National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for desert rock sky

  1. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: The Nevada Test Site Development Corporations's Desert Rock Sky Park at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2000-03-01

    The United States Department of Energy has prepared an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1300) (EA) which analyzes the potential environmental effects of developing operating and maintaining a commercial/industrial park in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site, between Mercury Camp and U.S. Highway 95 and east of Desert Rock Airport. The EA evaluates the potential impacts of infrastructure improvements necessary to support fill build out of the 512-acre Desert Rock Sky Park. Two alternative actions were evaluated: (1) Develop, operate and maintain a commercial/industrial park in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site, and (2) taking no action. The purpose and need for the commercial industrial park are addressed in Section 1.0 of the EA. A detailed description of the proposed action and alternatives is in section 2.0. Section 3.0 describes the affected environment. Section 4.0 the environmental consequences of the proposed action and alternative. Cumulative effects are addressed in Section 5.0. Mitigation measures are addressed in Section 6.0. The Department of Energy determined that the proposed action of developing, operating and maintaining a commercial/industrial park in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site would best meet the needs of the agency.

  2. Desert Rock Coatings Ronald I. Dorn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    Chapter 7 Desert Rock Coatings Ronald I. Dorn Introduction Desert landforms are characterized, that the supposed funda- mental bare-rock nature of desert landforms stretches the truth. In reality, rock coatings Petra tourist attraction of the Al-Khazneh Tomb fac¸ade is coated with a black manganese-rich varnish

  3. Desert Sky Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9) WindGridDeepiSolar and WindQueen GeothermalSky

  4. Geochemistry of the Banded Iron Formations and their Host Rocks in the Eastern Desert of Egypt BACKUS, Ethan L.1, GAGNON, Kelli E.1, EL-SHAZLY, Aley K.1, and KHALIL, Khalil Isaac2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Shazly, Aley

    Geochemistry of the Banded Iron Formations and their Host Rocks in the Eastern Desert of Egypt University, Egypt Sponsored by NSF-OISE-1004021 Session 92:T3. Sigma Gamma Epsilon Undergraduate Research over 30,000 km2 in the central Eastern Desert of Egypt. The deposits most resemble Algoma-type iron

  5. Rocks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The Energy Materials CenterRobotics KeyRocks Rocks

  6. The Geometry of Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kagan, Shelly

    2005-01-01

    , better appreciate the com­ plex nature of desert if we approach it graphically. 5 Well-being Figure l. Desert Graph axes with a sample poinl In Figure 1, the X axis represents possible levels of well-being. Points to the right of the origin represent... of well-being. 10 One possible way of capturing a view like this is shown in Figure 5. Figure 5. Some desert lines with negative peaks. Now Figure 5 only displays desert lines for people who deserve to suffer. For each such person there is a...

  7. WATERCHARRETTE food deserts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WATERCHARRETTE food deserts University of Kansas School of Architecture, Design, and Planning 3 summary introduction context To provide a more local society that is less dependent upon large-scale food dialogues will be held to engage students in the concepts of sustainable water management, food deserts

  8. Big Sky Carbon Atlas

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    (Acknowledgment to the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership (BSCSP); see home page at http://www.bigskyco2.org/)

  9. Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    Bear Snow Vegetation RhinoWater Vegetation Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Rhino Water Rhino Water Ground Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Vegetation Rhino Vegetation Ground Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky

  10. Wide Blue Sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Caroline Imani

    2011-01-01

    dressed neatly in a dark blue dress, its high neck trimmedIt was covered in a light blue fabric embellished with softOF CALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE Wide Blue Sky A Thesis submitted in

  11. Supersymmetry without the Desert

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nomura, Yasunori; Poland, David

    2006-09-26

    Naturalness of electroweak symmetry breaking in weak scale supersymmetric theories may suggest the absence of the conventional supersymmetric desert. We present a simple, realistic framework for supersymmetry in which (most of) the virtues of the supersymmetric desert are naturally reproduced without having a large energy interval above the weak scale. The successful supersymmetric prediction for the low-energy gauge couplings is reproduced due to a gauged R symmetry present in the effective theory at the weak scale. The observable sector superpotential naturally takes the form of the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model, but without being subject to the Landau pole constraints up to the conventional unification scale. Supersymmetry breaking masses are generated by the F-term and D-term VEVs of singlet and U(1){sub R} gauge fields, as well as by anomaly mediation, at a scale not far above the weak scale. We study the resulting pattern of supersymmetry breaking masses in detail, and find that it can be quite distinct. We construct classes of explicit models within this framework, based on higher dimensional unified theories with TeV-sized extra dimensions. A similar model based on a non-R symmetry is also presented. These models have a rich phenomenology at the TeV scale, and allow for detailed analyses of, e.g., electroweak symmetry breaking.

  12. Rock Art

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huyge, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Courtesy of the Royal Museums of Art and History, Brussels.Figure 4. Rock art from Abu Ballas caravan station, 550 kmtypical of Pharaonic rock art. Kharga Oasis. Photograph by

  13. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan Capalbo

    2005-12-31

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework; (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts) and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated has significant potential to sequester large amounts of CO{sub 2}. Simulations conducted to evaluate mineral trapping potential of mafic volcanic rock formations located in the Idaho province suggest that supercritical CO{sub 2} is converted to solid carbonate mineral within a few hundred years and permanently entombs the carbon. Although MMV for this rock type may be challenging, a carefully chosen combination of geophysical and geochemical techniques should allow assessment of the fate of CO{sub 2} in deep basalt hosted aquifers. Terrestrial carbon sequestration relies on land management practices and technologies to remove atmospheric CO{sub 2} where it is stored in trees, plants, and soil. This indirect sequestration can be implemented today and is on the front line of voluntary, market-based approaches to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil Carbon (C) on rangelands, and forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Rangelands can store up to an additional 0.05 mt C/ha/yr, while the croplands are on average four times that amount. Estimates of technical potential for soil sequestration within the region in cropland are in the range of 2.0 M mt C/yr over 20 year time horizon. This is equivalent to approximately 7.0 M mt CO{sub 2}e/yr. The forestry sinks are well documented, and the potential in the Big Sky region ranges from 9-15 M mt CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. Value-added benefits include enhanced yields, reduced erosion, and increased wildlife habitat. Thus the terrestrial sinks provide a viable, environmentally beneficial, and relatively low cost sink that is available to sequester C in the current time frame. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological and terrestrial sequestration re

  14. Hacking the Sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simpson, R J

    2009-01-01

    In this article I present some special astronomical scripts created for Google Earth, Google Sky and Twitter. These 'hacks' are examples of the ways in which such tools can be used either alone, in on conjunction with online services. The result of a combination of multiple, online services to form a new facility is called a mash-up. Some of what follows falls into that definition. As we move into an era of online data and tools, it is the network as a whole that becomes important. Tools emerging from this network can be capable of more than the sum of their parts.

  15. Q00906010024 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    00906010024 rock check dam Q00906010025 rock check dam Q00906010021 rock check dam Q00906010022 rock check dam Q00906010027 rock check dam Q00906010026 rock check dam Q00906010018 rock check dam Q00906010023 rock check dam Q00906010011 rock check dam Q00906010008 rock check dam Q00906010007 rock check dam Q

  16. UNLV DESERT SUNRISE DESERT SUNRISE HOME Project Summary

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-Sessions | Department of Correctiveof Deliverables UDACSmart GridUNLV DESERT

  17. California Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name California Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

  18. Understanding the 30-year Barbados desert dust record

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahowald, Natalie M; Zender, C. S.; Luo, C.; Savoie, D.; Torres, O.; del Corral, J.

    2002-01-01

    UNDERSTANDING THE 30-YEAR BARBADOS DESERT DUST Moulin, C. ,on mineral dust in the Barbados trade winds, Nature, 320,Understanding the 30-year Barbados desert dust record, J.

  19. Big Sky Trust Fund (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Big Sky Trust Fund reimburses expenses incurred in the purchase, leasing, or relocation of real assets for direct use of the assisted business or employee training costs. A local or tribal...

  20. Lighting and Dark Sky Regulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radcliffe, David

    Lighting and Dark Sky Regulations Marjorie Palmer Spring 2008 #12;The UGA Land Use Clinic provides Road, Room 101 Athens, GA 30602-1510 (706) 583-0373 · Fax (706) 583-0612 jroskie@uga.edu #12;Lighting......................................................................................................................................1 II. Approaches to Lighting Regulation

  1. Red Sky with Red Mesa

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-23

    The Red Sky/Red Mesa supercomputing platform dramatically reduces the time required to simulate complex fuel models, from 4-6 months to just 4 weeks, allowing researchers to accelerate the pace at which they can address these complex problems. Its speed also reduces the need for laboratory and field testing, allowing for energy reduction far beyond data center walls.

  2. H33B-05H33B-05 Water subsidies from mountains to deserts:Water subsidies from mountains to deserts:Water subsidies from mountains to deserts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    water Bare dunes, instead, experienced deep drainage & local recharge. quicktour Site A bare interduneH33B-05H33B-05 Water subsidies from mountains to deserts:Water subsidies from mountains to deserts:Water subsidies from mountains to deserts: groundwater-fed oases in a sandy landscape Water subsidies from

  3. V00306010057 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ¬« ¬« ¬« ¬« ¬« XY! 16-020 16-030(c) 16-026(l) 16-028(c) 16-026(l) V00306010057 rock check dam V00306010012 rock check dam V00306010040 rock check dam V00306010039 rock check dam V00306010058 rock check dam V00306010064 rock check dam V00306010061 rock check dam V00306010062 rock check dam V00306010063

  4. Every Square Inch: The Fight for the California Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Argandona, Monica

    2012-01-01

    and James B. Greenberg. "Fight for the West: A PoliticalEvery Square Inch: The Fight for the California Desert AEvery Square Inch: A Fight for the California Desert by

  5. V01406010015 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! ¬« ¬« V01406010015 rock check dam V01406010014 rock check dam V01406010013 rock check dam 1501403010012 earthen berm V01403010008 earthen berm V01406010003 rock check dam V01406010004 rock check dam V01406010010 rock check dam V01406010011 rock check dam 15-0651 15-0307 15-0588 15-0532 15-0575 stormdrain 7160

  6. T00706010013 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! ¬« T00706010013 rock check dam T00706010014 rock check dam T00702040012 established vegetation, green hatch area T00706010002 rock check dam T00706010011 rock check dam T00703120010 rock berm T00703020003 base course berm T00706010004 rock check dam T00706010009 rock check dam T00703020008 base course

  7. ARM: Fractional cloud cover, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave flux for each of 25 individual SGP facilities.

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Krista Gaustad; Laura Riihimaki

    1997-01-01

    Fractional cloud cover, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave flux for each of 25 individual SGP facilities.

  8. ARM: Fractional cloud cover, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave flux for each of 25 individual SGP facilities.

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Krista Gaustad; Laura Riihimaki

    Fractional cloud cover, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave flux for each of 25 individual SGP facilities.

  9. Critical Zones in Desert Fog: Aids to Multiscale Navigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furnas, George W.

    Critical Zones in Desert Fog: Aids to Multiscale Navigation Susanne Jul Computer Science +1 734-763-0076 furnas@umich.edu ABSTRACT In this paper, we introduce the problem of "desert fog desert fog in multiscale electronic worlds. Prototypes of these aids have been implemented

  10. Desert Sunlight | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstruments IncMississippi:DeltaFishDesert Queen GeothermalDesert

  11. Deep Sky Astronomical Image Database

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB Packet HanfordDOEDanielDe novo Design of Debugging6DecodingDeep Sky

  12. Sky Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter Battery Technology CoWanpingSilveira deScienceSky Energy Place:

  13. BIGGER AND BETTER BANGS IN THE SKY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TRIMBLE, V

    1982-01-01

    better hangs in the sky Supernovae are massive stars thatthe traditional prototype of supernovae; and its‘ remains,applicable to other supernovae and remnants. What do we know

  14. T00406010008 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! ¬« T00406010008 rock check dam T00406010009 rock check dam T00406010010 rock check dam T00406010011 rock check dam T-SMA-2.85 0.344 Acres 35-014(g) 35-016(n) T00406010005 rock check dam T00406010006 rock check dam T00403090004 curb T00402040007 established vegetation, green hatch area 7200 7200 7180

  15. Rock Cycle and Rocks Lab Rocks are aggregates of one or many minerals.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    Rock Cycle and Rocks Lab Rocks are aggregates of one or many minerals. Three types of rocks: A of their sizes, shapes and arrangement. Rule of Thumb: The size of mineral crystals in an igneous rock may, there is not enough time for large mineral crystals to form (e.g. obsidian) Igneous Rock Mineral Compositions

  16. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-01-04

    The Big Sky Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts during the first performance period fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first Partnership meeting the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Complementary to the efforts on evaluation of sources and sinks is the development of the Big Sky Partnership Carbon Cyberinfrastructure (BSP-CC) and a GIS Road Map for the Partnership. These efforts will put in place a map-based integrated information management system for our Partnership, with transferability to the national carbon sequestration effort. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but other policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long term viability. A series of meetings held in November and December, 2003, have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding the implementation of a market-based setting for soil C credits. These include the impact of existing local, state, and federal permitting issues for terrestrial based carbon sequestration projects, consistency of final protocols and planning standards with national requirements, and alignments of carbon sequestration projects with existing federal and state cost-share programs. Finally, the education and outreach efforts during this performance period have resulted in a comprehensive plan which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. The primary goal of this plan is to increase awareness, understanding, and public acceptance of sequestration efforts and build support for a constituent based network which includes the initial Big Sky Partnership and other local and regional businesses and entities.

  17. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-06-01

    The Big Sky Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts during the second performance period fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Two key deliverables were completed this quarter--a literature review/database to assess the soil carbon on rangelands, and the draft protocols, contracting options for soil carbon trading. To date, there has been little research on soil carbon on rangelands, and since rangeland constitutes a major land use in the Big Sky region, this is important in achieving a better understanding of terrestrial sinks. The protocols developed for soil carbon trading are unique and provide a key component of the mechanisms that might be used to efficiently sequester GHG and reduce CO{sub 2} concentrations. Progress on other deliverables is noted in the PowerPoint presentations. A series of meetings held during the second quarter have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding the implementation of a market-based setting for soil C credits. These meetings provide a connection to stakeholders in the region and a basis on which to draw for the DOE PEIS hearings. Finally, the education and outreach efforts have resulted in a comprehensive plan and process which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. While we are still working on the public website, we have made many presentations to stakeholders and policy makers, connections to other federal and state agencies concerned with GHG emissions, climate change, and efficient and environmentally-friendly energy production. In addition, we have laid plans for integration of our outreach efforts with the students, especially at the tribal colleges and at the universities involved in our partnership. This includes collaboration with the film and media arts departments at MSU, with outreach effort

  18. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2005-01-31

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. Efforts are underway to showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies.

  19. Every Square Inch: The Fight for the California Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Argandona, Monica

    2012-01-01

    centers as a clean and renewable energy resource. The demandProtective Council Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plancenters as a clean and renewable energy resource. Whether

  20. Every Square Inch: The Fight for the California Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Argandona, Monica

    2012-01-01

    centers as a clean and renewable energy resource. The demandfor Energy Efficiency and Renewable Technologies CaliforniaProtective Council Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan

  1. Desert dust suppressing precipitation: A possible desertification feedback loop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Desert dust suppressing precipitation: A possible desertification feedback loop Daniel Rosenfeld of land use exposing the topsoil can initiate such a desertification feedback process. Satellite

  2. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Desert Peak Area (Wisian & Blackwell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploration Activity Details Location Desert Peak Area Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References...

  3. Deep Sky Astronomical Image Database Project at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deep Sky Astronomical Image Database Deep Sky Astronomical Image Database Key Challenges: Develop, store, analyze, and make available an astronomical image database of...

  4. Clean Cities: Land of Sky Clean Vehicles coalition (Western North...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Land of Sky Clean Vehicles Coalition (Western North Carolina) The Land of Sky Clean Vehicles coalition (Western North Carolina) works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community...

  5. J00206010020 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! J00206010020 rock check dam J00206010023 rock check dam 09-009 09-009 09-009 PJ-SMA-2 0.901 Acres J00206010021 rock check dam J00206010019 rock check dam J00206010014 rock check dam J00203010007 Smith DATE: 14-November-2014 REVISION NUMBER: 8 XY! IP sampler location Berm Channel/swale Check dam

  6. Session: Hard Rock Penetration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

  7. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruce Margon

    1998-08-19

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey is an ambitious, multi-institutional project to create a huge digital imaging and spectroscopic data bank of 25% of the celestial sphere, approximately 10,000 deg^2 centred on the north galactic polar cap. The photometric atlas will be in 5 specially-chosen colours, covering the pi ster of the Survey area to a limiting magnitude of r~23.1, on 0.4" pixels, resulting in a 1 Tpixel map. This data base will be automatically analysed to catalog the photometric and astrometric properties of 10^8 stellar images, 10^8 galaxies, and 10^6 colour-selected QSO candidates; the galaxy data will in addition include detailed morphological data. The photometric data are used to autonomously and homogeneously select objects for the spectroscopic survey, which will include spectra of 10^6 galaxies, 10^5 QSOs, and 10^5 unusual stars. Although the project was originally motivated by the desire to study Large Scale Structure, we anticipate that these data will impact virtually every field of astronomy, from Earth-crossing asteroids to QSOs at z>6. In particular, the ~12 TByte multi-colour, precision calibrated imaging archive should be a world resource for many decades of the next century.

  8. Boundary processes between a desert sand dune community and an encroaching suburban landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrows, Cameron W.; Allen, M F; Rotenberry, J T

    2006-01-01

    biology of the Namib dune lizard, Aporosaura anchietae,energetics of a Namib Desert dune ecosystem. Journal of Aridbetween a desert sand dune community and an encroaching

  9. Sky coverage of orbital detectors. Analytical approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diego Casadei

    2005-12-28

    Orbital detectors without pointing capability have to keep their field of view axis laying on their orbital plane, to observe the largest sky fraction. A general approach to estimate the exposure of each sky element for such detectors is a valuable tool in the R&D phase of a project, when the detector characteristics are still to be fixed. An analytical method to estimate the sky exposure is developed, which makes only few very reasonable approximations. The formulae obtained with this method are used to compute the histogram of the sky exposure of a hypothetical gamma-ray detector installed on the ISS. The C++ code used in this example is freely available on the http://cern.ch/casadei/software.html web page.

  10. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-10-31

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. During the third quarter, planning efforts are underway for the next Partnership meeting which will showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks, discuss the methods and analysis underway for assessing geological and terrestrial sequestration potentials. The meeting will conclude with an ASME workshop. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Two key deliverables were completed in the second quarter--a literature review/database to assess the soil carbon on rangelands, and the draft protocols, contracting options for soil carbon trading. The protocols developed for soil carbon trading are unique and provide a key component of the mechanisms that might be used to efficiently sequester GHG and reduce CO{sub 2} concentrations. While no key deliverables were due during the third quarter, progress on other deliverables is noted in the PowerPoint presentations and in this report. A series of meetings held during the second and third quarters have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding carbon sequestration in this region, the need for a holistic approach to meeting energy demands and economic development potential, and the implementation of government programs or a market-based setting for soil C credits. These meetings provide a connection to stakeholders in the region and a basis on which to draw for the DOE PEIS hearings. In the fourth quarter, three deliverables have been completed, some in draft form to be revised and updated to include Wyoming. This is due primarily to some delays in funding to LANL and INEEL and the approval of a supplemental proposal to include Wyoming in much of the GIS data sets, analysis, and related materials. The de

  11. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-06-30

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. During the third quarter, planning efforts are underway for the next Partnership meeting which will showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks, discuss the methods and analysis underway for assessing geological and terrestrial sequestration potentials. The meeting will conclude with an ASME workshop (see attached agenda). The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Two key deliverables were completed in the second quarter--a literature review/database to assess the soil carbon on rangelands, and the draft protocols, contracting options for soil carbon trading. The protocols developed for soil carbon trading are unique and provide a key component of the mechanisms that might be used to efficiently sequester GHG and reduce CO2 concentrations. While no key deliverables were due during the third quarter, progress on other deliverables is noted in the PowerPoint presentations and in this report. A series of meetings held during the second and third quarters have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding carbon sequestration in this region, the need for a holistic approach to meeting energy demands and economic development potential, and the implementation of government programs or a market-based setting for soil C credits. These meetings provide a connection to stakeholders in the region and a basis on which to draw for the DOE PEIS hearings. A third Partnership meeting has been planned for August 04 in Idaho Falls; a preliminary agenda is attached.

  12. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2005-11-01

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO2 utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other DOE regional partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Deliverables for the 7th Quarter reporting period include (1) for the geological efforts: Reports on Technology Needs and Action Plan on the Evaluation of Geological Sinks and Pilot Project Deployment (Deliverables 2 and 3), and Report on the Feasibility of Mineralization Trapping in the Snake River Plain Basin (Deliverable 14); (2) for the terrestrial efforts: Report on the Evaluation of Terrestrial Sinks and a Report of the Best Production Practices for Soil C Sequestration (Deliverables 8 and 15). In addition, the 7th Quarter activities for the Partnership included further development of the proposed activities for the deployment and demonstration phase of the carbon sequestration pilots including geological and terrestrial pilots, expansion of the Partnership to encompass regions and institutions that are complimentary to the steps we have identified, building greater collaborations with industry and stakeholders in the region, contributed to outreach efforts that spanned all partnerships, co-authorship on the Carbon Capture and Separation report, and developed a regional basis to address future energy opportunities in the region. The deliverables and activities are discussed in the following sections and appended to this report. The education and outreach efforts have resulted in a comprehensive plan which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. The public website has been expanded and integrated with the GIS carbon atlas. We have made presentations to stakeholders and policy makers including two tribal sequestration workshops, and made connections to other federal and state agencies concerned with GHG emissions, climate change, and efficient and environmental

  13. Assessing Desert Tortoise Survival and Reproduction at a Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assessing Desert Tortoise Survival and Reproduction at a Wind Energy Facility Near Palm Springs of their habitat are characterized by significant wind and solar energy potential. As a result, the species in the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts have preexisting wind energy facilities dating back over 25 years. One

  14. ORIGINAL PAPER Neoproterozoic diamictite in the Eastern Desert of Egypt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stern, Robert J.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Neoproterozoic diamictite in the Eastern Desert of Egypt and Northern Saudi Arabia in Wadi Kareim and Wadi Mobarak in the Eastern Desert of Egypt and the Nuwaybah formation in NW Saudi and extends from Egypt, Israel, and Jordan to Ethiopia and Yemen. The ANS (Fig. 1a) developed during

  15. Desert Queen Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstruments IncMississippi:DeltaFishDesert Queen Geothermal Area

  16. Desert pavement morphology and dynamics, Big Bend National Park, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmon, Courtney Michelle

    2009-05-15

    29 30 41 42 44 47 48 50 51 52 ix FIGURE 20 Grain size distribution of Study Area 2 sediments, BBNP???. 21 Soil profile cross-sections (10 cm), Study Area 2??????... 22 Grain size distribution of Study Area 3... et al., (2002). Plan view photos show desert pavement from the Cima Volcanic Field in the eastern Mojave Desert, with a 50cm field of view (Wood, 2002). 18 The above study in the Mojave Desert concluded that DP1 has successively more ground...

  17. SkyFuel Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter Battery Technology CoWanpingSilveira deScienceSky EnergySkyFuel Inc

  18. SkyPilot Networks | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter Battery Technology CoWanpingSilveira deScienceSky EnergySkyFuel

  19. Regional Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Regional Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert and Adjacent Areas in Utah, Nevada, and Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  20. Into the Desert: Reflections on the Gulf War 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engel, Jeff

    2015-06-09

    Engel Presents his book, "Into the Desert: Reflections on the Gulf War," a reevaluation of the Gulf War's origins, the war itself, and its regional and long term impact on international relations.

  1. Aeolian depositional landforms of the south eastern Mojave Desert, California 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvis, William Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Remote sensing and photo interpretation techniques are used to describe and map aeolian deposits found along two sediment transport corridors in the south eastern Mojave Desert. The first pathway and associated sand deposits extend eastward from...

  2. Thyroid function in the desert tortoise, Gopherus agassizii 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohel, Kathryn Anne

    1994-01-01

    stimulate nutrient absorption across the intestine (Higgs et al. , 1982; Collie and Ferraris, 1994). However, there is a lack of information on the influence of food intake in most ectotherms, especially reptiles. 1f the desert tortoise resembles fish...

  3. Desert Sunlight is Shining Example of How DOE Loan Guarantees...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Sunlight is Shining Example of How DOE Loan Guarantees Helped Launch Utility-scale PV Solar Market Desert Sunlight is Shining Example of How DOE Loan Guarantees Helped Launch...

  4. Desert Sunlight is Shining Example of How DOE Loan Guarantees...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (EIA) forecasted in 2008 that just 140 MW of total utility-scale PV solar capacity would be installed by 2015. Now we're in 2015 and Desert Sunlight itself represents...

  5. Automated Sky Search Max Doppke (RET)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    of reliable software programs, a quality telescope, and a compatible CCD (charged coupling device) camera. My introductory period was spent working with the `SKY6' astronomy software by Software Bisque, Inc. This software an additional piece of software, called `Orchestrate'. Designed by #12;Software Bisque, it fully integrates

  6. Sublime endeavours : connecting earth to sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kain, Jacob E. (Jacob Evelyn), 1974-

    2000-01-01

    We live in an era in which we come closer everyday to conquering the elements, to a degree that earlier humans could scarcely dream of. Nearly one hundred years ago, we took to the skies, and learned to fly. Today the act ...

  7. Engineering rock mass classifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniawski, Z.T.

    1989-01-01

    This book is a reference on rock mass classification, consolidating into one handy source information widely scattered through the literature. Includes new, unpublished material and case histories. Presents the fundamental concepts of classification schemes and critically appraises their practical application in industrial projects such as tunneling and mining.

  8. Influence of sky conditions on carbon dioxide uptake by forests 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dengel, Sigrid

    2009-01-01

    Sky conditions play an important role in the Earth’s climate system, altering the solar radiation reaching the Earth’s surface and determining the fraction of incoming direct and diffuse radiation. Sky conditions dictate ...

  9. Microwave assisted hard rock cutting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindroth, David P. (Apple Valley, MN); Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN); Blair, James R. (Inver Grove Heights, MN)

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus for the sequential fracturing and cutting of subsurface volume of hard rock (102) in the strata (101) of a mining environment (100) by subjecting the volume of rock to a beam (25) of microwave energy to fracture the subsurface volume of rock by differential expansion; and , then bringing the cutting edge (52) of a piece of conventional mining machinery (50) into contact with the fractured rock (102).

  10. THE BLUE SKY CATASTROPHE ON THE KLEIN BOTTLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Meirong

    THE BLUE SKY CATASTROPHE ON THE KLEIN BOTTLE Weigu Li and Meirong Zhang Department of Mathematics orbit, the so-called blue sky catastrophe. Let's begin with the definition. Definition 1 One-parameter family of vector fields on a compact manifold has a blue sky catastrophe if for all parameter values from

  11. S00906010006 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! 53-0002 53-0890 53-1036 53-0598 53-0860 53-0056 S00906010006 rock check dam S00906010005 rock check dam S00906010007 rock check dam S00903010009 earthen berm S00903010010 earthen berm S00903120003 Channel/swale Check dam Sediment trap/basin Gabion Seed and mulch Cap Established vegetation SWMU boundary

  12. Rock-Around Orbits 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourgeois, Scott K.

    2010-07-14

    , David Hyland Tom Pollock J. Maurice Rojas Head of Department, Dimitris Lagoudas December 2009 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering iii ABSTRACT Rock-Around Orbits. (December 2009) Scott Kenneth Bourgeois, B.S., Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory...] : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 3 4 Compatible Orbits for a Circular Target Orbit (Example 1) : : : : : 8 5 Inclination Bounds Geometry for a Circular Target Orbit : : : : : : : 10 6 GEO and RAO Orbits in the Inertial Frame (Example 1) : : : : : : : 14 7 GEO and RAO Orbits...

  13. Session: Hot Dry Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Duchane, David V.; Ponden, Raymond F.; Brown, Donald W.

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Hot Dry Rock - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''HDR Opportunities and Challenges Beyond the Long Term Flow Test'' by David V. Duchane; ''Start-Up Operations at the Fenton Hill HDR Pilot Plant'' by Raymond F. Ponden; and ''Update on the Long-Term Flow Testing Program'' by Donald W. Brown.

  14. Effects of Land Surface Characteristics on Pedogenesis, Biological Soil Crust Community Diversity, and Ecosystem Functions in a Mojave Desert Piedmont Landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pietrasiak, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    shrub patches and water harvesting in the Negev Desert: theshrub patches and water harvesting in the Negev Desert: the

  15. Geography of urban food access : exploring potential causes of food deserts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cameron, Caitlin

    2012-01-01

    We believe we understand food deserts, but we do not. In the last decade the phenomenon of food deserts has been often discussed, and many solutions are proposed to alleviate food access issues in American cities. However, ...

  16. An Investigation into Early Desert Pastoralism: Excavations at the Camel Site, Negev

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Steven A

    2011-01-01

    architecture in the deserts of the Near East, and for that matter among mobile pastoralists in Eurasia and North Africa

  17. Research news: UC Desert Research and Extension Center celebrates 100 years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meadows, Robin

    2012-01-01

    for low desert biofuel production. Leafy greens and climateyield crops for biofuel production in the Imperial Valley

  18. Glaciation temperatures of convective clouds ingesting desert dust, air pollution and smoke from forest fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Glaciation temperatures of convective clouds ingesting desert dust, air pollution and smoke from observations show that desert dust and heavy air pollution over East Asia have similar ability to glaciate desert dust, air pollution and smoke from forest fires, Geophys. Res. Lett., 38, L21804, doi:10

  19. American Clean Skies Foundation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name:AmbataSkies Foundation Jump to:

  20. Sky Solar Global SA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter Battery Technology CoWanpingSilveira deScienceSky Energy

  1. SolarSkies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEurope GmbH JumpSloughInfraSolarSkies Jump to: navigation,

  2. New Sky Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to: navigation,NationalJersey/Incentives <EnergyOrleansSky Energy Jump

  3. North Sky River | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to:Information 3rd| OpenInformation 9thNorthNewton SchoolNorthSky

  4. Green Skies of Brazil |GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Lowï‚— We want USDOE to vitrify allfromGreenGreen Skies

  5. Iron and Steel Phosphate Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Lime Lithium Magnesium Manganese Mercury Mica Molybdenum Nickel Nitrogen Peat Perlite Phosphate Rock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194 Appendix C--Resource/Reserve Definitions . . . . . . 195 Commodities: Abrasives (Manufactured

  6. Iron and Steel Phosphate Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Mica Molybdenum Nickel Nitrogen Peat Perlite Phosphate Rock Platinum Potash Pumice Quartz Crystal Rare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190 Appendix C--A Resource/Reserve Classification for Minerals

  7. Seeing the sky through Hubble's eye: The COSMOS SkyWalker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Jahnke; S. F. Sanchez; A. Koekemoer

    2006-07-23

    Large, high-resolution space-based imaging surveys produce a volume of data that is difficult to present to the public in a comprehensible way. While megapixel-sized images can still be printed out or downloaded via the World Wide Web, this is no longer feasible for images with 10^9 pixels (e.g., the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys [ACS] images of the Galaxy Evolution from Morphology and SEDs [GEMS] project) or even 10^10 pixels (for the ACS Cosmic Evolution Survey [COSMOS]). We present a Web-based utility called the COSMOS SkyWalker that allows viewing of the huge ACS image data set, even through slow Internet connections. Using standard HTML and JavaScript, the application successively loads only those portions of the image at a time that are currently being viewed on the screen. The user can move within the image by using the mouse or interacting with an overview image. Using an astrometrically registered image for the COSMOS SkyWalker allows the display of calibrated world coordinates for use in science. The SkyWalker "technique" can be applied to other data sets. This requires some customization, notably the slicing up of a data set into small (e.g., 256^2 pixel) subimages. An advantage of the SkyWalker is the use of standard Web browser components; thus, it requires no installation of any software and can therefore be viewed by anyone across many operating systems.

  8. ARM: Gridded (0.25 x 0.25 lat/lon) fractional cloud cover, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave flux over the SGP site.

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Krista Gaustad; Laura Riihimaki

    Gridded (0.25 x 0.25 lat/lon) fractional cloud cover, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave flux over the SGP site.

  9. Photometry from online Digitized Sky Survey Plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bacher; S. Kimeswenger; P. Teutsch

    2005-07-22

    Online Digital Sky Survey (DSS) material is often used to obtain information on newly discovered variable stars for older epochs (e.g. Nova progenitors, flare stars, ...). We present here the results of an investigation of photometry on online digital sky survey material in small fields calibrated by CCD sequences. We compared different source extraction mechanisms and found, that even down near to the sensitivity limit, despite the H-compression used for the online material, photometry with an accuracy better than 0\\fm1 rms is possible on DSS-II. Our investigation shows that the accuracy depends strongly on the source extraction method. The SuperCOSMOS scans, although retrieved with an higher spatial resolution, do not give us better results. The methods and parameters presented here, allow the user to obtain good plate photometry in small fields down to the Schmidt plate survey limits with a few bright CCD calibrators, which may be calibrated with amateur size telescopes. Especially for the events mentioned above, new field photometry for calibration purposes mostly exists, but the progenitors were not measured photometrically before. Also the follow up whether stellar concentrations are newly detected clusters or similar work may be done without using mid size telescopes. The calibration presented here is a "local" one for small fields. We show that this method presented here gives higher accuracies than "global" calibrations of surveys (e.g. GSC-II, SuperCOSMOS and USNO-B)

  10. SkyMine Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joe Jones; Clive Barton; Mark Clayton; Al Yablonsky; David Legere

    2010-09-30

    This Topical Report addresses accomplishments achieved during Phase 1 of the SkyMine{reg_sign} Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project. The primary objectives of this project are to design, construct, and operate a system to capture CO{sub 2} from a slipstream of flue gas from a commercial coal-fired cement kiln, convert that CO{sub 2} to products having commercial value (i.e., beneficial use), show the economic viability of the CO{sub 2} capture and conversion process, and thereby advance the technology to a point of readiness for commercial scale demonstration and proliferation. The project will also substantiate market opportunities for the technology by sales of chemicals into existing markets, and identify opportunities to improve technology performance and reduce costs at commercial scale. The primary objectives of Phase 1 of the project were to elaborate proven SkyMine{reg_sign} process chemistry to commercial pilot-scale operation and complete the preliminary design ('Reference Plant Design') for the pilot plant to be built and operated in Phase 2. Additionally, during Phase 1, information necessary to inform a DOE determination regarding NEPA requirements for the project was developed, and a comprehensive carbon lifecycle analysis was completed. These items were included in the formal application for funding under Phase 2. All Phase 1 objectives were successfully met on schedule and within budget.

  11. SkyMine Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christenson, Norm; Walters, Jerel

    2014-12-31

    This Topical Report addresses accomplishments achieved during Phase 2b of the SkyMine® Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project. The primary objectives of this project are to design, construct, and operate a system to capture CO2 from a slipstream of flue gas from a commercial coal-fired cement kiln, convert that CO2 to products having commercial value (i.e., beneficial use), show the economic viability of the CO2 capture and conversion process, and thereby advance the technology to the point of readiness for commercial scale demonstration and deployment. The overall process is carbon negative, resulting in mineralization of CO2 that would otherwise be released into the atmosphere. The project will also substantiate market opportunities for the technology by sales of chemicals into existing markets, and identify opportunities to improve technology performance and reduce costs at the commercial scale. The project is being conducted in two phases. The primary objectives of Phase 1 were to evaluate proven SkyMine® process chemistry for commercial pilot-scale operation and complete the preliminary design for the pilot plant to be built and operated in Phase 2, complete a NEPA evaluation, and develop a comprehensive carbon life cycle analysis. The objective of Phase 2b was to build the pilot plant to be operated and tested in Phase 2c.

  12. NREL Success Stories - SkyFuel Partnership Reflects Bright Future

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jorgensen, Gary; Gee, Randy

    2013-05-29

    NREL Scientists and SkyFuel share a story about how their partnership has resulted in a revolutionary concentrating solar power technology ReflecTech Mirror Film.

  13. Workshop on hydrology of crystalline basement rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.N. (comp.)

    1981-08-01

    This workshop covered the following subjects: measurements in relatively shallow boreholes; measurement and interpretation of data from deep boreholes; hydrologic properties of crystalline rocks as interpreted by geophysics and field geology; rock mechanics related to hydrology of crystalline rocks; the possible contributions of modeling to the understanding of the hydrology of crystalline rocks; and geochemical interpretations of the hydrology of crystalline rocks. (MHR)

  14. Global observations and spectral characteristics of desert dust and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    characteristics of desert dust and biomass burning scenes · Conclusions and Outlook #12;where Rayleigh R340 Doubling-Adding KNMI Radiative Transfer Model Solar zenith angle = 30° Viewing zenith angle = 0° Surface Model Solar zenith angle = 30° Viewing zenith angle = 0° Surface albedo = 5% Absorbing aerosols

  15. Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    and desert dust observations from GOME and SCIAMACHY · Conclusions and Outlook #12; · Absorbing Aerosol Transfer Model Solar zenith angle = 30° Viewing zenith angle = 0° Surface albedo = 5% #12;Reflectance at TOA with absorbing aerosols Doubling-Adding KNMI Radiative Transfer Model Solar zenith angle = 30

  16. Desert Island Contribution --ASE Journal Software Engineering --A Human Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Gerhard

    Desert Island Contribution -- ASE Journal Software Engineering -- A Human Activity Gerhard Fischer of software engineering? Without a doubt, different people will have very different answers to this question their ideas and visions. Software engineering (especially its upstream activities) is a human-oriented field

  17. The Landscape of Klamath Basin Rock Art

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Robert James

    2012-01-01

    Figure 22. Main rock art panel at QzM-1………………………………………………….31. Special Use Area rock art sites (map)………………………………………….Figure 32. Mod-17 rock art site within Modoc territory (

  18. Oil and Gas CDT Bots in Rocks: Intelligent Rock Deformation for Fault Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Heriot-Watt University, Institute of Petroleum Engineering Supervisory Team · Dr Helen Lewis, Heriot://www.pet.hw.ac.uk/staff-directory/jimsomerville.htm Key Words Nano/Micro sensors; faults; fault zones; geomechanics; rock mechanics; rock deformation-deformed equivalent, a different lab-deformed example and a geomechanical simulation of a fault zone showing permanent

  19. Satellite measurements of the clear-sky greenhouse effect from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LETTERS Satellite measurements of the clear-sky greenhouse effect from tropospheric ozone HELEN M of longer-lived greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide. Here, we analyse spectrally resolved measurements of 0.48±0.14 W m-2 between 45 S and 45 N. This estimate of the clear-sky greenhouse effect from

  20. Definitions of Clear-sky Fluxes and Implications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verma, Abhishek

    2012-02-14

    .2 Clear-sky Fluxes : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 3 2. SATELLITE-INFERRED CLEAR-SKY FLUXES : : : : : : : : : : : : : 5 2.1 CERES Instrument : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 5 2.1.1 CERES... observation systems such as satellite system, radiosonde, solar panels etc. and simulation results from model generated scenarios including climate-model, reanalysis with assimilation system, radiative transfer models, to name a few, have helped...

