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1

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: The Nevada Test Site Development Corporations's Desert Rock Sky Park at the Nevada Test Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy has prepared an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1300) (EA) which analyzes the potential environmental effects of developing operating and maintaining a commercial/industrial park in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site, between Mercury Camp and U.S. Highway 95 and east of Desert Rock Airport. The EA evaluates the potential impacts of infrastructure improvements necessary to support fill build out of the 512-acre Desert Rock Sky Park. Two alternative actions were evaluated: (1) Develop, operate and maintain a commercial/industrial park in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site, and (2) taking no action. The purpose and need for the commercial industrial park are addressed in Section 1.0 of the EA. A detailed description of the proposed action and alternatives is in section 2.0. Section 3.0 describes the affected environment. Section 4.0 the environmental consequences of the proposed action and alternative. Cumulative effects are addressed in Section 5.0. Mitigation measures are addressed in Section 6.0. The Department of Energy determined that the proposed action of developing, operating and maintaining a commercial/industrial park in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site would best meet the needs of the agency.

N /A

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

DOE/EA-1300: Environmental Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Development Corporation's Desert Rock Sky Park at the Nevada Test Site (03/00)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NV EA-1300 NV EA-1300 The Nevada Test Site Development Corporation's Desert Rock Sky Park at the Nevada Test Site Environmental Assessment March 2000 United States Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office Las Vegas, Nevada Available for public sale, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Phone: (800) 553-6847 Fax: (703) 605-6900 Email: orders@ntis.fedworld.gov Online ordering: http://www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm Available electronically at http://www.doe.gov.bridge Available for processing fee to U.S. Department of Energy and its contactors, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62

3

Desert Sky Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Desert Sky Wind Farm Desert Sky Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Desert Sky Wind Farm Facility Desert Sky Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner American Electric Power Developer GE Energy Energy Purchaser City of San Antonio Texas (Utility Company) Location Pecos County TX Coordinates 30.926626°, -102.100067° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.926626,"lon":-102.100067,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

4

Heat flow in relation to hydrothermal activity in the southern Black Rock Desert, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of an investigation of the Gerlach NE KGRA (Known Geothermal Resource Area) a number of heat-flow measurements were made in playa sediments of the southern Black Rock Desert, northwestern Nevada. These data together with additional previously unpublished heat-flow values reveal a complex pattern of heat flow with values ranging between 1.0 to 5.0 HFU (40 to 100 mWm/sup -2/) outside of the hot springs area. The mean heat flow for the 13 reported sites in the southern Black Rock Desert is 1.8 +- 0.15 HFU (75 +- 6 mWm/sup -2/). The complexity of the pattern of heat flow is believed to arise from hydrothermal circulation supporting the numerous hot springs throughout the region. The fact that the lowest observed heat flow occurs in the deepest part of the basin strongly suggests that fluid movement within the basin represents part of the recharge for the hydrothermal system. A thermal balance for the system incorporating both anomalous conductive heat loss and convective heat loss from the spring systems indicate a total energy loss of about 8.0 Mcal/sec or 34 megawatts over an estimated 1000 km/sup 2/ region. Consideration of this additional heat loss yields a mean regional heat flow of 2.5 + HFU (100 + mWm/sup -2/) and warrants inclusion of this region in the Battle Mountain heat-flow high (Lachenbruch and Sass, 1977, 1978).

Sass, J.H.; Zoback, M.L.; Galanis, S.P. Jr.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Detailed gravity and aeromagnetic surveys in the Black Rock Desert Area, Utah. Topical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Aeromagnetic and gravity surveys were conducted during 1978 in the Black Rock Desert, Utah over an area of about 2400 km/sup 2/ between the north-trending Pavant and Cricket Mountains. The surveys assisted in evaluating the geothermal resources in the Meadow-Hatton Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) and vicinity by delineating geophysical characteristics of the subsurface. The gravity measurements from approximately 700 new stations were reduced to complete Bouguer gravity anomaly values with the aid of a computerized terrain-correction program and contoured at an interval of 1 milligal. The aeromagnetic survey was drape flown at an altitude of 305 m (1000 ft) and a total intensity residual aeromagnetic map with a contour interval of 20 gammas was produced. Two gravity and aeromagnetic east-west profiles and one north-south profile were modeled using a simultaneous 2 1/2-dimensional modeling technique to provide a single model satisfying both types of geophysical data.

Serpa, L.F.; Cook, K.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Simulating Injectate/Rock Chemical Interaction In Fractured Desert Peak Quartz Monzonite  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Simulations of the interactions of injected fluids with minerals within an engineered fracture in a sample of Desert Peak quartz monzonite were compared with experimental observations of fluid chemistry and fracture permeability. The observed decrease in permeability and effective hydraulic aperture was much more rapid ({approx}1.0 {micro}m/day) for a core injected with a mixed salt solution containing dissolved silica (near-saturation injectate), compared to cores injected with NaCl (far-from-saturation injectate) ({approx}0.1 {micro}m/day). Simulations were in qualitative agreement with these observations. Near-saturation injectate is predicted to result in net precipitation of secondary phases in the fracture ({approx}0.12 {micro}m/day), compared to a net dissolution of the rock for the far-from-saturation injectate ({approx}0.3 {micro}m/day). Permeability loss for the near-saturation-injectate is ascribed to precipitation in the fracture as well as potential dissolution of primary mineral asperities. Permeability loss for the far-from-saturation fluid is ascribed to dissolution of asperities and smoothing of the fracture. Post-test analysis of the fracture surface will be necessary to verify the processes occurring. The simplified geochemical models used do not account for mineral heterogeneity or for distributions of fluid residence times which could be important controls on permeability evolution. Further analysis is planned to explicitly account for these phenomena.

Viani, B; Roberts, J; Detwiler, R; Roberts, S; Carlson, S

2005-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

7

Geothermal resources of the western arm of the Black Rock Desert, northwestern Nevada. Part I. Geology and geophysics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies of the geothermal potential of the western arm of the Black Rock Desert in northwestern Nevada included a compilation of existing geologic data on a detailed map, a temperature survey at 1-meter depth, a thermal-scanner survey, and gravity and seismic surveys to determine basin geometry. The temperature survey showed the effects of heating at shallow depths due to rising geothermal fluids near the known hot spring areas. Lower temperatures were noted in areas of probable near-surface ground-water movement. The thermal-scanner survey verified the known geothermal areas and showed relatively high-temperature areas of standing water and ground-water discharge. The upland areas of the desert were found to be distinctly warmer than the playa area, probably due to the low thermal diffusivity of upland areas caused by low moisture content. Surface geophysical surveys indicated that the maximum thickness of valley-fill deposits in the desert is about 3200 meters. Gravity data further showed that changes in the trend of the desert axis occurred near thermal areas. 53 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Schaefer, D.H.; Welch, A.H.; Maurer, D.K.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Fracture Permeability Evolution in Rock from the Desert Peak EGS Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fluid flow experiments are being conducted on core specimens of quartz monzonite retrieved from depths of about 1 km at the Desert Peak East EGS site in Churchill County, Nevada. Our immediate goal is to observe permeability evolution in fractures at pressure and temperature conditions appropriate to the Desert Peak geothermal site. Longer term, we aim to evaluate mechanisms that control the evolution of fracture permeability. In the experiments saline water is flowed through an artificial fracture at a constant rate of 0.02 ml/min over a period of several weeks. The constant flow tests are interrupted at selected times for shorter tests in which flow is either stopped or varied between 0 and 2.0 ml/min. The experiments to date were conducted at a confining pressure of 5.5 MPa, pore pressures of 1.38 MPa or 2.07 MPa and temperatures of 167- 169 C. Measurements include differential pressure and electrical resistance across the specimen. The short-term variable flow rate experiments allow us to calculate the effective hydraulic aperture of the fracture at various times during the experiment. Changes in electrical resistivity provide indirect evidence of ongoing mineral dissolution and precipitation processes that are expected to change fracture permeability over time. The early experiments have shown that electrical resistivity rises during flow and falls during intervals in which flow is stopped.

Carlson, S R; Roberts, J J; Detwiler, R L; Burton, E A; Robertson-Tait, A; Morris, C; Kasameyer, P

2004-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

9

Chemical trends in the Ice Springs basalt, Black Rock Desert, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Holocene Ice Springs volcanic field of west-central Utah consists of 0.53 km/sup 3/ of tholeiitic basalts erupted as a sequence of nested cinder cones and associated lava flows. Whole rock x-ray fluorescence and atomic absorption analysis of ninety-six samples of known relative age document statistically significant inter- and intra-eruption chemical variations. Elemental trends include increases in Ti, Fe, Ca, P, and Sr and decreases in Si, K, Rb, Ni, Cr, and Zr with decreasing age. Microprobe analyses of microphenocrysts of olivine, plagioclase, and Fe-Ti oxides and of groundmass olivine, plagioclase, and clinopyroxene indicate limited chemical variation between mineral assemblages of the eruptive events. Petrographic analyses have identified the presence of minor amounts of silicic xenoliths, orthopyroxene megacrysts, and plagioclase xenocrysts. Potassium-argon determinations establish the existence of excess argon in the basaltic cinder (30.05 x 10/sup -12/ moles/gm) and in distal lava flows (8.29 x 10/sup -12/ moles/gm) which suggest apparent ages of 16 and 4.3 million years respectively. Strontium isotopic data (Puskar and Condie, 1973) show systematic variations from oldest eruptions (87Sr/86Sr=0.7052) to youngest eruptions (87Sr/86Sr=0.7059).

Lynch, W.C.; Nash, W.P.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Paradox Basin source rock, southeastern Utah : organic geochemical characterization of Gothic and Chimney Rock units, Ismay and Desert Creek zones, within a sequence stratigraphic framework.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Chimney Rock and Gothic units of the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation have long been considered source rocks for the rich hydrocarbon fields of southeastern Utah. (more)

Tischler, Keith Louris

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320: Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Closure Report (CR) describes the remediation activities performed and the results of verification sampling conducted at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 230, Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and CAU 320, Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box. The CAU is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). The CAU is located in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) (Figure 1) and consists of the following Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 22-03-01- Sewage Lagoon (CAU 230); and 22-99-01- Strainer Box (CAU 320). Included with CAS 22-99-01 is a buried Imhoff tank and a sludge bed. These CAUs will be collectively referred to in this plan as the Area 22 Sewage Lagoons site. Site characterization activities were done during September 1999. Characterization of the manholes associated with the septic system leading to the Imhoff tank was done during March 2000. The results of the characterization presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) indicated that only the sludge bed (CAS 22-99-01) contained constituents of concern (COC) above action levels and required remediation (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOE/NV], 2000a).

D. S. Tobiason

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Aerosol effects on red blue ratio of clear sky images, and impact on solar forecasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

urban, and desert dust aerosols ." JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICALand K. V. S. Badarinath. "Aerosol climatology: dependence ofUsing a Sky Imager for aerosol characterization."

Ghonima, Mohamed Sherif

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Clear Skies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clear Skies A. A. lacis NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Institute for Space Studies New York, NY 10025 "convective adjustment"takes place. Energy is transported upward within the...

14

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320: Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 230, Area 22 Sewage Lagoons, and CAU 320, Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Referred to as CAU 230/320, both CAUs are located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and comprise two Corrective Action Sites (CASs), 22-03-01 (Sewage Lagoons) and 22-99-01 (Strainer Box). The Area 22 Sewage Lagoons site also includes a buried Imhoff Tank, sludge bed, and associated sewer piping. A September 1999 corrective action investigation identified the only contaminant of concern above preliminary action levels at this CAU (i.e., total petroleum hydrocarbons as diesel-range organics). During this same investigation, three Corrective Action Objectives (CAOs) were identified to prevent or mitigate exposure to subsurface debris and contaminated soil. Based on these CAOs, a review of existing data, future use, and current operations in Area 22 of the NTS, three CAAs were developed for consideration: Alternative 1 - No Further Action, Alternative 2 - Closure in Place with Administrative Controls, and Alternative 3 - Excavation and Removal. These alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy selection decision factors. Alternative 3 was chosen on technical merit as the preferred alternative for CAU 230/320. This alternative was judged to meet all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site and will eliminate potential future exposure pathways to the buried debris and contaminated soils at both of the CASs within Area 22.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

2000-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

15

Big Sky Carbon Atlas  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

(Acknowledgment to the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership (BSCSP); see home page at http://www.bigskyco2.org/)

Carbon Sequestration Partnership, Big Sky [BSCSP; ,

16

Mobile Climate Monitoring Facility to Sample Skies in Africa | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mobile Climate Monitoring Facility to Sample Skies in Africa Mobile Climate Monitoring Facility to Sample Skies in Africa Mobile Climate Monitoring Facility to Sample Skies in Africa January 18, 2006 - 10:47am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is placing a new, portable atmospheric laboratory with sophisticated instruments and data systems in Niger, Africa, to gain a better understanding of the potential impacts of Saharan dust on global climate. Dust from Africa's Sahara desert-the largest source of dust on the planet-reaches halfway around the globe. Carried by winds and clouds, the dust travels through West African, Mediterranean, and European skies, and across the Atlantic into North America. Unfortunately, Africa is one of the most under-sampled climate regimes in the world, leaving scientists to

17

Lake Lahontan: Geology of Southern Carson Desert, Nevada | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake Lahontan: Geology of Southern Carson Desert, Nevada Lake Lahontan: Geology of Southern Carson Desert, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Lake Lahontan: Geology of Southern Carson Desert, Nevada Abstract This report presents a stratigraphic study of an area of about 860 square miles in the southern part of the Carson Desert, near Fallen, Churchill County, Nev. The exposed rocks and surficial sediments range in age from early Tertiary (?) to Recent. The late Quaternary sediments and soils were especially studied: they furnish a detailed history of the fluctuations of Lake Lahontan (a huge but intermittent late Pleistocene lake) and of younger lakes, as well as a history of late Quaternary sedimentation, erosion, soil development, and climatic change that probably is

18

The natural geochemistry of tetrafluoromethane and sulfur hexafluoride : : studies of ancient Mojave Desert groundwaters, North Pacific seawaters and the summit emissions of Kilauea Volcano  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 is detectable, and the source rock for CF 4 in upwellingsource of lithospheric CF 4 and SF 6 to Mojave Desert groundwaters is accessory fluorites contained in granitic rock.

Deeds, Daniel A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

The Natural Geochemistry of Tetrafluoromethane and Sulfur Hexafluoride : Studies of Ancient Mojave Desert Groundwaters, North Pacific Seawaters and the Summit Emissions of Kilauea Volcano  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 is detectable, and the source rock for CF 4 in upwellingsource of lithospheric CF 4 and SF 6 to Mojave Desert groundwaters is accessory fluorites contained in granitic rock.

Deeds, Daniel A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

COBE Sky Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

COBE sky map COBE sky map This map of the ancient sky shows the minute variations in the microwave background discovered by the team led by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory astrophysicist George Smoot. As seen in the map, vast regions of space have minute variations in temperature. Over billions of years, gravity magnified these small differences into the clusters of galaxies we observe today. Displayed horizontally across the middle of the map is the Milky Way galaxy. The image, a 360-degree map of the whole sky, shows the relic radiation from the Big Bang. The map was derived from one year of data taken by the Differential Microwave Radiometers onboard NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer satellite. Using Galactic coordinates, the map shows the plane of the Milky Way galaxy horizontally and the center of our galaxy at its

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desert rock sky" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Sloan digital sky survey  

SciTech Connect

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey will produce a detailed digital photometric map of half the northern sky to about 23 magnitude using a special purpose wide field 2.5 meter telescope. From this map we will select {approximately} 10{sup 6} galaxies and 10{sup 5} quasars, and obtain high resolution spectra using the same telescope. The imaging catalog will contain 10{sup 8} galaxies, a similar number of stars, and 10{sup 6} quasar candidates.

Kent, S.M.; Stoughton, C.; Newberg, H.; Loveday, J.; Petravick, D.; Gurbani, V.; Berman, E.; Sergey, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Lupton, R. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Sky Train Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sky Train Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name Sky Train Corp. Place Palm Harbor, Florida Zip 34684 Sector Services Product Sky Train Corporation is a consultant company...

23

Sky Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sky Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Sky Energy Place Germany Product A German company which is involved with the development of a 10MW STEG plant in the Moura region of...

24

Desert Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Desert Solar Place Apple Valley, California Zip 92308 Sector Renewable Energy, Solar Product Selling and installing commercial renewable energy projects, mainly...

25

The Infrared Sky  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The infrared sky from space is the sum of a cosmic signal from galaxies, quasars, and perhaps more exotic sources; and foregrounds from the Milky Way and from the Solar System. At a distance of 1 AU from the Sun, the foreground from interplanetary dust is very bright between 5 and 100 microns, but ``very bright'' is still several million times fainter than the background produced by ground-based telescopes. In the near infrared 1-2.2 micron range the space infrared sky is a thousand times fainter than the OH nightglow from the Earth's atmosphere. As a result of these advantages, wide-field imaging from space in the infrared can be an incredibly sensitive method to study the Universe.

E. L. Wright

2004-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

26

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

SciTech Connect

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework; (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts) and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated has significant potential to sequester large amounts of CO{sub 2}. Simulations conducted to evaluate mineral trapping potential of mafic volcanic rock formations located in the Idaho province suggest that supercritical CO{sub 2} is converted to solid carbonate mineral within a few hundred years and permanently entombs the carbon. Although MMV for this rock type may be challenging, a carefully chosen combination of geophysical and geochemical techniques should allow assessment of the fate of CO{sub 2} in deep basalt hosted aquifers. Terrestrial carbon sequestration relies on land management practices and technologies to remove atmospheric CO{sub 2} where it is stored in trees, plants, and soil. This indirect sequestration can be implemented today and is on the front line of voluntary, market-based approaches to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil Carbon (C) on rangelands, and forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Rangelands can store up to an additional 0.05 mt C/ha/yr, while the croplands are on average four times that amount. Estimates of technical potential for soil sequestration within the region in cropland are in the range of 2.0 M mt C/yr over 20 year time horizon. This is equivalent to approximately 7.0 M mt CO{sub 2}e/yr. The forestry sinks are well documented, and the potential in the Big Sky region ranges from 9-15 M mt CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. Value-added benefits include enhanced yields, reduced erosion, and increased wildlife habitat. Thus the terrestrial sinks provide a viable, environmentally beneficial, and relatively low cost sink that is available to sequester C in the current time frame. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological and terrestrial sequestration re

Susan Capalbo

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

27

Characteristics of Sonoran Desert Microbursts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the 2008 North American monsoon season, 140 microburst events were identified in Phoenix, Arizona, and the surrounding Sonoran Desert. The Sonoran microbursts were studied and examined for their frequency and characteristics, as observed ...

Katherine M. Willingham; Elizabeth J. Thompson; Kenneth W. Howard; Charles L. Dempsey

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Sky Energy Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy, Inc is a company located in Greenville, South Carolina . References "Sky Energy, Inc" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleSkyEnergyInc&oldid351167...

29

Measurements of sky luminance, sky illuminance, and horizontal solar radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents initial findings of a sky measurement program currently in progress at the National Bureau of Standards. Measurements are reported on sky luminance and illuminance and how they relate to horizontal solar radiation and sun position. Correlations are presented relating horizontal illuminance to horizontal solar radiation, and zenith luminance to solar altitude. These empirical models are particularly suitable for use in daylighting energy studies since they are based on existing solar data currently available on standard weather tapes.

Treado, S.; Gillette, G.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Sky Volt | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Volt Volt Jump to: navigation, search Name Sky Volt Facility Sky Volt Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Sky Volt LLC (community owned) Energy Purchaser City of Greenfield - excess to Central Iowa Power Cooperative Location Greenfield IA Coordinates 41.29038343°, -94.48851585° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.29038343,"lon":-94.48851585,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

31

RECIPIENT:SkyFuel, Inc.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SkyFuel, Inc. SkyFuel, Inc. u.s. DEPARTl.\IIEN T OF ENER qY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERlvIINATION Page 1 of2 STATE: CO PROJECT TITL E: SkyFuel 8aseload Parabolic Trough Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement I.nstrument N mber NEPA Control Number CID Number Baseload DE-EEOO03584 GFO-OOO3584-002 G03584 Based on my review oftbe information concerning the proposed achon, as NEP] Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4Sl.tA), I have made the followmg determmatlOn: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Descnptlon : 83.6 Small-scale Sltmg, construction, modification, operation, and de mmlSSlonlng of faCilities for smaliscale research research and and development projects; conventionallaboralory 0 rations (such as preparation of chemical

32

Hot rocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four kilometers down below the orange earth of Australias Cooper Basin lies some of the hottest nonvolcanic rock in the worldrock that the geothermal industry had never seriously considered using to make electricity. But next month Geodynamics, an ...

S. Upson

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Science satellites scour skies for Santa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

satellites scour skies for Santa Science satellites scour skies for Santa Beginning at 6 a.m. Monday, Dec. 24, scientists will use two advanced science satellites to mark the...

34

`blue-sky' science Spending review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Cooling Towers Fiddlers Ferry #12;What are the benefits of `blue-sky' science? At a time where every penny

35

Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region Liberty-Parker 2 230-kV Transmission Line Optical Power Ground Wire Repairs - Continuation Sheet Project Description...

36

Mercury Vapor At Desert Peak Area (Varekamp & Buseck, 1983) ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mercury Vapor At Desert Peak Area (Varekamp & Buseck, 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Mercury Vapor At Desert Peak Area...

37

BLM California Desert District Office | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California Desert District Office Jump to: navigation, search Name California Desert District Office Address 22835 Calle San Juan De Los Lagos Place Moreno Valley, CA Zip 92553...

38

BLM West Desert District Office | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

West Desert District Office Jump to: navigation, search Name BLM West Desert District Office Parent Organization BLM Place Salt Lake City, Utah Phone number (801) 977-4300...

39

California Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name California Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

40

Refraction Survey At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Refraction Survey At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desert rock sky" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Dynamics of the South American Coastal Desert  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The world's driest coastal desert is in South America along the coasts of Peru and Chile. The desert's maintenance is investigated by studying the local dynamics of the low-level southerly flow along the coast. A linear boundary-layer model is ...

Magda Luzimar de Abreu; Peter R. Bannon

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Utilization and Harvest of Desert Brush  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

plenty of desert brush grows in the north of China. Brush does not only have great influence on ecology, which serves for conserving soil and water and checking winds and fix drifting sand, but also have great benefits on economy, which serves as energy ... Keywords: desert brush, brush cutter, harvest

Chen Zhongjia; Yu Guosheng; Liu Xiaohu; Chen Cheng

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Why sequence desert locust (Schistocerca gregaria)?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

desert locust (Schistocerca gregaria)? desert locust (Schistocerca gregaria)? Desert locusts are a species of short-horned grasshopper that can form highly mobile swarms and spread over as much as 20 percent of the world's land mass. Comprised of more than 30 million locusts per square mile, locust swarms can travel up to 80 miles a day and impact the livelihoods of up to 10 percent of the world's population in 60 countries by eating same amount of food in a day as several thousand people. desert locust Photo: istockphoto Researchers are interested in sequencing the locust's gut wall as well as the microbial community inside the desert locust's gut to better understand how the insect can break down plant mass. The work will determine whether or not the ability to break down lignocellulose is

44

Determination of the Shortwave Anisotropic Function for Clear-Sky Desert Scenes from Meteosat Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determination of planetary albedo on the basis of satellite observations of reflected shortwave (SW) radiances requires taking into account the anisotropic (non-Lambertian) reflectance properties of the earth?atmosphere system, depending both on ...

Michel Capderou; Robert Kandel

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

SkyBuilt Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search Name SkyBuilt Power Place Arlington, Virginia Zip 22207 Sector Hydro, Renewable Energy, Solar, Wind energy Product US-based renewable energy system...

46

Property:CapRockLithology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CapRockLithology CapRockLithology Jump to: navigation, search Property Name CapRockLithology Property Type String Description Condensed description of the lithology of the cap rock. Subproperties This property has the following 6 subproperties: B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area D Desert Peak Geothermal Area E East Mesa Geothermal Area H Heber Geothermal Area S Salton Sea Geothermal Area Pages using the property "CapRockLithology" Showing 6 pages using this property. A Amedee Geothermal Area + volcanic; lacustrine sediments + B Blue Mountain Geothermal Area + Hydrothermal alteration layer + G Geysers Geothermal Area + Hydrothermal alteration layer + K Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area + Overlapping a'a' and pahoehoe flows + L Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area + Metasedimentary Landslide Block; Hydrothermal Alteration Layer +

47

Property:HostRockLithology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HostRockLithology HostRockLithology Jump to: navigation, search Property Name HostRockLithology Property Type String Description Condensed description of the lithology of the reservoir rock. This is a property of type Page. Subproperties This property has the following 14 subproperties: B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area C Chena Geothermal Area D Desert Peak Geothermal Area G Geysers Geothermal Area H Heber Geothermal Area L Lightning Dock Geothermal Area R Raft River Geothermal Area Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area S Salton Sea Geothermal Area Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area S cont. Stillwater Geothermal Area V Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area W Wabuska Hot Springs Geothermal Area Pages using the property "HostRockLithology"

48

Property:HostRockAge | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HostRockAge HostRockAge Jump to: navigation, search Property Name HostRockAge Property Type String Description Describes the age of the reservoir rock by epoch, era, or period per available data. This is a property of type Page. Subproperties This property has the following 10 subproperties: B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area C Chena Geothermal Area D Desert Peak Geothermal Area G Geysers Geothermal Area R Raft River Geothermal Area Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area S Salton Sea Geothermal Area Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area W Wabuska Hot Springs Geothermal Area Pages using the property "HostRockAge" Showing 11 pages using this property. A Amedee Geothermal Area + Mesozoic + B Blue Mountain Geothermal Area + Triassic + C Coso Geothermal Area + Mesozoic +

49

Sky Vegetables | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vegetables Vegetables Jump to: navigation, search Name Sky Vegetables Address 45 Rosemary Street, Suite F Place Needham, MA Zip 02494 Sector Solar Website http://www.skyvegetables.com/i Coordinates 42.2882945°, -71.2335259° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.2882945,"lon":-71.2335259,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

50

A physically-based night sky model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a physically-based model of the night sky for realistic image synthesis. We model both the direct appearance of the night sky and the illumination coming from the Moon, the stars, the zodiacal light, and the atmosphere. To accurately ...

Henrik Wann Jensen; Frdo Durand; Julie Dorsey; Michael M. Stark; Peter Shirley; Simon Premoe

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Einstein and the Daytime Sky - D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

D. Fun with polarizers D. Fun with polarizers In one respect, Einstein's mathematical analysis (like Rayleigh's earlier one) proves quite accurate, in a way that's easy to demonstrate. This has to do with how the sky's scattered light is polarized. Try looking at a patch of clear sky through one lens of a pair of polarizing sunglasses while you rotate the lens. You'll notice that the sky looks brighter as you look through the lens in some positions, and darker when the lens is in other positions. If the sun is not far from the patch of sky you're looking at, you'll find that the sky looks brightest when the sun is to the left or right of the lens, and darkest when the sun is "above the top" or "below the bottom" of the lens. Why is this? Any kind of wave-whether sound wave, water wave, light wave-is associated

52

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP ATLAS THE UNITED S  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP ATLAS THE UNITED S T A T E S 2012 CARBON UTILIZATION AND STORAGE Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration...

53

Prehistoric Rock Structures of the Idaho National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Over the past 13,500 years, human populations have lived in and productively utilized the natural resources offered by the cold desert environment of the northeastern Snake River Plain in eastern Idaho. Within an overall framework of hunting and gathering, groups relied on an intimate familiarity with the natural world and developed a variety of technologies to extract the resources that they needed to survive. Useful items were abundant and found everywhere on the landscape. Even the basaltic terrain and the rocks, themselves, were put to productive use. This paper presents a preliminary classification scheme for rock structures built on the Idaho National Laboratory landscape by prehistoric aboriginal populations, including discussions of the overall architecture of the structures, associated artifact assemblages, and topographic placement. Adopting an ecological perspective, the paper concludes with a discussion of the possible functions of these unique resources for the desert populations that once called the INL home.

Brenda R Pace

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

SkyPower Pekon Electronics JV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name SkyPower-Pekon Electronics JV Place India Sector Wind energy Product Joint venture for development of Indian wind farms. References SkyPower-Pekon Electronics...

55

Beijing Sky Solar Investment Management Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sky Solar Investment Management Co Jump to: navigation, search Name Beijing Sky Solar Investment & Management Co. Place Beijing, China Sector Solar Product Beijing based company...

56

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect

The Big Sky Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts during the first performance period fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first Partnership meeting the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Complementary to the efforts on evaluation of sources and sinks is the development of the Big Sky Partnership Carbon Cyberinfrastructure (BSP-CC) and a GIS Road Map for the Partnership. These efforts will put in place a map-based integrated information management system for our Partnership, with transferability to the national carbon sequestration effort. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but other policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long term viability. A series of meetings held in November and December, 2003, have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding the implementation of a market-based setting for soil C credits. These include the impact of existing local, state, and federal permitting issues for terrestrial based carbon sequestration projects, consistency of final protocols and planning standards with national requirements, and alignments of carbon sequestration projects with existing federal and state cost-share programs. Finally, the education and outreach efforts during this performance period have resulted in a comprehensive plan which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. The primary goal of this plan is to increase awareness, understanding, and public acceptance of sequestration efforts and build support for a constituent based network which includes the initial Big Sky Partnership and other local and regional businesses and entities.

Susan M. Capalbo

2004-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

57

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Big Sky Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts during the second performance period fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Two key deliverables were completed this quarter--a literature review/database to assess the soil carbon on rangelands, and the draft protocols, contracting options for soil carbon trading. To date, there has been little research on soil carbon on rangelands, and since rangeland constitutes a major land use in the Big Sky region, this is important in achieving a better understanding of terrestrial sinks. The protocols developed for soil carbon trading are unique and provide a key component of the mechanisms that might be used to efficiently sequester GHG and reduce CO{sub 2} concentrations. Progress on other deliverables is noted in the PowerPoint presentations. A series of meetings held during the second quarter have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding the implementation of a market-based setting for soil C credits. These meetings provide a connection to stakeholders in the region and a basis on which to draw for the DOE PEIS hearings. Finally, the education and outreach efforts have resulted in a comprehensive plan and process which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. While we are still working on the public website, we have made many presentations to stakeholders and policy makers, connections to other federal and state agencies concerned with GHG emissions, climate change, and efficient and environmentally-friendly energy production. In addition, we have laid plans for integration of our outreach efforts with the students, especially at the tribal colleges and at the universities involved in our partnership. This includes collaboration with the film and media arts departments at MSU, with outreach effort

Susan M. Capalbo

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. Efforts are underway to showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies.

Susan M. Capalbo

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

59

Ornaments of Two Extinct Marine Pelecypods from the Barrel Springs Site in the Colorado Desert  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Barrel Springs Site in the Colorado Desert JANICE F. FISHERSprings^ , Ocotillo Welle' COLORADO SA^N;-. DESERT Cornzo

Fisher, Janice F; Foster, John W; Oxendine, Joan

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Accounting for Circumsolar and Horizon Cloud Determination Errors in Sky Image Inferral of Sky Cover  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accounting for Circumsolar and Horizon Cloud Determination Errors in Sky Accounting for Circumsolar and Horizon Cloud Determination Errors in Sky Image Inferral of Sky Cover. C. N. Long, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 1) Introduction In observing the cloudless sky, one can often notice that the area near the sun is whiter and brighter than the rest of the hemisphere. Additionally, even a slight haze will make a large angular area of the horizon whiter and brighter when the sun is low on the horizon. The human eye has an amazing ability to handle a range of light intensity spanning orders of magnitude. But one of the persistent problems in using sky images to infer fractional sky cover is the intensity range limitations of the camera detector. It is desirable to have bright enough images to be able to detect thin clouds, yet this often means the part of the image near the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desert rock sky" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Big Sky Wind Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sky Wind Facility Sky Wind Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Big Sky Wind Facility Facility Big Sky Wind Facility Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Edison Mission Energy Developer Edison Mission Energy Energy Purchaser PJM Market Location Bureau County IL Coordinates 41.579967°, -89.46177° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.579967,"lon":-89.46177,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

62

SkyFuel Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SkyFuel Inc SkyFuel Inc Jump to: navigation, search Logo: SkyFuel Inc Name SkyFuel Inc Address 18300 W Highway 72 Place Arvada, Colorado Zip 80007 Sector Solar Product Solar thermal power Website http://www.skyfuel.com/ Coordinates 39.862942°, -105.206509° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.862942,"lon":-105.206509,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

63

North Sky River | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sky River Sky River Jump to: navigation, search Name North Sky River Facility North Sky River Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Pacific Gas & Electric Location Tehachapi CA Coordinates 35.335578°, -118.186347° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.335578,"lon":-118.186347,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

64

Einstein and the Daytime Sky - C  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Einstein "Einstein and the Daytime Sky" (continued) A B C D C. Imitation of opal Since Einstein was addressing a more general question than the color of the atmosphere, his results...

65

Sky Power LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power LLC Place Portland, Oregon Zip 97204 Sector Wind energy Product Developer of a high-altitude wind turbine technology. References Sky Power LLC1 LinkedIn Connections...

66

Sky River Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sky River Wind Farm Sky River Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Sky River Wind Farm Facility Sky River Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer Zond Systems Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location Tehachapi CA Coordinates 35.07665°, -118.25529° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.07665,"lon":-118.25529,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

67

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Desert Peak Area (Wisian & Blackwell...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Desert Peak Area (Wisian & Blackwell, 2004) Exploration Activity...

68

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO2 utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other DOE regional partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Deliverables for the 7th Quarter reporting period include (1) for the geological efforts: Reports on Technology Needs and Action Plan on the Evaluation of Geological Sinks and Pilot Project Deployment (Deliverables 2 and 3), and Report on the Feasibility of Mineralization Trapping in the Snake River Plain Basin (Deliverable 14); (2) for the terrestrial efforts: Report on the Evaluation of Terrestrial Sinks and a Report of the Best Production Practices for Soil C Sequestration (Deliverables 8 and 15). In addition, the 7th Quarter activities for the Partnership included further development of the proposed activities for the deployment and demonstration phase of the carbon sequestration pilots including geological and terrestrial pilots, expansion of the Partnership to encompass regions and institutions that are complimentary to the steps we have identified, building greater collaborations with industry and stakeholders in the region, contributed to outreach efforts that spanned all partnerships, co-authorship on the Carbon Capture and Separation report, and developed a regional basis to address future energy opportunities in the region. The deliverables and activities are discussed in the following sections and appended to this report. The education and outreach efforts have resulted in a comprehensive plan which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. The public website has been expanded and integrated with the GIS carbon atlas. We have made presentations to stakeholders and policy makers including two tribal sequestration workshops, and made connections to other federal and state agencies concerned with GHG emissions, climate change, and efficient and environmental

Susan M. Capalbo

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Desert Wind Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Desert Wind Power Desert Wind Power Facility Desert Wind Power Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status Proposed Developer Iberdrola Renewables Location Pasquotank and Perquimans Counties NC Coordinates 36.435688°, -76.232786° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.435688,"lon":-76.232786,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

70

Desert Queen Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Desert Queen Geothermal Area Desert Queen Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Desert Queen Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (4) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

71

Desert Peak Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Desert Peak Geothermal Area Desert Peak Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Desert Peak Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (3) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.75,"lon":-118.95,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

72

Google Sky, WorldWide Telescope & Celestia in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Google Sky, WorldWide Telescope & Celestia in the Undergraduate Non-Science Major Classroom & Lab of Public Outreach Dept.Astronomy & Astrophysics University of Chicago Sky #12;Google Sky, World interactive labs and self-directed modules that utilize new, emerging, software tools, specifically Google Sky

Collar, Juan I.

73

Geology of the Desert Hot Springs-Upper Coachella Valley Area, California (with a selected bibliography of the Coachella Valley, Salton Sea, and vicinity)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Desert Hot Springs area is in the upper Coachella Valley at the junction of three natural geomorphic provinces of California--the Transverse Ranges, the Peninsular Ranges, and the Colorado Desert. The mapped area is about 100 miles east of Los Angeles and lies principally in north central Riverside County. The oldest rocks in the area are Precambrian(?) amphibolitic and migmatized paragneisses of the San Gorgonio igneous-metamorphic (Chuckwalla) complex. They are intruded by Cretaceous diorite porphyry, Cactus Granite, quartz monzonite, intrusive breccia, and basic plutonic rocks. Of probable late Paleozoic age are the metamorphic rocks of the San Jacinto Mountains which form spurs projecting into San Gorgonio Pass and Coachella Valley.

Proctor, Richard J.

