Sample records for desert peak area

  1. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Desert Peak Area (Wisian & Blackwell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Desert Peak Area (Wisian & Blackwell, 2004) Exploration Activity...

  2. 2-M Probe At Desert Peak Area (Sladek, Et Al., 2007) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind ProjectsourceInformation 2-M Probe At Desert Peak

  3. Structural Analysis of the Desert Peak-Brady Geothermal Fields...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Structural Analysis of the Desert Peak-Brady Geothermal Fields, Northwestern Nevada: Implications for...

  4. Desert Peak to Humboldt House and Winnemucca, in: Lane, M.A....

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Winnemucca, in: Lane, M.A., (ed) Nevada geothermal areas: Desert Peak, Humboldt House, Beoware: Guidebook for field trip Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd...

  5. Desert Peak EGS Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy,Policy Act ImplementingALEnergy Deputy Secretary ofDesert

  6. Desert Peak EGS Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197E T A * S H I E L D *Department ofDescriptive ModelDesert

  7. Desert Peak Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential Microhydro SiteDayton Power &Denker WulfDeseret

  8. Desert Peak Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility DatabaseMichigan: EnergyKansas: EnergySprings, California:

  9. Discovery and geology of the Desert Peak geothermal field: a case history. Bulletin 97

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benoit, W.R.; Hiner, J.E.; Forest, R.T.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A case history of the exploration, development (through 1980), and geology of the Desert Peak geothermal field is presented. Sections on geochemistry, geophysics, and temperature-gradient drilling are included.

  10. First Tracer Test After Circulation in Desert Peak 27-15

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Rose, Peter

    Following the successful stimulation of Desert Peak target EGS well 27-15, a circulation test was initiated by injecting a conservative tracer (1,5-nds) in combination with a reactive tracer (7-amino-1,3-naphthalene disulfonate). The closest production well 74-21 was monitored over the subsequent several months.

  11. Stimulation at Desert Peak -modeling with the coupled THM code FEHM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    kelkar, sharad

    2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical modeling of the 2011 shear stimulation at the Desert Peak well 27-15. This submission contains the FEHM executable code for a 64-bit PC Windows-7 machine, and the input and output files for the results presented in the included paper from ARMA-213 meeting.

  12. First Tracer Test After Circulation in Desert Peak 27-15

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, Peter

    2013-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the successful stimulation of Desert Peak target EGS well 27-15, a circulation test was initiated by injecting a conservative tracer (1,5-nds) in combination with a reactive tracer (7-amino-1,3-naphthalene disulfonate). The closest production well 74-21 was monitored over the subsequent several months.

  13. Stimulation at Desert Peak -modeling with the coupled THM code FEHM

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    kelkar, sharad

    Numerical modeling of the 2011 shear stimulation at the Desert Peak well 27-15. This submission contains the FEHM executable code for a 64-bit PC Windows-7 machine, and the input and output files for the results presented in the included paper from ARMA-213 meeting.

  14. Desert Peak II Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision hasda62829c05bGabbs Valley AreaEnergyDerbyII

  15. Desert Queen Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility DatabaseMichigan: EnergyKansas: EnergySprings, California:Desert

  16. Cuttings Analysis At Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.pngRoofs and HeatOpen EnergyRoadmap1977Cuttings

  17. area thar desert: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mahowald, Natalie 13 Decision Support Tool for Desert Tortoises Near Solar Installations Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: Decision Support Tool for...

  18. area southeastern desert: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mahowald, Natalie 13 Decision Support Tool for Desert Tortoises Near Solar Installations Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: Decision Support Tool for...

  19. area eastern desert: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page Topic Index 21 Decision Support Tool for Desert Tortoises Near Solar Installations Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: Decision Support Tool for...

  20. area western desert: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mahowald, Natalie 24 Decision Support Tool for Desert Tortoises Near Solar Installations Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: Decision Support Tool for...

  1. Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region Facilities...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    95F (35C). Ambient air temperature will be measured in the shade, protected from wind, at a height of 2 inches (5 centimeters) above the ground surface. No desert tortoise...

  2. Geothermometry At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell2008) | OpenSilver Peak Area (DOE GTP)

  3. Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region Parker...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    areas, and other water sources that are vital in a region); and X (vii) Tundra, coral reefs, or rain forests.; or X (5) Involve genetically engineered organisms, synthetic...

  4. Desert Peak EGS Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197E T A * S H I E L D *Department ofDescriptive Model of

  5. Effects of Stocking Rate on the Variability of Peak Standing Crop in a Desert Steppe of Eurasia Grassland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and partitioned by species and functional groups, in the desert steppe of Inner Mongolia, China. The treatments Science, Inner Mongolia Agricultural University, Hohhot 010018, Inner Mongolia, People's Republic of China Experimental Range, P.O. Box 30003, MSC 3JER, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8003, USA L. A Á Y. Liu Inner Mongolia

  6. InSAR At Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel JumpCounty,Jump to: navigation, searchInformationCoso

  7. Micro-Earthquake At Desert Peak Geothermal Area (2011) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole Inc Jump to:Michigan/Wind Usefulnessand test a

  8. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Desert Peak Area (Wisian & Blackwell,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole IncMinuteman WindMoana GeothermalInformation

  9. Mercury Vapor At Desert Peak Area (Varekamp & Buseck, 1983) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin:Information Akutan

  10. Core Analysis At Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.pngRoofs and Heat Islands Jump to:Coppell,

  11. Gas Flux Sampling At Desert Peak Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh, 2007) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas: EnergyGarvin County,

  12. Peaked Encoding of Relative Luminance in Macaque Areas V1 and V2 Xinmiao Peng and David C. Van Essen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Essen, David

    Peaked Encoding of Relative Luminance in Macaque Areas V1 and V2 Xinmiao Peng and David C. Van. Peaked encoding of relative luminance in macaque areas V1 and V2. J Neurophysiol 93: 1620­1632, 2005 the primate visual pathway neurons encode the relative luminance of objects (at a given light adaptation level

  13. Method and device for remotely monitoring an area using a low peak power optical pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woodruff, Steven D.; Mcintyre, Dustin L.; Jain, Jinesh C.

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and device for remotely monitoring an area using a low peak power optical pump comprising one or more pumping sources, one or more lasers; and an optical response analyzer. Each pumping source creates a pumping energy. The lasers each comprise a high reflectivity mirror, a laser media, an output coupler, and an output lens. Each laser media is made of a material that emits a lasing power when exposed to pumping energy. Each laser media is optically connected to and positioned between a corresponding high reflectivity mirror and output coupler along a pumping axis. Each output coupler is optically connected to a corresponding output lens along the pumping axis. The high reflectivity mirror of each laser is optically connected to an optical pumping source from the one or more optical pumping sources via an optical connection comprising one or more first optical fibers.

  14. A solar powered distillation plant and pump station for use in ocean side desert areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dearien, J.A.; Priebe, S.J.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    There are thousands of miles of ocean shoreline which could sustain a productive human existence if sufficient fresh water were available for human consumption and for irrigation of crops. While solar stills can be built to produce fresh water at or close to sea level, raising water to a height sufficient to irrigate crops, even with minimum water usage crops, requires a significant amount of energy. This paper describes a ``no-external power`` process by which seawater can be purified and raised to a height above sea level sufficient to carry on a productive living in certain areas of the world. This device, the Solar Evaporation and Pumping System (SEAPS) is described as to function and areas of use.

  15. Field Mapping At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County,Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP)Open|San

  16. PSInSAR At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:EnergyOssian, New York:Ozark, Alabama:ASES 2003, Austin TXScienceArea

  17. amargosa desert research: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Utilization Websites Summary: Decision Support Tool for Desert Tortoises Near Solar Installations ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH Service Several largescale solar...

  18. agassizii desert tortoise: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Utilization Websites Summary: Decision Support Tool for Desert Tortoises Near Solar Installations ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH Service Several largescale solar...

  19. Desert Peak EGS Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197E T A * S H I E L D *Department ofDescriptive Model

  20. Water Sampling At Silver Peak Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED Jump to: navigation,Area (Wood, 2002) Jump|Salton Sea

  1. Density Log at Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision hasda62829c05bGabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP)

  2. Annual Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 329: Area 22 Desert Rock Airstrip Fuel Spill, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfred Wickline

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the data collected during field activities and quarterly soil-gas sampling activities conducted from May 9, 2005, through May 20, 2006, at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 329, Area 22 Desert Rock Airstrip (DRA) Fuel Spill; Corrective Action Site (CAS) 22-44-01, Fuel Spill. The CAU is located at the DRA, which is located approximately two miles southwest of Mercury, Nevada, as shown in Figure 1-1. Field activities were conducted in accordance with the revised sampling approach outlined in the Addendum to the Closure Report (CR) for CAU 329 (NNSA/NSO, 2005) to support data collection requirements. The previous annual monitoring program for CAU 329 was initiated in August 2000 using soil-gas samples collected from three specific intervals at the DRA-0 and DRA-3 monitoring wells. Results of four sampling events from 2000 through 2003 indicated there is uncertainty in the approach to establish a rate of natural attenuation as specified in ''Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Work Plan for Corrective Action Unit 329: Area 22 Desert Rock Airstrip Fuel Spill, Nevada Test Site, Nevada'' (DOE/NV, 1999). As a result, the Addendum to the CR (NNSA/NSO, 2005) was completed to address this uncertainty by modifying the previous approach. A risk evaluation was added to the scope of the project to determine if the residual concentration of the hazardous constituents of JP4 pose an unacceptable risk to human health or the environment and if a corrective action was required at the site, because the current quarterly monitoring program is not expected to yield a rate constant that could be used effectively to determine a biodegradation rate for total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in less than the initial five years outlined in the CR. Additionally, remediation to the Tier 1 action level for TPH is not practical or technically feasible due to the depth of contamination.

  3. Trap cultures reveal higher species richness of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in comparison to soil samples in the Phoenix metropolitan area.Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal and dark septate endophytes colonization of plant roots from urban desert preserves a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    samples in the Phoenix metropolitan area.Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal and dark septate endophytes mycorrhizal fungal and dark septate endophytes colonization of plant roots from urban desert preserves (Brundett 1999). Dark septate endophytes (DSE) are another type of root colonizing fungi mainly classified

  4. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 329: Area 22 Desert Rock Airstrip Fuel Spill with Errata Sheet, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navarro Nevada Environmental Services

    2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In Appendix 0, Use Restriction (UR) Form, the drawing of the use restricted area shows the incorrect coordinates for the use restricted area, the coordinates on the drawing do not match the approved UR Form. The coordinates have been verified and this Errata Sheet replaces the drawing of the use restricted area with an aerial photo showing the use restricted area and the correct coordinates that match the approved UR Form.

  5. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Work Plan for Corrective Action Unit 329: Area 22 Desert Rock Airstrip Fuel Spill, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Draft of Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

    1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan was prepared as a characterization and closure report for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 329: Area 22, Desert Rock Airstrip (DRA) Fuel Spill identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). The CAU, located on the Nevada Test Site, consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), 22-44-01, which encompasses an area contaminated by three recorded spills from a 25,000-gallon underground fuel storage tank. The tank was installed in 1980 and was imbedded in sand and gravel approximately 16 feet below the ground surface. Historically, the DRA consisted of a single runway, several portable buildings, two underground storage tanks containing aviation jet fuel, and plumbing to several refueling areas on the ramp. The constituents of potential concern from the spill were total petroleum hydrocarbons as gasoline or JP-4. This provides the methodology for sampling contaminated soil-vapor and soil to determine what activities, if any, are required for closure of this si te. In addition, there is sufficient process knowledge of the tank's historical use to recommend closure of CAU 329 using the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process. This process combines elements of the Data Quality Objectives process and the observational approach to help plan and conduct corrective actions. The study concluded that the spill is localized; therefore, it is very unlikely that the underground water supply has been or will be affected by these spills. In addition, there were high levels of carbon dioxide detected above the release which indicate that the spill is currently in the process of undergoing biological degradation and is not migrating. This CAU has been approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) to be moved into Appendix III of the FFACO. Closure is expected to be in-place with administrative controls and soil-vapor sampling. A closure report will be prepared and submitted to NDEP for review and approval upo n completion of the field activities.

  6. Abstract--Joshua Tree National Monument's nursery created methods for using native desert vegetation on disturbed areas in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , these containers offer benefits for use in remote areas, such as abandoned mine sites. Joshua Tree National, used along roadsides following road im- provements, on closed dirt roads and jeep trails, abandoned mine sites, as well as for facilities landscaping, and his- toric plant restoration. Joshua Tree's work

  7. Quantitative laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy data using peak area step-wise regression analysis: an alternative method for interpretation of Mars science laboratory results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clegg, Samuel M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Barefield, James E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wiens, Roger C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dyar, Melinda D [MT HOLYOKE COLLEGE; Schafer, Martha W [LSU; Tucker, Jonathan M [MT HOLYOKE COLLEGE

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ChemCam instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) will include a laser-induced breakdown spectrometer (LIBS) to quantify major and minor elemental compositions. The traditional analytical chemistry approach to calibration curves for these data regresses a single diagnostic peak area against concentration for each element. This approach contrasts with a new multivariate method in which elemental concentrations are predicted by step-wise multiple regression analysis based on areas of a specific set of diagnostic peaks for each element. The method is tested on LIBS data from igneous and metamorphosed rocks. Between 4 and 13 partial regression coefficients are needed to describe each elemental abundance accurately (i.e., with a regression line of R{sup 2} > 0.9995 for the relationship between predicted and measured elemental concentration) for all major and minor elements studied. Validation plots suggest that the method is limited at present by the small data set, and will work best for prediction of concentration when a wide variety of compositions and rock types has been analyzed.

  8. EIS-0448: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to First Solar for the Proposed Desert Sunlight Solar Farm Project, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    First Solar Desert Sunlight Solar Farm (DSSF) Project, proposes to develop a 550-megawatt photovoltaic solar project and proposes to facilitate the construction and operation of the Red Bluff Substation, California Desert Conservation Area (CDCA) Plan, Riverside County, California.

  9. Regional Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Northern Great Salt Lake Desert and Adjacent Areas in Utah, Nevada, and Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Regional Gravity...

  10. The Desert Environment January 26, 1999 1 The Desert Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiss, Steven P.

    The Desert Environment January 26, 1999 1 The Desert Environment Revised Paper Steven P. Reiss1@cs.brown.edu Abstract The Desert software engineering environment is a suite of tools developed to enhance pro- grammer virtual files on demand to address specific tasks. All this is done in an open and extensible environment

  11. Monitoring peak power and cooling energy savings of shade trees and white surfaces in the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) service area: Project design and preliminary results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, H.; Bretz, S.; Hanford, J.; Rosenfeld, A.; Sailor, D.; Taha, H. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Bos, W. [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, CA (United States)

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Urban areas in warm climates create summer heat islands of daily average intensity of 3--5{degrees}C, adding to discomfort and increasing air-conditioning loads. Two important factors contributing to urban heat islands are reductions in albedo (lower overall city reflectance) and loss of vegetation (less evapotranspiration). Reducing summer heat islands by planting vegetation (shade trees) and increasing surface albedos, saves cooling energy, allows down-sizing of air conditioners, lowers air-conditioning peak demand, and reduces the emission of CO{sub 2} and other pollutants from electric power plants. The focus of this multi-year project, jointly sponsored by SMUD and the California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE), was to measure the direct cooling effects of trees and white surfaces (mainly roofs) in a few buildings in Sacramento. The first-year project was to design the experiment and obtain base case data. We also obtained limited post retrofit data for some sites. This report provides an overview of the project activities during the first year at six sites. The measurement period for some of the sites was limited to September and October, which are transitional cooling months in Sacramento and hence the interpretation of results only apply to this period. In one house, recoating the dark roof with a high-albedo coating rendered air conditioning unnecessary for the month of September (possible savings of up to 10 kWh per day and 2 kW of non-coincidental peak power). Savings of 50% relative to an identical base case bungalow were achieved when a school bungalow`s roof and southeast wall were coated with a high-albedo coating during the same period. Our measured data for the vegetation sites do not indicate conclusive results because shade trees were small and the cooling period was almost over. We need to collect more data over a longer cooling season in order to demonstrate savings conclusively.

  12. Structural Analysis of the Desert Peak-Brady Geothermal Fields,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎SolarCityInformationStopwattchStrattonNorthwestern

  13. Interdisciplinary Graduate Internship Opportunities Desert Archaeology, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, Joseph C.

    Interdisciplinary Graduate Internship Opportunities ARIZONA Desert Archaeology, Inc. Desert to regulatory compliance. Interested in sponsoring graduate internships William Doelle, President Desert credit by working on research projects or campaigns. The purpose of the internship program is to provide

  14. Annual Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 329: Area 22 Desert Rock Airstrip Fuel Spill, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, with Errata Sheet, Rev. No.: 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wickline, Alfred

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the data collected during field activities and quarterly soil-gas sampling activities conducted from May 9, 2005, through May 20, 2006, at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 329, Area 22 Desert Rock Airstrip (DRA) Fuel Spill; Corrective Action Site (CAS) 22-44-01, Fuel Spill. The CAU is located at the DRA, which is located approximately two miles southwest of Mercury, Nevada. A risk evaluation was added to the scope of the project to determine if the residual concentration of the hazardous constituents of JP4 pose an unacceptable risk to human health or the environment and if a corrective action was required at the site, because the current quarterly monitoring program is not expected to yield a rate constant that could be used effectively to determine a biodegradation rate for total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in less than the initial five years outlined in the CR. Additionally, remediation to the Tier 1 action level for TPH is not practical or technically feasible due to the depth of contamination. Field activities were conducted under the Addendum to the CR to collect sufficient data to determine the rate of biodegradation for TPH contamination at CAU 329 to support closure requirements. Reconstruction of the monitoring system at the site and quarterly soil-gas sampling were conducted to collect the required data. Because existing Wells DRA-0 and DRA-3 were determined to be insufficient to provide adequate data, soil-gas monitoring Wells DRA-10 and DRA-11 were installed. Two soil-gas sampling events were conducted to establish a baseline for the site, and subsequent quarterly sampling was conducted as part of the quarterly soil-gas sampling program. In addition, soil samples were collected during well drilling activities so comparisons might be made between the initial soil contamination levels in 2000 and the concentrations present at the time of the well installation.

  15. Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    should cease until the condor(s) leaves on its own. The Navajo Nation Department of Fish and Wildlife (928-871-6450), or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (602-242-0210),...

  16. Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 transmission line. Four pullboxes will be installed along the route. The pullboxes measure 2 feet by 3 feet by 2 feet and will be installed at least 24 inches below grade....

  17. Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with geotextile underlayment. The riprap will be a stone barrier consisting of large rock that is buried below ground then graded upward toward the transmission structure...