  1. The Night Sky A Super Full Moon & Meteor Shower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luttermoser, Donald G.

    and the morning of August 13. The moon phase is a thin crescent that night leaving a very dark sky, but can appear anywhere in the sky. The new moon in August will occur on the 14th , thus aiding with dark for our Astronomy open houses can be found on the web at http

  2. Shotgun cartridge rock breaker

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruzzi, Peter L. (Eagan, NM); Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN)

    1995-01-01

    A rock breaker uses shotgun cartridges or other firearm ammunition as the explosive charge at the bottom of a drilled borehole. The breaker includes a heavy steel rod or bar, a gun with a firing chamber for the ammunition which screws onto the rod, a long firing pin running through a central passage in the rod, and a firing trigger mechanism at the external end of the bar which strikes the firing pin to fire the cartridge within the borehole. A tubular sleeve surround the main body of the rod and includes slits the end to allow it to expand. The rod has a conical taper at the internal end against which the end of the sleeve expands when the sleeve is forced along the rod toward the taper by a nut threaded onto the external end of the rod. As the sleeve end expands, it pushes against the borehole and holds the explosive gasses within, and also prevents the breaker from flying out of the borehole. The trigger mechanism includes a hammer with a slot and a hole for accepting a drawbar or drawpin which, when pulled by a long cord, allows the cartridge to be fired from a remote location.

  3. Monitoring the Sky with the Prototype All-Sky Imager on the LWA1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Obenberger, K S; Hartman, J M; Clarke, T E; Dowell, J; Dubois, A; Dubois, D; Henning, P A; Lazio, J; Michalak, S; Schinzel, F K

    2015-01-01

    We present a description of the Prototype All-Sky Imager (PASI), a backend correlator and imager of the first station of the Long Wavelength Array (LWA1). PASI cross-correlates a live stream of 260 dual-polarization dipole antennas of the LWA1, creates all-sky images, and uploads them to the LWA-TV website in near real-time. PASI has recorded over 13,000 hours of all-sky images at frequencies between 10 and 88 MHz creating opportunities for new research and discoveries. We also report rate density and pulse energy density limits on transients at 38, 52, and 74 MHz, for pulse widths of 5 s. We limit transients at those frequencies with pulse energy densities of $>2.7\\times 10^{-23}$, $>1.1\\times 10^{-23}$, and $>2.8\\times 10^{-23}$ J m$^{-2}$ Hz$^{-1}$ to have rate densities $<1.2\\times10^{-4}$, $<5.6\\times10^{-4}$, and $<7.2\\times10^{-4}$ yr$^{-1}$ deg$^{-2}$

  4. Dramatic Demand Reduction In The Desert Southwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boehm, Robert; Hsieh, Sean; Lee, Joon; Baghzouz, Yahia; Cross, Andrew; Chatterjee, Sarah

    2015-07-06

    This report summarizes a project that was funded to the University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV), with subcontractors Pulte Homes and NV Energy. The project was motivated by the fact that locations in the Desert Southwest portion of the US demonstrate very high peak electrical demands, typically in the late afternoons in the summer. These high demands often require high priced power to supply the needs, and the large loads can cause grid supply problems. An approach was proposed through this contact that would reduce the peak electrical demands to an anticipated 65% of what code-built houses of the similar size would have. It was proposed to achieve energy reduction through four approaches applied to a development of 185 homes in northwest part of Las Vegas named Villa Trieste. First, the homes would all be highly energy efficient. Secondly, each house would have a PV array installed on it. Third, an advanced demand response technique would be developed to allow the resident to have some control over the energy used. Finally, some type of battery storage would be used in the project. Pulte Homes designed the houses. The company considered initial cost vs. long-term savings and chose options that had relatively short paybacks. HERS (Home Energy Rating Service) ratings for the homes are approximately 43 on this scale. On this scale, code-built homes rate at 100, zero energy homes rate a 0, and Energy Star homes are 85. In addition a 1.764 Wp (peak Watt) rated PV array was used on each house. This was made up of solar shakes that were in visual harmony with the roofing material used. A demand response tool was developed to control the amount of electricity used during times of peak demand. While demand response techniques have been used in the utility industry for some time, this particular approach is designed to allow the customer to decide the degree of participation in the response activity. The temperature change in the residence can be decided by the residents by adjusting settings. In a sense the customer can choose between greater comfort and greater money savings during demand response circumstances. Finally a battery application was to be considered. Initially it was thought that a large battery (probably a sodium-sulfur type) would be installed. However, after the contract was awarded, it was determined that a single, centrally-located battery system would not be appropriate for many reasons, including that with the build out plan there would not be any location to put it. The price had risen substantially since the budget for the project was put together. Also, that type of battery has to be kept hot all the time, but its use was only sought for summer operation. Hence, individual house batteries would be used, and these are discussed at the end of this report. Many aspects of the energy use for climate control in selected houses were monitored before residents moved in. This was done both to understand the magnitude of the energy flows but also to have data that could be compared to the computer simulations. The latter would be used to evaluate various aspects of our plan. It was found that good agreement existed between actual energy use and computed energy use. Hence, various studies were performed via simulations. Performance simulations showed the impact on peak energy usage between a code built house of same size and shape compared to the Villa Trieste homes with and without the PV arrays on the latter. Computations were also used to understand the effect of varying orientations of the houses in this typical housing development, including the effect of PV electrical generation. Energy conservation features of the Villa Trieste homes decreased the energy use during peak times (as well as all others), but the resulting decreased peak occurred at about the same time as the code-built houses. Consideration of the PV generation decreases the grid energy use further during daylight hours, but did not extend long enough many days to decrease the peak. Hence, a demand response approach, as planned, was needed. With p

  5. Desert Sunlight Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstruments IncMississippi:DeltaFishDesert Queen Geothermal

  6. Desert View Highlands, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstruments IncMississippi:DeltaFishDesert Queen

  7. Global horizontal irradiance clear sky models : implementation and analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Hansen, Clifford W.; Reno, Matthew J.

    2012-03-01

    Clear sky models estimate the terrestrial solar radiation under a cloudless sky as a function of the solar elevation angle, site altitude, aerosol concentration, water vapor, and various atmospheric conditions. This report provides an overview of a number of global horizontal irradiance (GHI) clear sky models from very simple to complex. Validation of clear-sky models requires comparison of model results to measured irradiance during clear-sky periods. To facilitate validation, we present a new algorithm for automatically identifying clear-sky periods in a time series of GHI measurements. We evaluate the performance of selected clear-sky models using measured data from 30 different sites, totaling about 300 site-years of data. We analyze the variation of these errors across time and location. In terms of error averaged over all locations and times, we found that complex models that correctly account for all the atmospheric parameters are slightly more accurate than other models, but, primarily at low elevations, comparable accuracy can be obtained from some simpler models. However, simpler models often exhibit errors that vary with time of day and season, whereas the errors for complex models vary less over time.

  8. Thermal Performance of Building Envelope in Very Hot Dry Desert Region in Egypt (Toshky) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khalil, M. H.; Sheble, S. S.; Helal, M. A.; El-Demirdash, M.

    2010-01-01

    of Building Envelope in Very Hot Dry Desert Region in Egypt (Toshky Region) S.S. Sheble* M. H. Khalil M. A. Helal Prof. M. El- Demirdash3 Asso. Prof. Building Physics Institute (HBRC) Asso. Prof. Building Physics Institute (HBRC) Prof. & head... of Building Physics Institute (HBRC) Prof. & Chairman of HBRC Housing & Building National Research Center (HBRC) Cairo, Egypt * Author ABSTRACT Toshky region is a desert region located in the south east of Egyptian western desert...

  9. SNAP sky background at the north ecliptic pole

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldering, Greg

    2002-07-01

    I summarize the extant direct and indirect data on the sky background SNAP will see at the North Ecliptic Pole over the wavelength range 0.4 < {lambda} < 1.7 {micro}m. At the spatial resolution of SNAP the sky background due to stars and galaxies is resolved, so the only source considered is zodiacal light. Several models are explored to provide interpolation in wavelength between the broadband data from HST and COBE observations. I believe the input data are now established well enough that the accuracy of the sky background presented here is sufficient for SNAP simulations, and that it will stand up to scrutiny by reviewers.

  10. The variable sky of deep synoptic surveys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridgway, Stephen T.; Matheson, Thomas; Mighell, Kenneth J.; Olsen, Knut A. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85725 (United States); Howell, Steve B., E-mail: ridgway@noao.edu [NASA Ames Research Center, P.O. Box 1, M/S 244-30, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2014-11-20

    The discovery of variable and transient sources is an essential product of synoptic surveys. The alert stream will require filtering for personalized criteria—a process managed by a functionality commonly described as a Broker. In order to understand quantitatively the magnitude of the alert generation and Broker tasks, we have undertaken an analysis of the most numerous types of variable targets in the sky—Galactic stars, quasi-stellar objects (QSOs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and asteroids. It is found that the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will be capable of discovering ?10{sup 5} high latitude (|b| > 20°) variable stars per night at the beginning of the survey. (The corresponding number for |b| < 20° is orders of magnitude larger, but subject to caveats concerning extinction and crowding.) However, the number of new discoveries may well drop below 100 per night within less than one year. The same analysis applied to GAIA clarifies the complementarity of the GAIA and LSST surveys. Discovery of AGNs and QSOs are each predicted to begin at ?3000 per night and decrease by 50 times over four years. Supernovae are expected at ?1100 per night, and after several survey years will dominate the new variable discovery rate. LSST asteroid discoveries will start at >10{sup 5} per night, and if orbital determination has a 50% success rate per epoch, they will drop below 1000 per night within two years.

  11. Fire Impacts on the Mojave Desert Ecosystem: Literature Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenstermaker Lynn

    2012-01-01

    The Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) is located within the Mojave Desert, which is the driest region in North America. Precipitation on the NNSS varies from an annual average of 130 millimeters (mm; 5.1 inches) with a minimum of 47 mm (1.9 inches) and maximum of 328 mm (12.9 inches) over the past 15 year period to an annual average of 205 mm (8.1 inches) with an annual minimum of 89 mm (3.5 inches) and maximum of 391 mm (15.4 inches) for the same time period; for a Frenchman Flat location at 970 meters (m; 3182 feet) and a Pahute Mesa location at 1986 m (6516 feet), respectively. The combination of aridity and temperature extremes has resulted in sparsely vegetated basins (desert shrub plant communities) to moderately vegetated mountains (mixed coniferous forest plant communities); both plant density and precipitation increase with increasing elevation. Whereas some plant communities have evolved under fire regimes and are dependent upon fire for seed germination, plant communities within the Mojave Desert are not dependent on a fire regime and therefore are highly impacted by fire (Brown and Minnich, 1986; Brooks, 1999). As noted by Johansen (2003) natural range fires are not prevalent in the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts because there is not enough vegetation present (too many shrub interspaces) to sustain a fire. Fire research and hence publications addressing fires in the Southwestern United States (U.S.) have therefore focused on forest, shrub-steppe and grassland fires caused by both natural and anthropogenic ignition sources. In the last few decades, however, invasion of mid-elevation shrublands by non-native Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens and Bromus tectorum (Hunter, 1991) have been highly correlated with increased fire frequency (Brooks and Berry, 2006; Brooks and Matchett, 2006). Coupled with the impact of climate change, which has already been shown to be playing a role in increased forest fires (Westerling et al., 2006), it is likely that the fire frequency will further increase in the Mojave Desert (Knapp 1998; Smith et al., 1987; Smith et al., 2000).

  12. Understanding the 30-year Barbados desert dust record Natalie M. Mahowald,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahowald, Natalie

    (such as new sources due to desertification or land use) may be difficult to distinguish from: Aerosols (0305); KEYWORDS: mineral aerosols, desert dust, North Africa, desertification Citation: Mahowald

  13. South African night sky brightness during high aerosol epochs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winkler, Hartmut; Marang, Fred

    2014-01-01

    Sky conditions in the remote, dry north-western interior of South Africa are now the subject of considerable interest in view of the imminent construction of numerous solar power plants in this area. Furthermore, the part of this region in which the core of the SKA is to be located (which includes SALT) has been declared an Astronomical Advantage Zone, for which sky brightness monitoring will now be mandatory. In this project we seek to characterise the sky brightness profile under a variety of atmospheric conditions. Key factors are of course the lunar phase and altitude, but in addition the sky brightness is also significantly affected by the atmospheric aerosol loading, as that influences light beam scattering. In this paper we chose to investigate the sky characteristics soon after the Mount Pinatubo volcanic eruption in 1991, which resulted in huge ash masses reaching the stratosphere (where they affected solar irradiance for several years). We re-reduced photometric sky measurements from the South Afric...

  14. Rock Art in the Public Trust: Managing Prehistoric Rock Art on Federal Land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hale, John Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Stories in Stone: Rock Art Pictures by Early Americans. NewIntroduction. ? Coso Rock Art: a New Perspective, edited byIn The Archaeology of Rock Art,? edited by Christopher

  15. Summary - Hot Dry Rock R&D Strategies and Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tennyson, George P..

    1989-03-21

    In geothermal energy technology, the hydrothermal systems rely on volcanic hot rocks being fortuitously co-located with an adequate supply of natural ground water, usually at some considerable depth within the earth. This represents essentially two accidents in the same place, and the occurrence is relatively rare. Yellowstone Park and the desert valley of southern California are the most noteworthy US. examples. Since the heat is the energy needed, if we could just get the water down to it and back. Well, that's what is being done with the hot dry rock program. A well is drilled down to where there is adequate heat in the rocks. The well is then pressurized until the rock fractures creating what amounts to a reservoir full of hot, shattered rock. Finally, a well is drilled into the reservoir and water is pumped in one well, heated by the rock, and taken out through the other well at useful temperatures and pressures. We are getting ready to run significant long-term flow tests at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock site west of Los Alamos, New Mexico. We expect the operational information to provide the data to forecast the energy life of the wells as a production facility. This kind of resource is much more common than regular geothermal resources. Robert H. Hendron described the Long Term Flow Test and reservoir studies for which the project is preparing. A shortfall of available funding has slowed preparations, delaying the start of that test. The test is planning to gather data for more definitive reservoir modeling with energy availability or reservoir lifetime of primary interest. Other interests include geochemistry and tracer studies, microseismic response, water requirements and flow impedance which relates directly to the pumping power required. Progress has been made in modeling studies, chemically reactive tracer techniques, and in improvements in acoustic or microseismic event analysis. Donald W. Brown discussed reservoir modeling as it relates to production management of the HDR well. For wells which are fracture dominated rather than matrix-permeability controlled, a knowledge of the pressure-dependent permeability of the interconnected system of natural joints (or pre-existing fractures is critical to long-term power production from the wells) through optimized pressure management. It was mentioned that a knowledge of the pressure-dependent joint permeability could aid in designing more appropriate secondary recovery strategies in petroleum reservoirs, or reinjection I procedures of geothermal reservoirs. Dr. Bruce A. Robinson discussed the development of fluid flow and transport models for simulation of HDR geothermal reservoirs. These models are also expected to provide accurate predictions of long-term behavior and help in the development of strategies for reservoir improvement and operation. Two approaches were discussed. The discrete fracture approach is based on a random fracture network subject to prescribed statistical properties of the fracture set. It is used to simulate steady state fluid flow and solute transport. The other approach used the continuum approximation. This type of model is appropriate when the reservoir consists of many interconnected fractures, as is the case at Fenton Hill.

  16. Geologic evolution of Iron Mountain, central Mojave Desert, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boettcher, Stefan S.; Walker, J. Douglas

    1993-04-01

    Geologic mapping, structural analysis, petrologic study, and U-Pb geochronology at Iron Mountain, 20 km southwest of Barstow, California, place important constraints on the paleogeographic affinities of metasedimentary rocks in the area and provide...

  17. Evaluation of Clear Sky Models for Satellite-Based Irradiance Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sengupta, M.; Gotseff, P.

    2013-12-01

    This report describes an intercomparison of three popular broadband clear sky solar irradiance model results with measured data, as well as satellite-based model clear sky results compared to measured clear sky data. The authors conclude that one of the popular clear sky models (the Bird clear sky model developed by Richard Bird and Roland Hulstrom) could serve as a more accurate replacement for current satellite-model clear sky estimations. Additionally, the analysis of the model results with respect to model input parameters indicates that rather than climatological, annual, or monthly mean input data, higher-time-resolution input parameters improve the general clear sky model performance.

  18. Ecological controls on water-cycle response to climate variability in deserts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scanlon, Bridget R.

    sites for waste disposal (4). For example, the proposed U.S. repository to isolate highly radioactive are critical for water resources and waste disposal in deserts. Desert environments are particularly vulnerable in response to elevated winter precipitation reduced soil water storage to half of that in a nonvegetated

  19. Deserts are water-controlled ecosystems characterized by high ambient temperature (Ta), intense solar radiation,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Jos. B.

    , it can be argued that rates of energy flow through desert ecosystems are controlled by available water dominated by, the availability of water in desert ecosystems. Animals that occupy arid climes face the challenge of meeting their daily energy and water requirements in an environment that, on average, provides

  20. Microbial Origin of Desert Varnish Abstract. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analyse,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    Reports Microbial Origin of Desert Varnish Abstract. Scanning electron microscopy and energy bacteria support a microbial originfor manganese-) films. Varnish microbes can be cultured and produce environments appear to be a product of microbial activity. Desert varnish is a natural coating dominatedby

  1. REGULAR ARTICLE Impact of biological soil crusts and desert plants on soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    REGULAR ARTICLE Impact of biological soil crusts and desert plants on soil microfaunal community plants and biological soil crusts on desert soil nematode and protozoan abundance and community composition. In the first experiment, biological soil crusts were removed by physical trampling. Treatments

  2. Neoproterozoic tectonothermal evolution of the Central Eastern Desert, Egypt: a slow velocity tectonic process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, Harald

    Neoproterozoic tectonothermal evolution of the Central Eastern Desert, Egypt: a slow velocity, University of Assiut, Egypt Received 10 January 2001; received in revised form 24 October 2001; accepted 25 in the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt is constraint by 40 Ar/39 Ar ages of hornblende and muscovite from Meatiq

  3. Desert Shores, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstruments IncMississippi:DeltaFishDesert Queen Geothermal AreaShores,

  4. Desert Hills, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9) WindGridDeepiSolar and Wind JumpEnergy|Desert

  5. LPO5-002-Proj-Poster-PV-DesertSunlight

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties - WAPA PublicLED ADOPTION REPORT LED8-14 LMBLUE MOUNTAINTo boostDESERT

  6. Iron and Steel Phosphate Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Kyanite Lead Lime Lithium Magnesium Manganese Mercury Mica Molybdenum Nickel Nitrogen Peat Perlite Graphite Peat Sulfur Beryllium Gypsum Perlite Talc Bismuth Hafnium Phosphate Rock Tantalum Boron Helium on the USGS--the Federal source for science about the Earth, its natural and living resources, natural hazards

  7. Iron and Steel Phosphate Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Kyanite Lead Lime Lithium Magnesium Manganese Mercury Mica Molybdenum Nickel Nitrogen Peat Perlite Graphite Peat Sulfur Beryllium Gypsum Perlite Talc Bismuth Hafnium Phosphate Rock Tantalum Boron Helium information on the USGS--the Federal source for science about the Earth, its natural and living resources

  8. Nitrate dynamics in the soil and unconfined aquifer in arid groundwater coupled ecosystems of the Monte desert, Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    of the Monte desert, Argentina J. N. Aranibar,1,2 P. E. Villagra,1,3 M. L. Gomez,1 E. Jobbágy,4 M. Quiroga,1 R desert, Argentina, J. Geophys. Res., 116, G04015, doi:10.1029/2010JG001618. 1. Introduction [2] Drylands desert, Argentina, shallow groundwater is exploited by deep rooted trees, increasing primary productivity

  9. Andean uplift and climate evolution in the southern Atacama Desert deduced from geomorphology and supergene alunite-group minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiners, Peter W.

    Andean uplift and climate evolution in the southern Atacama Desert deduced from geomorphology 2010 Available online 18 October 2010 Editor: T.M. Harrison Keywords: Atacama Desert Andes uplift Atacama Desert had been uplifted as early as the late Eocene and, thus, significantly prior

  10. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 329: Area 22 Desert Rock Airstrip Fuel Spill with Errata Sheet, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navarro Nevada Environmental Services

    2010-08-10

    In Appendix 0, Use Restriction (UR) Form, the drawing of the use restricted area shows the incorrect coordinates for the use restricted area, the coordinates on the drawing do not match the approved UR Form. The coordinates have been verified and this Errata Sheet replaces the drawing of the use restricted area with an aerial photo showing the use restricted area and the correct coordinates that match the approved UR Form.

  11. ArchRock Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Arch Rock is a systems and software company that builds products and technology for wireless sensor networks. References: ArchRock Corporation1 This article is a stub. You can...

  12. Lichen: the challenge for rock art conservation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dandridge, Debra Elaine

    2007-04-25

    This study investigates the effects that lichens have on rock surfaces in which ancient rock art (petroglyphs and pictographs) may be found. The study area includes four sites in the United States: one quartzite site in ...

  13. When dunes move together, structure of deserts emerges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Génois, Mathieu; Pont, Sylvain Courrech du; Grégoire, Guillaume

    2012-01-01

    Crescent shaped barchan dunes are highly mobile dunes that are usually presented as a prototypical model of sand dunes. Although they have been theoretically shown to be unstable when considered separately, it is well known that they form large assemblies in desert. Collisions of dunes have been proposed as a mechanism to redistribute sand between dunes and prevent the formation of heavily large dunes, resulting in a stabilizing effect in the context of a dense barchan field. Yet, no models are able to explain the spatial structures of dunes observed in deserts. Here, we use an agent-based model with elementary rules of sand redistribution during collisions to access the full dynamics of very large barchan dune fields. Consequently, stationnary, out of equilibrium states emerge. Trigging the dune field density by a sand load/lost ratio, we show that large dune fields exhibit two assymtotic regimes: a dilute regime, where sand dune nucleation is needed to maintain a dune field, and a dense regime, where dune c...

  14. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    42) ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON 1961 Marine Biological. McKeman, Director ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1961--Fisheries No. 421 Washington, D. C. April 1962 #12;Rock Island Dam, Columbia River, Washington ii #12;CONTENTS

  15. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1959 :y .iiJA/i-3ri ^' WUUUi. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1959 by Paul D. Zimmer, Clifton and observations 10 Summary 13 #12;#12;ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON

  16. Annual Fish Passage Report -Rock Island Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965 By Paul D. Zimmer L. McKeman, Director Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965;#12;Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965 By PAUL D. ZIMMER, Fishery

  17. The Palomar-Quest Digital Synoptic Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. G. Djorgovski; C. Baltay; A. A. Mahabal; A. J. Drake; R. Williams; D. Rabinowitz; M. J. Graham; C. Donalek; E. Glikman; A. Bauer; R. Scalzo; N. Ellman; J. Jerke

    2008-01-21

    We describe briefly the Palomar-Quest (PQ) digital synoptic sky survey, including its parameters, data processing, status, and plans. Exploration of the time domain is now the central scientific and technological focus of the survey. To this end, we have developed a real-time pipeline for detection of transient sources. We describe some of the early results, and lessons learned which may be useful for other, similar projects, and time-domain astronomy in general. Finally, we discuss some issues and challenges posed by the real-time analysis and scientific exploitation of massive data streams from modern synoptic sky surveys.

  18. CO2 EFFECTS ON MOJAVE DESERT PLANT INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. A. DEFALCO; G. C. FERNANDEZ; S. D. SMITH; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01

    Seasonal and interannual droughts characteristic of deserts have the potential to modify plant interactions as atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations continue to rise. At the Nevada Desert FACE (free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment) facility in the northern Mojave Desert, the effects of elevated atmospheric C02 (550 vs. ambient {approx}360 {micro}mol mol{sup -1}) on plant interactions were examined during two years of high and low rainfall. Results suggest that CO{sub 2} effects on the interaction between native species and their understory herbs are dependent on the strength of competition when rainfall is plentiful, but are unimportant during annual drought. Seasonal rainfall for 1999 was 23% the long-term average for the area, and neither elevated CO{sub 2} nor the low production of herbaceous neighbors had an effect on relative growth rate (RGR, d{sup -1}) and reproductive effort (RE, number of flowers g{sup -1}) for Achnatherum hymenoides (early season perennial C{sub 3} grass), Pleuraphis rigida (late season perennial C{sub 4} grass), and Larrea tridentata (evergreen C{sub 3} shrub). In contrast, 1998 received 213% the average rainfall. Consequently, the decrease in RGR and increase in RE for Achnatherum, whose period of growth overlaps directly with that of its neighbors, was exaggerated at elevated CO{sub 2}. However, competitive effects of neighbors on Eriogonum trichopes (a winter annual growing in shrub interspaces), Pleuraphis and Larrea were not affected by elevated CO{sub 2}, and possible explanations are discussed. Contrary to expectations, the invasive annual neighbor Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens had little influence on target plant responses because densities in 1998 and 1999 at this site were well below those found in other studies where it has negatively affected perennial plant growth. The extent that elevated CO{sub 2} reduces the performance of Achnatherum in successive years to cause its loss from the plant community depends more on future pressure from herbaceous neighbors and less on the extent that CO{sub 2} enhances Achnatherum growth during periods of severe drought.

  19. Biotic Processes Regulating the Carbon Balance of Desert Ecosystems - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nowak, Robert S; Smith, Stanley D; Evans, Dave; Ogle, Kiona; Fenstermaker, Lynn

    2012-12-13

    Our results from the 10-year elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration study at the Nevada Desert FACE (Free-air CO{sub 2} Enrichment) Facility (NDFF) indicate that the Mojave Desert is a dynamic ecosystem with the capacity to respond quickly to environmental changes. The Mojave Desert ecosystem is accumulating carbon (C), and over the 10-year experiment, C accumulation was significantly greater under elevated [CO{sub 2}] than under ambient, despite great fluctuations in C inputs from year to year and even apparent reversals in which [CO{sub 2}] treatment had greater C accumulations.

  20. Atmospheric ozone and colors of the Antarctic twilight sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee Jr., Raymond L.

    Atmospheric ozone and colors of the Antarctic twilight sky Raymond L. Lee, Jr.,1, * Wolfgang Meyer absorption at longer wavelengths by ozone's Chappuis bands. Because stratospheric ozone is greatly depleted correlations between ozone concentration and twilight colors. We also used a spectroradiometer at a midlatitude

  1. The Night Sky Earth Farthest from Sun in July

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luttermoser, Donald G.

    The Night Sky Earth Farthest from Sun in July Although some may mistakenly believe it is the Earth's distance from the Sun that creates the seasons, we are actually farthest from the Sun in early July during summer. This year, the Earth reaches the point when it is most distant from the Sun, the aphelion of its

  2. Hot Dry Rock; Geothermal Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1990-01-01

    The commercial utilization of geothermal energy forms the basis of the largest renewable energy industry in the world. More than 5000 Mw of electrical power are currently in production from approximately 210 plants and 10 000 Mw thermal are used in direct use processes. The majority of these systems are located in the well defined geothermal generally associated with crustal plate boundaries or hot spots. The essential requirements of high subsurface temperature with huge volumes of exploitable fluids, coupled to environmental and market factors, limit the choice of suitable sites significantly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) concept at any depth originally offered a dream of unlimited expansion for the geothermal industry by relaxing the location constraints by drilling deep enough to reach adequate temperatures. Now, after 20 years intensive work by international teams and expenditures of more than $250 million, it is vital to review the position of HDR in relation to the established geothermal industry. The HDR resource is merely a body of rock at elevated temperatures with insufficient fluids in place to enable the heat to be extracted without the need for injection wells. All of the major field experiments in HDR have shown that the natural fracture systems form the heat transfer surfaces and that it is these fractures that must be for geothermal systems producing from naturally fractured formations provide a basis for directing the forthcoming but, equally, they require accepting significant location constraints on HDR for the time being. This paper presents a model HDR system designed for commercial operations in the UK and uses production data from hydrothermal systems in Japan and the USA to demonstrate the reservoir performance requirements for viable operations. It is shown that these characteristics are not likely to be achieved in host rocks without stimulation processes. However, the long term goal of artificial geothermal systems developed by systematic engineering procedures at depth may still be attained if high temperature sites with extensive fracturing are developed or exploited. [DJE -2005

  3. Mountain Sheep in the Sky: Orion's Belt in Great Basin Mythology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowler, Catherine S

    1995-01-01

    2, pp. 146-152 (1995). Mountain Sheep in the Sky: Orion'sNevada, Reno, NV 89557-0006. Mountain Sheep in the Sky is ain the great himt for the Mountain Sheep. Muhwinti, Leader (

  4. Annual meeting of Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership to be held Oct. 28, 29 | ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ... Annual meeting of Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership to be held ... meeting of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership to be held ... science policy and technology of carbon capture and storage (CCS). Panels ...

  5. Big Bang Day : Physics Rocks

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Is particle physics the new rock 'n' roll? The fundamental questions about the nature of the universe that particle physics hopes to answer have attracted the attention of some very high profile and unusual fans. Alan Alda, Ben Miller, Eddie Izzard, Dara O'Briain and John Barrowman all have interests in this branch of physics. Brian Cox - CERN physicist, and former member of 90's band D:Ream, tracks down some very well known celebrity enthusiasts and takes a light-hearted look at why this subject can appeal to all of us.

  6. Post Rock | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2, Blue MountainSchoolPrairiePonder,Abbey SchoolS AOakRock

  7. Discovery and geology of the Desert Peak geothermal field: a case history. Bulletin 97

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benoit, W.R.; Hiner, J.E.; Forest, R.T.

    1982-09-01

    A case history of the exploration, development (through 1980), and geology of the Desert Peak geothermal field is presented. Sections on geochemistry, geophysics, and temperature-gradient drilling are included.

  8. From Industrial Garden to Food Desert: Unearthing the Root Structure of Urban Agriculture in Oakland, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClintock, Nathan

    2008-01-01

    A Theory of Agro-Industrial Development. New York: BasilSERIES 2007-2008.32 From Industrial Garden to Food Desert:I demonstrate how flows of industrial capital and racialized

  9. Food deserts and access to fresh food in low-income San Diego

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puhl, Emily Theresa

    2011-01-01

    R. Kaufman (2003) “Exploring Food Purchase Behavior of Low-Do the Poor Still Pay More? Food Price Variations in Largeand Pavan Yadav. 2008. “Beyond Food Deserts: Measuring and

  10. Ecohydrological Analysis of the Transport of Nitrate and Ammonium in Sandy Desert Soils in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scanlan, Julie Marie

    2012-01-01

    of nitrate beneath desert soils. Science 302:1021-1024. DOI:deposition on vegetation and soils in Joshua Tree NationalAndraski B.J. (1997) Soil-water movement under natural-site

  11. Observed 20th century desert dust variability: impact on climate and biogeochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the 30-year Barbados desert dust record, J.tration data observed at Barbados (Prospero and Lamb, 2003)on the shorter in situ Barbados concentration data (1968 to

  12. MRF Technical Note # 49 Can desert dust explain the anomalous greenhouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    MRF Technical Note # 49 Can desert dust explain the anomalous greenhouse effect observed over greenhouse effect observed over the Sahara during July 2003 revealed by GERB/UM intercomparisons? Jim M

  13. VP of Transmission System Asset Management for Desert Southwest Region (Maintenance Manager)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    (See Frequently Asked Questions for more information). Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration Desert Southwest Region Maintenance (G5000) 615 S. 43rd Avenue Phoenix, AZ 85009...

  14. Sites with Holocene dung deposits in the Eastern Desert of Egypt: Visited by herders?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marinova, Elena

    Sites with Holocene dung deposits in the Eastern Desert of Egypt: Visited by herders? V. Linseele a by the Belgian Middle Egypt Prehistoric Project of Leuven University under the direction of P.M. Vermeersch

  15. Long-term insights into the influence of precipitation on community dynamics in desert rodents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, James H.

    for ecosystem dynamics. DOI: 10.1644/09-MAMM-S-142.1. Key words: consumer dynamics, desertification, desert ecosystems (Easterling et al. 2000), and desertification (Van Auken 2000). The dynamics of small mammals

  16. AN EMPIRICAL METHOD FOR ESTIMATING THE THERMAL RADIANCE OF CLEAR SKIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdahl, Paul

    2012-01-01

    exposed to the sky. thermal Solar energy applications ofSolar Energy AN EMPIRICAL METHOD FOR ESTIMATING THE THERMAL

  17. Rock Classification in Organic Shale Based on Petrophysical and Elastic Rock Properties Calculated from Well Logs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aranibar Fernandez, Alvaro A

    2015-01-05

    Organic Content (TOC), fluid saturation, volumetric concentrations of mineral constituents, and elastic properties facilitated identification of different rock classes, using an unsupervised artificial neural network. A good rock classification technique...

  18. Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  19. Clear sky atmosphere at cm-wavelengths from climatology data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lew, Bartosz

    2015-01-01

    We utilise ground-based, balloon-born and satellite climatology data to reconstruct site and season-dependent vertical profiles of precipitable water vapour (PWV). We use these profiles to numerically solve radiative transfer through the atmosphere, and derive atmospheric brightness temperature ($T_{\\rm atm}$) and optical depth ($\\tau$) at the centimetre wavelengths. We validate the reconstruction by comparing the model column PWV, with photometric measurements of PWV, performed in the clear sky conditions towards the Sun. Based on the measurements, we devise a selection criteria to filter the climatology data to match the PWV levels to the expectations of the clear sky conditions. We apply the reconstruction to the location of the Polish 32-metre radio telescope, and characterise $T_{\\rm atm}$ and $\\tau$ year-round, at selected frequencies. We also derive the zenith distance dependence for these parameters, and discuss shortcomings of using planar, single-layer, and optically thin atmospheric model approxima...

  20. The First Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abazajian, Kevork N; Agüeros, Marcel A; Allam, Sahar S; Anderson, Scott F; Annis, James; Bahcall, Neta A; Baldry, Ivan K; Bastian, Steven; Berlind, Andreas A; Bernardi, Mariangela; Blanton, Michael R; Blythe, Norman; Bochanski, John J; Boroski, William N; Brewington, Howard; Briggs, John W; Brinkmann, J; Brunner, Robert J; Budavari, Tamas; Carey, Larry N; Carr, Michael A; Castander, F J; Chiu, Kuenley; Collinge, Matthew J; Connolly, A J; Covey, Kevin R; Csabai, Istvan; Dodelson, Scott; Doi, Mamoru; Dong, Feng; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Evans, Michael L; Fan, Xiaohui; Feldman, Paul D; Finkbeiner, Douglas P; Friedman, Scott D; Frieman, Joshua A; Fukugita, Masataka; Gal, Roy R; Gillespie, Bruce; Glazebrook, Karl; Gonzalez, Carlos F; Gray, Jim; Grebel, Eva K; Grodnicki, Lauren; Gunn, James E; Gurbani, Vijay K; Hall, Patrick B; Hao, Lei; Harbeck, Daniel; Harris, Frederick H; Harris, Hugh C; Harvanek, Michael J; Hawley, Suzanne L; Heckman, Timothy M; Helmboldt, J F; Hendry, John S; Hennessy, Gregory S; Hindsley, Robert B; Hogg, David W; Holmgren, Donald; Holtzman, Jon A; Homer, Lee; Hui, Lam; Ichikawa, Shin-ichi; Ichikawa, Takashi; Inkmann, John P; Ivezic, Z; Jester, Sebastian; Johnston, David E; Jordan, Beatrice; Jordan, Wendell P; Jorgensen, Anders M; Juric, Mario; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Kent, Stephen M; Kleinman, S J; Knapp, G R; Kniazev, Alexei Yu; Kron, Richard G; Krzesinski, Jurek; Kunszt, Peter Z; Kuropatkin, Nickolai; Lamb, Donald Q; Lampeitl, Hubert; Laubscher, Bryan E; Lee, Brian C; Leger, R French; Li No Lan; Lidz, Adam; Lin, Huan; Loh Yeong Shang; Long, Daniel C; Loveday, Jon; Lupton, Robert H; Malik, Tanu; Margon, Bruce; McGehee, Peregrine M; McKay, Timothy A; Meiksin, Avery; Miknaitis, Gajus A; Moorthy, Bhasker K; Munn, Jeffrey A; Murphy, Tara; Nakajima, Reiko; Narayanan, Vijay K; Nash, Thomas; Neilsen, Erich; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Newman, Peter R; Nichol, Robert C; Nicinski, Tom; Nieto-Santisteban, Maria; Nitta, Atsuko; Odenkirchen, Michael; Okamura, Sadanori; Ostriker, Jeremiah P; Owen, Russell; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Peoples, John; Pier, Jeffrey R; Pindor, Bartosz; Pope, Adrian C; Quinn, Thomas R; Rafikov, R R; Raymond, Sean N; Richards, Gordon T; Richmond, Michael W; Rix, Hans-Walter; Rockosi, Constance M; Schaye, Joop; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, D P; Schroeder, Joshua; Scranton, Ryan; Sekiguchi, Maki; Seljak, Uros; Sergey, Gary; Sesar, Branimir; Sheldon, E S; Shimasaku, Kazu; Siegmund, Walter A; Silvestri, Nicole M; Sinisgalli, Allan J; Sirko, Edwin; Smith, Allyn J; Smolcic, Vernesa; Snedden, Stephanie A; Stebbins, Albert; Steinhardt, Charles; Stinson, Gregory M; Stoughton, Chris; Strateva, Iskra V; Strauss, Michael A; SubbaRao, Mark; Szalay, Alexander S; Istvan Szapudi; Szkody, Paula; Tasca, Lidia; Tegmark, Max; Thakar, Aniruddha R; Tremonti, Christy A; Tucker, Douglas L; Uomoto, Alan; Vanden Berk, Daniel E; Vandenberg, Jan; Vogeley, Michael S; Voges, Wolfgang; Vogt, Nicole P; Walkowicz, Lucianne M; Weinberg, David H; West, Andrew A; White, Simon D M; Wilhite, Brian C; Willman, Beth; Xu Yong Hong; Yanny, Brian; Yarger, Jean; Yasuda, Naoki; Yip, Ching-Wa; Yocum, D R; York, Donald G; Zakamska, Nadia L; Zheng, Wei; Zibetti, Stefano; Zucker, Daniel B

    2003-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has validated and made publicly available its First Data Release. This consists of 2099 square degrees of five-band (u, g, r, i, z) imaging data, 186,240 spectra of galaxies, quasars, stars and calibrating blank sky patches selected over 1360 square degrees of this area, and tables of measured parameters from these data. The imaging data go to a depth of r ~ 22.6 and are photometrically and astrometrically calibrated to 2% rms and 100 milli-arcsec rms per coordinate, respectively. The spectra cover the range 3800--9200 A, with a resolution of 1800--2100. Further characteristics of the data are described, as are the data products themselves.

