(s): ArizonaOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  18. CX-013528: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pest Control at Buildings in 44 Substations CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 03/11/2015 Location(s): Multiple LocationsOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  19. CX-004896: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Davis Dam Switchyards (Erosion Control)CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 08/12/2010Location(s): Mohave County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  20. CX-012342: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Liberty Parker #2 Transmission Line - Erosion Repair at Structure 53/1 CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 06/09/2014 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  1. CX-007135: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Coolidge-Oracle Crossarm ReplacementCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 07/29/2010Location(s): Pinal County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  2. [Climate implications of terrestrial paleoclimate]. Quaternary Sciences Center, Desert Research Institute annual report, fiscal year 1994/1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigand, P.E.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this study is to collect terrestrial climate indicators for paleoclimate synthesis. The paleobiotic and geomorphic records are being examined for the local and regional impact of past climates to assess Yucca Mountain`s suitability as a high-level nuclear waste repository. In particular these data are being used to provide estimates of the timing, duration and extremes of past periods of moister climate for use in hydrological models of local and regional recharge that are being formulated by USGS and other hydrologists for the Yucca Mountain area. The project includes botanical, faunal, and geomorphic components that will be integrated to accomplish this goal. To this end personnel at the Quaternary Sciences Center of the Desert Research Institute in Reno, Nevada are conducting the following activities: Analyses of packrat middens; Analysis of pollen samples; and Determination of vegetation climate relationships.

  3. Feasibility study of the seismic reflection method in Amargosa Desert, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brocher, T.M.; Hart, P.E.; Carle, S.F.

    1990-11-01

    The US Geological Survey (USGS) working under an Interagency agreement with the Department of Energy is engaged in a broad geoscience program to assess and identify a potential repository for high level nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. The USGS program, referred to as the Yucca Mountain Project, or YMP, consists of integrated geologic, hydrologic and geophysical studies which range in nature from site specific to regional. This report is an evaluation of different acquisition methods for future regional seismic reflection studies to be conducted in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, located in the southwestern corner of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). In January 1988, field studies were conducted to investigate the feasibility of using the common-depth point (CDP) seismic reflection method to map subsurface geological horizons within the Amargosa Desert, Nye County, Nevada. The goal of the field study was to investigate which seismic reflection method(s) should be used for mapping shallow to lower-crustal horizons. Therefore, a wide-variety of field acquisition parameters were tested, included point versus linear receiver group arrays; Vibroseis (service and trademark of Conoco, Inc.) versus explosive sources; Vibroseis array patterns; and Vibroseis sweep and frequency range. 31 refs., 33 figs., 8 tabs.

  4. Reservoir characterization of the Smackover Formation in southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Hall, D.R.; Mann, S.D.; Tew, B.H.

    1993-02-01

    The Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation is found in an arcuate belt in the subsurface from south Texas to panhandle Florida. The Smackover is the most prolific hydrocarbon-producing formation in Alabama and is an important hydrocarbon reservoir from Florida to Texas. In this report Smackover hydrocarbon reservoirs in southwest Alabama are described. Also, the nine enhanced- and improved-recovery projects that have been undertaken in the Smackover of Alabama are evaluated. The report concludes with recommendations about potential future enhanced- and improved-recovery projects in Smackover reservoirs in Alabama and an estimate of the potential volume of liquid hydrocarbons recoverable by enhanced- and improved-recovery methods from the Smackover of Alabama.

  5. CO2 EFFECTS ON MOJAVE DESERT PLANT INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. A. DEFALCO; G. C. FERNANDEZ; S. D. SMITH; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01

    Seasonal and interannual droughts characteristic of deserts have the potential to modify plant interactions as atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations continue to rise. At the Nevada Desert FACE (free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment) facility in the northern Mojave Desert, the effects of elevated atmospheric C02 (550 vs. ambient {approx}360 {micro}mol mol{sup -1}) on plant interactions were examined during two years of high and low rainfall. Results suggest that CO{sub 2} effects on the interaction between native species and their understory herbs are dependent on the strength of competition when rainfall is plentiful, but are unimportant during annual drought. Seasonal rainfall for 1999 was 23% the long-term average for the area, and neither elevated CO{sub 2} nor the low production of herbaceous neighbors had an effect on relative growth rate (RGR, d{sup -1}) and reproductive effort (RE, number of flowers g{sup -1}) for Achnatherum hymenoides (early season perennial C{sub 3} grass), Pleuraphis rigida (late season perennial C{sub 4} grass), and Larrea tridentata (evergreen C{sub 3} shrub). In contrast, 1998 received 213% the average rainfall. Consequently, the decrease in RGR and increase in RE for Achnatherum, whose period of growth overlaps directly with that of its neighbors, was exaggerated at elevated CO{sub 2}. However, competitive effects of neighbors on Eriogonum trichopes (a winter annual growing in shrub interspaces), Pleuraphis and Larrea were not affected by elevated CO{sub 2}, and possible explanations are discussed. Contrary to expectations, the invasive annual neighbor Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens had little influence on target plant responses because densities in 1998 and 1999 at this site were well below those found in other studies where it has negatively affected perennial plant growth. The extent that elevated CO{sub 2} reduces the performance of Achnatherum in successive years to cause its loss from the plant community depends more on future pressure from herbaceous neighbors and less on the extent that CO{sub 2} enhances Achnatherum growth during periods of severe drought.

  6. DOE: Integrating Southwest Power Pool Wind Energy into Southeast Electricity Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Daniel, EPRI; Tuohy, Aidan, EPRI; Deb, Sidart, LCG Consulting; Jampani, Srinivas, LCG Consulting; Kirby, Brendan, Consultant; King, Jack, Consultant

    2011-11-29

    Wind power development in the United States is outpacing previous estimates for many regions, particularly those with good wind resources. The pace of wind power deployment may soon outstrip regional capabilities to provide transmission and integration services to achieve the most economic power system operation. Conversely, regions such as the Southeastern United States do not have good wind resources and will have difficulty meeting proposed federal Renewable Portfolio Standards with local supply. There is a growing need to explore innovative solutions for collaborating between regions to achieve the least cost solution for meeting such a renewable energy mandate. The DOE-funded project 'Integrating Southwest Power Pool Wind Energy into Southeast Electricity Markets' aims to evaluate the benefits of coordination of scheduling and balancing for Southwest Power Pool (SPP) wind transfers to Southeastern Electric Reliability Council (SERC) Balancing Authorities (BAs). The primary objective of this project is to analyze the benefits of different balancing approaches with increasing levels of inter-regional cooperation. Scenarios were defined, modeled and investigated to address production variability and uncertainty and the associated balancing of large quantities of wind power in SPP and delivery to energy markets in the southern regions of the SERC. The primary analysis of the project is based on unit commitment (UC) and economic dispatch (ED) simulations of the SPP-SERC regions as modeled for the year 2022. The UC/ED models utilized for the project were developed through extensive consultation with the project utility partners, to ensure the various regions and operational practices are represented as accurately as possible realizing that all such future scenario models are quite uncertain. SPP, Entergy, Oglethorpe Power Company (OPC), Southern Company, and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) actively participated in the project providing input data for the models and review of simulation results and conclusions. While other SERC utility systems are modeled, the listed SERC utilities were explicitly included as active participants in the project due to the size of their load and relative proximity to SPP for importing wind energy. The analysis aspects of the project comprised 4 primary tasks: (1) Development of SCUC/SCED model of the SPP-SERC footprint for the year 2022 with only 7 GW of installed wind capacity in SPP for internal SPP consumption with no intended wind exports to SERC. This model is referred to as the 'Non-RES' model as it does not reflect the need for the SPP or SERC BAs to meet a federal Renewable Energy Standard (RES). (2) Analysis of hourly-resolution simulation results of the Non-RES model for the year 2022 to provide project stakeholders with confidence in the model and analytical framework for a scenario that is similar to the existing system and more easily evaluated than the high-wind transfer scenarios that are analyzed subsequently. (3) Development of SCUC/SCED model of the SPP-SERC footprint for the year 2022 with sufficient installed wind capacity in SPP (approximately 48 GW) for both SPP and the participating SERC BAs to meet an RES of 20% energy. This model is referred to as the 'High-Wind Transfer' model with several different scenarios represented. The development of the High-Wind Transfer model not only included identification and allocation of SPP wind to individual SERC BAs, but also included the evaluation of various methods to allow the model to export the SPP wind to SERC without developing an actual transmission plan to support the transfers. (4) Analysis of hourly-resolution simulation results of several different High-Wind Transfer model scenarios for the year 2022 to determine balancing costs and potential benefits of collaboration among SPP and SERC BAs to provide the required balancing.

  7. Biotic Processes Regulating the Carbon Balance of Desert Ecosystems - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nowak, Robert S; Smith, Stanley D; Evans, Dave; Ogle, Kiona; Fenstermaker, Lynn

    2012-12-13

    Our results from the 10-year elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration study at the Nevada Desert FACE (Free-air CO{sub 2} Enrichment) Facility (NDFF) indicate that the Mojave Desert is a dynamic ecosystem with the capacity to respond quickly to environmental changes. The Mojave Desert ecosystem is accumulating carbon (C), and over the 10-year experiment, C accumulation was significantly greater under elevated [CO{sub 2}] than under ambient, despite great fluctuations in C inputs from year to year and even apparent reversals in which [CO{sub 2}] treatment had greater C accumulations.

  8. Stimulation at Desert Peak -modeling with the coupled THM code FEHM

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Dataset) | SciTech Connect Dataset: Stimulation at Desert Peak -modeling with the coupled THM code FEHM Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Stimulation at Desert Peak -modeling with the coupled THM code FEHM Numerical modeling of the 2011 shear stimulation at the Desert Peak well 27-15. This submission contains the FEHM executable code for a 64-bit PC Windows-7 machine, and the input and output files for the results presented in the included paper from ARMA-213 meeting. Authors:

  9. Desert Peak to Humboldt House and Winnemucca, in: Lane, M.A....

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to Humboldt House and Winnemucca, in: Lane, M.A., (ed) Nevada geothermal areas: Desert Peak, Humboldt House, Beoware: Guidebook for field trip Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  10. HYDROPHOBIC CHARACTERISTICS OF COMPOSITE INSULATORS IN SIMULATED INLAND ARID DESERT ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Yasin; Al-Arainy, Abdulrehman Ali; Malik, Nazar Hussain; Qureshi, Muhammad Iqbal

    2010-06-15

    Presently along with traditional insulators i.e. glass and porcelain, etc., the polymeric insulators are also used world widely. These polymeric insulators are very sensitive to various environmental parameters e.g. UV radiations, heat, etc. The UV radiation level in the central region of Saudi Arabia is high as compared to the recommended IEC-61109 standard for the accelerated aging of the composite insulators. In this study, thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) and Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer (EPDM) insulators were subjected to accelerated aging stress as per IEC standard as well as modified IEC standard simulating the inland arid desert's atmospheric conditions. The hydrophobic characteristics were studied by measuring the contact angle along the insulator surface before and after the accelerated aging of the samples. It was found that TPE loses its hydrophobic properties more as compared to EPDM insulator. This loss was proportional to the intensity of UV irradiation. The rate of recovery is also low for both the tested materials as compared to Silicone Rubber insulators.

  11. EIS-0443: Southwest Intertie Project-South (SWIP-S), White Pine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    White Pine, Nye, Lincoln, and Clark counties, NV EIS-0443: Southwest Intertie Project-South (SWIP-S), White Pine, Nye, Lincoln, and Clark counties, NV Documents Available for ...

  12. DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Transmission Corridors | Department of Energy Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors October 2, 2007 - 2:50pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Kevin M. Kolevar today announced the Department's designation of two National Interest

  13. East Pond West Pond South Pond South Pond Southwest Pond

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    West Pond South Pond South Pond Southwest Pond Pond 5 15-M03D 14.97 15-M14D 14.65 15-M27D 14.1 15-M32D 14.53 18-0507 14.28 18-0509 14.3 18-0520 14.06 18-0523 14.22 20-0502 14.36 20-M005 14.64 20-M007 14.72 20-M011 14.9 20-M023 14.39 20-M028 14.81 20-M036 14.6 20-M40D 11.5 20-M41D 14.11 20-M059 14.53 12-0555C 13.55 12-0558C 13.6 12-0543 12.86 12-0520 14.45 15-0506 13.47 12-0514 13.44 12-0516 13.84 12-0522 14.45 12-0524 14.33 12-RW02 14.36 15-0518 13.92 15-0534 13.59 15-0535 14.21 18-0508 14.4

  14. CX-011853: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Outgrant to Southwest Gas for an Underground Natural Gas Distribution Pipeline at Coolidge Substation CX(s) Applied: B1.24 Date: 02/18/2014 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  15. Workshop Explores Energy Project Financing Options for Southwest...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More than 21 representatives of state and regional organizations participated in an the initial facilitation workshop for Alaska Energy Ambassadors held at the U.S. Fish & Wildlife ...

  16. Countering third world weapons of mass destruction: Desert storm as a prototype. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, S.M.

    1993-02-19

    The proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMDs)--nuclear, biological, and chemical--is occurring throughout the Third World. Desert Storm offers an excellent case study for assessing the various measures and operations which can be employed to protect U.S.. forces against an adversary possessing a WMD capability. The elements of Desert Storm's successful strategy can be categorized in three broad approaches--deterrence, denial, and defense. All three approaches were necessary and syngergistic. In the future, the ability to quickly deny or destroy an adversary's WMD capability will be increasingly important, due to the unacceptability of exposing forces to any type of NBC agent, the likelihood for increased uncertainty surrounding deterrent threats, and the diplomatic, political, and psychological dilemmas posed by an adversary's first use....Weapons of mass destruction, Desert Storm.

  17. Desert Sunlight is Shining Example of How DOE Loan Guarantees Helped Launch

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Utility-scale PV Solar Market | Department of Energy Desert Sunlight is Shining Example of How DOE Loan Guarantees Helped Launch Utility-scale PV Solar Market Desert Sunlight is Shining Example of How DOE Loan Guarantees Helped Launch Utility-scale PV Solar Market February 9, 2015 - 12:01am Addthis In 2011, LPO issued loan guarantees to the first 5 PV projects larger than 100 MW in the U.S. An additional 17 projects have been financed since without loan guarantees. In 2011, LPO issued loan

  18. Numerical modeling of aerial bursts and ablation melting of Libyan desert

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    glass. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Numerical modeling of aerial bursts and ablation melting of Libyan desert glass. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Numerical modeling of aerial bursts and ablation melting of Libyan desert glass. No abstract prepared. Authors: Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick Publication Date: 2006-07-01 OSTI Identifier: 892766 Report Number(s): SAND2006-4263C TRN: US200623%%501 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation:

  19. Wintertime meteorology of the Grand Canyon region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whiteman, C.D.

    1992-09-01

    The Grand Canyon region of the American Southwest is an interesting region meteorologically, but because of its isolated location, the lack of major population centers in the region, and the high cost of meteorological field experiments, it has historically received little observational attention. In recent years, however, attention has been directed to episodes of visibility degradation in many of the US National parks, and two recent field studies focused on this visibility problem have greatly increased the meteorological data available for the Grand Canyon region. The most recent and comprehensive of these studies is the Navajo Generating Station Winter Visibility Study of 1989--90. This study investigated the sources of visibility degradation in Grand Canyon National Park and the meteorological mechanisms leading to low visibility episodes. In this paper we present analyses of this rich data set to gain a better understanding of the key wintertime meteorological features of the Grand Canyon region.