  18. Desert Queen Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential Microhydro SiteDayton Power &Denker

  19. Decision Support Tool for Desert Tortoises Near Solar Installations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decision Support Tool for Desert Tortoises Near Solar Installations ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH of renewable energy is of vital importance. Through its focus on reducing the environmental impacts of solar PIER Environmental Research www.energy.ca.gov/research/ environmental/index.html April 2011 The Issue

  20. Erratum to Case Study: Desert Arid Under "For More Information"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and the surrounding mountain ranges. These arid lands of the United States lay nestled between the mountain ranges of them died before they were rescued, this desert area of exceptional heat has been known since as "Death Valley."1 Death Valley is part of the dry mountainous Southwest ecoregion, which includes the Mojave

  1. Soils and Brine Geochemistry and Mineralogy of Hyperarid Desert Playa, Ouargla Basin,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Soils and Brine Geochemistry and Mineralogy of Hyperarid Desert Playa, Ouargla Basin, Algerian. The chemical and mineralogical specificity of this hyperarid ecosystem has been compared to other areas under

  2. Short residence time and fast transport of fine detritus in the Judean Desert: Clues from 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    in Darga Wadi, a dry river in the Judean Desert, Israel, part of the drainage area of the Dead Sea and its late Pleistocene precursor, Lake Lisan (Figure 1). Darga Wadi is located in an arid region in which

  3. GEOLOGICAL NOTE Desert Pavement: An Environmental Canary?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    GEOLOGICAL NOTE Desert Pavement: An Environmental Canary? P K. Haft Division of Earth and Ocean 27708 Ie-mail: /wff@geo.duke_eciul ABSTRACT Ongoing ctisruption of ancient, varnished desert pavement that the pavement disturbances reported here ~ue rarc on the millcnnhll time scale of desert varnish format ion

  4. Oil Peak or Panic?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, David L [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this balanced consideration of the peak-oil controversy, Gorelick comes down on the side of the optimists.

  5. Mosses in the Desert: Fascinating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    ;· 2. How does a desert moss do this and what are the implications? ­ a. applications to agriculture the membranes damaged by desiccation. ­ (ii) a quick repair time is the key to surviving drought: half during;· 8. Recall the 100+ proteins required to effect repairs for desiccation tolerance. ­ a. should

  6. Silver Peak Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, New York:SiG Solar GmbH JumpSilicium de(Redirected from Silver

  7. Silver Peak Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AGShandongShirkeSichuanSilicon Recycling

  8. WECC and Peak Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WECC and Peak Update Transmission B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N Pre-decisional. For Discussion Purposes Only. WECC and Peak Background In the...

  9. California Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name California Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  10. american southwest desert: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    structures in the hyper-arid Gebel Uweinat region of the Sahara Desert (Southwestern Egypt) q Geosciences Websites Summary: Desert (Southwestern Egypt) q Margarita M. Marinova...

  11. atacama desert soils: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CellDerived Desert Hedgehog Controls Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Hedgehog Controls the Development of Peripheral Nerve Sheaths by the signaling protein Desert...

  12. UNLV DESERT SUNRISE DESERT SUNRISE HOME Project Summary

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group current C3E Ambassadors and U.S.MANAGEMENT Annual DEPARTMENT OFUNLV DESERT

  13. Banded Iron Formations from the Eastern Desert of Egypt: A new type of Ore? KHALIL, Khalil Isaac1 and EL-SHAZLY, Aley K.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Shazly, Aley

    Banded Iron Formations from the Eastern Desert of Egypt: A new type of Ore? KHALIL, Khalil Isaac1 and EL-SHAZLY, Aley K.2 1 Department of Geology, University of Alexandria, Egypt 2 Geology Department localities in an area approximately 30,000 km2 within the eastern desert of Egypt. With the exception

  14. Idaho_GrousePeak

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogenIT | NationalMentoringWindMiller204Grouse Peak

  15. Remote sensing approaches for reconstructing fire perimeters and burn severity mosaics in desert spring ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weisberg, Peter J.

    Remote sensing approaches for reconstructing fire perimeters and burn severity mosaics in desert wildfires in these often remote areas has been inconsistent and proxy records are often not available. Remote sensing methods have been used in other environments to gain information about fires that have

  16. Atmospheric Environment 40 (2006) 38813897 Field measurements of desert dust deposition in Libya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Michèle

    Atmospheric Environment 40 (2006) 3881­3897 Field measurements of desert dust deposition in Libya-based dust monitoring study of three zones across Libya, ranging from the Mediterranean coast to the Sahara studies in North Africa shows that areas of Libya have the highest dust deposition rates on record. r 2006

  17. Plants--Desert Studies Center + -Common names from Edmund Jaeger's Desert Wild Flowers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Plants--Desert Studies Center + - Common names from Edmund Jaeger's Desert Wild Flowers * - Common Encelia farinosa *+Brittlebush, Incienso Page 1 of 7DSC Plant List 8/18/2007file://C:\\Documents and Settings\\Owner.YOUR-780C524461\\My Documents\\DSC\\biology\\plants... #12;Top of Page · Biology Index Page

  18. Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols Martin de Graaf KNMI #12; Outline · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Theory · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Reality · Biomass burning and desert dust observations from GOME and SCIAMACHY · Conclusions and Outlook #12; · Absorbing Aerosol

  19. Project title: Stimulation at Desert Peak and Bradys reservoirs...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and verified on a variety of projects including Geothermal, CO 2 , Nuclear waste, Oil&Gas, ER, Arctic permafrost, Hydrates 8 | US DOE Geothermal Office eere.energy.gov...

  20. Project title: Stimulation at Desert Peak and Bradys reservoirs...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Networks and Fluid Flow in EGS Reservoirs; II: Full-Waveform Inversion of 3D-9C VSP data from Bradys EGS Site and Update of the Brady Reservoir Scale Model Imaging,...

  1. Desert Peak to Humboldt House and Winnemucca, in: Lane, M.A., (ed) Nevada

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential Microhydro SiteDayton Power &Denker WulfDeseretgeothermal

  2. Project title: Stimulation at Desert Peak and Bradys reservoirs: modeling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of ContaminationHubs+ ReportEnergy National SolarPublications »with the coupled THM

  3. SUNLIGHT TRANSMISSION THROUGH DESERT DUST AND MARINE AEROSOLS: DIFFUSE LIGHT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SUNLIGHT TRANSMISSION THROUGH DESERT DUST AND MARINE AEROSOLS: DIFFUSE LIGHT CORRECTIONS TO SUN transmission through desert dust and marine aerosols: Diffuse light corrections to Sun photometry 2004; published 27 April 2004. [1] Desert dust and marine aerosols are receiving increased scientific

  4. Environmental Tradeoffs in a Desert City: An Investigation of Water Use, Energy Consumption, and Local Air Temperature in Phoenix, AZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Environmental Tradeoffs in a Desert City: An Investigation of Water Use, Energy Consumption Area This study examined 16 Census Block Groups (2000) within the City of Phoenix to investigate are critical for long-term urban planning. Figure 2: Study Area: 16 Census Block Groups within City of Phoenix

  5. Geothermal resources of the western arm of the Black Rock Desert, northwestern Nevada. Part I. Geology and geophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaefer, D.H.; Welch, A.H.; Maurer, D.K.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of the geothermal potential of the western arm of the Black Rock Desert in northwestern Nevada included a compilation of existing geologic data on a detailed map, a temperature survey at 1-meter depth, a thermal-scanner survey, and gravity and seismic surveys to determine basin geometry. The temperature survey showed the effects of heating at shallow depths due to rising geothermal fluids near the known hot spring areas. Lower temperatures were noted in areas of probable near-surface ground-water movement. The thermal-scanner survey verified the known geothermal areas and showed relatively high-temperature areas of standing water and ground-water discharge. The upland areas of the desert were found to be distinctly warmer than the playa area, probably due to the low thermal diffusivity of upland areas caused by low moisture content. Surface geophysical surveys indicated that the maximum thickness of valley-fill deposits in the desert is about 3200 meters. Gravity data further showed that changes in the trend of the desert axis occurred near thermal areas. 53 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES & GUIDANCE MANUAL: DESERT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES & GUIDANCE MANUAL: DESERT RENEWABLE ENERGY SOUTHWEST REGION #12;Draft BMPs and Guidance October 5, 2009 DISCLAIMER Best Management Practices & Guidance Eugenia Laychak Mignon Marks James W. Reede, Jr., Ed. D. Paul Richins Authors Roger Johnson Manager

  7. Peak Oil, Peak Energy Mother Nature Bats Last

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sereno, Martin

    Peak Oil, Peak Energy Mother Nature Bats Last Martin Sereno 1 Feb 2011 (orig. talk: Nov 2004) #12;Oil is the Lifeblood of Industrial Civilization · 80 million barrels/day, 1000 barrels/sec, 1 cubicPods to the roads themselves) · we're not "addicted to oil" -- that's like saying a person has an "addiction

  8. Texas Nuclear Profile - Comanche Peak

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Comanche Peak" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  9. The Relative Abundance of Desert Tortoises on the Nevada Test Site within Ecological Landform Units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy Woodward, Kurt R. Rautenstrauch, Derek B. Hall, and W. Kent Ostler

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sign-survey transects were sampled in 1996 to better determine the relative abundance of desert tortoises on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These transects were sampled within ecological land-form units (ELUs), which are small, ecologically homogeneous units of land. Two-hundred and six ELUs were sampled by walking 332 transects totaling 889 kilometers (km) (552 miles [mi]). These ELUs covered 528 km{sup 2} (204 mi{sup 2}). Two-hundred and eighty-one sign were counted. An average of 0.32 sign was found per km walked. Seventy percent of the area sampled had a very low abundance of tortoises, 29 percent had a low abundance, and 1 percent had a moderate abundance. A revised map of the relative abundance of desert tortoise on the NTS is presented. Within the 1,330 km{sup 2} (514 mi{sup 2}) of desert tortoise habitat on the NTS, 49 percent is classified as having no tortoises or a very low abundance, 18 percent has a low or moderate abundance, 12 percent is unclassified land being used by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, and the remaining 21 percent still has an unknown abundance of desert tortoises. Based on the results of this work, the amount of tortoise habitat previously classified as having an unknown or low-moderate abundance, and on which clearance surveys and on-site monitoring was required, has been reduced by 20 percent.

  10. The relative abundance of desert tortoises on the Nevada Test Site within ecological landform units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodward, R. [Bechtel National (United States); Rautenstrauch, K.R. [Science Applications International Corp. (United States); Hall, D.B.; Ostler, W.K. [Bechtel Nevada (United States)

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sign-survey transects were sampled in 1996 to better determine the relative abundance of desert tortoises on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These transects were sampled within ecological land-form units (ELUs), which are small, ecologically homogeneous units of land. Two-hundred and six ELUs were sampled by walking 332 transects totaling 889 kilometers (km). These ELUs covered 528 km{sup 2}. Two-hundred and eight-one sign were counted. An average of 0.32 sign was found per km walked. Seventy percent of the area sampled had a very low abundance of tortoises, 29% had a low abundance, and 1% had a moderate abundance. A revised map of the relative abundance of desert tortoise on the NTS is presented. Within the 1,330 km{sup 2} of desert tortoise habitat on the NTS, 49% is classified as having no tortoises or a very low abundance, 18% has a low or moderate abundance, 12% is unclassified land being used by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, and the remaining 21% still has an unknown abundance of desert tortoises. Based on the results of this work, the amount of tortoise habitat previously classified as having an unknown or low-moderate abundance, and on which clearance surveys and on-site monitoring was required, has been reduced by 20%.

  11. Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region Tucson...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I I I C 17 - Hydropower Projects I I I C 18 - Minor Discharges I I I C 19 - Minor Dredging I I I C 20 - Response Operations for Oil and Hazardous Substances I I I T If work...

  12. FINAL Western Area Power Administration Desert Southwest Region...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    source materials in Western's DSW region archives and records and at the Arizona State University Library in Phoenix, Arizona. Information concerning the general history of...

  13. Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region Tucson...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    threatened species or their habitat; Federally-protected marine mammals and Essential Fish Habitat (Marine Mammal Protection Act; Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and...

  14. Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region Parker...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    siting and construction or major expansion of waste storage, disposal, recovery, or treatment facilities (including incinerators), but the proposal may include categorically...

  15. San Emidio Desert Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:RoscommonSBYSalton Sea Geothermal(Empire) Geothermal Facility

  16. San Emidio Desert Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:RoscommonSBYSalton Sea Geothermal(Empire) Geothermal FacilitySan

  17. High performance robotic traverse of desert terrain.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whittaker, William (Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA)

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents tentative innovations to enable unmanned vehicle guidance for a class of off-road traverse at sustained speeds greater than 30 miles per hour. Analyses and field trials suggest that even greater navigation speeds might be achieved. The performance calls for innovation in mapping, perception, planning and inertial-referenced stabilization of components, hosted aboard capable locomotion. The innovations are motivated by the challenge of autonomous ground vehicle traverse of 250 miles of desert terrain in less than 10 hours, averaging 30 miles per hour. GPS coverage is assumed to be available with localized blackouts. Terrain and vegetation are assumed to be akin to that of the Mojave Desert. This terrain is interlaced with networks of unimproved roads and trails, which are a key to achieving the high performance mapping, planning and navigation that is presented here.

  18. Desert Pavement and Buried Archaeological Features in the Arid West: A Case Study from Southern Arizona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahlstrom, Richard V. N.; Roberts, Heidi

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    u t e . New York: DESERT PAVEMENT AND BURIED ARCHAEOLOGICAL10. Cooke, Ronald U. Stone Pavements in Deserts. Annals of tt , Sif O i d a k DESERT PAVEMENT AND BURIED ARCHAEOLOGICAL

  19. Vesicular Horizon Distribution, Properties, and Pedogenic Processes in Deserts of the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turk, Judith Katherine

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of desert soils of Mongolia. Euras. Soil Sci. 42:1204-1217.of desert soils of Mongolia. Euras. Soil Sci. 42:1204-1217.of desert soils of Mongolia. Euras. Soil Sci. 42:1204-1217.

  20. Every Square Inch: The Fight for the California Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Argandona, Monica

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    centers as a clean and renewable energy resource. The demandProtective Council Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plancenters as a clean and renewable energy resource. Whether

  1. EIS-0448: First Solar Desert Sunlight Project in Riverside County...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    June 24, 2011 EIS-0448: Final Environmental Impact Statement Desert Sunlight Solar Farm Project, California June 24, 2011 EIS-0448: Notice of Adoption of an Environmental Impact...

  2. Every Square Inch: The Fight for the California Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Argandona, Monica

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    centers as a clean and renewable energy resource. The demandfor Energy Efficiency and Renewable Technologies CaliforniaProtective Council Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan

  3. amargosa desert nye: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the TOMS AI make Mahowald, Natalie 32 Decision Support Tool for Desert Tortoises Near Solar Installations Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: Decision...

  4. America's Atomic Army: The Historical Archaeology of Camp Desert Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan R. Edwards

    2007-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Established in 1951, Camp Desert Rock served as the training ground for America's 'Atomic Army'. For the next six years, U.S. ground troops traveled to the Nevada desert to participate in military maneuvers during atmospheric atomic weapons testing. Nearly 60,000 soldiers received physical and psychological training in atomic warfare. Abandoned when atmospheric testing ended, Camp Desert Rock was dismantled and its buildings moved to other locations. Today, the camp appears as a sterile expanse of desert marked by rock-lined tent platforms, concrete foundations, and trash scatters. Although visually unimposing, the site is rich with the history of America's nuclear testing program.

  5. CO2 EFFECTS ON MOJAVE DESERT PLANT INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. A. DEFALCO; G. C. FERNANDEZ; S. D. SMITH; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seasonal and interannual droughts characteristic of deserts have the potential to modify plant interactions as atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations continue to rise. At the Nevada Desert FACE (free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment) facility in the northern Mojave Desert, the effects of elevated atmospheric C02 (550 vs. ambient {approx}360 {micro}mol mol{sup -1}) on plant interactions were examined during two years of high and low rainfall. Results suggest that CO{sub 2} effects on the interaction between native species and their understory herbs are dependent on the strength of competition when rainfall is plentiful, but are unimportant during annual drought. Seasonal rainfall for 1999 was 23% the long-term average for the area, and neither elevated CO{sub 2} nor the low production of herbaceous neighbors had an effect on relative growth rate (RGR, d{sup -1}) and reproductive effort (RE, number of flowers g{sup -1}) for Achnatherum hymenoides (early season perennial C{sub 3} grass), Pleuraphis rigida (late season perennial C{sub 4} grass), and Larrea tridentata (evergreen C{sub 3} shrub). In contrast, 1998 received 213% the average rainfall. Consequently, the decrease in RGR and increase in RE for Achnatherum, whose period of growth overlaps directly with that of its neighbors, was exaggerated at elevated CO{sub 2}. However, competitive effects of neighbors on Eriogonum trichopes (a winter annual growing in shrub interspaces), Pleuraphis and Larrea were not affected by elevated CO{sub 2}, and possible explanations are discussed. Contrary to expectations, the invasive annual neighbor Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens had little influence on target plant responses because densities in 1998 and 1999 at this site were well below those found in other studies where it has negatively affected perennial plant growth. The extent that elevated CO{sub 2} reduces the performance of Achnatherum in successive years to cause its loss from the plant community depends more on future pressure from herbaceous neighbors and less on the extent that CO{sub 2} enhances Achnatherum growth during periods of severe drought.

  6. Evaluation of a Translocated Population of Desert Mule Deer in the Chihuahuan Desert of Northern Coahuila, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ortega-Sanchez, Alfonso

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    EVALUATION OF A TRANSLOCATED POPULATION OF DESERT MULE DEER IN THE CHIHUAHUAN DESERT OF NORTHERN COAHUILA, MEXICO A Dissertation by ALFONSO ORTEGA-SANCHEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies of Texas A..., Michael P. Masser December 2013 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences Copyright 2013 Alfonso Ortega-Sanchez ii ABSTRACT Mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) are large (30–150 kg) ungulates that occur from southern Alaska to the desert...

  7. ORIGINAL PAPER Neoproterozoic diamictite in the Eastern Desert of Egypt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stern, Robert J.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Neoproterozoic diamictite in the Eastern Desert of Egypt and Northern Saudi Arabia in Wadi Kareim and Wadi Mobarak in the Eastern Desert of Egypt and the Nuwaybah formation in NW Saudi and extends from Egypt, Israel, and Jordan to Ethiopia and Yemen. The ANS (Fig. 1a) developed during

  8. Peak finding using biorthogonal wavelets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, C.Y.

    2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors show in this paper how they can find the peaks in the input data if the underlying signal is a sum of Lorentzians. In order to project the data into a space of Lorentzian like functions, they show explicitly the construction of scaling functions which look like Lorentzians. From this construction, they can calculate the biorthogonal filter coefficients for both the analysis and synthesis functions. They then compare their biorthogonal wavelets to the FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigations) wavelets when used for peak finding in noisy data. They will show that in this instance, their filters perform much better than the FBI wavelets.

  9. Peak Oil Food Network | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Butte, Colorado Zip: 81224 Website: http:www.PeakOilFoodNetwork. References: Peak Oil Food Network1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. The Peak...

  10. Silver Peak Innovative Exploration Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objectives: Reduce the high level of risk during the early stages of geothermal project development by conducting a multi-faceted and innovative exploration and drilling program at Silver Peak. Determine the combination of techniques that are most useful and cost-effective in identifying the geothermal resource through a detailed, post-project evaluation of the exploration and drilling program.