  1. Observed 20th Century Desert Dust Variability: Impact on Climate and Biogeochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahowald, Natalie; Kloster, Silvia; Engelstaedter, S.; Moore, Jefferson Keith; Mukhopadhyay, S.; McConnell, J. R.; Albani, S.; Doney, Scott C.; Bhattacharya, A.; Curran, M. A. J.; Flanner, Mark G.; Hoffman, Forrest M; Lawrence, David M.; Lindsay, Keith; Mayewski, P. A.; Neff, Jason; Rothenberg, D.; Thomas, E.; Thornton, Peter E; Zender, Charlie S.

    2010-01-01

    Desert dust perturbs climate by directly and indirectly interacting with incoming solar and outgoing long wave radiation, thereby changing precipitation and temperature, in addition to modifying ocean and land biogeochemistry. While we know that desert dust is sensitive to perturbations in climate and human land use, previous studies have been unable to determine whether humans were increasing or decreasing desert dust in the global average. Here we present observational estimates of desert dust based on paleodata proxies showing a doubling of desert dust during the 20th century over much, but not all the globe. Large uncertainties remain in estimates of desert dust variability over 20th century due to limited data. Using these observational estimates of desert dust change in combination with ocean, atmosphere and land models, we calculate the net radiative effect of these observed changes (top of atmosphere) over the 20th century to be -0.14 {+-} 0.11 W/m{sup 2} (1990-1999 vs. 1905-1914). The estimated radiative change due to dust is especially strong between the heavily loaded 1980-1989 and the less heavily loaded 1955-1964 time periods (-0.57 {+-} 0.46 W/m{sup 2}), which model simulations suggest may have reduced the rate of temperature increase between these time periods by 0.11 C. Model simulations also indicate strong regional shifts in precipitation and temperature from desert dust changes, causing 6 ppm (12 PgC) reduction in model carbon uptake by the terrestrial biosphere over the 20th century. Desert dust carries iron, an important micronutrient for ocean biogeochemistry that can modulate ocean carbon storage; here we show that dust deposition trends increase ocean productivity by an estimated 6% over the 20th century, drawing down an additional 4 ppm (8 PgC) of carbon dioxide into the oceans. Thus, perturbations to desert dust over the 20th century inferred from observations are potentially important for climate and biogeochemistry, and our understanding of these changes and their impacts should continue to be refined.

  2. Cosmology using the Parkes Multibeam Southern-Sky HI Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. A. Thomas

    1996-07-02

    I discuss the implications of the Parkes HI Multibeam Southern Sky Survey for cosmology. It will determine the local mass function of HI clouds, detecting several hundred per decade of mass. Each of these will come with a redshift and, for the more massive clouds, an estimate of the velocity width. This will provide an ideal database for peculiar motion studies and for measurements of biasing of galaxies relative to the underlying matter distribution.

  3. Candidate spectroscopic binaries in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pourbaix, D; Szkody, P; Ivezic, Z; Kleinman, S J; Long, D; Snedden, S A; Nitta, A; Harvanek, M; Krzesínski, J; Brewington, H J; Barentine, J C; Neilsen, E H; Brinkmann, J

    2005-01-01

    We have examined the radial velocity data for stars spectroscopically observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) more than once to investigate the incidence of spectroscopic binaries, and to evaluate the accuracy of the SDSS stellar radial velocities. We find agreement between the fraction of stars with significant velocity variations and the expected fraction of binary stars in the halo and thick disk populations. The observations produce a list of 675 possible new spectroscopic binary stars and orbits for eight of them.

  4. Candidate spectroscopic binaries in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Pourbaix; G. R. Knapp; P. Szkody; Z. Ivezic; S. J. Kleinman; D. Long; S. A. Snedden; A. Nitta; M. Harvanek; J. Krzesinski; H. J. Brewington; J. C. Barentine; E. H. Neilsen; J. Brinkman

    2005-08-29

    We have examined the radial velocity data for stars spectroscopically observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) more than once to investigate the incidence of spectroscopic binaries, and to evaluate the accuracy of the SDSS stellar radial velocities. We find agreement between the fraction of stars with significant velocity variations and the expected fraction of binary stars in the halo and thick disk populations. The observations produce a list of 675 possible new spectroscopic binary stars and orbits for eight of them.

  5. Bright Skies Ahead for Moapa | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels ResearchofDerivative Classifiers Should KnowLandfillBright Skies

  6. Manufactured caverns in carbonate rock

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bruce, David A.; Falta, Ronald W.; Castle, James W.; Murdoch, Lawrence C.

    2007-01-02

    Disclosed is a process for manufacturing underground caverns suitable in one embodiment for storage of large volumes of gaseous or liquid materials. The method is an acid dissolution process that can be utilized to form caverns in carbonate rock formations. The caverns can be used to store large quantities of materials near transportation facilities or destination markets. The caverns can be used for storage of materials including fossil fuels, such as natural gas, refined products formed from fossil fuels, or waste materials, such as hazardous waste materials. The caverns can also be utilized for applications involving human access such as recreation or research. The method can also be utilized to form calcium chloride as a by-product of the cavern formation process.

  7. Reliability of radio transients detected in the Nasu sky survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aoki, Takahiro; Daishido, Tsuneaki; Tanaka, Tai; Nakao, Ryota; Nomura, Naomi; Sugisawa, Kentaro; Niinuma, Kotaro; Takefuji, Kazuhiro; Kida, Sumiko

    2014-01-20

    This article reports on the reliability of 11 radio transients detected in the Nasu sky survey. We derived false detection rates and evaluated the statistical significance of each transient source. A single source, labeled WJN J1443+3439, was statistically significant at the 10{sup –5} significance level; the other 10 sources were insignificant. On the basis of this single detection, the sky surface density of live radio transients was estimated to be 2{sub ?1.9}{sup +9}×10{sup ?6} deg{sup ?2} at a flux density above 3 Jy and a frequency of 1.42 GHz. Since this result is comparable with other survey results and known transients, WJN J1443+3439 could not be excluded. The sky surface density supported a power-law distribution of source count versus flux density. For transient events, the power-law exponent was approximately –3/2. These results are expected to assist radio variable/transient surveys in next-generation facilities such as the Square Kilometre Array.

  8. Conservation Planning for Offsetting the Impacts of Development: A Case Study of Biodiversity and Renewable Energy in the Mojave Desert.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreitler, J; Schloss, CA; Soong, O; Hannah, L; Davis, FW

    2015-01-01

    environmental impacts of renewable energy sources. Appliedbiological impacts. Renewable Energy. 2013; 57: 289–98. doi:of biodiversity and renewable energy in the Mojave Desert.

  9. WAVE GENERATIONS FROM CONFINED EXPLOSIONS IN ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Sarah T.

    WAVE GENERATIONS FROM CONFINED EXPLOSIONS IN ROCKS C. L. Liu and Thomas J. Ahrens Seismological Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 In order to record P- and S-waves on the interactions between incident P- and SV-waves and free-surfaces of rocks. The relations between particle

  10. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON 1960 . SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1960 by Paul D. Zimmer and Clifton C. Davidson United States Fish This annual report of fishway operations at Rock Island Dam in 1960 is dedicated to the memory of co

  11. Ground-water sapping processes, Western Desert, Egypt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, W.; Arvidson, R.E.; Sultan, M.; Becker, R.; Crombie, M.K. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)] [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Sturchio, N. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Alfy, Z.E. [Egyptian Geological Survey and Mining Authority, Cairo (Egypt)] [Egyptian Geological Survey and Mining Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1997-01-01

    Depressions of the Western Desert of Egypt (specifically, Kharga, Farafra, and Kurkur regions) are mainly occupied by shales that are impermeable, but easily erodible by rainfall and runoff, whereas the surrounding plateaus are composed of limestones that are permeable and more resistant to fluvial erosion under semiarid to arid conditions. A computer simulation model was developed to quantify the ground-water sapping processes, using a cellular automata algorithm with coupled surface runoff and ground-water flow for a permeable, resistant layer over an impermeable, friable unit. Erosion, deposition, slumping, and generation of spring-derived tufas were parametrically modeled. Simulations using geologically reasonable parameters demonstrate that relatively rapid erosion of the shales by surface runoff, ground-water sapping, and slumping of the limestones, and detailed control by hydraulic conductivity inhomogeneities associated with structures explain the depressions, escarpments, and associated landforms and deposits. Using episodic wet pulses, keyed by {delta}{sup 18}O deep-sea core record, the model produced tufa ages that are statistically consistent with the observed U/Th tufa ages. This result supports the hypothesis that northeastern African wet periods occurred during interglacial maxima. This {delta}{sup 18}O-forced model also replicates the decrease in fluvial and sapping activity over the past million years. 65 refs., 21 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Fluid-rock interaction: A reactive transport approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steefel, C.

    2009-01-01

    to coupled mass transport and fluid-rock interaction in aof a reactive transport approach in fluid-rock interaction,reactive transport models for fluid-rock interaction. Case

  13. Photovoltaic at Hollywood and Desert Breeze Recreational Centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, Shane

    2015-09-24

    Executive Summary Renewable Energy Initiatives for Clark County Parks and Recreation Solar Project DOE grant # DE-EE0003180 In accordance with the goals of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy for promoting solar energy as clean, carbon-free and cost-effective, the County believed that a recreational center was an ideal place to promote solar energy technologies to the public. This project included the construction of solar electricity generation facilities (40kW) at two Clark County facility sites, Desert Breeze Recreational Center and Hollywood Recreational Center, with educational kiosks and Green Boxes for classroom instruction. The major objectives and goals of this Solar Project include demonstration of state of the art technologies for the generation of electricity from solar technology and the creation of an informative and educational tool in regards to the benefits and process of generating alternative energy. Clark County partnered with Anne Johnson (design architect/consultant), Affiliated Engineers Inc. (AEI), Desert Research Institute (DRI), and Morse Electric. The latest photovoltaic technologies were used in the project to help create the greatest expected energy savings for60443 each recreational center. This coupled with the data created from the monitoring system will help Clark County and NREL further understand the real time outputs from the system. The educational portion created with AEI and DRI incorporates material for all ages with a focus on K - 12. The AEI component is an animated story telling the fundamentals of how sunlight is turned into electricity and DRI‘s creation of Solar Green Boxes brings environmental education into the classroom. In addition to the educational component for the public, the energy that is created through the photovoltaic system also translates into saved money and health benefits for the general public. This project has helped Clark County to further add to its own energy reduction goals created by the energy management agenda (Resolution to Encourage Sustainability) and the County’s Eco-initiative. Each site has installed photovoltaic panels on the existing roof structures that exhibit suitable solar exposure. The generation systems utilize solar energy creating electricity used for the facility’s lighting system and other electrical requirements. Unused electricity is sent to the electric utility grid, often at peak demand times. Educational signage, kiosks and information have been included to inform and expand the public’s understanding of solar energy technology. The Solar Green Boxes were created for further hands on classroom education of solar power. In addition, data is sent by a Long Term PV performance monitoring system, complete with data transmission to NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory), located in Golden, CO. This system correlates local solar irradiance and weather with power production. The expected outcomes of this Solar Project are as follows: (1) Successful photovoltaic electricity generation technologies to capture solar energy in a useful form of electrical energy. (2) Reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and environmental degradation resulting from reduced energy demand from traditional electricity sources such as fossil fuel fired and nuclear power plants. (3) Advance the research and development of solar electricity generation. (4) The education of the general public in regards to the benefits of environmentally friendly electricity generation and Clark County’s efforts to encourage sustainable living practices. (5) To provide momentum for the nexus for future solar generation facilities in Clark County facilities and buildings and further the County’s energy reduction goals. (6) To ultimately contribute to the reduction of dependence on foreign oil and other unsustainable sources of energy. This Solar Project addresses several objectives and goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Solar Energy Technology Program. The project improves the integration and performance of sola

  14. SYSTEMATICS AND EVOLUTION IN THE TRIBE SCHIZOPETALAE (BRASSICACEAE): A MOLECULAR, MORPHOLOGICAL, AND ECOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF THE DIVERSIFICATION OF AN ENDEMIC LINEAGE FROM THE ATACAMA DESERT (CHILE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toro Nunez, Oscar Fernando

    2013-12-31

    As aridity has been identified as an active promoter of diversification in deserts, attempts to test organismal differentiation in the Atacama Desert have resulted particularly challenging. Most limitations are related to ...

  15. Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    three alternative geologic host rocks for mined repositories (granitic crystalline, salt, and clay shale) and crystalline basement rock for deep borehole disposal. This...

  16. Rock Physics of Geologic Carbon Sequestration/Storage Dvorkin...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Rock Physics of Geologic Carbon SequestrationStorage Dvorkin, Jack; Mavko, Gary 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 58 GEOSCIENCES This report covers the results of developing the rock...

  17. Fundamental Research on Percussion Drilling: Improved rock mechanics

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    full-scale laboratory investigations Michael S. Bruno 58 GEOSCIENCES; 02 PETROLEUM; 03 NATURAL GAS; ROCK DRILLING; PRESSURE DEPENDENCE; ROCK MECHANICS; ROTARY DRILLING; WELL...

  18. Pre-treating Seed to Enhance Germination of Desert Shrubs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. K. Ostler; D. C. Anderson; D. J. Hansen

    2002-06-01

    Creosotebush [Larrea tridentata (D.C.) Cav.] and white bursage [Ambrosia dumosa (A. Gray) W.W. Payne] seeds were subjected to pre-treatments of rinsing and soaking in water and thiourea to enhance germination in laboratory experiments. The effects of darkness, temperature, seed source, and soil moisture were also evaluated in the laboratory. The best pre-treatment from the laboratory experiments, rinsing with water for 36 hours followed by drying, was field-tested at Fort Irwin, California. Two sites and two seeding dates (early March and mid April) were determined for each site. Five mulch treatments (no mulch, straw, gravel, chemical stabilizer, and plastic) were evaluated in combination with the seed pre-treatments. Field emergence was greatly enhanced with the seed pre-treatment for white bursage during the March (18-42% increase in germination) and April seedings (16-23% increase in germination). Creosotebush showed poor germination during March (2-5%) when soil temperatures averaged 15 C, but germination increased during the April trials (6-43%) when soil temperatures averaged 23 C. The seed pre-treatment during the April trials increased germination from 16-23%. The plastic mulch treatment increased germination dramatically during both the March and April trials. The plastic mulch increased soil temperatures (8-10 C)and maintained high humidity during germination. Both the chemical stabilizer and the gravel mulches improved germination over the control while the straw mulch decreased germination. These results suggest that seed pre-treatments combined with irrigation and mulch are effective techniques to establish these two dominant Mojave Desert species from seed.

  19. Species Diversity of Seed-Eating Desert Rodents in Sand Dune Habitats Author(s): James H. Brown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, James H.

    Species Diversity of Seed-Eating Desert Rodents in Sand Dune Habitats Author(s): James H. Brown DIVERSITY OF SEED-EATING DESERT RODENTS IN SAND DUNE HABITATS' JAMES H. BROWN Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City 84112 Abstract.The seed-eatingrodent faunas were sampled on 18 dunes

  20. Holocene freshwater carbonate structures in the hyper-arid Gebel Uweinat region of the Sahara Desert (Southwestern Egypt) q

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Desert (Southwestern Egypt) q Margarita M. Marinova a,b , A. Nele Meckler c , Christopher P. McKay b region of the Sahara Desert, near the triple border of Egypt, Sudan, and Libya (N22°, E25°), re- ceives- ibrated years BP; Wendorf and expedition, 1977). While some parts of southwest Egypt have been extensively

  1. Phanerozoic tectonothermal history of the ArabianNubian shield in the Eastern Desert of Egypt: evidence from fission track

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, Harald

    Phanerozoic tectonothermal history of the Arabian­Nubian shield in the Eastern Desert of Egypt were performed in the Eastern Desert of Egypt. The results provide insights into the processes driving reserved. Keywords: Phanerozoic; Fission track thermochronology; Palaeostress; Arabian­Nubien shield; Egypt

  2. Confusion of Diffuse Objects in the X-ray Sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Mark Voit; August E. Evrard; Greg L. Bryan

    2000-12-08

    Most of the baryons in the present-day universe are thought to reside in intergalactic space at temperatures of 10^5-10^7 K. X-ray emission from these baryons contributes a modest (~10%) fraction of the ~ 1 keV background whose prominence within the large-scale cosmic web depends on the amount of non-gravitational energy injected into intergalactic space by supernovae and AGNs. Here we show that the virialized regions of groups and clusters cover over a third of the sky, creating a source-confusion problem that may hinder X-ray searches for individual intercluster filaments and contaminate observations of distant groups.

  3. American Clean Skies Foundation | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name:AmbataSkies Foundation Jump

  4. SkySails GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEurope GmbH Jump to:Idaho-Utah |RenovablesSixthPowerSkySails

  5. Big Sky, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental JumpInformation BeaufortBentMichigan:Greece)Daddy s BiodieselSky, Montana:

  6. Clear Skies Group Inc Holdings Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:ClayBurnVitaCleanstar EnergyClearLake,Skies

  7. Rock mechanics design in mining and tunneling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniawski, Z.T.

    1984-01-01

    This book introduces the design process as applied to rock mechanics aspects of underground mining and tunneling. Topics covered include a historical perspective, the design process in engineering, empirical methods of design, observational methods of design, and guided design.

  8. First Rocks from Outside the Solar System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westphal, Andrew

    2014-10-17

    Andrew Westphal presents his findings in examining the first rocks from outside the solar system at our '8 Big Ideas' Science at the Theater event on October 8th, 2014, in Oakland, California.

  9. COMPUTED SEISMIC SPEEDS AND ATTENUATION IN ROCKS ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, J. E.

    At the gas-oil or gas-water contact in a homo- geneous reservoir rock, capillary pressure ... During production of a field, gas may come out of solution and crcatr ...

  10. Rock Slopes from Mechanics to Decision Making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einstein, Herbert H.

    Rock slope instabilities are discussed in the context of decision making for risk assessment and management. Hence, the state of the slope and possible failure mechanism need to be defined first. This is done with geometrical ...

  11. Variability in desert bighorn and Rambouillet sheep using restriction fragment length polymorphisms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyles, Ingrid Doodeheefver

    1989-01-01

    , was resuspended in Tris-EDTA, and the concentration of DNA in yg/ml was determined (Skow et al. 1988). 18 Table 1. Species identification. No. 1 2 3 4 6 7 DBHS NV/TX DBHS NV/TX DBHS NV/TX DBHS NV/TX DBHS NV/TX DBHS NV/TX Heparinized Blood.... Rambo. Calif. Rambo. Calif. Rambo. DNA extracted form DNA extracted form DNA extracted form DNA extracted form DNA extracted form UCB UCB UCB UCB UCB DBHS NV/TX: Desert Bighorn Sheep Nevada/Texas cross DBHS AZ/AZ: Desert Bighorn Sheep...

  12. EFFECTS OF ELEVATED CO2 ON ROOT FUNCTION AND SOIL RESPIRATION IN A MOJAVE DESERT ECOSYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nowak, Robert S.

    2007-12-19

    Increases in atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration during the last 250 years are unequivocal, and CO{sub 2} will continue to increase at least for the next several decades (Houghton et al. 2001, Keeling & Whorf 2002). Arid ecosystems are some of the most important biomes globally on a land surface area basis, are increasing in area at an alarming pace (Dregne 1991), and have a strong coupling with regional climate (Asner & Heidebrecht 2005). These water-limited ecosystems also are predicted to be the most sensitive to elevated CO{sub 2}, in part because they are stressful environments where plant responses to elevated CO{sub 2} may be amplified (Strain & Bazzaz 1983). Indeed, all C{sub 3} species examined at the Nevada Desert FACE Facility (NDFF) have shown increased A{sub net} under elevated CO{sub 2} (Ellsworth et al. 2004, Naumburg et al. 2003, Nowak et al. 2004). Furthermore, increased shoot growth for individual species under elevated CO{sub 2} was spectacular in a very wet year (Smith et al. 2000), although the response in low to average precipitation years has been smaller (Housman et al. 2006). Increases in perennial cover and biomass at the NDFF are consistent with long term trends in the Mojave Desert and elsewhere in the Southwest, indicating C sequestration in woody biomass (Potter et al. 2006). Elevated CO{sub 2} also increases belowground net primary production (BNPP), with average increases of 70%, 21%, and 11% for forests, bogs, and grasslands, respectively (Nowak et al. 2004). Although detailed studies of elevated CO{sub 2} responses for desert root systems were virtually non-existent prior to our research, we anticipated that C sequestration may occur by desert root systems for several reasons. First, desert ecosystems exhibit increases in net photosynthesis and primary production at elevated CO{sub 2}. If large quantities of root litter enter the ecosystem at a time when most decomposers are inactive, significant quantities of carbon may be stored belowground in relatively recalcitrant forms. Indeed, a model-based analysis predicted that the arid/semiarid southwestern bioclimatic region had one of the highest rates of net carbon storage in the United States over the past century (Schimel et al. 2000). Second, root systems of desert plants are often extensive (Foxx et al. 1984, Hartle et al. 2006) with relatively large proportions of roots deep in the soil (Schenk & Jackson 2002). Thus, an understanding of belowground processes in desert ecosystems provides information on the potential for terrestrial carbon sequestration in desert ecosystems.

  13. Stress-induced transverse isotropy in rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, L.M.; Murphy, W.F. III [Schlumberger-Doll Research Center, Ridgefield, CT (United States); Berryman, J.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-03-28

    The application of uniaxial pressure can induce elastic anisotropy in otherwise isotropic rock. We consider models based on two very different rock classes, granites and weakly consolidated granular systems. We show that these models share common underlying assumptions, that they lead to similar qualitative behavior, and that both provide a microscopic basis for elliptical anisotropy. In the granular case, we make experimentally verifiable predictions regarding the horizontally propagating modes based on the measured behavior of the vertical modes.

  14. Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a series of three interlocking imaging and spectroscopic surveys, carried out over an eight-year period with a dedicated 2.5m telescope located at Apache Point Observatory in Southern New Mexico. The SDSS Supernova Survey was one of those three components of SDSS and SDSS-II, a 3-year extension of the original SDSS that operated from July 2005 to July 2008. The Supernova Survey was a time-domain survey, involving repeat imaging of the same region of sky every other night, weather permitting. The primary scientific motivation was to detect and measure light curves for several hundred supernovae through repeat scans of the SDSS Southern equatorial stripe 82 (about 2.5? wide by ~120? long). Over the course of three 3-month campaigns SDSS-II SN discovered and measured multi-band lightcurves for ~500 spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia supernovae in the redshift range z=0.05-0.4. In addition, the project harvested a few hundred light curves for SNe Ia and discovered about 80 spectroscopically confirmed core-collapse supernovae (supernova types Ib/c and II).

  15. Ultraluminous infrared galaxies in the AKARI all-sky survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilerci Eser, E., E-mail: ecekilerci@dark-cosmology.dk [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark); Goto, T. [National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Section 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Doi, Y., E-mail: tomo@phys.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: doi@ea.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp [The University of Tokyo, Komaba 3-8-1, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan)

    2014-12-10

    We present a new catalog of 118 ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) and one hyperluminous infrared galaxy (HLIRG) by cross-matching the AKARI all-sky survey with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10 (SDSS DR10) and the final data release of the Two-Degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey. Forty of the ULIRGs and one HLIRG are new identifications. We find that ULIRGs are interacting pair galaxies or ongoing or postmergers. This is consistent with the widely accepted view: ULIRGs are major mergers of disk galaxies. We confirm the previously known positive trend between the active galactic nucleus fraction and infrared luminosity. We show that ULIRGs have a large offset from the main sequence up to z ? 1; their offset from the z ? 2 'main sequence' is relatively smaller. We find a result consistent with the previous studies showing that, compared to local star-forming SDSS galaxies of similar mass, local ULIRGs have lower oxygen abundances. We demonstrate for the first time that ULIRGs follow the fundamental metallicity relation (FMR). The scatter of ULIRGs around the FMR (0.09 dex-0.5 dex) is comparable to the scatter of z ? 2-3 galaxies. We provide the largest local (0.050

  16. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS): Data Release 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is one of the most ambitious and influential surveys in the history of astronomy.Over eight years of operations (SDSS-I, 2000-2005; SDSS-II, 2005-2008), it obtained deep, multi-color images covering more than a quarter of the sky and created 3-dimensional maps containing more than 930,000 galaxies and more than 120,000 quasars. The SDSS used a dedicated 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory, New Mexico, equipped with two powerful special-purpose instruments. SDSS data have supported fundamental work across an extraordinary range of astronomical disciplines, including the properties of galaxies, the evolution of quasars, the structure and stellar populations of the Milky Way, the dwarf galaxy companions of the Milky Way and M31, asteroids and other small bodies in the solar system, and the large scale structure and matter and energy contents of the universe. (Taken from home page of www.sdss.org). DR1 was the first major data release, providing images, imaging catalogs, spectra, and redshifts for download.

  17. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS): Data Release 5

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is one of the most ambitious and influential surveys in the history of astronomy.Over eight years of operations (SDSS-I, 2000-2005; SDSS-II, 2005-2008), it obtained deep, multi-color images covering more than a quarter of the sky and created 3-dimensional maps containing more than 930,000 galaxies and more than 120,000 quasars. The SDSS used a dedicated 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory, New Mexico, equipped with two powerful special-purpose instruments. SDSS data have supported fundamental work across an extraordinary range of astronomical disciplines, including the properties of galaxies, the evolution of quasars, the structure and stellar populations of the Milky Way, the dwarf galaxy companions of the Milky Way and M31, asteroids and other small bodies in the solar system, and the large scale structure and matter and energy contents of the universe. (Taken from home page of www.sdss.org). DR5 provides provides images, imaging catalogs, spectra, and redshifts for download.

  18. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS): Data Release 2

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is one of the most ambitious and influential surveys in the history of astronomy.Over eight years of operations (SDSS-I, 2000-2005; SDSS-II, 2005-2008), it obtained deep, multi-color images covering more than a quarter of the sky and created 3-dimensional maps containing more than 930,000 galaxies and more than 120,000 quasars. The SDSS used a dedicated 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory, New Mexico, equipped with two powerful special-purpose instruments. SDSS data have supported fundamental work across an extraordinary range of astronomical disciplines, including the properties of galaxies, the evolution of quasars, the structure and stellar populations of the Milky Way, the dwarf galaxy companions of the Milky Way and M31, asteroids and other small bodies in the solar system, and the large scale structure and matter and energy contents of the universe. (Taken from home page of www.sdss.org). DR2 provides provides images, imaging catalogs, spectra, and redshifts for download.

  19. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS): Data Release 4

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is one of the most ambitious and influential surveys in the history of astronomy.Over eight years of operations (SDSS-I, 2000-2005; SDSS-II, 2005-2008), it obtained deep, multi-color images covering more than a quarter of the sky and created 3-dimensional maps containing more than 930,000 galaxies and more than 120,000 quasars. The SDSS used a dedicated 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory, New Mexico, equipped with two powerful special-purpose instruments. SDSS data have supported fundamental work across an extraordinary range of astronomical disciplines, including the properties of galaxies, the evolution of quasars, the structure and stellar populations of the Milky Way, the dwarf galaxy companions of the Milky Way and M31, asteroids and other small bodies in the solar system, and the large scale structure and matter and energy contents of the universe. (Taken from home page of www.sdss.org). DR4 provides provides images, imaging catalogs, spectra, and redshifts for download.

  20. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS): Data Release 3

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is one of the most ambitious and influential surveys in the history of astronomy.Over eight years of operations (SDSS-I, 2000-2005; SDSS-II, 2005-2008), it obtained deep, multi-color images covering more than a quarter of the sky and created 3-dimensional maps containing more than 930,000 galaxies and more than 120,000 quasars. The SDSS used a dedicated 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory, New Mexico, equipped with two powerful special-purpose instruments. SDSS data have supported fundamental work across an extraordinary range of astronomical disciplines, including the properties of galaxies, the evolution of quasars, the structure and stellar populations of the Milky Way, the dwarf galaxy companions of the Milky Way and M31, asteroids and other small bodies in the solar system, and the large scale structure and matter and energy contents of the universe. (Taken from home page of www.sdss.org). DR3 provides provides images, imaging catalogs, spectra, and redshifts for download.

  1. Dusty WDs in the WISE all sky survey ? SDSS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barber, Sara D.; Kilic, Mukremin; Gianninas, A. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks St., Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Brown, Warren R., E-mail: barber@nhn.ou.edu [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2014-05-10

    A recent cross-correlation between the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 White Dwarf Catalog with the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) all-sky photometry at 3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22 ?m performed by Debes et al. resulted in the discovery of 52 candidate dusty white dwarfs (WDs). However, the 6'' WISE beam allows for the possibility that many of the excesses exhibited by these WDs may be due to contamination from a nearby source. We present MMT+SAO Wide-Field InfraRed Camera J- and H-band imaging observations (0.''5-1.''5 point spread function) of 16 of these candidate dusty WDs and confirm that four have spectral energy distributions (SEDs) consistent with a dusty disk and are not accompanied by a nearby source contaminant. The remaining 12 WDs have contaminated WISE photometry and SEDs inconsistent with a dusty disk when the contaminating sources are not included in the photometry measurements. We find the frequency of disks around single WDs in the WISE ? SDSS sample to be 2.6%-4.1%. One of the four new dusty WDs has a mass of 1.04 M {sub ?} (progenitor mass 5.4 M {sub ?}) and its discovery offers the first confirmation that massive WDs (and their massive progenitor stars) host planetary systems.

  2. The Digital Sky Project: Prototyping Virtual Observatory Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. J Brunner; T. Prince; J. Good; T. Handley; C. Lonsdale; S. G. Djorgovski

    2000-11-10

    Astronomy is entering a new era as multiple, large area, digital sky surveys are in production. The resulting datasets are truly remarkable in their own right; however, a revolutionary step arises in the aggregation of complimentary multi-wavelength surveys (i.e., the cross-identification of a billion sources). The federation of these large datasets is already underway, and is producing a major paradigm shift as Astronomy has suddenly become an immensely data-rich field. This new paradigm will enable quantitatively and qualitatively new science, from statistical studies of our Galaxy and the large-scale structure in the universe, to discoveries of rare, unusual, or even completely new types of astronomical objects and phenomena. Federating and then exploring these large datasets, however, is an extremely challenging task. The Digital Sky project was initiated with this task in mind and is working to develop the techniques and technologies necessary to solve the problems inherent in federating these large databases, as well as the mining of the resultant aggregate data.

  3. THE TENTH DATA RELEASE OF THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY: FIRST...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: THE TENTH DATA RELEASE OF THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY: FIRST SPECTROSCOPIC DATA FROM THE SDSS-III APACHE POINT OBSERVATORY GALACTIC EVOLUTION EXPERIMENT Citation...

  4. MODELING WATER MOVEMENT BETWEEN THE GLACIAL, AGRICULTURAL OASIS AND DESERT IN THE HEIHE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the watershed respectively (Pan and Tien 2001). While glacial/snow melt in the Qilianshan Mountain contribute1 MODELING WATER MOVEMENT BETWEEN THE GLACIAL, AGRICULTURAL OASIS AND DESERT IN THE HEIHE WATERSHED inland river in arid Northwestern China, with a drainage area of 128,000 km2) for understanding glacial

  5. Stimulation at Desert Peak -modeling with the coupled THM code FEHM

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    kelkar, sharad

    Numerical modeling of the 2011 shear stimulation at the Desert Peak well 27-15. This submission contains the FEHM executable code for a 64-bit PC Windows-7 machine, and the input and output files for the results presented in the included paper from ARMA-213 meeting.

  6. Estimating the influence of the thermal environment on activity patterns of the desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Felisa A.

    Estimating the influence of the thermal environment on activity patterns of the desert woodrat temperature influences the ecology and life history of animals. In habitats near the thermal range boundary temperature might influence both the timing and the duration of activity. To test this idea, we attached i

  7. Can Desert Dwellers Continue To Afford Lush Lawns: Analyzing Consumer Response to Rate Changes in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    Can Desert Dwellers Continue To Afford Lush Lawns: Analyzing Consumer Response to Rate Changes of price and weather on wa- ter demand is important for Arizona. If the effect of weather is not well. In part, this is because few other studies use household data, and instead use data aggregated

  8. Ion Secretion by Salt Glands of Desert Iguanas (Dipsosaurus dorsalis) Lisa C. Hazard*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazard, Lisa C.

    22 Ion Secretion by Salt Glands of Desert Iguanas (Dipsosaurus dorsalis) Lisa C. Hazard* DepartmentCl-secreting salt glands of many birds and reptiles, the nasal salt glands of lizards can secrete potassium as well iguana, Dipsosaurus dorsalis. Lizards were given combinations of ions for several days, and secreted salt

  9. Metabolism, Swimming Performance, and Tissue Biochemistry of High Desert Redband Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss ssp.): Evidence for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeley, Ernest R.

    413 Metabolism, Swimming Performance, and Tissue Biochemistry of High Desert Redband Trout (Ucrit) and oxygen consumption in the field at 12 and 24 C; (2) biochemical indices of energy metabolism gradient. Fur- ther, we also examined genetic and morphological character- istics of fish from these two

  10. Modelling Desert Dune Fields Based on Discrete Dynamics STEVEN R. BISHOPa,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carretero, Ricardo

    Modelling Desert Dune Fields Based on Discrete Dynamics STEVEN R. BISHOPa, *, HIROSHI MOMIJIb is developed to model the dynamics of sand dunes. The physical processes display strong non-linearity that has features we monitor morphology, dune growth, dune migration and spatial patterns within a dune field

  11. Relations between albedos and emissivities from MODIS and ASTER data over North African Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Liming

    of incident solar energy reflected by the land surface in all directions. They determine the surface radiation map over the arid areas of Algeria, Libya, and Tunisia in North Africa at 30 second (about 1 km) and 2 in climate model deserts such as the Sahara. However, solar short- wave diffuse albedos vary by a factor

  12. Mineral magnetic study of the Taklimakan desert sands and its relevance to the Chinese loess

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Mineral magnetic study of the Taklimakan desert sands and its relevance to the Chinese loess M and weathered loess sections from the Chinese Loess Plateau. We found an apparent decreasing grain size trend it is located more than 2000 km west of the central Loess Plateau. Key words: Chinese loess, magnetic

  13. Expansion of the world's deserts due to vegetation-albedo feedback under global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Ning

    -ocean-land model with a dynamic vegetation component that predicts surface albedo change, here we simulate, the model simulated an increase in the world's `warm desert' area of 2.5 million km2 or 10% at the end Coupled- Carbon-Cycle-Climate Model Intercomparison Project [Friedlingstein et al., 2006] (C4MIP) has

  14. Developmental plasticity of cutaneous water loss and lipid composition in stratum corneum of desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Jos. B.

    Developmental plasticity of cutaneous water loss and lipid composition in stratum corneum of desert and cerebrosides in the SC compared with mesic spar- rows. In this study, we investigated developmental plasticity modifications of the lipid composition of the SC. The expression of plasticity in CWL seems to be a response

  15. First Tracer Test After Circulation in Desert Peak 27-15

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Rose, Peter

    2013-11-16

    Following the successful stimulation of Desert Peak target EGS well 27-15, a circulation test was initiated by injecting a conservative tracer (1,5-nds) in combination with a reactive tracer (7-amino-1,3-naphthalene disulfonate). The closest production well 74-21 was monitored over the subsequent several months.

  16. Stimulation at Desert Peak -modeling with the coupled THM code FEHM

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    kelkar, sharad

    2013-04-30

    Numerical modeling of the 2011 shear stimulation at the Desert Peak well 27-15. This submission contains the FEHM executable code for a 64-bit PC Windows-7 machine, and the input and output files for the results presented in the included paper from ARMA-213 meeting.