  20. Photovoltaic at Hollywood and Desert Breeze Recreational Centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, Shane

    2015-09-24

    Executive Summary Renewable Energy Initiatives for Clark County Parks and Recreation Solar Project DOE grant # DE-EE0003180 In accordance with the goals of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy for promoting solar energy as clean, carbon-free and cost-effective, the County believed that a recreational center was an ideal place to promote solar energy technologies to the public. This project included the construction of solar electricity generation facilities (40kW) at two Clark County facility sites, Desert Breeze Recreational Center and Hollywood Recreational Center, with educational kiosks and Green Boxes for classroom instruction. The major objectives and goals of this Solar Project include demonstration of state of the art technologies for the generation of electricity from solar technology and the creation of an informative and educational tool in regards to the benefits and process of generating alternative energy. Clark County partnered with Anne Johnson (design architect/consultant), Affiliated Engineers Inc. (AEI), Desert Research Institute (DRI), and Morse Electric. The latest photovoltaic technologies were used in the project to help create the greatest expected energy savings for60443 each recreational center. This coupled with the data created from the monitoring system will help Clark County and NREL further understand the real time outputs from the system. The educational portion created with AEI and DRI incorporates material for all ages with a focus on K - 12. The AEI component is an animated story telling the fundamentals of how sunlight is turned into electricity and DRI‘s creation of Solar Green Boxes brings environmental education into the classroom. In addition to the educational component for the public, the energy that is created through the photovoltaic system also translates into saved money and health benefits for the general public. This project has helped Clark County to further add to its own energy reduction goals created by the energy management agenda (Resolution to Encourage Sustainability) and the County’s Eco-initiative. Each site has installed photovoltaic panels on the existing roof structures that exhibit suitable solar exposure. The generation systems utilize solar energy creating electricity used for the facility’s lighting system and other electrical requirements. Unused electricity is sent to the electric utility grid, often at peak demand times. Educational signage, kiosks and information have been included to inform and expand the public’s understanding of solar energy technology. The Solar Green Boxes were created for further hands on classroom education of solar power. In addition, data is sent by a Long Term PV performance monitoring system, complete with data transmission to NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory), located in Golden, CO. This system correlates local solar irradiance and weather with power production. The expected outcomes of this Solar Project are as follows: (1) Successful photovoltaic electricity generation technologies to capture solar energy in a useful form of electrical energy. (2) Reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and environmental degradation resulting from reduced energy demand from traditional electricity sources such as fossil fuel fired and nuclear power plants. (3) Advance the research and development of solar electricity generation. (4) The education of the general public in regards to the benefits of environmentally friendly electricity generation and Clark County’s efforts to encourage sustainable living practices. (5) To provide momentum for the nexus for future solar generation facilities in Clark County facilities and buildings and further the County’s energy reduction goals. (6) To ultimately contribute to the reduction of dependence on foreign oil and other unsustainable sources of energy. This Solar Project addresses several objectives and goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Solar Energy Technology Program. The project improves the integration and performance of solar electricity directly through implementation of cutting edge technology. The project further addresses this goal by laying important ground work and infrastructure for integration into the utility grid in future related projects. There will also be added security, reliability, and diversity to the energy system by providing and using reliable, secure, distributed electricity in Clark County facilities as well as sending such electricity back into the utility electric grid. A final major objective met by the Solar Project will be the displacement of energy derived by fossil fuels with clean renewable energy created by photovoltaic panels.

  1. Stimulation at Desert Peak -modeling with the coupled THM code FEHM

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    kelkar, sharad

    2013-04-30

    Numerical modeling of the 2011 shear stimulation at the Desert Peak well 27-15. This submission contains the FEHM executable code for a 64-bit PC Windows-7 machine, and the input and output files for the results presented in the included paper from ARMA-213 meeting.

  2. Stimulation at Desert Peak -modeling with the coupled THM code FEHM

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    kelkar, sharad

    Numerical modeling of the 2011 shear stimulation at the Desert Peak well 27-15. This submission contains the FEHM executable code for a 64-bit PC Windows-7 machine, and the input and output files for the results presented in the included paper from ARMA-213 meeting.

  3. First Tracer Test After Circulation in Desert Peak 27-15

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Rose, Peter

    Following the successful stimulation of Desert Peak target EGS well 27-15, a circulation test was initiated by injecting a conservative tracer (1,5-nds) in combination with a reactive tracer (7-amino-1,3-naphthalene disulfonate). The closest production well 74-21 was monitored over the subsequent several months.

  4. First Tracer Test After Circulation in Desert Peak 27-15

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Rose, Peter

    2013-11-16

    Following the successful stimulation of Desert Peak target EGS well 27-15, a circulation test was initiated by injecting a conservative tracer (1,5-nds) in combination with a reactive tracer (7-amino-1,3-naphthalene disulfonate). The closest production well 74-21 was monitored over the subsequent several months.

  5. Regional Purchasing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Partnerships Regional Partnerships DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Program DOE has created a network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) to help develop the technology, infrastructure, and regulations to implement large-scale CO2 storage (also called carbon sequestration) in different regions and geologic formations within the Nation. Collectively, the seven RCSPs represent regions encompassing: 97 percent of coal-fired CO2 emissions; 97 percent

  6. Project title: Stimulation at Desert Peak and Bradys reservoirs: modeling with the coupled THM code FEHM

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project title: Stimulation at Desert Peak and Bradys reservoirs: modeling with the coupled THM code FEHM presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

  7. Wood-Producing Sunflower? Mining Genetic Diversity in Desert-Dwelling Wild Species (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Knapp, Steve

    2011-04-26

    Steve Knapp from Monsanto on "Wood-Producing Sunflower? Mining Genetic Diversity in Desert-Dwelling Wild Species" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  8. EIS-0005-S2: Bonneville Power Administration Proposed FY 1979 Program Facility Planning Supplement Southwest Oregon Area Service, Supplemental

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statement, one of a series prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bonneville Power Administration on various facets of its construction and maintenance activities, addresses the potential impact of a major new facility proposed for fiscal year 1979. To allow power generated in Wyoming to be delivered to Southwest Oregon and to facilitate the exchange of electric power between the Pacific Northwest and the Middle Snake region, two basic plans of service, each with two corridor routing options, have been identified to meet system requirements. BPA proposes construction of the following two transmission facilities: (1) a 500-kV line from Idaho Power Company's Brownlee Substation in Idaho to BPA's Slatt Substation near Arlington, Oregon, and (2) a 500-kV line from Buckley (near Maupin, Oregon) to Malin, Oregon. This statement must be reviewed and used in conjunction with the overall programmatic environmental statement entitled ""The Role of the Bonneville Power Administration in the Pacific Northwest Power Supply System, Including Its Participation in the Hydro-Thermal Power Program: A Program Environmental Statement and Planning Report (The ""Role EIS""), particularly Appendix B - BPA Power Transmission.

  9. Validation and Comparison of Carbon Sequestration Project Cost Models with Project Cost Data Obtained from the Southwest Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Lee; Reid Grigg; Brian McPherson

    2011-04-15

    Obtaining formal quotes and engineering conceptual designs for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration sites and facilities is costly and time-consuming. Frequently, when looking at potential locations, managers, engineers and scientists are confronted with multiple options, but do not have the expertise or the information required to quickly obtain a general estimate of what the costs will be without employing an engineering firm. Several models for carbon compression, transport and/or injection have been published that are designed to aid in determining the cost of sequestration projects. A number of these models are used in this study, including models by J. Ogden, MIT's Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technologies Program Model, the Environmental Protection Agency and others. This report uses the information and data available from several projects either completed, in progress, or conceptualized by the Southwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP) to determine the best approach to estimate a project's cost. The data presented highlights calculated versus actual costs. This data is compared to the results obtained by applying several models for each of the individual projects with actual cost. It also offers methods to systematically apply the models to future projects of a similar scale. Last, the cost risks associated with a project of this scope are discussed, along with ways that have been and could be used to mitigate these risks.

  10. Morongo Band of Mission Indians - Southwest Tribal Energy Consortiums Renewable Energy Project

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Southwest Tribal Energy Consortium Renewable Energy Feasibility Study U.S. Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program Review Todd Hooks, SWTEC Member, Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians Carolyn Stewart, Red Mountain Energy Partners October 2006 1 © 2006 All Rights Reserved Discussion Outline 1 Project Overview 2 Project Location 3 Project Participants 4 Project Status 5 Next Steps Project Overview 2 © 2006 All Rights Reserved Project Overview >> Background Feasibility study to

  11. Ecological energetics of the desert tortoise (Gopherus Agassizii): Effects of rainfall and drought

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, C.C.

    1996-09-01

    To elucidate ecological effects of variation in the temporal distribution of a limiting resource (water in the Mojave Desert), energetics of two free-living populations of desert tortoises (Gopherus [=Xerobates] agassizii) were studied concurrently over 18 mo with use of doubly-labeled water. Field metabolic rates (FMR) and feeding rates were highly variable. This variability was manifested at several levels, including seasonal changes within populations, year-to-year differences within populations, and differences between populations. Underlying observed patterns and contrasts was considerable variation among individuals. Much of the variation in energetic variables was associated with a single climatic variable, rainfall. Seasonal, annual, and interpopulation differences in FMR and foraging rates corresponded to differences in availability of free-standing water from rainstorms. Some differences among individuals were apparently due to differences in proclivity or ability to drink. Tortoises had very low FMRs relative to other reptiles, allowed them to tolerate long periods of chronic energy shortage during a drought. Calculations suggested that tortoises experienced a net loss of energy shortage during a drought and tortoises experienced a net loss of energy on their spring diet of succulent annual plants. If so, tortoises require drier forage to accrue an energy profit, emphasizing reliance on drinking rainwater. Further, it suggests that growth (as protein deposition) and net acquisition of energy may be temporally decoupled in desert tortoises, with potential consequences for geographic variation in life history. Energy acquisition and expenditure in desert tortoises are strongly constrained by the contingencies of rainfall, both indirectly through effects on availability and quality of food, and directly through reliance on free-standing water for drinking, which is apparently necessary for achieving a net annual energy profit. 61 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Desert architecture for educational buildings, a case study: A center for training university graduates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebeid, M.

    1996-10-01

    A new program for training graduates in desert development is being implemented by the Desert Development Center (DDC) of the American University in Cairo. The facilities consist of fifty bed/sitting rooms for accommodating 100 students. Each unit consists of two rooms and a bathroom for the use of 4 students; a lecture theater which can house 120 students, with adjoining office for trainers as well as necessary facilities; a general cafeteria which can serve 120--150 persons and an adjoining dining room for teaching staff. The cafeteria building also houses the kitchen; a cold storage area; a laundry room, storerooms, sleeping quarters and services for the labor force of the building complex; a system of solar water heaters; and a special sanitary sewage system for treatment of waste water produced by the building`s activities. When designing and implementing this complex, architectural elements and building philosophy based on the concept of integrating with the environment were considered. Elements included orientation heights and building materials suited to the desert environment, thick walls, outer and inner finishing materials, roofs, malkafs, floors, colors, solar heaters, lighting, green areas, windbreaks, terraces, and furniture. The paper includes a general evaluation of this educational building based on the PRA approach (Participatory Rapid Appraisal) involving those living and working in it. As a result of her position with the project, the author was able to evaluate the original designs, recommend modifications, and evaluate their implementation and fulfillment of the original goals of the projects.

  13. CAPITAL REGION

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    t 092007 15:28 FAX 301 903 4656 CAPITAL REGION 0 j002 SDOE F 1325.8 (8-89) EFG (0790) ... 092007 15:29 FAX 301 903 4656 CAPITAL REGION 003 * Implemented a more robust ...

  14. FIA-13-0024- In the Matter of Laborers’ International Union of North America, Pacific Southwest Region

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On May 9, 2013, the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) issued a decision remanding an appeal (Appeal) from a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) determination issued by the Loan Guarantee Program...

  15. EA-1898: Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration Phase III Gordon Creek Project near Price, Utah in Carbon County

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal for Phase III field deployment to demonstrate commercial-scale carbon storage technologies.This Phase III large-scale carbon dioxide injection project will combine science and engineering from many disciplines to successfully sequester and monitor carbon storage. [NOTE: This EA has been cancelled].

  16. The makings of a regional transmission group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, H.

    1994-04-15

    The Southwest Regional Transmission Association (SWRTA) plans to file this month at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) for recognition as a regional transmission group (RTG), pursuant to the FERC's July 1993 policy statement on RTGs. As the provision of electricity becomes less regulated and more competitive, many industry observers expect RTGs to play a key role in increasing the efficiency of our nation's electricity supply system. What exactly is an RTG There are as many definitions as there are interested parties. SWRTA's working group has spent over two years turning an idea into an RTG. Along the way they have learned a few important things about the FERC, congressional intent, the amended Federal Power Act, the dynamics of large groups, and fairness. This article describes the creation of the SWRTA RTG.

  17. A Microcantilever Sensor Array for the Detection and Inventory of Desert Tortoises

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venedam, R. J.; Dillingham, T. R.

    2008-07-01

    Wehavedesignedandtestedaportableinstrumentconsistingofasmallinfraredcameracoupledwithanarrayofpiezoresistivemicrocantileversensorsthatisusedtoprovidereal-time,non-invasive data on desert tortoise den occupancy. The piezoresistive microcantilever (PMC) sensors are used to obtain a chemical signature of tortoise presence from the air deep within the dens, and provide data in cases where the camera cannot extend deep enough into the den to provide visual evidence of tortoise presence. The infrared camera was used to verify the PMC data during testing, and in many cases, such as shallower dens, may be used to provide exact numbers on den populations.

  18. Linking ecosystem scale vegetation change to shifts in carbon and water cycling: the consequences of widespread piñon mortality in the Southwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litvak, Marcy Ellen

    2012-10-01

    The southwestern United States experienced an extended drought from 1999-2002 which led to widespread coniferous tree mortality. Piñon-juniper (PJ) woodlands, which occupy 24 million ha throughout the Southwest, were extremely vulnerable to this drought. An abrupt die-off of 40 to 95% of piñon pine (Pinus edulis) and 2-25% of juniper (Juniperus monosperma) across 1.5 million ha triggered rapid and extensive changes in the structure of PJ woodlands with potentially large, yet unknown, consequences for ecosystem services and feedbacks between the carbon cycle and climate system. Given the spatial extent of PJ woodlands (3rd largest biome in the US) and climatic predictions of increased frequency and intensity of drought in the region, it is crucial to understand the consequences of these disturbances on regional carbon and energy dynamics, biogeochemical processes and atmospheric CO2. The overall objective of our research was to quantify what impact widespread mortality of piñon trees has for carbon and water cycling in PJ woodlands. Our specific objectives for this proposal were: 1) Quantify the carbon, water and energy exchange trajectory after mortality in PJ woodlands; 2) Determine the mechanisms controlling the response and recovery of ecosystem production and respiration processes following large-scale piñon mortality; 3) Use the relationships we measure between ecosystem structure and function PJ woodlands recover from mortality to scale the results of our study up to the regional scale.

  19. Assessment of damage to the desert surfaces of Kuwait due to the Gulf War

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Baz, F. . Center for Remote Sensing); Al-Ajmi, D. . Environmental and Earth Sciences Div.)

    1993-01-01

    This is a preliminary report on a joint research project by Boston University and the Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research that commenced in April 1992. The project aim is to establish the extent and nature of environmental damage to the desert surface and coastal zone of Kuwait due to the Gulf War and its aftermath. Change detection image enhancement techniques were employed to enhance environmental change by comparison of Landsat Thematic Mapper images obtained before the wars and after the cessation of the oil and well fires. Higher resolution SPOT images were also utilized to evaluate the nature of the environmental damage to specific areas. The most prominent changes were due to: (1) the deposition of oil and course-grained soot on the desert surface as a result of oil rain'' from the plume that emanated from the oil well fires; (2) the formation of hundreds of oil lakes, from oil seepage at the damaged oil well heads; (3) the mobilization of sand and dust and (4) the pollution of segments of the coastal zone by the deposition of oil from several oil spills. Interpretation of satellite image data are checked in the field to confirm the observations, and to assess the nature of the damage. Final results will be utilized in establishing the needs for remedial action to counteract the harmful effects of the various types of damage to the environment of Kuwait.

  20. State action in regional transmission groups

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rokach, J.Z.

    1994-12-01

    States should participate in coordinated transmission planning through regional transmission groups, while reserving their right to pass upon transmission planning. This would smooth an otherwise difficult transition, as FERC and state regulators seek to facilitate a competitive bulk power market that ignores arbitrary jurisdiction lines. Since the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission issued its Policy Statement on Regional Transmission Groups, two RTG`s, the Western Regional Transmission Association and the Southwest Regional Transmission Association, have gained conditional approval from FERC. A third, the Northwest Regional Transmission Association, files its governing agreement with the Commission, seeking FERC`s approval. Price setting within RTGs and information exchanges involved in planning the grid raise questions of the legality of these collective actions under the antitrust laws. All three agreements allow for exchanges of commercial and planning information, but, conspicuously, do not set transmission prices. For the moment, therefore, antitrust liability for RTGs would arise out of the information exchanges involved in planning the grid. In addition, with FERC pushing for `restructuring` at the wholesale level through open access and the states becoming aggressive in trying to institute competition at the consumer level through retail wheeling, issues of federal-state jurisdiction in transmission have come to the fore.

  1. EIS-0443: Project Financing for Southwest Intertie Project- South, Clark, Lincoln, Nye, and White Pine Counties, Nevada

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Western Area Power Administration, is considering whether to provide partial financing of the southern portion of the Southwest lntertie Project (SWIP-South) which consists of approximately 235 miles of 500- kilovolt (kV) transmission line.

  2. Final Technical Report: Effects of Changing Water and Nitrogen Inputs on a Mojave Desert Ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Stanley, D.; Nowak, Robert S.; Fenstermaker, Lynn, F.; Young, Michael,H.