  11. Ecosystems of MongoliaEcosystems of Mongolia The vast area of the country contains a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Ecosystems of MongoliaEcosystems of Mongolia The vast area of the country contains a great array Desert steppe Desert ecosystems MainMain ecosystems of Mongolia High mountain ecosystemsHigh mountain ecosystems High mountain occupies 4.48% of the total territory of Mongolia. Mountain forest ecosystems

  12. Peak Oil Awareness Network | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Awareness Network Jump to: navigation, search Name: Peak Oil Awareness Network Place: Crested Butte, Colorado Zip: 81224 Website: http:www.PeakOilAwarenessNet Coordinates:...

  13. Food Deserts and Eating Habits of Children Participating in the WIC Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jewell, Kassi Kae

    2013-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Food Desert Mapping This thesis also utilizes the USDA?s (ERS division) data on food deserts to determine which participating WIC clients reside in food desert zip codes. The USDA defines a food desert as a census tract in which at least 33 percent..., and 80 RQ6: What percentage of the western region WIC participants reside in food deserts? Participant Zip Codes 21 4. MATERIALS AND METHODS Institutional Review Board The proposed study has been approved...

  14. Magnetotellurics At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconverter <WAGMadisonOpen Energy Information

  15. Multispectral Imaging At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasoleTremor(Question) | Open EnergyEnergyEnergyInformation

  16. Multispectral Imaging At Silver Peak Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula,MontereyHill,SpurrMulberry,Energy InformationAl.,

  17. GPUs: An Oasis in the Supercomputing Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamleh, Waseem

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel metric is introduced to compare the supercomputing resources available to academic researchers on a national basis. Data from the supercomputing Top 500 and the top 500 universities in the Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU) are combined to form the proposed "500/500" score for a given country. Australia scores poorly in the 500/500 metric when compared with other countries with a similar ARWU ranking, an indication that HPC-based researchers in Australia are at a relative disadvantage with respect to their overseas competitors. For HPC problems where single precision is sufficient, commodity GPUs provide a cost-effective means of quenching the computational thirst of otherwise parched Lattice practitioners traversing the Australian supercomputing desert. We explore some of the more difficult terrain in single precision territory, finding that BiCGStab is unreliable in single precision at large lattice sizes. We test the CGNE and CGNR forms of the conjugate gradient method on the normal equa...

  18. Texas Nuclear Profile - Comanche Peak

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun1DecadeMonthComanche Peak"

  19. Idaho_LonePinePeak

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogenIT |Hot Springs Site #0104 Latitude:Peak Site

  20. Desert Sunlight is Shining Example of How DOE Loan Guarantees...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Sunlight is Shining Example of How DOE Loan Guarantees Helped Launch Utility-scale PV Solar Market Desert Sunlight is Shining Example of How DOE Loan Guarantees Helped Launch...

  1. NextEra Energy Resources, LLC (Desert Sunlight) | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    financing of the development of the Desert Sunlight Project, a 550 MW photovoltaic (PV) solar generating plant. The project is owned by NextEra, GE, and Sumitoto of America (50%,...

  2. Factors controlling tungsten concentrations in ground water, Carson Desert, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Factors controlling tungsten concentrations in ground water, Carson Desert, Nevada Ralph L. Seiler sources. Tungsten concentrations in 100 ground water samples from all aquifers used as drinking water indicates that W exhibits Tungsten con- centrations are strongly and positively correlated

  3. Effects of Land Surface Characteristics on Pedogenesis, Biological Soil Crust Community Diversity, and Ecosystem Functions in a Mojave Desert Piedmont Landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pietrasiak, Nicole

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    shrub patches and water harvesting in the Negev Desert: theshrub patches and water harvesting in the Negev Desert: the

  4. GPUs: An Oasis in the Supercomputing Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waseem Kamleh

    2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel metric is introduced to compare the supercomputing resources available to academic researchers on a national basis. Data from the supercomputing Top 500 and the top 500 universities in the Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU) are combined to form the proposed "500/500" score for a given country. Australia scores poorly in the 500/500 metric when compared with other countries with a similar ARWU ranking, an indication that HPC-based researchers in Australia are at a relative disadvantage with respect to their overseas competitors. For HPC problems where single precision is sufficient, commodity GPUs provide a cost-effective means of quenching the computational thirst of otherwise parched Lattice practitioners traversing the Australian supercomputing desert. We explore some of the more difficult terrain in single precision territory, finding that BiCGStab is unreliable in single precision at large lattice sizes. We test the CGNE and CGNR forms of the conjugate gradient method on the normal equations. Both CGNE and a modified form of CGNR (with restarts) provide reliable convergence for quark propagator calculations in single precision.

  5. An endangered oasis of aquatic microbial biodiversity in the Chihuahuan desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forney, Larry J.

    An endangered oasis of aquatic microbial biodiversity in the Chihuahuan desert Valeria Souza, representing a desert oasis of high biodiversity. Here, we combine data from molecular microbiology and geology

  6. Geography of urban food access : exploring potential causes of food deserts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cameron, Caitlin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We believe we understand food deserts, but we do not. In the last decade the phenomenon of food deserts has been often discussed, and many solutions are proposed to alleviate food access issues in American cities. However, ...

  7. New age constraints on the Middle Stone Age occupations of Kharga Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asmerom, Yemane

    New age constraints on the Middle Stone Age occupations of Kharga Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt rocks, or tufas, exposed along the flanks of the Libyan Plateau near Kharga Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt

  8. Peak Travel, Peak Car and the Future of Mobility: Evidence, Unresolved...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Travel, Peak Car and the Future of Mobility: Evidence, Unresolved Issues, Policy Implications, and a Research Agenda Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Peak...

  9. Soil Formation and Transport Processes on Hillslopes along a Precipitation Gradient in the Atacama Desert, Chile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owen, Justine J.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2000, Desert pavement characteristics on wadi terrace andalluvial fan surfaces: Wadi Al-Bih, UAE and Oman:

  10. Glaciation temperatures of convective clouds ingesting desert dust, air pollution and smoke from forest fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Glaciation temperatures of convective clouds ingesting desert dust, air pollution and smoke from observations show that desert dust and heavy air pollution over East Asia have similar ability to glaciate desert dust, air pollution and smoke from forest fires, Geophys. Res. Lett., 38, L21804, doi:10

  11. INTEG. AND COMP. BIOL., 42:6875 (2002) Ecological and Evolutionary Physiology of Desert Birds: A Progress Report1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Jos. B.

    of desert environments, regions where high ambient temperature (Ta) and low water availability limits of mechanisms of energy and water conservation among species of desert rodents, which avoid temperature extremes studies that show that desert birds may have evolved specific features to deal with hot desert conditions

  12. Promoting Employment Across Kansas (PEAK) (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Promoting Employment Across Kansas (PEAK) allows for the retention of employee payroll withholding taxes for qualified companies or third parties performing services on behalf of such companies....

  13. Adaptive architectures for peak power management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kontorinis, Vasileios

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    load – in fact, we almost completely flatten the power profilepower profiles, we investigate a number of policies for peak power shaving which react to the observed load

  14. Decision Center for a Desert City Water/Climate Briefings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junshan

    Water and its Role in Mitigation of Surface/Ground water depletion ­ Max Krzyzewski Climate Change EfDecision Center for a Desert City Water/Climate Briefings A place where multiple perspectives with the public policy community to investigate water, climate, decision-making and vulnerability

  15. Desert pavement morphology and dynamics, Big Bend National Park, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmon, Courtney Michelle

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Desert pavements consist of a one- to two-layer thick surface armory of stones overlying finer, virtually stone-free material which often adopts the appearance of a meticulously tiled mosaic. They cover half of the arid land surface in North America...

  16. Water Resources Center, Desert Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    modeling efforts, quantify the flux of groundwater nutrients to the lower Truckee River; 2. Using benchWater Resources Center, Desert Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction Research Program #12;A Multi-Level Approach to Modeling Ground- and Surface Water Exchange

  17. Preliminary Assumptions for Natural Gas Peaking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    plants and capital cost estimates for peaking technologies Frame, Aeroderivative, Intercooled, Reciprocating Engines Next steps 2 #12;Definitions Baseload Energy: power generated (or conserved) across a period of time to serve system demands for electricity Peaking Capacity: capability of power generating

  18. The Boson peak in supercooled water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pradeep Kumar; K. Thor Wikfeldt; Daniel Schlesinger; Lars G. M. Pettersson; H. E. Stanley

    2013-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform extensive molecular dynamics simulations of the TIP4P/2005 model of water to investigate the origin of the Boson peak reported in experiments on supercooled water in nanoconfined pores, and in hydration water around proteins. We find that the onset of the Boson peak in supercooled bulk water coincides with the crossover to a predominantly low-density-like liquid below the Widom line $T_W$. The frequency and onset temperature of the Boson peak in our simulations of bulk water agree well with the results from experiments on nanoconfined water. Our results suggest that the Boson peak in water is not an exclusive effect of confinement. We further find that, similar to other glass-forming liquids, the vibrational modes corresponding to the Boson peak are spatially extended and are related to transverse phonons found in the parent crystal, here ice Ih.

  19. The Houston Pollution Problem: An analysis of the primary and secondary regional pollution peak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omiecinski, Curtis

    266 The Houston Pollution Problem: An analysis of the primary and secondary regional pollution peak was conducted in the Houston area to assess the secondary regional pollution peak that occurs at that time pollution episodes, which correlated with stagnant weather patterns and high temperatures. During spring

  20. ReproducedfromVadoseZoneJournal.PublishedbySoilScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. Hydraulic Properties of a Desert Soil Chronosequence in the Mojave Desert, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Donald, T. G. Caldwell, S. G. Benner, and D. G. Meadows ABSTRACT packed gravel that overlies a thin (3­10 cm layer of closely packed gravel that overlies a thin, gravel-poor, vesicular A (Av) soil horizon. Well), fine-grained, gravel-poor, vesicular A (Av) soil horizon.1 Desert pave-Desert pavements are prominent

  1. QER- Comment of Cloud Peak Energy Inc

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dear Ms Pickett Please find attached comments from Cloud Peak Energy as input to the Department of Energy’s Quadrennial Energy Review. If possible I would appreciate a confirmation that this email has been received Thank you.

  2. LNG production for peak shaving operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, B.C.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LNG production facilities are being developed as an alternative or in addition to underground storage throughout the US to provide gas supply during peak gas demand periods. These facilities typically involved a small liquefaction unit with a large LNG storage tank and gas sendout facilities capable of responding to peak loads during the winter. Black and Veatch is active in the development of LNG peak shaving projects for clients using a patented mixed refrigerant technology for efficient production of LNG at a low installed cost. The mixed refrigerant technology has been applied in a range of project sizes both with gas turbine and electric motor driven compression systems. This paper will cover peak shaving concepts as well as specific designs and projects which have been completed to meet this market need.

  3. A perspective on the CMB acoustic peak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. A. Marriage

    2002-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    CMB angular spectrum measurements suggest a flat universe. This paper clarifies the relation between geometry and the spherical harmonic index of the first acoustic peak ($\\ell_{peak}$). Numerical and analytic calculations show that $\\ell_{peak}$ is approximately a function of $\\Omega_K/\\Omega_M$ where $\\Omega_K$ and $\\Omega_M$ are the curvature ($\\Omega_K > 0$ implies an open geometry) and mass density today in units of critical density. Assuming $\\Omega_K/\\Omega_M \\ll 1$, one obtains a simple formula for $\\ell_{peak}$, the derivation of which gives another perspective on the widely-recognized $\\Omega_M$-$\\Omega_\\Lambda$ degeneracy in flat models. This formula for near-flat cosmogonies together with current angular spectrum data yields familiar parameter constraints.

  4. Measured Peak Equipment Loads in Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathew, Paul A.

    2007-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical bulletin documents measured peak equipment load data from 39 laboratory spaces in nine buildings across five institutions. The purpose of these measurements was to obtain data on the actual peak loads in laboratories, which can be used to rightsize the design of HVAC systems in new laboratories. While any given laboratory may have unique loads and other design considerations, these results may be used as a 'sanity check' for design assumptions.

  5. A gravity study of the Great Basin-Sonoran Desert transition zone, Basin and Range province, western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, Debra Ann

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    chairman, Neville Carter approved funding for me to attend a GSA field trip in the Great Basin-Sonoran Desert transition area for an initial look at the rocks. As I wrote computer programs and ran models, it really helped me to remember..., they did not use a modeling technique; instead, Bancroft's method (1960) was used to determine the maximum possible depth to an assumed step-source. SEISMIC STUDIES Because of the basin and range physiography, and the generally north-south orientation...

  6. Relative abundance of desert tortoises on the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rautenstrauch, K.R.; O`Farrell, T.P.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Seven hundred fifty-nine transects having a total length of 1,191 km were walked during 1981--1986 to determine the distribution and relative abundance of desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The abundance of tortoises on NTS was low to very low relative to other populations in the Mojave Desert. Sign of tortoises was found from 880 to 1,570 m elevation and was more abundant above 1,200 m than has been reported previously for Nevada. Tortoises were more abundant on NTS on the upper alluvial fans and slopes of mountains than in valley bottoms. They also were more common on or near limestone and dolomite mountains than on mountains of volcanic origin.

  7. Desert Queen Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision hasda62829c05bGabbs Valley AreaEnergyDerbyIIQueen

  8. Desert Sky Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision hasda62829c05bGabbs Valley AreaEnergyDerbyIIQueenSky

  9. Fire Impacts on the Mojave Desert Ecosystem: Literature Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenstermaker Lynn

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) is located within the Mojave Desert, which is the driest region in North America. Precipitation on the NNSS varies from an annual average of 130 millimeters (mm; 5.1 inches) with a minimum of 47 mm (1.9 inches) and maximum of 328 mm (12.9 inches) over the past 15 year period to an annual average of 205 mm (8.1 inches) with an annual minimum of 89 mm (3.5 inches) and maximum of 391 mm (15.4 inches) for the same time period; for a Frenchman Flat location at 970 meters (m; 3182 feet) and a Pahute Mesa location at 1986 m (6516 feet), respectively. The combination of aridity and temperature extremes has resulted in sparsely vegetated basins (desert shrub plant communities) to moderately vegetated mountains (mixed coniferous forest plant communities); both plant density and precipitation increase with increasing elevation. Whereas some plant communities have evolved under fire regimes and are dependent upon fire for seed germination, plant communities within the Mojave Desert are not dependent on a fire regime and therefore are highly impacted by fire (Brown and Minnich, 1986; Brooks, 1999). As noted by Johansen (2003) natural range fires are not prevalent in the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts because there is not enough vegetation present (too many shrub interspaces) to sustain a fire. Fire research and hence publications addressing fires in the Southwestern United States (U.S.) have therefore focused on forest, shrub-steppe and grassland fires caused by both natural and anthropogenic ignition sources. In the last few decades, however, invasion of mid-elevation shrublands by non-native Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens and Bromus tectorum (Hunter, 1991) have been highly correlated with increased fire frequency (Brooks and Berry, 2006; Brooks and Matchett, 2006). Coupled with the impact of climate change, which has already been shown to be playing a role in increased forest fires (Westerling et al., 2006), it is likely that the fire frequency will further increase in the Mojave Desert (Knapp 1998; Smith et al., 1987; Smith et al., 2000).

  10. andaman backarc basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to better understand these areas and determine if they are indeed high potential exploration targets. On the more local scale, Desert Peak-Bradys geothermal area has been...

  11. anadarko basin oklahoma: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to better understand these areas and determine if they are indeed high potential exploration targets. On the more local scale, Desert Peak-Bradys geothermal area has been...

  12. anoxic basin nitinat: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to better understand these areas and determine if they are indeed high potential exploration targets. On the more local scale, Desert Peak-Bradys geothermal area has been...

  13. abay basin ethiopia: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to better understand these areas and determine if they are indeed high potential exploration targets. On the more local scale, Desert Peak-Bradys geothermal area has been...

  14. austral magallanes basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to better understand these areas and determine if they are indeed high potential exploration targets. On the more local scale, Desert Peak-Bradys geothermal area has been...

  15. anoxic cariaco basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to better understand these areas and determine if they are indeed high potential exploration targets. On the more local scale, Desert Peak-Bradys geothermal area has been...

  16. T-1 Training Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Another valuable homeland security asset at the NNSS is the T-1 training area, which covers more than 10 acres and includes more than 20 separate training venues. Local, County, and State first responders who train here encounter a variety of realistic disaster scenarios. A crashed 737 airliner lying in pieces across the desert, a helicopter and other small aircraft, trucks, buses, and derailed train cars are all part of the mock incident scene. After formal classroom education, first responders are trained to take immediate decisive action to prevent or mitigate the use of radiological or nuclear devices by terrorists. The Counterterrorism Operations Support Center for Radiological Nuclear Training conducts the courses and exercises providing first responders from across the nation with the tools they need to protect their communities. All of these elements provide a training experience that cannot be duplicated anywhere else in the country.

  17. T-1 Training Area

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Another valuable homeland security asset at the NNSS is the T-1 training area, which covers more than 10 acres and includes more than 20 separate training venues. Local, County, and State first responders who train here encounter a variety of realistic disaster scenarios. A crashed 737 airliner lying in pieces across the desert, a helicopter and other small aircraft, trucks, buses, and derailed train cars are all part of the mock incident scene. After formal classroom education, first responders are trained to take immediate decisive action to prevent or mitigate the use of radiological or nuclear devices by terrorists. The Counterterrorism Operations Support Center for Radiological Nuclear Training conducts the courses and exercises providing first responders from across the nation with the tools they need to protect their communities. All of these elements provide a training experience that cannot be duplicated anywhere else in the country.

  18. The Protection of Riparian Areas: New Approaches for New Times?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the nation. There is no lack of water here, unless you try to establish a city where no city should be. (1The Protection of Riparian Areas: New Approaches for New Times? Denise D. Fort "Water, water, water....There is no shortage of water in the desert but exactly the right amount, a perfect ratio

  19. Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) Research Data from the Nevada Desert FACE Facility (NDFF)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    DOE has conducted trace gas enrichment experiments since the mid 1990s. The FACE Data Management System is a central repository and archive for Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) data, as well as for the related open-top chamber (OTC) experiments. FACE Data Management System is located at the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). While the data from the various FACE sites, each one a unique user facility, are centralized at CDIAC, each of the FACE sites presents its own view of its activities and information. For that reason, DOE Data Explorer users are advised to see both the central repository at http://public.ornl.gov/face/index.shtml and the individual home pages of each site. NDFF whole-ecosystem manipulation is a flagship experiment of the Terrestrial Carbon Process (TCP) research program of the US Dept. of Energy. It is also a core project of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program (IGBP) and a contribution to the US Global Change Research Program. The NDFF was developed in conjunction with the National Science Foundation (NSF) and DOE-EPSCoR programs. FACE (Free-Air-Carbon dioxide-Enrichment) technology allows researchers to elevate the carbon dioxide level in large study plots while minimizing ecosystem disturbance. At the NDFF the concentration of CO2 was elevated by 50 percent above the present atmospheric levels in three plots in the Mojave Desert ecosystem, while six other plots remained at the current level. This experimental design provided a large area in which integrated teams of scientists could describe and quantify processes regulating carbon, nutrient, and water balances in desert ecosystems.