  17. Balancing Energy and Water Consumption in an Urban Desert Environment: A Case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    at the Census block group level for 2005 3. Energy consumption data from 2005 Census Mesic Landscaping XericBalancing Energy and Water Consumption in an Urban Desert Environment: A Case Study on Phoenix, AZ effect, water scarcity, and energy consumption. The transformation of native landscapes into built

  18. Soil microbial activity and N availability with elevated CO2 in Mojave Desert soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Billings, Sharon A.; Schaeffer, Sean M.

    2004-01-01

    We examined the effects of elevated CO2 on soil nitrogen (N) dynamics in the Mojave Desert by measuring plant N isotope composition (?15N), soil microbial biomass N, soil respiration, resin-available N, and C and N dynamics during soil incubations...

  19. Remote sensing approaches for reconstructing fire perimeters and burn severity mosaics in desert spring ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weisberg, Peter J.

    Remote sensing approaches for reconstructing fire perimeters and burn severity mosaics in desert. Remote sensing methods have been used in other environments to gain information about fires that have reported sizes of less than one hectare. Additional refinement of remote sensing methods is necessary

  20. Precambrian Research 136 (2005) 2750 The Wadi Mubarak belt, Eastern Desert of Egypt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, Harald

    2005-01-01

    Precambrian Research 136 (2005) 27­50 The Wadi Mubarak belt, Eastern Desert of Egypt, Graz, Austria b Mansoura University, Faculty of Science, Geology Department, El Mansoura, Egypt c February 2003; accepted 3 September 2004 Abstract The Wadi Mubarak belt in Egypt strikes west­east (and

  1. Using cosmogenic nuclides to decipher desert piedmont surface histories and process We used cosmogenic 10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nichols, Kyle K.

    Using cosmogenic nuclides to decipher desert piedmont surface histories and process rates We used. Comparison of the different data sets allows us to see similarities in piedmont behavior over time. Nuclide of sediment as it is transported down each piedmont. Nuclide activities in sediment samples from two soil pits

  2. First Tracer Test After Circulation in Desert Peak 27-15

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Rose, Peter

    Following the successful stimulation of Desert Peak target EGS well 27-15, a circulation test was initiated by injecting a conservative tracer (1,5-nds) in combination with a reactive tracer (7-amino-1,3-naphthalene disulfonate). The closest production well 74-21 was monitored over the subsequent several months.

  3. Interactive effects of keystone rodents on the structure of desert grassland arthropod communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Ana

    Interactive effects of keystone rodents on the structure of desert grassland arthropod communities to as keystones. However, little is known about the interactive effects of these species where they co keystone species of grassland ecosystems, creating a mosaic of unique habitats on the landscape through

  4. GALEX DIFFUSE OBSERVATIONS OF THE SKY: THE DATA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murthy, Jayant

    2014-08-01

    I present tabulations of the diffuse observations made by the GALEX spacecraft in two UV bands (FUV: 1539 Å and NUV: 2316 Å) from the (almost) final data release of the GALEX spacecraft (GR6/GR7). This data release includes all the FUV observations and the majority of the NUV observations. I discuss overall trends in the data but the primary purpose of this paper is to make the data available to the public. The data files described in this paper are hosted by the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes at the Space Telescope Science Insitute from whence they may be downloaded. For ease of use, I have also created maps of the diffuse radiation in both bands over the entire observed sky at 6' resolution.

  5. Cool covered sky-splitting spectrum-splitting FK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohedano, Rubén; Chaves, Julio; Falicoff, Waqidi; Hernandez, Maikel; Sorgato, Simone; Miñano, Juan C.; Benitez, Pablo; Buljan, Marina

    2014-09-26

    Placing a plane mirror between the primary lens and the receiver in a Fresnel Köhler (FK) concentrator gives birth to a quite different CPV system where all the high-tech components sit on a common plane, that of the primary lens panels. The idea enables not only a thinner device (a half of the original) but also a low cost 1-step manufacturing process for the optics, automatic alignment of primary and secondary lenses, and cell/wiring protection. The concept is also compatible with two different techniques to increase the module efficiency: spectrum splitting between a 3J and a BPC Silicon cell for better usage of Direct Normal Irradiance DNI, and sky splitting to harvest the energy of the diffuse radiation and higher energy production throughout the year. Simple calculations forecast the module would convert 45% of the DNI into electricity.

  6. Ancient peoples had the benefit of dark skies and experienced the full spectacle of the starry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the sky in winter and high in summer, as well as giving the daily alternation of day and night. Some area low in the southern sky up to a few centuries before the digging of the ditch and bank. Ancient

  7. Aldo Morselli, INFN Roma Tor Vergata 1 Search for Dark Matter in the Sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morselli, Aldo

    Aldo Morselli, INFN Roma Tor Vergata 1 Search for Dark Matter in the Sky Aldo Morselli INFN Roma Tor Vergata 14 Jun 2012 Dark Side of the Univers 2012 Buzios 10-15 June #12;Aldo Morselli, INFN Roma press/web releases. #12;Aldo Morselli, INFN Roma Tor Vergata 10 The Fermi LAT gamma-ray sky 3-year all

  8. Proposed (to) EXIST: Hard X-ray Imaging All Sky Survey/Monitor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. E. Grindlay; T. A. Prince; F. Harrison; N. Gehrels; C. J. Hailey; B. Ramsey; M. C. Weisskopf; G. K. Skinner; P. Ubertini

    1998-01-01

    The hard x-ray (10-600 keV) sky is inherently time variable and yet has neither been surveyed nor monitored with a sensitive imaging telescope. The Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST) is a mission concept, proposed for MIDEX, which would conduct the first imaging all-sky hard x-ray survey as well as provide a sensitive all sky monitor. With $\\sim 60%$ sky coverage each orbit, and full sky coverage each 50 days, hard x-ray studies of gamma-ray bursts, AGN, galactic transients, x-ray binaries and accretion-powered pulsars can be conducted over a wide range of timescales. We summarize the scientific objectives of EXIST for both the survey and monitoring objectives. We describe the mission concept and the instrumentation approach, which would incorporate a large area array of Cd-Zn-Te (CZT) detectors, as well as some of our ongoing development of CZT array detectors.

  9. Rock melting tool with annealer section

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bussod, Gilles Y. (Santa Fe, NM); Dick, Aaron J. (Oakland, CA); Cort, George E. (Montrose, CO)

    1998-01-01

    A rock melting penetrator is provided with an afterbody that rapidly cools a molten geological structure formed around the melting tip of the penetrator to the glass transition temperature for the surrounding molten glass-like material. An annealing afterbody then cools the glass slowly from the glass transition temperature through the annealing temperature range to form a solid self-supporting glass casing. This allows thermally induced strains to relax by viscous deformations as the molten glass cools and prevents fracturing of the resulting glass liner. The quality of the glass lining is improved, along with its ability to provide a rigid impermeable casing in unstable rock formations.

  10. Solar Power in the Desert: Are the current large-scale solar developments really improving California’s environment?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Michael F.; McHughen, Alan

    2011-01-01

    D EVELOPMENT I SSUES Solar Power in the Desert: Are the2 Most of the large-scale solar power projects utilize largethat will be affected by solar power facilities. There are

  11. Wood-Producing Sunflower? Mining Genetic Diversity in Desert-Dwelling Wild Species (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, Steve

    2010-03-25

    Steve Knapp from Monsanto on "Wood-Producing Sunflower? Mining Genetic Diversity in Desert-Dwelling Wild Species" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  12. Wood-Producing Sunflower? Mining Genetic Diversity in Desert-Dwelling Wild Species (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Knapp, Steve

    2011-04-26

    Steve Knapp from Monsanto on "Wood-Producing Sunflower? Mining Genetic Diversity in Desert-Dwelling Wild Species" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  13. ANCIENT CALENDRICAL OBSERVING SITES IN CALIFORNIA’S MOJAVE DESERT AND SIERRA NEVADA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Merle F

    2012-01-01

    Rocks 4 Observing the Equinox 5 Mid-Season Day at Counselmodels: Shadow tracks on day of autumnal equinox . . .on day after autumnal equinox . Barrier Hill: Cairn, with

  14. SKY Computers, Inc. Company Confidential. All Rights Reserved 08/27/03 Slide 1 Health Management System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kepner, Jeremy

    © SKY Computers, Inc. Company Confidential. All Rights Reserved 08/27/03 Slide 1 Health Management Complexity Input Output Input Output Compare #12;© SKY Computers, Inc. Company Confidential. All Rights available) · Repair/Recovery #12;© SKY Computers, Inc. Company Confidential. All Rights Reserved 08

  15. LASER SCANNING TECHNOLOGY FOR ROCK ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LASER SCANNING TECHNOLOGY FOR ROCK ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS Thorsten Schulz Institute of Geodesy or on the excavation surface. The use of laser scanners enables one to cope with practical constraints encountered surfaces regardless of the lighting conditions. Therefore, laser scanners have the potential to be employed

  16. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Donald W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01

    A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

  17. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, D.W.

    1997-11-11

    A method is described for extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid inventory of the reservoir. 4 figs.

  18. Transfer of hot dry rock technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.C.

    1985-11-01

    The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program has focused worldwide attention on the facts that natural heat in the upper part of the earth's crust is an essentially inexhaustible energy resource which is accessible almost everywhere, and that practical means now exist to extract useful heat from the hot rock and bring it to the earth's surface for beneficial use. The Hot Dry Rock Program has successfully constructed and operated a prototype hot, dry rock energy system that produced heat at the temperatures and rates required for large-scale space heating and many other direct uses of heat. The Program is now in the final stages of constructing a larger, hotter system potentially capable of satisfying the energy requirements of a small, commercial, electrical-generating power plant. To create and understand the behavior of such system, it has been necessary to develop or support the development of a wide variety of equipment, instruments, techniques, and analyses. Much of this innovative technology has already been transferred to the private sector and to other research and development programs, and more is continuously being made available as its usefulness is demonstrated. This report describes some of these developments and indicates where this new technology is being used or can be useful to industry, engineering, and science.

  19. Sensitivity of full-sky experiments to large scale cosmic ray anisotropies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denton, Peter B

    2015-01-01

    The two main advantages of space-based observation of extreme energy ($\\gtrsim5\\times10^{19}$ eV) cosmic rays (EECRs) over ground based observatories are the increased field of view and the full-sky coverage with nearly uniform systematics across the entire sky. The former guarantees increased statistics, whereas the latter enables a clean partitioning of the sky into spherical harmonics. The discovery of anisotropies would help to identify the long sought origin of EECRs. We begin an investigation of the reach of a full-sky space-based experiment such as EUSO to detect anisotropies in the extreme-energy cosmic-ray sky compared to ground based partial-sky experiments such as the Pierre Auger Observatory and Telescope Array. The technique is explained here, and simulations for a Universe with just two nonzero multipoles, monopole plus either dipole or quadrupole, are presented. These simulations quantify the advantages of space-based, all-sky coverage.

  20. SEARCH FOR UNDERGROUND OPENINGS FOR IN SITU TEST FACILITIES IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallenberg, H.A.

    2010-01-01

    of the precambrian crystalline rocks, Park and Jeffersonmap 1-413. 1965, The crystalline rocks of South Carolina,TEST FACILITIES IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK Harold A. Wollenberg,

  1. FACTORS IN THE DESIGN OF A ROCK MECHANICS CENTRIFUGE FOR STRONG ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, George B

    1984-01-01

    1 . Capacit i es of known centrifuges and v proposed SoftSolla I rock mechanics centrifuge r, ---------1~ --- dxB. , (1980), Geotechnical centrifuges for model studies and

  2. Modeling of crack initiation, propagation and coalescence in rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonçalves da Silva, Bruno Miguel

    2009-01-01

    Natural or artificial fracturing of rock plays a very important role in geologic processes and for engineered structures in and on rock. Fracturing is associated with crack initiation, propagation and coalescence, which ...

  3. Project Reports for Standing Rock Sioux Tribe- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe (SRST) will perform a feasibility study and associated tasks over the course of two years on sites within the exterior boundaries of the Standing Rock Sioux...

  4. Inversion of seismic attributes for petrophysical parameters and rock facies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahraeeni, Mohammad Sadegh

    2011-01-01

    Prediction of rock and fluid properties such as porosity, clay content, and water saturation is essential for exploration and development of hydrocarbon reservoirs. Rock and fluid property maps obtained from such predictions ...

  5. 2.20 Properties of Rocks and Minerals -Magnetic Properties of Rocks and Minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Scale Exchange Interactions and Magnetic Structure in Fe-Bearing Oxides Atomistic Simulations2.20 Properties of Rocks and Minerals - Magnetic Properties of Rocks and Minerals R. J. Harrison, R.20.5.1.3 2.20.5.2 2.20.5.2.1 2.20.5.2.2 2.20.5.2.3 2.20.5.2.4 Introduction Magnetism at the Atomic Length

  6. New Approaches to Object Classification in Synoptic Sky Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Donalek; A. Mahabal; S. G. Djorgovski; S. Marney; A. Drake; E. Glikman; M. J. Graham; R. Williams

    2008-10-27

    Digital synoptic sky surveys pose several new object classification challenges. In surveys where real-time detection and classification of transient events is a science driver, there is a need for an effective elimination of instrument-related artifacts which can masquerade as transient sources in the detection pipeline, e.g., unremoved large cosmic rays, saturation trails, reflections, crosstalk artifacts, etc. We have implemented such an Artifact Filter, using a supervised neural network, for the real-time processing pipeline in the Palomar-Quest (PQ) survey. After the training phase, for each object it takes as input a set of measured morphological parameters and returns the probability of it being a real object. Despite the relatively low number of training cases for many kinds of artifacts, the overall artifact classification rate is around 90%, with no genuine transients misclassified during our real-time scans. Another question is how to assign an optimal star-galaxy classification in a multi-pass survey, where seeing and other conditions change between different epochs, potentially producing inconsistent classifications for the same object. We have implemented a star/galaxy multipass classifier that makes use of external and a priori knowledge to find the optimal classification from the individually derived ones. Both these techniques can be applied to other, similar surveys and data sets.

  7. Optical Identification of the ASCA Large Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Akiyama; K. Ohta; T. Yamada; N. Kashikawa; M. Yagi; W. Kawasaki; M. Sakano; T. Tsuru; Y. Ueda; T. Takahashi; I. Lehmann; G. Hasinger; W. Voges

    2000-01-17

    We present results of optical identification of the X-ray sources detected in the ASCA Large Sky Survey. Optical spectroscopic observations were done for 34 X-ray sources which were detected with the SIS in the 2-7 keV band above 3.5 sigma. The sources are identified with 30 AGNs, 2 clusters of galaxies, and 1 galactic star. Only 1 source is still unidentified. The flux limit of the sample corresponds to 1 x 10^{-13} erg s^{-1} cm^{-2} in the 2-10 keV band. Based on the sample, the paper discusses optical and X-ray spectral properties of the AGNs, contribution of the sources to the Cosmic X-ray Background, and redshift and luminosity distributions of the AGNs. An interesting result is that the redshift distribution of the AGNs suggests a deficiency of high-redshift (0.5 10^{44} erg s^{-1}) absorbed narrow-line AGNs (so called type 2 QSOs).

  8. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Monitor Telescope Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. L. Tucker; S. Kent; M. W. Richmond; J. Annis; J. A. Smith; S. S. Allam; C. T. Rodgers; J. L. Stute; J. K. Adelman-McCarthy; J. Brinkmann; M. Doi; D. Finkbeiner; M. Fukugita; J. Goldston; B. Greenway; J. E. Gunn; J. S. Hendry; D. W. Hogg; S. -I. Ichikawa; Z. Ivezic; G. R. Knapp; H. Lampeitl; B. C. Lee; H. Lin; T. A. McKay; A. Merrelli; J. A. Munn; E. H. Neilsen, Jr.; H. J. Newberg; G. T. Richards; D. J. Schlegel; C. Stoughton; A. Uomoto; B. Yanny

    2006-08-26

    The photometric calibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a multi-step process which involves data from three different telescopes: the 1.0-m telescope at the US Naval Observatory (USNO), Flagstaff Station, Arizona (which was used to establish the SDSS standard star network); the SDSS 0.5-m Photometric Telescope (PT) at the Apache Point Observatory (APO), New Mexico (which calculates nightly extinctions and calibrates secondary patch transfer fields); and the SDSS 2.5-m telescope at APO (which obtains the imaging data for the SDSS proper). In this paper, we describe the Monitor Telescope Pipeline, MTPIPE, the software pipeline used in processing the data from the single-CCD telescopes used in the photometric calibration of the SDSS (i.e., the USNO 1.0-m and the PT). We also describe transformation equations that convert photometry on the USNO-1.0m u'g'r'i'z' system to photometry the SDSS 2.5m ugriz system and the results of various validation tests of the MTPIPE software. Further, we discuss the semi-automated PT factory, which runs MTPIPE in the day-to-day standard SDSS operations at Fermilab. Finally, we discuss the use of MTPIPE in current SDSS-related projects, including the Southern u'g'r'i'z' Standard Star project, the u'g'r'i'z' Open Star Clusters project, and the SDSS extension (SDSS-II).

  9. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Monitor Telescope Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tucker, D L; Richmond, M W; Annis, J; Smith, J A; Allam, S S; Rodgers, C T; Stute, J L; Adelman-McCarthy, J K; Brinkmann, J; Doi, M; Finkbeiner, D; Fukugita, M; Goldston, J; Greenway, B; Gunn, J E; Hendry, J S; Hogg, D W; Ichikawa, S I; Ivezic, Z; Knapp, G R; Lampeitl, H; Lee, B C; Lin, H; McKay, T A; Merrelli, A; Munn, J A; Neilsen, E H; Newberg, H J; Richards, G T; Schlegel, D J; Stoughton, C; Uomoto, A; Yanny, B

    2006-01-01

    The photometric calibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a multi-step process which involves data from three different telescopes: the 1.0-m telescope at the US Naval Observatory (USNO), Flagstaff Station, Arizona (which was used to establish the SDSS standard star network); the SDSS 0.5-m Photometric Telescope (PT) at the Apache Point Observatory (APO), New Mexico (which calculates nightly extinctions and calibrates secondary patch transfer fields); and the SDSS 2.5-m telescope at APO (which obtains the imaging data for the SDSS proper). In this paper, we describe the Monitor Telescope Pipeline, MTPIPE, the software pipeline used in processing the data from the single-CCD telescopes used in the photometric calibration of the SDSS (i.e., the USNO 1.0-m and the PT). We also describe transformation equations that convert photometry on the USNO-1.0m u'g'r'i'z' system to photometry the SDSS 2.5m ugriz system and the results of various validation tests of the MTPIPE software. Further, we discuss the s...

  10. Sloan Digital Sky Survey observing time tracking and efficiency measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric H. Neilsen, Jr.; Richard G. Kron; William N. Boroski

    2002-10-16

    Accurate and consistent time tracking is essential for evaluating the efficiency of survey observing operations and identifying areas that need improvement. Off the shelf time tracking software, which requires users to enter activities by hand, proved tedious to use and insufficiently exible. In this paper, we present an alternate time tracking system developed specifically for Sloan Digital Sky Survey observing. This system uses an existing logging system, murmur, to log the beginning and ending times of tracked circumstances, including activities, weather, and problems which effect observing. Operations software automatically generates most entries for routine observing activities; in a night of routine observing, time tracking requires little or no attention from the observing staff. A graphical user interface allows observers to make entries marking time lost to weather and equipment, and to correct inaccurate entries made by the observing software. The last is necessary when the change in activity is not marked by a change in the state of the software or instruments, or when the time is used for engineering or other observing not part of routine survey data collection. A second utility generates reports of time usage from these logs. These reports include totals for the time spent for each observing task, time lost to weather and problems, efficiency statistics for comparison with the survey baseline, and a detailed listing of what activities and problems were present in any covered time period.

  11. Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric telescope automation and observing software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric H. Neilsen, Jr. et al.

    2002-10-16

    The photometric telescope (PT) provides observations necessary for the photometric calibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Because the attention of the observing staff is occupied by the operation of the 2.5 meter telescope which takes the survey data proper, the PT must reliably take data with little supervision. In this paper we describe the PT's observing program, MOP, which automates most tasks necessary for observing. MOP's automated target selection is closely modeled on the actions a human observer might take, and is built upon a user interface that can be (and has been) used for manual operation. This results in an interface that makes it easy for an observer to track the activities of the automating procedures and intervene with minimum disturbance when necessary. MOP selects targets from the same list of standard star and calibration fields presented to the user, and chooses standard star fields covering ranges of airmass, color, and time necessary to monitor atmospheric extinction and produce a photometric solution. The software determines when additional standard star fields are unnecessary, and selects survey calibration fields according to availability and priority. Other automated features of MOP, such as maintaining the focus and keeping a night log, are also built around still functional manual interfaces, allowing the observer to be as active in observing as desired; MOP's automated features may be used as tools for manual observing, ignored entirely, or allowed to run the telescope with minimal supervision when taking routine data.

  12. Ecological energetics of the desert tortoise (Gopherus Agassizii): Effects of rainfall and drought

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, C.C.

    1996-09-01

    To elucidate ecological effects of variation in the temporal distribution of a limiting resource (water in the Mojave Desert), energetics of two free-living populations of desert tortoises (Gopherus [=Xerobates] agassizii) were studied concurrently over 18 mo with use of doubly-labeled water. Field metabolic rates (FMR) and feeding rates were highly variable. This variability was manifested at several levels, including seasonal changes within populations, year-to-year differences within populations, and differences between populations. Underlying observed patterns and contrasts was considerable variation among individuals. Much of the variation in energetic variables was associated with a single climatic variable, rainfall. Seasonal, annual, and interpopulation differences in FMR and foraging rates corresponded to differences in availability of free-standing water from rainstorms. Some differences among individuals were apparently due to differences in proclivity or ability to drink. Tortoises had very low FMRs relative to other reptiles, allowed them to tolerate long periods of chronic energy shortage during a drought. Calculations suggested that tortoises experienced a net loss of energy shortage during a drought and tortoises experienced a net loss of energy on their spring diet of succulent annual plants. If so, tortoises require drier forage to accrue an energy profit, emphasizing reliance on drinking rainwater. Further, it suggests that growth (as protein deposition) and net acquisition of energy may be temporally decoupled in desert tortoises, with potential consequences for geographic variation in life history. Energy acquisition and expenditure in desert tortoises are strongly constrained by the contingencies of rainfall, both indirectly through effects on availability and quality of food, and directly through reliance on free-standing water for drinking, which is apparently necessary for achieving a net annual energy profit. 61 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. A CONSTITUTIVE MODEL TO PREDICT THE HYDROMECHANICAL BEHAVIOUR OF ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    in the presence of water to better assess the stability of rock structures under many situations. The accurate conditions. A rock mass behaviour can also be influenced by the water flow and ensuing pore pressure. For example, a previously stable rock structure can become unstable with an increase of water pressure inside

  14. A Calibrated Measurement of the Near-IR Continuum Sky Brightness Using Magellan/FIRE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Peter William

    We characterize the near-IR sky background from 308 observations with the Folded-port InfraRed Echellette (FIRE) spectrograph at Magellan. A subset of 105 observations selected to minimize lunar and thermal effects gives ...

  15. A SIMPLIFIED PROCEDURE FOR CALCULATING THE EFFECTS OF DAYLIGHT FROM CLEAR SKIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan, Harvey J.

    2012-01-01

    Reflected Component or IRC). The total for these threeDaylight Factor SC + ERC + IRC The Sky Component: The skycomponent is given as: Average IRC where T Transmittance of

  16. OT 060420: A Seemingly Optical Transient Recorded by All-Sky Cameras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lior Shamir; Robert J. Nemiroff

    2006-07-03

    We report on a ~5th magnitude flash detected for approximately 10 minutes by two CONCAM all-sky cameras located in Cerro Pachon - Chile and La Palma - Spain. A third all-sky camera, located in Cerro Paranal - Chile did not detect the flash, and therefore the authors of this paper suggest that the flash was a series of cosmic-ray hits, meteors, or satellite glints. Another proposed hypothesis is that the flash was an astronomical transient with variable luminosity. In this paper we discuss bright optical transient detection using fish-eye all-sky monitors, analyze the apparently false-positive optical transient, and propose possible causes to false optical transient detection in all-sky cameras.

  17. COLORS AND KINEMATICS OF L DWARFS FROM THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Sarah J.

    We present a sample of 484 L dwarfs, 210 of which are newly discovered from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 spectroscopic database. We combine this sample with known L dwarfs to investigate their ...

  18. Prospects for Future Very High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sky Survey: Impact...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Prospects for Future Very High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sky Survey: Impact of Secondary Gamma Rays Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Prospects for Future Very High-Energy...

  19. A Radiometric All-Sky Infrared Camera (RASICAM) for DES/CTIO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Peter M.; Rogers, Howard; Schindler, Rafe H.; /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    A novel radiometric all-sky infrared camera [RASICAM] has been constructed to allow automated real-time quantitative assessment of night sky conditions for the Dark Energy Camera [DECam] located on the Blanco Telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. The camera is optimized to detect the position, motion and optical depth of thin, high (8-10km) cirrus clouds and contrails by measuring their apparent temperature above the night sky background. The camera system utilizes a novel wide-field equiresolution catadioptic mirror system that provides sky coverage of 2{pi} azimuth and 14-90{sup o} from zenith. Several new technological and design innovations allow the RASICAM system to provide unprecedented cloud detection and IR-based photometricity quantification. The design of the RASICAM system is presented.

  20. Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR): Instrument Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunagan, Stephen; Johnson, Roy; Zavaleta, Jhony; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Flynn, Connor J.; Redemann, Jens; Shinozuka, Yohei; Livingston, J.; Segal Rozenhaimer, Michal

    2013-08-06

    The Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) combines airborne sun tracking and sky scanning with diffraction spectroscopy, to improve knowledge of atmospheric constituents and their links to air-pollution/climate. Direct beam hyper-spectral measurement of optical depth improves retrievals of gas constituents and determination of aerosol properties. Sky scanning enhances retrievals of aerosol type and size distribution. 4STAR measurements will tighten the closure between satellite and ground-based measurements. 4STAR incorporates a modular sun-tracking/ sky-scanning optical head with fiber optic signal transmission to rack mounted spectrometers, permitting miniaturization of the external optical head, and future detector evolution. Technical challenges include compact optical collector design, radiometric dynamic range and stability, and broad spectral coverage. Test results establishing the performance of the instrument against the full range of operational requirements are presented, along with calibration, engineering flight test, and scientific field campaign data and results.

  1. A Phased Array Approach to Rock Blasting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leslie Gertsch; Jason Baird

    2006-07-01

    A series of laboratory-scale simultaneous two-hole shots was performed in a rock simulant (mortar) to record the shock wave interference patterns produced in the material. The purpose of the project as a whole was to evaluate the usefulness of phased array techniques of blast design, using new high-precision delay technology. Despite high-speed photography, however, we were unable to detect the passage of the shock waves through the samples to determine how well they matched the expected interaction geometry. The follow-up mine-scale tests were therefore not conducted. Nevertheless, pattern analysis of the vectors that would be formed by positive interference of the shockwaves from multiple charges in an ideal continuous, homogeneous, isotropic medium indicate the potential for powerful control of blast design, given precise characterization of the target rock mass.

  2. Big Rock Point severe accident management strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brogan, B.A. [Consumers Power Co., Charlevoix, MI (United States); Gabor, J.R. [Dames and Moore, Westmont, IL (United States)

    1996-07-01

    December 1994, the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) issued guidance relative to the formal industry position on Severe Accident Management (SAM) approved by the NEI Strategic Issues Advisory Committee on November 4, 1994. This paper summarizes how Big Rock Point (BRP) has and continues to address SAM strategies. The historical accounting portion of this presentation includes a description of how the following projects identified and defined the current Big Rock Point SAM strategies: the 1981 Level 3 Probabilistic Risk Assessment performance; the development of the Plant Specific Technical Guidelines from which the symptom oriented Emergency Operating Procedures (EOPs) were developed; the Control Room Design Review; and, the recent completion of the Individual Plant Evaluation (IPE). In addition to the historical presentation deliberation, this paper the present activities that continue to stress SAM strategies.

  3. Ground-Dwelling Arthropod and Small Mammal Responses to Anthropogenic Disturbances Within Southern California Deserts: From Plant Invasions to Altered Fire Regimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hulton VanTassel, Heather Lynn

    2015-01-01

    selected California sand dunes. Bureau of Land Management,Coachella Valley sand dunes, Coleoptera: (Tenebrionidae).schemes within a desert sand dune landscape. Journal of Arid

  4. Milagro: A TeV Gamma-Ray Monitor of the Northern Hemisphere Sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    transients, such as gamma-ray bursts, and all sky surveys are diÆcult. A new type of TeV -ray observatoryMilagro: A TeV Gamma-Ray Monitor of the Northern Hemisphere Sky B.L. Dingus 1 , R. Atkins 1 , W type of very high energy (> a few 100 GeV) gamma-ray observatory, Milagro, has been built with a large

  5. CORRELATIONS AMONG GALAXY PROPERTIES FROM THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Zhongmu; Mao Caiyan, E-mail: zhongmu.li@gmail.com [Institute for Astronomy and History of Science and Technology, Dali University, Dali 671003 (China)

    2013-07-01

    Galaxies are complex systems with many properties. Correlations among galaxy properties can supply important clues for studying the formation and evolution of galaxies. Using principal component analysis and least-squares fitting, this paper investigates the correlations among galactic parameters involving more properties (color, morphology, stellar population, and absolute magnitude) than previous studies. We use a volume-limited sample (whole sample) of 75,423 galaxies that was selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 2 and divided into two subsamples (blue and red samples) using a critical color of (g - r) = 0.70 mag. In addition to recovering some previous results, we also obtain some new results. First, all separators for dividing galaxies into two groups can be related via good parameter-first principal component (PC1) correlations. A critical PC1 that indicates whether or not stellar age (or the evolution of a stellar population over time) is important can be used to separate galaxies. This suggests that a statistical parameter, PC1, is helpful in understanding the physical separators of galaxies. In addition, stellar age is shown to be unimportant for red galaxies, while both stellar age and mass are dominating parameters of blue galaxies. This suggests that the various numbers of dominating parameters of galaxies may result from the use of different samples. Finally, some parameters are shown to be correlated, and quantitative fits for a few correlations are obtained, e.g., log(t) = 8.57 + 1.65 (g - r) for the age (log t) and color (g - r) of blue galaxies and log (M{sub *}) = 4.31 - 0.30 M{sub r} for the stellar mass (log M{sub *}) and absolute magnitude (M{sub r}) of red galaxies. The median relationships between various parameter pairs are also presented for comparison.

  6. DISCRIMINATING BETWEEN CLOUDY, HAZY, AND CLEAR SKY EXOPLANETS USING REFRACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misra, Amit K.; Meadows, Victoria S.

    2014-11-01

    We propose a method to distinguish between cloudy, hazy, and clear sky (free of clouds and hazes) exoplanet atmospheres that could be applicable to upcoming large aperture space- and ground-based telescopes such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). These facilities will be powerful tools for characterizing transiting exoplanets, but only after a considerable amount of telescope time is devoted to a single planet. A technique that could provide a relatively rapid means of identifying haze-free targets (which may be more valuable targets for characterization) could potentially increase the science return for these telescopes. Our proposed method utilizes broadband observations of refracted light in the out-of-transit spectrum. Light refracted through an exoplanet atmosphere can lead to an increase of flux prior to ingress and subsequent to egress. Because this light is transmitted at pressures greater than those for typical cloud and haze layers, the detection of refracted light could indicate a cloud- or haze-free atmosphere. A detection of refracted light could be accomplished in <10 hr for Jovian exoplanets with JWST and <5 hr for super-Earths/mini-Neptunes with E-ELT. We find that this technique is most effective for planets with equilibrium temperatures between 200 and 500 K, which may include potentially habitable planets. A detection of refracted light for a potentially habitable planet would strongly suggest the planet was free of a global cloud or haze layer, and therefore a promising candidate for follow-up observations.

  7. Low Pore Connectivity in Natural Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Qinhong; Ewing, Robert P.; Dultz, Stefan

    2012-05-15

    As repositories for CO? and radioactive waste, as oil and gas reservoirs, and as contaminated sites needing remediation, rock formations play a central role in energy and environmental management. The connectivity of the rock's porespace strongly affects fluid flow and solute transport. This work examines pore connectivity and its implications for fluid flow and chemical transport. Three experimental approaches (imbibition, tracer concentration profiles, and imaging) were used in combination with network modeling. In the imbibition results, three types of imbibition slope [log (cumulative imbibition) vs. log (imbibition time)] were found: the classical 0.5, plus 0.26, and 0.26 transitioning to 0.5. The imbibition slope of 0.26 seen in Indiana sandstone, metagraywacke, and Barnett shale indicates low pore connectivity, in contrast to the slope of 0.5 seen in the well-connected Berea sandstone. In the tracer profile work, rocks exhibited different distances to the plateau porosity, consistent with the pore connectivity from the imbibition tests. Injection of a molten metal into connected pore spaces, followed by 2-D imaging of the solidified alloy in polished thin sections, allowed direct assessment of pore structure and lateral connection in the rock samples. Pore-scale network modeling gave results consistent with measurements, confirming pore connectivity as the underlying cause of both anomalous behaviors: imbibition slope not having the classical value of 0.5, and accessible porosity being a function of distance from the edge. A poorly connected porespace will exhibit anomalous behavior in fluid flow and chemical transport, such as a lower imbibition slope (in air–water system) and diffusion rate than expected from classical behavior.

  8. Rock Chalk Report, January 9, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-09

    to both Baseball and Softball) on sale now! Season Tickets starting as low as $50! Earn two Williams Education Fund Priority Points per sport when you buy Baseball and Softball season tickets! Spirit Squad The University... of Kansas Spirit Squad The KU Cheer Squad and Rock Chalk Dancers will perform their National Competition routines on January 13 @ 4PM & 6PM! This event will be prior to their departure for Orlando to compete in the UCA/UDA College Nationals. This event...

  9. Hydrothermally Deposited Rock | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNewTexas:Hydrothermally Deposited Rock Jump to: navigation,

  10. Rock Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: Energy Resources Jump to:Rock

  11. Rock, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: Energy Resources JumpMtSampling Jump to:Rock,

  12. Squirt flow in fully saturated rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dvorkin, J.; Mavko, G.; Nur, A. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics] [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics

    1995-01-01

    The authors estimate velocity/frequency dispersion and attenuation in fully saturated rocks by employing the squirt-flow mechanism of solid-fluid interaction. In this model, pore fluid is squeezed from thin soft cracks into the surrounding large pores. Information about the compliance of these soft cracks at low confining pressures is extracted from high-pressure velocity data. The frequency dependence of squirt-induced pressure in the soft cracks is linked with the porosity and permeability of the soft pore space, and the characteristic squirt-flow length. These unknown parameters are combined into one expression that is assumed to be a fundamental rock property that does not depend on frequency. The appropriate value of this expression for a given rock can be found by matching the authors theoretical predictions with the experimental measurements of attenuation or velocity. The low-frequency velocity limits, as given by their model, are identical to those predicted by Gassmann`s formula. The high-frequency limits may significant exceed those given by the Biot theory: the high-frequency frame bulk modulus is close to that measured at high confining pressure. They have applied their model to D`Euville Limestone, Navajo Sandstone, and Westerly Granite. The model realistically predicts the observed velocity/frequency dispersion, and attenuation.

  13. Gage for measuring displacements in rock samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcomb, David J. (Albuquerque, NM); McNamee, Michael J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1986-01-01

    A gage for measuring diametral displacement within a rock sample for use in a rock mechanics laboratory and in the field, comprises a support ring housing a linear variable differential transformer, a mounting screw, and a leaf spring. The mounting screw is adjustable and defines a first point of contact with the rock sample. The leaf spring has opposite ends fixed to the inner periphery of the mounting ring. An intermediate portion of the leaf spring projecting radially inward from the ring is formed with a dimple defining a second point of contact with the sample. The first and second points of contact are diametrically opposed to each other. The LVDT is mounted in the ring with its axis parallel to the line of measurement and its core rod received in the dimple of the leaf spring. Any change in the length of the line between the first and second support points is directly communicated to the LVDT. The leaf spring is rigid to completely support lateral forces so that the LVDT is free of all load for improved precision.

  14. Gage for measuring displacements in rock samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcomb, D.J.; McNamee, M.J.

    1985-07-18

    A gage for measuring diametral displacement within a rock sample for use in a rock mechanics laboratory and in the field, comprises a support ring housing a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT), a mounting screw, and a leaf spring. The mounting screw is adjustable and defines a first point of contact with the rock sample. The leaf spring has opposite ends fixed to the inner periphery of the mounting ring. An intermediate portion of the leaf spring projecting radially inward from the ring is formed with a dimple defining a second point of contact with the sample. The first and second points of contact are diametrically opposed to each other. The LVDT is mounted in the ring with its axis parallel to the line of measurement and its core rod received in the dimple of the leaf spring. Any change in the length of the line between the first and second support points is directly communicated to the LVDT. The leaf spring is rigid to completely support lateral forces so that the LVDT is free of all load for improved precision.

  15. GEOTECHNICAL ASSESSMENT AND INSTRUMENTATION NEEDS FOR NUCLEAR WASTE ISOLATION IN CRYSTALLINE AND ARGILLACEOUS ROCKS SYMPOSIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01

    Characterization of Rock Masses Structural GeologicalCharacterization of Rock Masses . • • • • • • • • 5.2.1 Structural Geological

  16. Night-sky brightness monitoring in Hong Kong - a city-wide light pollution assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pun, Chun Shing Jason

    2011-01-01

    Results of the first comprehensive light pollution survey in Hong Kong are presented. The night-sky brightness was measured and monitored around the city using a portable light sensing device called the Sky Quality Meter over a 15-month period beginning in March 2008. A total of 1,957 data sets were taken at 199 distinct locations, including urban and rural sites covering all 18 Administrative Districts of Hong Kong. The survey shows that the environmental light pollution problem in Hong Kong is severe - the urban night-skies (sky brightness at 15.0 mag per arcsec square) are on average ~100 times brighter than at the darkest rural sites (20.1 mag per arcsec square), indicating that the high lighting densities in the densely populated residential and commercial areas lead to light pollution. In the worst polluted urban location studied, the night-sky at 13.2 mag per arcsec square can be over 500 times brighter than the darkest sites in Hong Kong. The observed night-sky brightness is found to be affected by hu...