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

City of Palm Desert - Energy Independence Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Palm Desert - Energy Independence Program Palm Desert - Energy Independence Program City of Palm Desert - Energy Independence Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating Water Heating Program Info State California Program Type PACE Financing Provider Palm Desert '''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing Agency (FHFA) issued a statement in July 2010 concerning the senior lien status associated with most PACE programs. In response to the FHFA statement, most local PACE programs have been suspended until further clarification is provided. After temporarily suspending their program, Palm Desert reinstated it in August 2010, but

75

Cloudy Sky Version of Bird's Broadband Hourly Clear Sky Model (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation on Bird's Broadband Hourly Clear Sky Model given by NREL's Daryl Myers at SOLAR 2006. The objective of this report is to produce ''all sky'' modeled hourly solar radiation. This is based on observed cloud cover data using a SIMPLE model.

Myers, D.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Desert Peak Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Desert Peak Geothermal Area Desert Peak Geothermal Area (Redirected from Desert Peak Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Desert Peak Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (3) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.75,"lon":-118.95,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

77

National Aeronautics and Space Administration Desert RATS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This helps the D-RATS team determine the system requirements necessary for exploring distant locations while exploration methods, equipment and tools developed in laboratory settings in a real world environment developing the technical skills required of the next generation of explorers. Desert RATS is one of a suite

78

SolarSkies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SolarSkies SolarSkies Jump to: navigation, search Name SolarSkies Address 106 Donovan Drive Place Alexandria, Minnesota Zip 56308 Country United States Sector Solar Coordinates 45.88897°, -95.3536576° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.88897,"lon":-95.3536576,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

79

Fracture Permeability Evolution in Desert Peak Quartz Monzonite  

SciTech Connect

Fracture flow experiments are being conducted on quartz monzonite core from the Desert Peak East EGS site, Churchill County, Nevada. The flow experiments are conducted at temperatures of 167-169 C and 5.5 MPa confining pressure through artificial fractures. Two injection fluids, a saline solution and a silica-bearing solution, have been used to date. Flow rates are typically 0.02 mL/min, but other rates have been used. The fracture surfaces are characterized with a contact profilometer. The profilometry data demonstrate that it is possible to fabricate statistically similar fracture surfaces and enable us to map aperture variations, which we use in numerical simulations. Effluent samples are collected for chemical analysis. The fluid pressure gradient is measured across the specimen and effective hydraulic apertures are calculated. The experiments show a reduction in permeability over time for both injection fluids, but a more rapid loss of permeability was observed for the silica-bearing solution. The calculated hydraulic aperture is observed to decrease by 17% for the saline solution and 75% for the silica-bearing fluid, respectively. Electrical resistivity measurements, which are sensitive to the ionic content of the pore fluid, provide additional evidence of fluid-rock interactions.

Carlson, S R; Roberts, J J; Detwiler, R L; Viani, B E; Roberts, S K

2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

80

SkyFuel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SkyFuel SkyFuel Jump to: navigation, search Logo: SkyFuel Name SkyFuel Address 18300 West Highway 72 Place Arvada, Colorado Zip 80007 Sector Solar Product Parabolic Trough Solar Collector Year founded 2007 Number of employees 11-50 Phone number 303.330.0276 Website http://www.skyfuel.com Coordinates 39.8630176°, -105.2064482° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.8630176,"lon":-105.2064482,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desert rock sky" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

American Clean Skies Foundation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Skies Foundation Skies Foundation Jump to: navigation, search Logo: American Clean Skies Foundation Name American Clean Skies Foundation Address 750 1st Street NE, Suite 1100 Place Washington, DC Zip 20002 Region Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Year founded 2007 Phone number (202) 682-6294 Website http://www.cleanskies.org/ Coordinates 38.899704°, -77.007068° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.899704,"lon":-77.007068,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

82

Desert Queen Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Desert Queen Geothermal Project Desert Queen Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 39.877777777778°, -118.34722222222° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.877777777778,"lon":-118.34722222222,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

83

Modeling of Regional Hydroclimate Change over the Indian Subcontinent: Impact of the Expanding Thar Desert  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Thar Desert between northwestern India and Pakistan is the most densely populated desert region in the world, and the vast surrounding areas are affected by rapid soil degradation and vegetation loss. The impact of an expanded desert (...

Massimo Bollasina; Sumant Nigam

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Gas Flux Sampling At Desert Peak Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Gas Flux Sampling At Desert Peak Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh, 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

85

Thermal Gradient Holes At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details...

86

Structural Analysis of the Desert Peak-Brady Geothermal Fields...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

mapping, delineation of Tertiary strata, analysis of faults and folds, and a new gravity survey have elucidated the structural controls on the Desert Peak and Brady...

87

Regional Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert and Adjacent Areas in Utah, Nevada, and Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Regional Gravity...

88

Burning season effect on four southern Chihuahuan desert plants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Use of prescribed fire to manage undesirable vegetation in the Chihuahuan Desert of Mexico, promises acceptable results, but information on plants responses to different weather (more)

Luna, Miguel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

The Challenge of Archaeological Research in the Colorado Desert: Recent Approaches and Discoveries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESEARCH IN THE COLORADO DESERT Bierman, PaulRidge-back Tools of the Colorado Desert. American AntiquityL. 1986 The Lower Colorado River Valley: A Pleistocene

Schaefer, Jerry

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Blue Sky Bio Fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bio Fuels Bio Fuels Jump to: navigation, search Name Blue Sky Bio-Fuels Place Oakland, California Zip 94602 Product Blue Sky owns and operates a biodiesel plant in Idaho with a capacity of 37.9mLpa (10m gallons annually). Coordinates 37.805065°, -122.273024° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.805065,"lon":-122.273024,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

91

NETL: News Release - Eyes in the Sky...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August 28, 2003 August 28, 2003 Eyes in the Sky... Remote Sensing Technology Maps Flow of Groundwater from the Air Photo: Remote Sensor Suspended Beneath a Helicopter Detects Groundwater Beneath the Surface DOE is using remote sensors suspended from helicopters to map the flow of groundwater that may be affected by energy projects. In four states this past spring and summer, eyes have turned skyward as helicopters zig-zagged over hills and valleys, towing torpedo- or spiderweb-like contraptions that conjured up thoughts of Superman - "Look! Up in the sky!" But the "x-ray vision" in this case isn't comic-book fantasy. Instead, using aerial remote sensing techniques, researchers working with the U.S. Department of Energy are "seeing" through solid ground to create

92

New Sky Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New Sky Energy New Sky Energy Place Boulder, Colorado Sector Carbon Product Colorado-based startup that focuses on using chemical technology to convert carbon dioxide to usable outputs. Coordinates 42.74962°, -109.714163° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.74962,"lon":-109.714163,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

93

Einstein and the Daytime Sky - A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The distinction between a fluid's liquid and gaseous phases breaks down at a certain temperature and pressure; when illuminated under these conditions, the fluid looks milky white, like a common opal. Einstein found how this relates to the reason the sky is blue. A B C D A. A path with a detour If you look at many artists' renderings of Albert Einstein, you are likely to find some that depict Einstein with some representation of the universe as a whole, or black holes, or other objects in deep space. Because many such pictures exist, we may, somewhat unconsciously, associate Einstein with the dark nighttime sky. This is a quite reasonable association, since Einstein's theories of space and time deal with the universe as a whole and with certain astrophysical

94

Blue Sky Optimum Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Optimum Energy Optimum Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Blue Sky Optimum Energy Place Buffalo, New York Product Blue Sky offers a processing system to produce biodiesel at a cheaper price. Coordinates 42.88544°, -78.878464° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.88544,"lon":-78.878464,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

95

Infrared Sky Brightness Monitors for Antarctica  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Two sky brightness monitorsone for the near-infrared and one for the mid-infraredhave been developed for site survey work in Antarctica. The instruments, which we refer to as the NISM (Near-Infrared Sky Monitor) and the MISM (Mid-Infrared Sky Monitor), are part of a suite of instruments being deployed in the Automated Astrophysical Site-Testing Observatory (AASTO). The chief design constraints include reliable, autonomous operation, low power consumption, and of course the ability to operate under conditions of extreme cold. The instruments are currently operational at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, prior to deployment at remote, unattended sites on the high antarctic plateau. 1. INTRODUCTION The antarctic plateau is recognized as having the potential to provide some of the best astronomical observing conditions on earth (see, e.g., Burton et al. 1994). Almost all the site testing to date has been carried out at the South Pole, where it has already been demonstrated t...

Storey Ashley Boccas; J. W. V. Storey; M. C. B. Ashley; M. Boccas; M. A. Phillips; A. E. T. Schinckel

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Conergy SkyPower JV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SkyPower JV SkyPower JV Jump to: navigation, search Name Conergy & SkyPower JV Place Canada Sector Solar Product Canada-based solar project developer. References Conergy & SkyPower JV[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Conergy & SkyPower JV is a company located in Canada . References ↑ "Conergy & SkyPower JV" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Conergy_SkyPower_JV&oldid=343842" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load)

97

Cogenra Solar formerly SkyWatch Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cogenra Solar formerly SkyWatch Energy Cogenra Solar formerly SkyWatch Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Cogenra Solar (formerly SkyWatch Energy) Place Mountain View, California Zip 94043 Sector Solar Product California-based and founded by a former Applied Materials executive, Cogenra Solar is a stealth mode solar company. References Cogenra Solar (formerly SkyWatch Energy)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Cogenra Solar (formerly SkyWatch Energy) is a company located in Mountain View, California . References ↑ "Cogenra Solar (formerly SkyWatch Energy)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Cogenra_Solar_formerly_SkyWatch_Energy&oldid=343766"

98

Gopherus Agassizii (Desert Tortoise). Predation/Mountain Lions (Pre-Print)  

SciTech Connect

During a long-term study on tortoise growth within 3 fenced 9-ha enclosures in Rock Valley, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada, USA, tortoises have been captured annually since 1964 (Medica et al. 1975. Copeia 1975:630-643; Turner et al. 1987. Copeia 1987:974-979). Between early August and mid October 2003 we observed a significant mortality event. The Rock Valley enclosures were constructed of 6 x 6 mm mesh 1.2 m wide hardware cloth, buried 0.3 m in the soil with deflective flashing on both sides on the top to restrict the movement of small mammals and lizards from entering or leaving the enclosures (Rundel and Gibson 1996, Ecological communities and process in a Mojave Desert ecosystem: Rock Valley, Nevada, Cambridge University Press, Great Britain. 369 pp.). On August 6, 2003, the carcass of an adult female Desert Tortoise No.1411 (carapace length 234 mm when alive) was collected while adult male tortoise No.4414 (carapace length 269 mm) was observed alive and in good health on the same day. Subsequently the carcass of No.4414 was found on October 16, 2003. Between October 16-17, 2003, the remains of 6 (5 adult and 1 juvenile) Desert Tortoises were found, some within each of the 3 enclosures in Rock Valley. A seventh adult tortoise was found on September 26, 2006, its death also attributed to the 2003 mortality event based upon the forensic evidence. Each of the 7 adult Desert Tortoises had the central portion of their carapace broken open approximately to the dorsal portion of the marginal scutes while the plastron was still intact (Figure 1A). Adjacent to 7 of the 8 remains we located numerous bone fragments including parts of the carapace and limbs as well as dried intestines in a nearby Range Rhatany (Krameria parvifolia) shrub. The significance of the frequent use of this shrub is puzzling. Three of the Desert Tortoise shell remains possessed distinctive intercanine punctures measuring 55-60 mm center to center indicating that this was an adult sized Mountain Lion. By comparison, a 2 year old male Mountain Lion salvaged on NTS had an upper intercanine bite width of 45 mm, and a 6 month old kitten measured 35mm respectively. The Mountain Lion (Puma concolor) is the only predator that exists in southern Nevada that could possibly have a bite with a gap between its upper canine teeth that large (Murmann et al. 2006. J. Forensic Sci. 51:846-860). The appearance of the shell remains in Figure 1A is similar to that depicting Jaguar (Panthera onca) predation, on the Amazonian Tortoise (Geochelone denticulata) as illustrated by Emmons (1989. J. Herpetol. 23:311-314) with the majority of the carapace broken open and the plastron still intact. Predation of Desert Tortoises by Mountain Lions was also documented in 1993 in southern Arizona (Little Shipp Wash Plot), where 7 of 8 carcasses found were attributed to Mountain Lion predation (Averill-Murray et al. 2002. In. T.R.Van Devender [ed.], The Sonoran Desert Tortoise: Natural History, Biology, and Conservation, pp.109-134. University of Arizona Press and Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum, Tucson, Arizona). Similarly, predation by a Mountain Lion has been reported on the Argentine Tortoise (Chelonoidis chilensis) in Argentina (Acosta et al. 2004. Herpetol. Review 35:53-54), and a Mountain Lion kitten was observed to kill and consume a portion of the carapace of a Texas Tortoise (Gopherus berlandieri) in west Texas (Adams et al. 2006. Southwestern Nat. 51:581-581). Over the past 45 years this Desert Tortoise population has been monitored yearly, with no prior evidence of predation to tortoises within the fenced enclosures. On several occasions other predators such as Bobcats (Lynx rufus) have been observed within the study enclosures for as long as a week. Evidence of Kit Fox (Vulpes macrotus) sign has been observed on numerous occasions, and a Spotted Skunk (Spilogale putorius) and Longtail Weasels (Mustela frenata) have been captured and released (B.G. Maza, pers. comm.; Medica 1990. Great Basin Nat. 50:83-84), while Coyotes (Canis latrans) were never observed within th

Paul D. Greger and Philip A. Medica

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Assessing Desert Tortoise Survival and Reproduction at a Wind Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessing Desert Tortoise Survival and Reproduction at a Wind Energy Facility Near Palm Springs of their habitat are characterized by significant wind and solar energy potential. As a result, the species in the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts have preexisting wind energy facilities dating back over 25 years. One

100

ASSEMBLAGES ON WASTE ROCK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Natural regeneration on waste rock was investigated at the old Wangaloa coal mine, south-east Otago. A 450-m long waste rock stack had been created 4050 years ago, and has had little anthropogenic intervention since. The stack is made up of a gradient of three main waste rock types, defined as silt-rich, mixed, and quartz-rich, which reflect different proportions of loess siltstone and quartz gravel conglomerate. Plant species assemblages were quantified in four 5-m 2 quadrats in each waste rock type. Invertebrates were heat extracted from substrate cores (7 cm diameter; depth 5 cm) collected from quadrats over an eight-week period in spring 2003. Ordination analysis showed statistically distinct plant and invertebrate assemblages had arisen on each waste rock type. Revegetation patterns were dominated by native, woody individuals on all waste rock types, particularly manuka (Leptospermum scoparium) and kanuka (Kunzea ericoides). Plant cover on silt-rich waste rock was four-fold that on quartz-rich waste rock. Total numbers of invertebrates were highest on quartz-rich waste rock, but richness greatest on silt-rich waste rock. Collembola dominated the fauna but their numbers were proportionally greatest in poorly vegetated areas. Further work is required to explain the absence of plants and invertebrates from local areas of waste rock. ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

C. G. Rufaut; S. Hammit; D. Craw; S. G. Clearwater

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desert rock sky" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Origin And Characterization Of Geothermal Waters At Desert Queen, Nevada |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Origin And Characterization Of Geothermal Waters At Desert Queen, Nevada Origin And Characterization Of Geothermal Waters At Desert Queen, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Origin And Characterization Of Geothermal Waters At Desert Queen, Nevada Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Desert Queen geothermal system, which is in close proximity to two locations where geothermal energy is currently being harnessed, may host an additional reservoir. A _18O vs _D plot indicates that Desert Queen waters likely originate from the Humboldt River, and reflects Humboldt River water that is clearly evaporated. Temperatures of the reservoir at depth are estimated to be between 92-141°C and were calculated using the _18O(SO4-H2O) geothermometer. It is unclear whether these temperatures

102

Eco-Friendly Complex Blends into Desert | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Eco-Friendly Complex Blends into Desert Eco-Friendly Complex Blends into Desert Eco-Friendly Complex Blends into Desert October 7, 2010 - 11:58am Addthis Paul Lester Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy What does this project do? Rooftop solar panels provide 27 percent of the facility's energy. Maricopa County officials estimate the complex is 42 percent more energy efficient than many modern day buildings. Next month, hikers marveling at the sun bathed canyons and ridges of White Tank Mountain in the Sonoran Desert will see something on the horizon - if they look hard. Built to blend into the desert landscape, the new 29,000 square-foot White Tank Library and Nature Center in Surprise, Ariz., is set to open on Nov. 13. Rooftop solar panels provide 27 percent of the facility's energy.

103

Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Calibration Revisited  

SciTech Connect

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey calibration is revisited to obtain the most accurate photometric calibration. A small but significant error is found in the flat-fielding of the Photometric telescope used for calibration. Two SDSS star catalogs are compared and the average difference in magnitude as a function of right ascension and declination exhibits small systematic errors in relative calibration. The photometric transformation from the SDSS Photometric Telescope to the 2.5 m telescope is recomputed and compared to synthetic magnitudes computed from measured filter bandpasses.

Marriner, John; /Fermilab

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

104

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: SkyVision  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SkyVision SkyVision SkyVision logo. Calculates the overall optical characteristics (transmittance, absorptance, reflectance and Solar Heat Gain Coefficient) of conventional and tubular skylights, performance indicators of skylight/room interfaces (well efficiency and coefficient of utilization), indoor daylight availability (daylight factor and illuminance) and daily/annual lighting energy savings. SkyVision accounts for the skylight shape and glazing, geometry of the indoor space (curb, well, room), skylight layouts, lighting and shading controls, site location and sky/ground conditions. SkyVision is unique--it uses the state-of-art glazing models and ray-tracing-based methods to compute the optical characteristics of skylights and indoor daylight availability. Screen Shots

105

EXPLORING THE VARIABLE SKY WITH LINEAR. I. PHOTOMETRIC RECALIBRATION WITH THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY  

SciTech Connect

We describe photometric recalibration of data obtained by the asteroid survey LINEAR. Although LINEAR was designed for astrometric discovery of moving objects, the data set described here contains over 5 billion photometric measurements for about 25 million objects, mostly stars. We use Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data from the overlapping {approx}10,000 deg{sup 2} of sky to recalibrate LINEAR photometry and achieve errors of 0.03 mag for sources not limited by photon statistics with errors of 0.2 mag at r {approx} 18. With its 200 observations per object on average, LINEAR data provide time domain information for the brightest four magnitudes of the SDSS survey. At the same time, LINEAR extends the deepest similar wide-area variability survey, the Northern Sky Variability Survey, by 3 mag. We briefly discuss the properties of about 7000 visually confirmed periodic variables, dominated by roughly equal fractions of RR Lyrae stars and eclipsing binary stars, and analyze their distribution in optical and infrared color-color diagrams. The LINEAR data set is publicly available from the SkyDOT Web site.

Sesar, Branimir [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stuart, J. Scott [Lincoln Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lexington, MA 02420-9108 (United States); Ivezic, Zeljko; Morgan, Dylan P.; Becker, Andrew C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Wozniak, Przemyslaw [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545-0001 (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

106

Seeing the sky through Hubble's eye: The COSMOS SkyWalker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large, high-resolution space-based imaging surveys produce a volume of data that is difficult to present to the public in a comprehensible way. While megapixel-sized images can still be printed out or downloaded via the World Wide Web, this is no longer feasible for images with 10^9 pixels (e.g., the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys [ACS] images of the Galaxy Evolution from Morphology and SEDs [GEMS] project) or even 10^10 pixels (for the ACS Cosmic Evolution Survey [COSMOS]). We present a Web-based utility called the COSMOS SkyWalker that allows viewing of the huge ACS image data set, even through slow Internet connections. Using standard HTML and JavaScript, the application successively loads only those portions of the image at a time that are currently being viewed on the screen. The user can move within the image by using the mouse or interacting with an overview image. Using an astrometrically registered image for the COSMOS SkyWalker allows the display of calibrated world coordinates for use in science. The SkyWalker "technique" can be applied to other data sets. This requires some customization, notably the slicing up of a data set into small (e.g., 256^2 pixel) subimages. An advantage of the SkyWalker is the use of standard Web browser components; thus, it requires no installation of any software and can therefore be viewed by anyone across many operating systems.

K. Jahnke; S. F. Sanchez; A. Koekemoer

2006-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

107

URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

District, Teller County, Colorado," U.S. Geol. Survey Bull.Jamestown District, Colorado," Econ. Geol. , v. 68, pp 1247-Rocks at Powderhorn, Colorado; Economic Geology, Vol. 60,

Murphy, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership--Kevin Dome...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Services Vecta Oil & Gas, Ltd. Washington State University Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership-Kevin Dome Development Phase Project Background The U.S....

109

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: SkyVision  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and dailyannual lighting energy savings. SkyVision accounts for the skylight shape and glazing, geometry of the indoor space (curb, well, room), skylight layouts,...

110

NETL: Carbon Storage - Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BSCSP BSCSP Carbon Storage Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership MORE INFO Additional information related to ongoing BSCSP efforts can be found on their website. The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership (BSCSP) is led by Montana State University-Bozeman and represents a coalition of more than 60 organizations including universities, national laboratories, private companies, state agencies, Native American tribes, and international collaborators. The partners are engaged in several aspects of BSCSP projects and contribute to the efforts to deploy carbon storage projects in the BSCSP region. The BSCSP region encompasses Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, South Dakota, and eastern Washington and Oregon. BSCSP Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region

111

EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership -...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA,...

112

Clear Skies Group Inc Holdings Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sector Solar Product Designs and installs photovoltaic, solar thermal and co-generation power generation systems for domestic use. References Clear Skies Group Inc Holdings...

113

SkyMine Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Topical Report addresses accomplishments achieved during Phase 1 of the SkyMine{reg_sign} Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project. The primary objectives of this project are to design, construct, and operate a system to capture CO{sub 2} from a slipstream of flue gas from a commercial coal-fired cement kiln, convert that CO{sub 2} to products having commercial value (i.e., beneficial use), show the economic viability of the CO{sub 2} capture and conversion process, and thereby advance the technology to a point of readiness for commercial scale demonstration and proliferation. The project will also substantiate market opportunities for the technology by sales of chemicals into existing markets, and identify opportunities to improve technology performance and reduce costs at commercial scale. The primary objectives of Phase 1 of the project were to elaborate proven SkyMine{reg_sign} process chemistry to commercial pilot-scale operation and complete the preliminary design ('Reference Plant Design') for the pilot plant to be built and operated in Phase 2. Additionally, during Phase 1, information necessary to inform a DOE determination regarding NEPA requirements for the project was developed, and a comprehensive carbon lifecycle analysis was completed. These items were included in the formal application for funding under Phase 2. All Phase 1 objectives were successfully met on schedule and within budget.

Joe Jones; Clive Barton; Mark Clayton; Al Yablonsky; David Legere

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

114

Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region Liberty-Parker #2 230-kV Transmission Line Optical Power Ground Wire Repairs - Continuation Sheet Project Description The scope of work includes digging a trenching and burying a 1.25-inch OPGW conduit. The conduit trench will be about 4 feet deep and 10 inches wide, with warning tape placed above the conduit in the trench. Once the conduit has been placed, the trench will be backfilled with the original surface material. About 5.3 linear miles of trenching will be required, mostly within the existing dirt access road associated with the LIB-PAD #2 transmission line. Four pullboxes will be installed along the route. The pullboxes measure 2 feet by 3 feet by 2 feet and will be installed at least 24 inches below grade. An

115

Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region Liberty-Parker #2 230-kV Transmission Line Optical Power Ground Wire Repairs - Continuation Sheet Project Description The scope of work includes digging a trenching and burying a 1.25-inch OPGW conduit. The conduit trench will be about 4 feet deep and 10 inches wide, with warning tape placed above the conduit in the trench. Once the conduit has been placed, the trench will be backfilled with the original surface material. About 5.3 linear miles of trenching will be required, mostly within the existing dirt access road associated with the LIB-PAD #2 transmission line. Four pullboxes will be installed along the route. The pullboxes measure 2 feet by 3 feet by 2 feet and will be installed at least 24 inches below grade. An

116

Session: Hard Rock Penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

100th shot for LLNL's 'gun in the desert'  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

09262012 | NR-12-09-04 100th shot for LLNL's 'gun in the desert' Robert H Hirschfeld, LLNL, (925) 422-2379, hirschfeld2@llnl.gov Printer-friendly The JASPER two-stage gas gun, as...

118

Structural Analysis of the Desert Peak-Brady Geothermal Fields,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Structural Analysis of the Desert Peak-Brady Geothermal Fields, Structural Analysis of the Desert Peak-Brady Geothermal Fields, Northwestern Nevada: Implications for Understanding Linkages Between Northeast-Trending Structures and Geothermal Reservoirs in the Humboldt Structural Zone Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Structural Analysis of the Desert Peak-Brady Geothermal Fields, Northwestern Nevada: Implications for Understanding Linkages Between Northeast-Trending Structures and Geothermal Reservoirs in the Humboldt Structural Zone Abstract Detailed geologic mapping, delineation of Tertiary strata, analysis of faults and folds, and a new gravity survey have elucidated the structural controls on the Desert Peak and Brady geothermal fields in the Hot Springs Mountains of northwestern Nevada. The fields lie within the Humboldt

119

Rock-ravintolatoiminta : elv rock-musiikkia ravintolaympristss; Rock venue activity : live rock music in the restaurant setting.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Tyn tavoitteena oli tutkia rock-ravintolatoimintaa ja elv rock-musiikkia ravintolaympristss ravintolan, artistin ja asiakkaan nkkulmasta. Tutkimuksessa pyrittiin selvittmn rock-ravintolayrittmisen toimintatapoja ja kartoittamaan alan tmn hetkist tilaa. (more)

Vyli, Jari

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

ORNITHOCOPROPHILOUS PLANTS OF MOUNT DESERT ROCK, A REMOTE BIRD-NESTING ISLAND IN THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, with a total fuel alcohol consumption of 13.8 ? 106 m3/year (ANP, 1999). In the U.S., several recent political

Rajakaruna, Nishanta

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desert rock sky" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Real-time rendering of daylight sky scene for virtual environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Realistic rendering of sky scene is important in virtual environment. Traditional methods are mostly based on skybox, thus failing to realistically simulate the change of sky scene under different weathers and conditions. In this paper, a new sky light ...

Changbo Wang

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Oldest Rock on Earth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Canada." and "Some of the oldest surface rock can be found in the Canadian Shield, Australia, Africa and in other more specific places around the world. The ages of...

123

Pink Skies coming to Northern New Mexico October 15-16  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pink Skies Coming To Northern New Mexico Community Connections: Our link to Northern New Mexico Communities Latest Issue:November 2013 All Issues submit Pink Skies coming to...

124

Global horizontal irradiance clear sky models : implementation and analysis.  

SciTech Connect

Clear sky models estimate the terrestrial solar radiation under a cloudless sky as a function of the solar elevation angle, site altitude, aerosol concentration, water vapor, and various atmospheric conditions. This report provides an overview of a number of global horizontal irradiance (GHI) clear sky models from very simple to complex. Validation of clear-sky models requires comparison of model results to measured irradiance during clear-sky periods. To facilitate validation, we present a new algorithm for automatically identifying clear-sky periods in a time series of GHI measurements. We evaluate the performance of selected clear-sky models using measured data from 30 different sites, totaling about 300 site-years of data. We analyze the variation of these errors across time and location. In terms of error averaged over all locations and times, we found that complex models that correctly account for all the atmospheric parameters are slightly more accurate than other models, but, primarily at low elevations, comparable accuracy can be obtained from some simpler models. However, simpler models often exhibit errors that vary with time of day and season, whereas the errors for complex models vary less over time.

Stein, Joshua S.; Hansen, Clifford W.; Reno, Matthew J.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Geography of urban food access : exploring potential causes of food deserts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We believe we understand food deserts, but we do not. In the last decade the phenomenon of food deserts has been often discussed, and many solutions are proposed to alleviate food access issues in American cities. However, ...

Cameron, Caitlin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

A Green Planet versus a Desert World: Estimating the Effect of Vegetation Extremes on the Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of vegetation extremes on the general circulation is estimated by two atmospheric GCM simulations using global desert and forest boundary conditions over land. The difference between the climates of a green planet and a desert world...

Klaus Fraedrich; Axel Kleidon; Frank Lunkeit

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Big Sky Trust Fund (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Big Sky Trust Fund (Montana) Big Sky Trust Fund (Montana) Big Sky Trust Fund (Montana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Local Government Tribal Government Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Wind Home Weatherization Solar Program Info Start Date 2005 State Montana Program Type Grant Program Provider Montana Department of Commerce The Big Sky Trust Fund reimburses expenses incurred in the purchase, leasing, or relocation of real assets for direct use of the assisted business or employee training costs. A local or tribal government on behalf of any business may apply. The funding limit of the program is $5,000 per new qualifying job created or $7,500 per qualifying job created in a high poverty county. A dollar for dollar match (or 50% match in a high poverty

128

Deep Sky Astronomical Image Database Project at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deep Sky Astronomical Image Deep Sky Astronomical Image Database Deep Sky Astronomical Image Database Key Challenges: Develop, store, analyze, and make available an astronomical image database of unprecedented depth, temporal breadth, and sky coverage, consisting of images from the seven-year span of the Palomar-Quest and Near-Earth Astroid Tracking (NEAT) transient surveys and the current Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). The database currently has over 13 million images stored on the NERSC Global Filesystem but data from the PTF are accumulating at the rate of about 105TB per year. The challenge is not only archiving the data but processing it in near-real time to observe rare and fleeting cosmic events as they happen so that experimental astronomers can be alerted. Why it Matters: The PTF will probe gaps in the transient phase space and

129

EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase 886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana SUMMARY This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal for the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnership to demonstrate the viability and safety of CO2 storage in a regionally significant subsurface formation in Toole County, Montana and to promote the commercialization of future

130

EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase 6: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana SUMMARY This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal for the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnership to demonstrate the viability and safety of CO2 storage in a regionally significant subsurface formation in Toole County, Montana and to promote the commercialization of future

131

Real-Time Sky-View Factor Calculation and Approximation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previously, the acquisition of sky-view factor data for climate studies has been time consuming and dependent on postprocessing. However, advances in technology now mean that techniques using fish-eye imagery can be algorithmically processed in ...

L. Chapman; J. E. Thornes

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Clear-Sky Nocturnal Temperatures Forecast and the Greenhouse Effect  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nocturnal evolution of air and soil temperatures are computed for clear-sky situations. The model takes into account the soil heat conduction and the atmospheric radiative transfers by using radiosonde data for temperature, water vapor, and ...

A. Quinft; J. Vanderborght

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Empirical Estimation of Daily Clear Sky Solar Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The suitability of two simple empirical equations for the estimation of clear sky radiation was investigated. Results indicated that latitude and altitude were sufficient to estimate the empirical equation coefficients and that the estimates of ...

D. F. Heermann; G. J. Harrington; K. M. Stahl

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

American Clean Skies Foundation | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

American Clean Skies Foundation Home Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(1992) Super contributor 2 October, 2012 - 14:01 Nominations open for 250,000 Multimedia Clean...

135

SkySails GmbH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

kite, with which it supplements the momentum of commercial vessels on long journeys, saving fuel costs. References SkySails GmbH1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No...

136

Factors Controlling ERBE Longwave Clear Sky and Cloud Forcing Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The factors controlling the Earth Radiation Budget satellite (ERBS) longwave clear sky and cloud-forcing fluxes are investigated using statistical analyses of the ERBS fluxes with International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) cloud ...

Bryan C. Weare

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Effect of grain size on remotely sensed spectral reflectance of sandy desert surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into the otherwise stable, armored desert surface. This has resulted in sand plumes, eroded from the fields by wind

Painter, Thomas H.

138

Research news: UC Desert Research and Extension Center celebrates 100 years  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for low desert biofuel production. Leafy greens and climateyield crops for biofuel production in the Imperial Valley

Meadows, Robin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Feasibility of night-sky radiation with heat pumps  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the procedure involved in the determination of the feasibility of high-sky radiation as the means of rejecting heat through solar collectors for a sample residential house in the Evansville area. It presents conclusions on different types of coatings that are used on solar collectors. It also designs the system, and its backup, in schematic form. For the purpose of cost analysis it discusses the difference of a cooling tower and night-sky radiation.

McKinney, T.G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership--Validation Phase  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership-Validation Phase Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected seven partnerships, through its Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) initiative, to determine the best approaches for capturing and permanently storing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), a greenhouse gas (GHG) which can contribute to global climate change. The RCSPs are made up of state and local agencies, coal companies, oil and gas companies, electric utilities,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desert rock sky" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Desert Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Desert Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Desert Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Desert Hot Springs, California Coordinates 33.961124°, -116.5016784° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

142

Desert Sunlight Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sunlight Solar Power Plant Sunlight Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Desert Sunlight Solar Power Plant Facility Desert Sunlight Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer First Solar Location Desert Center, California Coordinates 33.7541038°, -115.3311778° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.7541038,"lon":-115.3311778,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

143

Cuttings Analysis At Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Desert Peak Area Exploration Technique Cuttings Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Remote Sensing for Exploration and Mapping of Geothermal Resources, Wendy Calvin, 2005. Task 1: Detailed analysis of hyperspectral imagery obtained in summer of 2003 over Brady's Hot Springs region was completed and validated (Figure 1). This analysis provided a local map of both sinter and tufa deposits surrounding the Ormat plant, identified fault extensions not previously recognized from field mapping and has helped constrain where to put additional wells that were drilled at the site. Task 2: Initial analysis of Landsat and ASTER data for Buffalo Valley and Pyramid Lake was

144

Gaseous Emissions From Steamboat Springs, Brady'S Hot Springs, And Desert  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gaseous Emissions From Steamboat Springs, Brady'S Hot Springs, And Desert Gaseous Emissions From Steamboat Springs, Brady'S Hot Springs, And Desert Peak Geothermal Systems, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Gaseous Emissions From Steamboat Springs, Brady'S Hot Springs, And Desert Peak Geothermal Systems, Nevada Details Activities (3) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: Gaseous emissions from the landscape can be used to explore for geothermal systems, characterize their lateral extent, or map the trends of concealed geologic structures that may provide important reservoir permeability at depth. Gaseous geochemical signatures vary from system to system and utilization of a multi-gas analytical approach to exploration or characterization should enhance the survey's clarity. This paper describes

145

Desert Peak II Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

II Geothermal Facility II Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Desert Peak II Geothermal Facility General Information Name Desert Peak II Geothermal Facility Facility Desert Peak II Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Churchill, Nevada Coordinates 39.753854931241°, -118.95378112793° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.753854931241,"lon":-118.95378112793,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

146

Seeing the sky through Hubble's eye: The COSMOS SkyWalker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large, high-resolution space-based imaging surveys produce a volume of data that is difficult to present to the public in a comprehensible way. While megapixel-sized images can still be printed out or downloaded via the World Wide Web, this is no longer feasible for images with 10^9 pixels (e.g., the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys [ACS] images of the Galaxy Evolution from Morphology and SEDs [GEMS] project) or even 10^10 pixels (for the ACS Cosmic Evolution Survey [COSMOS]). We present a Web-based utility called the COSMOS SkyWalker that allows viewing of the huge ACS image data set, even through slow Internet connections. Using standard HTML and JavaScript, the application successively loads only those portions of the image at a time that are currently being viewed on the screen. The user can move within the image by using the mouse or interacting with an overview image. Using an astrometrically registered image for the COSMOS SkyWalker allows the display of calibrated world coordinates f...

Jahnke, K; Koekemoer, A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Biomass production by desert halophytes: alleviating the pressure on food production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Desert plants, i.e., plants that are adapted to grow under extreme desert conditions were studied with the aim of identifying new sources for energy crops. Such crops should not compete with conventional agriculture for valuable resources of fertile ... Keywords: Euphorbia tirucalii, biofuel, biomass, desert halophytes, saline water, tamarix

Amram Eshel; Aviah Zilberstein; Chingiz Alekparov; Tamar Eilam; Israel Oren; Yoel Sasson; Riccardo Valentini; Yoav Waisel

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Display of clouds taking into account multiple anisotropic scattering and sky light  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: clouds, multiple scattering, optical length, participating media, photo-realism, radiative transfer, sky light

Tomoyuki Nishita; Yoshinori Dobashi; Eihachiro Nakamae

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

A New Strategy for Analyzing the Chronometry of Constructed Rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mojave Desert Cultural and Historical Association, 14044 Hemlock Street, Trona, California 93562 3 Bureau

Dorn, Ron

150

Rock Harbor UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Passage Conglomerate Bay Five Finger Bay Lane Cove Stockly Bay Lake Ojibway Siskiwit River Creek Little River Washington Moskey M cCargoe Cove Robinson Bay Amygdaloid Channel Pickerel Cove Chippewa Harbor Crystal Cove Belle Isle Canoe Rocks Caribou Island Saginaw Point Tookers Island The Palisades Raspberry

151

The Landscape of Klamath Basin Rock Art  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Lines: Ethnographic Sources and Rock Art Interpretationwhen applying these sources toward rock art interpretation.information source for developing rock art interpretations.