  20. Preliminary Assumptions for Natural Gas Peaking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; adjusted to 2012$, state construction cost index, vintage of cost estimate, scope of estimate to extent's Discussion Aeroderivative Gas Turbine Technology Proposed reference plant and assumptions Preliminary cost Robbins 2 #12;Peaking Power Plant Characteristics 6th Power Plan ($2006) Unit Size (MW) Capital Cost ($/k

  1. AUTOMATED CRITICAL PEAK PRICING FIELD TESTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) for development of the DR Automation Server System This project could not have been completed without extensive: Greg Watson and Mark Lott · C&C Building Automation: Mark Johnson and John Fiegel · Chabot Space AUTOMATED CRITICAL PEAK PRICING FIELD TESTS: 2006 PROGRAM DESCRIPTION AND RESULTS

  2. sonorensis | winter 2005 11 As the intense heat of day in the Sonoran Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medellín, Rodrigo

    sonorensis | winter 2005 11 As the intense heat of day in the Sonoran Desert gives way to cooler and fruit. Once the intense Sonoran Desert heat ebbs, and fall encroaches, the bats head southward, back as threatened in 1994. FORECAST FOR THE LESSER LONG-NOSED BAT A USFWS recovery plan in 1994 listed conservation

  3. A numerical modeling study on desert oasis self-supporting mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Peter C.

    A numerical modeling study on desert oasis self-supporting mechanisms Peter C. Chua, *, Shihua Lub February 2005 Abstract Oasis self-supporting mechanisms due to oasis breeze circulation (OBC) are proposed from the oasis makes the oasis surface colder than the surrounding desert surface. The sensible heat

  4. Ecological controls on water-cycle response to climate variability in deserts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scanlon, Bridget R.

    sites for waste disposal (4). For example, the proposed U.S. repository to isolate highly radioactive are critical for water resources and waste disposal in deserts. Desert environments are particularly vulnerable in response to elevated winter precipitation reduced soil water storage to half of that in a nonvegetated

  5. Response of desert pavement to seismic shaking, Hector Mine earthquake, California, 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Response of desert pavement to seismic shaking, Hector Mine earthquake, California, 1999 P. K. Haff characteristic surface disturbances on nearby desert pavements. These disturbances included (1) zones of wholesale gravel displacement interspersed with zones of intact pavement, (2) displaced and rotated cobbles

  6. REGULAR ARTICLE Impact of biological soil crusts and desert plants on soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    REGULAR ARTICLE Impact of biological soil crusts and desert plants on soil microfaunal community are supplied by a variety of sources in the desert food web; both vascular and non-vascular plants and cyanobacteria supply carbon, and cyanobacteria and plant-associated rhizosphere bacteria are sources

  7. The Adjustment of Avian Metabolic Rates and Water Fluxes to Desert Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Jos. B.

    ambient air temperatures (Ta), low primary productivity, and lack of surface water place deserts among and Seely 1982; Williams and Tieleman 2000b). Likewise, lack of surface water ostensibly limits water intake461 The Adjustment of Avian Metabolic Rates and Water Fluxes to Desert Environments B. Irene

  8. Global observations and spectral characteristics of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    Global observations and spectral characteristics of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols M. de (UV) absorbing aerosols, mainly desert dust and biomass burning aerosols. The AAI is not an aerosol quantity, but a radiation difference in the UV. Its main advantages are its insensitivity to scattering

  9. Neoproterozoic tectonothermal evolution of the Central Eastern Desert, Egypt: a slow velocity tectonic process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, Harald

    Neoproterozoic tectonothermal evolution of the Central Eastern Desert, Egypt: a slow velocity, University of Assiut, Egypt Received 10 January 2001; received in revised form 24 October 2001; accepted 25 in the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt is constraint by 40 Ar/39 Ar ages of hornblende and muscovite from Meatiq

  10. Nitrate dynamics in the soil and unconfined aquifer in arid groundwater coupled ecosystems of the Monte desert, Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    of the Monte desert, Argentina J. N. Aranibar,1,2 P. E. Villagra,1,3 M. L. Gomez,1 E. Jobbágy,4 M. Quiroga,1 R desert, Argentina, J. Geophys. Res., 116, G04015, doi:10.1029/2010JG001618. 1. Introduction [2] Drylands desert, Argentina, shallow groundwater is exploited by deep rooted trees, increasing primary productivity

  11. BLM West Desert District Office | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon, France: Energy ResourcesBurleyBLM SierraBLM West Desert

  12. Peak power tracking for a solar buck charger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Jeremy Michael, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis discusses the design, implementation, and testing of a buck converter with peak power tracking. The peak power tracker uses a perturb and observe algorithm to actively track the solar panel's peak power point ...

  13. Central peaking of magnetized gas discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Francis F. [Electrical Engineering Department, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)] [Electrical Engineering Department, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Curreli, Davide [Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)] [Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Partially ionized gas discharges used in industry are often driven by radiofrequency (rf) power applied at the periphery of a cylinder. It is found that the plasma density n is usually flat or peaked on axis even if the skin depth of the rf field is thin compared with the chamber radius a. Previous attempts at explaining this did not account for the finite length of the discharge and the boundary conditions at the endplates. A simple 1D model is used to focus on the basic mechanism: the short-circuit effect. It is found that a strong electric field (E-field) scaled to electron temperature T{sub e}, drives the ions inward. The resulting density profile is peaked on axis and has a shape independent of pressure or discharge radius. This “universal” profile is not affected by a dc magnetic field (B-field) as long as the ion Larmor radius is larger than a.

  14. Triangle Singularities and XYZ Quarkonium Peaks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam P. Szczepaniak

    2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss analytical properties of partial waves derived from projection of a 4-legged amplitude with crossed-channel exchanges in the kinematic region of the direct channel that corresponds to the XYZ peaks in charmonium and bottomonium. We show that in general partial waves can develop anomalous branch points in the vicinity of the direct channel physical region. In a specific case, when these branch points lie on the opposite side of the unitary cut they pinch the integration contour in a dispersion relation and if the pinch happens close to threshold, the normal threshold cusp is enhanced. We show that this effect only occurs if masses of resonances in the crossed channel are in a specific, narrow range. We estimate the size of threshold enhancements originating from these anomalous singularities in reactions where the Zc(3900) and the Zb(10610) peaks have been observed.

  15. Triangle Singularities and XYZ Quarkonium Peaks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szczepaniak, Adam P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss analytical properties of partial waves derived from projection of a 4-legged amplitude with crossed-channel exchanges in the kinematic region of the direct channel that corresponds to the XYZ peaks in charmonium and bottomonium. We show that in general partial waves can develop anomalous branch points in the vicinity of the direct channel physical region. In a specific case, when these branch points lie on the opposite side of the unitary cut they pinch the integration contour in a dispersion relation and if the pinch happens close to threshold, the normal threshold cusp is enhanced. We show that this effect only occurs if masses of resonances in the crossed channel are in a specific, narrow range. We estimate the size of threshold enhancements originating from these anomalous singularities in reactions where the Zc(3900) and the Zb(10610) peaks have been observed.

  16. Residential implementation of critical-peak pricing of electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herter, Karen

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L.R. Modeling alternative residential peak-load electricitydemand response to residential critical peak pricing (CPP)analysis of California residential customer response to

  17. Equivalence Principle and the Baryon Acoustic Peak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldauf, Tobias; Simonovi?, Marko; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the dominant effect of a long wavelength density perturbation $\\delta(\\lambda_L)$ on short distance physics. In the non-relativistic limit, the result is a uniform acceleration, fixed by the equivalence principle, and typically has no effect on statistical averages due to translational invariance. This same reasoning has been formalized to obtain a "consistency condition" on the cosmological correlation functions. In the presence of a feature, such as the acoustic peak at $l_{\\rm BAO}$, this naive expectation breaks down for $\\lambda_Lpower spectrum. Finally, the success of BAO reconstruction schemes is argue...

  18. Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900Steep SlopeStochastic WeeklyStores Catalog The AmesPeak

  19. Pilot Peak Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska: Energy ResourcesPicketGeothermal Project Jump to:Pilot Peak

  20. Mt Peak Utility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole IncMinutemanVistaZephyr)Mountain AirPeak Utility Jump

  1. DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS ON PEAK POWER CLIPPING THRESHOLDS IN MICROGRIDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paderborn, Universität

    the utility grid. This kind of operating strategy is called e.g. "peak load shaving", "peak power reduction. This method is broadly applicable to similar applications, e.g. for peak-shaving of PV power to limit" or just "peak shaving" and is applied to diverse applications and systems. This paper presents a method

  2. Peak Oil and REMI PI+: State Fiscal Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    the possibility of multiple maxima (peaks) · There is no particular reason why peak oil in New Mexico or some to assume that these peaks will not occur at the same time. #12;The Oil Peak in New Mexico Source: Starbuck are Proved Reserves? "Proved reserves of crude oil are the estimated quantities which geological

  3. Biotic Processes Regulating the Carbon Balance of Desert Ecosystems - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nowak, Robert S [UNR; Smith, Stanley D [UNLV; Evans, Dave [WSU; Ogle, Kiona [ASU; Fenstermaker, Lynn [DRI

    2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Our results from the 10-year elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration study at the Nevada Desert FACE (Free-air CO{sub 2} Enrichment) Facility (NDFF) indicate that the Mojave Desert is a dynamic ecosystem with the capacity to respond quickly to environmental changes. The Mojave Desert ecosystem is accumulating carbon (C), and over the 10-year experiment, C accumulation was significantly greater under elevated [CO{sub 2}] than under ambient, despite great fluctuations in C inputs from year to year and even apparent reversals in which [CO{sub 2}] treatment had greater C accumulations.

  4. HD 137510: An Oasis in the Brown Dwarf Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Endl; Artie P. Hatzes; William D. Cochran; Barbara McArthur; Carlos Allende Prieto; Diane B. Paulson Eike Guenther; Ana Bedalov

    2004-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the beginning of precise Doppler surveys, which have had stunning success in detecting extrasolar planetary companions, one surprising enigma has emerged: the relative paucity of spectroscopic binaries where the secondary mass lies in between the stellar and planetary mass regime. This gap in the mass function for close-in (a < 3 - 4 AU) companions to solar-type stars is generally referred to as the ``Brown Dwarf Desert''. Here we report the detection of a companion to HD 137510 (G0IV), with a minimum mass of 26 M_Jupiter, moving in an eccentric orbit (e=0.4) with a period of 798 days and an orbital semimajor axis of 1.85 AU. The detection is based on precise differential radial velocity (RV) data obtained by the McDonald Observatory and Thueringer Landessternwarte Tautenburg planet search programs.

  5. HD 137510: An Oasis in the Brown Dwarf Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endl, M; Cochran, W D; McArthur, B; Allende-Prieto, C; Günther, D B; Bedalov, A; Endl, Michael; Hatzes, Artie P.; Cochran, William D.; Arthur, Barbara Mc; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Guenther, Diane B. Paulson Eike; Bedalov, Ana

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the beginning of precise Doppler surveys, which have had stunning success in detecting extrasolar planetary companions, one surprising enigma has emerged: the relative paucity of spectroscopic binaries where the secondary mass lies in between the stellar and planetary mass regime. This gap in the mass function for close-in (a < 3 - 4 AU) companions to solar-type stars is generally referred to as the ``Brown Dwarf Desert''. Here we report the detection of a companion to HD 137510 (G0IV), with a minimum mass of 26 M_Jupiter, moving in an eccentric orbit (e=0.4) with a period of 798 days and an orbital semimajor axis of 1.85 AU. The detection is based on precise differential radial velocity (RV) data obtained by the McDonald Observatory and Thueringer Landessternwarte Tautenburg planet search programs.

  6. Flow Test At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489Information Hydro IncEnergy Information Roosevelt

  7. Geothermometry At Desert Queen Area (Garchar & Arehart, 2008) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell TestingGeothermal/PowerInformation

  8. Ground Magnetics At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJump to:InformationGrotonOpenGround|

  9. Reflection Survey At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to:bJumpRedSeismic Imaging, Majer, Gritto

  10. Ground Gravity Survey At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG| Open Energy Information 2000) ExplorationAl.,Open

  11. Stepout-Deepening Wells At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk,SoutheastSt.Steep Gradient Flume JumpTexas:Information San

  12. Thermal Gradient Holes At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThe year openEnergy2003)Energy| Open

  13. Refraction Survey At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation, searchRayreview ofOzkocak,InformationLaney,

  14. Tectono-metamorphic evolution of the Wadi Hafafit Culmination (central Eastern Desert, Egypt). Implication for Neoproterozoic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siebel, Wolfgang

    Tectono-metamorphic evolution of the Wadi Hafafit Culmination (central Eastern Desert, Egypt.O. 530 El-Maadi, Cairo, Egypt Institut für Geowissenschaften, Universität Tübingen Sigwartstr. 10, D

  15. Sites with Holocene dung deposits in the Eastern Desert of Egypt: Visited by herders?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marinova, Elena

    Sites with Holocene dung deposits in the Eastern Desert of Egypt: Visited by herders? V. Linseele a by the Belgian Middle Egypt Prehistoric Project of Leuven University under the direction of P.M. Vermeersch

  16. Slip and Dilation Tendency Analysis of the Tuscarora Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Slip and dilation tendency for the Tuscarora geothermal field was calculated based on the faults mapped Tuscarora area (Dering, 2013). The Tuscarora area lies in the Basin and Range Province, as such we applied a normal faulting stress regime to the Tuscarora area faults, with a minimum horizontal stress direction oriented 115, based on inspection of local and regional stress determinations, as explained above. Under these stress conditions north-northeast striking, steeply dipping fault segments have the highest dilation tendency, while north-northeast striking 60° dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to slip. Tuscarora is defined by a left-step in a major north- to-north northeast striking, west-dipping range-bounding normal fault system. Faults within the broad step define an anticlinal accommodation zone...

  17. Thermal Performance of Building Envelope in Very Hot Dry Desert Region in Egypt (Toshky)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khalil, M. H.; Sheble, S. S.; Helal, M. A.; El-Demirdash, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal Performance of Building Envelope in Very Hot Dry Desert Region in Egypt (Toshky Region) S.S. Sheble* M. H. Khalil M. A. Helal Prof. M. El- Demirdash3 Asso. Prof. Building Physics Institute (HBRC) Asso. Prof. Building Physics... Institute (HBRC) Prof. & head of Building Physics Institute (HBRC) Prof. & Chairman of HBRC Housing & Building National Research Center (HBRC) Cairo, Egypt * Author ABSTRACT Toshky region is a desert region located in the south east...

  18. [Climate implications of terrestrial paleoclimate]. Quaternary Sciences Center, Desert Research Institute annual report, fiscal year 1994/1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigand, P.E.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to collect terrestrial climate indicators for paleoclimate synthesis. The paleobiotic and geomorphic records are being examined for the local and regional impact of past climates to assess Yucca Mountain`s suitability as a high-level nuclear waste repository. In particular these data are being used to provide estimates of the timing, duration and extremes of past periods of moister climate for use in hydrological models of local and regional recharge that are being formulated by USGS and other hydrologists for the Yucca Mountain area. The project includes botanical, faunal, and geomorphic components that will be integrated to accomplish this goal. To this end personnel at the Quaternary Sciences Center of the Desert Research Institute in Reno, Nevada are conducting the following activities: Analyses of packrat middens; Analysis of pollen samples; and Determination of vegetation climate relationships.

  19. MODELING THE GLOBAL PEAKS AND COOLING SY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . In this study, the morphological analysis depicted to clarify different district areas from G.I.S. data heat island and global warming effects building simulation is outlined. INTRODUCTION Urban structures city scale and local scale. The main influence microclimate is the heat island caused by trapping

  20. Potential For Energy, Peak Demand, and Water Savings in California Tomato Processing Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trueblood, A. J.; Wu, Y. Y.; Ganji, A. R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - wattage metal halide lamps. Other support areas may be lit by inefficient T12 lighting. Replacing these lamps with T5, T8, light-emitting diode (LED), or induction lighting can result in significant electrical energy savings and reduce the peak...

  1. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: The Nevada Test Site Development Corporations's Desert Rock Sky Park at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy has prepared an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1300) (EA) which analyzes the potential environmental effects of developing operating and maintaining a commercial/industrial park in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site, between Mercury Camp and U.S. Highway 95 and east of Desert Rock Airport. The EA evaluates the potential impacts of infrastructure improvements necessary to support fill build out of the 512-acre Desert Rock Sky Park. Two alternative actions were evaluated: (1) Develop, operate and maintain a commercial/industrial park in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site, and (2) taking no action. The purpose and need for the commercial industrial park are addressed in Section 1.0 of the EA. A detailed description of the proposed action and alternatives is in section 2.0. Section 3.0 describes the affected environment. Section 4.0 the environmental consequences of the proposed action and alternative. Cumulative effects are addressed in Section 5.0. Mitigation measures are addressed in Section 6.0. The Department of Energy determined that the proposed action of developing, operating and maintaining a commercial/industrial park in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site would best meet the needs of the agency.

  2. GTA P.M. PEAK MODEL Version 2.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    WORKING DRAFT GTA P.M. PEAK MODEL Version 2.0 And HALTON REGION SUB-MODEL Documentation & Users' Guide Prepared by Peter Dalton July 2001 #12;GTA P.M. Model Page 2 30/05/2002 Contents 1.0 P.M. Peak ................................................................................................ 4 Table 1 - Features of the P.M. Peak Period Model

  3. The University of Oklahoma Peak People Temporary Services Appointment Notification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    The University of Oklahoma Peak People Temporary Services Appointment Notification Please read of Oklahoma. Peak Appointment -This section is to be completed by the hiring department. Print Peak Person will not be eligible for any of the University of Oklahoma's benefit programs except for the 403(b) and 457(b

  4. Reduced Peak Power Requirements in FDM and Related Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, Thomas J.

    Reduced Peak Power Requirements in FDM and Related Systems Rajiv Laroia, Tom Richardson, R. This is especially true of communication systems for which the cost of peak transmitted power is critical. Often by the peak power required of the amplifier. On the other hand, the capacity of the system is proportional

  5. The role of building technologies in reducing and controlling peak electricity demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koomey, Jonathan; Brown, Richard E.

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Peak power demand issues have come to the fore recently because of the California electricity crisis. Uncertainties surrounding the reliability of electric power systems in restructured markets as well as security worries are the latest reasons for such concerns, but the issues surrounding peak demand are as old as the electric utility system itself. The long lead times associated with building new capacity, the lack of price response in the face of time-varying costs, the large difference between peak demand and average demand, and the necessity for real-time delivery of electricity all make the connection between system peak demand and system reliability an important driver of public policy in the electric utility sector. This exploratory option paper was written at the request of Jerry Dion at the U.S.Department of Energy (DOE). It is one of several white papers commissioned in 2002 exploring key issues of relevance to DOE. This paper explores policy-relevant issues surrounding peak demand, to help guide DOE's research efforts in this area. The findings of this paper are as follows. In the short run, DOE funding of deployment activities on peak demand can help society achieve a more economically efficient balance between investments in supply and demand-side technologies. DOE policies can promote implementation of key technologies to ameliorate peak demand, through government purchasing, technology demonstrations, and improvements in test procedures, efficiency standards, and labeling programs. In the long run, R&D is probably the most important single leverage point for DOE to influence the peak demand issue. Technologies for time-varying price response hold great potential for radically altering the way people use electricity in buildings, but are decades away from widespread use, so DOE R&D and expertise can make a real difference here.