  17. Multiphase fluid flow and subsequent geochemical transport in variably saturated fractured rocks: 1. Approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

    2000-01-01

    copper enrichment in the Atacama Desert, Northern Chile (Alpers and Brimhall, 1988), hydrothermal alteration at a potential high-level nuclear waste

  18. THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY REVERBERATION MAPPING PROJECT: TECHNICAL OVERVIEW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Yue; Brandt, W. N.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Hall, Patrick B.; McGreer, Ian D.; Fan, Xiaohui; Anderson, Scott F.; Chen, Yuguang; Denney, Kelly D.; Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Gao, Yang; Green, Paul J.; Greene, Jenny E.; Ho, Luis C.; Horne, Keith; Kelly, Brandon C.; and others

    2015-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping (SDSS-RM) project is a dedicated multi-object RM experiment that has spectroscopically monitored a sample of 849 broad-line quasars in a single 7 deg{sup 2} field with the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey spectrograph. The RM quasar sample is flux-limited to i {sub psf} = 21.7 mag, and covers a redshift range of 0.1 < z < 4.5 without any other cuts on quasar properties. Optical spectroscopy was performed during 2014 January-July dark/gray time, with an average cadence of ?4 days, totaling more than 30 epochs. Supporting photometric monitoring in the g and i bands was conducted at multiple facilities including the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) and the Steward Observatory Bok telescope in 2014, with a cadence of ?2 days and covering all lunar phases. The RM field (R.A., decl. = 14:14:49.00, +53:05:00.0) lies within the CFHT-LS W3 field, and coincides with the Pan-STARRS 1 (PS1) Medium Deep Field MD07, with three prior years of multi-band PS1 light curves. The SDSS-RM six month baseline program aims to detect time lags between the quasar continuum and broad line region (BLR) variability on timescales of up to several months (in the observed frame) for ?10% of the sample, and to anchor the time baseline for continued monitoring in the future to detect lags on longer timescales and at higher redshift. SDSS-RM is the first major program to systematically explore the potential of RM for broad-line quasars at z > 0.3, and will investigate the prospects of RM with all major broad lines covered in optical spectroscopy. SDSS-RM will provide guidance on future multi-object RM campaigns on larger scales, and is aiming to deliver more than tens of BLR lag detections for a homogeneous sample of quasars. We describe the motivation, design, and implementation of this program, and outline the science impact expected from the resulting data for RM and general quasar science.

  19. SURVEYING THE DYNAMIC RADIO SKY WITH THE LONG WAVELENGTH DEMONSTRATOR ARRAY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazio, T. Joseph W.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Lane, W. M.; Gross, C.; Kassim, N. E.; Hicks, B.; Polisensky, E.; Stewart, K.; Ray, P. S.; Wood, D.; York, J. A.; Kerkhoff, A.; Dalal, N. Paravastu; Cohen, A. S.; Erickson, W. C.

    2010-12-15

    This paper presents a search for radio transients at a frequency of 73.8 MHz (4 m wavelength) using the all-sky imaging capabilities of the Long Wavelength Demonstrator Array (LWDA). The LWDA was a 16-dipole phased array telescope, located on the site of the Very Large Array in New Mexico. The field of view of the individual dipoles was essentially the entire sky, and the number of dipoles was sufficiently small that a simple software correlator could be used to make all-sky images. From 2006 October to 2007 February, we conducted an all-sky transient search program, acquiring a total of 106 hr of data; the time sampling varied, being 5 minutes at the start of the program and improving to 2 minutes by the end of the program. We were able to detect solar flares, and in a special-purpose mode, radio reflections from ionized meteor trails during the 2006 Leonid meteor shower. We detected no transients originating outside of the solar system above a flux density limit of 500 Jy, equivalent to a limit of no more than about 10{sup -2} events yr{sup -1} deg{sup -2}, having a pulse energy density {approx}>1.5 x 10{sup -20} J m{sup -2} Hz{sup -1} at 73.8 MHz for pulse widths of about 300 s. This event rate is comparable to that determined from previous all-sky transient searches, but at a lower frequency than most previous all-sky searches. We believe that the LWDA illustrates how an all-sky imaging mode could be a useful operational model for low-frequency instruments such as the Low Frequency Array, the Long Wavelength Array station, the low-frequency component of the Square Kilometre Array, and potentially the Lunar Radio Array.

  20. Seismic Absorption and Modulus Measurements in Porous Rocks Under Fluid and Gas Flow-Physical and Chemical Effects: a Laboratory Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmut Spetzler

    2005-11-28

    This paper describes the culmination of a research project in which we investigated the complex modulus change in partially fluid saturated porous rocks. The investigation started with simple flow experiments over ''clean'' and ''contaminated'' surfaces, progressed to moduli measurements on partially filled single cracks, to measurements in ''clean'' and ''contaminated'' porous rocks and finally to a feasibility study in the field. For the experiments with the simple geometries we were able to measure fundamental physical properties such as contact angles of the meniscus and time dependent forces required to get the meniscus moving and to keep it moving at various velocities. From the data thus gathered we were able to interpret the complex elastic moduli data we measured in the partially saturated single cracks. While the geometry in real rocks is too complex to make precise calculations we determined that we had indeed identified the mechanisms responsible for the changes in the moduli we had measured. Thus encouraged by the laboratory studies we embarked on a field experiment in the desert of Arizona. The field site allowed for controlled irrigation. Instrumentation for fluid sampling and water penetration were already in place. The porous loosely consolidated rocks at the site were not ideal for finding the effects of the attenuation mechanism we had identified in the lab, but for logistic and cost constraint reasons we chose to field test the idea at that site. Tiltmeters and seismometers were installed and operated nearly continuously for almost 3 years. The field was irrigated with water in the fall of 2003 and with water containing a biosurfactant in the fall of 2004. We have indications that the biosurfactant irrigation has had a notable effect on the tilt data.

  1. Hot dry rock venture risks investigation:

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This study assesses a promising resource in central Utah as the potential site of a future commerical hot dry rock (HDR) facility for generating electricity. The results indicate that, if the HDR reservoir productivity equals expectations based on preliminary results from research projects to date, a 50 MWe HDR power facility at Roosevelt Hot Springs could generate power at cost competitive with coal-fired plants. However, it is imperative that the assumed productivity be demonstrated before funds are committed for a commercial facility. 72 refs., 39 figs., 38 tabs.

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Slick Rock

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers Co - OH 51SavannahMill SiteSlick Rock

  3. Category:Rock Density | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR Jump to:RAPID Roadmap ContactRock Density Jump to: navigation,

  4. Isotopic Analysis- Rock | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam:on OpeneiAlbanianStudy)savingsInformationRock Jump to:

  5. Resource Utilization and Coexistence of Seed-Eating Desert Rodents in Sand Dune Habitats Author(s): James H. Brown and Gerald A. Lieberman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, James H.

    Resource Utilization and Coexistence of Seed-Eating Desert Rodents in Sand Dune Habitats Author UTILIZATION AND COEXISTENCE OF SEED-EATING DESERT RODENTS IN SAND DUNE HABITATS' JAMES H. BROWN Department how these differences affect the utilization of seeds. Our estimates of total overlap in resource

  6. Banded Iron Formations from the Eastern Desert of Egypt: A new type of Ore? KHALIL, Khalil Isaac1 and EL-SHAZLY, Aley K.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Shazly, Aley

    Banded Iron Formations from the Eastern Desert of Egypt: A new type of Ore? KHALIL, Khalil Isaac1 and EL-SHAZLY, Aley K.2 1 Department of Geology, University of Alexandria, Egypt 2 Geology Department localities in an area approximately 30,000 km2 within the eastern desert of Egypt. With the exception

  7. The El Mayah molasse basin in the Eastern Desert of Egypt A. Shalaby a,b,*, K. Stuwe a,*, H. Fritz a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, Harald

    The El Mayah molasse basin in the Eastern Desert of Egypt A. Shalaby a,b,*, K. Stu¨we a,*, H. Fritz, Austria b Department of Geology, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt Received 8 September 2004; received of kilometres of the East- ern Desert of Egypt. Its sedimentary record shows that deposition occurred in two

  8. High-Tech Energy "Oasis" to Bloom in the Desert?1 by Christine Dell'Amore for www.nationalgeographic.com2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Bohemia, University of

    technologies designed to bring green4 living to the desert. The planned research center is part of the Sahara to build in deserts around the globe. Experts are now examining arid sites in Australia, the U and seawater make fresh water for growing crops, solar energy would be collected to generate power, and algae

  9. A Microcantilever Sensor Array for the Detection and Inventory of Desert Tortoises

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venedam, R. J.; Dillingham, T. R.

    2008-07-01

    We have designed and tested a portable instrument consisting of a small infrared camera coupled with an array of piezoresistive microcantilever sensors that is used to provide real-time, non-invasive data on desert tortoise den occupancy. The piezoresistive microcantilever (PMC) sensors are used to obtain a chemical “signature” of tortoise presence from the air deep within the dens, and provide data in cases where the camera cannot extend deep enough into the den to provide visual evidence of tortoise presence. The infrared camera was used to verify the PMC data during testing, and in many cases, such as shallower dens, may be used to provide exact numbers on den populations.

  10. Field Mapping At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbHFarinello GeothermalFideris Inc formerly1-2003)Emidio Desert Area (DOE

  11. Sensitivity analysis of GSI based mechanical characterization of rock mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ván, P

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the rock mechanical and rock engineering designs and calculations are frequently based on Geological Strength Index (GSI) method, because it is the only system that provides a complete set of mechanical properties for design purpose. Both the failure criteria and the deformation moduli of the rock mass can be calculated with GSI based equations, which consists of the disturbance factor, as well. The aim of this paper is the sensitivity analysis of GSI and disturbance factor dependent equations that characterize the mechanical properties of rock masses. The survey of the GSI system is not our purpose. The results show that the rock mass strength calculated by the Hoek-Brown failure criteria and both the Hoek-Diederichs and modified Hoek-Diederichs deformation moduli are highly sensitive to changes of both the GSI and the D factor, hence their exact determination is important for the rock engineering design.

  12. United States National Waste Terminal Storage argillaceous rock studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunton, G.D.

    1981-01-01

    The past and present argillaceous rock studies for the US National Waste Terminal Storage Program consist of: (1) evaluation of the geological characteristics of several widespread argillaceous formations in the United States; (2) laboratory studies of the physical and chemical properties of selected argillaceous rock samples; and (3) two full-scale in situ surface heater experiments that simulate the emplacement of heat-generating radioactive waste in argillaceous rock.

  13. Velocity and attenuation in partially molten rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.M.

    1980-10-10

    Interpretation of seismic velocity and attenuation in partially molten rocks has been limited, with few exceptions, to models that assume the melt to be distributed either as spheres or as thin films. However, other melt phase geometries, such as interconnected tubes along grain edges, might equally well account for seismic observations if there is a much larger fraction of melt. Seismic velocity and attenuation are estimated in rocks in which the melt phase has the tube geometry, and the results are compared with results expected for the more familiar film model under similar conditions. For a given melt fraction, tubes are found to give moduli intermediate between moduli for rigid spherical inclusions and compliant films. For example, in polycrystalline olivine at 20 kbar the model predicts a decrease in V/sub s/ of 10% and a decrease in V/sub p/ of 5% at 0.05 melt fraction, without considering inelastic relaxation. Shear attenuation appears to be dominated by viscous flow of melt between the tubes and/or films. For olivine the tube model predicts the increment of relaxation due to melt, ..delta mu../..mu.., to be 0.01 at 0.05 melt fraction. Relaxation of the bulk modulus is dominated by flow between melt pockets of different shape, heat flow, and solid-melt phase change. If melt is present, considerable bulk attenuation is expected, although the relaxation may be observable only at long periods, outside the seismic body wave band.

  14. Elastic properties of saturated porous rocks with aligned fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-12-02

    of fluid properties on seismic characteristics. ... C. C. A . The host rock is permeated by a set of parallel fractures which are ..... Similar behaviour is ..... Page 14 ...

  15. Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Analysis- Rock Activity Date - 1995 Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis The study utilizes the fission-track dating method...

  16. Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Hisatoshi Ito, Kazuhiro Tanaka (1995) Insights On The...

  17. Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technique Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date 1989 - 2000 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis The purpose of this study was to analyze deep core...

  18. Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date - 2004 Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis The study was undertaken to refine understanding of...

  19. Stress and fault rock controls on fault zone hydrology, Coso...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    fault zone hydrology, Coso geothermal field, CA Abstract In crystalline rock of the Coso Geothermal Field, CA, fractures are the primary source of permeability. At reservoir...

  20. Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in the overlying metamorphic rock acts as a cap to the productive zone and inhibits vertical movement of the geothermal fluids above the main upwelling zone. The upwelling...

  1. Lithology and Alteration Mineralogy of Reservoir Rocks at Coso...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in the overlying metamorphic rock acts as a cap to the productive zone and inhibits vertical movement of the geothermal fluids above the main upwelling zone. The upwelling...

  2. Carbon Dioxide Geological Sequestration in Fractured Porous Rocks

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Training and Research on Probabilistic Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Geological Sequestration in Fractured Porous Rocks Gutierrez, Marte 54 ENVIRONMENTAL...

  3. Fractured rock stress-permeability relationships from in situ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fractured rock stress-permeability relationships from in situ data and effects of temperature and chemical-mechanical couplings Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fractured...

  4. Fundamental Research on Percussion Drilling: Improved rock mechanics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fundamental Research on Percussion Drilling: Improved rock mechanics analysis, advanced simulation technology, and full-scale laboratory investigations Citation Details In-Document...

  5. Seepage into drifts in unsaturated fractured rock at Yucca Mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkholzer, Jens; Li, Guomin; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Tsang, Yvonne

    1998-01-01

    Fractured Rock at Yucca Mountain Jens Birkholzer, Guomin Lrepository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as it is locatedclimate conditions at Yucca Mountain. The numerical study is

  6. Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geologically mapped the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify...

  7. Scientists Pass Solid Particles Through Rock in DOE-Sponsored...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    rock fractures in the laboratory. This technology has the potential for mapping fracture systems in detail and aid in determining reservoir characteristics. This research was...

  8. Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technologies Project Type Topic 2 Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Project Description Supercritical CO2 is currently becoming a more...

  9. INTEGRAL high energy sky: The keV to MeV cosmic sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Ubertini; A. De Rosa; A. Bazzano; L. Bassani; V. Sguera

    2008-02-03

    After almost 5 years of operation, ESA's International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) Space Observatory has unveiled a new soft Gamma ray sky and produced a remarkable harvest of results, ranging from identification of new high energy sources, to the discovery of dozens of variable sources to the mapping of the Aluminum emission from the Galaxy Plane to the presence of electrons and positrons generating the annihilation line in the Galaxy central radian. INTEGRAL is continuing the deep observations of the Galactic Plane and of the whole sky in the soft Gamma ray range. The new IBIS gamma ray catalogue contains more than 420 sources detected above 20 keV. We present a view of the INTEGRAL high energy sky with particular regard to sources emitting at high energy, including Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), HESS/MAGIC counterparts and new view of the cosmic gamma ray diffuse background.

  10. A Robotic Wide-Angle H-Alpha Survey of the Southern Sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. E. Gaustad; P. R. McCullough; W. Rosing; D. Van Buren

    2001-08-31

    We have completed a robotic wide-angle imaging survey of the southern sky (declination less than +15 degrees) at 656.3 nm wavelength, the H-alpha emission line of hydrogen. Each image of the resulting Southern H-Alpha Sky Survey Atlas (SHASSA) covers an area of the sky 13 degrees square at an angular resolution of approximately 0.8 arcminute, and reaches a sensitivity level of 2 rayleigh (1.2 x 10^-17 erg cm^-2 s^-1 arcsec^-2) per pixel, corresponding to an emission measure of 4 cm^-6 pc, and to a brightness temperature for microwave free-free emission of 12 microkelvins at 30 GHz. Smoothing over several pixels allows features as faint as 0.5 rayleigh to be detected.

  11. Testing foundations of modern cosmology with SKA all-sky surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominik J. Schwarz; David Bacon; Song Chen; Chris Clarkson; Dragan Huterer; Martin Kunz; Roy Maartens; Alvise Raccanelli; Matthias Rubart; Jean-Luc Starck

    2015-01-15

    Continuum and HI surveys with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will allow us to probe some of the most fundamental assumptions of modern cosmology, including the Cosmological Principle. SKA all-sky surveys will map an enormous slice of space-time and reveal cosmology at superhorizon scales and redshifts of order unity. We illustrate the potential of these surveys and discuss the prospects to measure the cosmic radio dipole at high fidelity. We outline several potentially transformational tests of cosmology to be carried out by means of SKA all-sky surveys.

  12. Testing foundations of modern cosmology with SKA all-sky surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwarz, Dominik J; Chen, Song; Clarkson, Chris; Huterer, Dragan; Kunz, Martin; Maartens, Roy; Raccanelli, Alvise; Rubart, Matthias; Starck, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    Continuum and HI surveys with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will allow us to probe some of the most fundamental assumptions of modern cosmology, including the Cosmological Principle. SKA all-sky surveys will map an enormous slice of space-time and reveal cosmology at superhorizon scales and redshifts of order unity. We illustrate the potential of these surveys and discuss the prospects to measure the cosmic radio dipole at high fidelity. We outline several potentially transformational tests of cosmology to be carried out by means of SKA all-sky surveys.

  13. Elemental composition of two cumulate rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naeem, A.; Almohandis, A.A.

    1983-04-01

    Two cumulate rock samples K-185, K-250 from the Kapalagulu intrusion, W. Tanzania, were analyzed using X-ray fluorescence (XRF), wet chemical and neutron activation analysis (NAA) techniques. Major element oxides were determined by XRF and wet chemical methods, while the concentration of trace elements were measured by NAA, using high resolution Ge(Li) detector, minicomputer-based data acquisition system and off-line computer. The percentage of major oxides and sixteen trace elements have been reported. It has been found that Cr, Ni, and Co are highly concentrated in K-250 while Sc, and most of the major elements are more concentrated in K-185. The variation of major and trace elements in these two samples have been discussed.

  14. PTYS 109 LAB EXPLORATION AND DISCOVERY IN PLANETARY SCIENCE ROCKS AND MINERALS 133

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Barbara Anne

    PTYS 109 LAB EXPLORATION AND DISCOVERY IN PLANETARY SCIENCE ROCKS AND MINERALS 133 Rocks and Minerals I. OBJECTIVES One of the many ways to study Earth is by examining the rocks that make up its types of rocks and minerals; · determine the formation and the history of each rock and mineral; · infer

  15. Experience with in situ measurement of rock deformability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniawski, Z.T.

    1981-07-01

    Although in situ tests have the advantage of involving a large volume or rock tested under the same environmental conditions as are prevailing in the rock mass, such tests are expensive and time consuming. In addition, there are a number of controversial questions pertinent to in situ tests.

  16. Geophysical detection and structural characterization of discontinuities in rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geophysical detection and structural characterization of discontinuities in rock slopes (J. Deparis geophysical methods (seismic, electric and electromagnetic) are available to address this problem, differing and geophysical methods for characterizing the rock mass. Section 2 is dedicated to a review of the main

  17. Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project Objectives: Elucidate comprehensively the carbonation reaction mechanisms between supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and reservoir rocks consisting of different mineralogical compositions in aqueous and non-aqueous environments at temperatures of up to 250ºC, and to develop chemical modeling of CO2-reservior rock interactions.

  18. RUPTURE BY DAMAGE ACCUMULATION IN ROCKS David Amitrano

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    RUPTURE BY DAMAGE ACCUMULATION IN ROCKS David Amitrano LIRIGM, Université J. Fourier, Grenoble of rocks is associated with microcracks nucleation and propagation, i.e. damage. The accumulation of damage as strength and modulus. The damage process can be studied both statically by direct observation of thin

  19. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2003-06-30

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have studied (1) Effects of pore texture on porosity, permeability, and sonic velocity. We show how a relation can be found between porosity, permeability, and velocity by separating the formations of rocks with similar pore textures.

  20. Geological and mathematical framework for failure modes in granular rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borja, Ronaldo I.

    Geological and mathematical framework for failure modes in granular rock Atilla Aydina, *, Ronaldo I. Borjab , Peter Eichhubla,1 a Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford processes in granular rock and provide a geological framework for the corresponding structures. We describe

  1. Rock to Regolith Earth's Critical Zone on Volcanic Ocean Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geist, Dennis

    increases monotonically towards surface #12;Frost creep transport Frequency and depth of freezing event (f in a landscape? (the w question) What governs the efficiency of regolith transport? (the Q question) What lens growth #12;Ice lenses in soils Ice lenses in rock Water freezing in soil and rocks Murton et al

  2. Teleost fish are found in thermal environments ranging from 44C (desert pupfish, Cyprinodon macularius; Schoenherr and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Albert F.

    Teleost fish are found in thermal environments ranging from 44°C (desert pupfish, Cyprinodon with a Q10 of 2 or greater (see Bennett, 1985), it has traditionally been assumed that the thermal show a significant thermal dependence in ectotherms. For example, goldfish fast muscle myofibrillar

  3. Environmental effects on distributions of culturable soil oligotrophic bacteria along an elevational gradient in the Chihuahuan Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strauss, Richard E.

    an elevational gradient in the Chihuahuan Desert James H. Campbell*, John C. Zak, Randall M. Jeter, Richard E from five sites along an elevational and vegetational gradient within Big Bend National Park during the first stressors to be investigated. Microbes capable of metabolism at low concentra- tions of carbon

  4. HABITAT SELECTION BY MOUNTAIN SHEEP IN MOJAVE DESERT SCRUB LOUISR. BERNER,PAULR. KRAUSMAN,ANDMARK C. WALLACE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Mark C.

    HABITAT SELECTION BY MOUNTAIN SHEEP IN MOJAVE DESERT SCRUB .. .. LOUISR. BERNER,PAULR. KRAUSMAN use by 12-18 mountain sheep(Ovis canadensis nelsom)in a 320-ha enclosure betweenJune 1990and June 1991-collared mountain sheep. Mountain sheepusedmidslopes and drawassociationson the westside of the enclosure

  5. The Kelso dune field is located in the eastern Mojave Desert, California, at the terminus of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramsey, Michael

    ABSTRACT The Kelso dune field is located in the eastern Mojave Desert, California, at the terminus significant spectral variations that indicate potential mineralogic heterogeneities within the active dunes-member minerals that showed marked variations within the dunes. In addition, standard petrographic techniques re

  6. &p.1:Abstract We investigated the occurrence of freezing-in-duced cavitation in the evergreen desert shrub Larrea tri-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pockman, William T.

    &p.1:Abstract We investigated the occurrence of freezing-in- duced cavitation in the evergreen, freezing exotherms occurred at temperatures between ­6.5 and ­9°C and as long as temperatures were held · Prosopis velutina · Cavitation · Freezing tolerance · Deserts&bdy: Introduction Freezing tolerance

  7. Summer rain pulse size and rainwater uptake by three dominant desert plants in a desertified grassland ecosystem in northwestern China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    Summer rain pulse size and rainwater uptake by three dominant desert plants in a desertified composition, Rain pulse size, Summer precipitation Abstract To examine the different effects of rain pulse with different pulse sizes based on the changes in the hydrogen isotope ratios (dD) of their stem water 7 days

  8. Ecophysiological responses of Chihuahuan desert grasses to fire B.W. Allred , K.A. Snyder 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allred, Brady

    Nitrogen Photosynthesis a b s t r a c t To better understand the effects of fire in the Chihuahuan desert, gas exchange characteristics of two dominant grass species, Bouteloua eriopoda and Aristida purpurea, and soil nitrogen availability were studied in response to prescribed fire at the Jornada Experimental

  9. Summer rain pulse size and rainwater uptake by three dominant desert plants in a desertified grassland ecosystem in northwestern China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    water sources derived from small (rain events, A. ordosia took advantage of deeper soil waterSummer rain pulse size and rainwater uptake by three dominant desert plants in a desertified composition, Rain pulse size, Summer precipitation Abstract To examine the different effects of rain pulse

  10. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Slick Rock sites, Slick Rock, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1981-09-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah, Inc., has reevaluated the Slick Rock sites in order to revise the October 1977 engineering radioactive uranium mill tailings at Slick Rock, Colorado. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 387,000 tons of tailings at the Slick Rock sites constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The five alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment include millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material, consolidation of the piles, and removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings sites. Cost estimates for the five options range from about $6,800,000 for stabilization in-place, to about $11,000,000 for disposal at a distance of about 6.5 mi. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Slick Rock tailings were examined: heap leaching; treatment at an existing mill; and reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be over $800/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ whether by conventional or heap leach plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery is not economically attractive at present, nor for the foreseeable future.

  11. Summary of the engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Slick Rock sites, Slick Rock, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1981-09-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah, Inc., has reevaluated the Slick Rock sites in order to revise the October 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Slick Rock, Colorado. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 387,000 tons of tailings at the Slick Rock sites constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The five alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment include millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material, consolidation of the piles, and removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings sites. Cost estimates for the five options range from about $6,800,000 for stabilization in-place, to about $11,000,000 for disposal at a distance of about 6.5 mi. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Slick Rock tailings were examined: heap leaching; treatment at an existing mill; and reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be over $800/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ whether by conventional or heap leach plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery is not economically attractive at present, nor for the foreseeable future.

  12. Modeling of coupled thermodynamic and geomechanical performance of underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, J.

    2013-01-01

    compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock cavernsCompressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) in Lined Rock Cavernscompressed air energy storage (CAES) in concrete-lined rock

  13. Fire in the sky: The southern lights in Indigenous oral traditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamacher, Duane W

    2015-01-01

    Parts of Australia have been privileged to see dazzling lights in the night sky as the Aurora Australis (known as the southern lights) puts on a show this year. Aurorae are significant in Australian Indigenous astronomical traditions. Aboriginal people associate aurorae with fire, death, blood, and omens, sharing many similarities with Native American communities.

  14. SkyHunter: A Multi-Surface Environment for Supporting Oil and Gas Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurer, Frank

    SkyHunter: A Multi-Surface Environment for Supporting Oil and Gas Exploration Teddy Seyed, Mario}@ucalgary.ca ABSTRACT The process of oil and gas exploration and its result, the decision to drill for oil in a specific show in this paper, many of the existing technologies and practices that support the oil and gas

  15. The Animated Gamma-ray Sky Revealed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Isabelle Grenier

    2010-01-08

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been observing the sky in gamma-rays since August 2008.  In addition to breakthrough capabilities in energy coverage (20 MeV-300 GeV) and angular resolution, the wide field of view of the Large Area Telescope enables observations of 20% of the sky at any instant, and of the whole sky every three hours. It has revealed a very animated sky with bright gamma-ray bursts flashing and vanishing in minutes, powerful active galactic nuclei flaring over hours and days, many pulsars twinkling in the Milky Way, and X-ray binaries shimmering along their orbit. Most of these variable sources had not been seen by the Fermi predecessor, EGRET, and the wealth of new data already brings important clues to the origin of the high-energy emission and particles powered by the compact objects. The telescope also brings crisp images of the bright gamma-ray emission produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the interstellar medium, thus allowing to measure the cosmic nuclei and electron spectra across the Galaxy, to weigh interstellar clouds, in particular in the dark-gas phase. The telescope sensitivity at high energy will soon provide useful constraints on dark-matter annihilations in a variety of environments. I will review the current results and future prospects of the Fermi mission.

  16. WAHRSIS: A Low-cost, High-resolution Whole Sky Imager With Near-Infrared Capabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winkler, Stefan

    community for a variety of applications and domains, such as aviation, weather prediction, and solar energy Dev,a Florian M. Savoy,b Yee Hui Lee,a Stefan Winklerb aSchool of Electrical and Electronic of automatic whole sky imagers have been developed at the Scripps Institute of Oceanography, University

  17. Einstein@Home all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in LIGO S5 data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barsotti, Lisa

    This paper presents results of an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range [50,1?190]??Hz and with frequency derivative range of ?[-20,1.1]×10[superscript -10]??Hz?s[superscript -1] for the ...

  18. Final Technical Report: Effects of Changing Water and Nitrogen Inputs on a Mojave Desert Ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Stanley, D.; Nowak, Robert S.; Fenstermaker, Lynn, F.; Young, Michael,H.

    2007-11-30

    In order to anticipate the effects of global change on ecosystem function, it is essential that predictive relationships be established linking ecosystem function to global change scenarios. The Mojave Desert is of considerable interest with respect to global change. It contains the driest habitats in North America, and thus most closely approximates the world’s great arid deserts. In order to examine the effects of climate and land use changes, in 2001 we established a long-term manipulative global change experiment, called the Mojave Global Change Facility. Manipulations in this study include the potential effects of (1) increased summer rainfall (75 mm over three discrete 25 mm events), (2) increased nitrogen deposition (10 and 40 kg ha-1), and (3) the disturbance of biological N-fixing crusts . Questions addressed under this grant shared the common hypothesis that plant and ecosystem performance will positively respond to the augmentation of the most limiting resources to plant growth in the Mojave Desert, e.g., water and nitrogen. Specific hypotheses include (1) increased summer rainfall will significantly increase plant production through an alleviation of moisture stress in the dry summer months, (2) N-deposition will increase plant production in this N-limited system, particularly in wet years or in concert with added summer rain, and (3) biological crust disturbance will gradually decrease bio-available N, with concomitant long-term reductions in photosynthesis and ANPP. Individual plant and ecosystem responses to global change may be regulated by biogeochemical processes and natural weather variability, and changes in plant and ecosystem processes may occur rapidly, may occur only after a time lag, or may not occur at all. During the first PER grant period, we observed changes in plant and ecosystem processes that would fall under each of these time-response intervals: plant and ecosystem processes responded rapidly to added summer rain, whereas most processes responded slowly or in a lag fashion to N-deposition and with no significant response to crust disturbance. Therefore, the primary objectives of this renewal grant were to: (1) continue ongoing measurements of soil and plant parameters that assess primary treatment responses; (2) address the potential heterogeneity of soil properties and (3) initiate a new suite of measurements that will provide data necessary for scaling/modeling of whole-plot to ecosystem-level responses. Our experimental approach included soil plant-water interactions using TDR, neutron probe, and miniaturized soil matric potential and moisture sensors, plant ecophysiological and productivity responses to water and nitrogen treatments and remote sensing methodologies deployed on a radio control platform. We report here the most significant findings of our study.

  19. Contributions of artificial lighting sources on light pollution in Hong Kong measured through a night sky brightness monitoring network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pun, Chun Shing Jason; Leung, Wai Yan; Wong, Chung Fai

    2014-01-01

    Light pollution is a form of environmental degradation in which excessive artificial outdoor lighting, such as street lamps, neon signs, and illuminated signboards, affects the natural environment and the ecosystem. Poorly designed outdoor lighting not only wastes energy, money, and valuable Earth resources, but also robs us of our beautiful night sky. Effects of light pollution on the night sky can be evaluated by the skyglow caused by these artificial lighting sources, through measurements of the night sky brightness (NSB). The Hong Kong Night Sky Brightness Monitoring Network (NSN) was established to monitor in detail the conditions of light pollution in Hong Kong. Monitoring stations were set up throughout the city covering a wide range of urban and rural settings to continuously measure the variations of the NSB. Over 4.6 million night sky measurements were collected from 18 distinct locations between May 2010 and March 2013. This huge dataset, over two thousand times larger than our previous survey, for...

  20. LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS ON THE HYDRAULIC AND THERMOMECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF FRACTURED CRYSTALLINE ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witherspoon, P.A.

    2010-01-01

    PROPERTIES OF FRACTURED CRYSTALLINE ROCKS P. A. W i t h e ring of the behavior of crystalline rocks under the influencein Mined Caverns in Crystalline Rock^ ) of LBL. STRESS-FLOW

  1. Coupled Environmental Processes and Long-term Performance of Landfill Covers in the northern Mojave Desert

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Shafer; Michael Young; Stephen Zitzer; Eric McDonald; Todd Caldwell

    2004-05-12

    Evapotransiration (ET) covers have gained widespread acceptance as a closure feature for waste disposal sites, particularly in the arid and semi-arid regions of the southwestern U.S. But as landforms, ET covers are subject to change over time because of processes such as pedogenesis, hydrologic processes, vegetation establishment and change, and biological processes. To better understand the effects of coupled process changes to ET covers, a series of four primary analog sites in Yucca Flat on the Nevada Test Site, along with measurements and observations from other locations in the Mojave Desert, were selected to evaluate changes in ET covers over time. The analog sites, of varying ages, were selected to address changes in the early post-institutional control period, the 1,000-year compliance period for disposal of low-level and mixed low-level waste, and the 10,000-year compliance period for transuranic waste sites.

  2. Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) Research Data from the Nevada Desert FACE Facility (NDFF)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    DOE has conducted trace gas enrichment experiments since the mid 1990s. The FACE Data Management System is a central repository and archive for Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) data, as well as for the related open-top chamber (OTC) experiments. FACE Data Management System is located at the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). While the data from the various FACE sites, each one a unique user facility, are centralized at CDIAC, each of the FACE sites presents its own view of its activities and information. For that reason, DOE Data Explorer users are advised to see both the central repository at http://public.ornl.gov/face/index.shtml and the individual home pages of each site. NDFF whole-ecosystem manipulation is a flagship experiment of the Terrestrial Carbon Process (TCP) research program of the US Dept. of Energy. It is also a core project of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program (IGBP) and a contribution to the US Global Change Research Program. The NDFF was developed in conjunction with the National Science Foundation (NSF) and DOE-EPSCoR programs. FACE (Free-Air-Carbon dioxide-Enrichment) technology allows researchers to elevate the carbon dioxide level in large study plots while minimizing ecosystem disturbance. At the NDFF the concentration of CO2 was elevated by 50 percent above the present atmospheric levels in three plots in the Mojave Desert ecosystem, while six other plots remained at the current level. This experimental design provided a large area in which integrated teams of scientists could describe and quantify processes regulating carbon, nutrient, and water balances in desert ecosystems.

  3. Evaluation of Five Sedimentary Rocks Other Than Salt for Geologic Repository Siting Purposes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Croff, A.G.; Lomenick, T.F.; Lowrie, R.S.; Stow, S.H.

    2003-11-15

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), in order to increase the diversity of rock types under consideration by the geologic disposal program, initiated the Sedimary ROck Program (SERP), whose immediate objectiv eis to evaluate five types of secimdnary rock - sandstone, chalk, carbonate rocks (limestone and dolostone), anhydrock, and shale - to determine the potential for siting a geologic repository. The evaluation of these five rock types, together with the ongoing salt studies, effectively results in the consideration of all types of relatively impermeable sedimentary rock for repository purposes. The results of this evaluation are expressed in terms of a ranking of the five rock types with respect to their potential to serve as a geologic repository host rock. This comparative evaluation was conducted on a non-site-specific basis, by use of generic information together with rock evaluation criteria (RECs) derived from the DOE siting guidelines for geologic repositories (CFR 1984). An information base relevant to rock evaluation using these RECs was developed in hydrology, geochemistry, rock characteristics (rock occurrences, thermal response, rock mechanics), natural resources, and rock dissolution. Evaluation against postclosure and preclosure RECs yielded a ranking of the five subject rocks with respect to their potential as repository host rocks. Shale was determined to be the most preferred of the five rock types, with sandstone a distant second, the carbonate rocks and anhydrock a more distant third, and chalk a relatively close fourth.

  4. Seismic and Acoustic Investigations of Rock Fall Initiation, Processes, and Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmer, Valerie Louise

    2011-01-01

    Seismic  and  Acoustic  Investigations  of  Rock  Fall  Initiation,  Processes,  Seismic  and  Acoustic  Investigations  of  Rock  Fall  Initiation,  Processes,  other  seismic  sources  was  an  iterative  process.    

  5. Thermochronometric Investigation of Multiple Unconformities and Post-depositional Thermal History of a Fault Block in the Northern Western Desert, Egypt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glauser, Travis Robert

    2010-12-13

    Detrital apatite and zircon (U-TH)/He analysis across a recently discovered unconformity in the Western Desert of Egypt provides new insight into the tectonic evolution of northeastern Africa. The unconformity juxtaposes ...

  6. Impact of Desert Dust Radiative Forcing on Sahel Precipitation: Relative Importance of Dust Compared to Sea Surface Temperature Variations, Vegetation Changes, and Greenhouse Gas Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the 30-year Barbados desert dust record. J.on mineral dust in the Barbados trade winds. Nature, 320,late 1960s to 1980s over Barbados (13°N, 60°W; Prospero and

  7. Characterising and modelling the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) in crystalline rock in the context of radioactive waste disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudson, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Institute of Rock and Soil Mechanics, Chinese Academy ofis designed for rock and soil mechanics. In a TOUGH-FLAC

  8. Characterizing Flow in Oil Reservoir Rock Using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmes, David W.

    In this paper, a 3D Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulator for modeling grain scale fluid flow in porous rock is presented. The versatility of the SPH method has driven its use in increasingly complex areas of flow ...

  9. Comparative Records of Time Nature of the rock record

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    : sequence stratigraphy · temporal excursions and sequential changes in chemical characteristicsComparative Records of Time · Nature of the rock record · principles of stratigraphy: · deposition of StratigraphyPrinciples of Stratigraphy continuous deposition erosion for 50 years renewed deposition 100 years

  10. The Effect of Heterogeneity on Matrix Acidizing of Carbonate Rocks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keys, Ryan S.

    2010-07-14

    In matrix acidizing, the goal is to dissolve minerals in the rock to increase well productivity. This is accomplished by injecting an application-specific solution of acid into the formation at a pressure between the pore ...