    2007-11-30

    In order to anticipate the effects of global change on ecosystem function, it is essential that predictive relationships be established linking ecosystem function to global change scenarios. The Mojave Desert is of considerable interest with respect to global change. It contains the driest habitats in North America, and thus most closely approximates the worlds great arid deserts. In order to examine the effects of climate and land use changes, in 2001 we established a long-term manipulative global change experiment, called the Mojave Global Change Facility. Manipulations in this study include the potential effects of (1) increased summer rainfall (75 mm over three discrete 25 mm events), (2) increased nitrogen deposition (10 and 40 kg ha-1), and (3) the disturbance of biological N-fixing crusts . Questions addressed under this grant shared the common hypothesis that plant and ecosystem performance will positively respond to the augmentation of the most limiting resources to plant growth in the Mojave Desert, e.g., water and nitrogen. Specific hypotheses include (1) increased summer rainfall will significantly increase plant production through an alleviation of moisture stress in the dry summer months, (2) N-deposition will increase plant production in this N-limited system, particularly in wet years or in concert with added summer rain, and (3) biological crust disturbance will gradually decrease bio-available N, with concomitant long-term reductions in photosynthesis and ANPP. Individual plant and ecosystem responses to global change may be regulated by biogeochemical processes and natural weather variability, and changes in plant and ecosystem processes may occur rapidly, may occur only after a time lag, or may not occur at all. During the first PER grant period, we observed changes in plant and ecosystem processes that would fall under each of these time-response intervals: plant and ecosystem processes responded rapidly to added summer rain, whereas most processes responded slowly or in a lag fashion to N-deposition and with no significant response to crust disturbance. Therefore, the primary objectives of this renewal grant were to: (1) continue ongoing measurements of soil and plant parameters that assess primary treatment responses; (2) address the potential heterogeneity of soil properties and (3) initiate a new suite of measurements that will provide data necessary for scaling/modeling of whole-plot to ecosystem-level responses. Our experimental approach included soil plant-water interactions using TDR, neutron probe, and miniaturized soil matric potential and moisture sensors, plant ecophysiological and productivity responses to water and nitrogen treatments and remote sensing methodologies deployed on a radio control platform. We report here the most significant findings of our study.

  3. Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) Research Data from the Nevada Desert FACE Facility (NDFF)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    DOE has conducted trace gas enrichment experiments since the mid 1990s. The FACE Data Management System is a central repository and archive for Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) data, as well as for the related open-top chamber (OTC) experiments. FACE Data Management System is located at the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). While the data from the various FACE sites, each one a unique user facility, are centralized at CDIAC, each of the FACE sites presents its own view of its activities and information. For that reason, DOE Data Explorer users are advised to see both the central repository at http://public.ornl.gov/face/index.shtml and the individual home pages of each site. NDFF whole-ecosystem manipulation is a flagship experiment of the Terrestrial Carbon Process (TCP) research program of the US Dept. of Energy. It is also a core project of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program (IGBP) and a contribution to the US Global Change Research Program. The NDFF was developed in conjunction with the National Science Foundation (NSF) and DOE-EPSCoR programs. FACE (Free-Air-Carbon dioxide-Enrichment) technology allows researchers to elevate the carbon dioxide level in large study plots while minimizing ecosystem disturbance. At the NDFF the concentration of CO2 was elevated by 50 percent above the present atmospheric levels in three plots in the Mojave Desert ecosystem, while six other plots remained at the current level. This experimental design provided a large area in which integrated teams of scientists could describe and quantify processes regulating carbon, nutrient, and water balances in desert ecosystems.

  4. CX-010676: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Pinnacle Peak- Rogers 230-kilovolt Double Inset Structure Number 5/1 a installation CX(s) Applied: B4.12 Date: 06/28/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  5. CX-010677: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Removal and replacement of Oracle Breakers 562 and 762 along with associated disconnects. CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 07/02/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  6. CX-010412: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Road Maintenance and Brushwork along the Saguaro-Tucson 115 Kilovolt Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/30/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  7. CX-003195: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oracle-Tucson 115-Kilovolt Transmission Line in Pima County, ArizonaCX(s) Applied: B4.13Date: 06/10/2010Location(s): Pima County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  8. CX-012340: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Flagstaff Pinnacle Peak #1 & 2 Transmission Lines - Slid Static Damper Repair at Structures 134/3 & 139/2 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/11/2014 Location(s): Arizona, Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  9. CX-012088: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Emergency Installation of Concrete Pad for Western's Communication Tower at Valley Farms Substation CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 04/01/2014 Location(s): Arizona, Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  10. CX-011718: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Electrical District 2 to Saguaro #2 115 Kilovolt Transmission Line, Marker Ball Installation at Structure 26-10. CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 01/09/2014 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  11. CX-007149: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Gila-Knob Structure, Access Road Maintenance & Vegetation Removal Amendment 1CX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 02/18/2011Location(s): Yuma County, AZ; Imperial County, CA, Arizona, CaliforniaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  12. CX-010882: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Liberty-Parker Dam #2 230-Kilovolt Transmission Line, Optical Power Ground Wire Repair CX(s) Applied: B4.7 Date: 08/22/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  13. CX-010683: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Glen Canyon Substation Stage 09- 50MVA 230/69KV Transformer addition CX(s) Applied: B4.11 Date: 07/02/2013 Location(s): Arizona, Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  14. CX-011202: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    COLORA - Cross-Arm Replacement, Structure Numbers 12-3, 12-6 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 09/23/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  15. CX-010679: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Herbicide Application at Four Substations: Blythe, Knob, Parker, and Senator Wash Located in California during Fiscal Year 2014 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/01/2013 Location(s): California, California, California Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  16. CX-010544: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Glen Canyon Switchyard - 230 Kilovolt Wavetrap Removal - TZ9A2 on the Navajo Line CX(s) Applied: B4.11 Date: 06/21/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  17. CX-001118: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Emergency Wood Pole Replacement at 59 Structures Located Along the Coolidge-Oracle 115-Kilovolt Transmission LineCX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 11/13/2009Location(s): Pinal County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  18. CX-007156: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    New Waddell-Raceway-Westwing Structure ReplacementCX(s) Applied: B4.6, B4.13Date: 03/11/2010Location(s): Maricopa County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  19. CX-009805: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Maintenance and Wood Pole Replacement along the Gila Wellton Mohawk 161 Kilovolt Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 01/03/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  20. CX-007803: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Electrical District 2 - Saguaro No. 1 Pole Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.16, B1.19, B1.23 Date: 11/22/2011 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  1. CX-010548: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pest Control within Buildings at 44 Substations in Arizona, California and Nevada CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/06/2013 Location(s): Arizona, California, Nevada Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  2. CX-007150: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Gila-Knob Structure, Access Road Maintenance & Vegetation RemovalCX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 08/02/2011Location(s): Yuma County, AZ; Imperial County, CA, Arizona, CaliforniaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  3. CX-010681: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Herbicide Application at Two Substations: Kayenta and Long House Valley Located on the Navajo Nation During Fiscal Year 2014 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/01/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region"

  4. CX-010682: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Herbicide Application at Four Substations: Amargosa, Boulder City, Henderson, and Mead located in Nevada during Fiscal Year 2014 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/01/2013 Location(s): Nevada Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  5. CX-007151: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Gila-Knob Structure, Access Road Maintenance & Vegetation RemovalCX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 02/07/2011Location(s): Yuma County, AZ; Imperial County, CA, Arizona, CaliforniaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  6. CX-012089: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wood Pole Testing for 20 Transmission Lines in Southern Arizona and Southern California CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 04/17/2014 Location(s): Arizona, Arizona, Arizona, California, California Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  7. CX-010678: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Herbicide Application at 40 Substations Located in Arizona During Fiscal Year 2014 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/01/2013 Location(s): Arizona, Arizona, Arizona, Arizona, Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  8. CX-007140: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Vegetation Removal and Access Road Maintenance along the existing Electrical District 2-Saguaro #2 115-kV transmission lineCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 03/21/2011Location(s): Pinal County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  9. CX-010680: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Herbicide Application at One Substation: Lone Butte, located on the Gila River Indian Community During Fiscal Year 2014 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/01/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  10. CX-003193: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Davis Dam 230-Kilovolt Switchyards Stage 06 Upgrade (Double Breaker Double Bus) in Mohave County, ArizonaCX(s) Applied: B4.11Date: 06/30/2010Location(s): Mohave County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  11. CX-012742: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mead-Liberty 345 Kilovolt Transmission Line Access Road and Maintenance and Localized Vegetation Management Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41878 Location(s): ArizonaOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  12. CX-012339: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Crossman Peak Communication Site Lease and Equipment Upgrades at 5 Facilities CX(s) Applied: B1.19 Date: 06/02/2014 Location(s): Arizona, Arizona, Arizona, California, Nevada Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  13. CX-010675: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Parker Dam to Gila 161-kilovolt Transmission Line, Cross Arm Replacement at Structure 0/7 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/22/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  14. CX-010407: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Electrical District 2 to Saguaro #2 115 Kilovolt Transmission Line Access Road Maintenance between Structure 26/8 and 26/9 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05/20/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  15. CX-010410: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oracle to Tucson 115 Kilovolt Transmission Line, Cross Arm Replacements at Structure 2/5 and 7/3 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05/02/2013 Location(s): Arizona, Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  16. CX-011203: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Emergency Storm Damage Repairs to the Gila North Gila, Gila Knob, and Sonora San Luis Transmission Lines, near Yuma, Yuma County, Arizona CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 08/26/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  17. CX-010883: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PHX-LOB and LIB-LOB 230-Kilovolt Double-Circuit- Replace Insulators at Structure No. 28-2 With NCI Type Polymers CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/12/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  18. CX-004887: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cable and Conduit Addition Within the Fenced Area of the Buck Boulevard SubstationCX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 11/23/2010Location(s): Riverside County, CaliforniaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  19. CX-011228: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Structure 112-4 LIBPAD1 230-kilovolt Transmission Line "Live Line" Maintenance Training CX(s) Applied: B1.2 Date: 10/25/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  20. CX-010547: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Parker-Gila 161 Kilovolt Transmission Line Maintenance Project, Structure 92/1 to 94/9 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/05/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  1. CX-007164: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Prescott-Pinnacle Peak & Pinnacle Peak-Rogers Aerial Marker Ball AdditionCX(s) Applied: B1.9Date: 01/07/2011Location(s): Maricopa County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  2. CX-003194: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Installation of a Mid-Span Interset Structure between Structures 141/1 and 141/2 on the Existing Davis Dam-Prescott 230-Kilovolt Transmission Line in Yavapai County, ArizonaCX(s) Applied: B4.13Date: 06/10/2010Location(s): Yavapai County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  3. CX-001125: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Blading of Washed Out Access Road and Repairing the Washed Out Area Inside the Substation FenceCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 11/12/2009Location(s): Mohave County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  4. CX-010096: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Herbicide Application at 36 Substations Located in Arizona and California During Fiscal Year 2013 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/19/2013 Location(s): Arizona, Arizona, Arizona, Arizona, Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  5. CX-010406: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Davis Dam to Kingman Tap 69 Kilovolt Transmission Line, Overhead Optical Power Ground Wire Installation CX(s) Applied: B4.7 Date: 05/16/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  6. CX-010881: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Glen Canyon to Flagstaff #2 345-Kilovolt Transmission Line, Access Road Maintenance from Structure 45/5 to 46/1 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/08/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  7. CX-007799: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Black Point Communication Site Building Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.16, B1.19, B1.23 Date: 10/17/2011 Location(s): California Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  8. CX-011652: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Protection and Communication Facilities Maintenance CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.7, B1.19 Date: 11/08/2013 Location(s): Arizona, Nevada, California, Utah Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  9. CX-013527: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Urgent Herbicide Application at 15 Substations located in Arizona, California, and Nevada CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 03/03/2015 Location(s): Multiple LocationsOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  10. CX-013768: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Communication Facilities Maintenance and Minor Additions or Modifications CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.7, B1.19Date: 04/10/2015 Location(s): Multiple LocationsOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  11. CX-012090: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Henderson-Mead Number 2 230-Kilovolt Transmission Line, Erosion Repair at Structure 2/4 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 09/11/2013 Location(s): Nevada, Nevada Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  12. PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND RESOURCE ALLOCATION OF THREE MOJAVE DESERT GRASSES IN RESPONSE TO ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. A. DEFALCO; C. K. IVANS; P. VIVIN; J. R. SEEMANN; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01

    Gas exchange, biomass and N allocation were compared among three Mojave Desert grasses representing different functional types to determine if photosynthetic responses and the associated allocation of resources within the plant changed after prolonged exposure to elevated CO{sub 2}. Leaf gas exchange characteristics were measured for Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens (C{sub 3} invasive annual), Achnatherum hymenoides (C{sub 3} native perennial) and Pleuraphis rigida (C{sub 4} native perennial) exposed to 360 {micro}mol mol{sup -1} (ambient) and 1000 {micro}mol mol{sup -1} (elevated) CO{sub 2} concentrations in a glasshouse experiment, and tissue biomass and total N pools were quantified from three harvests during development. The maximum rate of carboxylation by the N-rich enzyme Rubisco (Vc{sub max}), which was inferred from the relationship between net CO{sub 2} assimilation (A{sub net}) and intracellular CO{sub 2} concentration (c{sub i}), declined in the C{sub 3} species Bromus and Achnatherum across all sampling dates, but did not change at elevated CO{sub 2} for the C{sub 4} Pleuraphis. Whole plant N remained the same between CO{sub 2} treatments for all species, but patterns of allocation differed for the short- and long-lived C{sub 3} species. For Bromus, leaf N used for photosynthesis was reallocated to reproduction at elevated CO{sub 2} as inferred from the combination of lower Vc{sub max} and N per leaf area (NLA) at elevated CO{sub 2}, but similar specific leaf area (SLA, cm{sup 2} g{sup -1}), and of greater reproductive effort (RE) for the elevated CO{sub 2} treatment. Vc{sub max}, leaf N concentration and NLA declined for the perennial Achnatherum at elevated CO{sub 2} potentially due to accumulation of carbohydrates or changes in leaf morphology inferred from lower SLA and greater total biomass at elevated CO{sub 2}. In contrast, Vc{sub max} for the C{sub 4} perennial Pleuraphis did not change at elevated CO{sub 2}, and tissue biomass and total N were the same between CO{sub 2} treatments. Adjustments in photosynthetic capacity at elevated CO{sub 2} may optimize N allocation of C{sub 3} species in the Mojave Desert, which may influence plant performance and plant-plant interactions of these co-occurring species.

  13. Vulnerability and adaptation to severe weather events in the American southwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boero, Riccardo; Bianchini, Laura; Pasqualini, Donatella

    2015-05-04

    Climate change can induce changes in the frequency of severe weather events representing a threat to socio-economic development. It is thus of uttermost importance to understand how the vulnerability to the weather of local communities is determined and how adaptation public policies can be effectively put in place. We focused our empirical analysis on the American Southwest. Results show that, consistently with the predictions of an investment model, economic characteristics signaling local economic growth in the near future decrease the level of vulnerability. We also show that federal governments transfers and grants neither work to support recovery from and adaptation to weather events nor to distribute their costs over a broader tax base. Finally, we show that communities relying on municipal bonds to finance adaptation and recovery policies can benefit from local acknowledgment of the need for such policies and that they do not have to pay lenders a premium for the risk induced by weather events. In conclusion, our findings suggest that determinants of economic growth support lower vulnerability to the weather and increase options for financing adaptation and recovery policies, but also that only some communities are likely to benefit from those processes.

  14. Vulnerability and adaptation to severe weather events in the American southwest

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Boero, Riccardo; Bianchini, Laura; Pasqualini, Donatella

    2015-05-04

    Climate change can induce changes in the frequency of severe weather events representing a threat to socio-economic development. It is thus of uttermost importance to understand how the vulnerability to the weather of local communities is determined and how adaptation public policies can be effectively put in place. We focused our empirical analysis on the American Southwest. Results show that, consistently with the predictions of an investment model, economic characteristics signaling local economic growth in the near future decrease the level of vulnerability. We also show that federal governments transfers and grants neither work to support recovery from and adaptationmore » to weather events nor to distribute their costs over a broader tax base. Finally, we show that communities relying on municipal bonds to finance adaptation and recovery policies can benefit from local acknowledgment of the need for such policies and that they do not have to pay lenders a premium for the risk induced by weather events. In conclusion, our findings suggest that determinants of economic growth support lower vulnerability to the weather and increase options for financing adaptation and recovery policies, but also that only some communities are likely to benefit from those processes.« less

  15. Estimating Annual Precipitation in the Fenner Basin of the Eastern Mojave Desert, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davisson, M.L.; Rose, T.P.