  6. Rehab permits desert line to run at original pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurdi, A.M.; Abougfeefa, M.S. (Agip Oil Co. Ltd., Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya)); Denney, A.K. (John Brown Engineering and Constructors Ltd., London (United Kingdom))

    1993-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An extensive inspection and rehabilitation program on a 34-in. desert pipeline in gas-condensate service has restored the line to full operating pressures and ensured the line's active service life for at least 20 years. Since Agip Oil Co. Ltd. built the 133-km pipeline in 1972 using API 5L Grade X-60, it has suffered six known failures. There has been no single cause of the failures. As a consequence of the failures, the line has been progressively down rated from the original operating pressure of 700 psig to 500 psig. So that the line could again be operated between 650 and 700 psig, two options have been considered: extensive study and investigation leading to inspection and replacement of suspect pipe: total replacement of the line. These options were evaluated from economic and safety points of view. A major consideration was that the line will be operating in its current manner for only the next 2 years before changing to dry-gas transportation. The first option was therefore considered viable. The paper discusses the failure mechanisms, the history of hydrogen-induced cracking, the 1989 failure, survey results, calculation of acceptable pressures, and the rehabilitation program.

  7. SYSTEMATICS AND EVOLUTION IN THE TRIBE SCHIZOPETALAE (BRASSICACEAE): A MOLECULAR, MORPHOLOGICAL, AND ECOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF THE DIVERSIFICATION OF AN ENDEMIC LINEAGE FROM THE ATACAMA DESERT (CHILE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toro Nunez, Oscar Fernando

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    As aridity has been identified as an active promoter of diversification in deserts, attempts to test organismal differentiation in the Atacama Desert have resulted particularly challenging. Most limitations are related to ...

  8. CORRELATION BETWEEN PEAK ENERGY AND PEAK LUMINOSITY IN SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. B.; Chen, D. Y. [Department of Physics, College of Sciences, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025 (China); Huang, Y. F., E-mail: sci.zbzhang@gzu.edu.cn, E-mail: hyf@nju.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A correlation between the peak luminosity and the peak energy has been found by Yonetoku et al. as L{sub p} {proportional_to}E{sup 2.0}{sub p,i} for 11 pre-Swift long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In this study, for a greatly expanded sample of 148 long GRBs in the Swift era, we find that the correlation still exists, but most likely with a slightly different power-law index, i.e., L{sub p} {proportional_to} E{sup 1.7}{sub p,i}. In addition, we have collected 17 short GRBs with necessary data. We find that the correlation of L{sub p} {proportional_to} E{sup 1.7}{sub p,i} also exists for this sample of short events. It is argued that the radiation mechanism of both long and short GRBs should be similar, i.e., of quasi-thermal origin caused by the photosphere, with the dissipation occurring very near the central engine. Some key parameters of the process are constrained. Our results suggest that the radiation processes of both long and short bursts may be dominated by thermal emission, rather than by the single synchrotron radiation. This might put strong physical constraints on the theoretical models.

  9. Slip and Dilation Tendency Analysis of the Patua Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Slip and dilation tendency analysis for the Patua geothermal system was calculated based on faults mapped in the Hazen Quadrangle (Faulds et al., 2011). Patua lies near the margin between the Basin and Range province, which is characterized by west-northwest directed extension and the Walker Lane province, characterized by west-northwest directed dextral shear. As such, the Patua area likely has been affected by tectonic stress associated with either or both of stress regimes over geologic time. In order to characterize this stress variation we calculated slip tendency at Patua for both normal faulting and strike slip faulting stress regimes. Based on examination of regional and local stress data (as explained above) we applied at shmin direction of 105 to Patua. Whether the vertical stress (sv) magnitude is larger than ...

  10. Pre-treating Seed to Enhance Germination of Desert Shrubs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. K. Ostler; D. C. Anderson; D. J. Hansen

    2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Creosotebush [Larrea tridentata (D.C.) Cav.] and white bursage [Ambrosia dumosa (A. Gray) W.W. Payne] seeds were subjected to pre-treatments of rinsing and soaking in water and thiourea to enhance germination in laboratory experiments. The effects of darkness, temperature, seed source, and soil moisture were also evaluated in the laboratory. The best pre-treatment from the laboratory experiments, rinsing with water for 36 hours followed by drying, was field-tested at Fort Irwin, California. Two sites and two seeding dates (early March and mid April) were determined for each site. Five mulch treatments (no mulch, straw, gravel, chemical stabilizer, and plastic) were evaluated in combination with the seed pre-treatments. Field emergence was greatly enhanced with the seed pre-treatment for white bursage during the March (18-42% increase in germination) and April seedings (16-23% increase in germination). Creosotebush showed poor germination during March (2-5%) when soil temperatures averaged 15 C, but germination increased during the April trials (6-43%) when soil temperatures averaged 23 C. The seed pre-treatment during the April trials increased germination from 16-23%. The plastic mulch treatment increased germination dramatically during both the March and April trials. The plastic mulch increased soil temperatures (8-10 C)and maintained high humidity during germination. Both the chemical stabilizer and the gravel mulches improved germination over the control while the straw mulch decreased germination. These results suggest that seed pre-treatments combined with irrigation and mulch are effective techniques to establish these two dominant Mojave Desert species from seed.

  11. Does variation in mineral composition alter the short-wave light scattering properties of desert dust aerosol?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    retrievals of mineral dust aerosol from space by visible and near-infrared radiometers. Errors in aerosol depth in deserts and the surrounding regions during periods of high wind. Long range transport of desert particles into the air [6] (wind alone does not have sufficient energy to remove particles from the surface

  12. Holocene freshwater carbonate structures in the hyper-arid Gebel Uweinat region of the Sahara Desert (Southwestern Egypt) q

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Desert (Southwestern Egypt) q Margarita M. Marinova a,b , A. Nele Meckler c , Christopher P. McKay b region of the Sahara Desert, near the triple border of Egypt, Sudan, and Libya (N22°, E25°), re- ceives- ibrated years BP; Wendorf and expedition, 1977). While some parts of southwest Egypt have been extensively

  13. Phanerozoic tectonothermal history of the ArabianNubian shield in the Eastern Desert of Egypt: evidence from fission track

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, Harald

    Phanerozoic tectonothermal history of the Arabian­Nubian shield in the Eastern Desert of Egypt were performed in the Eastern Desert of Egypt. The results provide insights into the processes driving reserved. Keywords: Phanerozoic; Fission track thermochronology; Palaeostress; Arabian­Nubien shield; Egypt

  14. Effect of asymmetry in peak profiles on solar oscillation frequencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarbani Basu; H. M. Antia

    1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Most helioseismic analyses are based on solar oscillations frequencies obtained by fitting symmetric peak profiles to the power spectra. However, it has now been demonstrated that the peaks are not symmetric. In this work we study the effects of asymmetry of the peak profiles on the solar oscillations frequencies of p-modes for low and intermediate degrees. We also investigate how the resulting shift in frequencies affects helioseismic inferences.

  15. The northern boundary of the desert tortoise range on the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rautenstrauch, K.R.; Brown, G.A.; Goodwin, R.G.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was conducted in 1993 to more accurately define the northern boundary of the range of desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) on the Nevada Test Site. Eighty-six transects totaling 338.2 km were walked along this boundary and 53 tortoise signs were recorded. Tortoise signs were found all along the northern edge of Jackass and Frenchman flats. Signs were found north of those valleys only in the Calico Hills at the south end of Topopah Valley and in the CP Hills at the extreme southern end of Yucca Flat. A revised map of the range of desert tortoises on NTS is presented. This information can be used by the US Department of Energy to determine whether activities conducted along or near this boundary will affect desert tortoises.

  16. Microgrid Dispatch for Macrogrid Peak-Demand Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeForest, Nicholas

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on-peak rates from time-of-use (TOU) tariffs while enhancingTable 1 Time of Use Electricity Tariff at SRJ Period Summer

  17. affect peak oxidative: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    establish a monotonicity result that indicates fuel supply Todd, Michael J. 119 Potential Peak Load Reductions From Residential Energy Efficient Upgrades Texas A&M University -...

  18. assisting daytime peaking: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    models are deterministic Minnesota, University of 105 Distributed Battery Control for Peak Power Shaving in Datacenters Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites...

  19. artery peak systolic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    power spectrum. Michael P. Hobson 1996-11-26 69 COMMITTEE FINAL REPORT REVISED SHORTTERM PEAK Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: , weather adjustment,...

  20. Reducing Peak Demand to Defer Power Plant Construction in Oklahoma

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reducing Peak Demand to Defer Power Plant Construction in Oklahoma Located in the heart of "Tornado Alley," Oklahoma Gas & Electric Company's (OG&E) electric grid faces significant...

  1. Residential implementation of critical-peak pricing of electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herter, Karen

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to time-of-day electricity pricing: first empirical results.S. The trouble with electricity markets: understandingresidential peak-load electricity rate structures. Journal

  2. annihilation coincidence peak: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    V. Fedorov; Julia M. Mikhailova; Peter A. Volkov 2011-12-05 3 (2013) 128 Data Center Demand Response: Avoiding the Coincident Peak via Computer Technologies and Information...

  3. Cosmology Constraints from the Weak Lensing Peak Counts and the Power Spectrum in CFHTLenS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Jia [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Columbia University, New York, NY, (United States); May, Morgan [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, (United States); Petri, Andrea [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, NY, (United States); Haiman, Zoltan [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Columbia University, New York, NY, (United States); Institute for Strings, Cosmology, and Astroparticle Physics (ISCAP), Columbia University, New York, (United States); Hui, Lam [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, NY, (United States); Institute for Strings, Cosmology, and Astroparticle Physics (ISCAP), Columbia University, New York, (United States); Kratochvil, Jan M. [Astrophysics and Cosmology Research Unit, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Westville, Durban, (South Africa)

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lensing peaks have been proposed as a useful statistic, containing cosmological information from non-Gaussianities that is inaccessible from traditional two-point statistics such as the power spectrum or two-point correlation functions. Here we examine constraints on cosmological parameters from weak lensing peak counts, using the publicly available data from the 154 deg2 CFHTLenS survey. We utilize a new suite of ray-tracing N-body simulations on a grid of 91 cosmological models, covering broad ranges of the three parameters ?m, ?8, and w, and replicating the galaxy sky positions, redshifts, and shape noise in the CFHTLenS observations. We then build an emulator that interpolates the power spectrum and the peak counts to an accuracy of ? 5%, and compute the likelihood in the three-dimensional parameter space (?m, ?8, w) from both observables. We find that constraints from peak counts are comparable to those from the power spectrum, and somewhat tighter when different smoothing scales are combined. Neither observable can constrain w without external data. When the power spectrum and peak counts are combined, the area of the error “banana” in the (?m, ?8) plane reduces by a factor of ? two, compared to using the power spectrum alone. For a flat ? cold dark matter model, combining both statistics, we obtain the constraint ?8(?m/0.27)0.63 = 0.85+0.03-0.03.

  4. Cosmology Constraints from the Weak Lensing Peak Counts and the Power Spectrum in CFHTLenS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Jia; May, Morgan; Petri, Andrea; Haiman, Zoltan; Hui, Lam; Kratochvil, Jan M.

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lensing peaks have been proposed as a useful statistic, containing cosmological information from non-Gaussianities that is inaccessible from traditional two-point statistics such as the power spectrum or two-point correlation functions. Here we examine constraints on cosmological parameters from weak lensing peak counts, using the publicly available data from the 154 deg2 CFHTLenS survey. We utilize a new suite of ray-tracing N-body simulations on a grid of 91 cosmological models, covering broad ranges of the three parameters ?m, ?8, and w, and replicating the galaxy sky positions, redshifts, and shape noise in the CFHTLenS observations. We then build an emulator thatmore »interpolates the power spectrum and the peak counts to an accuracy of ? 5%, and compute the likelihood in the three-dimensional parameter space (?m, ?8, w) from both observables. We find that constraints from peak counts are comparable to those from the power spectrum, and somewhat tighter when different smoothing scales are combined. Neither observable can constrain w without external data. When the power spectrum and peak counts are combined, the area of the error “banana” in the (?m, ?8) plane reduces by a factor of ? two, compared to using the power spectrum alone. For a flat ? cold dark matter model, combining both statistics, we obtain the constraint ?8(?m/0.27)0.63 = 0.85+0.03-0.03.« less

  5. Variability in desert bighorn and Rambouillet sheep using restriction fragment length polymorphisms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyles, Ingrid Doodeheefver

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , was resuspended in Tris-EDTA, and the concentration of DNA in yg/ml was determined (Skow et al. 1988). 18 Table 1. Species identification. No. 1 2 3 4 6 7 DBHS NV/TX DBHS NV/TX DBHS NV/TX DBHS NV/TX DBHS NV/TX DBHS NV/TX Heparinized Blood.... Rambo. Calif. Rambo. Calif. Rambo. DNA extracted form DNA extracted form DNA extracted form DNA extracted form DNA extracted form UCB UCB UCB UCB UCB DBHS NV/TX: Desert Bighorn Sheep Nevada/Texas cross DBHS AZ/AZ: Desert Bighorn Sheep...

  6. On Transforming Spectral Peaks in Voice Conversion Elizabeth Godoy 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    On Transforming Spectral Peaks in Voice Conversion Elizabeth Godoy 1 , Olivier Rosec1 , Thierry.chonavel@telecom-bretagne.eu Abstract This paper explores the benefits of transforming spectral peaks in voice conversion. First, in examining classic GMM- based transformation with cepstral coefficients, we show that the lack of transformed

  7. Distributed Battery Control for Peak Power Shaving in Datacenters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simunic, Tajana

    Distributed Battery Control for Peak Power Shaving in Datacenters Baris Aksanli and Tajana Rosing-physical systems with continuous performance and power measurements, and real-time control decisions related to shave peak power demands. Our novel distributed battery control design has no performance impact

  8. PEAKING OF WORLD OIL PRODUCTION: IMPACTS, MITIGATION, & RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    PEAKING OF WORLD OIL PRODUCTION: IMPACTS, MITIGATION, & RISK MANAGEMENT Robert L. Hirsch, SAIC OF WORLD OIL PRODUCTION III. WHY TRANSITION WILL BE TIME CONSUMING IV. LESSONS FROM PAST EXPERIENCE V REMARKS APPENDICES #12;4 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The peaking of world oil production presents the U

  9. Peaks of Otter Soil and Water Conservation District

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    leadership and education to sustain and utilize Bedford's natural resources in a manner that will enhancePeaks of Otter Soil and Water Conservation District Annual Report FY 2014 1071ATurnpikeRd.Bedford,VA24523 "The Peaks of Otter Soil and Water Con- servation District, with its partners, will provide

  10. Bunch Compressor for small Emittances and high Peak Currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bunch Compressor for small Emittances and high Peak Currents the VUV Free­Electron Laser Frank Stulle University Hamburg #12; #12; Bunch Compressor for small Emittances and high Peak Currents the VUV longitudinally in two magnetic chicanes. first chicane modified version bunch compressor (BC2) which TTF1

  11. TRENDS IN ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION, PEAK DEMAND, AND GENERATING CAPACITY IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley. University of

    PWP-085 TRENDS IN ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION, PEAK DEMAND, AND GENERATING CAPACITY IN CALIFORNIA, California 94720-5180 www.ucei.org #12;TRENDS IN ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION, PEAK DEMAND, AND GENERATING** Abstract This study analyzes state and regional electricity supply and demand trends for the eleven states

  12. P3DDT Peak Profile Analysis 4.1 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winokur, Michael

    81 Chapter 4 P3DDT Peak Profile Analysis 4.1 Introduction The increasing molecular level complexity of paracrystal order are given in Ref. [36]. #12; 82 CHAPTER 4. P3DDT PEAK PROFILE ANALYSIS The well are the primary reasons why few have attempted apply­ ing this methodology to polymer systems. P3DDT is a polymer

  13. Smoothing the Energy Consumption: Peak Demand Reduction in Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xiang-Yang

    for autonomous demand side management within one house. The DRS devices are able to sense and control the peak energy consumption or demand. We assume that several appliances within one building access to oneSmoothing the Energy Consumption: Peak Demand Reduction in Smart Grid Shaojie Tang , Qiuyuan Huang

  14. Microsoft Word - Rockwood _CFC_ Silver Peak Area Final EA V4...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... 41 APPENDICES Appendix A: Reclamation Plan Appendix B: Federal Geothermal Lease Stipulations Appendix C: Comments Received and Responses to Comments Appendix...

  15. EA-1921: Silver Peak Area Geothermal Exploration Project Environmental Assessment, Esmeralda County, Nevada

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bureau of Land Management (BLM)(lead agency) and DOE are jointly preparing this EA, which evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a project proposed by Rockwood Lithium Inc (Rockwood), formerly doing business as Chemetall Foote Corporation.

  16. Field Mapping At Silver Peak Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 NoEurope BVEnergy InformationInformation Field Mapping

  17. Flow Test At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489Information Hydro IncEnergy Information Roosevelt

  18. Gamma Log At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489InformationFrenchtown, NewG22 Jump to: navigation,Log At

  19. Ground Magnetics At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJump to:InformationGrotonOpenGround|2004) | OpenSilver

  20. Microsoft Word - Rockwood _CFC_ Silver Peak Area Final EA V4 _dec date_.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE LMI-EFRCAddendumNo. 1REPRHUBC,1670-012407 1the

  1. Soil Sampling At Silver Peak Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, New York:SiG26588°,Socorro County,LesterInformation Soil

  2. 2-M Probe At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCaliforniaWeifangwiki Home Jweers's pictureInformation

  3. Z-Axis Tipper Electromagnetics At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind Projectsource History View

  4. Pressure Temperature Log At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska:Precourt Institute for Energy EfficiencyConsultation|Maui

  5. Slim Holes At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |RippeyInformation Slim HolesNewberry Caldera Areawell

  6. Mercury Vapor At Silver Peak Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend <StevensMcClellan,II JumpMepsolar AG

  7. Neutron Log At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcerns Jump to:Neppel Wind Power Project

  8. Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThe year open (energy) data wentOpen

  9. Thermal Gradient Holes At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThe year openEnergy2003)Energy|

  10. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png ElColumbia,2005) | Open(Thompson,2006) | Open2009) |

  11. Core Analysis At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.pngRoofs and Heat Islands Jump| OpenInformation

  12. Cuttings Analysis At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.pngRoofs and HeatOpenInformation 2)|

  13. Radiometrics At Silver Peak Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformationeNevadaRadioactive

  14. Rock Density At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation,MazeOhio:Ohio: Energy Resources JumpNebraska: EnergyDOE

  15. Development Wells At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision hasda62829c05bGabbs Type TermcitingOpen2009) |

  16. Testing of peak demand limiting using thermal mass at a small commercial building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Kyoung-Ho; Braun, James E; Fredrickson, Steve; Konis, Kyle; Arens, Edward

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Figure 1. Building Picture / Satellite Photo Demand ResponseDemand Response Research Center, July 2007 https://escholarship.org/uc/item/19p737k1 The buildingbuilding in Palm Desert, California. The precooling Demand Response

  17. Mr. Ronald E. Moulton Acting Regional Manager Desert Southwest...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Western Area Power Administration P.O. Box 6457 Phoenix, Arizona 85005-6457 RE: MEAD TRANSFORMER Dear Mr. Moulton: Arizona's G T Cooperatives Touchstone Energy* Cooperatives T...