David, Robert James

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

The effect of drought on four plant communities in the northern Mojave Desert  

SciTech Connect

Desert plant communities contain many perennial plant species that are well adapted to arid environments; therefore, one would intuitively believe that perennial desert species readily survive drought conditions. Abundant research on plant-soil-water relationships in North American deserts has shown that many species can maintain water uptake and growth when the soil-water potential is low. Little research, however, has focused on how prolonged drought conditions affect plant species in vegetation associations in desert ecosystems. A prolonged and widespread drought occurred in much of the western United States, including the Northern Mojave Desert, from 1987 through 1991. During this drought period vegetation characterization studies, initiated in 1990, by the US Department of Energy (DOE) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, allowed EG and G Energy Measurements to collect data that could be used to infer how both desert vegetation associations and desert plant species reacted to a prolonged drought. This paper presents the preliminary results.

Schultz, B.W. [Desert Research Inst., Reno, NV (United States); Ostler, W.K. [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

153

San Emidio Desert Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Emidio Desert Geothermal Area San Emidio Desert Geothermal Area (Redirected from San Emidio Desert Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: San Emidio Desert Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (4) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.38,"lon":-119.4,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

154

Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols Martin de Graaf KNMI #12; Outline · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Theory · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Reality · Biomass burning.6 Biomass burning over Angola, 09 Sep. 2004 Absorbing Aerosol Index PMD image #12;biomass burning ocean

Graaf, Martin de

155

Microwave assisted hard rock cutting  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for the sequential fracturing and cutting of subsurface volume of hard rock (102) in the strata (101) of a mining environment (100) by subjecting the volume of rock to a beam (25) of microwave energy to fracture the subsurface volume of rock by differential expansion; and , then bringing the cutting edge (52) of a piece of conventional mining machinery (50) into contact with the fractured rock (102).

Lindroth, David P. (Apple Valley, MN); Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN); Blair, James R. (Inver Grove Heights, MN)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Session: Hot Dry Rock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Hot Dry Rock - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''HDR Opportunities and Challenges Beyond the Long Term Flow Test'' by David V. Duchane; ''Start-Up Operations at the Fenton Hill HDR Pilot Plant'' by Raymond F. Ponden; and ''Update on the Long-Term Flow Testing Program'' by Donald W. Brown.

Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Duchane, David V.; Ponden, Raymond F.; Brown, Donald W.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Definition: Rock Density | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in crustal rocks. Rock density is a physical characteristic that is governed by the chemical composition (in situ minerals) and pore spaces of a specific rock or rock type.1...

158

Zhenjiang Sky Solar Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zhenjiang Sky Solar Co Ltd Zhenjiang Sky Solar Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Zhenjiang Sky-Solar Co Ltd Place Zhenjiang, Jiangsu Province, China Zip 212009 Sector Solar Product A high-tech enterprise specialized in developing and manufacturing solar series lights and solar panels. Coordinates 31.966261°, 119.472687° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.966261,"lon":119.472687,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

159

A blue sky catastrophe in double-diffusive convection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A global bifurcation of the blue sky catastrophe type has been found in a small Prandtl number binary mixture contained in a laterally heated cavity. The system has been studied numerically applying the tools of bifurcation theory. The catastrophe corresponds to the destruction of an orbit which, for a large range of Rayleigh numbers, is the only stable solution. This orbit is born in a global saddle-loop bifurcation and becomes chaotic in a period doubling cascade just before its disappearance at the blue sky catastrophe.

Esteban Meca; Isabel Mercader; Oriol Batiste; Laureano Ramirez-Piscina

2004-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

160

Microsoft Word - NEPA Big Sky Final EA .doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

886 886 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT For The Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Kevin Dome Carbon Storage Project U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY April 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Kevin Dome Carbon Storage Project National Energy Technology Laboratory Final Environmental Assessment i April 2013 COVER SHEET Responsible Agency: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Title: Environmental Assessment for the Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Kevin Dome Carbon Storage Project (DOE/EA-1886) Contact: For additional copies or more information about this Environmental Assessment, please contact: Mr. Bill Gwilliam U.S. Department of Energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desert rock sky" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Session: Hot Dry Rock  

SciTech Connect

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Hot Dry Rock - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''HDR Opportunities and Challenges Beyond the Long Term Flow Test'' by David V. Duchane; ''Start-Up Operations at the Fenton Hill HDR Pilot Plant'' by Raymond F. Ponden; and ''Update on the Long-Term Flow Testing Program'' by Donald W. Brown.

Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Duchane, David V.; Ponden, Raymond F.; Brown, Donald W.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Extraction of cloud statistics from whole sky imaging cameras  

SciTech Connect

Computer codes have been developed to extract basic cloud statistics from whole sky imaging (WSI) cameras. This report documents, on an algorithmic level, the steps and processes underlying these codes. Appendices comment on code details and on how to adapt to future changes in either the source camera or the host computer.

Kegelmeyer, W.P. Jr.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Name Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Address 2327 University Way, 3rd Floor Place Bozeman, Montana Zip 59715 Region Pacific Northwest Area Phone number 406-994-3755 Notes One of the US DOE's seven regional carbon sequestration partnerships. Coordinates 45.6565752°, -111.041813° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.6565752,"lon":-111.041813,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

164

California Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name California Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility California Desert Fish Farm Sector Geothermal energy Type Aquaculture Location Niland, California Coordinates 33.2400366°, -115.5188756° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

165

Palm Desert, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Desert, California: Energy Resources Desert, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.7222445°, -116.3744556° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.7222445,"lon":-116.3744556,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

166

Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Sampling Rock Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Sampling Details Activities (13) Areas (13) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock samples are used to define lithology. Field and lab analyses can be used to measure the chemical and isotopic constituents of rock samples. Stratigraphic/Structural: Provides information about the time and environment which formed a particular geologic unit. Microscopic rock textures can be used to estimate the history of stress and strain, and/or faulting. Hydrological: Isotope geochemistry can reveal fluid circulation of a geothermal system.

167

The Clear-Sky Greenhouse Effect Sensitivity to a Sea Surface Temperature Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The clear-sky greenhouse effect response to a sea surface temperature (SST or Ts) change is studied using outgoing clear-sky longwave radiation measurements from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE). Considering geographical distributions ...

J. Ph Duvel; F. M. Bron

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

A Technique for Mapping the Distribution of Diffuse Solar Radiation over the Sky Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique to map the distribution of diffuse solar radiation over the sky hemisphere is described. The method is based on an analysis of all-sky, visible photographs and concurrent actinometric measurements of diffuse solar radiance. The ...

L. J. Bruce McArthur; John E. Hay

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Feasibility of GRB with TeV gamma ray all sky monitor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss feasibility of Gamma ray burst (GRB) with TeV gamma ray all sky monitor and discuss necessity of TeV gamma ray cherenkov all sky monitor.

S. Osone

2003-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

170

A Study of the Incoming Longwave Atmospheric Radiation from a Clear Sky  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A band model for atmospheric absorption is used to calculate the incoming longwave atmospheric radiative flux for some typical clear sky conditions. The sky radiation is also measured using a specially-designed calorimetric apparatus over a wide ...

J. W. Ramsey; H. D. Chiang; R. J. Goldstein

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Overview: Hard Rock Penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

Dunn, J.C.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Overview - Hard Rock Penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling Organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

Dunn, James C.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

173

Overview: Hard Rock Penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

Dunn, J.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

San Emidio Desert Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Emidio Desert Geothermal Area San Emidio Desert Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: San Emidio Desert Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (4) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.38,"lon":-119.4,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

175

Rock Art in the Public Trust: Managing Prehistoric Rock Art on Federal Land  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Archaic North America. ? In Handbook of Rock Art Research,Rock Art Analysis. ? In Handbook of Archaeological Methods,Rock Art Analysis,? in Handbook of Archaeological Methods,

Hale, John Patrick

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Energy from hot dry rock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Program is described. The system, operation, results, development program, environmental implications, resource, economics, and future plans are discussed. (MHR)

Hendron, R.H.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Ground Gravity Survey At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activity Details Location San Emidio Desert Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes (prior to...

178

Retrofitting existing commercial buildings in the desert southwest to be energy efficient.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research proposes recommendations specific to the desert southwest for retrofitting existing commercial buildings. A dry, arid region such as Las Vegas, Nevada must contend (more)

Wilkins, Andrea Lee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Flow Test At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location San Emidio...

180

PSInSAR At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon PSInSAR At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desert rock sky" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Retrieving Cloud Characteristics from Ground-Based Daytime Color All-Sky Images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A discussion is presented of daytime sky imaging and techniques that may be applied to the analysis of full-color sky images to infer cloud macrophysical properties. Descriptions of two different types of sky-imaging systems developed by the ...

C. N. Long; J. M. Sabburg; J. Calb; D. Pags

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

The Determination of Sky View-Factors in Urban Environments Using Video Imagery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique is described whereby sky view-factors may be determined using a video camera equipped with a fish-eye lens. The video image is digitized and then analyzed to distinguish between sky and non-sky pixels. View-factors are calculated ...

D. G. Steyn; J. E. Hay; Ian D. Watson; Glenn T. Johnson

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Fire Impacts on the Mojave Desert Ecosystem: Literature Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) is located within the Mojave Desert, which is the driest region in North America. Precipitation on the NNSS varies from an annual average of 130 millimeters (mm; 5.1 inches) with a minimum of 47 mm (1.9 inches) and maximum of 328 mm (12.9 inches) over the past 15 year period to an annual average of 205 mm (8.1 inches) with an annual minimum of 89 mm (3.5 inches) and maximum of 391 mm (15.4 inches) for the same time period; for a Frenchman Flat location at 970 meters (m; 3182 feet) and a Pahute Mesa location at 1986 m (6516 feet), respectively. The combination of aridity and temperature extremes has resulted in sparsely vegetated basins (desert shrub plant communities) to moderately vegetated mountains (mixed coniferous forest plant communities); both plant density and precipitation increase with increasing elevation. Whereas some plant communities have evolved under fire regimes and are dependent upon fire for seed germination, plant communities within the Mojave Desert are not dependent on a fire regime and therefore are highly impacted by fire (Brown and Minnich, 1986; Brooks, 1999). As noted by Johansen (2003) natural range fires are not prevalent in the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts because there is not enough vegetation present (too many shrub interspaces) to sustain a fire. Fire research and hence publications addressing fires in the Southwestern United States (U.S.) have therefore focused on forest, shrub-steppe and grassland fires caused by both natural and anthropogenic ignition sources. In the last few decades, however, invasion of mid-elevation shrublands by non-native Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens and Bromus tectorum (Hunter, 1991) have been highly correlated with increased fire frequency (Brooks and Berry, 2006; Brooks and Matchett, 2006). Coupled with the impact of climate change, which has already been shown to be playing a role in increased forest fires (Westerling et al., 2006), it is likely that the fire frequency will further increase in the Mojave Desert (Knapp 1998; Smith et al., 1987; Smith et al., 2000).

Fenstermaker Lynn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Geophysical well logging operations and log analysis in Geothermal Well Desert Peak No. B-23-1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal Well Desert Peak No. B-23-1 was logged by Dresser Atlas during April/May 1979 to a total depth of 2939 m (9642 ft). A temperature of 209/sup 0/C (408/sup 0/F) was observed on the maximum thermometer run with one of the logging tools. Borehole tools rated to a maximum temperature of 204.4/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) were utilized for logging except for the Densilog tool, which was from the other set of borehole instruments, rated to a still higher temperature, i.e., 260/sup 0/C (500/sup 0/F). The quality of the logs recorded and the environmental effects on the log response have been considered. The log response in the unusual lithologies of igneous and metamorphic formations encountered in this well could be correlated with the drill cutting data. An empirical, statistical log interpretation approach has made it possible to obtain meaningful information on the rocks penetrated. Various crossplots/histograms of the corrected log data have been generated on the computer. These are found to provide good resolution between the lithological units in the rock sequence. The crossplotting techniques and the statistical approach were combined with the drill cutting descriptions in order to arrive at the lithological characteristics. The results of log analysis and recommendations for logging of future wells have been included.

Sethi, D.K.; Fertl, W.H.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Given that water is the sine qua non of life, it is intriguing that animals can live in deserts, environments with little  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in deserts, environments with little drinking water, high ambient temperatures (Ta), intense solar radiation, low humidity and desiccating winds. Because desert birds are typically diurnal, at times

Williams, Jos. B.

186

Workshop on hydrology of crystalline basement rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This workshop covered the following subjects: measurements in relatively shallow boreholes; measurement and interpretation of data from deep boreholes; hydrologic properties of crystalline rocks as interpreted by geophysics and field geology; rock mechanics related to hydrology of crystalline rocks; the possible contributions of modeling to the understanding of the hydrology of crystalline rocks; and geochemical interpretations of the hydrology of crystalline rocks. (MHR)

Davis, S.N. (comp.)

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Big Sky, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sky, Montana: Energy Resources Sky, Montana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 45.2846507°, -111.368292° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.2846507,"lon":-111.368292,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

188

The First Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has validated and made publicly available its First Data Release. This consists of 2099 square degrees of five-band (u, g, r, i, z) imaging data, 186,240 spectra of galaxies, quasars, stars and calibrating blank sky patches selected over 1360 square degrees of this area, and tables of measured parameters from these data. The imaging data go to a depth of r ~ 22.6 and are photometrically and astrometrically calibrated to 2% rms and 100 milli-arcsec rms per coordinate, respectively. The spectra cover the range 3800--9200 A, with a resolution of 1800--2100. Further characteristics of the data are described, as are the data products themselves.

Abazajian, Kevork N; Ageros, Marcel A; Allam, Sahar S; Anderson, Scott F; Annis, James; Bahcall, Neta A; Baldry, Ivan K; Bastian, Steven; Berlind, Andreas A; Bernardi, Mariangela; Blanton, Michael R; Blythe, Norman; Bochanski, John J; Boroski, William N; Brewington, Howard; Briggs, John W; Brinkmann, J; Brunner, Robert J; Budavari, Tamas; Carey, Larry N; Carr, Michael A; Castander, F J; Chiu, Kuenley; Collinge, Matthew J; Connolly, A J; Covey, Kevin R; Csabai, Istvan; Dodelson, Scott; Doi, Mamoru; Dong, Feng; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Evans, Michael L; Fan, Xiaohui; Feldman, Paul D; Finkbeiner, Douglas P; Friedman, Scott D; Frieman, Joshua A; Fukugita, Masataka; Gal, Roy R; Gillespie, Bruce; Glazebrook, Karl; Gonzalez, Carlos F; Gray, Jim; Grebel, Eva K; Grodnicki, Lauren; Gunn, James E; Gurbani, Vijay K; Hall, Patrick B; Hao, Lei; Harbeck, Daniel; Harris, Frederick H; Harris, Hugh C; Harvanek, Michael J; Hawley, Suzanne L; Heckman, Timothy M; Helmboldt, J F; Hendry, John S; Hennessy, Gregory S; Hindsley, Robert B; Hogg, David W; Holmgren, Donald; Holtzman, Jon A; Homer, Lee; Hui, Lam; Ichikawa, Shin-ichi; Ichikawa, Takashi; Inkmann, John P; Ivezic, Z; Jester, Sebastian; Johnston, David E; Jordan, Beatrice; Jordan, Wendell P; Jorgensen, Anders M; Juric, Mario; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Kent, Stephen M; Kleinman, S J; Knapp, G R; Kniazev, Alexei Yu; Kron, Richard G; Krzesinski, Jurek; Kunszt, Peter Z; Kuropatkin, Nickolai; Lamb, Donald Q; Lampeitl, Hubert; Laubscher, Bryan E; Lee, Brian C; Leger, R French; Li No Lan; Lidz, Adam; Lin, Huan; Loh Yeong Shang; Long, Daniel C; Loveday, Jon; Lupton, Robert H; Malik, Tanu; Margon, Bruce; McGehee, Peregrine M; McKay, Timothy A; Meiksin, Avery; Miknaitis, Gajus A; Moorthy, Bhasker K; Munn, Jeffrey A; Murphy, Tara; Nakajima, Reiko; Narayanan, Vijay K; Nash, Thomas; Neilsen, Erich; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Newman, Peter R; Nichol, Robert C; Nicinski, Tom; Nieto-Santisteban, Maria; Nitta, Atsuko; Odenkirchen, Michael; Okamura, Sadanori; Ostriker, Jeremiah P; Owen, Russell; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Peoples, John; Pier, Jeffrey R; Pindor, Bartosz; Pope, Adrian C; Quinn, Thomas R; Rafikov, R R; Raymond, Sean N; Richards, Gordon T; Richmond, Michael W; Rix, Hans-Walter; Rockosi, Constance M; Schaye, Joop; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, D P; Schroeder, Joshua; Scranton, Ryan; Sekiguchi, Maki; Seljak, Uros; Sergey, Gary; Sesar, Branimir; Sheldon, E S; Shimasaku, Kazu; Siegmund, Walter A; Silvestri, Nicole M; Sinisgalli, Allan J; Sirko, Edwin; Smith, Allyn J; Smolcic, Vernesa; Snedden, Stephanie A; Stebbins, Albert; Steinhardt, Charles; Stinson, Gregory M; Stoughton, Chris; Strateva, Iskra V; Strauss, Michael A; SubbaRao, Mark; Szalay, Alexander S; Istvan Szapudi; Szkody, Paula; Tasca, Lidia; Tegmark, Max; Thakar, Aniruddha R; Tremonti, Christy A; Tucker, Douglas L; Uomoto, Alan; Vanden Berk, Daniel E; Vandenberg, Jan; Vogeley, Michael S; Voges, Wolfgang; Vogt, Nicole P; Walkowicz, Lucianne M; Weinberg, David H; West, Andrew A; White, Simon D M; Wilhite, Brian C; Willman, Beth; Xu Yong Hong; Yanny, Brian; Yarger, Jean; Yasuda, Naoki; Yip, Ching-Wa; Yocum, D R; York, Donald G; Zakamska, Nadia L; Zheng, Wei; Zibetti, Stefano; Zucker, Daniel B

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Candidate spectroscopic binaries in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have examined the radial velocity data for stars spectroscopically observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) more than once to investigate the incidence of spectroscopic binaries, and to evaluate the accuracy of the SDSS stellar radial velocities. We find agreement between the fraction of stars with significant velocity variations and the expected fraction of binary stars in the halo and thick disk populations. The observations produce a list of 675 possible new spectroscopic binary stars and orbits for eight of them.

D. Pourbaix; G. R. Knapp; P. Szkody; Z. Ivezic; S. J. Kleinman; D. Long; S. A. Snedden; A. Nitta; M. Harvanek; J. Krzesinski; H. J. Brewington; J. C. Barentine; E. H. Neilsen; J. Brinkman

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

190

Candidate spectroscopic binaries in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have examined the radial velocity data for stars spectroscopically observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) more than once to investigate the incidence of spectroscopic binaries, and to evaluate the accuracy of the SDSS stellar radial velocities. We find agreement between the fraction of stars with significant velocity variations and the expected fraction of binary stars in the halo and thick disk populations. The observations produce a list of 675 possible new spectroscopic binary stars and orbits for eight of them.

Pourbaix, D; Szkody, P; Ivezic, Z; Kleinman, S J; Long, D; Snedden, S A; Nitta, A; Harvanek, M; Krzesnski, J; Brewington, H J; Barentine, J C; Neilsen, E H; Brinkmann, J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

OZZ Solar Inc Sky Ozz International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OZZ Solar Inc Sky Ozz International OZZ Solar Inc Sky Ozz International Jump to: navigation, search Name OZZ Solar Inc. (Sky Ozz International) Place Concord, Ontario, Canada Zip L4K 4R1 Sector Solar Product Ontario-based OZZ Solar was formed to build commercial and residential rooftop solar projects under the province's feed-in tariff programme. Coordinates 37.344704°, -78.975299° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.344704,"lon":-78.975299,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

192

Bright Skies Ahead for Moapa | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bright Skies Ahead for Moapa Bright Skies Ahead for Moapa Bright Skies Ahead for Moapa March 1, 2013 - 7:19pm Addthis In addition to the planned 250-MW solar farm set to begin construction in June 2013, the Moapa Band of Paiutes is working on a second 150-MW project that would use both PV and concentrated solar technologies to generate power for the Tribe. Photo from Moapa Band of Paiutes. In addition to the planned 250-MW solar farm set to begin construction in June 2013, the Moapa Band of Paiutes is working on a second 150-MW project that would use both PV and concentrated solar technologies to generate power for the Tribe. Photo from Moapa Band of Paiutes. Photo from Moapa Band of Paiutes. Photo from Moapa Band of Paiutes. Moapa Band of Paiutes Chairman William Anderson. In addition to the planned 250-MW solar farm set to begin construction in June 2013, the Moapa Band of Paiutes is working on a second 150-MW project that would use both PV and concentrated solar technologies to generate power for the Tribe. Photo from Moapa Band of Paiutes.

193

Sloan Digital Sky Survey III: Data Release Eight  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and SDSS-II, the SDSS-III Collaboration is working to map the Milky Way, search for extrasolar planets, and solve the mystery of dark energy. SDSS-III's first release, Data Release 8 (DR8), became available in the first half of 2012. DR8 contains all the images ever taken by the SDSS telescope. Together, these images make up the largest color image of the sky ever made. A version of the DR8 image is shown to the right. DR8 also includes measurements for nearly 500 million stars, galaxies, and quasars, and spectra for nearly two million. All of DR8's images, spectra, and measurements are available to anyone online. You can browse through sky images, look up data for individual objects, or search for objects anywhere using any criteria. SDSS-III will collect data from 2008 to 2014, using the 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. SDSS-III consists of four surveys, each focused on a different scientific theme. These four surveys are:

  • Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS)
  • SEGUE-2 (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration)
  • The APO Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE)
  • The Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS)

[Copied with edits from http://www.sdss3.org/index.php

SDSS Collaboration

194

Correlated Errors in the COBE DMR Sky Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The {\\it COBE} DMR sky maps contain low-level correlated noise. We obtain estimates of the amplitude and pattern of the correlated noise from three techniques: angular averages of the covariance matrix, Monte Carlo simulations of two-point correlation functions, and direct analysis of the DMR maps. The results from the three methods are mutually consistent. The noise covariance matrix of a DMR sky map is diagonal to an accuracy of better than 1\\%. For a given sky pixel, the dominant noise covariance occurs with the ring of pixels at an angular separation of $60 \\deg$ due to the $60 \\deg$ separation of the DMR horns. The mean covariance at $60 \\deg$ is $0.45\\% ^{+0.18}_{-0.14}$ of the mean variance. Additionally, the variance in a given pixel is $0.7\\%$ greater than would be expected from a single beam experiment with the same noise properties. Auto-correlation functions suffer from a $\\sim 1.5\\; \\sigma$ positive bias at $60 \\deg$ while cross-correlations have no bias. Published {\\it COBE} DMR results are not significantly affected by correlated noise. COBE pre-print 94-

C. H. Lineweaver; G. F. Smoot; C. L. Bennett; E. L. Wright; L. Tenorio; A. Kogut; P. B. Keegstra; G. Hinshaw; A. J. Banday

1994-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

195

Mechanisms for Diurnal Boundary Layer Circulations in the Great Basin Desert  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this observation- and model-based study of the Great Basin Desert boundary layer is to illustrate the variety of locally forced circulations that can affect such an area during a diurnal cycle. The area of the Great Basin Desert (...

Daran L. Rife; Thomas T. Warner; Fei Chen; Elford G. Astling

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Sediment yield and runoff frequency of small drainage basins in the Mojave Desert, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Desert (outlined in red), which covers 25,000 square miles. Elevation in the Mojave Desert ranges from of which falls during the winter season. Figure 2. Aerial view of the former Tonopah and Tidewater Railroad National Park Nevada Test Site 50 km Burlington Northern & Santa Fe RR Carson & Colorado RR Barnwell

197

Transition of Surface Energy Budget in the Gobi Desert between Spring and Summer Seasons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An investigation of the transition between spring and summer seasons of the surface energy budget in the Gobi desert is presented. The motivation behind this study is to determine eventually the degree to which changes in a desert system can be ...

Eric A. Smith; Elmar R. Reiter; Youxi Gao

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Shotgun cartridge rock breaker  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rock breaker uses shotgun cartridges or other firearm ammunition as the explosive charge at the bottom of a drilled borehole. The breaker includes a heavy steel rod or bar, a gun with a firing chamber for the ammunition which screws onto the rod, a long firing pin running through a central passage in the rod, and a firing trigger mechanism at the external end of the bar which strikes the firing pin to fire the cartridge within the borehole. A tubular sleeve surround the main body of the rod and includes slits the end to allow it to expand. The rod has a conical taper at the internal end against which the end of the sleeve expands when the sleeve is forced along the rod toward the taper by a nut threaded onto the external end of the rod. As the sleeve end expands, it pushes against the borehole and holds the explosive gasses within, and also prevents the breaker from flying out of the borehole. The trigger mechanism includes a hammer with a slot and a hole for accepting a drawbar or drawpin which, when pulled by a long cord, allows the cartridge to be fired from a remote location.

Ruzzi, Peter L. (Eagan, NM); Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

InSAR At Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

InSAR At Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) InSAR At Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Desert Peak Area Exploration Technique InSAR Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes InSAR Ground Displacement Analysis, Gary Oppliger and Mark Coolbaugh. This project supports increased utilization of geothermal resources in the Western United States by developing basic measurements and interpretations that will assist reservoir management and expansion at Bradys, Desert Peak and the Desert Peak EGS study area (80 km NE of Reno, Nevada) and will serve as a technology template for other geothermal fields. Raw format European Space Agency (ESA) ERS 1/2 satellite synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) radar scenes acquired from 1992 through 2002 are being processed to

200

Rock Density | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock Density Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Density Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Density of different lithologic units. Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 10.001,000 centUSD 0.01 kUSD 1.0e-5 MUSD 1.0e-8 TUSD / sample

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desert rock sky" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Post Rock | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Rock Jump to: navigation, search Name Post Rock Facility Post Rock Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Wind Capital Group Developer Wind Capital Group Energy Purchaser Westar Energy Location Ellsworth KS Coordinates 38.87269233°, -98.33059788° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.87269233,"lon":-98.33059788,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

202

Rock physics at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rock physics refers to the study of static and dynamic chemical and physical properties of rocks and to phenomenological investigations of rocks reacting to man-made forces such as stress waves and fluid injection. A bibliography of rock physics references written by LASL staff members is given. Listing is by surname of first author. (RWR)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Clean Cities: Land of Sky Clean Vehicles coalition (Western North Carolina)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Land of Sky Clean Vehicles Coalition (Western North Carolina) Land of Sky Clean Vehicles Coalition (Western North Carolina) The Land of Sky Clean Vehicles coalition (Western North Carolina) works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and other stakeholders to reduce petroleum use in transportation. Land of Sky Clean Vehicles coalition (Western North Carolina) Contact Information Bill Eaker 828-251-6622 x142 bill@landofsky.org Coalition Website Clean Cities Coordinator Bill Eaker Photo of Bill Eaker Bill Eaker established the Land of Sky Clean Vehicles Coalition, serving the Western North Carolina region, in 2004 and has served as the coalition's coordinator since then. Eaker has over 31 years of experience in environmental, land use, and growth management planning at the local, regional, and state scales. He has worked at Land of Sky Regional Council

204

Hot Dry Rock - Summary  

SciTech Connect

Hot Dry Rock adds a new flexibility to the utilization of geothermal energy. Almost always the approach has been to limit that utilization to places where there is a natural source of water associated with a source of heat. Actually, the result was that steam was mined. Clearly there are much larger heat resources available which lack natural water to transport that energy to the surface. Also, as is found in hydrothermal fields being mined for steam, the water supply finally gets used up. There is a strong motive in the existing capital investment to revitalize those resources. Techniques for introducing, recovering and utilizing the water necessary to recover the heat from below the surface of the earth is the subject of this session. Implicit in that utilization is the ability to forecast with reasonable accuracy the busbar cost of that energy to the utility industry. The added element of supplying the water introduces costs which must be recovered while still supplying energy which is competitive. Hot Dry Rock technology can supply energy. That has been proved long since. The basic barrier to its use by the utility industry has been and remains proof to the financial interests that the long term cost is competitive enough to warrant investment in a technology that is new to utility on-grid operations. As the opening speaker for this session states, the test that is underway will ''simulate the operations of a commercial facility in some ways, but it will not show that energy from HDR can be produced at a variety of locations with different geological settings''. Further, the Fenton Hill system is a research facility not designed for commercial production purposes, but it can give indications of how the system must be changed to provide economic HDR operations. And so it is that we must look beyond the long term flow test, at the opportunities and challenges. Proving that the huge HDR resources can be accessed on a worldwide scale must involve the construction of additional sites, preferably to the specifications of the now Federal geothermal community. These facilities will have to be engineered to produce and market energy at competitive prices. At the same time, we must not rest on our technological laurels, though they be many. Design and operational techniques have been conceived which could lead to improved economics and operations for HDR. These must be pursued and where merit is found, vigorously pursued. Accelerated research and development ought to include revolutionary drilling techniques, reservoir interrogation, and system modeling to assure the competitiveness and geographical diversity of applications of HDR. Much of this work will be applicable to the geothermal industry in general. More advanced research ought to include such innovations as the utilization of other operating fluids. Supercritical carbon dioxide and the ammonia/water (Kalina) cycle have been mentioned. But even as the near and more distant outlook is examined, today's work was reported in the HDR session. The start-up operations for the current test series at the Fenton Hill HDR Pilot Plant were described. The surface plant is complete and initial operations have begun. While some minor modifications to the system have been required, nothing of consequence has been found to impede operations. Reliability, together with the flexibility and control required for a research system were shown in the system design, and demonstrated by the preliminary results of the plant operations and equipment performance. Fundamental to the overall success of the HDR energy resource utilization is the ability to optimize the pressure/flow impedance/time relationships as the reservoir is worked. Significant new insights are still being developed out of the data which will substantially affect the operational techniques applied to new systems. However, again, these will have to be proved to be general and not solely specific to the Fenton Hill site. Nevertheless, high efficiency use of the reservoir without unintended reservoir grow

Tennyson, George P. Jr.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

205

Isotopic Analysis- Rock | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopic Analysis- Rock Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Isotopic Analysis- Rock Details Activities (13) Areas (11) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Water rock interaction Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis- Rock: Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in a given system, while the conditions which increase/decrease the number of neutrons are well understood and measurable.

206

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 329: Area 22 Desert Rock Airstrip Fuel Spill with Errata Sheet, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

In Appendix 0, Use Restriction (UR) Form, the drawing of the use restricted area shows the incorrect coordinates for the use restricted area, the coordinates on the drawing do not match the approved UR Form. The coordinates have been verified and this Errata Sheet replaces the drawing of the use restricted area with an aerial photo showing the use restricted area and the correct coordinates that match the approved UR Form.

Navarro Nevada Environmental Services

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

207

Blue Sky Green Field Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Green Field Wind Farm Green Field Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Blue Sky Green Field Wind Farm Facility Blue Sky Green Field Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner We Energies Developer We Energies Energy Purchaser We Energies Location Fond du Lac County WI Coordinates 43.908549°, -88.305384° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.908549,"lon":-88.305384,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

208

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper Northern Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) has surveyed the distribution and kinematics of ionized gas in the Galaxy above declination -30 degrees. The WHAM Northern Sky Survey (WHAM-NSS) has an angular resolution of one degree and provides the first absolutely-calibrated, kinematically-resolved map of the H-Alpha emission from the Warm Ionized Medium (WIM) within ~ +/-100 km/s of the Local Standard of Rest. Leveraging WHAM's 12 km/s spectral resolution, we have modeled and removed atmospheric emission and zodiacal absorption features from each of the 37,565 spectra. The resulting H-Alpha profiles reveal ionized gas detected in nearly every direction on the sky with a sensitivity of 0.15 R (3 sigma). Complex distributions of ionized gas are revealed in the nearby spiral arms up to 1-2 kpc away from the Galactic plane. Toward the inner Galaxy, the WHAM-NSS provides information about the WIM out to the tangent point down to a few degrees from the plane. Ionized gas is also detected toward many intermediate velocity clouds at high latitudes. Several new H II regions are revealed around early B-stars and evolved stellar cores (sdB/O). This work presents the details of the instrument, the survey, and the data reduction techniques. The WHAM-NSS is also presented and analyzed for its gross properties. Finally, some general conclusions are presented about the nature of the WIM as revealed by the WHAM-NSS.

L. M. Haffner; R. J. Reynolds; S. L. Tufte; G. J. Madsen; K. P. Jaehnig; J. W. Percival

2003-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

209

Summary - Hot Dry Rock R&D Strategies and Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In geothermal energy technology, the hydrothermal systems rely on volcanic hot rocks being fortuitously co-located with an adequate supply of natural ground water, usually at some considerable depth within the earth. This represents essentially two accidents in the same place, and the occurrence is relatively rare. Yellowstone Park and the desert valley of southern California are the most noteworthy US. examples. Since the heat is the energy needed, if we could just get the water down to it and back. Well, that's what is being done with the hot dry rock program. A well is drilled down to where there is adequate heat in the rocks. The well is then pressurized until the rock fractures creating what amounts to a reservoir full of hot, shattered rock. Finally, a well is drilled into the reservoir and water is pumped in one well, heated by the rock, and taken out through the other well at useful temperatures and pressures. We are getting ready to run significant long-term flow tests at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock site west of Los Alamos, New Mexico. We expect the operational information to provide the data to forecast the energy life of the wells as a production facility. This kind of resource is much more common than regular geothermal resources. Robert H. Hendron described the Long Term Flow Test and reservoir studies for which the project is preparing. A shortfall of available funding has slowed preparations, delaying the start of that test. The test is planning to gather data for more definitive reservoir modeling with energy availability or reservoir lifetime of primary interest. Other interests include geochemistry and tracer studies, microseismic response, water requirements and flow impedance which relates directly to the pumping power required. Progress has been made in modeling studies, chemically reactive tracer techniques, and in improvements in acoustic or microseismic event analysis. Donald W. Brown discussed reservoir modeling as it relates to production management of the HDR well. For wells which are fracture dominated rather than matrix-permeability controlled, a knowledge of the pressure-dependent permeability of the interconnected system of natural joints (or pre-existing fractures is critical to long-term power production from the wells) through optimized pressure management. It was mentioned that a knowledge of the pressure-dependent joint permeability could aid in designing more appropriate secondary recovery strategies in petroleum reservoirs, or reinjection I procedures of geothermal reservoirs. Dr. Bruce A. Robinson discussed the development of fluid flow and transport models for simulation of HDR geothermal reservoirs. These models are also expected to provide accurate predictions of long-term behavior and help in the development of strategies for reservoir improvement and operation. Two approaches were discussed. The discrete fracture approach is based on a random fracture network subject to prescribed statistical properties of the fracture set. It is used to simulate steady state fluid flow and solute transport. The other approach used the continuum approximation. This type of model is appropriate when the reservoir consists of many interconnected fractures, as is the case at Fenton Hill.

Tennyson, George P..

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

210

Deserting Gender: A Feminist Rhetorical Approach to Vietnam War Novels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Female characters and references to femininity throughout American war literature disrupt discursive and biological divisions of the masculine and feminine. In examining gender and war literature over the twentieth century, I propose an alternative genealogy of American war literature in which narratives since the end of the nineteenth century initiate two related patterns of gender representation that Vietnam War literature dramatically expands: they critique aggression, camaraderie, and heroism, rejecting these traditional sites of masculinity through desertion narratives, and they harness sentimentality, domesticity, motherhood, and penetration, embracing these traditional sites of femininity in ways that disrupt gender norms. By examining these sites of cross-gender identification through psychoanalytic, rhetorical, and feminist methods, I argue that narratives by Stephen Crane, Ernest Hemingway, Kurt Vonnegut, Tim O'Brien, Stephen Wright, and Larry Heinemann reveal the power of contemporary redefinitions of gender by absorbing feminist discourse into the performance of masculinity.

Womack, Anne-Marie

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Genomic insights into salt adaptation in a desert poplar  

SciTech Connect

Despite the high economic and ecological importance of forests, our knowledge of the genomic evolution of trees under salt stress remains very limited. Here we report the genome sequence of the desert poplar, Populus euphratica, which exhibits high tolerance to sa lt stress. Its genome is very similar and collinear to that of the closely related mesophytic congener, P trichocarpa. However, we find that several gene families likely to be involved in tolerance to salt stress contain significantly more gene copies within the P euphratica lineage. Furthermore, genes showing evidence of positive selection are significantly enriched in functional categories related to salt stress. Some of these genes, and others within the same categories, are significantly upregulated under salt stress relative to their expression in another salt-sensitive poplar. Our results provide an important background for understanding tree adaptation to salt stress and facilitating the genetic improvement of cultivated poplars for saline soils.