    2000-05-15

    Metropolitan Water District (MWD) of southern California and Cadiz Inc. investigated the feasibility of storing Colorado River water in groundwater aquifers of the eastern Mojave Desert as a future drought mitigation strategy. This culminated in the public release of the Cadiz Groundwater Storage and Dry-Year Supply program Draft EIR, which included pilot percolation studies, groundwater modeling, and precipitation/runoff analysis in the Fenner groundwater basin, which overlies the proposed storage site. The project proposes to store and withdrawal Colorado River water over a 50-year period, but will not exceed the natural replenishment rates of the groundwater basin. Several independent analyses were conducted to estimate the rates of natural groundwater replenishment to the Fenner Groundwater Basin which was included in the Draft EIR. The US Geologic Survey, Water Resources Division (WRD) officially submitted comments during public review and concluded that the natural groundwater replenishment rates calculated for the Draft EIR were too high. In the WRD review, they provided a much lower recharge calculation based on a Maxey-Eakin estimation approach. This approach estimates annual precipitation over an entire basin as a function of elevation, followed by calibration against annual recharge rates. Previous attempts to create precipitation-elevation functions in western Nevada have been difficult and result in large uncertainty. In the WRD data analysis, the effect of geographic scale on the precipitation-elevation function was overlooked. This contributed to an erroneous Maxey-Eakin recharge estimate.

  16. Corrosion of Uranium in Desert Soil, with Application to GCD Source Term M

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ANDERSON, HOWARD L.; BACA, JULIANNE; KRUMHANSL, JAMES L.; STOCKMAN, HARLAN W.; THOMPSON, MOLLIE E.

    1999-09-01

    Uranium fragments from the Sandia Sled Track were studied as analogues for weapons components and depleted uranium buried at the Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) site in Nevada. The Sled Track uranium fragments originated as weapons mockups and counterweights impacted on concrete and soil barriers, and experienced heating and fragmentation similar to processes thought to affect the Nuclear Weapons Accident Residues (NWAR) at GCD. Furthermore, the Sandia uranium was buried in unsaturated desert soils for 10 to 40 years, and has undergone weathering processes expected to affect the GCD wastes. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and microprobe analyses of the fragments show rapid alteration from metals to dominantly VI-valent oxy-hydroxides. Leaching studies of the samples give results consistent with published U-oxide dissolution rates, and suggest longer experimental periods (ca. 1 year) would be required to reach equilibrium solution concentrations. Thermochemical modeling with the EQ3/6 code indicates that the uranium concentrations in solutions saturated with becquerelite could increase as the pore waters evaporate, due to changes in carbonate equilibria and increased ionic strength.

  17. Secondary production of benthic insects in three cold-desert streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaines, W.L.

    1987-07-01

    Aquatic insect production was studied in three cold-desert streams in eastern Washington (Douglas Creek, Snively Springs, and Rattlesnake Springs). The size-frequency method was applied to individual taxa to estimate total insect production. production was also assessed for functional groups and trophic levels in each stream. Optioservus sp. (riffle beetles) and Baetis sp. (mayflies) accounted for 72% of the total insect numbers and 50% of the total biomass in Douglas Creek. Baetis sp. accounted for 42% of the total insect numbers and 25% of the total biomass in Snively Springs. Simulium sp. (blackflies) and Baetis sp. comprised 74% of the total insect numbers and 55% of the total biomass in Rattlesnake Springs. Grazer-scrapers (49%) and collectors (48%) were the most abundant functional groups in Douglas Creek. Collectors were the most abundant functional group in Snively Springs and Rattlesnake Springs. Herbivores and detritivores were the most abundant trophic level in Snively Springs and Rattlesnake Springs. Dipterans (midges and blackflies) were the most productive taxa within the study streams, accounting for 40% to 70% of the total community production. Production by collectors and detritivores was the highest of all functional groups and trophic levels in all study streams.

  18. Accretion disks in the IRAS 23151+5912 region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodrguez-Esnard, T.; Trinidad, M. A.; Migenes, V. E-mail: trinidad@astro.ugto.mx

    2014-06-20

    We present observations of radio continuum emission at 1.3 and 3.6 cm and H{sub 2}O masers toward the high-mass star-forming region IRAS 23151+5912 carried out with the Very Large Array-Expanded Very Large Array (in transition phase) in configuration A. We detected one continuum source at 1.3 cm in the region, but the counterpart of this radio continuum source at 3.6 cm was not detected at a level of 3?. We also detected 13 water maser spots toward IRAS 23151+5912, which are distributed in three groups aligned along the northeast-southwest direction. Our results suggest that the 1.3 cm emission is consistent with a hypercompact H II region, probably with an embedded zero-age main-sequence star of type B2. In particular, we find that this young star is spatially associated with a maser group, which is tracing a disk-like structure of about 460 AU. We also find that the masers of the second group are probably describing a circumstellar disk of about 86 AU, whose central protostar, still undetected, should have a mass of ?11 M {sub ?}. We also suggest that the third water maser group is possibly associated with the SiO outflow and the undetected driving source of the system. Finally, we noted that the 1.3 cm continuum source and the three maser groups are aligned in the northeast-southwest direction, similar to the elongation of the large ionized region, which probably is the result of shock-wave induced star formation on the densest region of the medium.

  19. Material unaccounted for at the Southwest Experimental Fast Oxide Reactor: The SEFOR MUF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higinbotham, W.A.

    1994-11-07

    The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission contracted with the General Electric Company to design, construct, and operate the Southwest Experimental Fast Oxide Reactor (SEFOR) to measure the Doppler effect for fast neutron breeder reactors. It contracted with Nuclear Fuel Services to fabricate the fuel rods for the reactor. When the reactor went critical in May, 1969, it appeared that some of the mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) fuel rods did not contain the specified quantity of plutonium. The SEFOR operators soon found several fuel rods which appeared to be low in plutonium. The safeguards group at Brookhaven was asked to look into the problem and, if possible, determine how much plutonium was missing from the unirradiated rods and from the larger number which had been slightly irradiated in the reactor. It was decided that the plutonium content of the unirradiated and irradiated rods could be measured relative to a reference rod using a high resolution gamma-ray detector and also by neutron measurements using an auto-correlation circuit recently developed at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). During the next two years, Brookhaven personnel and C.V. Strain of NRL made several trips to the SEFOR reactor. About 250 of the 775 rods were measured by two or more methods, using a sodium-iodide detector, a high-resolution germanium detector, a neutron detector, or the reactor (to measure reactivity). The research team concluded that 4.6 {+-} 0.46 kg of plutonium was missing out of the 433 kg that the rods should have contained. This report describes the SEFOR experiment and the procedures used to determine the material unaccounted for, or MUF.

  20. Multipurpose bedrock surficial, and environmental geologic maps, New River valley, southwest Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, A. ); Collins, T. )

    1994-03-01

    Multipurpose bedrock, surficial, and environmental geologic maps have recently been completed for portions of the Valley and Ridge province of southwest VA. The maps, at both 1:100,000 and 1:24,000 scales, show generalized and detailed bedrock geology grouped by lithology and environmental hazard associations. Also shown are a variety of alluvial, colluvial, debris flow, and landslide deposits, as well as karst features. Multidisciplinary research topics addressed during the mapping included slope evolution and geomorphology, drainage history and terrace distribution, ancient large-scale landsliding, and sinkhole development. The maps have been used by land-use planners and engineering firms in an evaluation of Appalachian paleoseismicity and to assess potential groundwater contamination and subsidence in karst areas. The maps are being used for environmental hazard assessment and site selection of a proposed large electric powerline that crosses the Jefferson National Forest. Also, the maps are proving useful in planning for a public access interpretive geologic enter focused on large-scale slope failures. Some of the largest known landslides in eastern North America took place within the map area. Field comparisons and detailed structure mapping of similar features along the Front Range of the Colorado Rockies indicate that the landslides were probably emplaced during a single catastrophic event of short duration. Although the giles County seismic zone is nearby, stability analyses of slopes in the map area have shown that failure need not have been initiated by a seismic event. Several distinct colluvial units mapped within the area of landslides document a period of extensive weathering that postdates slide emplacement. Radiocarbon dates from landslide sag ponds indicate a minimum age of 9,860 B.P. for emplacement of some of the landslides. These results indicate that pre-slide colluvial and debris flow deposits are at least Pleistocene in age.

  1. Evaluation of stress experienced by soldiers wearing chemical protective clothing during varying work loads in desert or tropical environments. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudgens, G.A.; Banderet, L.E.; Cadarette, B.S.

    1994-04-01

    A stress evaluation was conducted in a laboratory test in which the physiological and psychological reactions of soldiers were monitored while they wore either the standard battle dress overgarment (MOPPI) or the full complement of chemical protective clothing with mask (MOPPIV) and worked at low, moderate, or high work loads in simulated desert (hot and dry) or tropic (hot and humid) environments. The psychological instruments indicated greater stress responses for soldiers wearing MOPPIV than wearing MOPPI and for soldiers working at a high work load than working at a low work load. Chemical protective clothing, MOPPIV, Tropics, Desert, Psychological stress, Work load, MOPPI, Stress evaluation.

  2. A Calibrated Maxey-Eakin Curve for the Fenner Basin of the Eastern Mojave Desert, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davisson, M.L.; Rose, T.P.

    2000-05-15

    Metropolitan Water District (MWD) of southern California and Cadiz Inc. investigated the feasibility of storing Colorado River water in groundwater aquifers of the eastern Mojave Desert as a future drought mitigation strategy. This culminated in the public release of the Cadiz Groundwater Storage and Dry-Year Supply program Draft EIR, which included pilot percolation studies, groundwater modeling, and precipitation/runoff analysis in the Fenner groundwater basin, which overlies the proposed storage site. The project proposes to store and withdrawal Colorado River water over a 50-year period, but will not exceed the natural replenishment rates of the groundwater basin. Several independent analyses were conducted to estimate the rates of natural groundwater replenishment to the Fenner Groundwater Basin, which was included in the Draft EIR. The US Geologic Survey, Water Resources Division (WRD) officially submitted comments during public review and concluded that the natural groundwater replenishment rates calculated for the Draft EIR were too high. In the WRD review, they provided a much lower recharge calculation based on a Maxey-Eakin estimation approach. This approach estimates annual precipitation over an entire basin as a function of elevation, followed by calibration against annual recharge rates. Recharge rates are estimated on the basis that some fraction of annual precipitation will recharge, and that fraction will increase with increasing elevation. This results in a hypothetical curve relating annual groundwater recharge to annual precipitation. Field validation of recharge rates is critical in order to establish credibility to any estimate. This is due to the fact that the Maxey-Eakin model is empirical. An empirical model is derived from practical experience rather than basic theory. Therefore, a validated Maxey-Eakin model in one groundwater basin does not translate to a different one. In the WRD's Maxey-Eakin model, they used a curve calibrated against three locations in western Nevada and applied it to the Fenner Basin. It is of particular importance to note that all three of the WRD's location are west of longitude 116{sup o}W, where annual precipitation is significantly lower. Therefore, The WRD's Maxey-Eakin curve was calibrated to a drier climate, and its application to the Fenner Basin lacks credibility.

  3. ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL COLONIZATION OF LARREA TRIDENTATA AND AMBROSIA DUMOSA ROOTS VARIES WITH PRECIPITATION AND SEASON IN THE MOJAVE DESERT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. E. APPLE; C. I. THEE; V. L. SMITH-LONGOZO; C. R. COGAR; C. E. WELLS; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01

    The percentage of fine roots colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi varied with season and with species in the co-dominant shrubs Lurreu tridentutu and Ambrosia dumosu at a site adjacent to the Nevada Desert FACE (Free-Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment) Facility (NDFF) in the Mojave Desert. We excavated downward and outward from the shrub bases in both species to collect and examine fine roots (< 1.0 mm diameter) at monthly intervals throughout 2001 and from October 2002 to September 2003. Fungal structures became visible in cleared roots stained with trypan blue. We quantified the percent colonization of roots by AM fungi via the line intercept method. In both years and for both species, colonization was highest in fall, relatively low in spring when root growth began, increased in late spring, and decreased during summer drought periods. Increases in colonization during summer and fall reflect corresponding increases in precipitation. Spring mycorrhizal colonization is low despite peaks in soil water availability and precipitation, indicating that precipitation is not the only factor influencing mycorrhizal colonization. Because the spring decrease in mycorrhizal colonization occurs when these shrubs initiate a major flush of fine root growth, other phenological events such as competing demands for carbon by fine root initiation, early season shoot growth, and flowering may reduce carbon availability to the fungus, and hence decrease colonization. Another possibility is that root growth exceeds the rate of mycorrhizal colonization.

  4. Regional and local subsidence in Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trahan, D.B.

    1984-01-01

    The measurement of local, man-induced subsidence is especially critical in areas with high rates of land loss. To measure this subsidence, absolute historical geodetic movements have been estimated by adjusting all movements along the first-order vertical control network from northeast to southwest Louisiana as related to the Monroe uplift. The adjustment will serve as a base line by which local subsidence or uplift can be measured. A generalized trend of increasing subsidence to the south in Louisiana probably reflects increasing sediment thickness and weight toward the axis of the Gulf Coast basin. Anomalous values as low as -17.6 mm/y (-0.7 in./y) occur in areas overlying Pleistocene and Holocene fluvial elements. Positive movement as high as +4.1 mm/y (+0.2 in./y), has been found to be associated with the Iberian structural axis in south-central Louisiana. Land subsidence due to natural causes may far outweigh subsidence resulting from fluid withdrawal or depressurization of geopressured aquifers. The effects of regional and local natural processes should not be underestimated in any systematic approach to measuring subsidence.

  5. Draft genome sequence of Streptomyces sp. strain Wb2n-11, a desert isolate with broad-spectrum antagonism against soilborne phytopathogens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koeberl, Martina; White, Richard A.; Erschen, Sabine; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-06

    Streptomyces sp. strain Wb2n-11, isolated from native desert soil, exhibited broad-spectrum antagonism against plant pathogenic fungi, bacteria and nematodes. The 8.2 Mb draft genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol activity and genes which enable the soil bacterium to directly interact beneficially with plants.

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptomyces sp. Strain Wb2n-11, a Desert Isolate with Broad-Spectrum Antagonism against Soilborne Phytopathogens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kberl, Martina; White, Richard A.; Erschen, Sabine; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-06

    Streptomyces sp. strain Wb2n-11, isolated from native desert soil, exhibited broad-spectrum antagonism against plant pathogenic fungi, bacteria, and nematodes. The 8.2-Mb draft genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol activity and genes which enable the soil bacterium to directly interact beneficially with plants.

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptomyces sp. Strain Wb2n-11, a Desert Isolate with Broad-Spectrum Antagonism against Soilborne Phytopathogens

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Köberl, Martina; White, Richard A.; Erschen, Sabine; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-06

    Streptomyces sp. strain Wb2n-11, isolated from native desert soil, exhibited broad-spectrum antagonism against plant pathogenic fungi, bacteria, and nematodes. The 8.2-Mb draft genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol activity and genes which enable the soil bacterium to directly interact beneficially with plants.

  8. Regional Education Partners

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Education Partners Regional Education Partners One of the Laboratory's STEM education objectives is centered on strengthening the future workforce of Northern New Mexico...

  9. David Blackwell’s Forty Years in the Idaho Desert, The Foundation for 21st Century Geothermal Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLing, Travis; McCurry, Mike; Cannon, Cody; Neupane, Ghanashyam; Wood, Thomas; Podgorney, Robert; Welhan, John; Mines, Greg; Mattson, Earl; Wood, Rachel; Palmer, Carl

    2015-04-01

    Dr. David Blackwell has had a profound influence on geo-thermal exploration and R&D in Idaho. Forty years have elapsed since the first Southern Methodist University (SMU) temperature logging truck rolled onto the high desert in Southern Idaho, yet even after so much time has elapsed, most recent and ongoing geothermal R&D can trace its roots to the foundational temperature studies led by Dr. Blackwell. We believe that the best way to honor any scientist is to see their work carried forward by others. As this paper demonstrates, it has been an easy task to find a host of Idaho researchers and students eager to contribute to this tribute paper. We organize this paper by ongoing or recent projects that continue to benefit left to Idaho by Dr. David Blackwell.

  10. Savannah River Region: Transition between the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Plains. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zullo, V.A.; Harris, W.B.; Price, V. [eds.

    1990-12-31

    The focus of the this conference of Coastal Plains geologists was on the Savannah River region of Georgia and South Carolina, and particularly on the geology of the US Department of Energy`s 300 square mile Savannah River Site (SRS) in western South Carolina. Current geological studies indicate that the Mesozoic-Cenozoic section in the Savannah River region is transitional between that of the Gulf Coastal Plain to the southwest and that of the Atlantic Coastal Plain to the northeast. With the transitional aspect of the region as its theme, the first session was devoted to overviews of Cretaceous and Paleogene geology in the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Plains. Succeeding presentations and resulting discussions dealt with more specific problems in structural, lithostratigraphic, hydrological, biostratigraphic, and cyclostratigraphic analysis, and of correlation to standard stratigraphic frameworks. For these conference proceedings, individual papers have been processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

  11. Stratified precambrian rocks (sedimentary?) beneath the midcontinent region of the US. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauser, E.C.