  18. Every Square Inch: The Fight for the California Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Argandona, Monica

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    possibility of a few wind or solar farms in the area was ais an industrial size solar or wind farm on its borders? Are

  19. Assessing Desert Tortoise Survival and Reproduction at a Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , California ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH PIER Environmental Research www.energy.ca.gov/research/ environmental of their habitat are characterized by significant wind and solar energy potential. As a result, the species. Public Interest Energy Research Program, Environmental Area Phone: 9163271368 Email: Joe

  20. Gaseous Emissions From Steamboat Springs, Brady'S Hot Springs, And Desert

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489InformationFrenchtown, NewG22 JumpGas Sampling Jump to:Peak

  1. Natural history of thorny devils Moloch horridus (Lacertilia: Agamidae) in the Great Victoria Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pianka, Eric R.

    183 Natural history of thorny devils Moloch horridus (Lacertilia: Agamidae) in the Great Victoria received August 1997; accepted February 1998 Abstract Daily movements and activity of three male and five female thorny devils (Moloch horridus) were monitored using biotelemetry in the Great Victoria Desert

  2. Can Desert Dwellers Continue To Afford Lush Lawns: Analyzing Consumer Response to Rate Changes in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    Can Desert Dwellers Continue To Afford Lush Lawns: Analyzing Consumer Response to Rate Changes of price and weather on wa- ter demand is important for Arizona. If the effect of weather is not well. In part, this is because few other studies use household data, and instead use data aggregated

  3. Persistent effects of a discrete warming event on a polar desert ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fountain, Andrew G.

    Persistent effects of a discrete warming event on a polar desert ecosystem J . E . B A R R E over the previous decade and altered ecosystem properties in both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems of melt-water had significant influences on Taylor Valley ecosystems that persisted for several years

  4. Metabolism, Swimming Performance, and Tissue Biochemistry of High Desert Redband Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss ssp.): Evidence for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeley, Ernest R.

    413 Metabolism, Swimming Performance, and Tissue Biochemistry of High Desert Redband Trout (Ucrit) and oxygen consumption in the field at 12 and 24 C; (2) biochemical indices of energy metabolism gradient. Fur- ther, we also examined genetic and morphological character- istics of fish from these two

  5. Precambrian Research 136 (2005) 2750 The Wadi Mubarak belt, Eastern Desert of Egypt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, Harald

    Precambrian Research 136 (2005) 27­50 The Wadi Mubarak belt, Eastern Desert of Egypt, Graz, Austria b Mansoura University, Faculty of Science, Geology Department, El Mansoura, Egypt c February 2003; accepted 3 September 2004 Abstract The Wadi Mubarak belt in Egypt strikes west­east (and

  6. Balancing Energy and Water Consumption in an Urban Desert Environment: A Case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    at the Census block group level for 2005 3. Energy consumption data from 2005 Census Mesic Landscaping XericBalancing Energy and Water Consumption in an Urban Desert Environment: A Case Study on Phoenix, AZ effect, water scarcity, and energy consumption. The transformation of native landscapes into built

  7. ORNITHOCOPROPHILOUS PLANTS OF MOUNT DESERT ROCK, A REMOTE BIRD-NESTING ISLAND IN THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajakaruna, Nishanta

    ORNITHOCOPROPHILOUS PLANTS OF MOUNT DESERT ROCK, A REMOTE BIRD-NESTING ISLAND IN THE GULF OF MAINE for the maintenance of plant communities (Cruden 1966; Gillham 1970; Howe and Smallwood 1982; Mulder and Keall 2001 to botanists as they often determine which plant species are dispersed and become established in such remote

  8. Structure and Function of Chihuahuan Desert Ecosystem The Jornada Basin Long-Term Ecological Research Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Land degradation in most of the Chihuahuan Desert is characterized by a shift from grass- to shrub objective where perennial plants have been completely lost from a site, whereas the term reclamation is used to support revegetation, reclamation, and restoration objectives. This chapter is organized into three

  9. Urbanization and food availability advance the reproductive phenology of a Sonoran Desert songbird

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Urbanization and food availability advance the reproductive phenology of a Sonoran Desert songbird for vernal reproductive activity. Other supplementary cues, such as food availability, fine tune reproductive availability (Chamberlain et al. 2009, Ibis). General Methods Species: Abert's Towhee, Melozone aberti. Capture

  10. Ion Secretion by Salt Glands of Desert Iguanas (Dipsosaurus dorsalis) Lisa C. Hazard*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazard, Lisa C.

    22 Ion Secretion by Salt Glands of Desert Iguanas (Dipsosaurus dorsalis) Lisa C. Hazard* DepartmentCl-secreting salt glands of many birds and reptiles, the nasal salt glands of lizards can secrete potassium as well iguana, Dipsosaurus dorsalis. Lizards were given combinations of ions for several days, and secreted salt

  11. Iron control of past productivity in the coastal upwelling system off the Atacama Desert, Chile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Iron control of past productivity in the coastal upwelling system off the Atacama Desert, Chile in the productivity of the upwelling system off presently arid northern Chile during the last 100,000 years. Changes in productivity are found to be in phase with the precessional cycle ($20,000 years) and with inputs of iron from

  12. Sensing in the Urban Technological Deserts A Position Paper for Smart Cities in Least Developed Countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sensing in the Urban Technological Deserts A Position Paper for Smart Cities in Least Developed to ubiquitous computing. This paradigm has made the concept of smart cities a reality that is now in synchrony or users of existential services such as hospitals, the implementation of smart cities is equally important

  13. Developmental plasticity of cutaneous water loss and lipid composition in stratum corneum of desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Jos. B.

    Developmental plasticity of cutaneous water loss and lipid composition in stratum corneum of desert and cerebrosides in the SC compared with mesic spar- rows. In this study, we investigated developmental plasticity modifications of the lipid composition of the SC. The expression of plasticity in CWL seems to be a response

  14. Slip and Dilation Tendency Analysis of the San Emidio Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Slip and dilation tendency for the San Emidio geothermal field was calculated based on the faults mapped Tuscarora area (Rhodes, 2011). The San Emidio area lies in the Basin and Range Province, as such we applied a normal faulting stress regime to the San Emidio area faults, with a minimum horizontal stress direction oriented 115, based on inspection of local and regional stress determinations, as explained above. This is consistent with the shmin determined through inversion of fault data by Rhodes (2011). Under these stress conditions north-northeast striking, steeply dipping fault segments have the highest dilation tendency, while north-northeast striking 60° dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to slip. Interesting, the San Emidio geothermal field lies in an area of primarily north striking faults, which...

  15. An analysis of peak traffic demand at signalized urban intersections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drew, Donald R

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (3 LANES) 350 705 7:15 725 7:35 7:45 7:55 805 TIME INTERVAL TYPICAL PEAK HOUR 5 MIN. TRAFFIC FLOWS 3 ? LANE FREEWAY 100 90 80 UI Z 3 70 0 PEAK RATES OF FLOW FORT WORTH UNIFORM ARRIVALS 0 ~ o170 EQUIVALENT RATE OF FLOW 60 50 O... {Figure 3), it is seen thai from 7:10 A. M. to 7:45 A. Lvf . the average hourly rate of flow is exceeded. If the mid-points of the five-minute ordinates are connected, a polygon is formed which:ntersects the PHV at the extremities of the peak period...

  16. Every Square Inch: The Fight for the California Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Argandona, Monica

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    this area, and put the solar plant. ” He said not everyonethe largest industrial solar plant is under construction inmost of these industrial solar and wind plants would only be

  17. artificial extra peaks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Gas Units Peaking Hydro from manufacturer Regional utility IRPs Gas Turbine World (2013 Handbook) Black & Veatch analysis First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7...

  18. Optimization of Demand Response Through Peak Shaving , D. Craigie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todd, Michael J.

    Optimization of Demand Response Through Peak Shaving G. Zakeri , D. Craigie , A. Philpott , M. Todd for the demand response of such a consumer. We will establish a monotonicity result that indicates fuel supply

  19. Off peak cooling using an ice storage system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinlan, Edward Michael

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electric utilities in the United States have entered a period of slow growth due to a combination of increased capital costs and a staggering rise in the costs for fuel. In addition to this, the rise in peak power ...

  20. Potential Peak Load Reductions From Residential Energy Efficient Upgrades

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meisegeier, D.; Howes, M.; King, D.; Hall, J.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the potential peak load reductions from residential energy efficiency upgrades in hot and humid climates. First, a baseline scenario is established. Then, the demand and consumption impacts of individual upgrade measures are assessed. Several of these upgrades...

  1. Application of Thermal Storage, Peak Shaving and Cogeneration for Hospitals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClure, J. D.; Estes, J. M.; Estes, M. C.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy costs of hospitals can be managed by employing various strategies to control peak electrical demand (KW) while at the same time providing additional security of operation in the event that an equipment failure or a disruption of power from...

  2. artery peak velocity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The time series analysis of Doppler velocity maps show enhanced power in the sunspot umbra at higher frequencies and in the penumbra at lower frequencies. We find that the peak...

  3. Peak thrust operation of linear induction machines from parameter identification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z.; Eastham, T.R.; Dawson, G.E. [Queen`s Univ., Kingston, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Various control strategies are being used to achieve high performance operation of linear drives. To maintain minimum volume and weight of the power supply unit on board the transportation vehicle, peak thrust per unit current operation is a desirable objective. True peak thrust per unit current through slip control is difficult to achieve because the parameters of linear induction machines vary during normal operation. This paper first develops a peak thrust per unit current control law based on the per-phase equivalent circuit for linear induction machines. The algorithm for identification of the variable parameters in induction machines is then presented. Application to an operational linear induction machine (LIM) demonstrates the utility of this algorithm. The control strategy is then simulated, based on an operational transit LIM, to show the capability of achieving true peak thrust operation for linear induction machines.

  4. Observation of low magnetic field density peaks in helicon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barada, Kshitish K.; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Ghosh, J.; Kumar, Sunil; Saxena, Y. C. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Single density peak has been commonly observed in low magnetic field (<100 G) helicon discharges. In this paper, we report the observations of multiple density peaks in low magnetic field (<100 G) helicon discharges produced in the linear helicon plasma device [Barada et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 063501 (2012)]. Experiments are carried out using argon gas with m = +1 right helical antenna operating at 13.56 MHz by varying the magnetic field from 0 G to 100 G. The plasma density varies with varying the magnetic field at constant input power and gas pressure and reaches to its peak value at a magnetic field value of {approx}25 G. Another peak of smaller magnitude in density has been observed near 50 G. Measurement of amplitude and phase of the axial component of the wave using magnetic probes for two magnetic field values corresponding to the observed density peaks indicated the existence of radial modes. Measured parallel wave number together with the estimated perpendicular wave number suggests oblique mode propagation of helicon waves along the resonance cone boundary for these magnetic field values. Further, the observations of larger floating potential fluctuations measured with Langmuir probes at those magnetic field values indicate that near resonance cone boundary; these electrostatic fluctuations take energy from helicon wave and dump power to the plasma causing density peaks.

  5. Peaking of world oil production: Impacts, mitigation, & risk management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirsch, R.L. (SAIC); Bezdek, Roger (MISI); Wendling, Robert (MISI)

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The peaking of world oil production presents the U.S. and the world with an unprecedented risk management problem. As peaking is approached, liquid fuel prices and price volatility will increase dramatically, and, without timely mitigation, the economic, social, and political costs will be unprecedented. Viable mitigation options exist on both the supply and demand sides, but to have substantial impact, they must be initiated more than a decade in advance of peaking.... The purpose of this analysis was to identify the critical issues surrounding the occurrence and mitigation of world oil production peaking. We simplified many of the complexities in an effort to provide a transparent analysis. Nevertheless, our study is neither simple nor brief. We recognize that when oil prices escalate dramatically, there will be demand and economic impacts that will alter our simplified assumptions. Consideration of those feedbacks will be a daunting task but one that should be undertaken. Our aim in this study is to-- • Summarize the difficulties of oil production forecasting; • Identify the fundamentals that show why world oil production peaking is such a unique challenge; • Show why mitigation will take a decade or more of intense effort; • Examine the potential economic effects of oil peaking; • Describe what might be accomplished under three example mitigation scenarios. • Stimulate serious discussion of the problem, suggest more definitive studies, and engender interest in timely action to mitigate its impacts.

  6. Slip and Dilation Tendency Anlysis of McGinness Hills Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Slip and dilation tendency for the McGinness Hills geothermal field was calculated based on the faults mapped McGinness Hills area (Siler 2012, unpublished). The McGinness Hills area lies in the Basin and Range Province, as such we applied a normal faulting stress regime to the McGinness area faults, with a minimum horizontal stress direction oriented 115, based on inspection of local and regional stress determinations, as explained above. Under these stress conditions north-northeast striking, steeply dipping fault segments have the highest dilation tendency, while north-northeast striking 60° dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to slip. The McGinness Hills geothermal system is characterized by a left-step in a north-northeast striking west-dipping fault system wit...

  7. Solar Power in the Desert: Are the current large-scale solar developments really improving California’s environment?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Michael F.; McHughen, Alan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D EVELOPMENT I SSUES Solar Power in the Desert: Are the2 Most of the large-scale solar power projects utilize largethat will be affected by solar power facilities. There are

  8. Stable isotope geochemistry of sulfur bearing minerals and clay mineralogy of some soils and sediments in Loot Desert, central Iran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Stable isotope geochemistry of sulfur bearing minerals and clay mineralogy of some soils Keywords: Sulfur geochemistry Gypsum crystallization water Clay mineralogy Palygorskite Iranian soils Loot technique and clay mineralogy were studied in different landforms in Loot Desert, central Iran. Four

  9. Wood-Producing Sunflower? Mining Genetic Diversity in Desert-Dwelling Wild Species (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Knapp, Steve

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Steve Knapp from Monsanto on "Wood-Producing Sunflower? Mining Genetic Diversity in Desert-Dwelling Wild Species" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  10. CaF/sub 2/:Mn thermoluminescence: a single glow peak not described by 1st or 2nd order kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hornyak, W.F.; Levy, P.W.; Kierstead, J.A.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermoluminescence (TL) of CaF/sub 2/:Mn has been studied using photon counting and digital recording. For doses of 10 rad or less the TL glow curves appear to consist of a single glow peak. However, there are indications - which are pronounced at larger doses - that one additional low intensity peak (area less than or equal to one percent) is superimposed on each side of the central peak. The intense peak is not described by 1st or 2nd order kinetics but is well described by the more general kinetics from which these kinetics are derived. These observations, and the results of additional kinetic analysis, demonstrate that retrapping is not negligible and may include all three peaks. In such systems, which are likely to include other dosimeter materials and minerals, peak height will not increase linearly with dose; an important factor for dosimetry and dating applications.

  11. Peak CO2? China's Emissions Trajectories to 2050

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David G.; McNeil, Michael; Zheng, Nina; Ke, Jing; Levine, Mark

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a result of soaring energy demand from a staggering pace of economic growth and the related growth of energy-intensive industry, China overtook the United States to become the world's largest contributor to CO{sub 2} emissions in 2007. At the same time, China has taken serious actions to reduce its energy and carbon intensity by setting both short-term energy intensity reduction goal for 2006 to 2010 as well as long-term carbon intensity reduction goal for 2020. This study focuses on a China Energy Outlook through 2050 that assesses the role of energy efficiency policies in transitioning China to a lower emission trajectory and meeting its intensity reduction goals. In the past years, LBNL has established and significantly enhanced the China End-Use Energy Model based on the diffusion of end-use technologies and other physical drivers of energy demand. This model presents an important new approach for helping understand China's complex and dynamic drivers of energy consumption and implications of energy efficiency policies through scenario analysis. A baseline ('Continued Improvement Scenario') and an alternative energy efficiency scenario ('Accelerated Improvement Scenario') have been developed to assess the impact of actions already taken by the Chinese government as well as planned and potential actions, and to evaluate the potential for China to control energy demand growth and mitigate emissions. It is a common belief that China's CO{sub 2} emissions will continue to grow throughout this century and will dominate global emissions. The findings from this research suggest that this will not likely be the case because of saturation effects in appliances, residential and commercial floor area, roadways, railways, fertilizer use, and urbanization will peak around 2030 with slowing population growth. The baseline and alternative scenarios also demonstrate that the 2020 goals can be met and underscore the significant role that policy-driven energy efficiency improvements will play in carbon mitigation along with a decarbonized power supply through greater renewable and non-fossil fuel generation.

  12. SEPARATION OF OVERLAPPED ELECTROCHEMICAL PEAKS USING THE KALMAN FILTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, T.F.; Brown, S.D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A major limitation in the use of electrochemical techniques for the quantitative analysis of mixtures is the difficulty of resolving overlapped peaks. This problem is further complicated by the low signal-to-noise ratios often encountered in trace analysis and by the use of electrochemical techniques that produce broad, asymmetric waveforms. This paper demonstrates the use of the Kalman Filter for multi-component analysis of linear sweep voltammograms. Even with the broad, asymmetric LSV waveform, synthetic data runs show that a peak separation of as little as 2.5 mV is sufficient for peak deconvolution in the presence of random noise. Besides separating overlapped peaks, the methods also filters the noise from the signal and can be used to separate the capacitive current component from the faradaic current component. The method is validated further using the Cd(II)/In(III) and Cd(II)/In(III)/Pb(II) systems which show peak separations of 40 to 200 mV. The use of the techniques with two other voltammetric waveforms is also demonstrated.

  13. Wavelet Approach for Operational Gamma Spectral Peak Detection - Preliminary Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ,

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma spectroscopy for radionuclide identifications typically involves locating spectral peaks and matching the spectral peaks with known nuclides in the knowledge base or database. Wavelet analysis, due to its ability for fitting localized features, offers the potential for automatic detection of spectral peaks. Past studies of wavelet technologies for gamma spectra analysis essentially focused on direct fitting of raw gamma spectra. Although most of those studies demonstrated the potentials of peak detection using wavelets, they often failed to produce new benefits to operational adaptations for radiological surveys. This work presents a different approach with the operational objective being to detect only the nuclides that do not exist in the environment (anomalous nuclides). With this operational objective, the raw-count spectrum collected by a detector is first converted to a count-rate spectrum and is then followed by background subtraction prior to wavelet analysis. The experimental results suggest that this preprocess is independent of detector type and background radiation, and is capable of improving the peak detection rates using wavelets. This process broadens the doors for a practical adaptation of wavelet technologies for gamma spectral surveying devices.