Ma, Tao [Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences] [Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences; Wang, Junyi [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Zhou, Gongke [Key laboratory of Biofuels and Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Instit] [Key laboratory of Biofuels and Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Instit; Yue, Zhen [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Hu, Quanjun [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Chen, Yan [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Liu, Bingbing [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Qiu, Qiang [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Wang, Zhuo [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Zhang, Jian [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Wang, Kun [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Jaing, Dechun [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Gou, Caiyun [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Yu, Lili [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Zhan, Dongliang [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Zhou, Ran [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Luo, Wenchun [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Ma, Hui [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Yang, Yongzhi [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Pan, Shengkai [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Fang, Dongming [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Luo, Yadan [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Wang, Xia [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Wang, Gaini [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Wang, Juan [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Wang, Qian [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Lu, Xu [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Chen, Zhe [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Liu, Jinchao [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Lu, Yao [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Yin, Ye [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Yang, Huanming [BGI-Shenzhen, China] [BGI-Shenzhen, China; Abbott, Richard [School of Biology, University of St. Andrews, St andrews, Fife KY16 9TH, UK] [School of Biology, University of St. Andrews, St andrews, Fife KY16 9TH, UK; Wu, Yuxia [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Wan, Dongshi [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University; Li, Jia [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University] [State Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystem, Lanzhou University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Geothermometry At Desert Queen Area (Garchar & Arehart, 2008) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Queen Area (Garchar & Arehart, 2008) Queen Area (Garchar & Arehart, 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Desert Queen Area (Garchar & Arehart, 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Desert Queen Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Temperatures of the reservoir at depth are estimated to be between 92-141 degrees C and were calculated using the δ18O(SO4-H2O) geothermometer. It is unclear whether these temperatures reflect waters from the outflow zone of the Desert Peak geothermal system, or waters from a different reservoir at Desert Queen. Quartz, chalcedony, amorphous silica, Na-K-Ca, and δ18O(SO4-H2O) geothermometer calculations were performed.

213

Regional Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert and Adjacent  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert and Adjacent Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert and Adjacent Areas in Utah, Nevada, and Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Regional Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert and Adjacent Areas in Utah, Nevada, and Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: From 1957 to 1961 a regional gravity survey was made over the northern part of the Great Salt Lake Desert and adjacent areas in Utah, eastern Nevada, and southeastern Idaho. A total of 1040 stations were taken over an area of about 7000 square miles. The results were compiled as a Bouguer gravity anomaly map with a contour interval of 2 mgal. The Bouguer values ranged from a high of about -120 mgal over the outcrop areas to a

214

A Heuristic Investigation to Evaluate the Feasibility of Developing a Desert Dust Prediction Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A boundary layer model, to investigate various aspects of desert circulation, has been devised. The planetary boundary layer is divided into a surface (constant flux) layer, a transition layer and an inversion layer. The basic equations (motion, ...

Louis Berkofsky

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

EA-1912: Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project, near town of Desert Aire,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project, near town of Desert Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project, near town of Desert Aire, Benton County, WA EA-1912: Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project, near town of Desert Aire, Benton County, WA Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project, near town of Desert Aire, Benton County, WA This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal by DOE's Bonneville Power Administration to rebuild its existing Midway-Benton No.1 transmission line in place, or to reroute a portion of the Midway-Benton No. 1 transmission line that currently crosses Gable Mountain and Gable Butte in order to avoid crossing these features. Please note: Together, the Draft EA and the Revision to the Draft EA constitute the Final EA. EA-1912-DEA-2012.pdf EA-1912-RevisedDEA-2012.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1912: Draft Environmental Assessment

216

Intercomparison and Interpretation of Satellite-Derived Directional Albedos over Deserts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Desert regions are employed in somewhat of a tutorial mode for the purpose of addressing several issues associated with understanding the dependence of planetary (top-of-the-atmosphere) albedo upon solar zenith angle, i.e., the directional ...

Robert D. Cess; Inna L. Vulis

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Evaluating Detection Skills of Satellite Rainfall Estimates over Desert Locust Recession Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper evaluates rainfall detection capabilities of seven satellite rainfall estimates over the desert locust recession regions of the world. The region of interest covers the arid and semiarid region from northwestern Africa to northwestern ...

Tufa Dinku; Pietro Ceccato; Keith Cressman; Stephen J. Connor

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Discovery and geology of the Desert Peak geothermal field: a case history. Bulletin 97  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A case history of the exploration, development (through 1980), and geology of the Desert Peak geothermal field is presented. Sections on geochemistry, geophysics, and temperature-gradient drilling are included.

Benoit, W.R.; Hiner, J.E.; Forest, R.T.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Analytical Perspectives on a Protohistoric Cache of Ceramic Jars from the Lower Colorado Desert  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies of Sealed Storage Jar Near Grand Falls, Arizona.Protohistoric Cache of Ceramic Jars from the Lower ColoradoPress. CACHE OF CERAMIC JARS FROM THE LOWER COLORADO DESERT

Bayman, James M; Hevly, Richard H; Johnson, Boma; Reinhard, Karl J; Ryan, Richard

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

A trial to improve surface heat exchange simulation through sensitivity experiments over a desert steppe site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is still a daunting challenge for land surface models (LSMs) to correctly represent surface heat exchange for water-limited desert steppe ecosystems. This study aims at improving the ability of the Noah LSM to simulate surface heat fluxes ...

Guo Zhang; Guangsheng Zhou; Fei Chen; Michael Barlage; Lulin Xue

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desert rock sky" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Removal of Contaminated Pixels from the Desert Target for AVHRR Vicarious Calibration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Desert-based vicarious calibration plays an important role in generating long-term reliable satellite radiances for the visible and near-infrared channels of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR). Lacking an onboard calibration ...

Fangfang Yu; Xiangqian Wu

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Analytical Perspectives on a Protohistoric Cache of Ceramic Jars from the Lower Colorado Desert  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sediments from the Colorado Pla- teau. Ph.D. dissertation.Ceramic Jars from the Lower Colorado Desert J A M E S M . Bsistence on the Lower Colorado and Gila Rivers. Albuquerque:

Bayman, James M; Hevly, Richard H; Johnson, Boma; Reinhard, Karl J; Ryan, Richard

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

MI-TRIBE-LAC VIEUX DESERT BAND OF LAKE SUPERIOR CHIPPEWA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MI-TRIBE-LAC VIEUX DESERT BAND OF LAKE SUPERIOR CHIPPEWA MI-TRIBE-LAC VIEUX DESERT BAND OF LAKE SUPERIOR CHIPPEWA INDIANS Location: Tribe MI-TRIBE-LAC VIEUX DESERT BAND OF LAKE SUPERIOR CHIPPEWA INDIANS MI American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Lac Vieux Desert Tribe proposes to use funding to help with a current effort that is a collaboration of the Tribe with the Conservation Fund of Michigan, an effort that is funded by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. The project will be conducting a feasibility study to determine the viability of using wood products from resources found on tribal lands. The study is dedicating a part of the effort to see the feasibility of providing a renewable energy source to the Tribe in the form of wood products and biomass fuels. NEPA

224

Seasonal Variation of Surface TemperatureModulating Factors in the Sonoran Desert in Northwestern Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors explore a new approach to monitoring of desertification that is based on use of results on the relation between albedo and surface temperature for the Sonoran Desert in northwestern Mexico. The criteria of predominance of radiation by ...

Iryna Tereshchenko; Alexander N. Zolotokrylin; Tatiana B. Titkova; Luis Brito-Castillo; Cesar Octavio Monzon

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Paleoarchaic Surface Assemblages in the Great Salt Lake Desert, Northwestern Utah  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unknown Basalt Source B Black Rock, Utah Unknown BasaltMountain, and Black Rock obsidian source areas in relationMalad, and Black Rock obsidian sources have a similar

Arkush, Brooke S; Pitblado, Bonnie L

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ...

227

Rock Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Lab Analysis Rock Lab Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Lab Analysis Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Core and cuttings analysis is done to define lithology. Water rock interaction. Can determine detailed information about rock composition and morphology. Density of different lithologic units. Rapid and unambiguous identification of unknown minerals.[1] Stratigraphic/Structural: Core analysis can locate faults or fracture networks. Oriented core can give additional important information on anisotropy. Historic structure and deformation of land.

228

Imprint of Intergalactic Shocks on the Radio Sky  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strong intergalactic shocks are a natural consequence of structure formation in the universe. They are expected to deposit large fractions of their energy in relativistic electrons (xi_e~0.05 according to SNR observations) and magnetic fields (xi_B~0.01 according to cluster halo observations). We calculate the synchrotron emission from such shocks using an analytical model, calibrated with a hydrodynamical LCDM simulation. The resulting signal composes a large fraction of the extragalactic radio background (ERB) below 500 MHz. The associated angular fluctuations dominate the sky for frequencies nu3*10^-4. The fluctuating signal is most pronounced for nugas and magnetic fields. Space missions such as ALFA will thus provide important insight into the structure and composition of our Galaxy (abridged).

Uri Keshet; Eli Waxman; Abraham Loeb

2004-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

229

Blue Sky Energy Inc BSE | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Inc BSE Energy Inc BSE Jump to: navigation, search Name Blue Sky Energy Inc (BSE) Place Vista, California Zip 92081 Product MPPT (Maximum Power Point Tracking) technology. Own a patented technology allowing an increase of power from a PV array of up to 30% more than conventional controllers. Coordinates 37.989712°, -93.665689° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.989712,"lon":-93.665689,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

230

Cosmological Simulations for Large-Scale Sky Surveys | Argonne Leadership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Instantaneous velocity magnitude in a flow through an open valve in a valve/piston assembly. Instantaneous velocity magnitude in a flow through an open valve in a valve/piston assembly. Instantaneous velocity magnitude in a flow through an open valve in a valve/piston assembly. Christos Altantzis, MIT, and Martin Schmitt, LAV. All the images were generated from their work at LAV. Cosmological Simulations for Large-Scale Sky Surveys PI Name: Christos Frouzakis PI Email: frouzakis@lav.mavt.ethz.ch Institution: Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF: 100 Million Year: 2014 Research Domain: Chemistry The combustion of coal and petroleum-based fuels supply most of the energy needed to meet the world's transportation and power generation demands. To address the anticipated petroleum shortage, along with increasing energy

231

Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership--Validation Phase  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Technology Program Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-1345 traci.rodosta@netl.doe.gov William Aljoe Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-6569 william.aljoe@netl.doe.gov Leslie L. Schmidt Business Contact Montana State University-Bozeman 309 Montana Hall Bozeman, MT 59717-2470 406-994-2381 lschmidt@montana.edu Lee Spangler Technical Contact Montana State University-Bozeman P.O. Box 172460 Bozeman, MT 59717-2470 406-994-4399 spangler@montana.edu PARTNERS Battelle Pacific Northwest Division Center for Advanced Energy Studies Cimarex Energy Columbia University, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory Crow Tribe Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration

232

Running the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data archive server  

SciTech Connect

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Archive Server (DAS) provides public access to over 12Tb of data in 17 million files produced by the SDSS data reduction pipeline. Many tasks which seem trivial when serving smaller, less complex data sets present challenges when serving data of this volume and technical complexity. The included output files should be chosen to support as much science as possible from publicly released data, and only publicly released data. Users must have the resources needed to read and interpret the data correctly. Server administrators must generate new data releases at regular intervals, monitor usage, quickly recover from hardware failures, and monitor the data served by the DAS both for contents and corruption. We discuss these challenges, describe tools we use to administer and support the DAS, and discuss future development plans.

Neilsen, Eric H., Jr.; Stoughton, Chris; /Fermilab

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Data acquisition systems for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

SciTech Connect

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) will image {Pi} steradians about the north galactic cap in five filters, and acquire one million spectra using a dedicated 2.5 meter telescope at the Apache Point Observatory in New Mexico. The authors describe the data acquisition system for the survey`s three main detectors: an imaging camera, mounting 54 Tektronix charge-coupled devices (CCD); a pair of spectrographs, each mounting a pair of CCDs; and a smaller monitor telescope camera. The authors describe the system`s hardware and software architecture, and relate it to the survey`s special requirements for high reliability and need to understand its instrumentation in order to produce a consistent survey over a five year period.

Petravick, D.; Berman, E.; MacKinnon, B.; Nicinski, T.; Pordes, R.; Sergey, G.; Rechenmacher, R.; Annis, J.; Kent, S.; McKay, T.; Stoughton, C.; Husby, D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper Northern Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) has completed a survey in Balmer Alpha of the entire Northern sky above declination -30 deg. This survey provides the first calibrated, velocity-resolved map of the H-Alpha emission from the Galaxy. With one-degree spatial resolution, 12 km s^{-1} velocity resolution, and sensitivity to features as faint as 0.1 R (EM ~ 0.2 cm^{-6} pc), this survey provides the deepest maps of the ionized content of the Galaxy to date. In addition to probing the detailed kinematic structure of the Warm Ionized Medium and the vertical structure of the ionized content in spiral arms, initial results include the discovery of several faint, extended (d > 1\\deg) H II regions and the first map of the ionized component of an intermediate velocity cloud.

L. M. Haffner

2000-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

235

Monitoring of IR Clear-Sky Radiances over Oceans for SST (MICROS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monitoring of IR Clear-Sky Radiances over Oceans for SST (MICROS) is a Web-based tool to monitor model minus observation (M ? O) biases in clear-sky brightness temperatures (BTs) and sea surface temperatures (SSTs) produced by the Advanced Clear-...

Xingming Liang; Alexander Ignatov

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Almost a Century of Imaging Clouds Over the Whole-Sky Dome  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Meteorological whole-sky photography can be traced back to just after the turn of the century. Capturing an objective and well-determined view of the cloud cover over the whole-sky dome has been one of the principal goals of subsequent ...

K. McGuffe; A. Henderson-Sellers

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

The Computation of Cloud-Base Height from Paired Whole-Sky Imaging Cameras  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have developed a novel approach to the extraction of cloud-base height (CBH) from pairs of whole-sky images. The core problem is to spatially register cloud fields from widely separated whole-sky imaging (WSI) cameras; this complete ...

Mark C. Allmen; W. Philip Kegelmeyer Jr.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

THE SEVENTH DATA RELEASE OF THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), marking the completion of the original goals of the SDSS and the end of the phase known as SDSS-II. It includes 11,663 deg{sup 2} of imaging data, with most of the {approx}2000 deg{sup 2} increment over the previous data release lying in regions of low Galactic latitude. The catalog contains five-band photometry for 357 million distinct objects. The survey also includes repeat photometry on a 120 deg. long, 2.{sup 0}5 wide stripe along the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap, with some regions covered by as many as 90 individual imaging runs. We include a co-addition of the best of these data, going roughly 2 mag fainter than the main survey over 250 deg{sup 2}. The survey has completed spectroscopy over 9380 deg{sup 2}; the spectroscopy is now complete over a large contiguous area of the Northern Galactic Cap, closing the gap that was present in previous data releases. There are over 1.6 million spectra in total, including 930,000 galaxies, 120,000 quasars, and 460,000 stars. The data release includes improved stellar photometry at low Galactic latitude. The astrometry has all been recalibrated with the second version of the USNO CCD Astrograph Catalog, reducing the rms statistical errors at the bright end to 45 milliarcseconds per coordinate. We further quantify a systematic error in bright galaxy photometry due to poor sky determination; this problem is less severe than previously reported for the majority of galaxies. Finally, we describe a series of improvements to the spectroscopic reductions, including better flat fielding and improved wavelength calibration at the blue end, better processing of objects with extremely strong narrow emission lines, and an improved determination of stellar metallicities.

Abazajian, Kevork N. [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Adelman-McCarthy, Jennifer K.; Allam, Sahar S.; Annis, James; Berman, Eileen F. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Agueeros, Marcel A. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Allende Prieto, Carlos [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury SL Mary, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); An, Deokkeun [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Anderson, Kurt S. J. [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Anderson, Scott F.; Becker, Andrew C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Bahcall, Neta A. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.; Bell, Eric F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Barentine, J. C. [McDonald Observatory and Dept. of Astronomy, University of Texas, 1 University Station, C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Bassett, Bruce A. [South African Astronomical Observatory, Observatory, Cape Town (South Africa); Beers, Timothy C. [Dept. of Physics and Astrophysics, CSCE: Center for the Study of Cosmic Evolution, and JINA: Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, E. Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Belokurov, Vasily [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Berlind, Andreas A. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Bernardi, Mariangela [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)] (and others)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

239

GLAST Observatory Renamed for Fermi, Reveals Entire Gamma-Ray Sky |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GLAST Observatory Renamed for Fermi, Reveals Entire Gamma-Ray Sky GLAST Observatory Renamed for Fermi, Reveals Entire Gamma-Ray Sky GLAST Observatory Renamed for Fermi, Reveals Entire Gamma-Ray Sky August 26, 2008 - 3:20pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA announced today that the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) has revealed its first all-sky map in gamma rays. The onboard Large Area Telescope's (LAT) all-sky image-which shows the glowing gas of the Milky Way, blinking pulsars and a flaring galaxy billions of light-years away-was created using only 95 hours of "first light" observations, compared with past missions which took years to produce a similar image. Scientists expect the telescope will discover many new pulsars in our own galaxy, reveal powerful

240

Sensitivity of Clear-Sky Diffuse Radiation to In Situ Aerosol Scattering Parameters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensitivity of Clear-Sky Diffuse Radiation to In Situ Sensitivity of Clear-Sky Diffuse Radiation to In Situ Aerosol Scattering Parameters P. J. Ricchiazzi and C. Gautier University of California Santa Barbara, California Introduction Recent studies of clear-sky radiation indicate that current radiative transfer (RT) models underestimate atmospheric absorption when standard aerosol properties are used. This so-called clear-sky anomaly is manifested in predicted levels of diffuse radiation significantly below those observed at Southern Great Plains (SGP) and other sites in the continental United States (e.g., Halthore et al. 1998 GRL). Other observations at pristine sites do not show a discrepancy (Barnard and Powell 2001, 2001; Kato et al. 1997; Halthore 1998). These results may indicate that the clear-sky anomaly is only observed at sites

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desert rock sky" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

All Sky Cameras for the characterization of the Cherenkov Telescope Array candidate sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The All Sky Camera (ASC) was developed as a universal device for the monitoring of the night sky quality. Eight ASCs are already installed and measure night sky parameters at eight of the candidate sites of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) gamma-ray observatory. The ACS system consists of an astronomical CCD camera, a fish eye lens, a control computer and associated electronics. The measurement is carried out during astronomical night. The images are automatically taken every 5 minutes and automatically processed using the control computer of the device. The analysis results are the cloud fraction (the percentage of the sky covered by clouds) and night sky brightness (in mag/arcsec$^{2}$)

Mandt, Duan; Ebr, Jan; Hrabovsk, Miroslav; Prouza, Michael; Bulik, Tomasz; Allekotte, Ingomar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Laser Rock Perforation Demo - The NE Multimedia Collection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

rock perforation demo High power laser beam can be used in oil well completion application for perforating oil reservoir rock and increasing rock's permeability for high oil...

243

PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA 161-kV TRANSMISSION LINE Cross Arm Repair and Helicopter Staging Areas Figure 1. Project Location Project Location j PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK &...

244

Solar Power in the Desert: Are the current large-scale solar developments really improving Californias environment?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sage scrub in Southern California. In J.E. Keely, M.B.Land Development in California. International Association ofdegradation of the southern California desert ecosystem and

Allen, Michael F.; McHughen, Alan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Hot dry rock energy project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A proof-of-concept experimental project by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory endeavors to establish the feasibility of exploitation of the thermal energy contained in the earth's crust where such energy and a transporting fluid have not been juxtaposed in nature. A region of high heat flow and apparently unfaulted basement rock formation was selected. Two boreholes, drilled to a total depth of about 3 km (10,000 ft) and penetrating about 2.5 km (7500 ft) into the Precambrian formation, to a rock temperature of 200/sup 0/C, have been connected at depth by a hydraulically fractured zone to form the heat extraction surface. Energy was extracted at a rate of 3.2 MW(t) with water temperature of 132/sup 0/C during a 96-h preliminary circulating test run performed late in September 1977. This paper traces the progress of the project, summarizes procedures and salient events, and references detailed reports and specialized topics.

Hendron, R.H.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Sky in Google Earth: The Next Frontier in Astronomical Data Discovery and Visualization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Astronomy began as a visual science, first through careful observations of the sky using either an eyepiece or the naked eye, then on to the preservation of those images with photographic media and finally the digital encoding of that information via CCDs. This last step has enabled astronomy to move into a fully automated era -- where data is recorded, analyzed and interpreted often without any direct visual inspection. Sky in Google Earth completes that circle by providing an intuitive visual interface to some of the largest astronomical imaging surveys covering the full sky. By streaming imagery, catalogs, time domain data, and ancillary information directly to a user, Sky can provide the general public as well as professional and amateur astronomers alike with a wealth of information for use in education and research. We provide here a brief introduction to Sky in Google Earth, focusing on its extensible environment, how it may be integrated into the research process and how it can bring astronomical research to a broader community. With an open interface available on Linux, Mac OS X and Windows, applications developed within Sky are accessible not just within the Google framework but through any visual browser that supports the Keyhole Markup Language. We present Sky as the embodiment of a virtual telescope.

Ryan Scranton; Andrew Connolly; Simon Krughoff; Jeremy Brewer; Alberto Conti; Carol Christian; Brian McLean; Craig Sosin; Greg Coombe; Paul Heckbert

2007-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

247

Relative Permeability of Fractured Rock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Contemporary understanding of multiphase flow through fractures is limited. Different studies using synthetic fractures and various fluids have yielded different relative permeability-saturation relations. This study aimed to extend the understanding of multiphase flow by conducting nitrogen-water relative permeability experiments on a naturally-fractured rock from The Geysers geothermal field. The steady-state approach was used. However, steady state was achieved only at the endpoint saturations. Several difficulties were encountered that are attributed to phase interference and changes in fracture aperture and surface roughness, along with fracture propagation/initiation. Absolute permeabilities were determined using nitrogen and water. The permeability values obtained change with the number of load cycles. Determining the absolute permeability of a core is especially important in a fractured rock. The rock may change as asperities are destroyed and fractures propagate or st rain harden as the net stresses vary. Pressure spikes occurred in water a solute permeability experiments. Conceptual models of an elastic fracture network can explain the pressure spike behavior. At the endpoint saturations the water relative permeabilities obtained are much less than the nitrogen gas relative permeabilities. Saturations were determined by weighing and by resistivity calculations. The resistivity-saturation relationship developed for the core gave saturation values that differ by 5% from the value determined by weighing. Further work is required to complete the relative permeability curve. The steady-state experimental approach encountered difficulties due to phase interference and fracture change. Steady state may not be reached until an impractical length of time. Thus, unsteady-state methods should be pursued. In unsteady-state experiments the challenge will be in quantifying rock fracture change in addition to fluid flow changes.

Mark D. Habana

2002-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

248

Dispersivity as an oil reservoir rock characteristic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of this research project is to establish dispersivity, {alpha}{sub d}, as an oil reservoir rock characteristic and to use this reservoir rock property to enhance crude oil recovery. A second objective is to compare the dispersion coefficient and the dispersivity of various reservoir rocks with other rock characteristics such as: porosity, permeability, capillary pressure, and relative permeability. The dispersivity of a rock was identified by measuring the physical mixing of two miscible fluids, one displacing the other in a porous medium. 119 refs., 27 figs., 12 tabs.

Menzie, D.E.; Dutta, S.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Ensemble Properties of Comets in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the ensemble properties of 31 comets (27 resolved and 4 unresolved) observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). This sample of comets represents about 1 comet per 10 million SDSS photometric objects. Five-band (u, g, r, i, z) photometry is used to determine the comets colors, sizes, surface brightness profiles, and rates of dust production in terms of the Afp formalism. We find that the cumulative luminosity function for the Jupiter Family Comets in our sample is well fit by a power law of the form N(

Solontoi, Michael; /Adler Planetarium, Chicago; Ivezic, Zeljko; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Juric, Mario; /Harvard Coll. Observ.; Becker, Andrew C.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Jones, Lynne; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; West, Andrew A.; /Boston U.; Kent, Steve; /Fermilab; Lupton, Robert H.; /Princeton U. Observ.; Claire, Mark; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Knapp, Gillian R.; /Princeton U. Observ.; Quinn, Tom; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Princeton U. Observ.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Cloud classification using whole-sky imager data  

SciTech Connect

Clouds are one of the most important moderators of the earth radiation budget and one of the least understood. The effect that clouds have on the reflection and absorption of solar and terrestrial radiation is strongly influenced by their shape, size, and composition. Physically accurate parameterization of clouds is necessary for any general circulation model (GCM) to yield meaningful results. The work presented here is part of a larger project that is aimed at producing realistic three-dimensional (3D) volume renderings of cloud scenes, thereby providing the important shape information for parameterizing GCMs. The specific goal of the current study is to develop an algorithm that automatically classifies (by cloud type) the clouds observed in the scene. This information will assist the volume rendering program in determining the shape of the cloud. Much work has been done on cloud classification using multispectral satellite images. Most of these references use some kind of texture measure to distinguish the different cloud types and some also use topological features (such as cloud/sky connectivity or total number of clouds). A wide variety of classification methods has been used, including neural networks, various types of clustering, and thresholding. The work presented here utilizes binary decision trees to distinguish the different cloud types based on cloud feature vectors.

Buch, K.A. Jr.; Sun, Chen-Hui

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Monitor Telescope Pipeline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The photometric calibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a multi-step process which involves data from three different telescopes: the 1.0-m telescope at the US Naval Observatory (USNO), Flagstaff Station, Arizona (which was used to establish the SDSS standard star network); the SDSS 0.5-m Photometric Telescope (PT) at the Apache Point Observatory (APO), New Mexico (which calculates nightly extinctions and calibrates secondary patch transfer fields); and the SDSS 2.5-m telescope at APO (which obtains the imaging data for the SDSS proper). In this paper, we describe the Monitor Telescope Pipeline, MTPIPE, the software pipeline used in processing the data from the single-CCD telescopes used in the photometric calibration of the SDSS (i.e., the USNO 1.0-m and the PT). We also describe transformation equations that convert photometry on the USNO-1.0m u'g'r'i'z' system to photometry the SDSS 2.5m ugriz system and the results of various validation tests of the MTPIPE software. Further, we discuss the semi-automated PT factory, which runs MTPIPE in the day-to-day standard SDSS operations at Fermilab. Finally, we discuss the use of MTPIPE in current SDSS-related projects, including the Southern u'g'r'i'z' Standard Star project, the u'g'r'i'z' Open Star Clusters project, and the SDSS extension (SDSS-II).

D. L. Tucker; S. Kent; M. W. Richmond; J. Annis; J. A. Smith; S. S. Allam; C. T. Rodgers; J. L. Stute; J. K. Adelman-McCarthy; J. Brinkmann; M. Doi; D. Finkbeiner; M. Fukugita; J. Goldston; B. Greenway; J. E. Gunn; J. S. Hendry; D. W. Hogg; S. -I. Ichikawa; Z. Ivezic; G. R. Knapp; H. Lampeitl; B. C. Lee; H. Lin; T. A. McKay; A. Merrelli; J. A. Munn; E. H. Neilsen, Jr.; H. J. Newberg; G. T. Richards; D. J. Schlegel; C. Stoughton; A. Uomoto; B. Yanny

2006-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

252

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasar catalog: ninth data release  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the Data Release 9 Quasar (DR9Q) catalog from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. The catalog includes all BOSS objects that were targeted as quasar candidates during the survey, are spectrocopically confirmed as quasars via visual inspection, have luminosities Mi[z=2]2.15$ (61,931) is ~2.8 times larger than the number of z>2.15 quasars previously known. Redshifts and FWHMs are provided for the strongest emission lines (CIV, CIII], MgII). The catalog identifies 7,533 broad absorption line quasars and gives their characteristics. For each object the catalog presents five-band (u,g,r,i,z) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains X-ray, ultraviolet, near-infrared, and radio emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys.

Pris, Isabelle; Aubourg, Eric; Bailey, Stephen; Ross, Nicholas P; Myers, Adam D; Strauss, Michael A; Anderson, Scott F; Arnau, Eduard; Bautista, Julian; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Bolton, Adam S; Bovy, Jo; Brandt, William N; Brewington, Howard; Brownstein, Joel R; Busca, Nicolas; Capellupo, Daniel; Carithers, William; Croft, Rupert A C; Dawson, Kyle; Delubac, Timothe; Ebelke, Garrett; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Engelke, Philip; Fan, Xiaohui; Ak, Nur Filiz; Finley, Hayley; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Ge, Jian; Gibson, Robert R; Hall, Patrick B; Hamann, Fred; Hennawi, Joseph F; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W; Ivezic, Zeljko; Jiang, Linhua; Kimball, Amy E; Kirkby, David; Kirkpatrick, Jessica A; Lee, Khee-Gan; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Lundgren, Britt; MacLeod, Chelsea L; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Maraston, Claudia; McGreer, Ian D; McMahon, Richard G; Miralda-Escud, Jordi; Muna, Demitri; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Oravetz, Daniel; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Perez-Fournon, Ismal; Pieri, Matthew M; Richards, Gordon T; Rollinde, Emmanuel; Sheldon, Erin S; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Slosar, Anze; Shelden, Alaina; Shen, Yue; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie; Suzuki, Nao; Tinker, Jeremy; Viel, Matteo; Weaver, Benjamin A; Weinberg, David H; White, Martin; Wood-Vasey, W Michael; Yche, Christophe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

NREL: Technology Transfer - NREL and SkyFuel Partnership Reflects Bright  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL and SkyFuel Partnership Reflects Bright Future for Solar Energy NREL and SkyFuel Partnership Reflects Bright Future for Solar Energy In this video, NREL Principal Scientist Gary Jorgensen and SkyFuel Chief Technology Officer Randy Gee talk about their partnership to develop a thin film to substitute for bulkier glass mirrors on solar-collecting parabolic troughs. Get the Adobe Flash Player to see this video. Credit: Fireside Production More Information For more information about NREL's partnership with SkyFuel, read Award-Winning Reflector to Cut Solar Cost and New Solar Technology Concentrates on Cost, Efficiency. Learn more about NREL's Concentrating Solar Power Research. Printable Version Technology Transfer Home About Technology Transfer Technology Partnership Agreements Licensing Agreements Nondisclosure Agreements Research Facilities

254

Cloudy Sky RRTM Shortwave Radiative Transfer and Comparison to the Revised ECMWF Shortwave Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloudy Sky RRTM Shortwave Radiative Transfer and Cloudy Sky RRTM Shortwave Radiative Transfer and Comparison to the Revised ECMWF Shortwave Model M. J. Iacono, J. S. Delamere, E. J. Mlawer, and S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Lexington, Massachusetts J.-J. Morcrette European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Reading, United Kingdom Introduction An important step toward improving radiative transfer codes in general circulation models (GCMs) is their thorough evaluation by comparison to measurements directly, or to other data-validated radiation models. This work extends the clear-sky shortwave (SW) GCM evaluation presented by Iacono et al. (2001) to computations including clouds. The rapid radiative transfer model (RRTM) SW radiation model accurately reproduces clear-sky direct beam fluxes from the Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer

255

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3, 2013 Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of...

256

Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR): Instrument Technology  

SciTech Connect

The Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) combines airborne sun tracking and sky scanning with diffraction spectroscopy, to improve knowledge of atmospheric constituents and their links to air-pollution/climate. Direct beam hyper-spectral measurement of optical depth improves retrievals of gas constituents and determination of aerosol properties. Sky scanning enhances retrievals of aerosol type and size distribution. 4STAR measurements will tighten the closure between satellite and ground-based measurements. 4STAR incorporates a modular sun-tracking/ sky-scanning optical head with fiber optic signal transmission to rack mounted spectrometers, permitting miniaturization of the external optical head, and future detector evolution. Technical challenges include compact optical collector design, radiometric dynamic range and stability, and broad spectral coverage. Test results establishing the performance of the instrument against the full range of operational requirements are presented, along with calibration, engineering flight test, and scientific field campaign data and results.

Dunagan, Stephen; Johnson, Roy; Zavaleta, Jhony; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Flynn, Connor J.; Redemann, Jens; Shinozuka, Yohei; Livingston, J.; Segal Rozenhaimer, Michal

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

257

Lidar Determinations of Atmospheric Ice Crystal Layers at South Pole during Clear-Sky Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of lidar measurements of atmospheric ice crystal layers during 36 clear-sky precipitation events at South Pole (2850 m MSL) during the winter over the period March-November 1975 are presented and correlated with ice crystal replicator, ...

Vern N. Smiley; Bruce M. Whitcomb; Bruce M. Morley; Joseph A. Warburton

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

A Variable Sky-View Platform for the Measurement of Ultraviolet Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the more difficult tasks confronting atmospheric researchers today is the acquisition of long-term radiometric measurements that encapsulate variability in the sky hemisphere as well as time. High quality spatial measurements would allow ...

Christopher Kuchinke; Manuel Nunez

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Network-ready Camera System Development for All-Sky Observing System Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be located on a rooftop and continually monitors the sky for flashes such as bright meteor fireballs, accuracy of time stamping 2. Research autonomous power options (e.g., solar cells). Considerations include

Johnson, Eric E.

260

The Transmission of Sunlight through Cloudy Skies: An Analysis Based on Standard Meteorological Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work examines the use of standard meteorological information to describe the attenuation of sunlight associated with cloudy skies. Datasets consisting of broadband ultraviolet and total spectrally integrated solar irradiance are available ...

John E. Frederick; H. Donnan Steele

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desert rock sky" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

A Calibrated Measurement of the Near-IR Continuum Sky Brightness Using Magellan/FIRE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We characterize the near-IR sky background from 308 observations with the Folded-port InfraRed Echellette (FIRE) spectrograph at Magellan. A subset of 105 observations selected to minimize lunar and thermal effects gives ...

Sullivan, Peter William

262

Climate ModelSimulated Diurnal Cycles in HIRS Clear-Sky Brightness Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clear-sky brightness temperature measurements from the High-Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) are simulated with two climate models via a radiative transfer code. The models are sampled along the HIRS orbit paths to derive diurnal ...

Ian A. MacKenzie; Simon F. B. Tett; Anders V. Lindfors

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

The universe at extreme scale: multi-petaflop sky simulation on the BG/Q  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Remarkable observational advances have established a compelling cross-validated model of the Universe. Yet, two key pillars of this model -- dark matter and dark energy -- remain mysterious. Next-generation sky surveys will map billions of galaxies to ...

Salman Habib; Vitali Morozov; Hal Finkel; Adrian Pope; Katrin Heitmann; Kalyan Kumaran; Tom Peterka; Joe Insley; David Daniel; Patricia Fasel; Nicholas Frontiere; Zarija Luki?

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Improved Simulation of Clear-Sky Shortwave Radiative Transfer in the CCC-GCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The disposition of mean July clear-sky solar radiation in the Canadian Climate Centre second-generation general circulation model (CCC-GCMII) was analyzed by comparing top of the atmosphere (TOA) net fluxes with earth radiation budget experiment (...

Howard W. Barker; Zhanqing Li

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Clear-Sky Direct-Beam Solar Radiation Versus Altitude: A Proposal for Standard Soundings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The author reexamines Klein's (1948) quantitative statements relating clear-sky direct-beam solar radiation to altitude for the lower troposphere, which are of the form (transmissivity) = B + A log (altitude). Klein's summaries are judged to be ...

William P. Lowry

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Radiative Heat Transfer Analysis within Three-Dimensional Clouds Subjected to Solar and Sky Irradiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional radiative heat transfer analysis of an arbitrary-shaped modeled cloud subjected to solar and sky irradiation has been performed. The Radiation Element Method by Ray Emission Model (REM2) was used for numerical simulation. ...

Toru Nishikawa; Shigenao Maruyama; Seigo Sakai

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Aerosol effects on red blue ratio of clear sky images, and impact on solar forecasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bergin, M.H. From weather forecasting to exploring the solarWai, et al. "Intra-hour forecasting with a total sky imagerand Impact on Solar Forecasting A Thesis submitted in

Ghonima, Mohamed Sherif

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Clear-Sky Window Channel Radiances: A Comparison between Observations and the ECMWF Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparison of clear-sky radiances of the Meteosat window channel with the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model results is presented, aiming to assess both the model's performance and the quality of the observations. ...

Isabel F. Trigo; Pedro Viterbo

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

A Comparison of Computed and Observed Insolation under Clear Skies over the Pacific Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an effort to verify computational methods for ocean heat budgets, observations of insulation under clear skies for 26 days were compared with values computed by a formula previously derived from the Smithsonian Tables. The agreement between ...