    1993-02-01

    A thick sequence of layered rocks occurs beneath the Phanerozoic platform strata which blanket the US midcontinent. Observed on COCORP deep reflection data in southern Illinois and Indiana and in SW Oklahoma and adjacent Texas, this sequence is locally 1--3 times as thick as the overlying Paleozoic cover, but the origin of this sequence and its ultimate lateral extent are unknown. However, the occurrences of Precambrian layered rocks on both the COCORP profiles and reprocessed industry seismic reflection data from the region lie within regions of generally low amplitude and low frequency aeromagnetic anomaly, suggesting an even greater distribution. Unmetamorphosed Precambrian sedimentary rocks have been recovered from drill holes in southwest Ohio and adjacent northern Kentucky and southwesternmost Indiana. These Precambrian sedimentary rocks lie above and may be part of an underlying package of strongly layered rocks imaged on a short and shallow seismic profile in southwest Ohio. These Precambrian sedimentary rocks were originally viewed as part of a late Precambrian (Keweenawan?) rift; however, in light of Grenville foreland structures seen on the COCORP profile to the north in west central Ohio, these Precambrian strata may (1) be part of a heretofore unrecognized Grenville foreland basin, or (2) indicate that unmetamorphosed Precambrian sedimentary material may be an important constituent of the layered rocks observed on COCORP beneath southern Illinois and Indiana.

  12. Stratified precambrian rocks (sedimentary ) beneath the midcontinent region of the US

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauser, E.C.

    1993-02-01

    A thick sequence of layered rocks occurs beneath the Phanerozoic platform strata which blanket the US midcontinent. Observed on COCORP deep reflection data in southern Illinois and Indiana and in SW Oklahoma and adjacent Texas, this sequence is locally 1--3 times as thick as the overlying Paleozoic cover, but the origin of this sequence and its ultimate lateral extent are unknown. However, the occurrences of Precambrian layered rocks on both the COCORP profiles and reprocessed industry seismic reflection data from the region lie within regions of generally low amplitude and low frequency aeromagnetic anomaly, suggesting an even greater distribution. Unmetamorphosed Precambrian sedimentary rocks have been recovered from drill holes in southwest Ohio and adjacent northern Kentucky and southwesternmost Indiana. These Precambrian sedimentary rocks lie above and may be part of an underlying package of strongly layered rocks imaged on a short and shallow seismic profile in southwest Ohio. These Precambrian sedimentary rocks were originally viewed as part of a late Precambrian (Keweenawan ) rift; however, in light of Grenville foreland structures seen on the COCORP profile to the north in west central Ohio, these Precambrian strata may (1) be part of a heretofore unrecognized Grenville foreland basin, or (2) indicate that unmetamorphosed Precambrian sedimentary material may be an important constituent of the layered rocks observed on COCORP beneath southern Illinois and Indiana.

  13. NASEO Midwest Regional Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) is hosting its Midwest Regional Meeting in Des Moines, Iowa.

  14. Regional Education Partners

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Education Partners Regional Education Partners One of the Laboratory's STEM education objectives is centered on strengthening the future workforce of Northern New Mexico and LANL through effective partnerships with regional secondary and higher education organizations, businesses and industry. Contact Executive Office Director Kathy Keith Community Relations & Partnerships (505) 665-4400 Email Regional Partners Charlie McMillan talking with Rick Ulibarri and Dr. Fries, President of

  15. Impacts of Long-term Drought on Power Systems in the U.S. Southwest ¬タモ July 2012

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Impacts of Long-term Drought on Power Systems in the U.S. Southwest Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electric Delivery and Energy Reliability Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration Division OFFICIAL USE ONLY Outline of Presentation 2 1. Background, Objectives, and Assumptions 2. Methodology and Data 3. Analysis and Results OFFICIAL USE ONLY  DOE-OE has a responsibility to promote a resilient energy infrastructure in which continuity of business and services are

  16. Lineman - Foreman II | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    - Foreman II Lineman - Foreman II Submitted by admin on Sat, 2016-04-16 00:15 Job Summary Organization Name Department Of Energy Agency SubElement Western Area Power Administration Locations Yuma, Arizona Announcement Number WAPA-16-DE-158A Job Summary (See Frequently Asked Questions for more information). Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration Desert Southwest Region Transmission Lines and Substation Maintenance (G5200) 615 S. 43rd Avenue Phoenix, AZ 85009 Duty Location is:

  17. EA-1990: Ridgenose Solar Energy Interconnection Facility, Mohave County, Arizona

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Western Area Power Administration (Desert Southwest Region) is preparing an EA that will assess the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to interconnect the planned Ridgenose Solar Energy Project to Western’s transmission system. Western’s actions could include constructing less than a mile of new transmission line from the solar facility to an existing substation, constructing an interconnection substation, and adding, moving, or modifying structures.

  18. CX-013551: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    26: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-013526: Categorical Exclusion Determination Herbicide Application at 51 Substations Located in Arizona, California, and Nevada CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03/23/2015 Location(s): Multiple Locations Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region Western plans to apply pre-emergent, post-emergent, UV Inhibitor herbicides, which will include spray marking dyes, at 51 substations in Coconino, Cochise, La Paz, Maricopa, Mohave, Navajo

  19. Fossil endocarps of Aralia (Araliaceae) from the upper Pliocene of Yunnan in southwest China, and their biogeographical implications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhu, Hai; Jacques, Frederic M. B.; Wang, Li; Xiao, Xiang -Hui; Huang, Yong -Jiang; Zhou, Zhe -Kun

    2015-10-09

    Aralia stratosa H. Zhu, Y.J. Huang et Z.K. Zhou sp. nov. is described based on fossil endocarps from the upper Pliocene of northwest Yunnan in southwest China. The endocarps are characterized by a semicircular to elliptic outline in the lateral view, an apical beak-like structure bending towards the ventral side, and a transversely wrinkled surface, collectively indicating taxonomical inclusion in the genus Aralia (Araliaceae). The new fossil taxon is compared with nine extant species of Aralia based on endocarp morphology and anatomy, showing the carpological resemblance to A. echinocaulis. Aralia stratosa sp. nov. represents the first confirmed fossil record frommore » lower latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere. This implies a southerly biogeographical range for this genus than was previously interpreted. The fossil record of Aralia suggests a Cretaceous origin in North America and an Eocene dispersal to eastern Asia, likely via the Bering land bridge, followed by Miocene establishment in Europe. The genus likely began to inhabit lower latitudes in eastern Asia no later than the late Pliocene, which is in line with results from molecular analyses. As a result, all these may suggest a southward distributional change probably associated with the global cooling and northern acidification.« less

  20. Regional Economic Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Economic Development Regional Economic Development Supporting companies in every stage of development through access to technology, technical assistance or investment Questions Richard P. Feynman Center for Innovation Regional Programs (505) 665-9090 New Mexico Small Business Assistance Email Venture Acceleration Fund Email DisrupTECH Email SBIR/STTR Email FCI facilitates commercialization in New Mexico to accelerate and enhance our efforts to convert federal and state research

  1. Coal-Producing Region

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . Coal Production by State (thousand short tons) Year to Date Coal-Producing Region and State October - December 2015 July - September 2015 October - December 2014 2015 2014 ...

  2. CEMI Western Regional Summit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please Join Assistant Secretary of Energy Dr. David Danielson for the Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative's Western Regional Summit. Register now for this free event.

  3. ERHIC INTERACTION REGION DESIGN.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MONTAG,C.PARKER,B.PTITSYN,V.TEPIKIAN,S.WANG,D.WANG,F.

    2003-10-13

    This paper presents the current interaction region design status of the ring-ring version of the electron-ion collider eRHIC (release 2.0).

  4. Regional Analysis Briefs

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2028-01-01

    Regional Analysis Briefs (RABs) provide an overview of specific regions that play an important role in world energy markets, either directly or indirectly. These briefs cover areas that are currently major producers (Caspian Sea), have geopolitical importance (South China Sea), or may have future potential as producers or transit areas (East Africa, Eastern Mediterranean).

  5. Reservoir characterization of the Ordovician Red River Formation in southwest Williston Basin Bowman County, ND and Harding County, SD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sippel, M.A.; Luff, K.D.; Hendricks, M.L.; Eby, D.E.

    1998-07-01

    This topical report is a compilation of characterizations by different disciplines of the Red River Formation in the southwest portion of the Williston Basin and the oil reservoirs which it contains in an area which straddles the state line between North Dakota and South Dakota. Goals of the report are to increase understanding of the reservoir rocks, oil-in-place, heterogeneity, and methods for improved recovery. The report is divided by discipline into five major sections: (1) geology, (2) petrography-petrophysical, (3) engineering, (4) case studies and (5) geophysical. Interwoven in these sections are results from demonstration wells which were drilled or selected for special testing to evaluate important concepts for field development and enhanced recovery. The Red River study area has been successfully explored with two-dimensional (2D) seismic. Improved reservoir characterization utilizing 3-dimensional (3D) and has been investigated for identification of structural and stratigraphic reservoir compartments. These seismic characterization tools are integrated with geological and engineering studies. Targeted drilling from predictions using 3D seismic for porosity development were successful in developing significant reserves at close distances to old wells. Short-lateral and horizontal drilling technologies were tested for improved completion efficiency. Lateral completions should improve economics for both primary and secondary recovery where low permeability is a problem and higher density drilling is limited by drilling cost. Low water injectivity and widely spaced wells have restricted the application of waterflooding in the past. Water injection tests were performed in both a vertical and a horizontal well. Data from these tests were used to predict long-term injection and oil recovery.

  6. Nitrogen control of 13C enrichment in heterotrophic organs relative to leaves in a landscape-building desert plant species

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, J.; Gu, L.; Bao, F.; Cao, Y.; Hao, Y.; He, J.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Ren, Y.; Wang, F.; et al

    2014-09-10

    A longstanding puzzle in isotope studies of C3 plant species is that heterotrophic plant organs (e.g., stems, roots, seeds, and fruits) tend to be enriched in 13C compared to the autotrophic organ (leaves) that provides them with photosynthate. Our inability to explain this puzzle suggests key deficiencies in understanding post-photosynthetic metabolic processes. It also limits the effectiveness of applications of stable carbon isotope analyses in a variety of scientific disciplines ranging from plant physiology to global carbon cycle studies. To gain insight into this puzzle, we excavated whole plant architectures of Nitraria tangutorum Bobrov, a C3 species that has anmore » exceptional capability of fixing sands and building sand dunes, in two deserts in northwestern China. We systematically and simultaneously measured carbon isotope ratios and nitrogen and phosphorous contents of different parts of the excavated plants. We also determined the seasonal variations in leaf carbon isotope ratios on nearby intact plants of N. tangutorum. We found, for the first time, that higher nitrogen contents in heterotrophic organs were significantly correlated with increased heterotrophic 13C enrichment compared to leaves. However, phosphorous contents had no effect on the enrichment. In addition, new leaves had carbon isotope ratios similar to roots but were progressively depleted in 13C as they matured. We concluded that a nitrogen-mediated process, probably the refixation of respiratory CO2 by phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase, was responsible for the differences in 13C enrichment among different heterotrophic organs while processes within leaves or during phloem loading may contribute to the overall autotrophic – heterotrophic difference in carbon isotope compositions.« less

  7. Nitrogen control of 13C enrichment in heterotrophic organs relative to leaves in a landscape-building desert plant species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jinxin [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    A longstanding puzzle in isotopic studies of C3 plant species is that heterotrophic plant organs (e.g., stems, roots, seeds, and fruits) tend to be enriched in 13C compared to the autotrophic organ (leaves) that provides them with photosynthate. Our inability to explain this puzzle suggests key deficiencies in understanding post-photosynthetic metabolic processes. It also limits the effectiveness of applications of stable carbon isotope analyses in a variety of scientific disciplines ranging from plant physiology to global carbon cycle studies. To gain insight into this puzzle, we excavated whole plant architectures of Nitraria tangutorum Bobrov, a C3 species that has an exceptional capability of fixing sands and building sand dunes, in two deserts in northwestern China. We systematically and simultaneously measured carbon isotopic ratios and nitrogen and phosphorous concentrations of different parts of the excavated plants. We also determined the seasonal variations in leaf carbon isotopic ratios on nearby intact plants of N. tangutorum. We found that higher nitrogen concentrations in heterotrophic organs were significantly correlated with increased heterotrophic 13C enrichment compared to leaves. However, phosphorous concentrations had no effect on the enrichment. In addition, new leaves had carbon isotopic ratios similar to roots but were progressively depleted in 13C as they matured. We concluded that a nitrogen-mediated process, probably the refixation of respiratory CO2 by phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase, was responsible for the differences in 13C enrichment among different heterotrophic organs while processes within leaves or during phloem loading may contribute to the overall autotrophic heterotrophic difference in carbon isotopic compositions.

  8. Regional Workforce Study - SRSCRO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Workforce Study Regional employers will need to fill more than 30,000 job openings over the next five years in the five-county region of South Carolina and Georgia represented by the SRS Community Reuse Organization (SRSCRO). That is a key finding of a new study released on April 22, 2015. TIP Strategies, an Austin, Texas-based economic consulting firm, performed the study for the SRSCRO by examining workforce trends in the five counties the SRSCRO represents - Aiken, Allendale and

  9. Regional Science Bowl

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January » Regional Science Bowl Regional Science Bowl WHEN: Jan 23, 2016 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM WHERE: Highland High School 4700 Coal SE, Albuquerque, NM CONTACT: Janelle Vigil-Maestas (505) 665-4329 CATEGORY: Community INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description Five teams from Northern New Mexico area schools are among 16 participating in the middle school Regional Science Bowl competition. Northern area teams participating are from Los Alamos, Española, Cuba and Santa Fe. The winning team at this

  10. Delineating coal market regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, B.D.; Pyrdol, J.J.

    1986-04-01

    This study addresses the delineation of US coal market regions and their evolution since the 1973 Arab oil embargo. Dichotomizing into compliance (low sulfur) and high sulfur coal deliveries, market regions are generated for 1973, 1977, and 1983. Focus is restricted to steam coal shipments to electric utilities, which currently account for over 80% of the total domestic market. A two-stage method is used. First, cluster analyses are performed on the origin-destination shipments data to generate baseline regions. This is followed by multiple regression analyses on CIF delivered price data for 1983. Sensitivity analysis on the configuration of the regions is also conducted, and some thoughts on the behavior of coal markets conclude the paper. 37 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  11. Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has created a network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) to help develop the technology, infrastructure, and regulations to implement large-scale CO2 storage (also...

  12. Regional companies eye growth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional companies eye growth Regional companies eye growth Adaptive Radio Technologies, Los Alamos Visualization Associates, Mesa Tech International Inc., and ThermaSun Inc. were awarded from the Venture Acceleration Fund. August 21, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new

  13. INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE FOCUSED FEASIBILITY STUDY AND PROPOSED PLAN FOR DESIGNATED SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT UNITS CONTRIBUTING TO THE SOUTHWEST GROUNDWATER PLUME AT THE PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.; Amidon, M.; Rossabi, J.; Stewart, L.

    2011-05-31

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently developing a Proposed Plan (PP) for remediation of designated sources of chlorinated solvents that contribute contamination to the Southwest (SW) Groundwater Plume at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), in Paducah, KY. The principal contaminants in the SW Plume are trichloroethene (TCE) and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs); these industrial solvents were used and disposed in various facilities and locations at PGDP. In the SW plume area, residual TCE sources are primarily in the fine-grained sediments of the Upper Continental Recharge System (UCRS), a partially saturated zone that delivers contaminants downward into the coarse-grained Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA). The RGA serves as the significant lateral groundwater transport pathway for the plume. In the SW Plume area, the four main contributing TCE source units are: (1) Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) 1 / Oil Landfarm; (2) C-720 Building TCE Northeast Spill Site (SWMU 211A); (3) C-720 Building TCE Southeast Spill Site (SWMU 211B); and (4) C-747 Contaminated Burial Yard (SWMU 4). The PP presents the Preferred Alternatives for remediation of VOCs in the UCRS at the Oil Landfarm and the C-720 Building spill sites. The basis for the PP is documented in a Focused Feasibility Study (FFS) (DOE, 2011) and a Site Investigation Report (SI) (DOE, 2007). The SW plume is currently within the boundaries of PGDP (i.e., does not extend off-site). Nonetheless, reasonable mitigation of the multiple contaminant sources contributing to the SW plume is one of the necessary components identified in the PGDP End State Vision (DOE, 2005). Because of the importance of the proposed actions DOE assembled an Independent Technical Review (ITR) team to provide input and assistance in finalizing the PP.