  14. Estimating market potential for reducing customer peak loads through photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, J. [Citizens Advisory Panel, Central Islip, NY (United States); Perez, R. [Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Research Center

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Past studies have quantified photovoltaics` (PV) peak load matching capability on a utility-wide scale. The purpose of this paper is to estimate the number of utility subloads (e.g., customers, substations) whose peak loads are well matched with solar availability. A simple tool based on the utility scale load-PV match is developed to estimate the market size of customer scale PV applications with high load-PV matches. Illustrative examples of customer owned PV economics are also provided. The authors show that (1) the market size of high load matching PV applications on the subload scale is significant even within utility systems whose load requirements are not particularly well matched with PV output; and (2) the cost of PV as a peak shaving resource for utility customers is approaching competitive levels.

  15. Silver Peak Innovative Exploration Project (Ram Power Inc.)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Clay

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data generated from the Silver Peak Innovative Exploration Project, in Esmeralda County, Nevada, encompasses a “deep-circulation (amagmatic)” meteoric-geothermal system circulating beneath basin-fill sediments locally blanketed with travertine in western Clayton Valley (lithium-rich brines from which have been mined for several decades). Spring- and shallow-borehole thermal-water geochemistry and geothermometry suggest that a Silver Peak geothermal reservoir is very likely to attain the temperature range 260- 300oF (~125-150oC), and may reach 300-340oF (~150-170oC) or higher (GeothermEx, Inc., 2006). Results of detailed geologic mapping, structural analysis, and conceptual modeling of the prospect (1) support the GeothermEx (op. cit.) assertion that the Silver Peak prospect has good potential for geothermal-power production; and (2) provide a theoretical geologic framework for further exploration and development of the resource. The Silver Peak prospect is situated in the transtensional (regional shearing coupled with extension) Walker Lane structural belt, and squarely within the late Miocene to Pliocene (11 Ma to ~5 Ma) Silver Peak-Lone Mountain metamorphic core complex (SPCC), a feature that accommodated initial displacement transfer between major right-lateral strike- slip fault zones on opposite sides of the Walker Lane. The SPCC consists essentially of a ductiley-deformed lower plate, or “core,” of Proterozoic metamorphic tectonites and tectonized Mesozoic granitoids separated by a regionally extensive, low-angle detachment fault from an upper plate of severely stretched and fractured structural slices of brittle, Proterozoic to Miocene-age lithologies. From a geothermal perspective, the detachment fault itself and some of the upper-plate structural sheets could function as important, if secondary, subhorizontal thermal-fluid aquifers in a Silver Peak hydrothermal system.

  16. Silver Peak Innovative Exploration Project (Ram Power Inc.)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Miller, Clay

    Data generated from the Silver Peak Innovative Exploration Project, in Esmeralda County, Nevada, encompasses a “deep-circulation (amagmatic)” meteoric-geothermal system circulating beneath basin-fill sediments locally blanketed with travertine in western Clayton Valley (lithium-rich brines from which have been mined for several decades). Spring- and shallow-borehole thermal-water geochemistry and geothermometry suggest that a Silver Peak geothermal reservoir is very likely to attain the temperature range 260- 300oF (~125-150oC), and may reach 300-340oF (~150-170oC) or higher (GeothermEx, Inc., 2006). Results of detailed geologic mapping, structural analysis, and conceptual modeling of the prospect (1) support the GeothermEx (op. cit.) assertion that the Silver Peak prospect has good potential for geothermal-power production; and (2) provide a theoretical geologic framework for further exploration and development of the resource. The Silver Peak prospect is situated in the transtensional (regional shearing coupled with extension) Walker Lane structural belt, and squarely within the late Miocene to Pliocene (11 Ma to ~5 Ma) Silver Peak-Lone Mountain metamorphic core complex (SPCC), a feature that accommodated initial displacement transfer between major right-lateral strike- slip fault zones on opposite sides of the Walker Lane. The SPCC consists essentially of a ductiley-deformed lower plate, or “core,” of Proterozoic metamorphic tectonites and tectonized Mesozoic granitoids separated by a regionally extensive, low-angle detachment fault from an upper plate of severely stretched and fractured structural slices of brittle, Proterozoic to Miocene-age lithologies. From a geothermal perspective, the detachment fault itself and some of the upper-plate structural sheets could function as important, if secondary, subhorizontal thermal-fluid aquifers in a Silver Peak hydrothermal system.

  17. L: Shape-based peak identification for ChIPSeq

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valerie Hower; Steven N. Evans; Lior Pachter

    Abstract. We present a new algorithm for the identification of bound regions from ChIP-seq experiments. Our method for identifying statistically significant peaks from read coverage is inspired by the notion of persistence in topological data analysis and provides a non-parametric approach that is robust to noise in experiments. Specifically, our method reduces the peak calling problem to the study of tree-based statistics derived from the data. We demonstrate the accuracy of our method on existing datasets, and we show that it can discover previously missed regions and can more clearly discriminate between multiple binding events.

  18. Slip and Dilation Tendency Analysis of the Salt Wells Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Slip and dilation tendency for the Salt Wells geothermal field was calculated based on the faults mapped in the Bunejug Mountains quadrangle (Hinz et al., 2011). The Salt Wells area lies in the Basin and Range Province (N. Hinz personal comm.) As such we applied a normal faulting stress regime to the Salt Wells area faults, with a minimum horizontal stress direction oriented 105, based on inspection of local and regional stress determinations. Under these stress conditions north-northeast striking, steeply dipping fault segments have the highest dilation tendency, while north-northeast striking 60° dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to slip. Several such faults intersect in high density in the core of the accommodation zone in the Bunejug Mountains and local to the Salt Wells geothermal .

  19. Effects of Land Surface Characteristics on Pedogenesis, Biological Soil Crust Community Diversity, and Ecosystem Functions in a Mojave Desert Piedmont Landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pietrasiak, Nicole

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2000. Desert pavement characteristics on wadi-terrace andalluvial fan surfaces: Wadi Al-Bih, U.A.E. and Oman.

  20. Revised Manuscript Estimation of Peak Power Dissipation in VLSI Circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    and a gate-level circuit structure. Last, but not least, the proposed method produces maximum power estimatesRevised Manuscript 1 Estimation of Peak Power Dissipation in VLSI Circuits Using the Limiting Qiu, Massoud Pedram Department of EE-Systems Univ. of Southern California Los Angeles, CA 90089 Email

  1. Firing Excess Refinery Butane in Peaking Gas Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavone, A.; Schreiber, H.; Zwillenberg, M.

    normal butane production, which will reduce refinery normal butane value and price. Explored is an opportunity for a new use for excess refinery normal butane- as a fuel for utility peaking gas turbines which currently fire kerosene and #2 oil. Our paper...

  2. Piton Peaks, St. Lucia 515 Caribbean Discovery V1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connor, Ed

    · · · · · #12;V1 Piton Peaks, St. Lucia 515 Caribbean Discovery V1 PRSRTSTD U.S.POSTAGE PERMIT cruise the turquoise waters of the Caribbean. Sail from Miami to the beautiful island of Tortola, home beaches, and explore colorful towns as you discover the Caribbean. Cruise to celebrated ports aboard

  3. Firing Excess Refinery Butane in Peaking Gas Turbines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavone, A.; Schreiber, H.; Zwillenberg, M.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    normal butane production, which will reduce refinery normal butane value and price. Explored is an opportunity for a new use for excess refinery normal butane- as a fuel for utility peaking gas turbines which currently fire kerosene and #2 oil. Our paper...

  4. Disturbance and Landscape Dynamics The Rocky Mountains, Lander's Peak, 1863

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    environment. (Pickett and White 1985) Defining and Quantifying Disturbance #12;Frequency - number a specified time. Defining and Quantifying Disturbance #12;Frequency: none Frequency: 250-500 yrs SeverityBioe 515 Disturbance and Landscape Dynamics #12;The Rocky Mountains, Lander's Peak, 1863 Albert

  5. acoustic absorption peak: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    acoustic absorption peak First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 On the variations of acoustic...

  6. Desert Hills, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision hasda62829c05bGabbs Valley AreaEnergyDerby

  7. Peak Dose Assessment for Proposed DOE-PPPO Authorized Limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maldonado, Delis [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prime contractor, was contracted by the DOE Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (DOE-PPPO) to conduct a peak dose assessment in support of the Authorized Limits Request for Solid Waste Disposal at Landfill C-746-U at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (DOE-PPPO 2011a). The peak doses were calculated based on the DOE-PPPO Proposed Single Radionuclides Soil Guidelines and the DOE-PPPO Proposed Authorized Limits (AL) Volumetric Concentrations available in DOE-PPPO 2011a. This work is provided as an appendix to the Dose Modeling Evaluations and Technical Support Document for the Authorized Limits Request for the C-746-U Landfill at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky (ORISE 2012). The receptors evaluated in ORISE 2012 were selected by the DOE-PPPO for the additional peak dose evaluations. These receptors included a Landfill Worker, Trespasser, Resident Farmer (onsite), Resident Gardener, Recreational User, Outdoor Worker and an Offsite Resident Farmer. The RESRAD (Version 6.5) and RESRAD-OFFSITE (Version 2.5) computer codes were used for the peak dose assessments. Deterministic peak dose assessments were performed for all the receptors and a probabilistic dose assessment was performed only for the Offsite Resident Farmer at the request of the DOE-PPPO. In a deterministic analysis, a single input value results in a single output value. In other words, a deterministic analysis uses single parameter values for every variable in the code. By contrast, a probabilistic approach assigns parameter ranges to certain variables, and the code randomly selects the values for each variable from the parameter range each time it calculates the dose (NRC 2006). The receptor scenarios, computer codes and parameter input files were previously used in ORISE 2012. A few modifications were made to the parameter input files as appropriate for this effort. Some of these changes included increasing the time horizon beyond 1,050 years (yr), and using the radionuclide concentrations provided by the DOE-PPPO as inputs into the codes. The deterministic peak doses were evaluated within time horizons of 70 yr (for the Landfill Worker and Trespasser), 1,050 yr, 10,000 yr and 100,000 yr (for the Resident Farmer [onsite], Resident Gardener, Recreational User, Outdoor Worker and Offsite Resident Farmer) at the request of the DOE-PPPO. The time horizons of 10,000 yr and 100,000 yr were used at the request of the DOE-PPPO for informational purposes only. The probabilistic peak of the mean dose assessment was performed for the Offsite Resident Farmer using Technetium-99 (Tc-99) and a time horizon of 1,050 yr. The results of the deterministic analyses indicate that among all receptors and time horizons evaluated, the highest projected dose, 2,700 mrem/yr, occurred for the Resident Farmer (onsite) at 12,773 yr. The exposure pathways contributing to the peak dose are ingestion of plants, external gamma, and ingestion of milk, meat and soil. However, this receptor is considered an implausible receptor. The only receptors considered plausible are the Landfill Worker, Recreational User, Outdoor Worker and the Offsite Resident Farmer. The maximum projected dose among the plausible receptors is 220 mrem/yr for the Outdoor Worker and it occurs at 19,045 yr. The exposure pathways contributing to the dose for this receptor are external gamma and soil ingestion. The results of the probabilistic peak of the mean dose analysis for the Offsite Resident Farmer indicate that the average (arithmetic mean) of the peak of the mean doses for this receptor is 0.98 mrem/yr and it occurs at 1,050 yr. This dose corresponds to Tc-99 within the time horizon of 1,050 yr.

  8. Saving Power at Peak Hours (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Piette, Mary Ann

    2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    California needs new, responsive, demand-side energy technologies to ensure that periods of tight electricity supply on the grid don't turn into power outages. Led by Berkeley Lab's Mary Ann Piette, the California Energy Commission (through its Public Interest Energy Research Program) has established a Demand Response Research Center that addresses two motivations for adopting demand responsiveness: reducing average electricity prices and preventing future electricity crises. The research seeks to understand factors that influence "what works" in Demand Response. Piette's team is investigating the two types of demand response, load response and price response, that may influence and reduce the use of peak electric power through automated controls, peak pricing, advanced communications, and other strategies.

  9. Note on the set of Bragg peaks with high intensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Lenz; Nicolae Strungaru

    2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider diffraction of Delone sets in Euclidean space. We show that the set of Bragg peaks with high intensity is always Meyer (if it is relatively dense). We use this to provide a new characterization for Meyer sets in terms of positive and positive definite measures. Our results are based on a careful study of positive definite measures, which may be of interest in its own right.

  10. Deconvolution of mixed gamma emitters using peak parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gadd, Milan S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garcia, Francisco [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Magadalena, Vigil M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    When evaluating samples containing mixtures of nuclides using gamma spectroscopy the situation sometimes arises where the nuclides present have photon emissions that cannot be resolved by the detector. An example of this is mixtures of {sup 241}Am and plutonium that have L x-ray emissions with slightly different energies which cannot be resolved using a high-purity germanium detector. It is possible to deconvolute the americium L x-rays from those plutonium based on the {sup 241}Am 59.54 keV photon. However, this requires accurate knowledge of the relative emission yields. Also, it often results in high uncertainties in the plutonium activity estimate due to the americium yields being approximately an order of magnitude greater than those for plutonium. In this work, an alternative method of determining the relative fraction of plutonium in mixtures of {sup 241}Am and {sup 239}Pu based on L x-ray peak location and shape parameters is investigated. The sensitivity and accuracy of the peak parameter method is compared to that for conventional peak decovolution.

  11. Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: Program Descriptionand Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Xu, Peng

    2006-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    California utilities have been exploring the use of critical peak prices (CPP) to help reduce needle peaks in customer end-use loads. CPP is a form of price-responsive demand response (DR). Recent experience has shown that customers have limited knowledge of how to operate their facilities in order to reduce their electricity costs under CPP (Quantum 2004). While the lack of knowledge about how to develop and implement DR control strategies is a barrier to participation in DR programs like CPP, another barrier is the lack of automation of DR systems. During 2003 and 2004, the PIER Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) conducted a series of tests of fully automated electric demand response (Auto-DR) at 18 facilities. Overall, the average of the site-specific average coincident demand reductions was 8% from a variety of building types and facilities. Many electricity customers have suggested that automation will help them institutionalize their electric demand savings and improve their overall response and DR repeatability. This report focuses on and discusses the specific results of the Automated Critical Peak Pricing (Auto-CPP, a specific type of Auto-DR) tests that took place during 2005, which build on the automated demand response (Auto-DR) research conducted through PIER and the DRRC in 2003 and 2004. The long-term goal of this project is to understand the technical opportunities of automating demand response and to remove technical and market impediments to large-scale implementation of automated demand response (Auto-DR) in buildings and industry. A second goal of this research is to understand and identify best practices for DR strategies and opportunities. The specific objectives of the Automated Critical Peak Pricing test were as follows: (1) Demonstrate how an automated notification system for critical peak pricing can be used in large commercial facilities for demand response (DR). (2) Evaluate effectiveness of such a system. (3) Determine how customers will respond to this form of automation for CPP. (4) Evaluate what type of DR shifting and shedding strategies can be automated. (5) Explore how automation of control strategies can increase participation rates and DR saving levels with CPP. (6) Identify optimal demand response control strategies. (7) Determine occupant and tenant response.

  12. The El Mayah molasse basin in the Eastern Desert of Egypt A. Shalaby a,b,*, K. Stuwe a,*, H. Fritz a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, Harald

    The El Mayah molasse basin in the Eastern Desert of Egypt A. Shalaby a,b,*, K. Stu¨we a,*, H. Fritz, Austria b Department of Geology, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt Received 8 September 2004; received of kilometres of the East- ern Desert of Egypt. Its sedimentary record shows that deposition occurred in two

  13. DESERT RESEARCH INSTITUTE 11 UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA SYSTEM DOE/W/10162--20

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby/%2AO 474.2 Chg U.S. S p e c t®% DESERT

  14. Methods and apparatus for reducing peak wind turbine loads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moroz, Emilian Mieczyslaw

    2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for reducing peak loads of wind turbines in a changing wind environment includes measuring or estimating an instantaneous wind speed and direction at the wind turbine and determining a yaw error of the wind turbine relative to the measured instantaneous wind direction. The method further includes comparing the yaw error to a yaw error trigger that has different values at different wind speeds and shutting down the wind turbine when the yaw error exceeds the yaw error trigger corresponding to the measured or estimated instantaneous wind speed.

  15. Wanxiang Silicon Peak Electronics Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwide Permit webpageWalthall County,Wanxiang America CorporationPeak

  16. Silver Peak, Nevada: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, New York:SiG Solar GmbH JumpSilicium de(Redirected fromPeak,

  17. Jiminy Peak Ski Resort Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii | Wind FarmJeffersonJiminy Peak Ski Resort Wind

  18. Silver Peak, Nevada: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey JumpAirPowerSilcio SA JumpProject Jump to:Peak,

  19. Research Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press Releases 2014References by WebsitehomeResearch Areas

  20. Ashland Area Support Substation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides wholesale electric service to the City of Ashland (the City) by transferring power over Pacific Power Light Company's (PP L) 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission lines and through PP L's Ashland and Oak Knoll Substations. The City distributes power over a 12.5-kV system which is heavily loaded during winter peak periods and which has reached the limit of its ability to serve peak loads in a reliable manner. Peak loads under normal winter conditions have exceeded the ratings of the transformers at both the Ashland and Oak Knoll Substations. In 1989, the City modified its distribution system at the request of PP L to allow transfer of three megawatts (MW's) of electric power from the overloaded Ashland Substation to the Oak Knoll Substation. In cooperation with PP L, BPA installed a temporary 6-8 megavolt-amp (MVA) 115-12.5-kV transformer for this purpose. This additional transformer, however, is only a temporary remedy. BPA needs to provide additional, reliable long-term service to the Ashland area through additional transformation in order to keep similar power failures from occurring during upcoming winters in the Ashland area. The temporary installation of another 20-MVA mobile transformer at the Ashland Substation and additional load curtailment are currently being studied to provide for sustained electrical service by the peak winter period 1992. Two overall electrical plans-of-service are described and evaluated in this report. One of them is proposed for action. Within that proposed plan-of-service are location options for the substation. Note that descriptions of actions that may be taken by the City of Ashland are based on information provided by them.

  1. Mesozoic rift basins in western desert of Egypt, their southern extension and impact on future exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taha, M.A. (Conoco, Cairo (Egypt))

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rift basins are a primary target of exploration in east, central, and west Africa. These intracratonic rift basins range in age from the Triassic to the Neogene and are filled with lagoonal-lacustrine sand-shale sequences. Several rift basins may be present in the Western Desert of Egypt. In the northeastern African platform, the Mesozoic Tethyan strand lines were previously interpreted to have limited southern extension onto the continent. This concept, based upon a relatively limited amount of subsurface data, has directed and focused the exploration for oil and gas to the northernmost 120 km of the Western Desert of Egypt. Recent well and geophysical data indicate a southerly extension of mesozoic rift basins several hundred kilometers inland from the Mediterranean Sea. Shushan/Faghur and Abu Gharadig/Bahrein basins may represent subparallel Mesozoic basins, trending northeast-southwest. Marine Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian sediments were recently reported from wells drilled approximately 500 km south of the present-day Mediterranean shoreline. The link of these basins with the Sirte basin to the southwest in Libya is not well understood. Exploration is needed to evaluate the hydrocarbon potential of such basins.