R. K. Reed; R. E. Brainard

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

On the Relationship between Clear-Sky Planetary and Surfae Albedos  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on simulations, a simple linear relationship is derived between planetary albedo and the surface albedo for the case of clear skies. This relationship enables one to estimate the planetary albedo, given only the surface albedo, and vice ...

T. S. Chen; George Ohring

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

NERSC's Deep Sky Project Provides a Portal into Data Universe - NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deep Sky Project Deep Sky Project Provides a Portal into Data Universe Deep Sky Project Provides a Portal into Data Universe March 30, 2009 STARLIGHT: This image of the Coma cluster was made by combining over 500 images collected between 2001 and 2007. Every night approximately 3,000 astronomical files flow to the National Energy Research Scientific Computing (NERSC) Center from automated sky scanning systems all over the world for archiving. After a decade of collecting, the center currently holds over 8 million images, making this one of the largest troves of ground-based celestial images available. Now, a multidisciplinary team of astronomers, computer scientists, and engineers from NERSC are collaborating to develop a user-friendly database system and interface to instantly serve up high-resolution cosmic reference

272

Pre-treating Seed to Enhance Germination of Desert Shrubs  

SciTech Connect

Creosotebush [Larrea tridentata (D.C.) Cav.] and white bursage [Ambrosia dumosa (A. Gray) W.W. Payne] seeds were subjected to pre-treatments of rinsing and soaking in water and thiourea to enhance germination in laboratory experiments. The effects of darkness, temperature, seed source, and soil moisture were also evaluated in the laboratory. The best pre-treatment from the laboratory experiments, rinsing with water for 36 hours followed by drying, was field-tested at Fort Irwin, California. Two sites and two seeding dates (early March and mid April) were determined for each site. Five mulch treatments (no mulch, straw, gravel, chemical stabilizer, and plastic) were evaluated in combination with the seed pre-treatments. Field emergence was greatly enhanced with the seed pre-treatment for white bursage during the March (18-42% increase in germination) and April seedings (16-23% increase in germination). Creosotebush showed poor germination during March (2-5%) when soil temperatures averaged 15 C, but germination increased during the April trials (6-43%) when soil temperatures averaged 23 C. The seed pre-treatment during the April trials increased germination from 16-23%. The plastic mulch treatment increased germination dramatically during both the March and April trials. The plastic mulch increased soil temperatures (8-10 C)and maintained high humidity during germination. Both the chemical stabilizer and the gravel mulches improved germination over the control while the straw mulch decreased germination. These results suggest that seed pre-treatments combined with irrigation and mulch are effective techniques to establish these two dominant Mojave Desert species from seed.

W. K. Ostler; D. C. Anderson; D. J. Hansen

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Geochemical exploration for uranium in the Red Desert, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Geochemical exploration techniques for uranium were performed at a known deposit, the ENQ uranium deposit, which is in arkosic sandstones of the Battle Spring Formation in the Red Desert of Wyoming. Regional gross-gamma aerial data did not indicate the most favorable terrain for follow-up surveys, but instead the radionuclide distribution mapped radioactive mudstones. The /sup 234/U//sup 238/U activity ratio and total uranium concentration in ground water were successful downflow indicators of the ENQ deposit. Helium concentration increased downflow in the ground water flowing from the deposit, while Cu, Pb, and Ba decreased. Radon emanometric techniques generally produced data that coincided with the equivalent uranium concentrations at shallow depth. Helium content in soil was interpreted to reflect local lithology and gaseous migration. Multielement geochemical analyses on soils were effective in delineating the general vicinity of the orebody. Factor analysis was used to recognize three lithologic subgroups. Leachable uranium in soils was the best indicator of subsurface mineralization for the entire subregional area. Equivalent uranium, as determined from the gamma-spectral borehole logs, revealed a consistent dispersion pattern within the host sand of the Battle Spring Formation, whereas gross gamma logs could not detect the subtle gradients in radioelement content. Halo models developed to explain the distribution of helium, radon, radioelements, and trace elements demonstrate uranium itself as the most mobile indicator. Radon and helium appear to reflect local generation from radium accumulations. Vertical leakage due to hydraulic flow against an impermeable barrier is interpreted to be the major secondary redistribution process responsible for the measureable surface signals.

Pacer, J.C.; Bramlett, L.; Moll, S.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Early Eocene Asian climate dominated by desert and steppe with limited monsoons Zhongshi Zhang a,b,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Early Eocene Asian climate dominated by desert and steppe with limited monsoons Zhongshi Zhang a of a monsoonal system remains unclear for that period. Here, using a recon- structed land-sea distribution desert/steppe was reduced occasionally by intensification of monsoon circulations over East Asia

275

Hot Dry Rock; Geothermal Energy  

SciTech Connect

The commercial utilization of geothermal energy forms the basis of the largest renewable energy industry in the world. More than 5000 Mw of electrical power are currently in production from approximately 210 plants and 10 000 Mw thermal are used in direct use processes. The majority of these systems are located in the well defined geothermal generally associated with crustal plate boundaries or hot spots. The essential requirements of high subsurface temperature with huge volumes of exploitable fluids, coupled to environmental and market factors, limit the choice of suitable sites significantly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) concept at any depth originally offered a dream of unlimited expansion for the geothermal industry by relaxing the location constraints by drilling deep enough to reach adequate temperatures. Now, after 20 years intensive work by international teams and expenditures of more than $250 million, it is vital to review the position of HDR in relation to the established geothermal industry. The HDR resource is merely a body of rock at elevated temperatures with insufficient fluids in place to enable the heat to be extracted without the need for injection wells. All of the major field experiments in HDR have shown that the natural fracture systems form the heat transfer surfaces and that it is these fractures that must be for geothermal systems producing from naturally fractured formations provide a basis for directing the forthcoming but, equally, they require accepting significant location constraints on HDR for the time being. This paper presents a model HDR system designed for commercial operations in the UK and uses production data from hydrothermal systems in Japan and the USA to demonstrate the reservoir performance requirements for viable operations. It is shown that these characteristics are not likely to be achieved in host rocks without stimulation processes. However, the long term goal of artificial geothermal systems developed by systematic engineering procedures at depth may still be attained if high temperature sites with extensive fracturing are developed or exploited. [DJE -2005

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Micro-Earthquake At Desert Peak Geothermal Area (2011) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Desert Peak Geothermal Area Desert Peak Geothermal Area (2011) Exploration Activity Details Location Desert Peak Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Micro-Earthquake Activity Date 2011 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine seismicity before and after reservoir stimulation for EGS Notes The overall goal is to gather high resolution seismicity data before, during and after stimulation activities at the EGS projects. This will include both surface and borehole deployments (as necessary in available boreholes) to provide high quality seismic data for improved processing and interpretation methodologies. This will allow the development and testing of seismic methods for understanding the performance of the EGS systems, as well as aid in developing induced seismicity mitigation techniques that can

277

EA-1912: Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project, near town of Desert Aire,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1912: Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project, near town of Desert 1912: Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project, near town of Desert Aire, Benton County, WA EA-1912: Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project, near town of Desert Aire, Benton County, WA Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal by DOE's Bonneville Power Administration to rebuild its existing Midway-Benton No.1 transmission line in place, or to reroute a portion of the Midway-Benton No. 1 transmission line that currently crosses Gable Mountain and Gable Butte in order to avoid crossing these features. For more information, please see: http://efw.bpa.gov/environmental_services/Document_Library/MidwayBentonRebuild/ Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download December 6, 2012 EA-1912: Finding of No Significant Impact

278

Core Analysis At Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Core Analysis At Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) Core Analysis At Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Desert Peak Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Remote Sensing for Exploration and Mapping of Geothermal Resources, Wendy Calvin, 2005. Task 1: Detailed analysis of hyperspectral imagery obtained in summer of 2003 over Brady's Hot Springs region was completed and validated (Figure 1). This analysis provided a local map of both sinter and tufa deposits surrounding the Ormat plant, identified fault extensions not previously recognized from field mapping and has helped constrain where to put additional wells that were drilled at the site. Task 2: Initial analysis of Landsat and ASTER data for Buffalo Valley and Pyramid Lake was

279

EFFECTS OF ELEVATED CO2 ON ROOT FUNCTION AND SOIL RESPIRATION IN A MOJAVE DESERT ECOSYSTEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Increases in atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration during the last 250 years are unequivocal, and CO{sub 2} will continue to increase at least for the next several decades (Houghton et al. 2001, Keeling & Whorf 2002). Arid ecosystems are some of the most important biomes globally on a land surface area basis, are increasing in area at an alarming pace (Dregne 1991), and have a strong coupling with regional climate (Asner & Heidebrecht 2005). These water-limited ecosystems also are predicted to be the most sensitive to elevated CO{sub 2}, in part because they are stressful environments where plant responses to elevated CO{sub 2} may be amplified (Strain & Bazzaz 1983). Indeed, all C{sub 3} species examined at the Nevada Desert FACE Facility (NDFF) have shown increased A{sub net} under elevated CO{sub 2} (Ellsworth et al. 2004, Naumburg et al. 2003, Nowak et al. 2004). Furthermore, increased shoot growth for individual species under elevated CO{sub 2} was spectacular in a very wet year (Smith et al. 2000), although the response in low to average precipitation years has been smaller (Housman et al. 2006). Increases in perennial cover and biomass at the NDFF are consistent with long term trends in the Mojave Desert and elsewhere in the Southwest, indicating C sequestration in woody biomass (Potter et al. 2006). Elevated CO{sub 2} also increases belowground net primary production (BNPP), with average increases of 70%, 21%, and 11% for forests, bogs, and grasslands, respectively (Nowak et al. 2004). Although detailed studies of elevated CO{sub 2} responses for desert root systems were virtually non-existent prior to our research, we anticipated that C sequestration may occur by desert root systems for several reasons. First, desert ecosystems exhibit increases in net photosynthesis and primary production at elevated CO{sub 2}. If large quantities of root litter enter the ecosystem at a time when most decomposers are inactive, significant quantities of carbon may be stored belowground in relatively recalcitrant forms. Indeed, a model-based analysis predicted that the arid/semiarid southwestern bioclimatic region had one of the highest rates of net carbon storage in the United States over the past century (Schimel et al. 2000). Second, root systems of desert plants are often extensive (Foxx et al. 1984, Hartle et al. 2006) with relatively large proportions of roots deep in the soil (Schenk & Jackson 2002). Thus, an understanding of belowground processes in desert ecosystems provides information on the potential for terrestrial carbon sequestration in desert ecosystems.

Nowak, Robert S.

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

280

DOE hot dry rock program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing has been used to create and subsequently to enlarge the first hot dry rock heat-extraction loop at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. Encouraging results prompted the DOE to expand this project into a program of national scope. The elements of that Program and their present status are discussed. Emphasis is given the ongoing Fenton Hill Project where techniques and information developed in the existing research system will soon be used to produce a multiply-fractured engineering system in hotter rock at the same site. Recent results from research loop operation and progress in constructing the engineering system are reported. Although acoustic mapping and system geometry indicate that the primary hydraulic fractures are essentially vertical, relatively low fracturing pressure and absence of a sharp breakdown suggest that at Fenton Hill fracture initiation occurs by reopening of old natural fractures rather than by initiation of new ones. Flow patterns and temperature behavior suggest opening of additional old fractures as the loop is operated. Except where the hot fluid leaves the crack system to enter the production well, flow impedances are very low without either artificial propping or inflation by pressurization.

Nunz, G.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desert rock sky" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Definition: Rock Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to core recovered from boreholes. They typically involve measuring the physical and chemical properties of the rock. Physical properties include density, elastic modulus, seismic...

282

Rock Energy Cooperative (Illinois) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cooperative (Illinois) Jump to: navigation, search Name Rock Energy Cooperative Place Illinois Utility Id 16196 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101...

283

IS THE TWO MICRON ALL SKY SURVEY CLUSTERING DIPOLE CONVERGENT?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a long-standing controversy about the convergence of the dipole moment of the galaxy angular distribution (the so-called clustering dipole). Is the dipole convergent at all, and if so, what is the scale of the convergence? We study the growth of the clustering dipole of galaxies as a function of the limiting flux of the sample from the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS). Contrary to some earlier claims, we find that the dipole does not converge before the completeness limit of the 2MASS Extended Source Catalog, i.e., up to 13.5 mag in the near-infrared K{sub s} band (equivalent to an effective distance of 300 Mpc h{sup -1}). We compare the observed growth of the dipole with the theoretically expected, conditional one (i.e., given the velocity of the Local Group relative to the cosmic microwave background), for the {Lambda}CDM power spectrum and cosmological parameters constrained by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. The observed growth turns out to be within 1{sigma} confidence level of its theoretical counterpart once the proper observational window of the 2MASS flux-limited catalog is included. For a contrast, if the adopted window is a top hat, then the predicted dipole grows significantly faster and converges (within the errors) to its final value for a distance of about 300 Mpc h{sup -1}. By comparing the observational windows, we show that for a given flux limit and a corresponding distance limit, the 2MASS flux-weighted window passes less large-scale signal than the top-hat one. We conclude that the growth of the 2MASS dipole for effective distances greater than 200 Mpc h{sup -1} is only apparent. On the other hand, for a distance of 80 Mpc h{sup -1} (mean depth of the 2MASS Redshift Survey) and the {Lambda}CDM power spectrum, the true dipole is expected to reach only {approx}80% of its final value. Eventually, since for the window function of 2MASS the predicted growth is consistent with the observed one, we can compare the two to evaluate {beta} {identical_to} {Omega}{sub m}{sup 0.55}/b. The result is {beta} = 0.38 {+-} 0.04, which leads to an estimate of the density parameter {Omega}{sub m} = 0.20 {+-} 0.08.

Bilicki, Maciej; Chodorowski, Michal [Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Bartycka 18, 00-716, Warsaw (Poland); Jarrett, Thomas [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Mamon, Gary A., E-mail: bilicki@camk.edu.pl [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris - UMR 7095 CNRS and UPMC, 98 bis Bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Schmid et al. Inclusion Behavior in Deforming Rocks Inclusion Behavior in Deforming Rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Schmid et al. Inclusion Behavior in Deforming Rocks Inclusion Behavior in Deforming Rocks Dani Podladchikov, PGP, University of Oslo, Norway Intro 1 #12;Schmid et al. Inclusion Behavior in Deforming Rocks Motivation 2 The single most useful thing to understand! #12;Schmid et al. Inclusion Behavior in Deforming

Cesare, Bernardo

285

SURVEYING THE DYNAMIC RADIO SKY WITH THE LONG WAVELENGTH DEMONSTRATOR ARRAY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a search for radio transients at a frequency of 73.8 MHz (4 m wavelength) using the all-sky imaging capabilities of the Long Wavelength Demonstrator Array (LWDA). The LWDA was a 16-dipole phased array telescope, located on the site of the Very Large Array in New Mexico. The field of view of the individual dipoles was essentially the entire sky, and the number of dipoles was sufficiently small that a simple software correlator could be used to make all-sky images. From 2006 October to 2007 February, we conducted an all-sky transient search program, acquiring a total of 106 hr of data; the time sampling varied, being 5 minutes at the start of the program and improving to 2 minutes by the end of the program. We were able to detect solar flares, and in a special-purpose mode, radio reflections from ionized meteor trails during the 2006 Leonid meteor shower. We detected no transients originating outside of the solar system above a flux density limit of 500 Jy, equivalent to a limit of no more than about 10{sup -2} events yr{sup -1} deg{sup -2}, having a pulse energy density {approx}>1.5 x 10{sup -20} J m{sup -2} Hz{sup -1} at 73.8 MHz for pulse widths of about 300 s. This event rate is comparable to that determined from previous all-sky transient searches, but at a lower frequency than most previous all-sky searches. We believe that the LWDA illustrates how an all-sky imaging mode could be a useful operational model for low-frequency instruments such as the Low Frequency Array, the Long Wavelength Array station, the low-frequency component of the Square Kilometre Array, and potentially the Lunar Radio Array.

Lazio, T. Joseph W.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Lane, W. M.; Gross, C.; Kassim, N. E.; Hicks, B.; Polisensky, E.; Stewart, K. [Remote Sensing Division, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Ray, P. S. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20375-5382 (United States); Wood, D. [Praxis, Inc., 5845 Richmond Highway, Suite 700, Alexandria, VA 22303 (United States); York, J. A.; Kerkhoff, A. [Applied Research Laboratories, University of Texas at Austin, P.O. Box 8029, Austin, TX 78713-8029 (United States); Dalal, N. Paravastu [American Society for Engineering Education, Washington, DC 20036 (United States); Cohen, A. S. [Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Erickson, W. C., E-mail: Joseph.Lazio@jpl.nasa.go [School of Mathematics and Science, University of Tasmania, Churchill Ave., Sandy Bay, Tasmania 7005 (Australia)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

286

Satellite Measurements of Surface Albedo and Temperatures in Semi-Desert  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of surface parameters in an arid steppe (the semi-desert of the northern Sinai) were made from the NOAA-6 satellite to assess the effects of the vegetation recovery in a fenced-off area. The radiances measured in the solar ...

J. Otterman; C. J. Tucker

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Strong down-valley low-level jets over the Atacama Desert: observational characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The near-surface wind and temperature regime at three points in the Atacama Desert of northern Chile is described using two-year multi-level measurements from 80-m towers located in an altitude range between 2100 and 2700 m ASL. The data reveal ...

Ricardo C. Muoz; Mark J. Falvey; Marcelo Araya; Martin Jacques-Coper

288

Remote sensing approaches for reconstructing fire perimeters and burn severity mosaics in desert spring ecosystems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Remote sensing approaches for reconstructing fire perimeters and burn severity mosaics in desert. Remote sensing methods have been used in other environments to gain information about fires that have reported sizes of less than one hectare. Additional refinement of remote sensing methods is necessary

Weisberg, Peter J.

289

City of Palm Desert This page outlines solar PV incentives, financing mechanisms, permitting process, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/csi-latest-news/2167-why-pay-to-install-solar o Southern California Edison Solar Rooftop Program · This commercial energy grid. www.sce.com/solarleadership/solar-rooftop-program/ Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACECity of Palm Desert This page outlines solar PV incentives, financing mechanisms, permitting

290

Heat Low Over the Saudi Arabian Desert During May 1979 (Summer MONEX)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In May of 1979 a unique data set was obtained over the desert area in Saudi Arabia near the surface heat low as part of the GARP Monsoon Experiment (MONEX). Analysis of the data reveals that during the day a well-mixed layer extends up to 650 mb, ...

D. W. Blake; T. N. Krishnamurti; S. V. Low-Nam; J. S. Fein

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Dust Aerosol Optical Depth Retrieval over a Desert Surface Using the SEVIRI Window Channels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present a new algorithm to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD) over a desert using the window channels centered at 8.7, 10.8, and 12.0 ?m of the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) instrument on board the Meteosat ...

Bart De Paepe; Steven Dewitte

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

The hot dry rock geothermal energy program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The paper presents a simplified description of the Department of Energy's Hot-Dry-Rock program conducted at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. What a hot-dry-rock resource is and what the magnitude of the resource is are also described.

Smith, M.C.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Proceedings of hot dry rock geothermal workshop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Abstracts of 38 papers are included on the following subjects: rock mechanics, part 1: hydraulic fracturing; fracture imaging and borehole surveying; fluid flow-pressure analyses; rock mechanics, part 2: hydraulic fracturing and thermal cracking; geochemistry; heat extraction modeling; and economics and energy conversion. (MHR)

Elsner, D.B. (comp.)

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility General Information Name Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility Facility Eagle Rock Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location The Geysers, California Coordinates 38.826770222484°, -122.80002593994° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.826770222484,"lon":-122.80002593994,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

295

Definition: Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sampling Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Rock Sampling Systematic rock sampling can be used to characterize a geothermal reservoir. The physical and chemical properties of rock samples provide important information for determining whether a power generation or heat utilization facility can be developed. Some general rock properties can be measured by visual inspection, but detailed properties require laboratory techniques. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A core sample is a cylindrical section of (usually) a naturally occurring substance. Most core samples are obtained by drilling with special drills into the substance, for example sediment or rock, with a hollow steel tube called a core drill. The hole made for the core sample is called the "core hole". A variety of core samplers exist to sample

296

Open Skies and monitoring a fissile materials cut-off treaty  

SciTech Connect

The Treaty on Open Skies (Open Skies) is intended among other things to provide, in the words of its preamble, means ``to facilitate the monitoring of compliance with existing or future arms control agreements.`` Open Skies permits overflights of the territory of member states by aircraft equipped with an array of sensors of various types. Their types and capabilities are treaty-limited. To find useful application in monitoring a cut-off treaty Open Skies would need to be amended. The number of signatories would need to be expanded so as to provide greater geographical coverage, and restrictions on sensor-array capabilities would need to be relaxed. To facilitate the detection of impending violations of a cut-off convention by Open Skies overflights, the data base provided by parties to the former should include among other things an enumeration of existing and former fuel cycle and research facilities including those converted to other uses, their precise geographic location, and a site plan.

Allentuck, J.; Lemley, J.R.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Optical Sky Brightness at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory from 1992 to 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present optical UBVRI sky brightness measures from 1992 through 2006. The data are based on CCD imagery obtained with the CTIO 0.9-m, 1.3-m, and 1.5-m telescopes. The B- and V-band data are in reasonable agreement with measurements previously made at Mauna Kea, though on the basis of a small number of images per year there are discrepancies for the years 1992 through 1994. Our CCD-based data are not significantly different than values obtained at Cerro Paranal. We find that the yearly averages of V-band sky brightness are best correlated with the 10.7-cm solar flux taken 5 days prior to the sky brightness measures. This implies an average speed of 350 km/sec for the solar wind. While we can measure an enhancement of the night sky levels over La Serena 10 degrees above the horizon, at elevation angles above 45 degrees we find no evidence that the night sky brightness at Cerro Tololo is affected by artificial light of nearby towns and cities.

Krisciunas, Kevin; Sanhueza, Pedro; Schwarz, Hugo E; Semler, Dylan R; Suntzeff, Nicholas B; Vera, Sergio

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

FRACTURE DETECTION IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK USING ULTRASONIC SHEAR WAVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the piezoelectric source plate and the rock surface. With aThe S^j sources were bonded to the rock surface with a fast-^ source plate was epoxied in position on the rock specimen.

Waters, K.H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Use of Aeronet Aerosol Retrievals to Calculate Clear-Sky Irradiance at the Surface  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AERONET Aerosol Retrievals to AERONET Aerosol Retrievals to Calculate Clear-Sky Irradiance at the Surface G. L. Schuster National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia O. Dubovik National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics Greenbelt, Maryland Motivation The worldwide aerosol robotic network (AERONET) of ground-based radiometers was developed (in part) as a satellite validation tool (Holben et al. 1998). These sites utilize spectral sky-scanning radiometers, providing more information for aerosol retrievals than conventional sunphotometer measurements. The use of the almucantar sky radiance scans in conjunction with the aerosol optical thicknesses are the basis of the AERONET Dubovik retrievals, which provide the aerosol size

300

Tracking Santa With Our Eyes in the Sky | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tracking Santa With Our Eyes in the Sky Tracking Santa With Our Eyes in the Sky Tracking Santa With Our Eyes in the Sky December 24, 2013 - 10:00am Addthis The Energy Department's Los Alamos National Lab is tracking Santa Claus as he circles the globe the night before Christmas. The Energy Department's Los Alamos National Lab is tracking Santa Claus as he circles the globe the night before Christmas. Michael Hess Michael Hess Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Every year since 1998, the Energy Department's Los Alamos National Lab has been using state-of-the-art technology to track Santa Claus as he circles the globe the night before Christmas. You'll be able to monitor St. Nick's journey here starting at 6 a.m. ET on Christmas Eve. Since Santa doesn't file his flight path with the Federal Aviation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desert rock sky" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Bluer Skies and Brighter Days: The U.S. and India Collaborate in First  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bluer Skies and Brighter Days: The U.S. and India Collaborate in Bluer Skies and Brighter Days: The U.S. and India Collaborate in First Long-Term Climate Experiment Bluer Skies and Brighter Days: The U.S. and India Collaborate in First Long-Term Climate Experiment June 27, 2011 - 12:42pm Addthis ARM Mobile Facility instrumentation is installed in June 2011 at the ARIES Observatory in Nainital, India, for the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX). | Courtesy of ARM.gov ARM Mobile Facility instrumentation is installed in June 2011 at the ARIES Observatory in Nainital, India, for the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX). | Courtesy of ARM.gov Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science What are the key facts? Energy Department's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility recently deployed its mobile facility to

302

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection August 13, 2013 - 1:59pm Addthis Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey For Additional Information To learn more about the carbon storage projects in which NETL is involved, please visit the NETL Carbon Storage website How can a prehistoric volcanic eruption help us reduce the amount of CO2 released into the atmosphere today? The answer is found in the basalt formations created by the lava - formations that can be used as sites for injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) captured from industrial sources in a process called carbon capture and storage (CCS).

303

3.2B Pixel Camera to Shed Light on Southern Sky | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3.2B Pixel Camera to Shed Light on Southern Sky 3.2B Pixel Camera to Shed Light on Southern Sky 3.2B Pixel Camera to Shed Light on Southern Sky July 24, 2012 - 10:56am Addthis This is an artist's rendering of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), the 8.4 meter wide-field telescope that the National Science Board recently approved to advance to its final design stage. Construction is expected to begin in 2014 and take about five years. | Photo courtesy of LSST Corporation. This is an artist's rendering of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), the 8.4 meter wide-field telescope that the National Science Board recently approved to advance to its final design stage. Construction is expected to begin in 2014 and take about five years. | Photo courtesy of LSST Corporation. Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux

304

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection August 13, 2013 - 1:59pm Addthis Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey For Additional Information To learn more about the carbon storage projects in which NETL is involved, please visit the NETL Carbon Storage website How can a prehistoric volcanic eruption help us reduce the amount of CO2 released into the atmosphere today? The answer is found in the basalt formations created by the lava - formations that can be used as sites for injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) captured from industrial sources in a process called carbon capture and storage (CCS).

305

A SEARCH FOR CONCENTRIC CIRCLES IN THE 7 YEAR WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE TEMPERATURE SKY MAPS  

SciTech Connect

In this Letter, we search for concentric circles with low variance in cosmic microwave background sky maps. The detection of such circles would hint at new physics beyond the current cosmological concordance model, which states that the universe is isotropic and homogeneous, and filled with Gaussian fluctuations. We first describe a set of methods designed to detect such circles, based on matched filters and {chi}{sup 2} statistics, and then apply these methods to the best current publicly available data, the 7 year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) temperature sky maps. We compare the observations with an ensemble of 1000 Gaussian {Lambda}CDM simulations. Based on these tests, we conclude that the WMAP sky maps are fully compatible with the Gaussian and isotropic hypothesis as measured by low-variance ring statistics.

Wehus, I. K. [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Eriksen, H. K., E-mail: i.k.wehus@fys.uio.no [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Triggering of Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes: PMT trigger rates due to night-sky photons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Imaging air Cherenkov telescopes are usually triggered on a coincidence of two or sometimes more pixels, with discriminator thresholds in excess of 20 photoelectrons applied for each pixel. These thresholds required to suppress night-sky background are significantly higher than expected on the basis of a Poisson distribution in the number of night-sky photoelectrons generated during the characteristic signal integration time. We studied noise trigger rates under controlled conditions using an artificial background light source. Large tails in the PMT amplitude response to single photoelectrons are identified as a dominant contribution to noise triggers. The rate of such events is very sensitive to PMT operating parameters.

G. Hermann; C. Khler; T. Kutter; W. Hofmann

1995-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

307

PRIMORDIAL GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTABILITY WITH DEEP SMALL-SKY COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND EXPERIMENTS  

SciTech Connect

We use the Bayesian estimation on direct T - Q - U cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization maps to forecast errors on the tensor-to-scalar power ratio r, and hence on primordial gravitational waves, as a function of sky coverage f{sub sky}. This map-based likelihood filters the information in the pixel-pixel space into the optimal combinations needed for r detection for cut skies, providing enhanced information over a first-step linear separation into a combination of E, B, and mixed modes, and ignoring the latter. With current computational power and for typical resolutions appropriate for r detection, the large matrix inversions required are accurate and fast. Our simulations explore two classes of experiments, with differing bolometric detector numbers, sensitivities, and observational strategies. One is motivated by a long duration balloon experiment like Spider, with pixel noise {proportional_to}{radical}(f{sub sky}) for a specified observing period. This analysis also applies to ground-based array experiments. We find that, in the absence of systematic effects and foregrounds, an experiment with Spider-like noise concentrating on f{sub sky} {approx} 0.02-0.2 could place a 2{sigma}{sub r} Almost-Equal-To 0.014 boundary ({approx}95% confidence level), which rises to 0.02 with an l-dependent foreground residual left over from an assumed efficient component separation. We contrast this with a Planck-like fixed instrumental noise as f{sub sky} varies, which gives a Galaxy-masked (f{sub sky} = 0.75) 2{sigma}{sub r} Almost-Equal-To 0.015, rising to Almost-Equal-To 0.05 with the foreground residuals. Using as the figure of merit the (marginalized) one-dimensional Shannon entropy of r, taken relative to the first 2003 WMAP CMB-only constraint, gives -2.7 bits from the 2012 WMAP9+ACT+SPT+LSS data, and forecasts of -6 bits from Spider (+ Planck); this compares with up to -11 bits for CMBPol, COrE, and PIXIE post-Planck satellites and -13 bits for a perfectly noiseless cosmic variance limited experiment. We thus confirm the wisdom of the current strategy for r detection of deeply probed patches covering the f{sub sky} minimum-error trough with balloon and ground experiments.

Farhang, M.; Bond, J. R.; Netterfield, C. B. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Dore, O. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Full-sky correlation functions for CMB experiments with asymmetric window functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss full-sky convolution of the instrumental beam with the CMB sky signal in CMB single-dish and interferometry experiments, using the method (Challinor et al. 2000) that the measured temperature and polarization anisotropies are defined globally on the group manifold of the three-dimensional rotation by means of Wigner D-functions. We re-derive the anisotropy and polarization correlation functions incorporated with asymmetric window functions, which are then explicitly calculated for a single-dish elliptical Gaussian beam and an interferometric Gaussian beam.

Kin-Wang Ng

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Some approaches to rock mass hydrofracture theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new engineering method has been developed at the Leningrad Mining Institute for defining hot dry rock hydrofracturing parameters. It reflects the structural features of a real jointed rock mass, its gravity-tectonic components of the stress tensor and volume character of deformations, taking into account the inertial effects of hydrodynamics in the non-Darcy zone of radial fluid flow near the injection well, and conversion of the heat energy extracted from hot rock by circulating water partly into filtration-flow additional pressure. Results of calculations are compared to field experiments at Fenton Hill, NM, and are used for the first HDR circulation systems in the USSR.

Dyadkin, Yuri, D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Diurnal Variation of the Lower-Tropospheric Flow over the Arizona Low Desert from SWAMP-1993 Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the tropospheric circulation over the lower deserts of Arizona, California, and northwestern Mexico using observations from a special rawinsonde network operated during July and August as part of the 1993 Southwest Area ...

Michael W. Douglas; Shuhua Li

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Seeding Effectiveness?The Interaction of Desert Dust and the Southern Margins of Rain Cloud Systems in Israel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Statistical analyses suggest that cloud seeding has caused a net increase of rainfall only in northern Israel. These analyses also identify the reported desert dust as a detrimental factor for the seeding effectiveness. This paper deals with the ...

Daniel Rosenfeld; Ronit Nirel

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Multiscale Local Forcing of the Arabian Desert Daytime Boundary Layer, and Implications for the Dispersion of Surface-Released Contaminants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four 6-day simulations of the atmospheric conditions over the Arabian Desert during the time of the 1991 detonation and release of toxic material at the Khamisiyah, Iraq, weapons depot were performed using a mesoscale model run in a data-...

Thomas T. Warner; Rong-Shyang Sheu

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Wood-Producing Sunflower? Mining Genetic Diversity in Desert-Dwelling Wild Species (2010 JGI User Meeting)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Steve Knapp from Monsanto on "Wood-Producing Sunflower? Mining Genetic Diversity in Desert-Dwelling Wild Species" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

Knapp, Steve

2010-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

314

Solar Power in the Desert: Are the current large-scale solar developments really improving Californias environment?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D EVELOPMENT I SSUES Solar Power in the Desert: Are the2 Most of the large-scale solar power projects utilize largethat will be affected by solar power facilities. There are

Allen, Michael F.; McHughen, Alan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

"Now Dead I Begin to Sing": A Protohistoric Clothes-Burning Ceremonial Feature in the Colorado Desert  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. 1965 Warriors of the Colorado. Norman: Uni- versity of1861 Report Upon the Colorado River of the West. Washington:Research in the Colorado Desert: Recent Approaches and

Schaefer, Jerry

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Solar energy conversion: an analysis of impacts on desert ecosystems. Progress report, June 1, 1977--December 31, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some of the important potential ecological impacts that might occur when solar collector arrays are constructed and maintained in the desert Southwest are discussed. These impacts are categorized under major environmental consequences of solar collector development, that is, shading, wind deflection and site destruction and soil disturbance. Under these major categories secondary impacts are developed to show the significance of altering desert ecosystems with solar conversion systems. Some of the secondary impacts which include abiotic changes in radiation, temperature, heat flux, soil moisture and erosion, and biotic changes such as increased plant productivity and species diversity are discussed as to their short and long term significance in the desert system. A brief description of the solar collector simulator array being constructed in the desert to test many of the concepts developed during the early part of Phase I of this project is presented.

Patten, D.T.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Sand Flux Simulations at a Small Scale over a Heterogeneous Mesquite Area of the Northern Chihuahuan Desert  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within areas of the Chihuahuan Desert dominated by honey mesquite bushes (Prosopis glandulosa), soil erosion causes open eroded patches and the formation of large coppice dunes. The airflow patterns around the dunes and through the open areas are ...

George E. Bowker; Dale A. Gillette; Gilles Bergametti; Batrice Marticorena; David K. Heist

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Details Activities (5) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Two hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy reservoirs have been created by hydraulic fracturing of Precambrian granitic rock between two wells on the west flank of the Valles Caldera in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico. Heat is extracted by injecting water into one well,

319

Rock of Ages | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Ages of Ages Jump to: navigation, search Name Rock of Ages Facility Rock of Ages Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Rock of Ages Energy Purchaser Rock of Ages Location Graniteville VT Coordinates 44.14668574°, -72.48180896° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.14668574,"lon":-72.48180896,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

320

Definition: Isotopic Analysis- Rock | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopic Analysis- Rock Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in a given system, while the conditions which increase/decrease the number of neutrons are well understood and measurable.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition References ↑ http://wwwrcamnl.wr.usgs.gov/isoig/isopubs/itchch2.html Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Isotopic_Analysis-_Rock&oldid=687702" Category: Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desert rock sky" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Rock bed heat accumulators. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The principal objectives of the research program on rock bed heat accumulators (or RBHA) are: (1) to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of storing large amounts of thermal energy (in the tens of MWt range) at high temperature (up to 500/sup 0/C) over extended periods of time (up to 6 months) using native earth or rock materials; (2) to conduct studies to establish the performance characteristics of large rock bed heat accumulators at various power and temperature levels compatible with thermal conversion systems; and (3) to assess the materials and environmental problems associated with the operation of such large heat accumulators. Results of the study indicate that rock bed heat accumulators for seasonal storage are both technically and economically feasible, and hence could be exploited in various applications in which storage plays an essential role such as solar power and total energy systems, district and cogeneration heating systems.

Riaz, M.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

A 15-year Simulation of the Clear-Sky Greenhouse Effect Using the ECMWF Reanalyses: Fluxes and Comparisons with ERBE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are presented from the project Clear-sky Longwave from ERA (CLERA), in which simulations were performed of clear-sky longwave fluxes and heating rates for the period 197993, based on data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather ...