  14. Northeast Regional Biomass Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lusk, P.D.

    1992-12-01

    The Northeast Regional Biomass Program has been in operation for a period of nine years. During this time, state managed programs and technical programs have been conducted covering a wide range of activities primarily aim at the use and applications of wood as a fuel. These activities include: assessments of available biomass resources; surveys to determine what industries, businesses, institutions, and utility companies use wood and wood waste for fuel; and workshops, seminars, and demonstrations to provide technical assistance. In the Northeast, an estimated 6.2 million tons of wood are used in the commercial and industrial sector, where 12.5 million cords are used for residential heating annually. Of this useage, 1504.7 mw of power has been generated from biomass. The use of wood energy products has had substantial employment and income benefits in the region. Although wood and woodwaste have received primary emphasis in the regional program, the use of municipal solid waste has received increased emphasis as an energy source. The energy contribution of biomass will increase as potentia users become more familiar with existing feedstocks, technologies, and applications. The Northeast Regional Biomass Program is designed to support region-specific to overcome near-term barriers to biomass energy use.

  15. NV PFA Regional Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Faulds

    2015-10-28

    This project focused on defining geothermal play fairways and development of a detailed geothermal potential map of a large transect across the Great Basin region (96,000 km2), with the primary objective of facilitating discovery of commercial-grade, blind geothermal fields (i.e. systems with no surface hot springs or fumaroles) and thereby accelerating geothermal development in this promising region. Data included in this submission consists of: structural settings (target areas, recency of faulting, slip and dilation potential, slip rates, quality), regional-scale strain rates, earthquake density and magnitude, gravity data, temperature at 3 km depth, permeability models, favorability models, degree of exploration and exploration opportunities, data from springs and wells, transmission lines and wilderness areas, and published maps and theses for the Nevada Play Fairway area.

  16. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: The Nevada Test Site Development Corporations's Desert Rock Sky Park at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2000-03-01

    The United States Department of Energy has prepared an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1300) (EA) which analyzes the potential environmental effects of developing operating and maintaining a commercial/industrial park in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site, between Mercury Camp and U.S. Highway 95 and east of Desert Rock Airport. The EA evaluates the potential impacts of infrastructure improvements necessary to support fill build out of the 512-acre Desert Rock Sky Park. Two alternative actions were evaluated: (1) Develop, operate and maintain a commercial/industrial park in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site, and (2) taking no action. The purpose and need for the commercial industrial park are addressed in Section 1.0 of the EA. A detailed description of the proposed action and alternatives is in section 2.0. Section 3.0 describes the affected environment. Section 4.0 the environmental consequences of the proposed action and alternative. Cumulative effects are addressed in Section 5.0. Mitigation measures are addressed in Section 6.0. The Department of Energy determined that the proposed action of developing, operating and maintaining a commercial/industrial park in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site would best meet the needs of the agency.

  17. MIE Regional Climate Change Impact Webinar Series: Northwest

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Minorities in Energy Initiative is hosting a webinar on Southwest impacts of climate change on minority and tribal communities featuring presentations by nationally recognized policymakers, researchers, and educators.

  18. MIE Regional Climate Change Impact Webinar Series: Northwest

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Minorities in Energy Initiative is hosting a webinar on Southwest impacts of climate change on minority and tribal communities featuring presentations by...

  19. Operation Clean Desert

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  20. DESERT RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    CIRCULAR 1 2 CENTER FOR WATER R E S ~ U R C E ~ REHiARCH GROUND-WATER SERIES C - 1 GEOHYDROLOGIC DATA FROM THE PICEANCE CREEK B A S I N BETWEEN THE WHITE AND COLQRAD.0 RIVERS, NORTHWESTERN COLORADO D . L. C o f f i n , F . A. W e l d e r , R . K. G l a n z m a n , and X. W. D u t t o n U n i t e d S t a t e s G e o l o g i c a l Survey Prepared by T h e U n i t e d S t a t e s G e o l o g i c a l Survey i n c o o p e r a t i o n w i t h . 1 he C o l o r a . d o W a . t e r C o n s e r v a t i o

  1. Desert Peak EGS Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    eere.energy.gov Project ManagementCoordination * Coordination with Ormat's existing ... 68 MEQ events located in "Target Area" * Event locations consistent with stress- field ...

  2. Regions for Select Spot Prices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are used to represent the following regions: Region Gas Point Used Power Point Used New England Algonquin Citygate Massachusetts Hub (ISONE) New York City Transco Zone 6-NY...

  3. Introduction: Regional Dialogue Contract Templates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Introduction: Regional Dialogue Contract Templates October 17, 2007 1. Summary * BPA invites comments on the first draft of the Regional Dialogue Master Template by Friday,...

  4. Regional Shelter Analysis Methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillon, Michael B.; Dennison, Deborah; Kane, Jave; Walker, Hoyt; Miller, Paul

    2015-08-01

    The fallout from a nuclear explosion has the potential to injure or kill 100,000 or more people through exposure to external gamma (fallout) radiation. Existing buildings can reduce radiation exposure by placing material between fallout particles and exposed people. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was tasked with developing an operationally feasible methodology that could improve fallout casualty estimates. The methodology, called a Regional Shelter Analysis, combines the fallout protection that existing buildings provide civilian populations with the distribution of people in various locations. The Regional Shelter Analysis method allows the consideration of (a) multiple building types and locations within buildings, (b) country specific estimates, (c) population posture (e.g., unwarned vs. minimally warned), and (d) the time of day (e.g., night vs. day). The protection estimates can be combined with fallout predictions (or measurements) to (a) provide a more accurate assessment of exposure and injury and (b) evaluate the effectiveness of various casualty mitigation strategies. This report describes the Regional Shelter Analysis methodology, highlights key operational aspects (including demonstrating that the methodology is compatible with current tools), illustrates how to implement the methodology, and provides suggestions for future work.

  5. Colorado Regional Faults

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Originator: Colorado Geological Survey (CGS) Publication Date: 2012 Title: Regional Faults Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science, University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the regional faults of Colorado Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4543192.100000 m Left: 144385.020000 m Right: 754585.020000 m Bottom: 4094592.100000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  6. Paint Rock and southwest Paint Rock fields, Concho County, Texas: Strawn analogs of modern island carbonate facies of Ambergris Cay, Belize

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, A.M.; Mazzullo, S.J.

    1987-02-01

    Lower Strawn (Desmoinesian Goen Limestone) reservoirs at Paint Rock and Southwest Paint Rock fields are a complex of carbonate and associated facies interpreted as having been deposited in various environments on and around large, emergent islands on shallow carbonate shelves. The origin and geometries of the component lithofacies in these fields, and their reservoir diagenetic histories, are similar to those presently accumulating on Ambergris Cay, a linear island complex on the northern shelf of Belize. Paint Rock field originated as a narrow, elongate Chaetetes reef trend that formed the foundation on which the overlying island facies were deposited. As on Ambergris Cay, these reef limestones developed extensive porosity during postdepositional subaerial exposure due to meteoric leaching. In contrast, Southwest Paint Rock field is cored by older island deposits rather than reef limestones. With ensuing stillstand or subsequent sea level rise, beach grainstones were deposited along the windward and leeward margins of the foundation highs in these fields. Tight lagoonal micrites and coals (peat-swamp facies) comprise the inner island facies, and are locally associated with porous supratidal dolomites. These island complexes are transected locally by tidal channels that are filled with nonporous micrites. Repeated sea level fluctuations during the history of these fields resulted in a characteristic cyclic stratigraphy of stacked island facies and reservoirs. The reservoirs in the field are developed in the bedrock or older island cores, as well as in the overlying beach facies and supratidal dolomites. These fields are mappable as linear stratigraphic traps with low-relief closure, and are readily identified by subsurface geologic and facies analyses. Similar shelf island-type fields analogous to these strawn and Holocene Belizean examples are found throughout the Midland basin and Eastern shelf.

  7. SEASONALITY OF ANNUAL PLANT ESTABLISHMENT INFLUENCES THE INTERACTIONBETWEEN THE NON-NATIVE ANNUAL GRASS BROMUS MADRITENSIS SSP. RUBENS AND MOJAVE DESERT PERENNIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L A. DEFALCO; G. C. FERNANDEZ; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01

    Competition between native and non-native species can change the composition and structure of plant communities, but in deserts the timing of non-native plant establishment can modulate their impacts to native species. In a field experiment, we varied densities of the non-native annual grass Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens around individuals of three native perennials--Larrea iridentata, Achnatherum hymenoides, and Pleuraphis rigida--in either winter or spring. Additional plots were prepared for the Same perennial species and seasons, but with a mixture of native annual species. Relative growth rates of perennial shoots (RGRs) declined with increasing Bromus biomass when Bromus that was established in winter had 2-3 mo of growth and high water use before perennial growth began. However, this high water use did not significantly reduce water potentials for the perennials, suggesting Bromus that established earlier depleted other soil resources, such as N, otherwise used by perennial plants. Spring-established Bromus had low biomass even at higher densities and did not effectively reduce RGRs, resulting in an overall lower impact to perennials than when Bromus was established in winter. Similarly, growth and reproduction of perennials with mixed annuals as neighbors did not differ from those with Bromus neighbors of equivalent biomass, but densities of these annuals did not support the high biomass necessary to reduce perennial growth. Thus, impacts of native Mojave Desert annuals to perennials are expected to be lower than those of Bromus because seed dormancy and narrow requirements for seedling survivorship produce densities and biomass lower than those achieved by Bromus. In comparing the effects of Bromus among perennial species, the impact of increased Bromus biomass on RGR was lower for Larrea than for the two perennial grasses, probably because Lurrea maintains low growth rates throughout the year, even after Bromus has completed its life cycle. This contrasts with the perennial grasses, whose phenology overlaps completely with (Achnatherum) or closely follows (Pleuraphis) that of Bromus.

  8. Strengthening regional safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palhares, L.; Almeida, G.; Mafra, O.

    1996-08-01

    Nuclear cooperation between Argentina and Brazil has been growing since the early 1980`s and as it grew, so did cooperation with the US Department of Energy (DOE). The Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials (ABACC) was formed in December 1991 to operate the Common System of Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials (SCCC). In April 1994, ABACC and the DOE signed an Agreement of Cooperation in nuclear material safeguards. This cooperation has included training safeguards inspectors, exchanging nuclear material measurement and containment and surveillance technology, characterizing reference materials, and studying enrichment plant safeguards. The goal of the collaboration is to exchange technology, evaluate new technology in Latin American nuclear facilities, and strengthen regional safeguards. This paper describes the history of the cooperation, its recent activities, and future projects. The cooperation is strongly supported by all three governments: the Republics of Argentina and Brazil and the United States.

  9. REGIONAL PARTNERSHIPSThe Pioneer Regional Partnerships are early-stage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    REGIONAL PARTNERSHIPSThe Pioneer Regional Partnerships are early-stage public/private collaborative projects that address specific near-term grid modernization issues important to the identified region and its stakeholders. The Grid Modernization Laboratory Consortium (GMLC) has initiated 11 proposed partnerships to accomplish the following:Address a key state/regional grid modernization challenge that is visible and important to local industry and government stakeholders.Engage collaboration

  10. Lithologic descriptions and temperature profiles of five wells in the southwestern Valles caldera region, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shevenell, L.; Goff, F.; Miles, D.; Waibel, A.; Swanberg, C.

    1988-01-01

    The subsurface stratigraphy and temperature profiles of the southern and western Valles caldera region have been well constrained with the use of data from the VC-1, AET-4, WC 23-4, PC-1 and PC-2 wells. Data from these wells indicate that thermal gradients west of the caldera margin are between 110 and 140)degrees)C/km, with a maximum gradient occurring in the bottom of PC-1 equal to 240)degrees)C/km as a result of thermal fluid flow. Gradients within the caldera reach a maximum of 350)degrees)C/km, while the maximum thermal gradient measured southwest of the caldera in the thermal outflow plume is 140)degrees)C/km. The five wells exhibit high thermal gradients (>60)deghrees)C/km) resulting from high conductive heat flow associated with the Rio Grande rift and volcanism in the Valles caldera, as well as high convective heat flow associated with circulating geothermal fluids. Gamma logs run in four of the five wells appear to be of limited use for stratigraphic correlations in the caldera region. However, stratigraphic and temperature data from the five wells provide information about the structure and thermal regime of the southern and western Valles caldera region. 29 refs., 9 figs. 2 tabs.

  11. Fossil endocarps of Aralia (Araliaceae) from the upper Pliocene of Yunnan in southwest China, and their biogeographical implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Hai; Jacques, Frederic M. B.; Wang, Li; Xiao, Xiang -Hui; Huang, Yong -Jiang; Zhou, Zhe -Kun

    2015-10-09

    Aralia stratosa H. Zhu, Y.J. Huang et Z.K. Zhou sp. nov. is described based on fossil endocarps from the upper Pliocene of northwest Yunnan in southwest China. The endocarps are characterized by a semicircular to elliptic outline in the lateral view, an apical beak-like structure bending towards the ventral side, and a transversely wrinkled surface, collectively indicating taxonomical inclusion in the genus Aralia (Araliaceae). The new fossil taxon is compared with nine extant species of Aralia based on endocarp morphology and anatomy, showing the carpological resemblance to A. echinocaulis. Aralia stratosa sp. nov. represents the first confirmed fossil record from lower latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere. This implies a southerly biogeographical range for this genus than was previously interpreted. The fossil record of Aralia suggests a Cretaceous origin in North America and an Eocene dispersal to eastern Asia, likely via the Bering land bridge, followed by Miocene establishment in Europe. The genus likely began to inhabit lower latitudes in eastern Asia no later than the late Pliocene, which is in line with results from molecular analyses. As a result, all these may suggest a southward distributional change probably associated with the global cooling and northern acidification.

  12. Regional Partnerships | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Finally, these projects will demonstrate that the projects are representative of the regional geology to store large volumes of CO2 emissions generated from major point sources. ...

  13. " Level: National Data and Regional...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" ...

  14. " Level: National Data and Regional...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; " " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment ...

  15. " Level: National Data and Regional...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; " " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " ...

  16. " Level: National Data and Regional...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment ...

  17. Regional Networks for Energy Efficiency

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Sustainability Peer Exchange Call: Regional Networks for Energy Efficiency, call slides and discussion summary, December 6, 2012.

  18. TWO PLANETARY COMPANIONS AROUND THE K7 DWARF GJ 221: A HOT SUPER-EARTH AND A CANDIDATE IN THE SUB-SATURN DESERT RANGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arriagada, Pamela; Minniti, Dante; Anglada-Escude, Guillem; Butler, R. Paul; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Thompson, Ian; Wende, Sebastian

    2013-07-01

    We report two low-mass companions orbiting the nearby K7 dwarf GJ 221 that have emerged from reanalyzing 4.4 yr of publicly available HARPS spectra complemented with 2 years of high-precision Doppler measurements with Magellan/PFS. The HARPS measurements alone contain the clear signal of a low-mass companion with a period of 125 days and a minimum mass of 53.2 M{sub Circled-Plus} (GJ 221b), falling in a mass range where very few planet candidates have been found (sub-Saturn desert). The addition of 17 PFS observations allows the confident detection of a second low-mass companion (6.5 M{sub Circled-Plus }) in a hot orbit (3.87 day period, GJ 221c). Spectroscopic and photometric calibrations suggest that GJ 221 is slightly depleted ([Fe/H] {approx} -0.1) compared to the Sun, so the presence of two low-mass companions in the system confirms the trend that slightly reduced stellar metallicity does not prevent the formation of planets in the super-Earth to sub-Saturn mass regime.

  19. EWONAP Training and Regional Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Native Learning Center is pleased to announce the 2016 Eastern Woodlands ONAP Training and Regional Meeting taking place in our newly renovated training facility in Hollywood, FL. This three-day interactive training is designed to address Tribal Housing needs identified throughout the Eastern Woodlands region.

  20. USDA Regional Conservation Partnership Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture is accepting applications for the Regional Conservation Partnership Program to identify and address natural resource objectives in balance with operational goals in order to benefit soil, water, wildlife, and related natural resources locally, regionally, and nationally.

  1. Figure 1. Census Regions and Divisions

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee Region 5 Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, Wisconsin Region 6 Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas Region 7 ...

  2. Regional Energy Efficiency Programs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Regional Energy Efficiency Programs Regional Energy Efficiency Programs This presentation covers regional industrial energy efficiency programs in the Midwest, Southeast, and ...

  3. Regional Climate Change Webinar Presentation | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Regional Climate Change Webinar presentation dated August 6, 2015. Regional Climate Change Webinar Presentation More Documents & Publications Regional Climate Change Webinar...