  11. Zeolitization Of Intracaldera Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Mexico, USA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Zeolitization Of Intracaldera Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In The 1.25 Ma...

  12. ELECTRON HOLOGRAPHY OF NANOMAGNETS IN ROCKS AND BACTERIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    ELECTRON HOLOGRAPHY OF NANOMAGNETS IN ROCKS AND BACTERIA Rafal E. Dunin-Borkowski1 , Richard J-reversed thermo-remanent magnetization. #12;Magnetotactic bacteria provide the simplest example of the use

  13. Acid Fracture and Fracture Conductivity Study of Field Rock Samples 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Underwood, Jarrod

    2013-11-15

    Acid fracturing is a well stimulation strategy designed to increase the productivity of a producing well. The parameters of acid fracturing and the effects of acid interaction on specific rock samples can be studied experimentally. Acid injection...

  14. Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley Region, Nevada (1996-1999) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report:...

  15. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2003-06-01

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have studied (1) Elastic properties of clay minerals using Pulse Transmission experiments. We show measurements of elastic moduli and strain in clay minerals.

  16. Rock Hill Utilities- Water Heater and Heat Pump Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Through the SmartChoice program, Rock Hill Utilities offers rebates for water heater and heat pump replacements. Information on financing for heat pumps can also be found on the web site listed...

  17. Drilling Complete on Australian Hot Dry Rock Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The first commercial attempt to create a commercial geothermal power plant using hot dry rock technology reached a crucial milestone on January 22, when a production well successfully reached its target depth.

  18. Project Reports for Standing Rock Sioux Tribe- 2011 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's (SRST) cultural identity demands that tribal development occur in a sustainable manner and in a manner protective of the tribe's natural resources to preserve them for following generations.

  19. Zeolitization Of Intracaldera Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zeolitization Of Intracaldera Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In The 1.25 Ma Lake Of Valles Caldera, New Mexico, Usa Abstract Quantitative X-ray diffraction analysis of about 80...

  20. Modeling of Seismic Signatures of Carbonate Rock Types 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan, Badr H.

    2011-02-22

    Carbonate reservoirs of different rock types have wide ranges of porosity and permeability, creating zones with different reservoir quality and flow properties. This research addresses how seismic technology can be used to identify different...

  1. Rock glacier monitoring with low-cost GPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    moving stations on rock glacier Low-cost L1 GPS receivers (blox) Power source: solar panels Local data Rock glacier GPS antennaGPS antenna Solar panelSolar panel Box incl.Box incl. -GPS receiverData logger Instruments Solar panelSolar panel (24W, 12V, 50x50cm)(24W, 12V, 50x50cm) Costs per station: 2

  2. The LOFAR Multifrequency Snapshot Sky Survey (MSSS) I. Survey description and first results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heald, G H; Orrú, E; Breton, R P; Carbone, D; Ferrari, C; Hardcastle, M J; Jurusik, W; Macario, G; Mulcahy, D; Rafferty, D; Asgekar, A; Brentjens, M; Fallows, R A; Frieswijk, W; Toribio, M C; Adebahr, B; Arts, M; Bell, M R; Bonafede, A; Bray, J; Broderick, J; Cantwell, T; Carroll, P; Cendes, Y; Clarke, A O; Croston, J; Daiboo, S; de Gasperin, F; Gregson, J; Harwood, J; Hassall, T; Heesen, V; Horneffer, A; van der Horst, A J; Iacobelli, M; Jeli?, V; Jones, D; Kant, D; Kokotanekov, G; Martin, P; McKean, J P; Morabito, L K; Nikiel-Wroczy?ski, B; Offringa, A; Pandey, V N; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pietka, M; Pratley, L; Riseley, C; Rowlinson, A; Sabater, J; Scaife, A M M; Scheers, L H A; Sendlinger, K; Shulevski, A; Sipior, M; Sobey, C; Stewart, A J; Stroe, A; Swinbank, J; Tasse, C; Trüstedt, J; Varenius, E; van Velzen, S; Vilchez, N; van Weeren, R J; Wijnholds, S; Williams, W L; de Bruyn, A G; Nijboer, R; Wise, M; Alexov, A; Anderson, J; Avruch, I M; Beck, R; Bell, M E; van Bemmel, I; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Breitling, F; Brouw, W N; Brüggen, M; Butcher, H R; Ciardi, B; Conway, J E; de Geus, E; de Jong, A; de Vos, M; Deller, A; Dettmar, R J; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Engels, D; Falcke, H; Fender, R; Garrett, M A; Grießmeier, J; Gunst, A W; Hamaker, J P; Hessels, J W T; Hoeft, M; Hörandel, J; Holties, H A; Intema, H; Jackson, N J; Jütte, E; Karastergiou, A; Klijn, W F A; Kondratiev, V I; Koopmans, L V E; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; Law, C; van Leeuwen, J; Loose, M; Maat, P; Markoff, S; McFadden, R; McKay-Bukowski, D; Mevius, M; Miller-Jones, J C A; Morganti, R; Munk, H; Nelles, A; Noordam, J E; Norden, M J; Paas, H; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Renting, A; Röttgering, H; Schoenmakers, A; Schwarz, D; Sluman, J; Smirnov, O; Stappers, B W; Steinmetz, M; Tagger, M; Tang, Y; ter Veen, S; Thoudam, S; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; Vogt, C; Wijers, R A M J; Wucknitz, O; Yatawatta, S; Zarka, P

    2015-01-01

    We present the Multifrequency Snapshot Sky Survey (MSSS), the first northern-sky LOFAR imaging survey. In this introductory paper, we first describe in detail the motivation and design of the survey. Compared to previous radio surveys, MSSS is exceptional due to its intrinsic multifrequency nature providing information about the spectral properties of the detected sources over more than two octaves (from 30 to 160 MHz). The broadband frequency coverage, together with the fast survey speed generated by LOFAR's multibeaming capabilities, make MSSS the first survey of the sort anticipated to be carried out with the forthcoming Square Kilometre Array (SKA). Two of the sixteen frequency bands included in the survey were chosen to exactly overlap the frequency coverage of large-area Very Large Array (VLA) and Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) surveys at 74 MHz and 151 MHz respectively. The survey performance is illustrated within the "MSSS Verification Field" (MVF), a region of 100 square degrees centered at J...

  3. Film vs. magnetic tape recording for IRLS AN/AAD-5 for open skies imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, V.; Saatzer, P.; Goede, W.

    1996-11-01

    The United States Government (USG) Full Operational Capability (FOC) Open Skies aircraft (OC-135) will be equipped with an Infrared Line Scanner AN/AAD-5, fully compliant with the treaty requirements. An extensive trade study is conducted to explore the possibility of switching from film recording to either analog or digital magnetic tape recording when the AAD-5 IRLS is flown in the Open Skies Aircraft. This paper presents preliminary trade study results and the overall conclusions and recommendations based on the analysis. A flight measurement program is now being carried out under the Follow On Sensor Evaluation Program (FOSEP) to evaluate the digital magnetic recording as compared to the film recording and the results of these fight measurement will be presented at a later date. 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Estimating seismic velocities at ultrasonic frequencies in partially saturated rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.; Nolen-Hoeksema, R. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics)

    1994-02-01

    Seismic velocities in rocks at ultrasonic frequencies depend not only on the degree of saturation but also on the distribution of the fluid phase at various scales within the pore space. Two scales of saturation heterogeneity are important: (1) saturation differences between thin compliant pores and larger stiffer pores, and (2) differences between saturated patches and undersaturated patches at a scale much larger than any pore. The authors propose a formalism for predicting the range of velocities in partially saturated rocks that avoids assuming idealized pore shapes by using measured dry rock velocity versus pressure and dry rock porosity versus pressure. The pressure dependence contains all of the necessary information about the distribution of pore compliance for estimating effects of saturation at the finest scales where small amounts of fluid in the thinnest, most compliant parts of the pore space stiffen the rock in both compression and shear (increasing both P- and S-wave velocities) in approximately the same way that confining pressure stiffens the rock by closing the compliant pores. Large-scale saturation patches tend to increase only the high-frequency bulk modulus by amounts roughly proportional to the saturation. The pore-scale effects will be most important at laboratory and logging frequencies when pore-scale pore pressure gradients are unrelaxed. The patchy-saturation effects can persist even at seismic field frequencies if the patch sizes are sufficiently large and the diffusivities are sufficiently low for the larger-scale pressure gradients to be unrelaxed.

  5. A Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor projected onto the sky with reduced focal anisoplanatism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Butterley; G. D. Love; R. W. Wilson; R. M. Myers; T. J. Morris

    2006-02-10

    A method for producing a laser guide star wavefront sensor for adaptive optics with reduced focal anisoplanatism is presented. A theoretical analysis and numerical simulations have been carried out and the results are presented. The technique, named SPLASH (Sky-Projected Laser Array Shack-Hartmann), is shown to suffer considerably less from focal anisoplanatism than a conventional laser guide star system. The method is potentially suitable for large telescope apertures (~8m), and possibly for extremely large telescopes.

  6. Low-Mass Dwarf Template Spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John J. Bochanski; Andrew A. West; Suzanne L. Hawley; Kevin R. Covey

    2006-10-20

    We present template spectra of low-mass (M0-L0) dwarfs derived from over 4,000 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectra. These composite spectra are suitable for use as medium-resolution (R ~ 1,800) radial velocity standards. We report mean spectral properties (molecular bandhead strengths,equivalent widths) and use the templates to investigate the effects of magnetic activity and metallicity on the spectroscopic and photometric properties of low-mass stars.

  7. An All-Sky Search for Steady VHE Gamma-Ray Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkins, R; Berley, D; Chen, M L; Coyne, D G; Delay, R S; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Evans, D; Falcone, A D; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gisler, G; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hoffman, C M; Hugenberger, S; Kelley, L A; Leonor, I; Macri, J R; McConnell, M; McCullough, J F; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Ryan, J M; Schneider, M; Shen, B; Shoup, A L; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Thompson, T N; Tümer, T O; Wang, K; Wascko, M O; Westerhoff, S; Williams, D A; Yang, T; Yodh, G B

    1999-01-01

    The Milagrito water Cherenkov detector in the Jemez Mountains near Los Alamos, New Mexico took data from February 1997 to April 1998. Milagrito served as a prototype for the larger Milagro detector, which has just begun operations. Milagrito was the first large-aperture gamma-ray detector with sensitivity to gamma rays below 1 TeV. We report here on a search for steady emission from point sources over most of the northern sky using data from Milagrito.

  8. An All-Sky Search for Steady VHE Gamma-Ray Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Atkins; W. Benbow; D. Berley; M. -L. Chen; D. G. Coyne; R. S. Delay; B. L. Dingus; D. E. Dorfan; R. W. Ellsworth; D. Evans; A. Falcone; L. Fleysher; R. Fleysher; G. Gisler; J. A. Goodman; T. J. Haines; C. M. Hoffman; S. Hugenberger; L. A. Kelley; I. Leonor; J. Macri; M. McConnell; J. F. McCullough; J. E. McEnery; R. S. Miller; A. I. Mincer; M. F. Morales; P. Nemethy; J. M. Ryan; M. Schneider; B. Shen; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; T. N. Thompson; O. T. Tumer; K. Wang; M. O. Wascko; S. Westerhoff; D. A. Williams; T. Yang; G. B. Yodh

    1999-06-23

    The Milagrito water Cherenkov detector in the Jemez Mountains near Los Alamos, New Mexico took data from February 1997 to April 1998. Milagrito served as a prototype for the larger Milagro detector, which has just begun operations. Milagrito was the first large-aperture gamma-ray detector with sensitivity to gamma rays below 1 TeV. We report here on a search for steady emission from point sources over most of the northern sky using data from Milagrito.

  9. All-sky Search for Periodic Gravitational Waves in the Full S5 LIGO Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abadie, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allen, G S; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Amin, R S; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Behnke, B; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Belletoile, A; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brummit, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Burmeister, O; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cain, J; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chaibi, O; Chalermsongsak, T; Chalkley, E; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; del Prete, M; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Dorsher, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endr?czi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Farr, W; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Ganija, M R; Garcia, J; Garofoli, J A; Garufi, F; Gáspár, M E; Gemme, G; Geng, R; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; González, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, N; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, T; Hage, B; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kamaretsos, I; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B; Kim, C; Kim, D; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y -M; King, P J; Kinsey, M; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lang, M; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Leaci, P; Lee, C H; Lee, H M

    2011-01-01

    We report on an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency band 50-800 Hz and with the frequency time derivative in the range of 0 through -6e-9 Hz/s. Such a signal could be produced by a nearby spinning and slightly non-axisymmetric isolated neutron star in our galaxy. After recent improvements in the search program that yielded a 10x increase in computational efficiency, we have searched in two years of data collected during LIGO's fifth science run and have obtained the most sensitive all-sky upper limits on gravitational wave strain to date. Near 150 Hz our upper limit on worst-case linearly polarized strain amplitude $h_0$ is 1e-24, while at the high end of our frequency range we achieve a worst-case upper limit of 3.8e-24 for all polarizations and sky locations. These results constitute a factor of two improvement upon previously published data. A new detection pipeline utilizing a Loosely Coherent algorithm was able to follow up weaker outliers, increasing the volume of space wher...

  10. All-sky Search for Periodic Gravitational Waves in the Full S5 LIGO Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; P. Ajith; B. Allen; G. S. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; R. S. Amin; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. A. Arain; M. C. Araya; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; P. Barriga; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; B. Behnke; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; A. Belletoile; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; A. Brummit; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet--Castell; O. Burmeister; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Cain; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglià; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; T. Chalermsongsak; E. Chalkley; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. Cho; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; R. M. Cutler; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Díaz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Dorsher; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; G. Endr?czi; R. Engel; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; W. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; M. Flanigan; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; M. R. Ganija; J. Garcia; J. A. Garofoli; F. Garufi; M. E. Gáspár; G. Gemme; R. Geng; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Á. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; C. Gill; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. González; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; N. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; T. Ha; B. Hage; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; T. Hayler; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; T. Hong; S. Hooper; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; H. Jang; P. Jaranowski; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; I. Kamaretsos; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; Z. Keresztes; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; B. Kim; C. Kim; D. Kim; H. Kim; K. Kim; N. Kim; Y. -M. Kim; P. J. King; M. Kinsey; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; R. Kopparapu; S. Koranda; W. Z. Korth; I. Kowalska; D. Kozak; V. Kringel; S. Krishnamurthy; B. Krishnan; A. Królak

    2011-10-02

    We report on an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency band 50-800 Hz and with the frequency time derivative in the range of 0 through -6e-9 Hz/s. Such a signal could be produced by a nearby spinning and slightly non-axisymmetric isolated neutron star in our galaxy. After recent improvements in the search program that yielded a 10x increase in computational efficiency, we have searched in two years of data collected during LIGO's fifth science run and have obtained the most sensitive all-sky upper limits on gravitational wave strain to date. Near 150 Hz our upper limit on worst-case linearly polarized strain amplitude $h_0$ is 1e-24, while at the high end of our frequency range we achieve a worst-case upper limit of 3.8e-24 for all polarizations and sky locations. These results constitute a factor of two improvement upon previously published data. A new detection pipeline utilizing a Loosely Coherent algorithm was able to follow up weaker outliers, increasing the volume of space where signals can be detected by a factor of 10, but has not revealed any gravitational wave signals. The pipeline has been tested for robustness with respect to deviations from the model of an isolated neutron star, such as caused by a low-mass or long-period binary companion.

  11. SkyMouse: A smart interface for astronomical on-line resources and services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen-Zhou CUI; Hua-Ping SUN; Yong-Heng ZHAO; Yu LUO; Da-Zhi QI

    2007-11-27

    With the development of network and the World Wide Web (WWW), the Internet has been growing and changing dramatically. More and more on-line database systems and different kinds of services are available for astronomy research. How to help users find their way through the jungle of information services becomes an important challenge. Although astronomers have been aware of the importance of interoperability and introduced the concept of Virtual Observatory as a uniform environment for future astronomical on-line resources and services, transparent access to heterogeneous on-line information is still difficult. SkyMouse is a lightweight interface for distributed astronomical on-line resources and services, which is designed and developed by us, i.e., Chinese Virtual Observatory Project. Taking advantage of screen word-capturing technology, different kinds of information systems can be queried through simple mouse actions, and results are returned in a uniform web page. SkyMouse is an easy to use application, aiming to show basic information or to create a comprehensive overview of a specific astronomical object. In this paper current status of on-line resources and services access is reviewed; system architecture, features and functions of SkyMouse are described; challenges for intelligent interface for on-line astronomical resources and services are discussed.

  12. HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS IN THE GALACTIC ALL SKY SURVEY. I. CATALOG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moss, V. A.; Kummerfeld, J. K.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Murphy, T.; Pisano, D. J.; Curran, J. R.

    2013-11-01

    We present a catalog of high-velocity clouds (HVCs) from the Galactic All Sky Survey (GASS) of southern sky neutral hydrogen, which has 57 mK sensitivity and 1 km s{sup –1} velocity resolution and was obtained with the Parkes Telescope. Our catalog has been derived from the stray-radiation-corrected second release of GASS. We describe the data and our method of identifying HVCs and analyze the overall properties of the GASS population. We catalog a total of 1693 HVCs at declinations <0°, including 1111 positive velocity HVCs and 582 negative velocity HVCs. Our catalog also includes 295 anomalous velocity clouds (AVCs). The cloud line-widths of our HVC population have a median FWHM of ?19 km s{sup –1}, which is lower than that found in previous surveys. The completeness of our catalog is above 95% based on comparison with the HIPASS catalog of HVCs upon which we improve by an order of magnitude in spectral resolution. We find 758 new HVCs and AVCs with no HIPASS counterpart. The GASS catalog will shed unprecedented light on the distribution and kinematic structure of southern sky HVCs, as well as delve further into the cloud populations that make up the anomalous velocity gas of the Milky Way.

  13. Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III), Data Release 8

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and SDSS-II, the SDSS-III Collaboration is working to map the Milky Way, search for extrasolar planets, and solve the mystery of dark energy. SDSS-III's first release, Data Release 8 (DR8), became available in the first half of 2012. DR8 contains all the images ever taken by the SDSS telescope. Together, these images make up the largest color image of the sky ever made. A version of the DR8 image is shown to the right. DR8 also includes measurements for nearly 500 million stars, galaxies, and quasars, and spectra for nearly two million. All of DR8's images, spectra, and measurements are available to anyone online. You can browse through sky images, look up data for individual objects, or search for objects anywhere using any criteria. SDSS-III will collect data from 2008 to 2014, using the 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. SDSS-III consists of four surveys, each focused on a different scientific theme. These four surveys are: 1) Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS); 2) SEGUE-2 (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration); 3) The APO Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE); and 4) The Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS). [Copied with edits from http://www.sdss3.org/index.php

  14. ANTISYMMETRY IN THE FARADAY ROTATION SKY CAUSED BY A NEARBY MAGNETIZED BUBBLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolleben, M.; Landecker, T. L.; Fletcher, A.; Carretti, E.; McClure-Griffiths, N.; Dickey, J. M.; Gaensler, B. M.; Haverkorn, M.; Reich, W.; Taylor, A. R.

    2010-11-20

    Rotation measures (RMs) of pulsars and extragalactic point sources have been known to reveal large-scale antisymmetries in the Faraday rotation sky with respect to the Galactic plane and halo that have been interpreted as signatures of the mean magnetic field in the Galactic halo. We describe Faraday rotation measurements of the diffuse Galactic polarized radio emission over a large region in the northern Galactic hemisphere. Through application of RM synthesis we achieve sensitive Faraday rotation maps with high angular resolution, capable of revealing fine-scale structures of {approx}1{sup 0} in the Faraday rotation sky. Our analysis suggests that the observed antisymmetry in the Faraday rotation sky at b>0{sup 0} is dominated by the magnetic field around a local H I bubble at a distance of 100 pc, and not by the magnetic field of the Galactic halo. We derive physical properties of the magnetic field of this shell, which we find to be 20-34 {mu}G strong. It is clear that the diffuse polarized radio emission contains important information about the local magneto-ionic medium, which cannot yet be derived from Faraday RMs of extragalactic sources or pulsars alone.

  15. Lattice template placement for coherent all-sky searches for gravitational-wave pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karl Wette

    2014-12-22

    All-sky, broadband, coherent searches for gravitational-wave pulsars are restricted by limited computational resources. Minimizing the number of templates required to cover the search parameter space, of sky position and frequency evolution, is one important way to reduce the computational cost of a search. We demonstrate a practical algorithm which, for the first time, achieves template placement with a minimal number of templates for an all-sky search, using the reduced supersky parameter-space metric of Wette and Prix [Phys. Rev. D 88, 123005 (2013)]. The metric prescribes a constant template density in the signal parameters, which permits that templates be placed at the vertices of a lattice. We demonstrate how to ensure complete coverage of the parameter space, including in particular at its boundaries. The number of templates generated by the algorithm is compared to theoretical estimates, and to previous predictions by Brady et al. [Phys. Rev. D 57, 2101 (1998)]. The algorithm may be applied to any search parameter space with a constant template density, which includes semicoherent searches and searches targeting known low-mass X-ray binaries.

  16. Source Catalog Data from FIRST (Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Becker, Robert H.; Helfand, David J.; White, Richard L.; Gregg, Michael D.; Laurent-Muehleisen, Sally A.

    FIRST, Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters, is a project designed to produce the radio equivalent of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey over 10,000 square degrees of the North Galactic Cap. Using the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA) in its B-configuration, the Survey acquired 3-minute snapshots covering a hexagonal grid using 2?7 3-MHz frequency channels centered at 1365 and 1435 MHz. The data were edited, self-calibrated, mapped, and CLEANed using an automated pipeline based largely on routines in the Astronomical Image Processing System (AIPS). A final atlas of maps is produced by coadding the twelve images adjacent to each pointing center. Source catalogs with flux densities and size information are generated from the coadded images also. The 2011 catalog is the latest version and has been tested to ensure reliability and completness. The catalog, generated from the 1993 through 2004 images, contains 816,000 sources and covers more than 9000 square degrees. A specialized search interface for the catalog resides at this website, and the catalog is also available as a compressed ASCII file. The user may also view earlier versions of the source catalog. The FIRST survey area was chosen to coincide with that of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS); at the m(v)~24 limit of SDSS, ~50% of the optical counterparts to FIRST sources will be detected.

  17. Large-magnitude miocene extension in the central Mojave Desert: Implications for Paleozoic to Tertiary paleogeography and tectonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, J. Douglas; Bartley, John M.; Glazner, Allen F.

    1990-01-10

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 95, NO. B l, PAGES 557-569, JANUARY 10, 1990 Large-Magnitude Miocene Extension in the Central Mojave Desert' Implications for Paleozoic to Tertiary Paleogeography and Tectonics J. DOUGLAS WALKER Department... of Geology, University of Kansas, La}rwence JOHN M. BARTLEY Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City ALLEN F. GLAZNER Department of Geology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill The main Cenozoic extensional structure...

  18. PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND RESOURCE ALLOCATION OF THREE MOJAVE DESERT GRASSES IN RESPONSE TO ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. A. DEFALCO; C. K. IVANS; P. VIVIN; J. R. SEEMANN; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01

    Gas exchange, biomass and N allocation were compared among three Mojave Desert grasses representing different functional types to determine if photosynthetic responses and the associated allocation of resources within the plant changed after prolonged exposure to elevated CO{sub 2}. Leaf gas exchange characteristics were measured for Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens (C{sub 3} invasive annual), Achnatherum hymenoides (C{sub 3} native perennial) and Pleuraphis rigida (C{sub 4} native perennial) exposed to 360 {micro}mol mol{sup -1} (ambient) and 1000 {micro}mol mol{sup -1} (elevated) CO{sub 2} concentrations in a glasshouse experiment, and tissue biomass and total N pools were quantified from three harvests during development. The maximum rate of carboxylation by the N-rich enzyme Rubisco (Vc{sub max}), which was inferred from the relationship between net CO{sub 2} assimilation (A{sub net}) and intracellular CO{sub 2} concentration (c{sub i}), declined in the C{sub 3} species Bromus and Achnatherum across all sampling dates, but did not change at elevated CO{sub 2} for the C{sub 4} Pleuraphis. Whole plant N remained the same between CO{sub 2} treatments for all species, but patterns of allocation differed for the short- and long-lived C{sub 3} species. For Bromus, leaf N used for photosynthesis was reallocated to reproduction at elevated CO{sub 2} as inferred from the combination of lower Vc{sub max} and N per leaf area (NLA) at elevated CO{sub 2}, but similar specific leaf area (SLA, cm{sup 2} g{sup -1}), and of greater reproductive effort (RE) for the elevated CO{sub 2} treatment. Vc{sub max}, leaf N concentration and NLA declined for the perennial Achnatherum at elevated CO{sub 2} potentially due to accumulation of carbohydrates or changes in leaf morphology inferred from lower SLA and greater total biomass at elevated CO{sub 2}. In contrast, Vc{sub max} for the C{sub 4} perennial Pleuraphis did not change at elevated CO{sub 2}, and tissue biomass and total N were the same between CO{sub 2} treatments. Adjustments in photosynthetic capacity at elevated CO{sub 2} may optimize N allocation of C{sub 3} species in the Mojave Desert, which may influence plant performance and plant-plant interactions of these co-occurring species.

  19. PLUTONIUM UPTAKE AND BEHAVIOR IN PLANTS OF THE DESERT SOUTHWEST: A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, E.; Duff, M.; Ferguson, C.

    2011-03-01

    Eight species of desert vegetation and associated soils were collected from the Nevada National Security Site (N2S2) and analyzed for 238Pu and 239+240Pu concentrations. Amongst the plant species sampled were: atmospheric elemental accumulators (moss and lichen), the very slow growing, long-lived creosote bush and the rapidly growing, short-lived cheatgrass brome. The diversity of growth strategies provided insight into the geochemical behavior and bio-availability of Pu at the N2S2. The highest concentrations of Pu were measured in the onion moss (24.27 Bq kg-1 238Pu and 52.78 Bq kg-1 239+240Pu) followed by the rimmed navel lichen (8.18 Bq kg-1 and 18.4 Bq kg-1 respectively), pointing to the importance of eolian transport of Pu. Brome and desert globemallow accumulated between 3 and 9 times higher concentrations of Pu than creosote and sage brush species. These results support the importance of species specific elemental accumulation strategies rather than exposure duration as the dominant variable influencing Pu concentrations in these plants. Total vegetation elemental concentrations of Ce, Fe, Al, Sm and others were also analyzed. Strong correlations were observed between Fe and Pu. This supports the conclusion that Pu was accumulated as a consequence of the active accumulation of Fe and other plant required nutrients. Cerium and Pu are considered to be chemical analogs. Strong correlations observed in plants support the conclusion that these elements displayed similar geochemical behavior in the environment as it related to the biochemical uptake process of vegetation. Soils were also sampled in association with vegetation samples. This allowed for the calculation of a concentration ratio (CR). The CR values for Pu in plants were highly influenced by the heterogeneity of Pu distribution among sites. Results from the naturally occurring elements of concern were more evenly distributed between sample sites. This allowed for the development of a pattern of plant species that accumulated Ce, Sm, Fe and Al. The highest accumulators of these elements were onion moss, lichen flowed by brome. The lowest accumulators were creosote bush and fourwing saltbush. This ranked order corresponds to plant accumulations of Pu.

  20. Galaxy Clusters in Hubble Volume Simulations: Cosmological Constraints from Sky Survey Populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. E. Evrard; T. J. MacFarland; H. M. P. Couchman; J. M. Colberg; N. Yoshida; S. D. M. White; A. R. Jenkins; C. S. Frenk; F. R. Pearce; J. A. Peacock; P. A. Thomas

    2002-03-12

    We use giga-particle N-body simulations to study galaxy cluster populations in Hubble Volumes of LCDM (Omega_m=0.3, Omega_Lambda=0.7) and tCDM (Omega_m=1) world models. Mapping past light-cones of locations in the computational space, we create mock sky surveys of dark matter structure to z~1.4 over 10,000 sq deg and to z~0.5 over two full spheres. Calibrating the Jenkins mass function at z=0 with samples of ~1.5 million clusters, we show that the fit describes the sky survey counts to 5e13 Msun/h). Fitting the observed local temperature function determines the ratio beta of specific thermal energies in dark matter and intracluster gas. We derive a scaling with power spectrum normalization beta \\propto sigma8^{5/3}, and measure a 4% error on sigma8 arising from cosmic variance in temperature-limited cluster samples. Considering distant clusters, the LCDM model matches EMSS and RDCS X-ray-selected survey observations under economical assumptions for intracluster gas evolution. Using transformations of mass-limited cluster samples that mimic sigma8 variation, we explore SZ search expectations for a 10 sq deg survey complete above 10^{14} Msun/h. Cluster counts are shown to be extremely sensitive to sigma8 uncertainty while redshift statistics, such as the sample median, are much more stable. For LCDM, the characteristic temperature at fixed sky surface density is a weak function of redshift, implying an abundance of hot clusters at z>1. Assuming constant beta, four kT>8 keV clusters lie at z>2 and 40 kT>5 keV clusters lie at z>3 on the whole sky. Detection of Coma-sized clusters at z>1 violate LCDM at 95% confidence if their surface density exceeds 0.003 per sq deg, or 120 on the whole sky.

  1. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the slick rock Uranium Mill Tailings sites Slick Rock, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (42 USC {section} 7901 et seq.), hereafter referred to as the UMTRCA, authorized the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up two uranium mill tailings processing sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in San Miguel County. The purpose of the cleanup is to reduce the potential health effects associated with the radioactive materials remaining on the sites and on vicinity properties (VPs) associated with the sites. Contaminated materials cover an estimated 55 acres of the Union Carbide (UC) processing site and 12 ac of the North Continent (NC) processing site. The total estimated volume of contaminated materials is approximately 61 8,300 cubic yards. In addition to the contamination in the two processing site areas, four VPs were found to contain contamination. As a result of the tailings being exposed to the environment, contamination associated with the UC and NC sites has leached into shallow ground water. Surface water has not been affected. The closest residence is approximately 0.3 air mi from either site. The proposed action is to remediate the UC and NC sites by removing all contaminated materials within the designated site boundaries or otherwise associated with the sites, and relocating them to, and stabilizing them at, a location approximately 5 road mi (8 km) northeast of the sites on land administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Remediation would be performed by the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. All solid contaminated materials would be buried under 5 feet (ft) of rock and soil materials. The proposed disposal site area is currently used by ranchers for cattle grazing over a 7-month period. The closest residence to the proposed disposal site is 2 air mi. An estimated 44 ac of land would be permanently transferred from the BLM to the DOE and restricted from future use.

  2. Secondary production of benthic insects in three cold-desert streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaines, W.L.

    1987-07-01

    Aquatic insect production was studied in three cold-desert streams in eastern Washington (Douglas Creek, Snively Springs, and Rattlesnake Springs). The size-frequency method was applied to individual taxa to estimate total insect production. production was also assessed for functional groups and trophic levels in each stream. Optioservus sp. (riffle beetles) and Baetis sp. (mayflies) accounted for 72% of the total insect numbers and 50% of the total biomass in Douglas Creek. Baetis sp. accounted for 42% of the total insect numbers and 25% of the total biomass in Snively Springs. Simulium sp. (blackflies) and Baetis sp. comprised 74% of the total insect numbers and 55% of the total biomass in Rattlesnake Springs. Grazer-scrapers (49%) and collectors (48%) were the most abundant functional groups in Douglas Creek. Collectors were the most abundant functional group in Snively Springs and Rattlesnake Springs. Herbivores and detritivores were the most abundant trophic level in Snively Springs and Rattlesnake Springs. Dipterans (midges and blackflies) were the most productive taxa within the study streams, accounting for 40% to 70% of the total community production. Production by collectors and detritivores was the highest of all functional groups and trophic levels in all study streams.

  3. Estimating Annual Precipitation in the Fenner Basin of the Eastern Mojave Desert, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davisson, M.L.; Rose, T.P.

    2000-05-15

    Metropolitan Water District (MWD) of southern California and Cadiz Inc. investigated the feasibility of storing Colorado River water in groundwater aquifers of the eastern Mojave Desert as a future drought mitigation strategy. This culminated in the public release of the Cadiz Groundwater Storage and Dry-Year Supply program Draft EIR, which included pilot percolation studies, groundwater modeling, and precipitation/runoff analysis in the Fenner groundwater basin, which overlies the proposed storage site. The project proposes to store and withdrawal Colorado River water over a 50-year period, but will not exceed the natural replenishment rates of the groundwater basin. Several independent analyses were conducted to estimate the rates of natural groundwater replenishment to the Fenner Groundwater Basin which was included in the Draft EIR. The US Geologic Survey, Water Resources Division (WRD) officially submitted comments during public review and concluded that the natural groundwater replenishment rates calculated for the Draft EIR were too high. In the WRD review, they provided a much lower recharge calculation based on a Maxey-Eakin estimation approach. This approach estimates annual precipitation over an entire basin as a function of elevation, followed by calibration against annual recharge rates. Previous attempts to create precipitation-elevation functions in western Nevada have been difficult and result in large uncertainty. In the WRD data analysis, the effect of geographic scale on the precipitation-elevation function was overlooked. This contributed to an erroneous Maxey-Eakin recharge estimate.

  4. Feasibility study of the seismic reflection method in Amargosa Desert, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brocher, T.M.; Hart, P.E.; Carle, S.F.

    1990-11-01

    The US Geological Survey (USGS) working under an Interagency agreement with the Department of Energy is engaged in a broad geoscience program to assess and identify a potential repository for high level nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. The USGS program, referred to as the Yucca Mountain Project, or YMP, consists of integrated geologic, hydrologic and geophysical studies which range in nature from site specific to regional. This report is an evaluation of different acquisition methods for future regional seismic reflection studies to be conducted in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, located in the southwestern corner of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). In January 1988, field studies were conducted to investigate the feasibility of using the common-depth point (CDP) seismic reflection method to map subsurface geological horizons within the Amargosa Desert, Nye County, Nevada. The goal of the field study was to investigate which seismic reflection method(s) should be used for mapping shallow to lower-crustal horizons. Therefore, a wide-variety of field acquisition parameters were tested, included point versus linear receiver group arrays; Vibroseis (service and trademark of Conoco, Inc.) versus explosive sources; Vibroseis array patterns; and Vibroseis sweep and frequency range. 31 refs., 33 figs., 8 tabs.

  5. H.R.G.K. Hack. Slopes in rock. An overview of engineering geology in the Netherlands. pp. 111-119 SLOPES IN ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hack, Robert

    H.R.G.K. Hack. Slopes in rock. An overview of engineering geology in the Netherlands. pp. 111-119 SLOPES IN ROCK H.R.G.K. Hack ITC (Int.Inst. for Aerospace Survey and Earth Sciences), Section Engineering 'the rock is hard' (normally meaning: do not bother with further study because 111 #12;H.R.G.K. Hack

  6. Proceedings of the scientific visit on crystalline rock repository development.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mariner, Paul E.; Hardin, Ernest L.; Miksova, Jitka

    2013-02-01

    A scientific visit on Crystalline Rock Repository Development was held in the Czech Republic on September 24-27, 2012. The visit was hosted by the Czech Radioactive Waste Repository Authority (RAWRA), co-hosted by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The purpose of the visit was to promote technical information exchange between participants from countries engaged in the investigation and exploration of crystalline rock for the eventual construction of nuclear waste repositories. The visit was designed especially for participants of countries that have recently commenced (or recommenced) national repository programmes in crystalline host rock formations. Discussion topics included repository programme development, site screening and selection, site characterization, disposal concepts in crystalline host rock, regulatory frameworks, and safety assessment methodology. Interest was surveyed in establishing a %E2%80%9Cclub,%E2%80%9D the mission of which would be to identify and address the various technical challenges that confront the disposal of radioactive waste in crystalline rock environments. The idea of a second scientific visit to be held one year later in another host country received popular support. The visit concluded with a trip to the countryside south of Prague where participants were treated to a tour of the laboratory and underground facilities of the Josef Regional Underground Research Centre.

  7. Analysis of compressive fracture in rock using statistical techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blair, S.C.

    1994-12-01

    Fracture of rock in compression is analyzed using a field-theory model, and the processes of crack coalescence and fracture formation and the effect of grain-scale heterogeneities on macroscopic behavior of rock are studied. The model is based on observations of fracture in laboratory compression tests, and incorporates assumptions developed using fracture mechanics analysis of rock fracture. The model represents grains as discrete sites, and uses superposition of continuum and crack-interaction stresses to create cracks at these sites. The sites are also used to introduce local heterogeneity. Clusters of cracked sites can be analyzed using percolation theory. Stress-strain curves for simulated uniaxial tests were analyzed by studying the location of cracked sites, and partitioning of strain energy for selected intervals. Results show that the model implicitly predicts both development of shear-type fracture surfaces and a strength-vs-size relation that are similar to those observed for real rocks. Results of a parameter-sensitivity analysis indicate that heterogeneity in the local stresses, attributed to the shape and loading of individual grains, has a first-order effect on strength, and that increasing local stress heterogeneity lowers compressive strength following an inverse power law. Peak strength decreased with increasing lattice size and decreasing mean site strength, and was independent of site-strength distribution. A model for rock fracture based on a nearest-neighbor algorithm for stress redistribution is also presented and used to simulate laboratory compression tests, with promising results.

  8. Clear Skies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D BGene NetworkNuclearDNP 20082 P r o j e c t D e s iSitesA. A. lacis

  9. Cloudy Skies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D BGene NetworkNuclearDNP 20082 P r o j

  10. Cloudy Skies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D BGene NetworkNuclearDNP 20082 P r o jJ. linn Space Science and

  11. Superhard nanophase cutter materials for rock drilling applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voronov, O.; Tompa, G.; Sadangi, R.; Kear, B.; Wilson, C.; Yan, P.