A. Slingo; J. A. Pamment; M. J. Webb

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Second experiments in the robotic investigation of life in the Atacama Desert of Chile  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Atacama Desert of northern Chile may be the most lifeless place on Earth, yet microorganisms do survive in some areas. The distribution and diversity of life in the Atacama remains unexplored and is the focus of the Life in the Atacama project. To conduct this investigation, survey traverses across the desert with biologic and geologic instruments will allow us to create biogeographic maps. We accomplish these surveys with an autonomous astrobiology rover. In this paper we motivate the Life in the Atacama project and report on the second of three field seasons of scientific investigation and technical experiments in Chile. We describe the rover, instruments, algorithms and assess intermediate results. These results provide insight into the design of an effective robotic astrobiologist for future planetary investigations and into the best methods to conduct astrobiologic surveys. 1

David Wettergreen; Nathalie Cabrol; Vijayakumar Baskaran; Francisco Caldern; Paul Tompkins; Daniel Villa; Chris Williams; Michael Wagner

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Characterization of the corrosion environment of the desert near Barstow, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The corrosion characteristics of the desert atmosphere environment near Barstow, CA have been evaluated for the solar pilot plant receiver panel. Potential degradation mechanisms considered were hot corrosion from molten salts and stress corrosion cracking in aqueous environments. The possibility of degradation from these mechanisms depends on the chemical composition of airborne particulates, aerosols, and gases. These particulates and aerosols were collected near the pilot plant site and analyzed for water and acid soluble Na/sup +/, Mg/sup + +/, Li/sup +/, S/sup =/, SO/sub 4//sup =/, and Cl/sup -/. Comparison and evaluation of the quantities of these ions present with those necessary for corrosion indicate that external corrosion of the receiver due to the desert atmosphere environment is unlikely.

Hughes, D.A.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Einstein@Home all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in LIGO S5 data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents results of an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range [50,1?190]??Hz and with frequency derivative range of ?[-20,1.1]10[superscript -10]??Hz?s[superscript -1] for the ...

Barsotti, Lisa

326

All-sky astrophysical component separation with Fast Independent Component Analysis (FastICA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new, fast, algorithm for the separation of astrophysical components superposed in maps of the sky. The algorithm, based on the Independent Component Analysis (ICA) technique, is aimed at recovering both the spatial pattern and the frequency scalings of the emissions from statistically independent astrophysical processes, present along the line-of-sight, from multi-frequency observations, without any a priori assumption on properties of the components to be separated, except that all of them, but at most one, must have non-Gaussian distributions. The analysis starts from very simple toy-models of the sky emission in order to assess the quality of the reconstruction when inputs are well known and controlled. In particular we study the dependence of the results of separation conducted on and off the Galactic plane independently, showing that optimal separation is achieved for sky regions where components are smoothly distributed. Then we move to more realistic applications on simulated observations of the microwave sky with angular resolution and instrumental noise at the mean nominal

D. Maino; A. Farusi; C. Baccigalupi; F. Perrotta; L. Bedini

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Cloud Coverage Based on All-Sky Imaging and Its Impact on Surface Solar Irradiance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Lauder, Central Otago, New Zealand, two all-sky imaging systems have been in operation for more than 1 yr, measuring the total, opaque, and thin cloud fraction, as well as indicating whether the sun is obscured by clouds. The data provide a ...

G. Pfister; R. L. McKenzie; J. B. Liley; A. Thomas; B. W. Forgan; C. N. Long

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Analog Sky Condition Forecasting Based on a k-nn Algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Very short-range, cloudyclear sky condition forecasts are important for a variety of military, civil, and commercial activities. In this investigation, an approach based on a k-nearest neighbors (k-nn) algorithm was developed and implemented to ...

Timothy J. Hall; Rachel N. Thessin; Greg J. Bloy; Carl N. Mutchler

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Sky View Factors from High-Resolution Scanned Fish-eye Lens Photographic Negatives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computerized method for calculating the sky view factor from fish-eye lens photographic negatives is presented. The images are scanned and stored on CD ROM, each CD holding 100 images. The images can be retrieved at very high resolutions of up ...

Kristina Blennow

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

The Animated Gamma-ray Sky Revealed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope  

SciTech Connect

The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been observing the sky in gamma-rays since August 2008. In addition to breakthrough capabilities in energy coverage (20 MeV-300 GeV) and angular resolution, the wide field of view of the Large Area Telescope enables observations of 20% of the sky at any instant, and of the whole sky every three hours. It has revealed a very animated sky with bright gamma-ray bursts flashing and vanishing in minutes, powerful active galactic nuclei flaring over hours and days, many pulsars twinkling in the Milky Way, and X-ray binaries shimmering along their orbit. Most of these variable sources had not been seen by the Fermi predecessor, EGRET, and the wealth of new data already brings important clues to the origin of the high-energy emission and particles powered by the compact objects. The telescope also brings crisp images of the bright gamma-ray emission produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the interstellar medium, thus allowing to measure the cosmic nuclei and electron spectra across the Galaxy, to weigh interstellar clouds, in particular in the dark-gas phase. The telescope sensitivity at high energy will soon provide useful constraints on dark-matter annihilations in a variety of environments. I will review the current results and future prospects of the Fermi mission.

Grenier, Isabelle (University Paris Diderot and CEA Saclay, France)

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Clear-Sky Longwave Irradiance at the Earths SurfaceEvaluation of Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An evaluation of the clear-sky longwave irradiance at the earths surface (LI) simulated in climate models and in satellite-based global datasets is presented. Algorithm-based estimates of LI, derived from global observations of column water ...

J. R. Garratt

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Treaty on Open Skies sensor technologies with potential international safeguards applications  

SciTech Connect

The Treaty on Open Skies is a precedent-setting agreement that allows signatory states to fly aircraft over each other`s territory with sensor systems. The purpose of the Treaty is to improve confidence and security with respect to military activities of the signatories. This paper reviews the sensor technology that is currently allowed by the Treaty on Open Skies and potential future sensor technology. The Treaty on Open Skies does have provisions to allow for the improvement of the technology of the current sensor systems and for the proposal of new sensors after a period of time. This can occur only after the Treaty has been ratified and has entered into force. If this regime was to be used for other than Treaty on Open Skies applications some modifications to the allowed sensor technology should be examined. This paper presents some ideas on potential improvements to existing allowed sensor technology as well as some suggested new advanced sensor systems that would be useful for future potential monitoring of safeguard`s related activities. This paper addresses advanced imaging sensors and non-imaging sensors for potential use in aerial remote sensing roles that involve international data sharing.

Sandoval, M.B.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Measuring Total Column Water Vapor by Pointing an Infrared Thermometer at the Sky  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 2-yr study affirms that the temperature indicated by an inexpensive ($20$60) IR thermometer pointed at the cloud-free zenith sky (Tz) is a proxy for total column water vapor [precipitable water (PW)]. From 8 September 2008 to 18 October 2010 Tz was ...

Forrest M. Mims III; Lin Hartung Chambers; David R. Brooks

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Comparison of Regional Clear-Sky Albedos Inferred from Satellite Observations and Model Computations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have taken an important first step in validating climate models by comparing model and satellite inferred clear sky TOA (top-of-atmosphere) albedos. Model albodos were computed on a 1 1 latitude-longitude grid, allowing for variations in ...

B. P. Briegleb; P. Minnis; V. Ramanathan; E. Harrison

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Investigation of astrophysical phenomena in short time scales with "Pi of the Sky" apparatus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis the data analysis designed by author for the "Pi of the Sky" experiment is presented. The data analysis consists of data reduction and specific algorithms for identification of short time scale astrophysical processes. The algorithms have been tested and their efficiency has been determined and described. The "Pi of the Sky" prototype is collecting data since June 2004 and algorithms could be intensively studied and improved during over 700 nights. A few events of confirmed astrophysical origin and above 100 events in 10s time scale of unknown nature have been discovered. During the data collection period 3 Gamma Ray Bursts (out of 231) occurred in the field of view of the telescope, but no optical counterpart has been found. The upper limits for brightness of the optical counterpart have been determined. The continuous monitoring of the sky and own trigger for optical flashes allowed to determine limits on the number of GRBs without corresponding gamma-ray detection. This allowed determining limits on the ratio of emission collimation in optical and gamma bands, which is R >= 4.4. The perspectives of the full "Pi of the Sky" system has been studied and number of positive detections has been estimated on the level of ~ 2.5 events per year.

Marcin Sokolowski

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

336

Evaluation of a Ground-Based Sky Camera System for Use inSurface Irradiance Measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the evaluation of a ground-based sky camera system for studying the effect of clouds on the level of the ambient ultraviolet radiation. The system has been developed for research in the characterization of the effect of ...

Jeff Sabburg; Joe Wong

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

A Statistical Exmination of Sky Cover Changes in the Contiguous United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sette Weather Chart constructed in 1939 with data from 1900 to 1936 was used to describe the climatology of cloudless days and to predict cloudless days in the United States for 14 regions. When the data for days having 0.1 sky cover or less ...

William L. Seaver; James E. Lee

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Feature Extraction from Whole-Sky Ground-Based Images for Cloud-Type Recognition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several features that can be extracted from digital images of the sky and that can be useful for cloud-type classification of such images are presented. Some features are statistical measurements of image texture, some are based on the Fourier ...

Josep Calb; Jeff Sabburg

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Solar Irradiance Anomalies Caused by Clear-Sky Transmission Variations above Mauna Loa: 195899  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The clear-sky transmission of the atmosphere contributes to determining the amount of solar irradiance that reaches various levels in the atmosphere, which in turn is fundamental to defining the climate of the earth. As of the end of 1999, ...

Ellsworth G. Dutton; Barry A. Bodhaine

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Impact of the Desert Dust on the Summer Monsoon System over Southwestern North America  

SciTech Connect

The radiative forcing of dust emitted from the Southwest United States (US) deserts and its impact on monsoon circulation and precipitation over the North America monsoon (NAM) region are simulated using a coupled meteorology and aerosol/chemistry model (WRF-Chem) for 15 years (1995-2009). During the monsoon season, dust has a cooling effect (-0.90 W m{sup -2}) at the surface, a warming effect (0.40 W m{sup -2}) in the atmosphere, and a negative top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) forcing (-0.50 W m{sup -2}) over the deserts on 24-h average. Most of the dust emitted from the deserts concentrates below 800 hPa and accumulates over the western slope of the Rocky Mountains and Mexican Plateau. The absorption of shortwave radiation by dust heats the lower atmosphere by up to 0.5 K day{sup -1} over the western slope of the Mountains. Model sensitivity simulations with and without dust for 15 summers (June-July-August) show that dust heating of the lower atmosphere over the deserts strengthens the low-level southerly moisture fluxes on both sides of the Sierra Madre Occidental. It also results in an eastward migration of NAM-driven moisture convergence over the western slope of the Mountains. These monsoonal circulation changes lead to a statistically significant increase of precipitation by up to {approx}40% over the eastern slope of the Mountains (Arizona-New Mexico-Texas regions). This study highlights the interaction between dust and the NAM system and motivates further investigation of possible dust feedback on monsoon precipitation under climate change and the megadrought conditions projected for the future.

Zhao, Chun; Liu, Xiaohong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desert rock sky" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Species and community response to above normal precipitation following prolonged drought in the northern Mojave Desert  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Little information is available on how desert plant communities that are dominated by perennial species respond to normal and above normal precipitation following prolonged drought. Intuitively, one would expect total canopy cover to increase. Whether a concomitant increase in the density of perennial species also occurs is unknown. Even less is known about how individual species respond to above normal precipitation following drought. From 1987 through 1991 a prolonged drought occurred in much of the western United States, including the northern Mojave Desert. In March 1991 the northern Mojave Desert received well above normal precipitation. The following two winters (December--March) also had above normal precipitation (150 to 200 % of normal, unpublished data). Ongoing vegetation characterization studies by the US Department of Energy (DOE) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, allowed EG&G Energy Measurements to collect data that could be used to infer how both vegetation associations and individual species respond to above normal precipitation following prolonged drought. This paper reports the preliminary results.

Schultz, B.W. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Inst.; Ostler, W.K. [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

342

The MOXE X-ray all-sky monitor for Spectrum-X-Gamma  

SciTech Connect

MOXE is an X-ray all-sky monitor to be flown on the Russian Spectrum-X-Gamma satellite, to be launched in a few years. It will monitor several hundred X-ray sources on a daily basis, and will be the first instrument to monitor most of the X-ray sky most of the time. MOXE will alert users of more sensitive instruments on Russia`s giant high energy astrophysics observatory and of other instruments to transient activity. MOXE consists of an array of 6 X-ray pinhole cameras, sensitive from 3 to 25 keV, which views 4{pi} steradians (except for a 20{degree} {times} 80{degree} patch which includes the Sun). The pinhole apertures of 0.625 {times} 2.556 cm{sup 2} imply an angular resolution of 2{degree}.4 {times} 9{degree}.7 (on-axis). The MOXE hardware program includes an engineering model, now delivered, and a flight model. The flight instrument will mass approximately 118 kg and draw 38 Watts. For a non-focusing all-sky instrument that is limited by sky background, the limiting sensitivity is a function only of detector area. MOXE, with 6,000 cm{sup 2} of detector area, will, for a 24 hrs exposure, have a sensitivity of approximately 2 mCrab. MOXE distinguishes itself with respect to other all-sky monitors in its high duty cycle, thus being particularly sensitive to transient phenomena with time scales between minutes and hours.

In`t Zand, J.J.M.; Priedhorsky, W.C.; Moss, C.E. [and others

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Deep drilling technology for hot crystalline rock  

SciTech Connect

The development of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal systems at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico site has required the drilling of four deep boreholes into hot, Precambrian granitic and metamorphic rocks. Thermal gradient holes, four observation wells 200 m (600 ft) deep, and an exploration core hole 800 m (2400 ft) deep guided the siting of the four deep boreholes. Results derived from the exploration core hole, GT-1 (Granite Test No. 1), were especially important in providing core from the granitic rock, and establishing the conductive thermal gradient and heat flow for the granitic basement rocks. Essential stratigraphic data and lost drilling-fluid zones were identified for the volcanic and sedimentary rocks above the contact with the crystalline basement. Using this information drilling strategies and well designs were then devised for the planning of the deeper wells. The four deep wells were drilled in pairs, the shallowest were planned and drilled to depths of 3 km in 1975 at a bottom-hole temperature of nearly 200/sup 0/C. These boreholes were followed by a pair of wells, completed in 1981, the deepest of which penetrated the Precambrian basement to a vertical depth of 4.39 km at a temperature of 320/sup 0/C.

Rowley, J.C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Rock-brine chemical interactions. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of experimental interaction of powdered volcanic rock with aqueous solutions are presented at temperatures from 200 to 400/sup 0/C, 500 to 1000 bars fluid pressure, with reaction durations of approximately 30 days under controlled laboratory conditions. The aim of this research is to develop data on the kinetics and equilibria of rock solution interactions that will provide insight into the complex geochemical processes attending geothermal reservoir development, stimulation, and reinjection. The research was done in the Stanford Hydrothermal Lab using gold cell equipment of the Dickson design. This equipment inverts the solution rock mixture several times a minute to ensure thorough mixing. Solution samples were periodically withdrawn without interruption of the experimental conditions. The data from these experiments suggests a path dependent series of reactions by which geothermal fluids might evolve from meteoric or magmatic sources.

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Rock melting tool with annealer section  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rock melting penetrator is provided with an afterbody that rapidly cools a molten geological structure formed around the melting tip of the penetrator to the glass transition temperature for the surrounding molten glass-like material. An annealing afterbody then cools the glass slowly from the glass transition temperature through the annealing temperature range to form a solid self-supporting glass casing. This allows thermally induced strains to relax by viscous deformations as the molten glass cools and prevents fracturing of the resulting glass liner. The quality of the glass lining is improved, along with its ability to provide a rigid impermeable casing in unstable rock formations.

Bussod, Gilles Y. (Santa Fe, NM); Dick, Aaron J. (Oakland, CA); Cort, George E. (Montrose, CO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Category:Little Rock, AR | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AR AR Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Little Rock, AR" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 71 KB SVHospital Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVHospital Little Rock... 69 KB SVLargeHotel Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVLargeHotel Little Ro... 70 KB SVLargeOffice Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVLargeOffice Little R... 71 KB SVMediumOffice Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVMediumOffice Little ... 68 KB SVMidriseApartment Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVMidriseApartment Lit... 70 KB SVOutPatient Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVOutPatient Little Ro...

347

All-sky astrophysical component separation with Fast Independent Component Analysis (FastICA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new, fast, algorithm for the separation of astrophysical components superposed in maps of the sky, based on the fast Independent Component Analysis technique (FastICA). It allows to recover both the spatial pattern and the frequency scalings of the emissions from statistically independent astrophysical processes, present along the line-of-sight, from multi-frequency observations. We apply FastICA to simulated observations of the microwave sky with angular resolution and instrumental noise at the mean nominal levels for the Planck satellite, containing the most important known diffuse signals: the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), Galactic synchrotron, dust and free-free emissions. A method for calibrating the reconstructed maps of each component at each frequency has been devised. The spatial pattern of all the components have been recovered on all scales probed by the instrument. In particular, the CMB angular power spectra is recovered at the percent level up to $\\ell_{max}\\simeq 2000$. Freque...

Maino, D; Baccigalupi, C; Perrotta, F; Banday, A J; Bedini, L; Burigana, C; Zotti, G D; Grski, K M; Salerno, E

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ames: Phil Russell, Jens Redemann, NASA Ames: Phil Russell, Jens Redemann, Ames: Phil Russell, Jens Redemann, NASA Ames: Phil Russell, Jens Redemann, Steve Dunagan, Roy Johnson: Steve Dunagan, Roy Johnson: Battelle PND: Connor Flynn, Beat Schmid, Battelle PND: Connor Flynn, Beat Schmid, Evgueni Kassianov Evgueni Kassianov NASA GSFC: Alexander Sinyuk, Brent NASA GSFC: Alexander Sinyuk, Brent Holben Holben , , & AERONET Team & AERONET Team Collaboration involving: Collaboration involving: NASA Ames, Battelle PND, NASA GSFC NASA Ames, Battelle PND, NASA GSFC 4S 4S TAR TAR : : S S pectrometer for pectrometer for S S ky ky - - S S canning, canning, S S un un - - T T racking racking A A tmospheric tmospheric R R esearch esearch 4STAR: 4STAR: Spectrometer Spectrometer for for Sky Sky - - Scanning Scanning , , Sun Sun - - Tracking Tracking Atmospheric Research Atmospheric Research

349

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper Northern Sky Survey of Galactic Ionized Hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) has completed a one-degree resolution, velocity-resolved northern sky survey of H-alpha emission from our Galaxy. The unprecedented sensitivity of the instrument and accurate spectral subtraction of atmospheric features allow us to detect Galactic features as faint as 0.1 Rayleighs (EM ~ 0.25 cm^{-6} pc). This survey allows a direct comparison of the ionized and neutral components of the ISM on a global scale for the first time. All-sky maps of H-alpha emission in select velocity bands highlight the rich kinematic structure of the Galaxy's ionized gas. The full set of data from the WHAM survey is now available at http://www.astro.wisc.edu/wham/. (abridged)

G. J. Madsen; L. M. Haffner; R. J. Reynolds

2001-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

350

CGRaBS: An All-Sky Survey of Gamma-Ray Blazar Candidates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a uniform all-sky survey of bright blazars, selected primarily by their flat radio spectra, that is designed to provide a large catalog of likely gamma-ray AGN. The defined sample has 1625 targets with radio and X-ray properties similar to those of the EGRET blazars, spread uniformly across the |b| > 10 deg sky. We also report progress toward optical characterization of the sample; of objects with known R < 23, 85% have been classified and 81% have measured redshifts. One goal of this program is to focus attention on the most interesting (e.g., high redshift, high luminosity, ...) sources for intensive multiwavelength study during the observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on GLAST.

Healey, Stephen E; Cotter, Garret; Michelson, Peter F; Schlafly, Edward F; Readhead, Anthony C S; Giommi, Paolo; Chaty, Sylvain; Grenier, Isabelle A; Weintraub, Lawrence C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

On the Estimation of Clear-Sky Upwelling Shortwave and Longwave  

SciTech Connect

Previous work (Long and Ackerman 2000; Long 2004) has concentrated on estimation of the downwelling clear-sky irradiances and the calculation of the effect of clouds on the downwelling radiative energy budget. However, cloud forcing is defined for the difference between clear- and cloudy-sky net radiation, which includes the upwelling components. Thus, if we are to estimate the surface radiative cloud forcing, the means must be developed to estimate what the upwelling shortwave and longwave irradiance would be if the clouds were not present. Estimation of the upwelling longwave (LW) is particularly troublesome in that the emitted upwelling LW is a function of the total surface energy exchange including latent and sensible heat, which is related to but not necessarily always totally driven by the radiative exchange alone, but also involves the evolving soil and vegetation properties and changes in soil moisture amounts.

Long, C.N.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

352

Tests for Non-Gaussian Statistics in the DMR Four-Year Sky Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We search the high-latitude portion of the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) 4-year sky maps for evidence of a non-Gaussian temperature distribution in the cosmic microwave background. The genus, 3-point correlation function, and 2-point correlation function of temperature maxima and minima are all in excellent agreement with the hypothesis that the CMB anisotropy on angular scales of 7 degrees or larger represents a random-phase Gaussian field. A likelihood comparison of the DMR sky maps to a set of random-phase non-Gaussian toy models selects the exact Gaussian model as most likely. Monte Carlo simulations show that the 2-point correlation of the peaks and valleys in the maps provides the greatest discrimination among the class of models tested.

A. Kogut; A. J. Banday; C. L. Bennett; K. Gorski; G. Hinshaw; G. F. Smoot; E. L. Wright

1996-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

353

All-sky astrophysical component separation with Fast Independent Component Analysis (FastICA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new, fast, algorithm for the separation of astrophysical components superposed in maps of the sky, based on the fast Independent Component Analysis technique (FastICA). It allows to recover both the spatial pattern and the frequency scalings of the emissions from statistically independent astrophysical processes, present along the line-of-sight, from multi-frequency observations. We apply FastICA to simulated observations of the microwave sky with angular resolution and instrumental noise at the mean nominal levels for the Planck satellite, containing the most important known diffuse signals: the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), Galactic synchrotron, dust and free-free emissions. A method for calibrating the reconstructed maps of each component at each frequency has been devised. The spatial pattern of all the components have been recovered on all scales probed by the instrument. In particular, the CMB angular power spectra is recovered at the percent level up to $\\ell_{max}\\simeq 2000$. Frequency scalings and normalization have been recovered with better than percent precision for all the components at frequencies and in sky regions where their signal-to-noise ratio exceeds 1.5; the error increases at ten percent level for signal-to-noise ratios about 1. Runs have been performed on a Pentium III 600 MHz computer; FastICA typically took a time of the order of 10 minutes for all-sky simulations with 3.5 arcminutes pixel size. We conclude that FastICA is an extremly promising technique for analyzing the maps that will be obtained by the forthcoming high resolution CMB experiments.

D. Maino; A. Farusi; C. Baccigalupi; F. Perrotta; A. J. Banday; L. Bedini; C. Burigana; G. De Zotti; K. M. Gorski; E. Salerno

2001-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

354

Software standards, methods and quality control for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

SciTech Connect

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Collaboration involves upwards of 50 scientists, many of whom are involved in the development and use of the software needed to acquire, process and archive the image and spectroscopic data sets. Fermilab has major responsibilities in the development and maintenance of the project`s software and for its software engineering practices. The authors report on the standards and methodologies they have developed in support of these activities.

Pordes, R.; Berman, E.; Petravick, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States). Computing Div.] [and others

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Neural networks and separation of background and foregrounds in astrophysical sky maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Independent Component Analysis (ICA) algorithm is implemented as a neural network for separating signals of different origin in astrophysical sky maps. Due to its self-organizing capability, it works without prior assumptions on the signals, neither on their frequency scaling, nor on the signal maps themselves; instead, it learns directly from the input data how to separate the physical components, making use of their statistical independence. To have a first insight into the capabilities of this approach, we apply the ICA algorithm on sky patches, taken from simulations and observations, at the microwave frequencies, that are going to be deeply explored in a few years on the whole sky, by the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) and by the Planck Surveyor Satellite. The maps are at the frequencies of the Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) aboard the Planck satellite (30, 44, 70 and 100 GHz), and contain simulated astrophysical radio sources, Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation, and Galactic diffuse emissions from thermal dust and synchrotron. We show that the ICA algorithm is able to recover each

C. Baccigalupi; L. Bedini; C. Burigana; G. De Zotti; A. Farusi; D. Maino; M. Maris; F. Perrotta; E. Salerno; L. Toffolatti; A. Tonazzini

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

All-sky Search for Periodic Gravitational Waves in the Full S5 LIGO Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency band 50-800 Hz and with the frequency time derivative in the range of 0 through -6e-9 Hz/s. Such a signal could be produced by a nearby spinning and slightly non-axisymmetric isolated neutron star in our galaxy. After recent improvements in the search program that yielded a 10x increase in computational efficiency, we have searched in two years of data collected during LIGO's fifth science run and have obtained the most sensitive all-sky upper limits on gravitational wave strain to date. Near 150 Hz our upper limit on worst-case linearly polarized strain amplitude $h_0$ is 1e-24, while at the high end of our frequency range we achieve a worst-case upper limit of 3.8e-24 for all polarizations and sky locations. These results constitute a factor of two improvement upon previously published data. A new detection pipeline utilizing a Loosely Coherent algorithm was able to follow up weaker outliers, increasing the volume of space where signals can be detected by a factor of 10, but has not revealed any gravitational wave signals. The pipeline has been tested for robustness with respect to deviations from the model of an isolated neutron star, such as caused by a low-mass or long-period binary companion.

J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; P. Ajith; B. Allen; G. S. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; R. S. Amin; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. A. Arain; M. C. Araya; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; P. Barriga; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; B. Behnke; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; A. Belletoile; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; A. Brummit; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet--Castell; O. Burmeister; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Cain; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavagli; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; T. Chalermsongsak; E. Chalkley; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. Cho; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; R. M. Cutler; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Daz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Dorsher; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; G. Endr?czi; R. Engel; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; W. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; M. Flanigan; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; M. R. Ganija; J. Garcia; J. A. Garofoli; F. Garufi; M. E. Gspr; G. Gemme; R. Geng; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. . Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; C. Gill; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. Gonzlez; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Goler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; N. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; T. Ha; B. Hage; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; T. Hayler; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; T. Hong; S. Hooper; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; H. Jang; P. Jaranowski; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; I. Kamaretsos; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; Z. Keresztes; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; B. Kim; C. Kim; D. Kim; H. Kim; K. Kim; N. Kim; Y. -M. Kim; P. J. King; M. Kinsey; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; R. Kopparapu; S. Koranda; W. Z. Korth; I. Kowalska; D. Kozak; V. Kringel; S. Krishnamurthy; B. Krishnan; A. Krlak

2011-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

357

All-sky Search for Periodic Gravitational Waves in the Full S5 LIGO Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency band 50-800 Hz and with the frequency time derivative in the range of 0 through -6e-9 Hz/s. Such a signal could be produced by a nearby spinning and slightly non-axisymmetric isolated neutron star in our galaxy. After recent improvements in the search program that yielded a 10x increase in computational efficiency, we have searched in two years of data collected during LIGO's fifth science run and have obtained the most sensitive all-sky upper limits on gravitational wave strain to date. Near 150 Hz our upper limit on worst-case linearly polarized strain amplitude $h_0$ is 1e-24, while at the high end of our frequency range we achieve a worst-case upper limit of 3.8e-24 for all polarizations and sky locations. These results constitute a factor of two improvement upon previously published data. A new detection pipeline utilizing a Loosely Coherent algorithm was able to follow up weaker outliers, increasing the volume of space wher...

Abadie, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allen, G S; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Amin, R S; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Behnke, B; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Belletoile, A; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brummit, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Burmeister, O; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cain, J; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavagli, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chaibi, O; Chalermsongsak, T; Chalkley, E; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; del Prete, M; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Daz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Dorsher, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endr?czi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Farr, W; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Ganija, M R; Garcia, J; Garofoli, J A; Garufi, F; Gspr, M E; Gemme, G; Geng, R; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L ; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; Gonzlez, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Goler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, N; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, T; Hage, B; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kamaretsos, I; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B; Kim, C; Kim, D; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y -M; King, P J; Kinsey, M; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S; Krishnan, B; Krlak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lang, M; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Leaci, P; Lee, C H; Lee, H M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

THE 70 MONTH SWIFT-BAT ALL-SKY HARD X-RAY SURVEY  

SciTech Connect

We present the catalog of sources detected in 70 months of observations with the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) hard X-ray detector on the Swift gamma-ray burst observatory. The Swift-BAT 70 month survey has detected 1171 hard X-ray sources (more than twice as many sources as the previous 22 month survey) in the 14-195 keV band down to a significance level of 4.8{sigma}, associated with 1210 counterparts. The 70 month Swift-BAT survey is the most sensitive and uniform hard X-ray all-sky survey and reaches a flux level of 1.03 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} over 50% of the sky and 1.34 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} over 90% of the sky. The majority of new sources in the 70 month survey continue to be active galactic nuclei, with over 700 in the catalog. As part of this new edition of the Swift-BAT catalog, we also make available eight-channel spectra and monthly sampled light curves for each object detected in the survey in the online journal and at the Swift-BAT 70 month Web site.

Baumgartner, W. H.; Tueller, J.; Markwardt, C. B.; Skinner, G. K.; Barthelmy, S.; Gehrels, N. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Astrophysics Science Division, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Mushotzky, R. F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Evans, P. A., E-mail: whbaumga@alum.mit.edu [X-Ray and Observational Astronomy Group/Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

Source Catalog Data from FIRST (Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

FIRST, Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters, is a project designed to produce the radio equivalent of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey over 10,000 square degrees of the North Galactic Cap. Using the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA) in its B-configuration, the Survey acquired 3-minute snapshots covering a hexagonal grid using 2?7 3-MHz frequency channels centered at 1365 and 1435 MHz. The data were edited, self-calibrated, mapped, and CLEANed using an automated pipeline based largely on routines in the Astronomical Image Processing System (AIPS). A final atlas of maps is produced by coadding the twelve images adjacent to each pointing center. Source catalogs with flux densities and size information are generated from the coadded images also. The July, 2008 catalog is the latest version and has been tested to ensure reliability and completness. The catalog, generated from the 1993 through 2004 images, contains 816,000 sources and covers more than 9000 square degrees. A specialized search interface for the catalog resides at this website, and the catalog is also available as a compressed ASCII file. The user may also view earlier versions of the source catalog. The FIRST survey area was chosen to coincide with that of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS); at the m(v)~24 limit of SDSS, ~50% of the optical counterparts to FIRST sources will be detected.

Becker, Robert H.; Helfand, David J.; White, Richard L.; Gregg, Michael D.; Laurent-Muehleisen, Sally A.

360

Power Spectrum of Primordial Inhomogeneity Determined from the 4-Year COBE DMR Sky Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fourier analysis and power spectrum estimation of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy on an incompletely sampled sky developed by Gorski (1994) has been applied to the high-latitude portion of the 4-year COBE DMR 31.5, 53 and 90 GHz sky maps. Likelihood analysis using newly constructed Galaxy cuts (extended beyond |b| = 20deg to excise the known foreground emission) and simultaneously correcting for the faint high latitude galactic foreground emission is conducted on the DMR sky maps pixelized in both ecliptic and galactic coordinates. The Bayesian power spectrum estimation from the foreground corrected 4-year COBE DMR data renders n ~ 1.2 +/- 0.3, and Q_{rms-PS} ~ 15.3^{+3.7}_{-2.8} microK (projections of the two-parameter likelihood). These results are consistent with the Harrison-Zel'dovich n=1 model of amplitude Q_{rms-PS} ~ 18 microK detected with significance exceeding 14sigma (dQ/Q < 0.07). (A small power spectrum amplitude drop below the published 2-year results is predominantly due to the application of the new, extended Galaxy cuts.)

K. M. Gorski; A. J. Banday; C. L. Bennett; G. Hinshaw; A. Kogut; G. F. Smoot; E. L. Wright

1996-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desert rock sky" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

All-sky search for gravitational-wave bursts in the first joint LIGO-GEO-Virgo run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results from an all-sky search for unmodeled gravitational-wave bursts in the data collected by the LIGO, GEO 600 and Virgo detectors between November 2006 and October 2007. The search is performed by three ...

Weiss, Rainer

362

Satellite-based reconstruction of the tropical oceanic clear sky outgoing longwave radiation and comparison with climate models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The changes of the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) in clear-sky conditions have been calculated using High-resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) observations from 1979 to 2004. After applying corrections for satellite orbital drift and ...

Guillaume Gastineau; Brian J. Soden; Darren L. Jackson; Chris W. ODell

363

The Use of Euclidean Geometric Distance on RGB Color Space for the Classification of Sky and Cloud Patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current work describes the use of multidimensional Euclidean geometric distance (EGD) and Bayesian methods to characterize and classify the sky and cloud patterns present in image pixels. From specific images and using visualization tools, it ...

Sylvio Luiz Mantelli Neto; Aldo von Wangenheim; Enio Bueno Pereira; Eros Comunello

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Evaluating Cloud Contamination in Clear-Sky MODIS Terra Daytime Land Surface Temperatures Using Ground-Based Meteorology Station Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environment Canada meteorological station hourly sampled air temperatures Tair at four stations in the southwest Yukon were used to identify cloud contamination in the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Terra clear-sky daytime ...

Scott N. Williamson; David S. Hik; John A. Gamon; Jeffrey L. Kavanaugh; Saewan Koh

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Starlight's Story: What can the light we see in the night sky tell us about the universe?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

deal about an object from the light it emits. R eferencess S tory what can the light we see in the night sky tell usGriffin Rodgers a Visible light is a small band of

Rodgers, Griffen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

The Earths Clear-Sky Radiation Budget and Water Vapor Absorption in the Far Infrared  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed observational data are used to simulate the sensitivity of clear-sky outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) to water vapor perturbations in order to investigate the effect of uncertainties in water vapor measurements and spectroscopic ...

Ashok Sinha; John E. Harries

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Performance of Observation-Based Prediction Algorithms for Very Short-Range, Probabilistic Clear-Sky Condition Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Very short-range sky condition forecasts are produced to support a variety of military, civil, and commercial activities. In this investigation, six advanced, observation (obs)-based prediction algorithms were developed and tested that generated ...

Timothy J. Hall; Carl N. Mutchler; Greg J. Bloy; Rachel N. Thessin; Stephanie K. Gaffney; Jonathan J. Lareau

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Rim Rock Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rim Rock Wind Farm Rim Rock Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Rim Rock Wind Farm Facility Rim Rock Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NaturEner Developer NaturEner Energy Purchaser San Diego Gas & Electric Location Glacier and Toole Counties MT Coordinates 48.779564°, -112.061291° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.779564,"lon":-112.061291,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

369

Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid inventory of the reservoir. 4 figs.

Brown, D.W.

1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

370

Transfer of hot dry rock technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program has focused worldwide attention on the facts that natural heat in the upper part of the earth's crust is an essentially inexhaustible energy resource which is accessible almost everywhere, and that practical means now exist to extract useful heat from the hot rock and bring it to the earth's surface for beneficial use. The Hot Dry Rock Program has successfully constructed and operated a prototype hot, dry rock energy system that produced heat at the temperatures and rates required for large-scale space heating and many other direct uses of heat. The Program is now in the final stages of constructing a larger, hotter system potentially capable of satisfying the energy requirements of a small, commercial, electrical-generating power plant. To create and understand the behavior of such system, it has been necessary to develop or support the development of a wide variety of equipment, instruments, techniques, and analyses. Much of this innovative technology has already been transferred to the private sector and to other research and development programs, and more is continuously being made available as its usefulness is demonstrated. This report describes some of these developments and indicates where this new technology is being used or can be useful to industry, engineering, and science.

Smith, M.C.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Hot-dry-rock geothermal resource 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work performed on hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal resource evaluation, site characterization, and geophysical exploration techniques is summarized. The work was done by region (Far West, Pacific Northwest, Southwest, Rocky Mountain States, Midcontinent, and Eastern) and limited to the conterminous US.

Heiken, G.; Goff, F.; Cremer, G. (ed.)

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Segmentation of cracks in shale rock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the use of morphological connected filters are studied for segmenting sheet- and thread-like cracks in images of shale rock. A volume formed from a stack of 2-D X-ray images is processed using 3-D attributes. The shape-preserving property ...

Erik R. Urbach; Marina Pervukhina; Leanne Bischof

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

STANFORD ROCK PHYSICS BOREHOLE GEOPHYSICS PROJECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TABLE OF CONTENTS A: Rock Physics and Geology. Pressure-solution models and the velocity......................................................... A3 Pressure trends of compressional-and shear-wave velocities measured measured in sands to 20 MPA.....................................................C3 Properties of pore fluids at very high pressures from equations of state. Walls & Dvorkin

Nur, Amos

374

Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

Brown, Donald W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Comparative importance of overland runoff and mean annual rainfall to shrub communities of the Mojave Desert. [Larrea tridentata; Ambrosia dumosa  

SciTech Connect

The density, biomass, and pattern of shrubs on a desert piedmont in southern California were measured in a series of plots from which sheet-flow and stream-channel runoff from adjacent mountains have been excluded for 45 yr. The plots were compared with undisturbed adjacent areas in which soil moisture is derived from both runoff and incident precipitation. Larrea tridentata and Ambrosia dumosa showed significantly lower density in areas of drainage diversion. There were no differences in mean shrub biomass for A. dumosa, but in areas of drainage diversion, mortality of L. tridentata was concentrated among larger individuals. The remaining population of smaller shrubs showed a more aggregated pattern than the population in undisturbed sites. Biomass per hectare was lower for both species in areas of drainage diversion. Desert shrub communities depend on soil moisture recharge during periods of overland runoff. Sources of runoff are important to consider in studies of competition and pattern of desert shrubs.