  4. Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Region (Finn & Morgan, 2002) Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Goff & Janik, 2002) Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Hurwitz, Et Al.,...

  5. Regional

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 AÇORIANO ORIENTAL SEGUNDA-FEIRA, 5 DE MARÇO DE 2012 PUB Da Graciosa para a Índia graças à estação atmosférica Carlos está atualmente a trabalhar na estação atmosférica móvel instalada na Índia, a dois mil metros de altitude Estar no lugar certo na hora cer- ta pode mudar radicalmente a vida de uma pessoa. Foi isso que aconteceu ao graciosense Carlos Sousa, de 41 anos, que começou por ser trabalhador daconstrução civil antes de emigrar para os Es- tados Unidos da América. No

  6. More Regional Science Bowl Winners

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    By March 25, 2011, thousands of students will have competed in more than 100 regional science bowl contests throughout the country, and then the winning schools will compete in DC this spring for the national championship.

  7. 2015 NHA Alaska Regional Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Register today and join industry professionals for interactive discussions covering a variety of regional topics and a tour of the Eklutna lake Project.

  8. Geothermal Regions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    groundwater flow), and other relevant factors. The 21 regions can be seen outlined in red and overlain on the 2008 USGS Geothermal Favorability Map in Figure 1.1 Add a new...

  9. Regional Small Business Summit Material

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Instead of holding a single national conference, we're spreading out across the country, partnering with our National Laboratories and field sites to bring Regional Small Business Summits to you....

  10. RAFT Regional Algal Feedstock Testbed

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 3B—Integration of Supply Chains III: Algal Biofuels Strategy RAFT Regional Algal Feedstock Testbed Kimberly Ogden, Professor, University of Arizona, Engineering Technical Lead, National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts

  11. CX-007131: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007131: Categorical Exclusion Determination Casa Grande-Empire Double Circuit Upgrade and Structure Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03/08/2011 Location(s): Pinal County, Arizona Office(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region Western proposes to replace structures and upgrade to a double circuit 230- kilovolt (kV) transmission line on its Casa Grande-Empire 115-kV transmission line, from Thornton Road to its Empire Substation,

  12. CX-007172: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    72: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007172: Categorical Exclusion Determination Tucson-Apache Erosion Repair & Cactus Relocation CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 02/23/2011 Location(s): Pima County, Arizona Office(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region Western proposes to construct a new access road along the existing Tucson-Apache 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line within the existing right-of-way and to repair erosion damage at transmission line structures. Access

  13. WINDExchange: About Regional Resource Centers

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    Deployment Activities Printable Version Bookmark and Share Regional Resource Centers About Economic Development Siting About Regional Resource Centers Significant expansion of wind energy deployment will be required to achieve the President's goal of doubling renewable energy production in the United States by 2020. Wind energy currently provides more than 4% of the nation's electricity but has the potential to provide much more. Increasing the country's percentage from wind power will mean

  14. Nitrogen control of 13C enrichment in heterotrophic organs relative to leaves in a landscape-building desert plant species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, J.; Gu, L.; Bao, F.; Cao, Y.; Hao, Y.; He, J.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Ren, Y.; Wang, F.; Wu, R.; Yao, B.; Zhao, Y.; Lin, G.; Wu, B.; Lu, Q.; Meng, P.

    2014-09-10

    A longstanding puzzle in isotope studies of C3 plant species is that heterotrophic plant organs (e.g., stems, roots, seeds, and fruits) tend to be enriched in 13C compared to the autotrophic organ (leaves) that provides them with photosynthate. Our inability to explain this puzzle suggests key deficiencies in understanding post-photosynthetic metabolic processes. It also limits the effectiveness of applications of stable carbon isotope analyses in a variety of scientific disciplines ranging from plant physiology to global carbon cycle studies. To gain insight into this puzzle, we excavated whole plant architectures of Nitraria tangutorum Bobrov, a C3 species that has an exceptional capability of fixing sands and building sand dunes, in two deserts in northwestern China. We systematically and simultaneously measured carbon isotope ratios and nitrogen and phosphorous contents of different parts of the excavated plants. We also determined the seasonal variations in leaf carbon isotope ratios on nearby intact plants of N. tangutorum. We found, for the first time, that higher nitrogen contents in heterotrophic organs were significantly correlated with increased heterotrophic 13C enrichment compared to leaves. However, phosphorous contents had no effect on the enrichment. In addition, new leaves had carbon isotope ratios similar to roots but were progressively depleted in 13C as they matured. We concluded that a nitrogen-mediated process, probably the refixation of respiratory CO2 by phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase, was responsible for the differences in 13C enrichment among different heterotrophic organs while processes within leaves or during phloem loading may contribute to the overall autotrophic – heterotrophic difference in carbon isotope compositions.

  15. Regional Transmission Projects: Finding Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The Keystone Center

    2005-06-15

    The Keystone Center convened and facilitated a year-long Dialogue on "Regional Transmission Projects: Finding Solutions" to develop recommendations that will help address the difficult and contentious issues related to expansions of regional electric transmission systems that are needed for reliable and economic transmission of power within and across regions. This effort brought together a cross-section of affected stakeholders and thought leaders to address the problem with the collective wisdom of their experience and interests. Transmission owners sat at the table with consumer advocates and environmental organizations. Representatives from regional transmission organizations exchanged ideas with state and federal regulators. Generation developers explored common interests with public power suppliers. Together, the Dialogue participants developed consensus solutions about how to begin unraveling some of the more intractable issues surrounding identification of need, allocation of costs, and reaching consensus on siting issues that can frustrate the development of regional transmission infrastructure. The recommendations fall into three broad categories: 1. Recommendations on appropriate institutional arrangements and processes for achieving regional consensus on the need for new or expanded transmission infrastructure 2. Recommendations on the process for siting of transmission lines 3. Recommendations on the tools needed to support regional planning, cost allocation, and siting efforts. List of Dialogue participants: List of Dialogue Participants: American Electric Power American Transmission Company American Wind Energy Association California ISO Calpine Corporation Cinergy Edison Electric Institute Environmental Defense Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Great River Energy International Transmission Company ISO-New England Iowa Public Utility Board Kanner & Associates Midwest ISO National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners National Association of State Utility Consumer Advocates National Grid Northeast Utilities PA Office of Consumer Advocates Pacific Gas & Electric Corporation Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission PJM Interconnection The Electricity Consumers Resource Council U.S. Department of Energy US Department of the Interior Van Ness Feldman Western Interstate Energy Board Wind on the Wires Wisconsin Public Service Commission Xcel Energy

  16. Hierarchical probabilistic regionalization of volcanism for Sengan region, Japan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balasingam, Pirahas; Park, Jinyong; McKenna, Sean Andrew; Kulatilake, Pinnaduwa H. S. W.

    2005-03-01

    A 1 km square regular grid system created on the Universal Transverse Mercator zone 54 projected coordinate system is used to work with volcanism related data for Sengan region. The following geologic variables were determined as the most important for identifying volcanism: geothermal gradient, groundwater temperature, heat discharge, groundwater pH value, presence of volcanic rocks and presence of hydrothermal alteration. Data available for each of these important geologic variables were used to perform directional variogram modeling and kriging to estimate geologic variable vectors at each of the 23949 centers of the chosen 1 km cell grid system. Cluster analysis was performed on the 23949 complete variable vectors to classify each center of 1 km cell into one of five different statistically homogeneous groups with respect to potential volcanism spanning from lowest possible volcanism to highest possible volcanism with increasing group number. A discriminant analysis incorporating Bayes theorem was performed to construct maps showing the probability of group membership for each of the volcanism groups. The said maps showed good comparisons with the recorded locations of volcanism within the Sengan region. No volcanic data were found to exist in the group 1 region. The high probability areas within group 1 have the chance of being the no volcanism region. Entropy of classification is calculated to assess the uncertainty of the allocation process of each 1 km cell center location based on the calculated probabilities. The recorded volcanism data are also plotted on the entropy map to examine the uncertainty level of the estimations at the locations where volcanism exists. The volcanic data cell locations that are in the high volcanism regions (groups 4 and 5) showed relatively low mapping estimation uncertainty. On the other hand, the volcanic data cell locations that are in the low volcanism region (group 2) showed relatively high mapping estimation uncertainty. The volcanic data cell locations that are in the medium volcanism region (group 3) showed relatively moderate mapping estimation uncertainty. Areas of high uncertainty provide locations where additional site characterization resources can be spent most effectively. The new data collected can be added to the existing database to perform future regionalized mapping and reduce the uncertainty level of the existing estimations.

  17. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    cents on the week to yesterday's price of 6.76 per MMBtu. Temperatures along the Gulf of Mexico and in the desert Southwest tended to be more seasonable, keeping average price...

  18. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    cents on the week to yesterday's price of 6.76 per MMBtu. Temperatures along the Gulf of Mexico and in the desert Southwest tended to be more seasonable, keeping average price...

  19. Special Inquiry: OAS-SR-11-01 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SR-11-01 Special Inquiry: OAS-SR-11-01 May 18, 2011 Allegations Regarding Western Area Power Administration's Desert Southwest Reigon The U.S. Office of Special Counsel requested...

  20. SunPeak Solar LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: SunPeak Solar LLC Place: Palm Desert, California Zip: 92260 Product: US project developer and asset manager, focussing on PV projects in the south-west....

  1. Collaboration and Communication: DOE and Navajo Nation Tour Uranium...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in the use of technical approaches for controlling and mitigating erosion. Due to the geology of the desert southwest, where many LM disposal sites are located, and the area's...

  2. Impact of external industrial sources on the regional and local SO? and O? levels of the Mexico megacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Almanza, V. H.; Molina, Luisa T.; Li, Guohui; Fast, Jerome D.; Sosa, G.

    2014-08-22

    The air quality of megacities can be influenced by external emissions sources on both global and regional scale, and at the same time their outflow emissions can exert an important impact to the surrounding environment. The present study evaluates an SO? peak observed on 24 March 2006 at the suburban supersite T1 and ambient air quality monitoring stations located in the north region of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) during MILAGRO campaign. We found that this peak could be related to an important episodic emission event from Tizayuca region, northeast of the MCMA. Back trajectories analyses suggest that the emission event started in the early morning at 10 04:00 LST and lasted for about 9 h. The estimated emission rate is noticeably high, about 2 kgs-. This finding suggests the possibility of "overlooked"emission sources in this region that could influence the air quality of the MCMA. This further motivated us to study the cement plants, including those in the State of Hidalgo and in the State of Mexico, and we found that they can contribute in the NE region of the basin (about 15 41.7%), at the suburban supersite T1 (41.23%) and at some monitoring stations their contribution can be even higher than from the Tula Industrial Complex. The contribution of Tula Industrial Complex to regional ozone levels is estimated. The model suggests low contribution to the MCMA (1 ppb to 4 ppb) and slightly higher at the suburban T1 (6 ppb) and rural T2 (5 ppb) supersites. However, the contribution could be 20 as high as 10 ppb in the upper northwest region of the basin and in the southwest and south-southeast regions of State of Hidalgo. In addition, a first estimate of the potential contribution from flaring activities to regional ozone levels is presented. Emission rates are estimated with a CFD combustion model. Results suggest that up to 30% of the total regional ozone from TIC could be related to flaring activities. 25 Finally, the influence in SO? levels from technological changes in the existing refinery is briefly discussed. These changes are due to the upcoming construction of a new refinery in Tula. The combination of emission reductions in the power plant, the refinery and in local sources in the MCMA could result in higher reductions on the average SO? 26580 Discussion Paper | Discussion Paper | Discussion Paper | Discussion Paper | concentration. Reductions in external sources tend to affect more the northern part of the basin (-16.35% to -45.58%), whilst reductions of urban sources in the megacity tend to diminish SO? levels substantially in the central, southwest, and southeast regions (-30.71% to -49.75%).

  3. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Regional Definitions

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Definitions Map About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Regional Definitions The regions defined in the above map are based upon the 10 Federal Regions of the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. The State groupings are as follows: Northeast Region - Federal Region 1: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. Federal Region 2: New Jersey, and New York. Federal Region 3:Delaware, District of

  4. Groundwater in the Regional Aquifer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Groundwater in the Regional Aquifer Groundwater in the Regional Aquifer LANL maintains an extensive groundwater monitoring and surveillance program through sampling. August 1, 2013 Conceptual model of water movement and geology at Los Alamos National Laboratory Conceptual model of water movement and geology at Los Alamos National Laboratory RELATED IMAGES http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3749/9827580556_473a91fd78_t.jpg Enlarge http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2856/9804364405_b25f74cbb2_t.jpg En

  5. Sunzia Southwest | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and permits for construction activities would be obtained. Open burning of construction trash would not be allowed unless permitted by appropriate authorities. Cultural Resources...

  6. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    - The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527 representative of the region. Results: The results of our slip and dilation tendency analysis are shown in Figures 4 (dilation tendency), 5 (slip tendency) and 6 (slip tendency + dilation tendency). Shmin varies from northwest to east?west trending throughout much of the Great Basin. As such, north? to northeast?striking faults have the highest tendency to slip and to dilate, depending on the local trend of shmin. These results provide a first order filter on faults and fault systems in the Great Basin, affording focusing of local?scale exploration efforts for blind or hidden geothermal resources.

  7. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-09-30

    - The resulting along‐fault and fault‐to‐fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault‐to‐fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson‐Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike‐slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527 representative of the region. Results: The results of our slip and dilation tendency analysis are shown in Figures 4 (dilation tendency), 5 (slip tendency) and 6 (slip tendency + dilation tendency). Shmin varies from northwest to east‐west trending throughout much of the Great Basin. As such, north‐ to northeast‐striking faults have the highest tendency to slip and to dilate, depending on the local trend of shmin. These results provide a first order filter on faults and fault systems in the Great Basin, affording focusing of local‐scale exploration efforts for blind or hidden geothermal resources.

  8. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-09-30

    - The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527 representative of the region. Results: The results of our slip and dilation tendency analysis are shown in Figures 4 (dilation tendency), 5 (slip tendency) and 6 (slip tendency + dilation tendency). Shmin varies from northwest to east?west trending throughout much of the Great Basin. As such, north? to northeast?striking faults have the highest tendency to slip and to dilate, depending on the local trend of shmin. These results provide a first order filter on faults and fault systems in the Great Basin, affording focusing of local?scale exploration efforts for blind or hidden geothermal resources.

  9. Long-Term Regional Climate Simulations Driven by Two Global Reanalyses and a GCM for the Western United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, Lai R.; Bian, Xindi; Qian, Yun

    2002-01-01

    To take advantage of recent development in the NCAR/Penn State Mesoscale Model (MM5), an effort has been organized to develop and evaluate an MM5-based community regional climate model. Several modifications such as the implementation of the PNNL subgrid parameterization of orographic precipitation, representation of cloud-radiation interaction, and additional output capabilities have been made to the recently released MM5 Version 3.4. To evaluate the model, several long-term simulations have been performed over the western U.S. These simulations were driven by the NCEP/NCAR and ECMWF reanalyses respectively for 20 and 13 years beginning at 1980. The western U.S. is marked by diverse topographic features and varied climate conditions such as the maritime climate in the coastal area and the semi-arid climate in the southwest. We will present results based on two domain configurations: a nested domain with a fine domain covering the western U.S. at 40 km resolution, and a single domain at 60 km resolution with the subgrid orographic precipitation scheme applied in the western U.S. Analyses are being performed to evaluate the simulations of the averaged climate and interannual variability and examine the model sensitivity to different boundary conditions. Our analyses focus on the relationships between large-scale circulation and regional climate features, surface energy and water budgets, orographic precipitation, and hydrologic conditions within selected river basins. Regional simulations are also being performed using large-scale conditions simulated by the NCAR/DOE Parallel Climate Model (PCM). The regional model was used to downscale the ensemble PCM climate change scenarios for periods of 10-20 years in the current and future climate. Results will be analyzed to study the impacts of greenhouse warming on regional water resources in the western U.S.