    2000-06-23

    The Low Pressure-High Temperature (LPHT) System has been developed for sintering of nanophase cutter and anvil materials. Microstructured and nanostructured cutters were sintered and studied for rock drilling applications. The WC/Co anvils were sintered and used for development of High Pressure-High Temperature (HPHT) Systems. Binderless diamond and superhard nanophase cutter materials were manufactured with help of HPHT Systems. The diamond materials were studied for rock machining and drilling applications. Binderless Polycrystalline Diamonds (BPCD) have high thermal stability and can be used in geothermal drilling of hard rock formations. Nanophase Polycrystalline Diamonds (NPCD) are under study in precision machining of optical lenses. Triphasic Diamond/Carbide/Metal Composites (TDCC) will be commercialized in drilling and machining applications.

  12. Multiporosity Flow in Fractured Low-Permeability Rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhlman, Kristopher L; Heath, Jason E

    2015-01-01

    A multiporosity extension of classical double and triple porosity fractured rock flow models for slightly compressible fluids is presented. The multiporosity model is an adaptation of the multirate solute transport model of Haggerty and Gorelick (1995) to viscous flow in fractured rock reservoirs. It is a generalization of both pseudo-steady-state and transient interporosity flow double porosity models. The model includes a fracture continuum and an overlapping distribution of multiple rock matrix continua, whose fracture-matrix exchange coefficients are specified through a discrete probability mass function. Semi-analytical cylindrically symmetric solutions to the multiporosity mathematical model are developed using the Laplace transform to illustrate its behavior. The multiporosity model presented here is conceptually simple, yet flexible enough to simulate common conceptualizations of double and triple porosity flow. This combination of generality and simplicity makes the multiporosity model a good choice ...

  13. HAWC: A Next Generation All-Sky VHE Gamma-Ray Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Sinnis; A. Smith; J. E. McEnery

    2004-03-03

    The study of the universe at energies above 100 GeV is a relatively new and exciting field. The current generation of pointed instruments have detected TeV gamma rays from at least 10 sources and the next generation of detectors promises a large increase in sensitivity. We have also seen the development of a new type of all-sky monitor in this energy regime based on water Cherenkov technology (Milagro). To fully understand the universe at these extreme energies requires a highly sensitive detector capable of continuously monitoring the entire overhead sky. Such an instrument could observe prompt emission from gamma-ray bursts and probe the limits of Lorentz invariance at high energies. With sufficient sensitivity it could detect short transients ($\\sim$15 minutes) from active galaxies and study the time structure of flares at energies unattainable to space-based instruments. Unlike pointed instruments a wide-field instrument can make an unbiased study of all active galaxies and enable many multi-wavelength campaigns to study these objects. This paper describes the design and performance of a next generation water Cherenkov detector. To attain a low energy threshold and have high sensitivity the detector should be located at high altitude ($>$ 4km) and have a large area ($\\sim$40,000 m$^2$). Such an instrument could detect gamma ray bursts out to a redshift of 1, observe flares from active galaxies as short as 15 minutes in duration, and survey the overhead sky at a level of 50 mCrab in one year.

  14. A SOUTHERN SKY AND GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY FOR BRIGHT KUIPER BELT OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheppard, Scott S.; Udalski, Andrzej; Kubiak, Marcin; Pietrzynski, Grzegorz; Poleski, Radoslaw; Soszynski, Igor; Szymanski, Michal K.; Ulaczyk, Krzysztof; Trujillo, Chadwick

    2011-10-15

    About 2500 deg{sup 2} of sky south of declination -25{sup 0} and/or near the Galactic Plane were surveyed for bright outer solar system objects. This survey is one of the first large-scale southern sky and Galactic Plane surveys to detect dwarf planets and other bright Kuiper Belt Objects in the trans-Neptunian region. The survey was able to obtain a limiting R-band magnitude of 21.6. In all, 18 outer solar system objects were detected, including Pluto which was detected near the Galactic center using optimal image subtraction techniques to remove the high stellar density background. Fourteen of the detections were previously unknown trans-Neptunian objects, demonstrating that the southern sky had not been well searched to date for bright outer solar system objects. Assuming moderate albedos, several of the new discoveries from this survey could be in hydrostatic equilibrium and thus could be considered dwarf planets. Combining this survey with previous surveys from the northern hemisphere suggests that the Kuiper Belt is nearly complete to around 21st magnitude in the R band. All the main dynamical classes in the Kuiper Belt are occupied by at least one dwarf-planet-sized object. The 3:2 Neptune resonance, which is the innermost well-populated Neptune resonance, has several large objects while the main outer Neptune resonances such as the 5:3, 7:4, 2:1, and 5:2 do not appear to have any large objects. This indicates that the outer resonances are either significantly depleted in objects relative to the 3:2 resonance or have a significantly different assortment of objects than the 3:2 resonance. For the largest objects (H < 4.5 mag), the scattered disk population appears to have a few times more objects than the main Kuiper Belt (MKB) population, while the Sedna population could be several times more than that of the MKB.

  15. HAWC: a next generation all-sky VHE gamma-ray telescope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinnis, G. (Gus); Smith, A.; McEnery, J. E.

    2004-01-01

    The study of the universe at energies above 100 GeV is a relatively new and exciting field. The current generation of pointed instruments have detected TeV gamma rays from at least 10 sources and the next generation of detectors promises a large increase in sensitivity. We have also seen the development of a new type of all-sky monitor in this energy regime based on water Cherenkov technology (Milagro). To fully understand the universe at these extreme energies requires a highly sensitive detector capable of continuously monitoring the entire overhead sky. Such an instrument could observe prompt emission from gamma-ray bursts and probe the limits of Lorentz invariance at high energies. With sufficient sensitivity it could detect shorthransients ({approx}15 minutes) from active galaxies and study the time structure of flares at energies unattainable to space-based instruments. Unlike pointed instruments a wide-field instrument can make an unbiased study of all active galaxies and enable many multi-wavelength campaigns to study these objects. This paper describes the design and performance of a next generation water Cherenkov detector. To attain a low energy threshold and have high sensitivity the detector should be located at high altitude (> 4km) and have a large area ({approx}40,000 m{sup 2}). Such an instrument could detect gamma ray bursts out to a redshift of 1, observe flares from active galaxies as short as 15 minutes in duration, and survey the overhead sky at a level of 50 mCrab in one year.

  16. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2003-10-01

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have (1) Studied relationships between velocity and permeability. (2) Used independent experimental methods to measure the elastic moduli of clay minerals as functions of pressure and saturation. (3) Applied different statistical methods for characterizing heterogeneity and textures from scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) images of shale microstructures. (4) Analyzed the directional dependence of velocity and attenuation in different reservoir rocks (5) Compared Vp measured under hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic stress conditions in sands. (6) Studied stratification as a source of intrinsic anisotropy in sediments using Vp and statistical methods for characterizing textures in sands.

  17. Automated Classification of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stellar Spectra using Artificial Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahdi Bazarghan; Ranjan Gupta

    2008-04-26

    Automated techniques have been developed to automate the process of classification of objects or their analysis. The large datasets provided by upcoming spectroscopic surveys with dedicated telescopes urges scientists to use these automated techniques for analysis of such large datasets which are now available to the community. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is one of such surveys releasing massive datasets. We use Probabilistic Neural Network (PNN) for automatic classification of about 5000 SDSS spectra into 158 spectral type of a reference library ranging from O type to M type stars.

  18. Cataclysmic Variables From the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. VI. the Sixth Year (2005)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szkody, Paula; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Henden, Arne; /Naval Observ., Flagstaff /AAVSO, Cambridge; Mannikko, Lee; Mukadam, Anjum; /Washington U., Seattle,; Schmidt, Gary D.; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ.; Bochanski, John J.; Agueros, Marcel; Anderson, Scott F.; Silvestri, Nicole M.; /Washington U., Seattle,; Dahab, William E.; /Princeton U. Observ.; Oguri, Masamune; /Princeton U. Observ. /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Schneider, Donald P.; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys.; Shin,; Strauss, Michael A.; Knapp, Gillian R.; /Princeton U. Observ.; West, Andrew A.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.

    2007-06-15

    The 28 cataclysmic variables found in 2005 in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey are presented with their coordinates, magnitudes and spectra. Five of these systems are previously known CVs (HH Cnc, SX LMi, QZ Ser, RXJ1554.2+2721 and HS1016+3412) and the rest are new discoveries. Additional spectroscopic, photometric and/or polarimetric observations of 10 systems were carried out, resulting in estimates of the orbital periods for seven of the new binaries. The 23 new CVs include one eclipsing system, one new Polar and five systems whose spectra clearly reveal atmospheric absorption lines from the underlying white dwarf.

  19. First low frequency all-sky search for continuous gravitational wave signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; J. Aasi; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; F. Acernese; K. Ackley; C. Adams; T. Adams; P. Addesso; R. X. Adhikari; V. B. Adya; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; K. Agatsuma; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; A. Ain; P. Ajith; B. Allen; A. Allocca; D. V. Amariutei; M. Andersen; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. C. Arceneaux; J. S. Areeda; N. Arnaud; G. Ashton; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; F. Baldaccini; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; S. E. Barclay; B. C. Barish; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; J. Bartlett; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. C. Batch; C. Baune; V. Bavigadda; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; C. Belczynski; A. S. Bell; B. K. Berger; J. Bergman; G. Bergmann; C. P. L. Berry; D. Bersanetti; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; S. Bhagwat; R. Bhandare; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Birney; S. Biscans; M. Bitossi; C. Biwer; M. A. Bizouard; J. K. Blackburn; C. D. Blair; D. Blair; S. Bloemen; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; G. Bogaert; P. Bojtos; C. Bond; F. Bondu; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; Sukanta Bose; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; V. Branco; J. E. Brau; T. Briant; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; P. Brockill; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. Brown; D. D. Brown; N. M. Brown; C. C. Buchanan; A. Buikema; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Calderón Bustillo; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; K. C. Cannon; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; E. Capocasa; F. Carbognani; S. Caride; J. Casanueva Diaz; C. Casentini; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglià; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; C. Celerier; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; L. Cerboni Baiardi; G. Cerretani; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. J. Chamberlin; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; X. Chen; Y. Chen; C. Cheng; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; M. Cho; J. H. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; C. G. Collette; M. Colombini; M. Constancio Jr.; A. Conte; L. Conti; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; S. B. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. T. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. J. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; R. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; J. Cripe; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; T. Dal Canton; M. D. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; N. S. Darman; V. Dattilo; I. Dave; H. P. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; M. De Laurentis; S. Deléglise; W. Del Pozzo; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. De Rosa; R. T. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. C. Díaz; L. Di Fiore; M. Di Giovanni; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; G. Dojcinoski; V. Dolique; E. Dominguez; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; R. Douglas; T. P. Downes; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; M. Ducrot; S. E. Dwyer; T. B. Edo; M. C. Edwards; M. Edwards; A. Effler; H. -B. Eggenstein; P. Ehrens; J. M. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; R. C. Essick; T. Etzel; M. Evans; T. M. Evans; R. Everett; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Q. Fang; S. Farinon; B. Farr; W. M. Farr; M. Favata; M. Fays; H. Fehrmann; M. M. Fejer; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; E. C. Ferreira; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; J. -D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; H. A. G. Gabbard; J. R. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; S. G. Gaonkar; F. Garufi; A. Gatto; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; B. Gendre; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Á. Gergely; V. Germain; A. Ghosh; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; J. R. Gleason; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. Gondan; G. González; J. Gonzalez; A. Gopakumar; N. A. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. E. Gossan; M. Gosselin; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; G. Greco; P. Groot; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. J. Guido; X. Guo; A. Gupta; M. K. Gupta; K. E. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; J. J. Hacker; B. R. Hall; E. D. Hall; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; M. Haney; M. M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; M. D. Hannam; J. Hanson; T. Hardwick; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; M. J. Hart; M. T. Hartman; C. -J. Haster; K. Haughian; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; J. Hennig; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; J. Hoelscher-Obermaier; D. Hofman; S. E. Hollitt; K. Holt; P. Hopkins; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. A. Houston; E. J. Howell; Y. M. Hu; S. Huang; E. A. Huerta; D. Huet; B. Hughey

    2015-10-13

    In this paper we present the results of the first low frequency all-sky search of continuous gravitational wave signals conducted on Virgo VSR2 and VSR4 data. The search covered the full sky, a frequency range between 20 Hz and 128 Hz with a range of spin-down between $-1.0 \\times 10^{-10}$ Hz/s and $+1.5 \\times 10^{-11}$ Hz/s, and was based on a hierarchical approach. The starting point was a set of short Fast Fourier Transforms (FFT), of length 8192 seconds, built from the calibrated strain data. Aggressive data cleaning, both in the time and frequency domains, has been done in order to remove, as much as possible, the effect of disturbances of instrumental origin. On each dataset a number of candidates has been selected, using the FrequencyHough transform in an incoherent step. Only coincident candidates among VSR2 and VSR4 have been examined in order to strongly reduce the false alarm probability, and the most significant candidates have been selected. The criteria we have used for candidate selection and for the coincidence step greatly reduce the harmful effect of large instrumental artifacts. Selected candidates have been subject to a follow-up by constructing a new set of longer FFTs followed by a further incoherent analysis. No evidence for continuous gravitational wave signals was found, therefore we have set a population-based joint VSR2-VSR4 90$\\%$ confidence level upper limit on the dimensionless gravitational wave strain in the frequency range between 20 Hz and 128 Hz. This is the first all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves conducted at frequencies below 50 Hz. We set upper limits in the range between about $10^{-24}$ and $2\\times 10^{-23}$ at most frequencies. Our upper limits on signal strain show an improvement of up to a factor of $\\sim$2 with respect to the results of previous all-sky searches at frequencies below $80~\\mathrm{Hz}$.

  20. Magnetic white dwarfs in the Early Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. T. Gaensicke; F. Euchner; S. Jordan

    2002-08-26

    We have identified 7 new magnetic DA white dwarfs in the Early Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Our selection strategy has also recovered all the previously known magnetic white dwarfs contained in the SDSS EDR, KUV03292+0035 and HE0330-0002. Analysing the SDSS fibre spectroscopy of the magnetic DA white dwarfs with our state-of-the-art model spectra, we find dipole field strengths 1.5<=B_d<=63MG and effective temperatures 8500<=Teff<=39000K. As a conservative estimate, we expect that the complete SDSS will increase the number of known magnetic white dwarfs by a factor 3.

  1. Final Technical Report: Effects of Changing Water and Nitrogen Inputs on a Mojave Desert Ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Stanley D. [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Nowak, Robert S. [University of Nevada, Reno

    2007-11-30

    Questions addressed under this grant shared the common hypothesis that plant and ecosystem performance will positively respond to the augmentation of the most limiting resources to plant growth in the Mojave Desert, e.g., water and nitrogen. Specific hypothesis include (1) increased summer rainfall will significantly increase plant production thorugh an alleviation of moisture stress in the dry summer months, (2) N-deposition will increase plan production in this N-limited system, particularly in wet years or in concert with added summer rain, and (3) biological crust disturbance will gradually decrease bio-available N, with concomitant long-term reductions in photosynthesis and ANPP. Individual plan and ecosystem responses to global change may be regulated by biogeochemical processes and natural weather variability, and changes in plant and ecosystem processes may occur rapidly, may occur only after a time lag, or may not occur at all. During the first PER grant period, we observed changes in plant and ecosystem processes that would fall under each of these time-response intervals: plant and ecosystem processes responded rapidly to added summer rain, whereas most processes responded slowly or in a lag fashion to N-deposition and with no significant response to crust disturbance. Therefore, the primary objectives of this renewal grant were to: (1) continue ongoing measurements of soil and plant parameters that assess primary treatment responses; (2) address the potential heterogeneity of soil properties and (3) initiate a new suite of measurements that will provide data necessary for scaling/modeling of whole-plot to ecosystem-level responses. Our experimental approach included soil plan-water interactions using TDR, neutron probe, and miniaturized soil matric potential and moisture sensors, plant ecophysiological and productivity responses to water and nitrogen treatments and remote sensing methodologies deployed on a radio control platform.

  2. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites, Slick Rock, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, hereafter referred to as the UMTRCA, authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up two uranium mill tailings processing sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in San Miguel County. The purpose of the cleanup is to reduce the potential health effects associated with the radioactive materials remaining on the processing sites and on vicinity properties (VPs) associated with the sites. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated standards for the UMTRCA that contained measures to control the contaminated materials and to protect the ground water from further degradation. The sites contain concrete foundations of mill buildings, tailings piles, and areas contaminated by windblown and waterborne radioactive tailings materials. The proposed action is to remediate the UC and NC sites by removing all contaminated materials within the designated site boundaries or otherwise associated with the sites, and relocating them to, and stabilizing them at, a location approximately 5 road mi (8 km) northeast of the processing sites on land administered by the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Remediation would be performed by the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project.

  3. Hot dry rock energy: Hot dry rock geothermal development program. Progress report. Fiscal year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salazar, J.; Brown, M. [eds.

    1995-03-01

    Extended flow testing at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock (HDR) test facility concluded in Fiscal Year 1993 with the completion of Phase 2 of the long-term flow test (LTFT) program. As is reported in detail in this report, the second phase of the LTFT, although only 55 days in duration, confirmed in every way the encouraging test results of the 112-day Phase I LTFT carried out in Fiscal Year 1992. Interim flow testing was conducted early in FY 1993 during the period between the two LTFT segments. In addition, two brief tests involving operation of the reservoir on a cyclic schedule were run at the end of the Phase 2 LTFT. These interim and cyclic tests provided an opportunity to conduct evaluations and field demonstrations of several reservoir engineering concepts that can now be applied to significantly increase the productivity of HDR systems. The Fenton Hill HDR test facility was shut down and brought into standby status during the last part of FY 1993. Unfortunately, the world`s largest, deepest, and most productive HDR reservoir has gone essentially unused since that time.

  4. ANCIENT CALENDRICAL OBSERVING SITES IN CALIFORNIA’S MOJAVE DESERT AND SIERRA NEVADA, 2nd Edition April 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Merle

    2013-01-01

    models: Shadow tracks on day of autumnal equinox . . .on day after autumnal equinox . Barrier Hill: Cairn, withRocks 4 Observing the Equinox 5 Mid-Season Day at Counsel

  5. Machine learning techniques for astrophysical modelling and photometric redshift estimation of quasars in optical sky surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Daniel Kumar

    2009-01-06

    Machine learning techniques are utilised in several areas of astrophysical research today. This dissertation addresses the application of ML techniques to two classes of problems in astrophysics, namely, the analysis of individual astronomical phenomena over time and the automated, simultaneous analysis of thousands of objects in large optical sky surveys. Specifically investigated are (1) techniques to approximate the precise orbits of the satellites of Jupiter and Saturn given Earth-based observations as well as (2) techniques to quickly estimate the distances of quasars observed in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Learning methods considered include genetic algorithms, particle swarm optimisation, artificial neural networks, and radial basis function networks. The first part of this dissertation demonstrates that GAs and PSO can both be efficiently used to model functions that are highly non-linear in several dimensions. It is subsequently demonstrated in the second part that ANNs and RBFNs can be used as effective predictors of spectroscopic redshift given accurate photometry, especially in combination with other learning-based approaches described in the literature. Careful application of these and other ML techniques to problems in astronomy and astrophysics will contribute to a better understanding of stellar evolution, binary star systems, cosmology, and the large-scale structure of the universe.

  6. Evidence of cross-correlation between the CMB lensing and the gamma-ray sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Fornengo; L. Perotto; M. Regis; S. Camera

    2015-03-02

    We report the measurement of the angular power spectrum of cross-correlation between the unresolved component of the Fermi-LAT gamma-ray sky-maps and the CMB lensing potential map reconstructed by the Planck satellite. The matter distribution in the Universe determines the bending of light coming from the last scattering surface. At the same time, the matter density drives the growth history of astrophysical objects, including their capability at generating non-thermal phenomena, which in turn give rise to gamma-ray emissions. The Planck lensing map provides information on the integrated distribution of matter, while the integrated history of gamma-ray emitters is imprinted in the Fermi-LAT sky maps. We report here the first evidence of their correlation. We find that the multipole dependence of the cross-correlation measurement is in agreement with current models of the gamma-ray luminosity function for AGN and star forming galaxies, with a statistical evidence of 3.0$\\sigma$. Moreover, its amplitude can in general be matched only assuming that these extra-galactic emitters are also the bulk contribution of the measured isotopic gamma-ray background (IGRB) intensity. This leaves little room for a big contribution from galactic sources to the IGRB measured by Fermi-LAT, pointing toward a direct evidence of the extragalactic origin of the IGRB.

  7. An Efficient Algorithm for Positioning Tiles in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. R. Blanton; R. H. Lupton; F. Miller Maley; N. Young; I. Zehavi; J. Loveday

    2001-05-30

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) will observe around 10^6 spectra from targets distributed over an area of about 10,000 square degrees, using a multi-object fiber spectrograph which can simultaneously observe 640 objects in a circular field-of-view (referred to as a ``tile'') 1.49 degrees in radius. No two fibers can be placed closer than 55'' during the same observation; multiple targets closer than this distance are said to ``collide.'' We present here a method of allocating fibers to desired targets given a set of tile centers which includes the effects of collisions and which is nearly optimally efficient and uniform. Because of large-scale structure in the galaxy distribution (which form the bulk of the SDSS targets), a naive covering the sky with equally-spaced tiles does not yield uniform sampling. Thus, we present a heuristic for perturbing the centers of the tiles from the equally-spaced distribution which provides more uniform completeness. For the SDSS sample, we can attain a sampling rate greater than 92% for all targets, and greater than 99% for the set of targets which do not collide with each other, with an efficiency greater than 90% (defined as the fraction of available fibers assigned to targets).

  8. Far-IR Detection Limits I: Sky Confusion Due to Galactic Cirrus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woong-Seob Jeong; Hyung Mok Lee; Soojong Pak; Takao Nakagawa; Suk Minn Kwon; Chris P. Pearson; Glenn J. White

    2004-11-16

    Fluctuations in the brightness of the background radiation can lead to confusion with real point sources. Such background emission confusion will be important for infrared observations with relatively large beam sizes since the amount of fluctuation tends to increase with angular scale. In order to quantitively assess the effect of the background emission on the detection of point sources for current and future far-infrared observations by space-borne missions such as Spitzer, ASTRO-F, Herschel and SPICA, we have extended the Galactic emission map to higher angular resolution than the currently available data. Using this high resolution map, we estimate the sky confusion noise due to the emission from interstellar dust clouds or cirrus, based on fluctuation analysis and detailed photometry over realistically simulated images. We find that the confusion noise derived by simple fluctuation analysis agrees well with the result from realistic simulations. Although the sky confusion noise becomes dominant in long wavelength bands (> 100 um) with 60 - 90cm aperture missions, it is expected to be two order of magnitude smaller for the next generation space missions with larger aperture sizes such as Herschel and SPICA.

  9. First ground-based 200-um observing with THUMPER on JCMT - sky characterisation and planet maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Ward-Thompson; P. A. R. Ade; H. Araujo; I. Coulson; J. Cox; G. R. Davis; Rh. Evans; M. J. Griffin; W. K. Gear; P. Hargrave; P. Hargreaves; D. Hayton; B. J. Kiernan; S. J. Leeks; P. Mauskopf; D. Naylor; N. Potter; S. A. Rinehart; R. Sudiwala; C. R. Tucker; R. J. Walker; S. L. Watkin

    2005-09-22

    We present observations that were carried out with the Two HUndred Micron PhotometER (THUMPER) mounted on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) in Hawaii, at a wavelength of 200 um (frequency 1.5 THz). The observations utilise a small atmospheric window that opens up at this wavelength under very dry conditions at high-altitude observing sites. The atmosphere was calibrated using the sky-dipping method and a relation was established between the optical depth, tau, at 1.5 THz and that at 225 GHz: tau_1.5THz = (95 +/- 10)*tau_225GHz. Mars and Jupiter were mapped from the ground at this wavelength for the first time, and the system characteristics measured. A noise equivalent flux density (NEFD) of ~65 +/- 10 Jy (1 sigma 1 second) was measured for the THUMPER-JCMT combination, consistent with predictions based upon our laboratory measurements. The main-beam resolution of 14 arcsec was confirmed and an extended error-beam detected at roughly two-thirds of the magnitude of the main beam. Measurements of the Sun allow us to estimate that the fraction of the power in the main beam is ~15%, consistent with predictions based on modelling the dish surface accuracy. It is therefore shown that the sky over Mauna Kea is suitable for astronomy at this wavelength under the best conditions. However, higher or drier sites should have a larger number of useable nights per year.

  10. The star formation histories of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben Panter; Raul Jimenez; Alan F. Heavens; Stephane Charlot

    2007-04-24

    We present the results of a MOPED analysis of ~3 x 10^5 galaxy spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release Three (SDSS DR3), with a number of improvements in data, modelling and analysis compared with our previous analysis of DR1. The improvements include: modelling the galaxies with theoretical models at a higher spectral resolution of 3\\AA; better calibrated data; an extended list of excluded emission lines, and a wider range of dust models. We present new estimates of the cosmic star formation rate, the evolution of stellar mass density and the stellar mass function from the fossil record. In contrast to our earlier work the results show no conclusive peak in the star formation rate out to a redshift around 2 but continue to show conclusive evidence for `downsizing' in the SDSS fossil record. The star formation history is now in good agreement with more traditional instantaneous measures. The galaxy stellar mass function is determined over five decades of mass, and an updated estimate of the current stellar mass density is presented. We also investigate the systematic effects of changes in the stellar population modelling, the spectral resolution, dust modelling, sky lines, spectral resolution and the change of data set. We find that the main changes in the results are due to the improvements in the calibration of the SDSS data, changes in the initial mass function and the theoretical models used.

  11. Parameter-space metric for all-sky semicoherent searches for gravitational-wave pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karl Wette

    2015-10-28

    The sensitivity of all-sky searches for gravitational-wave pulsars is primarily limited by the finite availability of computing resources. Semicoherent searches are a widely-used method of maximizing sensitivity to gravitational-wave pulsars at fixed computing cost: the data from a gravitational-wave detector are partitioned into a number of segments, each segment is coherently analyzed, and the analysis results from each segment are summed together. The generation of template banks for the coherent analysis of each segment, and for the summation, requires knowledge of the metrics associated with the coherent and semicoherent parameter spaces respectively. We present a useful approximation to the semicoherent parameter-space metric, analogous to that presented in Wette and Prix [Phys. Rev. D 88, 123005 (2013)] for the coherent metric. The new semicoherent metric is compared to previous work in Pletsch [Phys. Rev. D 82, 042002 (2010)], and Brady and Creighton [Phys. Rev. D 61, 082001 (2000)]. We find that semicoherent all-sky searches require orders of magnitude more templates than previously predicted.

  12. The Eighth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: First Data from SDSS-III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aihara, Hiroaki; Prieto, Carlos Allende; An, Deokkeun; Anderson, Scott F.; Aubourg, Eric; Balbinot, Eduardo; Beers, Timothy C.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Bickerton, Steven J.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanton, Michael R.; /New York U., CCPP /Penn State U.

    2011-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) started a new phase in August 2008, with new instrumentation and new surveys focused on Galactic structure and chemical evolution, measurements of the baryon oscillation feature in the clustering of galaxies and the quasar Ly{alpha} forest, and a radial velocity search for planets around {approx}8000 stars. This paper describes the first data release of SDSS-III (and the eighth counting from the beginning of the SDSS). The release includes 5-band imaging of roughly 5200 deg{sup 2} in the Southern Galactic Cap, bringing the total footprint of the SDSS imaging to 14,555 deg{sup 2}, or over a third of the Celestial Sphere. All the imaging data have been reprocessed with an improved sky-subtraction algorithm and a final, self-consistent recalibration and flat-field determination. This release also includes all data from the second phase of the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Evolution (SEGUE-2), consisting of spectroscopy of approximately 118,000 stars at both high and low Galactic latitudes. All the more than half a million stellar spectra obtained with the SDSS spectrograph have been reprocessed through an improved stellar parameters pipeline, which has better determination of metallicity for high metallicity stars.

  13. An Initial Survey of White Dwarfs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. C. Harris; J. Liebert; S. J. Kleinman; A. Nitta; S. F. Anderson; G. R. Knapp; J. Krzesinski; G. Schmidt; M. A. Strauss; D. Vanden Berk; D. Eisenstein; S. Hawley; B. Margon; J. A. Munn; N. M. Silvestri; A. Smith; P. Szkody; M. J. Collinge; C. C. Dahn; X. Fan; P. B. Hall; D. P. Schneider; J. Brinkmann; S. Burles; J. E. Gunn; G. S. Hennessy; R. Hindsley; Z. Ivezic; S. Kent; D. Q. Lamb; R. H. Lupton; R. C. Nichol; J. R. Pier; D. J. Schlegel; M. SubbaRao; A. Uomoto; B. Yanny; D. G. York

    2003-05-19

    An initial assessment is made of white dwarf and hot subdwarf stars observed in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. In a small area of sky (190 square degrees), observed much like the full survey will be, 269 white dwarfs and 56 hot subdwarfs are identified spectroscopically where only 44 white dwarfs and 5 hot subdwarfs were known previously. Most are ordinary DA (hydrogen atmosphere) and DB (helium) types. In addition, in the full survey to date, a number of WDs have been found with uncommon spectral types. Among these are blue DQ stars displaying lines of atomic carbon; red DQ stars showing molecular bands of C_2 with a wide variety of strengths; DZ stars where Ca and occasionally Mg, Na, and/or Fe lines are detected; and magnetic WDs with a wide range of magnetic field strengths in DA, DB, DQ, and (probably) DZ spectral types. Photometry alone allows identification of stars hotter than 12000 K, and the density of these stars for 15

  14. EXIST: A High Sensitivity Hard X-ray Imaging Sky Survey Mission for ISS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Grindlay; L. Bildsten; D. Chakrabarty; M. Elvis; A. Fabian; F. Fiore; N. Gehrels; C. Hailey; F. Harrison; D. Hartmann; T. Prince; B. Ramsey; R. Rothschild; G. Skinner; S. Woosley

    1999-12-18

    A deep all-sky imaging hard x-ray survey and wide-field monitor is needed to extend soft (ROSAT) and medium (ABRIXAS2) x-ray surveys into the 10-100 keV band (and beyond) at comparable sensitivity (~0.05 mCrab). This would enable discovery and study of >3000 obscured AGN, which probably dominate the hard x-ray background; detailed study of spectra and variability of accreting black holes and a census of BHs in the Galaxy; Gamma-ray bursts and associated massive star formation (PopIII) at very high redshift and Soft Gamma-ray Repeaters throughout the Local Group; and a full galactic survey for obscured supernova remnants. The Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST) is a proposed array of 8 x 1m^2 coded aperture telescopes fixed on the International Space Station (ISS) with 160deg x 40deg field of view which images the full sky each 90 min orbit. EXIST has been included in the most recent NASA Strategic Plan as a candidate mission for the next decade. An overview of the science goals and mission concept is presented.

  15. Onboard Autonomous Rock Shape Analysis For Mars Rovers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in this process, we present an automated technique to allow a rover to classify the shape and other geologic were conducted by characterizing the two-dimensional rock shape while the three-dimensional shape developed and implemented. The per- formance of each measure was characterized by analyzing images from

  16. Ion beam analyses of radionuclide migration in heterogeneous rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonso, Ursula; Missana, Tiziana; Garcia-Gutierrez, Miguel [CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 40, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Patelli, Alessandro [CIVEN, Via delle Industrie 5, Venezia-Marghera 30175 (Italy); Rigato, Valentino; Ceccato, Daniele [LNL-INFN, Viale dell' Universita 2, Legnaro-Padova 35020 (Italy)

    2013-07-18

    The migration of radionuclides (RN) in the environment is a topic of general interest, for its implications on public health, and it is an issue for the long-term safety studies of deep geological repositories (DGR) for high-level radioactive waste. The role played by colloids on RN migration is also of great concern. Diffusion and sorption are fundamental mechanisms controlling RN migration in rocks and many experimental approaches are applied to determine transport parameters for low sorbing RN in homogeneous rocks. However, it is difficult to obtain relevant data for high sorbing RN or colloids, for which diffusion lengths are extremely short, or within heterogeneous rocks, where transport might be different in different minerals. The ion beam techniques Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and micro-Particle Induced X-Ray Emission ({mu}PIXE), rarely applied in the field, were selected for their micro-analytical potential to study RN diffusion and surface retention within heterogeneous rocks. Main achievements obtained during last 12 years are highlighted.

  17. Rheological properties of minerals and rocks Shun-ichiro Karato

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Rheological properties of minerals and rocks Shun-ichiro Karato Yale University Department Earth" (edited by S. Karato) Wiley-Blackwell #12; 2 SUMMARY Plastic deformation in Earth and planetary. The rheological properties in the upper mantle are controlled mostly by temperature, pressure and water content

  18. A Holocene lacustrine rock platform around Storavatnet, Ostery, western

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fossen, Haakon

    structures, and the time and mode of formation. Location Osterøy Island is at 60 300 N, just inland from, western Norway. The lake was converted to a reservoir in 1920 and therefore is subject to frequent changes Zealand, with an oceanic climate, Allen et al. (2002) interpreted the formation of a lacustrine rock

  19. Controlled Rocking Approach for the Seismic Resistance of Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruneau, Michel

    for the design of a single bridge pier for a specified seismic demand and set of capacity protection limitsControlled Rocking Approach for the Seismic Resistance of Structures Michael POLLINO and Michel response that can allow the system to self-center after the excitation ceases. This approach to seismic

  20. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2003-06-30

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have studied (1) Methods for detection of stress-induced velocity anisotropy in sands. (2) We have initiated efforts for velocity upscaling to quantify long-wavelength and short-wavelength velocity behavior and the scale-dependent dispersion caused by sediment variability in different depositional environments.

  1. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2004-08-01

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have continued our work on analyzing well logs and microstructural constraints on seismic signatures. We report results of three studies in this report. The first one deals with fractures and faults that provide the primary control on the underground fluid flow through low permeability massive carbonate rocks. Fault cores often represent lower transmissibility whereas the surrounding damaged rocks and main slip surfaces are high transmissibility elements. We determined the physical properties of fault rocks collected in and around the fault cores of large normal faults in central Italy. After studying the P- and S-wave velocity variation during cycles of confining pressure, we conclude that a rigid pore frame characterizes the fault gouge whereas the fractured limestone comprises pores with a larger aspect ratio. The second study was to characterize the seismic properties of brine as its temperature decreases from 25 C to -21 C. The purpose was to understand how the transmitted wave changes with the onset of freezing. The main practical reason for this experiment was to use partially frozen brine as an analogue for a mixture of methane hydrate and water present in the pore space of a gas hydrate reservoir. In the third study we analyzed variations in dynamic moduli in various carbonate reservoirs. The investigations include log and laboratory data from velocity, porosity, permeability, and attenuation measurements.

  2. ACG Practical Rock Mechanics and Ground Support in Mining Courses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobar, Michael

    CENTRE FOR GEOMECHANICS Ph: +61 8 6488 3300 Fax: +61 8 6488 1130 info for Geomechanics. Practical Rock Mechanics (Introduction) Short Course 28­29 July 2014 Course objectives This course is designed to develop specific underground mining geomechanics competencies for mine geologists

  3. Fluid Migration During Ice/Rock Planetesimal Differentiation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raney, Robert 1987-

    2012-12-12

    fast melt water can segregate from the core of an ice-rich planetesimal. To answer this question we treat the core as two phase flow problem: a compacting viscous “solid” (ice/rock mixture) and a segregating liquid (melt water). The model developed...

  4. Rock dilation, nonlinear deformation, and pore pressure change under shear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

    Rock dilation, nonlinear deformation, and pore pressure change under shear Yariv Hamiel a criterion and pore pressure response to a fault slip. We investigate the poroelastic response of two an increase of pore pressure with mean stress (according to Skempton coefficient B) under undrained conditions

  5. Colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport in fractured porous rock 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baek, Inseok

    1994-01-01

    phase, a carrier phase, and a stationary solid phase. In the basic model, one-dimensional advection in a single planar fracture of infinite extent is coupled with diffusion in the rock matrix perpendicular to the fracture. In this study, a full...

  6. Technical Note Evaluation of mechanical rock properties using a Schmidt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ze'ev, Reches

    December 1999 1. Introduction The Schmidt Hammer was developed in 1948 for non-destructive testing±6]. Such fast, non-destructive and in situ evaluations of rock mechanical parameters reduce the expenses for sample collection and laboratory testing. Consequently, the mechanical parameters can be deter- mined

  7. Overview of conservation treatments applied to rock glyph archaeological sites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dandridge, Debra E

    2000-01-01

    . Conservation efforts to save the world's ancient rock glyphs have been approached from a scientific basis for only the last twenty-five years. Many site managers, both private and public, have little knowledge of, or training in, the use of treatments that can...

  8. Used Fuel Disposal in Crystalline Rocks. FY15 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yifeng

    2015-08-20

    The objective of the Crystalline Disposal R&D Work Package is to advance our understanding of longterm disposal of used fuel in crystalline rocks and to develop necessary experimental and computational capabilities to evaluate various disposal concepts in such media.

  9. WATERJET ASSISTED POLYCRYSTALLINE DIAMOND INDENTATION DRILLING OF ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    improved drilling rates can provide a significant benefit, justifying the costs and effort required both of drilling and completions of the wells can account for 25 ­ 50% of the cost of the electricity whichWATERJET ASSISTED POLYCRYSTALLINE DIAMOND INDENTATION DRILLING OF ROCK Santi, P, Bell, S

  10. Process of breaking and rendering permeable a subterranean rock mass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lekas, Mitchell A. (Concord, CA)

    1980-01-01

    The process of the present invention involves the following steps: producing, as by hydrofracing, a substantially horizontal fracture in the subterranean rock mass to be processed; emplacing an explosive charge in the mass in spaced juxtaposed position to the fracture; enlarging the fracture to create a void space thereat, an initial lifting of the overburden, and to provide a free face juxtaposed to and arranged to cooperate with the emplaced explosive charge; and exploding the charge against the free face for fragmenting the rock and to distribute the space, thus providing fractured, pervious, rubble-ized rock in an enclosed subterranean chamber. Firing of the charge provides a further lifting of the overburden, an enlargement of the chamber and a larger void space to distribute throughout the rubble-ized rock within the chamber. In some forms of the invention an explosive charge is used to produce a transitory enlargement of the fracture, and the juxtaposed emplaced charge is fired during the critical period of enlargement of the fracture.