Schlesinger, W.H.; Jones, C.S.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

2012 SG Peer Review - Dramatic Residential Demand Reduction in the Desert Southwest - Robert Boehm, Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

S S t G id P 2012 Smart Grid Program Peer Review Meeting "D ti D d R d ti "Dramatic Demand Reduction in the Desert Southwest" Robert F Boehm Robert F. Boehm Center for Energy Research University of Nevada Las Vegas June 8, 2012 "Dramatic Demand Reduction in the Desert Southwest" in the Desert Southwest Objective Decrease the peak electrical demand by 65% over code-built houses in a new development of 185 homes. Life-cycle Funding ($K) FY08 - FY13 (now FY15) Technical Scope 1. Build energy conserving residences. 2. Include PV on the residences. FY08 - FY13 (now FY15) $6948k 3. Develop a demand control system that gives the customer options and that is enhanced by an artificial intelligence supplemental system. Instantaneous December 2008 power pricing information will be available

377

Water uptake of clay and desert dust aerosol particles at sub- and supersaturated water vapor conditions  

SciTech Connect

Airborne mineral dust particles serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), thereby influencing the formation and properties of warm clouds. It is therefore of particular interest how dust aerosols with different mineralogy behave when exposed to high relative humidity (RH) or supersaturation with respect to liquid water similar to atmospheric conditions. In this study the sub-saturated hygroscopic growth and the supersaturated cloud condensation nucleus activity of pure clays and real desert dust aerosols was determined using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) and a cloud condensation nuclei counter (CCNC), respectively. Five different illite, montmorillonite and kaolinite clay samples as well as three desert dust samples (Saharan dust (SD), Chinese dust (CD) and Arizona test dust (ATD)) were used. Aerosols were generated both with a wet and a dry disperser and the water uptake was parameterized via the hygroscopicity parameter, ?. The hygroscopicity of dry generated dust aerosols was found to be negligible when compared to processed atmospheric aerosols, with CCNC derived ? values between 0.00 and 0.02. The latter value can be idealized as a particle consisting of 96.7% (by volume) insoluble material and ~3.3% ammonium sulfate. Pure clay aerosols were found to be generally less hygroscopic than real desert dust particles. All illite and montmorillonite samples had ?~0.003, kaolinites were least hygroscopic and had ?=0.001. SD (?=0.023) was found to be the most hygroscopic dry-generated desert dust followed by CD (?=0.007) and ATD (?=0.003). Wet-generated dust showed an increased water uptake when compared to dry-generated samples. This is considered to be an artifact introduced by redistribution of soluble material between the particles while immersed in an aqueous medium during atomization, thus indicating that specification of the generation method is critically important when presenting such data. Any atmospheric processing of fresh mineral dust which leads to the addition of more than ~3% soluble material is expected to significantly enhance hygroscopicity and CCN activity.

Herich, Hanna; Tritscher, Torsten; Wiacek, Aldona; Gysel, Martin; Weingartner, E.; Lohmann, U.; Baltensperger, Urs; Cziczo, Daniel J.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Ripples and Ripples: from Sandy Deserts to Ion-Sputtered Surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the morphological evolution of surfaces during ion sputtering and we compare their dynamical roughening with aeolian ripple formation in sandy deserts. We show that the two phenomena can be described within the same theoretical framework. This approach explains the different dynamical behaviors experimentally observed in metals or in semiconductors and amorphous systems. In the case of ion erosion, we find exponential growth at constant wavelength up to a critical roughness $W_c$. Whereas, in metals, by introducing the contribution of the Erlich-Schwoebel barrier, we find a transition from an exponential growth to a power law evolution.

T. Aste; U. Valbusa

2003-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

379

A MaxBCG Catalog of 13,823 Galaxy Clusters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a catalog of galaxy clusters selected using the maxBCG redsequence method from Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric data. This catalog includes 13,823 clusters with velocity dispersions greater than 400 km/s, and is the largest galaxy cluster catalog assembled to date. They are selected in an approximately volume-limited way from a 0.5 Gpc^3 region covering 7500 square degrees of sky between redshifts 0.1 and 0.3. (ABRIGDED)

Koester, B P; Annis, J; Wechsler, R H; Evrard, A; Bleem, L; Becker, M; Johnston, D; Sheldon, E; Nichol, R; Miller, C; Scranton, R; Bahcall, N; Barentine, J; Brewington, H; Brinkmann, J; Harvanek, M; Kleinman, S; Krzesnski, J; Long, D; Nitta, A; Schneider, D; Sneddin, S; Voges, W; York, D; 10.1086/509599

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

A MaxBCG Catalog of 13,823 Galaxy Clusters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a catalog of galaxy clusters selected using the maxBCG redsequence method from Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric data. This catalog includes 13,823 clusters with velocity dispersions greater than 400 km/s, and is the largest galaxy cluster catalog assembled to date. They are selected in an approximately volume-limited way from a 0.5 Gpc^3 region covering 7500 square degrees of sky between redshifts 0.1 and 0.3. (ABRIGDED)

B. P. Koester; T. A. McKay; J. Annis; R. H. Wechsler; A. Evrard; L. Bleem; M. Becker; D. Johnston; E. Sheldon; R. Nichol; C. Miller; R. Scranton; N. Bahcall; J. Barentine; H. Brewington; J. Brinkmann; M. Harvanek; S. Kleinman; J. Krzesinski; D. Long; A. Nitta; D. Schneider; S. Sneddin; W. Voges; D. York; SDSS collaboration

2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desert rock sky" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320: Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan (CAP) is to provide the strategy and methodology to close the Area 22 Sewage Lagoons site. The CAU will be closed following state and federal regulations and the FFACO (1996). Site characterization was done during September 1999, Soil samples were collected using a direct-push method and a backhoe. Soil samples were collected from the sludge bed, sewage lagoons, strainer box, and Imhoff tank areas. Characterization of the manholes associated with the septic system leading to the Imhoff tank was done during March 2000. The results of the characterization were reported in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) (DOE/NV, 2000). Soil sample results indicated that the only constituent of concern (COC) detected above Preliminary Action Levels (PALs) was total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) as diesel-range organics. This COC was detected in three samples from the sludge bed at concentrations up to 580 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg). This exceeds the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) regulatory action level for TPH of 100 mg/kg (Nevada Administrative Code, 1996). Excavation of the area during characterization uncovered asphalt debris, four safety poles, and strands of barbed wire. The TPH-impacted soil and debris will be removed and disposed in the NTS Area 6 Hydrocarbon Landfill.

D. S. Tobiason

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

INFORMATION ON THE MILKY WAY FROM THE 2MASS ALL SKY STAR COUNT: BIMODAL COLOR DISTRIBUTIONS  

SciTech Connect

The J - K{sub s} color distributions (CDs) with a bin size of 0.05 mag has been carried out for the entire Milky Way using the Two Micron All Sky Survey Point Source Catalog (2MASS PSC). The CDs are bimodal, with a red peak at 0.8 < J - K{sub s} < 0.85 and a blue peak at 0.3 < J - K{sub s} < 0.4. The colors of the red peak are more or less the same for the whole sky, but those of the blue peak depend on Galactic latitude (J - K{sub s} {approx} 0.35 at low Galactic latitudes and 0.35 < J - K{sub s} < 0.4 for other sky areas). The blue peak dominates the bimodal CDs at low Galactic latitudes and becomes comparable with the red peak in other sky regions. In order to explain the bimodal distribution and the global trend shown by the all-sky 2MASS CDs, we assemble an empirical Hertzsprung-Russell (H-R) diagram, which is composed of observational-based near-infrared H-R diagrams and color-magnitude diagrams, and incorporate a Milky Way model. In the empirical H-R diagram, the main-sequence turn-off for stars in the thin disk is relatively bluer, (J - K{sub s} ){sub 0} = 0.31, compared with that of the thick disk which is (J - K{sub s} ){sub 0} = 0.39. The age of the thin/thick disk is roughly estimated to be around 4-5/8-9 Gyr according to the color-age relation of the main-sequence turn-off. In general, the 2MASS CDs can be treated as a tool to measure the age of the stellar population of the Milky Way in a statistical manner and to our knowledge it is the first attempt to do so.

Chang, Chan-Kao; Lai, Shao-Yu; Peng, Ting-Hung [Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, Jhongli, Taiwan (China); Ko, Chung-Ming, E-mail: rex@astro.ncu.edu.tw, E-mail: cmko@astro.ncu.edu.tw [Institute of Astronomy, Department of Physics and Center of Complex Systems, National Central University, Jhongli, Taiwan (China)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

383

Esimation of field-scale thermal conductivities of unsaturated rocks from in-situ temperature data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vicinity of the heat source, and rock temperature exceededand the dry rock near the heat source. The other differencesources, heat transfer takes place through the wet rock (see

Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Tsang, Yvonne W.; Birkholzer, Jens T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

SEARCH FOR UNDERGROUND OPENINGS FOR IN SITU TEST FACILITIES IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Index Appendix 1. Sources of Information Rock properties -various sources, and list of mines in crystalline rock whichoz SOURCE EOLOGY INFORMATION MINERALOGY OF HOST ROCKS GULF

Wallenberg, H.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Proceedings of the Second International Symposium on Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

toward the heat source, or into the rock underlying the heatcharacterizing DNAPL source zones in fractured rock at theby a point source injection in fractured rock with multiple

Faybishenko, Boris; Witherspoon, Paul A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Seismic and Acoustic Investigations of Rock Fall Initiation, Processes, and Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

systems and rock fall source and impact areas, it possible to a rock fall source area in the possible to a rock fall source area. There are

Zimmer, Valerie Louise

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Solar energy conversion: an analysis of impacts on desert ecosystems. Final report, June 1, 1977-December 31, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A research program is proposed to determine the response of desert ecosystems to the operation of various solar conversion systems. Existing solar powered irrigation pumping systems are described, as well as the 5 MW solar thermal test system at Albuquerque, the proposed 10 MW central receiver system at Barstow, and photovoltaic solar dispersed power systems. The theoretical ecological impacts of solar conversion system are described. Three major impact categories are discussed in detail: shading, wind deflection, and physical disturbance. Research needs necessary to evaluate biotic and abiotic changes in the desert ecosystem are delineated, and specific monitoring and manipulation programs for existing and proposed solar conversion sites are proposed.

Patten, D.C.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Little Rock, Arkansas Small Business IT Security Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Twitter, Facebook & Blogs Free Workshop helps Small Business Owners Reduce Cyber Threats LITTLE ROCK--The US ...

2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

389

CRC handbook of physical properties of rocks. Volume III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book presents topics on: Density of rocks and minerals, includes histograms of density ranges; elastic constants of minerals, elastic moduli, thermal properties; inelastic properties, strength and rheology for rocks and minerals, rock mechanics and friction, and stress-strain relations; radioactivity, decay constants and heat production of isotope systems in geology; seismic attenuation, in rocks, minerals, and the earth, with application to oil exploration and terrestrial studies; and index.

Carmichael, R.S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

A digital rock density map of New Zealand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Digital geological maps of New Zealand (QMAP) are combined with 9256 samples with rock density measurements from the national rock catalogue PETLAB and supplementary geological sources to generate a first digital density model of New Zealand. This digital ... Keywords: Crust, Database, Density, Geological mapping, Gravimetry, Rock types

Robert Tenzer; Pascal Sirguey; Mark Rattenbury; Julia Nicolson

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Cloudy Skies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Cloud Radiative Forcing andFeedback Analysis of Cloud Radiative Forcing andFeedback in a Climate General Circulation Model A. A. lacis NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Institute for Space Studies New York, NY 10225 The principal objectives of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program research at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) are 1) to improve and validate the radiation parameterizations in the GISS general circulation model (GCM) through model intercomparisons with line-by-line calculations and through comparisons with ARM observations, 2) to improve the GCM diagnostic output to enable more effective comparisons to global cloud/radiation data sets, and 3) to use ARM Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) data to develop improved parameterization of clouds in the GCM and to study the

392

Cloudy Skies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

J. linn J. linn Space Science and Technology Division Los Alamos National Laboratory iLos Alamos, NM 87545 The earth's weather and climate are influenced strongly by phenomena associated with clouds. Therefore, a general circulation model (GCM) that models the evolution of weather and climate must include an accurate physical model of the clouds. This paper describes our efforts to develop a suitable cloud model. It concentrates on the microphysical processes that determine the evolution of droplet and ice crystal size distributions, precipitation rates, total and condensed water content, and radiative extinction coefficients. We assume a fixed temperature, acloud vertical thickness, and concentrations and size distributions of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice condensation nuclei

393

Rock River Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Farm Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Rock River Wind Farm Facility Rock River Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Shell Wind Energy Developer SeaWest Energy Purchaser PacifiCorp Location Arlington and Carbon Counties WY Coordinates 41.6996°, -107.003° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.6996,"lon":-107.003,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

394

A Phased Array Approach to Rock Blasting  

SciTech Connect

A series of laboratory-scale simultaneous two-hole shots was performed in a rock simulant (mortar) to record the shock wave interference patterns produced in the material. The purpose of the project as a whole was to evaluate the usefulness of phased array techniques of blast design, using new high-precision delay technology. Despite high-speed photography, however, we were unable to detect the passage of the shock waves through the samples to determine how well they matched the expected interaction geometry. The follow-up mine-scale tests were therefore not conducted. Nevertheless, pattern analysis of the vectors that would be formed by positive interference of the shockwaves from multiple charges in an ideal continuous, homogeneous, isotropic medium indicate the potential for powerful control of blast design, given precise characterization of the target rock mass.

Leslie Gertsch; Jason Baird

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Low Pore Connectivity in Natural Rock  

SciTech Connect

As repositories for CO? and radioactive waste, as oil and gas reservoirs, and as contaminated sites needing remediation, rock formations play a central role in energy and environmental management. The connectivity of the rock's porespace strongly affects fluid flow and solute transport. This work examines pore connectivity and its implications for fluid flow and chemical transport. Three experimental approaches (imbibition, tracer concentration profiles, and imaging) were used in combination with network modeling. In the imbibition results, three types of imbibition slope [log (cumulative imbibition) vs. log (imbibition time)] were found: the classical 0.5, plus 0.26, and 0.26 transitioning to 0.5. The imbibition slope of 0.26 seen in Indiana sandstone, metagraywacke, and Barnett shale indicates low pore connectivity, in contrast to the slope of 0.5 seen in the well-connected Berea sandstone. In the tracer profile work, rocks exhibited different distances to the plateau porosity, consistent with the pore connectivity from the imbibition tests. Injection of a molten metal into connected pore spaces, followed by 2-D imaging of the solidified alloy in polished thin sections, allowed direct assessment of pore structure and lateral connection in the rock samples. Pore-scale network modeling gave results consistent with measurements, confirming pore connectivity as the underlying cause of both anomalous behaviors: imbibition slope not having the classical value of 0.5, and accessible porosity being a function of distance from the edge. A poorly connected porespace will exhibit anomalous behavior in fluid flow and chemical transport, such as a lower imbibition slope (in airwater system) and diffusion rate than expected from classical behavior.

Hu, Qinhong; Ewing, Robert P.; Dultz, Stefan

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

396

Dynamic rock fragmentation: oil shale applications  

SciTech Connect

Explosive rock fragmentation techniques used in many resource recovery operations have in the past relied heavily upon traditions of field experience for their design. As these resources, notably energy resources, become less accessible, it becomes increasingly important that fragmentation techniques be optimized and that methods be developed to effectively evaluate new or modified explosive deployment schemes. Computational procedures have significant potential in these areas, but practical applications must be preceded by a thorough understanding of the rock fracture phenomenon and the development of physically sound computational models. This paper presents some of the important features of a rock fragmentation model that was developed as part of a program directed at the preparation of subterranean beds for in situ processing of oil shale. The model, which has been implemented in a two-dimensional Lagrangian wavecode, employs a continuum damage concept to quantify the degree of fracturing and takes into account experimental observations that fracture strength and fragment dimensions depend on tensile strain rates. The basic premises of the model are considered in the paper as well as some comparisons between calculated results and observations from blasting experiments.

Boade, R. R.; Grady, D. E.; Kipp, M. E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Gage for measuring displacements in rock samples  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gage for measuring diametral displacement within a rock sample for use in a rock mechanics laboratory and in the field, comprises a support ring housing a linear variable differential transformer, a mounting screw, and a leaf spring. The mounting screw is adjustable and defines a first point of contact with the rock sample. The leaf spring has opposite ends fixed to the inner periphery of the mounting ring. An intermediate portion of the leaf spring projecting radially inward from the ring is formed with a dimple defining a second point of contact with the sample. The first and second points of contact are diametrically opposed to each other. The LVDT is mounted in the ring with its axis parallel to the line of measurement and its core rod received in the dimple of the leaf spring. Any change in the length of the line between the first and second support points is directly communicated to the LVDT. The leaf spring is rigid to completely support lateral forces so that the LVDT is free of all load for improved precision.

Holcomb, David J. (Albuquerque, NM); McNamee, Michael J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Los Alamos hot dry rock geothermal project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The greatest potential for geothermal energy is the almost unlimited energy contained in the vast regions of hot, but essentially impermeable, rock within the first six or seven km of the Earth's crust. For the past five years, the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory has been investigating and developing a practical, economical and environmentally acceptable method of extracting this energy. By early 1978, a 10 MW (thermal) heat extraction experiment will be in operation. In the Los Alamos concept, a man-made geothermal reservoir is formed by drilling into a region of suitably hot rock, and then creating within the rock a very large surface for heat transfer by large-scale hydraulic-fracturing techniques. After a circulation loop is formed by drilling a second hole to intersect the fractured region, the heat contained in this reservoir is brought to the surface by the buoyant closed-loop circulation of water. The water is kept liquid throughout the loop by pressurization, thereby increasing the rate of heat transport up the withdrawal hole compared to that possible with steam.

Brown, D.W.; Pettitt, R.A.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Artificial geothermal reservoirs in hot volcanic rock  

SciTech Connect

S>Some recent results from the Los Alamos program in which hydraulic fracturing is used for the recovery of geothermal energy are discussed. The location is about 4 kilometers west and south of the ring fault of the enormous Jemez Caldera in the northcentral part of New Mexico. It is shown that geothermal energy may be extracted from hot rock that does not contain circulating hot water or steam and is relatively impermeable. A fluid is pumped at high pressure into an isolated section of a wellbore. If the well is cased the pipe in this pressurized region is perforated as it is in the petroleum industry, so that the pressure may be applied to the rock, cracking it. A second well is drilled a few hundred feet away from the first. Cold water is injected through the first pipe, circulates through the crack, and hot water returns to the surface through the second pipe. Results are described and circumstances are discussed under which artiflcial geothermal reservoirs might be created in the basaltic rock of Hawaii. (MCW)

Aamodt, R.L.

1974-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

400

Gage for measuring displacements in rock samples  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gage for measuring diametral displacement within a rock sample for use in a rock mechanics laboratory and in the field, comprises a support ring housing a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT), a mounting screw, and a leaf spring. The mounting screw is adjustable and defines a first point of contact with the rock sample. The leaf spring has opposite ends fixed to the inner periphery of the mounting ring. An intermediate portion of the leaf spring projecting radially inward from the ring is formed with a dimple defining a second point of contact with the sample. The first and second points of contact are diametrically opposed to each other. The LVDT is mounted in the ring with its axis parallel to the line of measurement and its core rod received in the dimple of the leaf spring. Any change in the length of the line between the first and second support points is directly communicated to the LVDT. The leaf spring is rigid to completely support lateral forces so that the LVDT is free of all load for improved precision.

Holcomb, D.J.; McNamee, M.J.

1985-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desert rock sky" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Calculation of explosive rock breakage: oil shale  

SciTech Connect

Improved efficiency in explosive rock breakage becomes increasingly important as mining costs and the need to tap underground resources continue to grow. Industry has recognized this need for many years and has done a great deal in developing new products and new blasting techniques, generally by purely empirical means. One particular application that has received added attention within the past several years, and one that lends itself to a more objective theoretical study, is explosive fracture of oil shale for conventional and in situ fossil energy recovery. Numerical calculation of oil shale fracturization with commercial explosives has the potential to add to an objective understanding of the breakage process. Often, in such numerical studies, only one or two parts of the total problem are addressed with any degree of sophistication or completeness. Here an attempt is made to treat the entire problem, i.e., explosive characterization, constitutive behavior of intact rock, and a mathematical description of rock fracture. The final results are two-dimensional calculations of explosively induced fracture damage in oil shale.

Johnson, J.N.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During Fiscal Year 1987, emphasis in the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program was on preparations for a Long-Term Flow Test'' of the Phase II'' or Engineering'' hot dry rock energy system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. A successful 30-day flow test of the system during FY86 indicated that such a system would produce heat at a temperature and rate that could support operation of a commercial electrical power plant. However, it did not answer certain questions basic to the economics of long-term operation, including the rate of depletion of the thermal reservoir, the rate of water loss from the system, and the possibility of operating problems during extended continuous operation. Preparations for a one-year flow test of the system to answer these and more fundamental questions concerning hot dry rock systems were made in FY87: design of the required surface facilities; procurement and installation of some of their components; development and testing of slimline logging tools for use through small-diameter production tubing; research on temperature-sensitive reactive chemical tracers to monitor thermal depletion of the reservoir; and computer simulations of the 30-day test, extended to modeling the planned Long-Term Flow Test. 45 refs., 34 figs., 5 tabs.

Smith, M.C.; Hendron, R.H.; Murphy, H.D.; Wilson, M.G.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Development of hot dry rock resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The LASL Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Project is the only U.S. field test of this geothermal resource. In the LASL concept, a man-made geothermal reservoir would be formed by drilling a deep hole into relatively impermeable hot rock, creating a large surface area for heat transfer by fracturing the rock hydraulically, then drilling a second hole to intersect the fracture to complete the circulation loop. In 1974, the first hole was drilled to a depth of 2929 m (9610 ft) and a hydraulic fracture was produced near the bottom. In 1975, a second hole was directionally drilled to intersect the fracture. Although the desired intersection was not achieved, a connection was made through which water was circulated. After a year's study of the fracture system, drilling began again in April 1977 and an improved connection was achieved. In September of 1977 a 5 MW (thermal) heat extraction and circulation experiment was conducted for 100 h as a preliminary test of the concept. An 1800-h circulation experiment was concluded on April 13, 1978 to determine temperature-drawdown, permeation water loss and flow characteristics of the pressurized reservoir, to examine chemistry changes in the circulating fluid, and to monitor for induced seismic effects.

Pettitt, R.A.; Tester, J.W.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Neural networks and separation of Cosmic Microwave Background and astrophysical signals in sky maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Independent Component Analysis (ICA) algorithm is implemented as a neural network for separating signals of different origin in astrophysical sky maps. Due to its self-organizing capability, it works without prior assumptions on the signals, neither on their frequency scaling, nor on the signal maps themselves; instead, it learns directly from the input data how to separate the physical components, making use of their statistical independence. To test the capabilities of this approach, we apply the ICA algorithm on sky patches, taken from simulations and observations, at the microwave frequencies, that are going to be deeply explored in a few years on the whole sky, by the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) and by the {\\sc Planck} Surveyor Satellite. The maps are at the frequencies of the Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) aboard the {\\sc Planck} satellite (30, 44, 70 and 100 GHz), and contain simulated astrophysical radio sources, Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation, and Galactic diffuse emissions from thermal dust and synchrotron. We show that the ICA algorithm is able to recover each signal, with precision going from 10% for the Galactic components to percent for CMB; radio sources are almost completely recovered down to a flux limit corresponding to $0.7\\sigma_{CMB}$, where $\\sigma_{CMB}$ is the rms level of CMB fluctuations. The signal recovering possesses equal quality on all the scales larger then the pixel size. In addition, we show that the frequency scalings of the input signals can be partially inferred from the ICA outputs, at the percent precision for the dominant components, radio sources and CMB.

C. Baccigalupi; L. Bedini; C. Burigana; G. De Zotti; A. Farusi; D. Maino; M. Maris; F. Perrotta; E. Salerno; L. Toffolatti; A. Tonazzini

2000-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

405

HARMONIC IN-PAINTING OF COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND SKY BY CONSTRAINED GAUSSIAN REALIZATION  

SciTech Connect

The presence of astrophysical emissions between the last scattering surface and our vantage point requires us to apply a foreground mask on cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky maps, leading to large cuts around the Galactic equator and numerous holes. Since many CMB analysis, in particular on the largest angular scales, may be performed on a whole-sky map in a more straightforward and reliable manner, it is of utmost importance to develop an efficient method to fill in the masked pixels in a way compliant with the expected statistical properties and the unmasked pixels. In this Letter, we consider the Monte Carlo simulation of a constrained Gaussian field and derive it CMB anisotropy in harmonic space, where a feasible implementation is possible with good approximation. We applied our method to simulated data, which shows that our method produces a plausible whole-sky map, given the unmasked pixels, and a theoretical expectation. Subsequently, we applied our method to the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe foreground-reduced maps and investigated the anomalous alignment between quadrupole and octupole components. From our investigation, we find that the alignment in the foreground-reduced maps is even higher than the Internal Linear Combination map. We also find that the V-band map has higher alignment than other bands, despite the expectation that the V-band map has less foreground contamination than other bands. Therefore, we find it hard to attribute the alignment to residual foregrounds. Our method will be complementary to other efforts on in-painting or reconstructing the masked CMB data, and of great use to Planck surveyor and future missions.

Kim, Jaiseung; Naselsky, Pavel [Niels Bohr Institute and Discovery Center, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Mandolesi, Nazzareno, E-mail: jkim@nbi.dk [INAF/IASF, Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Bologna, Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

2009 by the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers. All rights reserved. Fire in the Desert: Initial Gullying  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Colorado, Denver Jeremy D. Dorn and Ronald I. Dorn Arizona State University ABSTRACT The June Desert. Post-fire gullying was measured using :900-scale aerial photographs. Detailed comparisons of pre. Cecil Schwalbe of the U.S. Geological Survey explained that vegeta- tion change played a substantial

Dorn, Ron

407

The WHAM Northern Sky Survey and the Nature of the Warm Ionized Medium in the Galaxy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) has completed a velocity-resolved map of diffuse H-alpha emission of the entire northern sky, providing the first comprehensive picture of both the distribution and kinematics of diffuse ionized gas in the Galaxy. WHAM continues to advance our understanding of the physical conditions of the warm ionized medium through observations of other optical emission lines throughout the Galactic disk and halo. We discuss some highlights from the survey, including an optical window into the inner Galaxy and the relationship between HI and HII in the diffuse ISM.

Madsen, G J

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

THE WHAM NORTHERN SKY SURVEY AND THE NATURE OF THE WARM IONIZED MEDIUM IN THE GALAXY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) has completed a velocity-resolved map of diffuse H? emission of the entire northern sky, providing the first comprehensive picture of both the distribution and kinematics of diffuse ionized gas in the Galaxy. WHAM continues to advance our understanding of the physical conditions of the warm ionized medium through observations of other optical emission lines throughout the Galactic disk and halo. We discuss some highlights from the survey, including an optical window into the inner Galaxy and the relationship between H I and H II in the diffuse ISM. 1.

G. J. Madsen

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

The WHAM Northern Sky Survey and the Nature of the Warm Ionized Medium in the Galaxy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) has completed a velocity-resolved map of diffuse H-alpha emission of the entire northern sky, providing the first comprehensive picture of both the distribution and kinematics of diffuse ionized gas in the Galaxy. WHAM continues to advance our understanding of the physical conditions of the warm ionized medium through observations of other optical emission lines throughout the Galactic disk and halo. We discuss some highlights from the survey, including an optical window into the inner Galaxy and the relationship between HI and HII in the diffuse ISM.

G. J. Madsen

2003-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

410

Cataclysmic Variables From the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. VI. the Sixth Year (2005)  

SciTech Connect

The 28 cataclysmic variables found in 2005 in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey are presented with their coordinates, magnitudes and spectra. Five of these systems are previously known CVs (HH Cnc, SX LMi, QZ Ser, RXJ1554.2+2721 and HS1016+3412) and the rest are new discoveries. Additional spectroscopic, photometric and/or polarimetric observations of 10 systems were carried out, resulting in estimates of the orbital periods for seven of the new binaries. The 23 new CVs include one eclipsing system, one new Polar and five systems whose spectra clearly reveal atmospheric absorption lines from the underlying white dwarf.

Szkody, Paula; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Henden, Arne; /Naval Observ., Flagstaff /AAVSO, Cambridge; Mannikko, Lee; Mukadam, Anjum; /Washington U., Seattle,; Schmidt, Gary D.; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ.; Bochanski, John J.; Agueros, Marcel; Anderson, Scott F.; Silvestri, Nicole M.; /Washington U., Seattle,; Dahab, William E.; /Princeton U. Observ.; Oguri, Masamune; /Princeton U. Observ. /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Schneider, Donald P.; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys.; Shin,; Strauss, Michael A.; Knapp, Gillian R.; /Princeton U. Observ.; West, Andrew A.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

New Neutrino Mass Bounds from Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Data Release 8 Photometric Luminous Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present neutrino mass bounds using 900,000 luminous galaxies with photometric redshifts measured from Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Data Release Eight (SDSS DR8). The galaxies have photometric redshifts between $z = 0.45$ and $z = 0.65$, and cover 10,000 square degrees and thus probe a volume of 3$h^{-3}$Gpc$^3$, enabling tight constraints to be derived on the amount of dark matter in the form of massive neutrinos. A new bound on the sum of neutrino masses $\\sum m_\

de Putter, Roland; Giusarma, Elena; Ho, Shirley; Cuesta, Antonio; Seo, Hee-Jong; Ross, Ashley; White, Martin; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Kirkby, David; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Percival, Will J; Ross, Nicholas P; Schneider, Donald P; Shelden, Alaina; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Experimentally determined rock-fluid interactions applicable to a natural hot-dry-rock geothermal system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The field program cnsists of experiments in which hot rock of low permeability is hydraulically fractured between two wellbores. Water is circulated from one well to the other through the fractured hot rock. Our field experiments are designed to test reservoir engineering parameters such as heat-extraction rates, water-loss rates, flow characteristics including impedance and buoyancy, seismic activity, and fluid chemistry. Laboratory experiments were designed to provide information on the mineral-water reactivity encountered during the field program. Two experimental circulation systems tested the rates of dissolution and alteration during dynamic flow. Solubility of rock in agitated systems was studied. Moreover, pure minerals, samples of the granodiorite from the actual reservoir, and Tijeras Canyon granite have been reacted with distilled water and various solutions of NaCl, NaOH, and Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/. The results of these experimental systems are compared to the observations made in field experiments done within the hot dry rock reservoir at a depth of approximately 3 km where the initial rock temperature was 150 to 200/sup 0/C.

Charles, R.W.; Grigsby, C.O.; Holley, C.E. Jr.; Tester, J.W.; Blatz, L.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Category:Rock Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Rock Lab Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Rock Lab Analysis page? For detailed information on exploration techniques, click here. Category:Rock Lab Analysis Add.png Add a new Rock Lab Analysis Technique Pages in category "Rock Lab Analysis" The following 9 pages are in this category, out of 9 total. C Core Analysis Cuttings Analysis I Isotopic Analysis- Rock O Over Core Stress P Paleomagnetic Measurements Petrography Analysis R Rock Density X X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF)

414

Goa, India Permeability of Charnokite Rock at High Temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: Permeability at high temperature is a very important parameter to be considered for designing underground high level nuclear waste repository (HLW) in rock mass. The surrounding rock mass is exposed to heat radiated by HLW when it is buried underground and development or extension of micro-cracks takes place in the host rock due to rise in temperature. Keeping this in view, the permeability study was conducted for Charnokite rock at high temperatures in the range from room temperature, 30 to 200 o C. The cylindrical rock samples of 36mm diameter and 150mm in length were used as per the required size for the equipment permeameter, TEMCO, USA. Total thirty rock samples were tested at various temperatures using nitrogen gas as fluid. The permeability tests were conducted at confining pressure of around 4MPa in order to simulate the horizontal in situ stress conditions in Charnokite rock at the depth of 400m for construction of HLW repository. 1

R. D. Dwivedi; R. K. Goel; A. Swarup; V. V. R. Prasad; R. K. Bajpai; P. K. Narayan; V. Arumugam

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Mechanical and acoustic properties of weakly cemented granular rocks  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of laboratory measurements on the mechanical and acoustic properties of weakly cemented granular rock. Artificial rock samples were fabricated by cementing sand and glass beads with sodium silicate binder. During uniaxial compression tests, the rock samples showed stress-strain behavior which was more similar to that of soils than competent rocks, exhibiting large permanent deformations with frictional slip. The mechanical behavior of the samples approached that of competent rocks as the amount of binder was increased. For very weak samples, acoustic waves propagating in these rocks showed very low velocities of less than 1000 m/sec for compressional waves. A borehole made within this weakly cemented rock exhibited a unique mode of failure that is called ''anti-KI mode fracture'' in this paper. The effect of cementation, grain type, and boundary conditions on this mode of failure was also examined experimentally.

Nakagawa, S.; Myer, L.R.

2001-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

416

TWO-DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF LASER SPALLATION DRILLING OF ROCKS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF LASER SPALLATION DRILLING OF ROCKS DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF LASER SPALLATION DRILLING OF ROCKS P532 Zhiyue Xu, Yuichiro Yamashita 1 , and Claude B. Reed Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439, USA 1 Now with Kyushu University, Japan Abstract High power lasers can weaken, spall, melt and vaporize natural earth materials with thermal spallation being the most energy efficient rock removal mechanism. Laser rock spallation is a very complex phenomenon that depends on many factors. Computer numerical modeling would provides great tool to understand the fundamental of this complex phenomenon, which is crucial to the success of its applications. Complexity of modeling laser rock spallation is due to: 1) rock is a porous media, to which traditional theories of heat transfer and rock mechanics can not be directly

417

ROCK PROPERTIES MODEL ANALYSIS MODEL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) is to document Rock Properties Model (RPM) 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties models are intended principally for use as input to numerical physical-process modeling, such as of ground-water flow and/or radionuclide transport. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. This work was conducted in accordance with the following planning documents: WA-0344, ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1998'' (SNL 1997, WA-0358), ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1999'' (SNL 1999), and the technical development plan, Rock Properties Model Version 3.1, (CRWMS M&O 1999c). The Interim Change Notice (ICNs), ICN 02 and ICN 03, of this AMR were prepared as part of activities being conducted under the Technical Work Plan, TWP-NBS-GS-000003, ''Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model, Process Model Report, Revision 01'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b). The purpose of ICN 03 is to record changes in data input status due to data qualification and verification activities. These work plans describe the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and implementing procedures for model construction. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. The work scope for this activity consists of the following: (1) Conversion of the input data (laboratory measured porosity data, x-ray diffraction mineralogy, petrophysical calculations of bound water, and petrophysical calculations of porosity) for each borehole into stratigraphic coordinates; (2) Re-sampling and merging of data sets; (3) Development of geostatistical simulations of porosity; (4) Generation of derivative property models via linear coregionalization with porosity; (5) Post-processing of the simulated models to impart desired secondary geologic attributes and to create summary and uncertainty models; and (6) Conversion of the models into real-world coordinates. The conversion to real world coordinates is performed as part of the integration of the RPM into the Integrated Site Model (ISM) 3.1; this activity is not part of the current analysis. The ISM provides a consistent volumetric portrayal of the rock layers, rock properties, and mineralogy of the Yucca Mountain site and consists of three components: (1) Geologic Framework Model (GFM); (2) RPM, which is the subject of this AMR; and (3) Mineralogic Model. The interrelationship of the three components of the ISM and their interface with downstream uses are illustrated in Figure 1. Figure 2 shows the geographic boundaries of the RPM and other component models of the ISM.