  10. From gas to stars in energetic environments: dense gas clumps in the 30 Doradus region within the Large Magellanic Cloud

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Crystal N.; Meier, David S.; Ott, Jrgen; Hughes, Annie; Wong, Tony; Looney, Leslie; Henkel, Christian; Chen, Rosie; Indebetouw, Remy; Muller, Erik; Pineda, Jorge L.; Seale, Jonathan

    2014-09-20

    We present parsec-scale interferometric maps of HCN(1-0) and HCO{sup +}(1-0) emission from dense gas in the star-forming region 30 Doradus, obtained using the Australia Telescope Compact Array. This extreme star-forming region, located in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), is characterized by a very intense ultraviolet ionizing radiation field and sub-solar metallicity, both of which are expected to impact molecular cloud structure. We detect 13 bright, dense clumps within the 30 Doradus-10 giant molecular cloud. Some of the clumps are aligned along a filamentary structure with a characteristic spacing that is consistent with formation via varicose fluid instability. Our analysis shows that the filament is gravitationally unstable and collapsing to form stars. There is a good correlation between HCO{sup +} emission in the filament and signatures of recent star formation activity including H{sub 2}O masers and young stellar objects (YSOs). YSOs seem to continue along the same direction of the filament toward the massive compact star cluster R136 in the southwest. We present detailed comparisons of clump properties (masses, linewidths, and sizes) in 30Dor-10 to those in other star forming regions of the LMC (N159, N113, N105, and N44). Our analysis shows that the 30Dor-10 clumps have similar masses but wider linewidths and similar HCN/HCO{sup +} (1-0) line ratios as clumps detected in other LMC star-forming regions. Our results suggest that the dense molecular gas clumps in the interior of 30Dor-10 are well shielded against the intense ionizing field that is present in the 30 Doradus region.

  11. Form:GeothermalRegion | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of a Geothermal Region below. If the region already exists, you will be able to edit its information. AddEdit a Geothermal Region Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  12. Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth J. Nemeth

    2006-08-30

    The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership's (SECARB) Phase I program focused on promoting the development of a framework and infrastructure necessary for the validation and commercial deployment of carbon sequestration technologies. The SECARB program, and its subsequent phases, directly support the Global Climate Change Initiative's goal of reducing greenhouse gas intensity by 18 percent by the year 2012. Work during the project's two-year period was conducted within a ''Task Responsibility Matrix''. The SECARB team was successful in accomplishing its tasks to define the geographic boundaries of the region; characterize the region; identify and address issues for technology deployment; develop public involvement and education mechanisms; identify the most promising capture, sequestration, and transport options; and prepare action plans for implementation and technology validation activity. Milestones accomplished during Phase I of the project are listed below: (1) Completed preliminary identification of geographic boundaries for the study (FY04, Quarter 1); (2) Completed initial inventory of major sources and sinks for the region (FY04, Quarter 2); (3) Completed initial development of plans for GIS (FY04, Quarter 3); (4) Completed preliminary action plan and assessment for overcoming public perception issues (FY04, Quarter 4); (5) Assessed safety, regulatory and permitting issues (FY05, Quarter 1); (6) Finalized inventory of major sources/sinks and refined GIS algorithms (FY05, Quarter 2); (7) Refined public involvement and education mechanisms in support of technology development options (FY05, Quarter 3); and (8) Identified the most promising capture, sequestration and transport options and prepared action plans (FY05, Quarter 4).

  13. Mexico Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Mexico Geothermal Region Details Areas (0) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (0) References...

  14. Cascades Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cascades Geothermal Region (Redirected from Cascades) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Cascades Geothermal Region Details Areas (2) Power Plants (0)...

  15. Regional math teacher wins presidential award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional math teacher wins presidential award Community Connections: Your link to news and ... Latest Issue:Mar. 2016 all issues All Issues submit Regional math teacher wins ...

  16. Italy Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Region Larderello Geothermal Area Mount Amiata Geothermal Area Travale-Radicondoli Geothermal Area Energy Generation Facilities within the Italy Geothermal Region Bagnore 3...

  17. Transition Zone Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Unknown Planned Capacity 1 Geothermal Areas within the Transition Zone Geothermal Region Energy Generation Facilities within the Transition Zone Geothermal Region Geothermal Power...

  18. Category:Geothermal Regions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Regions Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Geothermal Regions page? For detailed information on Geothermal...

  19. Germany Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Germany Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Germany Geothermal Region Details Areas (1) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (0)...

  20. Thailand Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Thailand Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Thailand Geothermal Region Details Areas (1) Power Plants (1) Projects (0) Techniques (0)...

  1. Indonesia Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Indonesia Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Indonesia Geothermal Region Details Areas (5) Power Plants (4) Projects (0) Techniques (0)...

  2. Philippines Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Philippines Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Philippines Geothermal Region Details Areas (1) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques...

  3. Clean Cities Regional Support & Petroleum Displacement Awards...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Regional Support & Petroleum Displacement Awards Clean Cities Regional Support & Petroleum Displacement Awards 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual ...

  4. Regional Climate Vulnerabilities and Resilience Solutions | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Regional Climate Vulnerabilities and Resilience Solutions Regional Climate Vulnerabilities and Resilience Solutions This interactive map is not viewable in your browser. Please ...

  5. China Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home China Geothermal Region Details Areas (0) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (0) References...

  6. Lake Region State College | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    College Jump to: navigation, search Name Lake Region State College Facility Lake Region State College Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service...

  7. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Southeast Regional Summit...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Southeast Regional Summit Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Southeast Regional Summit July 9, 2015 8:30AM to 6:00PM EDT Renaissance...

  8. Austria Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Austria Geothermal Region Details Areas (0) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (0) References Geothermal Region Data Area USGS Resource...

  9. Australia Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Australia Geothermal Region Details Areas (0) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (0) References Geothermal Region Data Area USGS Resource...

  10. New Zealand Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home New Zealand Geothermal Region Details Areas (2) Power Plants (2) Projects (0) Techniques (0) References Geothermal Region Data Area USGS Resource...

  11. Russia Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Russia Geothermal Region Details Areas (0) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (0) References Geothermal Region Data Area USGS Resource...

  12. Iceland Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Iceland Geothermal Region Details Areas (0) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (0) References Geothermal Region Data Area USGS Resource...

  13. Turkey Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Turkey Geothermal Region Details Areas (0) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (0) References...

  14. Developing a Regional Recovery Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesperance, Ann M.; Olson, Jarrod; Stein, Steven L.; Clark, Rebecca; Kelly, Heather; Sheline, Jim; Tietje, Grant; Williamson, Mark; Woodcock, Jody

    2011-09-01

    Abstract A biological attack would present an unprecedented challenge for local, state, and federal agencies; the military; the private sector; and individuals on many fronts ranging from vaccination and treatment to prioritization of cleanup actions to waste disposal. To prepare the Seattle region to recover from a biological attack, the Seattle Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI) partners collaborated with military and federal agencies to develop a Regional Recovery Framework for a Biological Attack in the Seattle Urban Area. The goal was to reduce the time and resources required to recover and restore wide urban areas, military installations, and other critical infrastructure following a biological incident by providing a coordinated systems approach. Based on discussions in small workshops, tabletop exercises, and interviews with emergency response agency staff, the partners identified concepts of operation for various areas to address critical issues the region will face as recovery progresses. Key to this recovery is the recovery of the economy. Although the Framework is specific to a catastrophic, wide-area biological attack using anthrax, it was designed to be flexible and scalable so it could also serve as the recovery framework for an all-hazards approach. The Framework also served to coalesce policy questions that must be addressed for long-term recovery. These questions cover such areas as safety and health, security, financial management, waste management, legal issues, and economic development.

  15. Hydrogen Regional Infrastructure Program in Pennsylvania

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydrogen Regional Infrastructure Program in Pennsylvania. Objectives: Capture data pertinent to H2 delivery in PA

  16. An assessment of possible climate change in the Australian region based on intercomparison of general circulation modeling results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whetton, P.H.; Pittock, A.B.; Haylock, M.R. ); Rayner, P.J. )

    1994-03-01

    To assist in estimating likely future climate change in the Australian region, the authors examine the results of four different general circulation modeling experiments run to assess the equilibrium impact of doubling greenhouse gases. The results examined were the most recent available at the time of study from various research centers in North America and Europe, as well as those of the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO). The approach used is, first, to assess the quality of the control (1 x CO[sub 2]) simulations from each of the models of mean sea level (MSL) pressure and precipitation in the Australian region by comparing these with the corresponding observed patterns; and, second, to then analyze the 2 x CO[sub 2] results of only those model experiments with the best control simulations. Of the models examined two are chosen on the basis of their simulation of current climate in the region: the CSIRO four-level model (CSIRO4) and the United Kingdom Meteorological Office (UKMO) model. For conditions of equivalent doubling of CO[sub 2], both models show substantial increases in surface air temperature of around 4[degrees]-6[degrees] inland and 2[degrees]-4[degrees]C in coastal regions. Both models show decreased MSL pressure over the Australian continent and increases in rainfall over northern, central, and eastern Australia, particularly in the summer half of the year. The CSIRO4 model, but not the UKMO model, also shows increased pressure to the south of the continent and decreased winter rainfall in southwest and southern Australia. Generally, field significance tests show the pattern and magnitude of the changes to be significant of CSIRO4 (for which the necessary monthly simulated data were available). 42 refs., 20 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Regional solid waste management study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    In 1990, the Lower Savannah Council of Governments (LSCOG) began dialogue with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) regarding possibilities for cooperation and coordination of solid waste management practices among the local governments and the Savannah River Site. The Department of Energy eventually awarded a grant to the Lower Savannah Council of Governments for the development of a study, which was initiated on March 5, 1992. After careful analysis of the region`s solid waste needs, this study indicates a network approach to solid waste management to be the most viable. The network involves the following major components: (1) Rural Collection Centers, designed to provide convenience to rural citizens, while allowing some degree of participation in recycling; (2) Rural Drop-Off Centers, designed to give a greater level of education and recycling activity; (3) Inert landfills and composting centers, designed to reduce volumes going into municipal (Subtitle D) landfills and produce useable products from yard waste; (4) Transfer Stations, ultimate landfill disposal; (5) Materials Recovery Facilities, designed to separate recyclables into useable and sellable units, and (6) Subtitle D landfill for burial of all solid waste not treated through previous means.

  18. WINDExchange: Wind Energy Regional Resource Centers

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    Deployment Activities Printable Version Bookmark and Share Regional Resource Centers About Economic Development Siting Wind Energy Regional Resource Centers The U.S. Department of Energy's Regional Resource Centers provide unbiased wind energy information to communities and decision makers to help them evaluate wind energy potential and learn about wind power's benefits and impacts in their regions. During their first year of operations, the Regional Resource Centers impacted more than 12,000

  19. CEMI Southeast Regional Summit | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CEMI Southeast Regional Summit CEMI Southeast Regional Summit CEMI Southeast Regional Summit July 9, 2015 8:30AM to 5:30PM EDT Renaissance Atlanta Midtown Hotel 866 West Peachtree Street, NW Atlanta, Georgia 30308 About the CEMI Southeast Regional Summit As part of the Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative (CEMI), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) organizes regional summits around the country to expand its partnerships, share resources and successes, and refine its strategy to boost U.S.

  20. Eastern Woodlands Training and Regional Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Native Learning Center and the Seminole Tribe of Florida is pleased to announce the 2016 Eastern Woodlands ONAP Training and Regional Meeting designed to address tribal housing needs identified throughout the Eastern Woodlands region.

  1. DC High School Science Bowl Regionals

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This event is the Washington, D.C. High School Regional competition for the US National Science Bowl. The regional competition is run by the Office of Economic Impact and Diversity, and the...

  2. Geothermal Literature Review At Cascades Region (Ingebritsen...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At Cascades Region (Ingebritsen & Mariner, 2010) Exploration Activity Details...

  3. Enforcement Policy: Regional Standards Enforcement and Distributors |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Enforcement and Distributors Enforcement Policy: Regional Standards Enforcement and Distributors Issued April 24, 2014 DOE has initiated a rulemaking to consider possible approaches to enforcing regional standards for residential central air conditioners and heat pumps. DOE will not assert civil penalty authority over distributors for violation of the regional standard for central air conditioners. PDF icon Enforcement Policy: Regional Standards Enforcement and

  4. State and Regional Initiatives Meeting Series Archive

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Learn about past state and regional initiatives webinars, calls, meetings, and presentations through the descriptions and linked materials below.

  5. Diode having trenches in a semiconductor region

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Palacios, Tomas Apostol; Lu, Bin; Matioli, Elison de Nazareth

    2016-03-22

    An electrode structure is described in which conductive regions are recessed into a semiconductor region. Trenches may be formed in a semiconductor region, such that conductive regions can be formed in the trenches. The electrode structure may be used in semiconductor devices such as field effect transistors or diodes. Nitride-based power semiconductor devices are described including such an electrode structure, which can reduce leakage current and otherwise improve performance.

  6. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline System - Central Region

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Central Region About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Natural Gas Pipelines in the Central Region Overview | Domestic Gas | Exports | Regional Pipeline Companies & Links Overview Twenty-two interstate and at least thirteen intrastate natural gas pipeline companies (see Table below) operate in the Central Region (Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, and Wyoming). Twelve

  7. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline System - Midwest Region

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Midwest Region About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Natural Gas Pipelines in the Midwest Region Overview | Domestic Gas | Canadian Imports | Regional Pipeline Companies & Links Overview Twenty-six interstate and at least eight intrastate natural gas pipeline companies operate within the Midwest Region (Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin). The principal sources of natural gas supply for the

  8. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline System - Northeast Region

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Northeast Region About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Natural Gas Pipelines in the Northeast Region Overview | Domestic Gas | Canadian Imports | Regional Pipeline Companies & Links Overview Twenty interstate natural gas pipeline systems operate within the Northeast Region (Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Virginia, and West Virginia). These

  9. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline System - Southeast Region

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Southeast Region About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Natural Gas Pipelines in the Southeast Region Overview | Transportation to Atlantic & Gulf States | Gulf of Mexico Transportation Corridor | Transportation to the Northern Tier | Regional Pipeline Companies & Links Overview Twenty-three interstate, and at least eight intrastate, natural gas pipeline companies operate within the Southeast Region (Alabama,

  10. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline System - Western Region

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Western Region About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Natural Gas Pipelines in the Western Region Overview | Transportation South | Transportation North | Regional Pipeline Companies & Links Overview Ten interstate and nine intrastate natural gas pipeline companies provide transportation services to and within the Western Region (Arizona, California, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington), the fewest number serving

  11. "Interconnection","NERC Regional Assesment Area"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area," ... "Notes: * NERC region and reliability assessment area maps are provided on ...

  12. "January","NERC Regional Assesment Area"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    demand, by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assesment Area, " ... "Notes: * NERC region and reliability assessment area maps are provided on ...

  13. State & Regional Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... & Workforce Development Financial Opportunities Information Resources Publications Multimedia Databases Analytical Tools Glossary State & Regional Resources State Biomass ...

  14. State and Regional Hydrogen Initiatives Meeting, Challenges for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Regional Hydrogen Initiatives Meeting, Challenges for State and Regional Hydrogen Initiatives State and Regional Hydrogen Initiatives Meeting, Challenges for State and Regional ...

  15. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Midwest Regional Summit:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lightweighting Breakout Session Summary | Department of Energy Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Midwest Regional Summit: Lightweighting Breakout Session Summary Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Midwest Regional Summit: Lightweighting Breakout Session Summary Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Midwest Regional Summit: Lightweighting Breakout Session Summary June 21, 2013 PDF icon Lightweighting Breakout Session Summary More Documents & Publications Fiber Reinforced Polymer

  16. NOAA 2015 Regional Coast Resilience Grant Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOOA) is accepting applications for the Regional Coastal Resilience Grant program to support regional approaches to undertake activities that build resilience of coastal regions, communities, and economic sectors to the negative impacts from extreme weather events, climate hazards, and changing ocean conditions.

  17. Securing non-volatile memory regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Faraboschi, Paolo; Ranganathan, Parthasarathy; Muralimanohar, Naveen

    2013-08-20

    Methods, apparatus and articles of manufacture to secure non-volatile memory regions are disclosed. An example method disclosed herein comprises associating a first key pair and a second key pair different than the first key pair with a process, using the first key pair to secure a first region of a non-volatile memory for the process, and using the second key pair to secure a second region of the non-volatile memory for the same process, the second region being different than the first region.

  18. Data, Feedback, and Awareness Lead to Big Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-08-01

    Institutional change case study details the Navy Region Southwest Metro San Diego Area regional energy management team achievements.

  19. NERSC Staff Participate in Regional Science Bowl

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Staff Participate in Regional Science Bowl NERSC Staff Participate in Regional Science Bowl February 5, 2013 DOEScienceBowl NERSC's Elizabeth Bautista moderates DOE Science Bowl Competition at Berkeley Lab. High School students from all corners of the San Francisco Bay Area flocked to the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) on Saturday, February 2, 2013 to battle in the Department of Energy's Regional Science Bowl-an academic competition that tests students' knowledge in all

  20. Regional Science Bowl | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Science Bowl Growing Scientific Communities from the Ground Up Jeopardy is America's favorite quiz game show. Imagine combining the concept of Jeopardy with science and a roomful of over 100 middle/high school students from various schools across several counties. What do you get? The Regional Science Bowl! Often known as the Super Bowl of science, Regional Science Bowls provide the perfect opportunity for middle and high school students interested in STEM to compete in teams for the