  11. Columbia River Channel Improvement Project Rock Removal Blasting: Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.

    2010-01-29

    This document provides a monitoring plan to evaluate take as outlined in the National Marine Fisheries Service 2002 Biological Opinion for underwater blasting to remove rock from the navigation channel for the Columbia River Channel Improvement Project. The plan was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District.

  12. ARM: W-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    1990-01-01

    W-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  13. ARM: X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    2011-09-14

    X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  14. ARM: Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    2011-05-24

    Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  15. ARM: X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif (Andrei) Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  16. ARM: W-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif (Andrei) Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    W-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  17. ARM: Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif (Andrei) Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  18. Layered rocks beneath the Phanerozoic platform of the US midcontinent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauser, E.C. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States))

    1991-03-01

    A thick sequence of layered rocks lies hidden beneath the Phanerozoic cover of the central US over large regions. A thick sequence of Precambrian layered rocks in imaged on the COCORP transect across southern Illinois and Indiana. The thickness of this layered sequence varies from 1-3 times the thickness of the overlying Phanerozoic section of the Illinois basin. The layered sequence is observed for close to 200 km in an east-west direction. Similar layered reflections are seen on the COCORP data from Hardeman Co., TX, and neighboring southwest Oklahoma. Both of these known occurrences lie within the region of the middle Proterozoic Granite/Rhyolite province of the US midcontinent, an area within which scattered wells to basement commonly encounter 1.3-1.5 Ga undeformed granite and/or compositionally similar rhyolite. Therefore, these layered assemblages may comprise a thick sequence of silicic volcanic and sedimentary rocks (perhaps also injected by mafic sills) between scattered volcanic-intrusive centers, such as exposed in the St. Francois Mountains of southeast Missouri. However, in places such as Illinois and Indiana, the near absence of deep wells leaves the possibility that the upper portion of these layered rocks may locally be of late Proterozoic or earliest Paleozoic age. The reprocessing of available industry data, analyzed in conjunction with the existing COCORP data, includes extended vibroseis correlation. These industry data are invaluable in the author's effort to expand the known distribution of these layered rocks (e.g., into north-central Illinois) and to map their structures.

  19. Tracer Fluid Flow through Porous Media: Theory Applied to Acid Stimulation Treatments in Carbonate Rocks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakaria Mohamed Reda, Ahmed

    2014-07-29

    Most carbonate rocks are heterogeneous at multiple length scales. These heterogeneities strongly influence the outcome of the acid stimulation treatments which are routinely performed to improve well productivity. At the pore scale, carbonate rocks...

  20. The Use of Random Forest in Rock-glacier Automatic Detection based on Satellite Imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freitas, Nando de

    and observed global warming (Barsch, 1996), rock-glaciers are46 also threatened by major human activities variables derived10 from remote sensing imagery, together with the truth label (presence/absence of rock-11

  1. Rock-Water Interactions in the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rock-Water Interactions in the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems I. Fluid Mixing and Chemical Geothermometry Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  2. Integration of Rock Physics and Seismic Inversion for Carbonate Reservoir Characterization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Tingting

    2014-12-12

    Carbonate reservoir characterization based on rock physics and seismic inversion helps in better understanding the influence of deposition and diagenesis on rock property. In this dissertation, I first study a modern carbonate platform to understand...

  3. Nonlinear Elastic Wave Experiments: Learning About the Behavior of Rocks and Geomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (historically) the macroscopic experiments that led to our cur- rent understanding of the peculiar nonlinearity of rocks were studied and all were found to be highly nonlinear; notably, sedimentary rocks (which are oil

  4. Geochemistry of silicate-rich rocks can curtail spreading of carbon dioxide in subsurface aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardoso, Silvana S. S.; Andres, J. T. H.

    2014-12-11

    in carbonate rocks the streaming of dissolved carbon dioxide persists, the chemical interactions in silicate-rich rocks may curb this transport drastically and even inhibit it altogether. These results challenge our view of carbon sequestration...

  5. Search for underground openings for in situ test facilities in crystalline rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wollenberg, H.A.; Strisower, B.; Corrigan, D.J.; Graf, A.N.; O'Brien, M.T.; Pratt, H.; Board, M.; Hustrulid, W.

    1980-01-01

    With a few exceptions, crystalline rocks in this study were limited to plutonic rocks and medium to high-grade metamorphic rocks. Nearly 1700 underground mines, possibly occurring in crystalline rock, were initially identified. Application of criteria resulted in the identification of 60 potential sites. Within this number, 26 mines and 4 civil works were identified as having potential in that they fulfilled the criteria. Thirty other mines may have similar potential. Most of the mines identified are near the contact between a pluton and older sedimentary, volcanic and metamorphic rocks. However, some mines and the civil works are well within plutonic or metamorphic rock masses. Civil works, notably underground galleries associated with pumped storage hydroelectric facilities, are generally located in tectonically stable regions, in relatively homogeneous crystalline rock bodies. A program is recommended which would identify one or more sites where a concordance exists between geologic setting, company amenability, accessibility and facilities to conduct in situ tests in crystalline rock.

  6. Coupled hydro-mechanical processes in crytalline rock and in induratedand plastic clays: A comparative discussion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Blumling, Peter; Bernier, Frederic

    2008-01-01

    at Grimsel. In Coupled Thermo-Hydro- Mechanical-ChemicalCOUPLED HYDRO-MECHANICAL PROCESSES IN CRYTALLINE ROCK AND IN

  7. Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II), Data Release 6, including Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Yanny, Brian; Rockosi, Constance; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Knapp, Gillian R.

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (see www.sdss.org for general information) will map one-quarter of the entire sky and perform a redshift survey of galaxies, quasars and stars. The DR6 is the sixth major data release and provides images, imaging catalogs, spectra, and redshifts for download. It is the first data release of SDSS-II, an extension of the original SDSS consisting of three subprojects: Legacy, SEGUE and a Supernova survey. Be sure to check out the separate page for SEGUE also at http://classic.sdss.org/dr6/start/aboutsegue.html.

  8. ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL COLONIZATION OF LARREA TRIDENTATA AND AMBROSIA DUMOSA ROOTS VARIES WITH PRECIPITATION AND SEASON IN THE MOJAVE DESERT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. E. APPLE; C. I. THEE; V. L. SMITH-LONGOZO; C. R. COGAR; C. E. WELLS; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01

    The percentage of fine roots colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi varied with season and with species in the co-dominant shrubs Lurreu tridentutu and Ambrosia dumosu at a site adjacent to the Nevada Desert FACE (Free-Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment) Facility (NDFF) in the Mojave Desert. We excavated downward and outward from the shrub bases in both species to collect and examine fine roots (< 1.0 mm diameter) at monthly intervals throughout 2001 and from October 2002 to September 2003. Fungal structures became visible in cleared roots stained with trypan blue. We quantified the percent colonization of roots by AM fungi via the line intercept method. In both years and for both species, colonization was highest in fall, relatively low in spring when root growth began, increased in late spring, and decreased during summer drought periods. Increases in colonization during summer and fall reflect corresponding increases in precipitation. Spring mycorrhizal colonization is low despite peaks in soil water availability and precipitation, indicating that precipitation is not the only factor influencing mycorrhizal colonization. Because the spring decrease in mycorrhizal colonization occurs when these shrubs initiate a major flush of fine root growth, other phenological events such as competing demands for carbon by fine root initiation, early season shoot growth, and flowering may reduce carbon availability to the fungus, and hence decrease colonization. Another possibility is that root growth exceeds the rate of mycorrhizal colonization.

  9. DESERT PAVEMENTS AND SOILS ON BASALTIC PYROCLASTIC DEPOSITS AT LATHROP WELLS AND RED CONE VOLCANOES, SOUTHERN NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.A. Valentine; C.D. Harrington

    2005-08-10

    Formation of desert pavement and accretionary soils are intimately linked in arid environments such as the Mojave Desert. Well-sorted fallout scoria lapilli at Lathrop Wells (75-80 ky) and Red Cone ({approx}1 Ma) volcanoes (southern Nevada) formed an excellent starting material for pavement, allowing infiltration of eolian silt and fine sand that first clogs the pore space of underlying tephra and then aggrades and develops vesicular A (Av) horizons. Variations in original pyroclast sizes provide insight into minimum and maximum clast sizes that promote pavement and soil formation: pavement becomes ineffective when clasts can saltate under the strongest winds, while clasts larger than coarse lapilli are unable to form an interlocking pavement that promotes silt accumulation (necessary for Av development). Contrary to predictions that all pavements above altitudes of {approx}400 m would have been ''reset'' in their development after late Pleistocene vegetation advances (about 15 ka), the soils and pavements show clear differences in maturity between the two volcanoes. This indicates that either the pavement soils develop slowly over many 10,000's of years and then are very stable, or that, if they are disrupted by vegetation advances, subsequent pavements are reestablished with successively more mature characteristics.

  10. A Calibrated Maxey-Eakin Curve for the Fenner Basin of the Eastern Mojave Desert, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davisson, M.L.; Rose, T.P.

    2000-05-15

    Metropolitan Water District (MWD) of southern California and Cadiz Inc. investigated the feasibility of storing Colorado River water in groundwater aquifers of the eastern Mojave Desert as a future drought mitigation strategy. This culminated in the public release of the Cadiz Groundwater Storage and Dry-Year Supply program Draft EIR, which included pilot percolation studies, groundwater modeling, and precipitation/runoff analysis in the Fenner groundwater basin, which overlies the proposed storage site. The project proposes to store and withdrawal Colorado River water over a 50-year period, but will not exceed the natural replenishment rates of the groundwater basin. Several independent analyses were conducted to estimate the rates of natural groundwater replenishment to the Fenner Groundwater Basin, which was included in the Draft EIR. The US Geologic Survey, Water Resources Division (WRD) officially submitted comments during public review and concluded that the natural groundwater replenishment rates calculated for the Draft EIR were too high. In the WRD review, they provided a much lower recharge calculation based on a Maxey-Eakin estimation approach. This approach estimates annual precipitation over an entire basin as a function of elevation, followed by calibration against annual recharge rates. Recharge rates are estimated on the basis that some fraction of annual precipitation will recharge, and that fraction will increase with increasing elevation. This results in a hypothetical curve relating annual groundwater recharge to annual precipitation. Field validation of recharge rates is critical in order to establish credibility to any estimate. This is due to the fact that the Maxey-Eakin model is empirical. An empirical model is derived from practical experience rather than basic theory. Therefore, a validated Maxey-Eakin model in one groundwater basin does not translate to a different one. In the WRD's Maxey-Eakin model, they used a curve calibrated against three locations in western Nevada and applied it to the Fenner Basin. It is of particular importance to note that all three of the WRD's location are west of longitude 116{sup o}W, where annual precipitation is significantly lower. Therefore, The WRD's Maxey-Eakin curve was calibrated to a drier climate, and its application to the Fenner Basin lacks credibility.

  11. Hydro-geologic Investigation of the Fresh Water lens in a Small Rock Principle Investigators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    Hydro-geologic Investigation of the Fresh Water lens in a Small Rock Principle Investigators Daniel W. Urish #12;Abstract Rose Island is a small rock island located in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island Island is a small 18.5 acre rock island located in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island (Fig. 1

  12. 4.5 Rock Coatings RI Dorn, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    4.5 Rock Coatings RI Dorn, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA r 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 4.5.1 Introduction to Rock Coatings 70 4.5.2 Interpreting Rock Coatings through a Landscape: Subaerial Exposure of Subsurface Coatings 73 4.5.2.3 Third-Order Control: Competition from Lithobionts 78 4

  13. Systematic variation of bedrock channel gradients in the central Oregon Coast Range: implications for rock uplift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roering, Joshua J.

    for rock uplift and shallow landsliding Jeremiah S. Kobor*, Joshua J. Roering Department of Geological rock uplift for several million years, did not experience Pleistocene glaciation, boasts a relatively variability in bedrock channel gradients resulting from differential rock uplift or other sources. Consistent

  14. SOURCE AND EFFECT OF ACID ROCK DRAINAGE IN THE SNAKE RIVER WATERSHED, SUMMIT COUNTY, COLORADO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SOURCE AND EFFECT OF ACID ROCK DRAINAGE IN THE SNAKE RIVER WATERSHED, SUMMIT COUNTY, COLORADO (the weathering of disseminated pyrite) sources of acid rock drainage (ARD). Stream waters and remediating the effects of acid rock drainage in the basin has given this research a real world application

  15. Bidirectional Seismic Behavior of Controlled Rocking Four-Legged Bridge Steel Truss Piers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruneau, Michel

    Bidirectional Seismic Behavior of Controlled Rocking Four-Legged Bridge Steel Truss Piers Michael rocking bridge steel truss piers to three components of seismic excitation are presented in this paper. The controlled rocking approach for seismic protection allows a pier to uplift from its base, limiting the force

  16. EXPLORING THE VARIABLE SKY WITH LINEAR. III. CLASSIFICATION OF PERIODIC LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palaversa, Lovro; Eyer, Laurent; Rimoldini, Lorenzo; Ivezi?, Željko; Loebman, Sarah; Hunt-Walker, Nicholas; VanderPlas, Jacob; Westman, David; Becker, Andrew C.; Ruždjak, Domagoj; Sudar, Davor; Boži?, Hrvoje; Galin, Mario; Kroflin, Andrea; Mesari?, Martina; Munk, Petra; Vrbanec, Dijana; Sesar, Branimir; Stuart, J. Scott; Srdo?, Gregor; and others

    2013-10-01

    We describe the construction of a highly reliable sample of ?7000 optically faint periodic variable stars with light curves obtained by the asteroid survey LINEAR across 10,000 deg{sup 2} of the northern sky. The majority of these variables have not been cataloged yet. The sample flux limit is several magnitudes fainter than most other wide-angle surveys; the photometric errors range from ?0.03 mag at r = 15 to ?0.20 mag at r = 18. Light curves include on average 250 data points, collected over about a decade. Using Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) based photometric recalibration of the LINEAR data for about 25 million objects, we selected ?200,000 most probable candidate variables with r < 17 and visually confirmed and classified ?7000 periodic variables using phased light curves. The reliability and uniformity of visual classification across eight human classifiers was calibrated and tested using a catalog of variable stars from the SDSS Stripe 82 region and verified using an unsupervised machine learning approach. The resulting sample of periodic LINEAR variables is dominated by 3900 RR Lyrae stars and 2700 eclipsing binary stars of all subtypes and includes small fractions of relatively rare populations such as asymptotic giant branch stars and SX Phoenicis stars. We discuss the distribution of these mostly uncataloged variables in various diagrams constructed with optical-to-infrared SDSS, Two Micron All Sky Survey, and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer photometry, and with LINEAR light-curve features. We find that the combination of light-curve features and colors enables classification schemes much more powerful than when colors or light curves are each used separately. An interesting side result is a robust and precise quantitative description of a strong correlation between the light-curve period and color/spectral type for close and contact eclipsing binary stars (? Lyrae and W UMa): as the color-based spectral type varies from K4 to F5, the median period increases from 5.9 hr to 8.8 hr. These large samples of robustly classified variable stars will enable detailed statistical studies of the Galactic structure and physics of binary and other stars and we make these samples publicly available.

  17. Petrography and Bedrock Origin of Shelter Rock, a Large Glacial Erratic in Western Long Island, New York

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merguerian, Charles

    Petrography and Bedrock Origin of Shelter Rock, a Large Glacial Erratic constrain the mineralogy and petrography of Shelter Rock. The dominant mineral suite

  18. Linked multicontinuum and crack tensor approach for modeling of coupled geomechanics, fluid flow and transport in fractured rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, J.

    2014-01-01

    porosity models for fluid transport in jointed rock. Journalof coupled fluid flow, solute transport, and geomechanics ingeomechanics, fluid flow and transport in fractured rock

  19. All-sky sensitivity of HAWC to Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,

    2015-01-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is a ground-based TeV gamma-ray observatory in the state of Puebla, Mexico at an altitude of 4100 m. Its 22,000 m$^2$ instrumented area, wide field of view ($\\sim$2 sr), and >95% uptime make it an ideal instrument for discovering gamma-ray burst (GRB) emission at $\\sim$100 GeV. Such a discovery would provide key information about the origins of prompt GRB emission as well as constraints on extra-galactic background light (EBL) models and the violation of Lorentz invariance. We will present prospects for discovering GRB emission at $\\sim$100 GeV with a simple, all-sky search algorithm using HAWC data that is most sensitive to short GRBs. The search algorithm presented here can also be used to detect other short transients with timescales and fluxes similar to short GRBs.

  20. Parameter-space metric for all-sky semicoherent searches for gravitational-wave pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wette, Karl

    2015-01-01

    The sensitivity of all-sky searches for gravitational-wave pulsars is primarily limited by the finite availability of computing resources. Semicoherent searches are a widely-used method of maximizing sensitivity to gravitational-wave pulsars at fixed computing cost: the data from a gravitational-wave detector are partitioned into a number of segments, each segment is coherently analyzed, and the analysis results from each segment are summed together. The generation of template banks for the coherent analysis of each segment, and for the summation, requires knowledge of the metrics associated with the coherent and semicoherent parameter spaces respectively. We present a useful approximation to the semicoherent parameter-space metric, analogous to that presented in Wette and Prix [Phys. Rev. D 88, 123005 (2013)] for the coherent metric. The new semicoherent metric is compared to previous work in Pletsch [Phys. Rev. D 82, 042002 (2010)], and Brady and Creighton [Phys. Rev. D 61, 082001 (2000)]. We find that semi...

  1. Science with the EXTraS Project: Exploring the X-ray Transient and variable Sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Luca, A; Tiengo, A; D'Agostino, D; Watson, M G; Haberl, F

    2015-01-01

    The EXTraS project (Exploring the X-ray Transient and variable Sky) will characterise the temporal behaviour of the largest ever sample of objects in the soft X-ray range (0.1-12 keV) with a complex, systematic and consistent analysis of all data collected by the European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC) instrument onboard the ESA XMM-Newton X-ray observatory since its launch. We will search for, and characterize variability (both periodic and aperiodic) in hundreds of thousands of sources spanning more than nine orders of magnitude in time scale and six orders of magnitude in flux. We will also search for fast transients, missed by standard image analysis. Our analysis will be completed by multiwavelength characterization of new discoveries and phenomenological classification of variable sources. All results and products will be made available to the community in a public archive, serving as a reference for a broad range of astrophysical investigations.

  2. A Proper Motion Survey Using the First Sky Pass of NEOWISE-Reactivation Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Adam C; Cushing, Michael C; Kirkpatrick, J Davy; Mainzer, Amy; Gelino, Christopher R; Fajardo-Acosta, Sergio B; Bauer, James

    2015-01-01

    The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) was reactivated in December of 2013 (NEOWISE) to search for potentially hazardous near-Earth objects. We have conducted a survey using the first sky pass of NEOWISE data and the AllWISE catalog to identify nearby stars and brown dwarfs with large proper motions ($\\mu_{\\rm total}$ $\\gtrsim$ 250 mas yr$^{-1}$). A total of 20,548 high proper motion objects were identified, 1,006 of which are new discoveries. This survey has uncovered a significantly larger sample of fainter objects (W2 $\\gtrsim$13 mag) than the previous WISE motion surveys of Luhman (2014a) and Kirkpatrick et al. (2014). Many of these objects are predicted to be new L and T dwarfs based on near- and mid-infrared colors. Using estimated spectral types along with distance estimates, we have identified several objects likely belonging to the nearby Solar neighborhood (d $potentially nea...

  3. Error analysis in cross-correlation of sky maps: application to the ISW detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anna Cabre; Pablo Fosalba; Enrique Gaztanaga; Marc Manera

    2007-01-15

    Constraining cosmological parameters from measurements of the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect requires developing robust and accurate methods for computing statistical errors in the cross-correlation between maps. This paper presents a detailed comparison of such error estimation applied to the case of cross-correlation of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and large-scale structure data. We compare theoretical models for error estimation with montecarlo simulations where both the galaxy and the CMB maps vary around a fiducial auto-correlation and cross-correlation model which agrees well with the current concordance LCDM cosmology. Our analysis compares estimators both in harmonic and configuration (or real) space, quantifies the accuracy of the error analysis and discuss the impact of partial sky survey area and the choice of input fiducial model on dark-energy constraints. We show that purely analytic approaches yield accurate errors even in surveys that cover only 10% of the sky and that parameter constraints strongly depend on the fiducial model employed. Alternatively, we discuss the advantages and limitations of error estimators that can be directly applied to data. In particular, we show that errors and covariances from the Jack-Knife method agree well with the theoretical approaches and simulations. We also introduce a novel method in real space that is computationally efficient and can be applied to real data and realistic survey geometries. Finally, we present a number of new findings and prescriptions that can be useful for analysis of real data and forecasts, and present a critical summary of the analyses done to date.

  4. Panel discussion on rock mechanics issues in repository design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniawski, Z.T.; Kim, K.S.; Nataraja, M.

    1996-04-01

    The panel discussion was introduced by Mr. Z.T.(Richard) Bieniawski and then continued with five additional speakers. The topics covered in the discussion included rock mechanics pertaining to the design of underground facilities for the disposal of radioactive wastes and the safety of such facilities. The speakers included: Mr. Kun-Soo Kim who is a specialist in the area of rock mechanics testing during the Basalt Waste Isolation Project; Dr. Mysore Nataraja who is the senior project manager with the NRC; Dr. Michael Voegele who is the project manager for Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) on the Yucca Mountain Project; Dr. Edward Cording who is a member of the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board; and Dr. Hemendra Kalia who is employed by Los Alamos National Laboratory and coordinates various activities of testing programs at the Yucca Mountain Site.

  5. Lithophysal Rock Mass Mechanical Properties of the Repository Host Horizon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Rigby

    2004-11-10

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop estimates of key mechanical properties for the lithophysal rock masses of the Topopah Spring Tuff (Tpt) within the repository host horizon, including their uncertainties and spatial variability. The mechanical properties to be characterized include an elastic parameter, Young's modulus, and a strength parameter, uniaxial compressive strength. Since lithophysal porosity is used as a surrogate property to develop the distributions of the mechanical properties, an estimate of the distribution of lithophysal porosity is also developed. The resulting characterizations of rock parameters are important for supporting the subsurface design, developing the preclosure safety analysis, and assessing the postclosure performance of the repository (e.g., drift degradation and modeling of rockfall impacts on engineered barrier system components).

  6. ForPeerReview Cavity expansion in cross anisotropic rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Peter

    for Numerical and Analytical Methods in Geomechanics Manuscript ID: NAG-10-0026.R1 Wiley - Manuscript type in Geomechanics #12;ForPeerReview Only Cavity expansion in cross-anisotropic rock Dimitrios Kolymbas Peter Wagner://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/nag International Journal for Numerical and Analytical Methods in Geomechanics 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

  7. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2003-02-10

    The objective of this project was to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity.

  8. Buoyancy driven dispersion in a layered porous rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farcas, Adrian; Woods, Andrew W.

    2015-02-12

    for example from a radioactive leak in a geological waste repository (Woods and Norris, 2010). One key challenge associated with modelling buoyancy driven flows in real rocks is the complex layering, on a range of length scales. In order to describe flows... ) Scaling, self-similarity and intermediate asymptotics. CUP, Cambridge. Bear, J. (1972) Dynamics of fluids in porous media. Elsevier. Bear, J., and Cheng A.H.-D (2010) Modeling groundwater flow and contaminant transport. Springer. Bijelic, J., Muggeridge A...

  9. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2003-02-10

    The objective of this project was to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions which are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. NMR well logging is finding wide use in formation evaluation. The formation parameters commonly estimated were porosity, permeability, and capillary bound water. Special cases include estimation of oil viscosity, residual oil saturation, location of oil/water contact, and interpretation on whether the hydrocarbon is oil or gas.

  10. Overprinting Deformations in Mantle Rocks, Dun Mountain, New Zealand 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donnelly, Sara

    2014-04-25

    ; Hansen et al., 2012a). Understanding these relationships as well as the nature of deformation in poly- and mono- mineralic rocks give insight to natural deformations in the mantle. Understanding of mantle deformation comes from coupling studies...-pyroxene formulations and argued that the thermometer developed by Taylor (1998) most accurately reproduced temperatures of laboratory experiments designed to equilibrate co-existing pyroxenes. We have applied 22 Figure 8: REE and trace element...

  11. Neutron Production from the Fracture of Piezoelectric Rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Widom; J. Swain; Y. N. Srivastava

    2012-02-08

    A theoretical explanation is provided for the experimental evidence that fracturing piezoelectric rocks produces neutrons. The elastic energy micro-crack production ultimately yields the macroscopic fracture. The mechanical energy is converted by the piezoelectric effect into electric field energy. The electric field energy decays via radio frequency (microwave) electric field oscillations. The radio frequency electric fields accelerate the condensed matter electrons which then collide with protons producing neutrons and neutrinos.

  12. Rock County, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: Energy Resources Jump to:Rock County, Minnesota:

  13. Rock County, Nebraska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: Energy Resources Jump to:Rock County,

  14. Rock Island County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: Energy Resources Jump to:Rock County,Silver

  15. Rock Island, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: Energy Resources Jump to:Rock County,SilverIsland,

  16. Rock Point, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: Energy Resources Jump to:RockPoint, Arizona: Energy

  17. Rock River LLC Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: Energy Resources Jump to:RockPoint, Arizona:

  18. Rock Sampling At Chena Geothermal Area (Kolker, 2008) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: Energy Resources Jump to:RockPoint, Arizona:2012)

  19. Rock Sampling At Coso Geothermal Area (1995) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: Energy Resources Jump to:RockPoint,

  20. Rock Sampling At Florida Mountains Area (Brookins, 1982) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: Energy Resources Jump to:RockPoint,Information

  1. RockPort Capital Partners (California) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: Energy Resources JumpMtSamplingRockPort Capital

  2. City of North Little Rock, Arkansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIRChurchFontanelle,Information North Little Rock, Arkansas

  3. Chemical hydrofracturing of the Hot Dry Rock reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yakovlev, Leonid

    1996-01-24

    The experimental study of the water-rock interaction shows that the secondary mineral assemblage depends on the water composition. For example, granite-pure water interaction produces zeolites (relatively low-dense, Mg-poor minerals), whereas seawater yields chlorites (high-dense, Mg-rich minerals). The reactions have volumetric effects from several % to 20 % in magnitude. Volume deformations in the heterogeneous matrix cause uneven mechanical strains. Reactions with the effect of about 0,1 vol.% may cause strains of the order of 100-1000 bars being enough for destruction of rocks. Signs and magnitudes of local volume changes depend on the mineral composition of the secondary assemblage. Hence, one can provide either healing or cracking of primary fractures, as desired, by changing the composition of water in the water-felsic rock system where some elements (Mg, Fe) are in lack. The techniques of "chemical hydrofracturing" looks promising as applied to a granite HDR massif. One can regulate the permeability of fractured flow paths by changing in concord the composition and pressure of the injected water. This approach should promote efficient extraction of the petrothermal energy.

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptomyces sp. Strain Wb2n-11, a Desert Isolate with Broad-Spectrum Antagonism against Soilborne Phytopathogens

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Köberl, Martina; White, Richard A.; Erschen, Sabine; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-06

    Streptomyces sp. strain Wb2n-11, isolated from native desert soil, exhibited broad-spectrum antagonism against plant pathogenic fungi, bacteria, and nematodes. The 8.2-Mb draft genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol activity and genes which enable the soil bacterium to directly interact beneficially with plants.

  5. Non-visual orientation of desert sand scorpions. R. McKee & D. Gaffin, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, U.S.A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaffin, Doug

    Non-visual orientation of desert sand scorpions. R. McKee & D. Gaffin, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, U.S.A OU Behavioral Neuroscience Works Cited. Brownell, P.H. & R.D. Farley. 1979 Arachnological Society. Burnham Beeches, Bucks. Stephens, A.V. 1999. Honors Thesis. University of Oklahoma

  6. Age constraints on the formation and emplacement of Neoproterozoic ophiolites along the AllaqiHeiani Suture, South Eastern Desert of Egypt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stern, Robert J.

    ­Heiani Suture, South Eastern Desert of Egypt K.A. Ali a,d, , M.K. Azer b , H.A. Gahlan c , S.A. Wilde d , M., Richardson, TX 75080, USA b Geology Department, National Research Centre, Dokki-Cairo, Egypt c Geology Department, Faculty of Science, Assiut University, Assiut 71516, Egypt d Department of Applied Geology

  7. Regular Cosmogenic Nuclide Dosing of Sediment Moving Down Desert Piedmonts Nichols, K K, Bierman, P R, Hooke, R L, Persico, L, Caffee, M, Finkel, R

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nichols, Kyle K.

    Regular Cosmogenic Nuclide Dosing of Sediment Moving Down Desert Piedmonts Nichols, K K, Bierman, P the variability of nuclide activity between sub-sample locations and thus gives a long-term dosing history. Nuclide activity and distance are well correlated (r$^{2}$ = 0.95) suggesting that sediment is dosed

  8. A simple evaluation of global and diffuse Luminous Efficacy for all sky conditions in tropical and humid climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -years-old database for solar irradiance (W.m-2 ). So it is important to determine Luminous Efficacy in order to find illuminance from solar irradiance (or luminance from solar radiance). The measured data. Keywords Global and diffuse luminous efficacy, different sky conditions, solar irradiance, solar

  9. A SKY-HIGH CHALLENGE: THE CARBON FOOTPRINT OF AVIATION IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA, AND MEASURES TO MITIGATE IT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    A SKY-HIGH CHALLENGE: THE CARBON FOOTPRINT OF AVIATION IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA, AND MEASURES but not subnational scale. In this thesis, I present what seems to be the first detailed analysis of the carbon footprint (CF) of civil aviation at a subnational level together with an assessment of what key stakeholders

  10. The Emu in the Sky and Other Stories When Europeans arrived in Australia in 1788, their navigators probably knew less

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norris, Ray

    stretching across the Milky Way. It's easy to make out the emu in a dark autumn sky, and once you've seen it appears to be aligned on the equinox and solstice sunsets, and we are trying to understand a possible

  11. In situ observations of the "preexisting auroral arc" by THEMIS all sky imagers and the FAST spacecraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    ) The preexisting arc is located 1 $2 poleward of the equatorward edge of the 1 keV electron plasma sheetIn situ observations of the "preexisting auroral arc" by THEMIS all sky imagers and the FAST involve brightening followed by poleward expansion of a discrete auroral arc. The arc that brightens

  12. DISCOVERIES FROM A NEAR-INFRARED PROPER MOTION SURVEY USING MULTI-EPOCH TWO MICRON ALL-SKY SURVEY DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirkpatrick, J. Davy

    We have conducted a 4030 deg[superscript 2] near-infrared proper motion survey using multi-epoch data from the Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS). We find 2778 proper motion candidates, 647 of which are not listed in SIMBAD. ...

  13. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CLOUD COMPUTING, VOL. XX, NO. X, XXXX 1 Cloud Federations in the Sky: Formation Game

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grosu, Daniel

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CLOUD COMPUTING, VOL. XX, NO. X, XXXX 1 Cloud Federations in the Sky for cloud resources. The cloud providers' available resources may not be sufficient enough to cope with such demands. Therefore, the cloud providers need to reshape their business structures and seek to improve

  14. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites Slick Rock, Colorado. Draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-06-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA) authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up two uranium mill tailings processing sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in San Miguel County. The purpose of the cleanup is to reduce the potential health effects associated with the radioactive materials remaining on the sites and on vicinity properties (VP) associated with the sites. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated standards for the UMTRCA that contained measures to control the contaminated materials and to protect the groundwater from further degradation. Remedial actions at the Slick Rock sites must be performed in accordance with these standards and with the concurrence of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).

  15. 2 INVESTIGATION OF CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION 2.1 EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CRUDE/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION AT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schechter, David S.

    44 2 INVESTIGATION OF CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION 2.1 EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CRUDE in this section and expand the understanding of the interactions of the Spraberry reservoir rock, oil and brine used Spraberry oil, synthetic reservoir brine and Spraberry core at reservoir temperature (138o F

  16. [Climate implications of terrestrial paleoclimate]. Quaternary Sciences Center, Desert Research Institute annual report, fiscal year 1994/1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigand, P.E.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this study is to collect terrestrial climate indicators for paleoclimate synthesis. The paleobiotic and geomorphic records are being examined for the local and regional impact of past climates to assess Yucca Mountain`s suitability as a high-level nuclear waste repository. In particular these data are being used to provide estimates of the timing, duration and extremes of past periods of moister climate for use in hydrological models of local and regional recharge that are being formulated by USGS and other hydrologists for the Yucca Mountain area. The project includes botanical, faunal, and geomorphic components that will be integrated to accomplish this goal. To this end personnel at the Quaternary Sciences Center of the Desert Research Institute in Reno, Nevada are conducting the following activities: Analyses of packrat middens; Analysis of pollen samples; and Determination of vegetation climate relationships.

  17. Source rock screening studies of Ordovician Maquoketa shale in western Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Autrey, A.; Crockett, J.E.; Dickerson, D.R.; Oltz, D.F.; Seyler, B.J.; Warren, R.

    1987-09-01

    Rock-Eval (pyrolysis) studies of Ordovician Maquoketa Shale samples (cuttings and cores) from the shallow subsurface (500-800 ft deep) in western Illinois indicate that facies within the Maquoketa have potential as hydrocarbon source rocks. Dark, presumably organic-rich zones within the Maquoketa Shale were selected and analyzed for total organic carbon (TOC), Rock-Eval (pyrolysis), and bulk and clay mineralogy using x-ray diffraction. Preliminary results from six samples from Schuyler, McDonough, and Fulton Counties show TOC values ranging from 4.70% to as high as 12.90%. Rock-Eval parameters, measured by heating organic matter in an inert atmosphere, indicate source rock maturity and petroleum-generative potential. Screening studies, using the Rock-Eval process, describe very good source rock potential in facies of the Maquoketa Shale. Further studies at the Illinois State Geological Survey will expand on these preliminary results. This study complements a proposed exploration model in western Illinois and further suggests the possibility of source rocks on the flanks of the Illinois basin. Long-distance migration from more deeply buried effective source rocks in southern Illinois has been the traditional mechanism proposed for petroleum in basin-flank reservoirs. Localized source rocks can be an alternative to long-distance migration, and can expand the possibilities of basin-flank reservoirs, encouraging further exploration in these areas.

  18. Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II), Data Release 7, including the Legacy Survey

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a series of three interlocking imaging and spectroscopic surveys, carried out over an eight-year period with a dedicated 2.5m telescope located at Apache Point Observatory in Southern New Mexico. The seventh data release (DR7) from the SDSS represents a completion of the overall, original project, though SDSS-III began in 2008 and will build upon the knowledge gained already. The SDSS Legacy Survey provided a uniform, well-calibrated map of more than 7,500 square degrees of the North Galactic Cap, and three stripes in the South Galactic Cap totaling 740 square degrees. The central stripe in the South Galactic Gap, Stripe 82, was scanned multiple times to enable a deep co-addition of the data and to enable discovery of variable objects. Legacy data supported studies ranging from asteroids and nearby stars to the large-scale structure of the universe. All of the imaging data have been processed to yield calibrated astrometric and photometric parameters and classifications. These parameters are available in one or more tables in a database accessible via the Catalog Archive Server (CAS) at http://cas.sdss.org/astro. [taken and edited from the Legacy page at http://www.sdss.org/legacy/index.html] All three surveys summarized are: 1) Legacy: an imaging survey in five bands over a contiguous 7646 deg2 high-latitude elliptical region in the Northern Galactic Cap, plus an additional 750 deg2 in the Southern Galactic Cap, together with spectroscopy of complete samples of galaxies and quasars covering about 8200 square degrees. The total imaging area in the Legacy survey is 8423 square degrees; 2) SEGUE: (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration): additional imaging of 3240 deg2 of sky at lower Galactic latitudes, together with spectroscopy of 240,000 stars towards 200 sight lines covering 1400 square degrees (spread throughout the Legacy and SEGUE imaging footprints), to study the structure of the Milky Way; 3) Supernova: the equivalent of about 80 repeated imaging scans of the Southern Equatorial Stripe (ra > 310 or ra < 59; -1.25 > dec < 1.25) obtained in variable weather conditions (some clouds) to search for supernovae in the redshift range 0.1 < z < 0.4. The catalog derived from the images includes more than 350 million celestial objects, and spectra of 930,000 galaxies, 120,000 quasars, and 460,000 stars. The data are fully calibrated and reduced, carefully checked for quality, and publicly accessible through efficient databases. The data have been publicly released in a series of annual data releases, culminating in the final data release, DR7.

  19. Reactor Vessel Removal: Improving Performance Big Rock Point Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daly, P.T. [BNG America, D and D Operations, 804 South Illinois Avenue, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The Big Rock Point (BRP) reactor vessel was successfully removed, packaged in a Type B shipping container, transported, and buried. The process took almost 4 years of work by many people and a variety of companies. This paper will discuss several areas that can reduce schedule time, resulting in reduced cost and employee dose exposure. For maximum cost effectiveness, these lessons should be applied during the planning stages when developing baseline cost and schedule, As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) budgets, and work processes. (authors)

  20. Simulation of water transport in heated rock salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlich, M.; Jockwer, N.

    1986-01-01

    This paper summarizes computer simulation studies on water transport in German rock salt. Based on JOCKWERS experimental investigations on water content and water liberation, the object of these studies was to select a water transport model, that matches the water inflow which was measured in some heater experiments in the Asse Salt Mine. The main result is, that an evaporation front model, with Knudsen-type vapor transport combined with fluid transport by thermal expansion of the adsorbed water layers in the non evaporated zone, showed the best agreement with experimental evidence.