Clinton Lum

2002-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

418

Organic matter characteristics of CenomanianTuronian source rocks: implications for petroleum and gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and shale source rocks . In: Petroleum Geochemistry and Source Rock Potential of Carbonate Rocks (Ed. by G of petroleum . In: Petroleum Geochemistry and Source Rock Potential of Carbonate Rocks (Ed. by G. Palacas of petroleum in Mesozoic reservoirs to carbonate source rocks of Jurassic Smackover Formation, southwestern

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

419

Final Technical Report: Effects of Changing Water and Nitrogen Inputs on a Mojave Desert Ecosystem  

SciTech Connect

In order to anticipate the effects of global change on ecosystem function, it is essential that predictive relationships be established linking ecosystem function to global change scenarios. The Mojave Desert is of considerable interest with respect to global change. It contains the driest habitats in North America, and thus most closely approximates the worlds great arid deserts. In order to examine the effects of climate and land use changes, in 2001 we established a long-term manipulative global change experiment, called the Mojave Global Change Facility. Manipulations in this study include the potential effects of (1) increased summer rainfall (75 mm over three discrete 25 mm events), (2) increased nitrogen deposition (10 and 40 kg ha-1), and (3) the disturbance of biological N-fixing crusts . Questions addressed under this grant shared the common hypothesis that plant and ecosystem performance will positively respond to the augmentation of the most limiting resources to plant growth in the Mojave Desert, e.g., water and nitrogen. Specific hypotheses include (1) increased summer rainfall will significantly increase plant production through an alleviation of moisture stress in the dry summer months, (2) N-deposition will increase plant production in this N-limited system, particularly in wet years or in concert with added summer rain, and (3) biological crust disturbance will gradually decrease bio-available N, with concomitant long-term reductions in photosynthesis and ANPP. Individual plant and ecosystem responses to global change may be regulated by biogeochemical processes and natural weather variability, and changes in plant and ecosystem processes may occur rapidly, may occur only after a time lag, or may not occur at all. During the first PER grant period, we observed changes in plant and ecosystem processes that would fall under each of these time-response intervals: plant and ecosystem processes responded rapidly to added summer rain, whereas most processes responded slowly or in a lag fashion to N-deposition and with no significant response to crust disturbance. Therefore, the primary objectives of this renewal grant were to: (1) continue ongoing measurements of soil and plant parameters that assess primary treatment responses; (2) address the potential heterogeneity of soil properties and (3) initiate a new suite of measurements that will provide data necessary for scaling/modeling of whole-plot to ecosystem-level responses. Our experimental approach included soil plant-water interactions using TDR, neutron probe, and miniaturized soil matric potential and moisture sensors, plant ecophysiological and productivity responses to water and nitrogen treatments and remote sensing methodologies deployed on a radio control platform. We report here the most significant findings of our study.

Smith, Stanley, D.; Nowak, Robert S.; Fenstermaker, Lynn, F.; Young, Michael,H.

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

420

ARM: Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

Nitin Bharadwaj; Kevin Widener

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desert rock sky" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The computation of cloud base height from paired whole-sky imaging cameras  

SciTech Connect

A major goal for global change studies is to improve the accuracy of general circulation models (GCMs) capable of predicting the timing and magnitude of greenhouse gas-induced global warming. Research has shown that cloud radiative feedback is the single most important effect determining the magnitude of possible climate responses to human activity. Of particular value to reducing the uncertainties associated with cloud-radiation interactions is the measurement of cloud base height (CBH), both because it is a dominant factor in determining the infrared radiative properties of clouds with respect to the earth`s surface and lower atmosphere and because CBHs are essential to measuring cloud cover fraction. We have developed a novel approach to the extraction of cloud base height from pairs of whole sky imaging (WSI) cameras. The core problem is to spatially register cloud fields from widely separated WSI cameras; this complete, triangulation provides the CBH measurements. The wide camera separation (necessary to cover the desired observation area) and the self-similarity of clouds defeats all standard matching algorithms when applied to static views of the sky. To address this, our approach is based on optical flow methods that exploit the fact that modern WSIs provide sequences of images. We will describe the algorithm and present its performance as evaluated both on real data validated by ceilometer measurements and on a variety of simulated cases.

Allmen, M.C.; Kegelmeyer, W.P. Jr.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Earth Occultation Imaging of the Low Energy Gamma-Ray Sky with GBM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Earth Occultation Technique (EOT) has been applied to Fermi's Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) to perform all-sky monitoring for a predetermined catalog of hard X-ray/soft gamma-ray sources. Imaging with a Differential filter using the Earth Occultation Method (IDEOM) has been developed to search for sources not in the catalog, thus completing the catalog and reducing a source of systematic error in EOT. IDEOM is a tomographic imaging method that takes advantage of the orbital precession of the Fermi satellite. Using IDEOM, all-sky images have been generated for ~4 years of GBM data in the 12-50 keV, 50-100 keV and 100-300 keV energy bands in search of sources otherwise unmodeled by the GBM occultation analysis. Analysis resulted in the detection of 43 sources in the 12-50 keV energy band, 23 sources in the 50-100 keV energy band, and 7 sources in the 100-300 keV energy band. IDEOM analysis has resulted in the addition of 16 sources to the GBM-EOT catalog. We also present the first joined averaged spectra fo...

Rodi, J; Case, G L; Camero-Arranz, A; Chaplin, C; Finger, M H; Jenke, P; Wilson-Hodge, C A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Influence of sky radiance measurement errors on inversion-retrieved aerosol properties  

SciTech Connect

Remote sensing of the atmospheric aerosol is a well-established technique that is currently used for routine monitoring of this atmospheric component, both from ground-based and satellite. The AERONET program, initiated in the 90's, is the most extended network and the data provided are currently used by a wide community of users for aerosol characterization, satellite and model validation and synergetic use with other instrumentation (lidar, in-situ, etc.). Aerosol properties are derived within the network from measurements made by ground-based Sun-sky scanning radiometers. Sky radiances are acquired in two geometries: almucantar and principal plane. Discrepancies in the products obtained following both geometries have been observed and the main aim of this work is to determine if they could be justified by measurement errors. Three systematic errors have been analyzed in order to quantify the effects on the inversion-derived aerosol properties: calibration, pointing accuracy and finite field of view. Simulations have shown that typical uncertainty in the analyzed quantities (5% in calibration, 0.2 Degree-Sign in pointing and 1.2 Degree-Sign field of view) yields to errors in the retrieved parameters that vary depending on the aerosol type and geometry. While calibration and pointing errors have relevant impact on the products, the finite field of view does not produce notable differences.

Torres, B.; Toledano, C.; Cachorro, V. E.; Bennouna, Y. S.; Fuertes, D.; Gonzalez, R.; Frutos, A. M. de [Atmospheric Optics Group (GOA), University of Valladolid, Valladolid (Spain); Berjon, A. J. [Izana Atmospheric Research Center, Meteorological State Agency of Spain (AEMET), Sta. Cruz de Tenerife (Spain); Dubovik, O.; Goloub, P.; Podvin, T.; Blarel, L. [Laboratory of Atmospheric Optics, Universite Lille 1, Villeneuve d'Ascq (France)

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

424

Multi-wavelength study of 14000 star-forming galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(abridged) We studied a large sample of ~14000 dwarf star-forming galaxies with strong emission lines selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and distributed in the redshift range of z~0-0.6. We modelled spectral energy distributions (SED) of all galaxies which were based on the SDSS spectra in the visible range of 0.38-0.92 micron and included both the stellar and ionised gas emission. These SEDs were extrapolated to the UV and mid-infrared ranges to cover the wavelength range of 0.1-22 micron. The SDSS spectroscopic data were supplemented by photometric data from the GALEX, SDSS, 2MASS, WISE, IRAS, and NVSS all-sky surveys. We derived global characteristics of the galaxies, such as their element abundances, luminosities, and stellar masses. The luminosities and stellar masses range within the sample over ~5 orders of magnitude, thereby linking low-mass and low-luminosity blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies to luminous galaxies, which are similar to high-redshift Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs). The lumi...

Izotov, Y I; Fricke, K J; Henkel, C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

DOE/NV/10845 IT U S VECAS LIBRARY UC-703 I?. DESERT RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

0845 0845 IT U S VECAS LIBRARY UC-703 I?. DESERT RESEARCH INSTITUTE 3 I 'UNIVERSITY OF . ? .NEVADA SYSTEM Jenny B. Chapman Sam L. Hokett EVALUATION OF GROUNDWATER MONITORING AT O F F S m NUCLEAR TEST AREAS March 1991 WATER RESOURCES CENTER Publication #45085 DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. EVALUATION OF GROUNDWATER MONITORING AT OFFSITE NUCLEAR TEST AREAS b-r Jenny B. Chapman Sam L Hokett Water Resources Center Desett Research Institute University of Nevada System Publication X45085 prepared for Nevada Operations Office U . S . :Department of Energy IAS Vegas, Nevada March 1991 The work upon which this report is based was supported by the U . S

426

Computational study of atmospheric transfer radiation on an equatorial tropical desert (La Tatacoa, Colombia)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiative transfer models explain and predict interaction between solar radiation and the different elements present in the atmosphere, which are responsible for energy attenuation. In Colombia there have been neither measurements nor studies of atmospheric components such as gases and aerosols that can cause turbidity and pollution. Therefore satellite images cannot be corrected radiometrically in a proper way. When a suitable atmospheric correction is carried out, loss of information is avoided, which may be useful for discriminating image land cover. In this work a computational model was used to find radiative atmospheric attenuation (300 1000nm wavelength region) on an equatorial tropical desert (La Tatacoa, Colombia) in order to conduct an adequate atmospheric correction.

Delgado-Correal, Camilo; Castao, Gabriel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Coupled Environmental Processes and Long-term Performance of Landfill Covers in the northern Mojave Desert  

SciTech Connect

Evapotransiration (ET) covers have gained widespread acceptance as a closure feature for waste disposal sites, particularly in the arid and semi-arid regions of the southwestern U.S. But as landforms, ET covers are subject to change over time because of processes such as pedogenesis, hydrologic processes, vegetation establishment and change, and biological processes. To better understand the effects of coupled process changes to ET covers, a series of four primary analog sites in Yucca Flat on the Nevada Test Site, along with measurements and observations from other locations in the Mojave Desert, were selected to evaluate changes in ET covers over time. The analog sites, of varying ages, were selected to address changes in the early post-institutional control period, the 1,000-year compliance period for disposal of low-level and mixed low-level waste, and the 10,000-year compliance period for transuranic waste sites.

David Shafer; Michael Young; Stephen Zitzer; Eric McDonald; Todd Caldwell

2004-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

428

Baseline studies in the desert ecosystem at East Mesa Geothermal Test Site, Imperial Valley, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Baseline data reported herein for soil, vegetation, and small mammal components of the East Mesa desert ecosystem represent a collection period from October 1975 to September 1977. Inasmuch as changes in salt balance from geothermal brine sources are of potential impact upon the ecosystem, considerable analytical effort was given to the determination of element constituents in soil, plant, and animal samples. A preliminary synthesis of data was done to investigate the heterogeneity of element constituents among the sampled population and to summarize results. Findings indicate that periodic sampling and chemical analysis of vegetation around an industrialized geothermal energy source is probably the best way to monitor the surrounding ecosystem for assuring containment of any resource pollutants.

Romney, E.M.; Wallace, A.; Lunt, O.R.; Ackerman, T.A.; Kinnear, J.E.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Water and nitrogen uptake patterns following moisture pulses in a cold desert community  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variation in the ability to utilize pulses of both water and nitrogen (N) is one possible mechanism allowing the coexistence of species in the cold desert community on the Colorado Plateau. The authors simulated 25-mm precipitation events and used stable isotope tracers ({sup 2}H and {sup 15}N) to follow water and N uptake patterns in six dominant perennials (Artemisia filifolia, Coleogyne ramosissima, Cryptantha flava, Ephedra viridis, Quercus havardii, and Vanclevea stylosa) at different times of the growing season. Water pulse utilization varied on a seasonal basis and was to some extent different among species during the summer. Carbon isotope discrimination was negatively related to both plant use of moisture in upper soil layers and foliar N concentration. Species that were similar in water pulse utilization patterns differed in the natural abundance of {sup 15}N, suggesting partitioning in N sources. All species were able to utilize N pulses after rain events, but there were temporal differences in the response among species. The authors also found that water and N uptake in shallow roots do not necessarily occur simultaneously. Artemisia, Cryptantha, and Quercus showed significant uptake of both water and N from the upper soil layers. In contrast, Coleogyne and Ephedra showed the capacity to utilize the water pulse, but not the N pulse. Vanclevea only took up N. The results indicate that different parts of the root system may be responsible for the acquisition of water and N. Their results also suggest that N and water partitioning could contribute to the coexistence of species in highly variable environments such as the Colorado Plateau desert system.

Gebauer, R.L.E.; Ehleringer, J.R.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Thermal Performance of Building Envelope in Very Hot Dry Desert Region in Egypt (Toshky)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Toshky region is a desert region located in the south east of Egyptian western desert at the Tropical Cancer (23.5 N). The following features characterized this region during the summer season; aridity, high summer day time temperatures reaches to above 40 C for about 6 hours, large diurnal temperature variation, low relative humidity, and high solar radiation reaches to about 1100W/m2 on horizontal surfaces. In such climate thermal human comfort is crucial to provide the reasonable environment for the people. As the building envelop has a major role in saving comfort for people and improve the consumption of energy in building. So this study is interested in studying the thermal performance for some building constructed from different building materials as; Nobaa sandstone, hollow clay brick, light sand block, and hollow and insulated bazelt blocks. The external climatic conditions and the temperature distribution inside the wall construction and the indoor air temperature were measured. The result shows that using Nobaa sandstone alone in building is not adequate with the external climatic conditions of this region. But using building materials with specific thermal characteristics, and using thermal insulation led to reduce the heat flow through the walls and help the building to be suitable with its external environment conditions. The study also show that hollow clay brick and light sand block valid the lowest indoor air temperature, and the thermal performance of hollow bazelt blocks can be improved by using thermal insulation, Natural and forced night ventilation help the indoor environment to be within the thermal comfort.

Khalil, M. H.; Sheble, S. S.; Helal, M. A.; El-Demirdash, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on: adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks; theoretical investigation of adsorption; estimation of adsorption parameters from transient experiments; transient adsorption experiment -- salinity and noncondensible gas effects; the physics of injection of water into, transport and storage of fluids within, and production of vapor from geothermal reservoirs; injection optimization at the Geysers Geothermal Field; a model to test multiwell data interpretation for heterogeneous reservoirs; earth tide effects on downhole pressure measurements; and a finite-difference model for free surface gravity drainage well test analysis.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Hot dry rock venture risks investigation:  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study assesses a promising resource in central Utah as the potential site of a future commerical hot dry rock (HDR) facility for generating electricity. The results indicate that, if the HDR reservoir productivity equals expectations based on preliminary results from research projects to date, a 50 MWe HDR power facility at Roosevelt Hot Springs could generate power at cost competitive with coal-fired plants. However, it is imperative that the assumed productivity be demonstrated before funds are committed for a commercial facility. 72 refs., 39 figs., 38 tabs.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

On Determining the Spectrum of Primordial Inhomogeneity from the COBE DMR Sky Maps: II. Results of Two Year Data Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new technique of Fourier analysis on a cut sky (Gorski, 1994) has been applied to the two year COBE DMR sky maps. The Bayesian power spectrum estimation results are consistent with the Harrison-Zel'dovich n=1 model. The maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters of the power spectrum of primordial perturbations are n=1.22 (1.02) and Q_{rms-PS}=17 (20) uK including (excluding) the quadrupole anisotropy. The marginal likelihood function on n renders n=1.10 \\pm 0.32 (0.87 \\pm 0.36).

K. M. Gorski; G. Hinshaw; A. J. Banday; C. L. Bennett; E. L. Wright; A. Kogut; G. F. Smoot; P. Lubin

1994-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

434

Impact of Desert Dust Radiative Forcing on Sahel Precipitation: Relative Importance of Dust Compared to Sea Surface Temperature Variations, Vegetation Changes, and Greenhouse Gas Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of direct radiative forcing of desert dust aerosol in the change from wet to dry climate observed in the African Sahel region in the last half of the twentieth century is investigated using simulations with an atmospheric general ...

Masaru Yoshioka; Natalie M. Mahowald; Andrew J. Conley; William D. Collins; David W. Fillmore; Charles S. Zender; Dani B. Coleman

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Rock mechanics contributions from defense programs  

SciTech Connect

An attempt is made at illustrating the many contributions to rock mechanics from US defense programs, over the past 30-plus years. Large advances have been achieved in the technology-base area covering instrumentation, material properties, physical modeling, constitutive relations and numerical simulations. In the applications field, much progress has been made in understanding and being able to predict rock mass behavior related to underground explosions, cratering, projectile penetration, and defense nuclear waste storage. All these activities stand on their own merit as benefits to national security. But their impact is even broader, because they have found widespread applications in the non-defense sector; to name a few: the prediction of the response of underground structures to major earthquakes, the physics of the earth`s interior at great depths, instrumentation for monitoring mine blasting, thermo-mechanical instrumentation useful for civilian nuclear waste repositories, dynamic properties of earthquake faults, and transient large-strain numerical modeling of geological processes, such as diapirism. There is not pretense that this summary is exhaustive. It is meant to highlight success stories representative of DOE and DOD geotechnical activities, and to point to remaining challenges.

Heuze, F.E.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Hot dry rock geothermal heat extraction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A man-made geothermal reservoir has been created at a depth of 2.7 km in hot, dry granite by hydraulic fracturing. The system was completed by directionally drilling a second well in close proximity with the top of the vertical fracture. In early 1978 heat was extracted from this reservoir for a period of 75 days. During this period thermal power was produced at an average rate of 4 MW(t). Theoretical analysis of th measured drawdown suggests a total fracture heat transfer area of 16,000 m/sup 2/. Viscous impedance to through-flow declined continuously so that at the end of the experiment this impedance was only one-fifth its initial value. Water losses to the surrounding rock formation also decreased continuously, and eventually this loss rate was less than 1% of the circulated flow rate. Geochemical analyses suggest that, with scale up of the heat transfer area and deeper, hotter reservoirs, hot dry rock reservoirs can ultimately produce levels of power on a commercial scale.

Murphy, H.D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Hot Dry Rock at Fenton Hill, USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Project began in the early 1970's with the objective of developing a technology to make economically available the large ubiquitous thermal energy of the upper earth crust. The program, operated by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, has been funded by the Department of Energy (and its predecessors) and for a few years with participation by West Germany and Japan. An energy reservoir was accessed by drilling and hydraulically fracturing in the Precambrian basement rock at Fenton Hill, outside the Valles Caldera of north-central New Mexico. Water was circulated through the reservoir (Phase 1, 1978--1980) producing up to 5 MWt at 132/degree/C. A second (Phase 2) reservoir has been established with a deeper pair of holes and an initial flow test completed producing about 10 MWt at 190/degree/C. These accomplishments have been supported and paralleled by developments in drilling, well completion and instrumentation hardware. Acoustic or microseismic fracture mapping and geochemistry studies in addition to hydraulic and thermal data contribute to reservoir analyses. Studies of some of the estimated 430,000 quads of HDR resources in the United States have been made with special attention focused on sites most advantageous for early development. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Hendron, R.H.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

The US Hot Dry Rock project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hot Dry Rock geothermal energy project began in the early 1970's with the objective of developing a technology to make economically available the large ubiquitous thermal energy of the upper earth crust. The program has been funded by the Department of Energy (and its predecessors) and for a few years with participation by West Germany and Japan. An energy reservoir was accessed by drilling and hydraulically fracturing in the precambrian basement rock outside the Valles Caldera of north-central New Mexico. Water was circulated through the reservoir (Phase I, 1978-1980) producing up to 5 MWt at 132/sup 0/C. A second (Phase II) reservoir has been established with a deeper pair of holes and an initial flow test completed producing about 10 MWt at 190/sup 0/C. These accomplishments have been supported and paralleled by developments in drilling, well completion and instrumentation hardware. Acoustic or microseismic fracture mapping and geochemistry studies in addition to hydraulic and thermal data contribute to reservoir analyses. Studies of some of the estimated 430,000 quads of HDR resources in the United States have been made with special attention focused on sites most advantageous for early development.

Hendron, R.H.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

EA-1300: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

00: Final Environmental Assessment 00: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1300: Final Environmental Assessment Nevada Test Site Development Corporation's Desert Rock Sky Park at the Nevada Test Site The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) proposes to issue a General Use Permit to the Nevada Test Site Development Corporation (NTSDC) to develop and lease an industrial park in a portion of Area 22 of Nevada Test Site (NTS). This Environmental Assessment (EA) identifies and discusses the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed action. Environmental Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Development Corporation's Desert Rock Sky Park at the Nevada Test Site, DOE/NV EA-1300, March 2000 More Documents & Publications EA-1170: Final Environmental Assessment

440

Thermal conductivity of rocks associated with energy extraction from hot dry rock geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of thermal conductivity measurements are given for 14 drill core rock samples taken from two exploratory HDR geothermal wellbores (maximum depth of 2929 m (9608 ft) drilled into Precambrian granitic rock in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico. These samples have been petrographically characterized and in general represent fresh competent Precambrian material of deep origin. Thermal conductivities, modal analyses, and densities are given for all core samples studied under dry and water-saturated conditions. Additional measurements are reported for several sedimentary rocks encountered in the upper 760 m (2500 ft) of that same region. A cut-bar thermal conductivity comparator and a transient needle probe were used for the determinations with fused quartz and Pyroceram 9606 as the standards. The maximum temperature range of the measurements was from the ice point to 250/sup 0/C. The measurements on wet, water-saturated rock were limited to the temperature range below room temperature. Conductivity values of the dense core rock samples were generally within the range from 2 to 2.9 W/mK at 200/sup 0/C. Excellent agreement was achieved between these laboratory measurements of thermal conductivity and those obtained by in situ measurements used in the HDR wellbores. By using samples of sufficient thickness to provide a statistically representative heat flow path, no difference between conductivity values and their temperature coefficients for orthogonal directions (heat flow parallel or perpendicular to core axis) was observed. This isotropic behavior was even found for highly foliated gneissic specimens. Estimates of thermal conductivity based on a composite dispersion analysis utilizing pure minerallic phase conductivities and detailed modal analyses usually agreed to within 9 percent of the experimental values.

Sibbitt, W.L.; Dodson, J.G.; Tester, J.W.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "desert rock sky" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Seepage into drifts in unsaturated fractured rock at Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fractured Rock at Yucca Mountain Jens Birkholzer, Guomin Lrepository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as it is locatedclimate conditions at Yucca Mountain. The numerical study is

Birkholzer, Jens; Li, Guomin; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Tsang, Yvonne

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Project Type Topic 2 Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Project Description Supercritical CO2 is currently becoming a more...

443

Rock Sampling At Yellowstone Region (Hellman & Ramsey, 2004)...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone National Park Using Aster And Aviris Remote Sensing Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleRockSamplingAtYel...

444

Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify potential drilling...

445

ROCK INSTRUMENTATION PROBLEMS EXPERIENCED DURING IN-SITU HEATER TESTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and R. Haught, Instrumentation evaluation, calibration, and27 - 30,1979. ROCK INSTRUMENTATION PROBLEMS EXPERIENCEDdiscussed here,l INSTRUMENTATION AND DATA ACQUISITION SYSTEM

Binnall, E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Jazz and Blues Legends Rock the Northeast, Help Save Louisiana ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Jazz and Blues Legends Rock the Northeast, Help Save Louisiana's Coastal Wetlands. 6.8.2006 Neville Brothers, Dr. John and Mavis Staples Highlight the ...

447

Using Ornamental Rock Waste in the Manufacture of Pressed Brick ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... is a major producer of rock trimmest, with its production destined largely for export. ... Application of Electrospun Gas Diffusion Nanofibre-membranes in the...

448

ROCK MASS CHARACTERIZATION FOR STORAGE OF NUCLEAR WASTE IN GRANITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effect of pressure on electrical resistivity of rocks. J..exceptionally high electrical resistivity and low waterwater content is the electrical resistivity which in igneous

Witherspoon, P.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Long Valley Caldera Area (Smith &...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Long Valley Caldera Area (Smith & Suemnicht, 1991) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis-...

450

THE MILKY WAY TOMOGRAPHY WITH SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY. IV. DISSECTING DUST  

SciTech Connect

We use Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometry of 73 million stars to simultaneously constrain best-fit main-sequence stellar spectral energy distribution (SED) and amount of dust extinction along the line of sight toward each star. Using a subsample of 23 million stars with Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) photometry, whose addition enables more robust results, we show that SDSS photometry alone is sufficient to break degeneracies between intrinsic stellar color and dust amount when the shape of extinction curve is fixed. When using both SDSS and 2MASS photometry, the ratio of the total to selective absorption, R{sub V} , can be determined with an uncertainty of about 0.1 for most stars in high-extinction regions. These fits enable detailed studies of the dust properties and its spatial distribution, and of the stellar spatial distribution at low Galactic latitudes (|b| < 30 Degree-Sign ). Our results are in good agreement with the extinction normalization given by the Schlegel et al. (SFD) dust maps at high northern Galactic latitudes, but indicate that the SFD extinction map appears to be consistently overestimated by about 20% in the southern sky, in agreement with recent study by Schlafly et al. The constraints on the shape of the dust extinction curve across the SDSS and 2MASS bandpasses disfavor the reddening law of O'Donnell, but support the models by Fitzpatrick and Cardelli et al. For the latter, we find a ratio of the total to selective absorption to be R{sub V} = 3.0 {+-} 0.1(random){+-}0.1 (systematic) over most of the high-latitude sky. At low Galactic latitudes (|b| < 5 Degree-Sign ), we demonstrate that the SFD map cannot be reliably used to correct for extinction because most stars are embedded in dust, rather than behind it, as is the case at high Galactic latitudes. We analyze three-dimensional maps of the best-fit R{sub V} and find that R{sub V} = 3.1 cannot be ruled out in any of the 10 SEGUE stripes at a precision level of {approx}0.1-0.2. Our best estimate for the intrinsic scatter of R{sub V} in the regions probed by SEGUE stripes is {approx}0.2. We introduce a method for efficient selection of candidate red giant stars in the disk, dubbed 'dusty parallax relation', which utilizes a correlation between distance and the extinction along the line of sight. We make these best-fit parameters, as well as all the input SDSS and 2MASS data, publicly available in a user-friendly format. These data can be used for studies of stellar number density distribution, the distribution of dust properties, for selecting sources whose SED differs from SEDs for high-latitude main-sequence stars, and for estimating distances to dust clouds and, in turn, to molecular gas clouds.

Berry, Michael; Ivezic, Zeljko; Brooks, Keira J.; Gibson, Robert R.; Jones, Lynne; Yoachim, Peter; Krughoff, Simon; Connolly, Andrew J.; Loebman, Sarah [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Sesar, Branimir [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Juric, Mario [Harvard College Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Schlafly, Edward F.; Finkbeiner, Douglas [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bellovary, Jillian [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Vrbanec, Dijana [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Bijenicka cesta 32, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Beers, Timothy C. [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Kimball, Amy [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2475 (United States); Bond, Nicholas A. [Physics and Astronomy Department, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8019 (United States); Schlegel, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, MS 50R5032, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); and others

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

All-Sky Earth Occultation Observations with the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on-board Fermi, we are monitoring the hard X-ray/soft gamma ray sky using the Earth occultation technique. Each time a source in our catalog enters or exits occultation by the Earth, we measure its flux using the change in count rates due to the occultation. Currently we are using CTIME data with 8 energy channels spanning 8 keV to 1 MeV for the GBM NaI detectors and spanning 150 keV to 40 MeV for the GBM BGO detectors. Our preliminary catalog consists of galactic X-ray binaries, the Crab Nebula, and active galactic nuclei. In addition, to Earth occultations, we have observed numerous occultations with Fermi's solar panels. We will present early results. Regularly updated results can be found on our website http://gammaray.nsstc.nasa.gov/gbm/science/occultation

Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A; Bhat, P N; Briggs, M S; Chaplin, V; Connaughton, V; Camero-Arranz, A; Case, G; Cherry, M; Rodi, J; Finger, M H; Jenke, P; Haynes, R H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Unresolved H-Alpha Enhancements at High Galactic Latitude in the WHAM Sky Survey Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have identified 85 regions of enhanced H-Alpha emission at |b| > 10 degrees subtending approximately 1 degree or less on the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) sky survey. These high latitude ``WHAM point sources'' have H-Alpha fluxes of 10^{-11} to 10^{-9} erg cm^-2 s^-1, radial velocities within about 70 km/s of the LSR, and line widths that range from less than 20 km/s to about 80 km/s (FWHM). Twenty nine of these enhancements are not identified with either cataloged nebulae or hot stars and appear to have kinematic properties that differ from those observed for planetary nebulae. Another 14 enhancements are near hot evolved low mass stars that had no previously reported detections of associated nebulosity. The remainder of the enhancements are cataloged planetary nebulae and small, high latitude H II regions surrounding massive O and early B stars.

R. J. Reynolds; V. Chaudhary; G. J. Madsen; L. M. Haffner

2004-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

453

Unresolved H-Alpha Enhancements at High Galactic Latitude in the WHAM Sky Survey Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have identified 85 regions of enhanced H-Alpha emission at |b| > 10 degrees subtending approximately 1 degree or less on the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) sky survey. These high latitude ``WHAM point sources'' have H-Alpha fluxes of 10^{-11} to 10^{-9} erg cm^-2 s^-1, radial velocities within about 70 km/s of the LSR, and line widths that range from less than 20 km/s to about 80 km/s (FWHM). Twenty nine of these enhancements are not identified with either cataloged nebulae or hot stars and appear to have kinematic properties that differ from those observed for planetary nebulae. Another 14 enhancements are near hot evolved low mass stars that had no previously reported detections of associated nebulosity. The remainder of the enhancements are cataloged planetary nebulae and small, high latitude H II regions surrounding massive O and early B stars.

Reynolds, R J; Madsen, G J; Haffner, L M

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Simplified clear sky model for direct and diffuse insolation on horizontal surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed comparison was made between five simple broadband models for clear sky global insolation. Compared models were those of Atwater and Ball, Davies and Hay, Watt, Hoyt, and Lacis and Hansen. A sixth simple model, called the Bird model, has been formulated by using parts of these five models and by comparison with the results from three rigorous radiative transfer codes. All of the simple models provide results that agree within < 10% with the three rigorous codes when the sun is in the zenith position. The Bird and Hoyt models agree within 3% with each other and with the results of the rigorous codes. However, the Bird model is easier to implement and has broader application than the Hoyt model.

Bird, R.E.; Hulstrom, R.L.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

A Catalogue of RR Lyrae Stars from the Northern Sky Variability Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search for RR Lyrae stars has been conducted in the publicly available data of the Northern Sky Variability Survey (NSVS). Candidates have been selected by the statistical properties of their variation; the standard deviation, skewness and kurtosis with appropriate limits determined from a sample 314 known RRab and RRc stars listed in the GCVS. From the period analysis and light curve shape of over 3000 candidates 785 RR Lyrae have been identified of which 188 are previously unknown. The light curves were examined for the Blazhko effect and several new stars showing this were found. Six double-mode RR Lyrae stars were also found of which two are new discoveries. Some previously known variables have been reclassified as RR Lyrae stars and similarly some RR Lyrae stars have been found to be other types of variable, or not variable at all.

Patrick Wils; Christopher Lloyd; Klaus Bernhard

2006-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

456

Improving the Accuracy of Using Pyranometers to Measure the Clear Sky Global Solar Irradiance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pyranometer users have customarily applied one responsivity value when calculating the global solar irradiance. Usually, the responsivity value is reported by either the manufacturer or a calibration facility. Many pyranometer calibrations, made both at NREL and elsewhere, have shown that the responsivity of a pyranometer changes with the change in solar zenith and azimuth angles. Depending on how well the pyranometer sensor is radiometrically leveled, these changes can exceed +/-5% of the reported responsivity, which means that errors in the calculated global solar irradiance can exceed +/-5% from the nominal values. This paper describes a method to decrease the errors resulting from the change of the solar zenith angle under clear sky conditions. Two responsivity functions, morning and afternoon, were used instead of one responsivity value. The two functions have been chosen because of asymmetry of the morning and afternoon cosine responses demonstrated by some pyranometers.

Reda, I.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Searching for Spurious Solar and Sky Lines in the Fermi-LAT Spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We search for a unified instrumental explanation of the spectral features seen near $E_\\gamma=130$ GeV in photons collected by Fermi-LAT from the galactic center and from the Earth's limb. We report for the first time a similar feature in photons originating from the vicinity of the Sun, and examine the instrumental characteristics of this Solar feature. To test an instrumental hypothesis, we identify the range of photon incident angles where most of the peak photons are observed in these three spectral features. An examination of the spectrum of photons from the rest of the sky with this characteristic angular range reveals a hint of a spectral feature near $E_\\gamma=130$ GeV. These results cast further doubt on the dark-matter-annihilation interpretation of the galactic center peak.

Daniel Whiteson

2013-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

458

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey: Search Algorithm and Follow-up Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey has identified a large number of new transient sources in a 300 sq. deg. region along the celestial equator during its first two seasons of a three-season campaign. Multi-band (ugriz) light curves were measured for most of the sources, which include solar system objects, Galactic variable stars, active galactic nuclei, supernovae (SNe), and other astronomical transients. The imaging survey is augmented by an extensive spectroscopic follow-up program to identify SNe, measure their redshifts, and study the physical conditions of the explosions and their environment through spectroscopic diagnostics. During the survey, light curves are rapidly evaluated to provide an initial photometric type of the SNe, and a selected sample of sources are targeted for spectroscopic observations. In the first two seasons, 476 sources were selected for spectroscopic observations, of which 403 were identified as SNe. For the Type Ia SNe, the main driver for the Survey, our photometr...

Sako, Masao; Becker, A; Cinabro, D; De Jongh, F; Depoy, D L; Dilday, B; Doi, M; Frieman, J A; Garnavich, P M; Hogan, C J; Holtzman, J; Jha, S; Kessler, R; Konishi, K; Lampeitl, H; Marriner, J; Miknaitis, G; Nichol, R C; Prieto, J L; Reiss, A G; Richmond, M W; Romani, R; Schneider, D P; Smith, M; Subba-Rao, M; Takanashi, N; Tokita, K; van der Heyden, K; Yasuda, N; Zheng, C; Barentine, J; Brewington, H; Choi, C; Dembicky, J; Harnavek, M; Ihara, Y; Im, M; Ketzeback, W; Kleinman, S J; Krzesi?ski, J; Long, D C; Malanushenko, E; Malanushenko, V; McMillan, R J; Morokuma, T; Nitta, A; Pan, K; Saurage, G; Snedden, S A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

A CATALOG OF QUASAR PROPERTIES FROM SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY DATA RELEASE 7  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a compilation of properties of the 105,783 quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (DR7) quasar catalog. In this product, we compile continuum and emission line measurements around the H{alpha}, H{beta}, Mg II, and C IV regions, as well as other quantities such as radio properties, and flags indicating broad absorption line quasars, disk emitters, etc. We also compile virial black hole mass estimates based on various calibrations. For the fiducial virial mass estimates we use the Vestergaard and Peterson (VP06) calibrations for H{beta} and C IV, and our own calibration for Mg II which matches the VP06 H{beta} masses on average. We describe the construction of this catalog and discuss its limitations. The catalog and its future updates will be made publicly available online.

Shen Yue [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., MS-51, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Richards, Gordon T. [Department of Physics, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Strauss, Michael A. [Princeton University Observatory, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Hall, Patrick B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, 4700 Keele St., Toronto, ON, M3J 1P3 (Canada); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Snedden, Stephanie; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Malanushenko, Viktor; Malanushenko, Elena; Oravetz, Dan; Pan, Kaike; Simmons, Audrey [Apache Point Observatory, Sunspot, NM, 88349 (United States)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

An Improved Photometric Calibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Imaging Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an algorithm to photometrically calibrate wide field optical imaging surveys, that simultaneously solves for the calibration parameters and relative stellar fluxes using overlapping observations. The algorithm decouples the problem of "relative" calibrations, from that of "absolute" calibrations; the absolute calibration is reduced to determining a few numbers for the entire survey. We pay special attention to the spatial structure of the calibration errors, allowing one to isolate particular error modes in downstream analyses. Applying this to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging data, we achieve ~1% relative calibration errors across 8500 sq.deg. in griz; the errors are ~2% for the u band. These errors are dominated by unmodelled atmospheric variations at Apache Point Observatory. These calibrations, dubbed "ubercalibration", are now public with SDSS Data Release 6, and will be a part of subsequent SDSS data releases.

N. Padmanabhan; D. J. Schlegel; D. P. Finkbeiner; J. C. Barentine; M. R. Blanton; H. J. Brewington; J. E. Gunn; M. Harvanek; D. W. Hogg; Z. Ivezic; D. Johnston; S. M. Kent; S. J. Kleinman; G. R. Knapp; J. Krzesinski; D. Long; E. H. Neilsen; A. Nitta; C. Loomis; R. H. Lupton; S. Roweis; S. A. Snedden; M. A. Strauss; D. L. Tucker

2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z