  2. Diet of desert tortoises at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and implications for habitat reclamation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakestraw, D.L.; Holt, E.A.; Rautenstrauch, K.R.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The diet of desert tortoises at Yucca Mountain was assessed during 1992 to 1995 using a combination of feeding observations and scat analysis. Feeding observation data (1993 through 1995) showed that tortoises fed on a wide variety of items. The most frequently eaten items were forbs and annual grasses. These two forage groups comprised more than 90% of all bites taken. Analysis of scat (1992 and 1993) also showed that grasses and forbs were the most common groups, making up more than 80% of the composition of scat. Yearly differences between proportions of species in the diet were observed and were most likely attributable to differences in plant productivity, which is linked to rainfall patterns. Non-native species were an important component of the diet in all years, accounting for 13 to 50% of all bites observed and 6 to 24% of scat contents. A list of all items encountered in the diet is provided. To facilitate reclamation of desert tortoise habitat disturbed by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, native forage species that should be included in reclamation seed mixes, when feasible, were identified. Although shrubs make up only a small proportion of the diet, they should also be included in reclamation efforts because they provide habitat structure. Tortoise cover sites, and microhabitats amenable to seed germination and seedling establishment. In addition, non-native species should not be planted on reclaimed sites and, if necessary, sites should be recontoured and soil compaction reduced prior to planting.

  3. Magnetar Driven Shock Breakout and Double Peaked Supernova Light Curves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasen, Daniel; Bildsten, Lars

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The light curves of some luminous supernovae are suspected to be powered by the spindown energy of a rapidly rotating magnetar. Here we describe a possible signature of the central engine: a burst of shock breakout emission occurring several days after the supernova explosion. The energy input from the magnetar inflates a high-pressure bubble that drives a shock through the pre-exploded supernova ejecta. If the magnetar is powerful enough, that shock will near the ejecta surface and become radiative. At the time of shock breakout, the ejecta will have expanded to a large radius (~10^{14} cm) so that the radiation released is at optical/ultraviolet wavelengths (T ~ 20,000 K) and lasts for several days. The luminosity and timescale of this magnetar driven shock breakout are similar to the first peak observed recently in the double-peaked light curve of SN-LSQ14BDQ. However, for a large region of model parameter space, the breakout emission is predicted to be dimmer than the diffusive luminosity from direct magn...

  4. Slip and Dilation Tendency Anlysis of Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Based on inversion of fault kinematic data, Edwards (2013) interpreted that two discrete stress orientations are preserved at Neal Hot Springs. An older episode of east-west directed extension and a younger episode of southwest-northeast directed sinistral, oblique -normal extension. This interpretation is consistent with the evolution of Cenozoic tectonics in the region (Edwards, 2013). As such we applied a southwest-northeast (060) directed normal faulting stress regime, consistent with the younger extensional episode, to the Neal Hot Springs faults. Under these stress conditions northeast striking steeply dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to dilate and northeast striking 60° dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to slip. Under these stress condition...

  5. Environmental effects on distributions of culturable soil oligotrophic bacteria along an elevational gradient in the Chihuahuan Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strauss, Richard E.

    an elevational gradient in the Chihuahuan Desert James H. Campbell*, John C. Zak, Randall M. Jeter, Richard E from five sites along an elevational and vegetational gradient within Big Bend National Park during the first stressors to be investigated. Microbes capable of metabolism at low concentra- tions of carbon

  6. Sesquiterpene Quinones and Related Metabolites from Phyllosticta spinarum, a Fungal Strain Endophytic in Platycladus orientalis of the Sonoran Desert1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, A. Elizabeth

    Endophytic in Platycladus orientalis of the Sonoran Desert1 E. M. Kithsiri Wijeratne, Priyani A. Paranagama, a fungal strain endophytic in Platycladus orientalis. The structures of the new compounds were determined of Phyllosticta spinarum (Botry- osphaeriaceae), a fungal strain endophytic in the leaf tissue of oriental arbor

  7. Peak Oil Netherlands Foundation (PONL) was founded in May 2005 by a group of citizens who are concerned about the effects of a premature peak in oil and other fossil fuels production. The main aims of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeling, Stephen L.

    are concerned about the effects of a premature peak in oil and other fossil fuels production. The main aims ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 5 - 1) INTRODUCTION ­ PEAKING OF WORLD OIL PRODUCTION-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- - 25 - 7) PEAK OIL NETHERLANDS OIL PRODUCTION & PEAKING OUTLOOK ---------------------------------- - 26

  8. High peak power test of S-band waveguide switches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nassiri, A.; Grelick, A.; Kustom, R.L.; White, M.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The injector and source of particles for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a 2856-MHz S-band electron-positron linear accelerator (linac) which produces electrons with energies up to 650 MeV or positrons with energies up to 450 MeV. To improve the linac rf system availability, an additional modulator-klystron subsystem is being constructed to provide a switchable hot spare unit for each of the five existing S-band transmitters. The switching of the transmitters will require the use of SF6-pressurized waveguide switches at a peak operating power of 35 MW. A test stand was set up at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) Klystron-Microwave laboratory to conduct tests characterizing the power handling capability of these waveguide switches. Test results are presented.

  9. Implications of "peak oil" for atmospheric CO2 and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kharecha, P A

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Peaking of global oil production may have a large effect on future atmospheric CO2 amount and climate change, depending upon choices made for subsequent energy sources. We suggest that, if estimates of oil and gas reserves by the Energy Information Administration are realistic, it is feasible to keep atmospheric CO2 from exceeding approximately 450 ppm, provided that future exploitation of the huge reservoirs of coal and unconventional fossil fuels incorporates carbon capture and sequestration. Existing coal-fired power plants, without sequestration, must be phased out before mid-century to achieve this limit on atmospheric CO2. We also suggest that it is important to "stretch" oil reserves via energy efficiency, thus avoiding the need to extract liquid fuels from coal or unconventional fossil fuels. We argue that a rising price on carbon emissions is probably needed to keep CO2 beneath the 450 ppm ceiling.

  10. Off-peak air conditioning; A major energy saver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacCracken, C.D.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today, the mission given to manufacturers is changing to include saving energy (kWh). Until now, saving energy was ignored because the utilities were happy to fill their night valley to reach a higher load factor. There also was a general feeling that making ice was much less efficient than standard air conditioning, and that anyone saying otherwise was a dreamer. This article discusses the energy savings based on the more prevalent ice storage technology, the similar suction temperatures of the various types of ice storage, and how storage is applied. Included are baseload power generation, partial storage with chiller priority, using air cooled condensers when making ice at night, colder duct air, heat recovery, central rooftop systems, smart controls, electric/gas combinations, supply side transmission and distribution losses, and cooling of air entering gas turbine generators during peak conditions.

  11. Ice Thermal Storage Systems for LWR Supplemental Cooling and Peak Power Shifting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Phil Sharpe; Blaise Hamanaka; Wei Yan; WoonSeong Jeong

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Availability of enough cooling water has been one of the major issues for the nuclear power plant site selection. Cooling water issues have frequently disrupted the normal operation at some nuclear power plants during heat waves and long draught. The issues become more severe due to the new round of nuclear power expansion and global warming. During hot summer days, cooling water leaving a power plant may become too hot to threaten aquatic life so that environmental regulations may force the plant to reduce power output or even temporarily to be shutdown. For new nuclear power plants to be built at areas without enough cooling water, dry cooling can be used to remove waste heat directly into the atmosphere. However, dry cooling will result in much lower thermal efficiency when the weather is hot. One potential solution for the above mentioned issues is to use ice thermal storage systems (ITS) that reduce cooling water requirements and boost the plant’s thermal efficiency in hot hours. ITS uses cheap off-peak electricity to make ice and uses those ice for supplemental cooling during peak demand time. ITS is suitable for supplemental cooling storage due to its very high energy storage density. ITS also provides a way to shift large amount of electricity from off peak time to peak time. Some gas turbine plants already use ITS to increase thermal efficiency during peak hours in summer. ITSs have also been widely used for building cooling to save energy cost. Among three cooling methods for LWR applications: once-through, wet cooling tower, and dry cooling tower, once-through cooling plants near a large water body like an ocean or a large lake and wet cooling plants can maintain the designed turbine backpressure (or condensation temperature) during 99% of the time; therefore, adding ITS to those plants will not generate large benefits. For once-through cooling plants near a limited water body like a river or a small lake, adding ITS can bring significant economic benefits and avoid forced derating and shutdown during extremely hot weather. For the new plants using dry cooling towers, adding the ice thermal storage systems can effectively reduce the efficiency loss and water consumption during hot weather so that new LWRs could be considered in regions without enough cooling water. \\ This paper presents the feasibility study of using ice thermal storage systems for LWR supplemental cooling and peak power shifting. LWR cooling issues and ITS application status will be reviewed. Two ITS application case studies will be presented and compared with alternative options: one for once-through cooling without enough cooling for short time, and the other with dry cooling. Because capital cost, especially the ice storage structure/building cost, is the major cost for ITS, two different cost estimation models are developed: one based on scaling method, and the other based on a preliminary design using Building Information Modeling (BIM), an emerging technology in Architecture/Engineering/Construction, which enables design options, performance analysis and cost estimating in the early design stage.

  12. Computational study of atmospheric transfer radiation on an equatorial tropical desert (La Tatacoa, Colombia)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delgado-Correal, Camilo; Castaño, Gabriel

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiative transfer models explain and predict interaction between solar radiation and the different elements present in the atmosphere, which are responsible for energy attenuation. In Colombia there have been neither measurements nor studies of atmospheric components such as gases and aerosols that can cause turbidity and pollution. Therefore satellite images cannot be corrected radiometrically in a proper way. When a suitable atmospheric correction is carried out, loss of information is avoided, which may be useful for discriminating image land cover. In this work a computational model was used to find radiative atmospheric attenuation (300 1000nm wavelength region) on an equatorial tropical desert (La Tatacoa, Colombia) in order to conduct an adequate atmospheric correction.

  13. Coupled Environmental Processes and Long-term Performance of Landfill Covers in the northern Mojave Desert

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Shafer; Michael Young; Stephen Zitzer; Eric McDonald; Todd Caldwell

    2004-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Evapotransiration (ET) covers have gained widespread acceptance as a closure feature for waste disposal sites, particularly in the arid and semi-arid regions of the southwestern U.S. But as landforms, ET covers are subject to change over time because of processes such as pedogenesis, hydrologic processes, vegetation establishment and change, and biological processes. To better understand the effects of coupled process changes to ET covers, a series of four primary analog sites in Yucca Flat on the Nevada Test Site, along with measurements and observations from other locations in the Mojave Desert, were selected to evaluate changes in ET covers over time. The analog sites, of varying ages, were selected to address changes in the early post-institutional control period, the 1,000-year compliance period for disposal of low-level and mixed low-level waste, and the 10,000-year compliance period for transuranic waste sites.

  14. EA-1863: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak Transmission Lines Spanning the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Western Area Power Administration is preparing this EA to evaluate the environmental impacts of updating the vegetation management and right-of-way maintenance program for Western’s Glen Canyon to Pinnacle Peak 345-kV transmission lines, which cross the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona.

  15. CX-007166: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pinnacle Peak-Prescott Danger Tree RemovalCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 03/18/2010Location(s): Maricopa County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  16. CX-007165: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Prescott-Pinnacle Peak Bird Diversion Equipment AdditionCX(s) Applied: B1.20Date: 12/15/2010Location(s): Yavapai County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  17. CX-007162: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pinnacle Peak Substation Electrical Equipment RemovalCX(s) Applied: B1.17Date: 05/09/2011Location(s): Maricopa County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  18. CX-007804: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Flagstaff-Pinnacle Peak #2 Conductor Maintenance CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 11/07/2011 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  19. Outliers to the Isotropic Energy - Peak Energy Relation in GRBs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehud Nakar; Tsvi Piran

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The peak energy - isotropic energy (EpEi) relation is among the most intriguing recent discoveries concerning GRBs. It can have numerous implications on our understanding of the emission mechanism of the bursts and on the application of GRBs for cosmological studies. However, this relation was verified only for a small sample of bursts with measured redshifts. We propose here a test whether a burst with an unknown redshift can potentially satisfy the EpEi relation. Applying this test to a large sample of BATSE bursts we find that a significant fraction of those bursts cannot satisfy this relation. Our test is sensitive only to dim and hard bursts and therefore this relation might still hold as an inequality (i.e. there are no intrinsically bright and soft bursts). We conclude that the observed relation seen in the sample of bursts with a known redshift might be influenced by observational biases and from the inability to locate and well localize hard and weak bursts that have only a small number of photons. In particular we point out that the threshold for detection, localization and redshift measurement is essentially higher than the threshold for detection alone. We predict that Swift will detect some hard and weak bursts that would be outliers to the EpEi relation. However, we cannot quantify this prediction. We stress the importance of understanding the detection-localization-redshift threshold for the coming Swift detections.

  20. Satisfying winter peak-power demand with phased gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, E.H.; Moss, T.E.; Ravikumar, R.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study, commissioned by the Bonneville Power Administration, was to investigate application of this concept to the Pacific Northwest. Coal gasification combined-cycle (GCC) plants are receiving serious attention from eastern utilities. Potomac Electric (PEPCO) has engaged Fluor Technology to perform conceptual and preliminary engineering for a nominal 375-MW coal GCC power generation facility to be located in northern Montgomery County, Maryland. Other eastern utilities are engaged in site-specific investigations of satisfying future power requirements employing this alternative, which involves an environmentally superior method of using coal. Coal is combined with oxygen to produce a medium-heating-value fuel gas as an alternative to natural gas. The fuel gas, cleaned to remove sulfur compounds, is burned in gas turbine-generator sets. The hot exhaust gas is used to generate steam for additional power generation. The gasification combined cycle plant is highly efficient and has a high level of flexibility to meet power demands. This study provided background for consideration of one alternative for satisfying winter peak-load demand. The concept is feasible, depending on the timing of the installation of the gasification system, projections of the cost and the availability of natural gas, and restrictions on the use of natural gas. It has the advantage of deferring capacity addition and capital outlay until power is needed and economics are favorable.

  1. Design and evaluation of seasonal storage hydrogen peak electricity supply system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oloyede, Isaiah Olanrewaju

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The seasonal storage hydrogen peak electricity supply system (SSHPESS) is a gigawatt-year hydrogen storage system which stores excess electricity produced as hydrogen during off-peak periods and consumes the stored hydrogen ...

  2. THE ROLE OF BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES IN REDUCING AND CONTROLLING PEAK ELECTRICITY DEMAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-49947 THE ROLE OF BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES IN REDUCING AND CONTROLLING PEAK ELECTRICITY DEMAND? ..................................... 8 What are the seasonal aspects of electric peak demand?............................ 9 What because of the California electricity crisis (Borenstein 2001). Uncertainties surrounding the reliability

  3. Production of Hydrogen at the Forecourt Using Off-Peak Electricity: June 2005 (Milestone Report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levene, J. I.

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This milestone report provides information about the production of hydrogen at the forecourt using off-peak electricity as well as the Hydrogen Off-Peak Electricity (HOPE) model.

  4. Microsoft Word - BUGS_The Next Smart Grid Peak Resource Final...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to engage half of the BUGS for peak reduction during 200 hours a year results in emission reduction compared to natural gas peaking units. Specifically, More than 935,000...

  5. Thermochronometric Investigation of Multiple Unconformities and Post-depositional Thermal History of a Fault Block in the Northern Western Desert, Egypt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glauser, Travis Robert

    2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Detrital apatite and zircon (U-TH)/He analysis across a recently discovered unconformity in the Western Desert of Egypt provides new insight into the tectonic evolution of northeastern Africa. The unconformity juxtaposes ...

  6. Controlling Peak Power During Scan Testing Ranganathan Sankaralingam and Nur A. Touba

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Touba, Nur A.

    Controlling Peak Power During Scan Testing Ranganathan Sankaralingam and Nur A. Touba Computer effective in controlling peak power. 1. Introduction The peak power drawn in a single clock cycle during. The average power dissipation during scan testing can be controlled by reducing the scan clock frequency

  7. Preparing for the Peak: Energy Security and Atlantic Canada 1 Larry Hughes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Larry

    region that will be particularly vulnerable to peak oil, since almost all of the region's oil is imported is destined for markets outside the region. This paper examines some of the potential impacts of peak oil the reliance on refined petroleum products for space heating and transportation. When peak oil production

  8. Result Demonstration Report Pigweed Control in Grain Sorghum Using Peak. 1996 to 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    74 78 Peak + Methylated Oil 0.75 oz + 1 pt 78 88 93 1) WAT = Weeks after treatment application. #12Result Demonstration Report Pigweed Control in Grain Sorghum Using Peak. 1996 to 1999 Brent Bean Summary Studies were conducted from 1996 to 1999 to evaluate pigweed control in grain sorghum using Peak

  9. Formation Of The Rare Earth Peak: Gaining Insight Into Late-Time r-Process Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew Mumpower; Gail McLaughlin; Rebecca Surman

    2011-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the formation and final structure of the rare earth peak ($A\\sim160$) of the $r$-process nucleosynthesis. The rare earth peak forms at late times in the $r$-process after neutron exhaustion (neutron-to-seed ratio unity or R=1) as matter decays back to stability. Since rare earth peak formation does not occur during \

  10. Nuclear Hydrogen for Peak Electricity Production and Spinning Reserve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear energy can be used to produce hydrogen. The key strategic question is this: ''What are the early markets for nuclear hydrogen?'' The answer determines (1) whether there are incentives to implement nuclear hydrogen technology today or whether the development of such a technology could be delayed by decades until a hydrogen economy has evolved, (2) the industrial partners required to develop such a technology, and (3) the technological requirements for the hydrogen production system (rate of production, steady-state or variable production, hydrogen purity, etc.). Understanding ''early'' markets for any new product is difficult because the customer may not even recognize that the product could exist. This study is an initial examination of how nuclear hydrogen could be used in two interconnected early markets: the production of electricity for peak and intermediate electrical loads and spinning reserve for the electrical grid. The study is intended to provide an initial description that can then be used to consult with potential customers (utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute, etc.) to better determine the potential real-world viability of this early market for nuclear hydrogen and provide the starting point for a more definitive assessment of the concept. If this set of applications is economically viable, it offers several unique advantages: (1) the market is approximately equivalent in size to the existing nuclear electric enterprise in the United States, (2) the entire market is within the utility industry and does not require development of an external market for hydrogen or a significant hydrogen infrastructure beyond the utility site, (3) the technology and scale match those of nuclear hydrogen production, (4) the market exists today, and (5) the market is sufficient in size to justify development of nuclear hydrogen production techniques independent of the development of any other market for hydrogen. These characteristics make it an ideal early market for nuclear hydrogen.

  11. ,"Table 2. Noncoincident Peak Load, by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area,"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePrice Sold to Electric Powere.. Net Energy

  12. Back-Up/ Peak Shaving Fuel Cell System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staudt, Rhonda L.

    2008-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This Final Report covers the work executed by Plug Power from 8/11/03 – 10/31/07 statement of work for Topic 2: advancing the state of the art of fuel cell technology with the development of a new generation of commercially viable, stationary, Back-up/Peak-Shaving fuel cell systems, the GenCore II. The Program cost was $7.2 M with the Department of Energy share being $3.6M and Plug Power’s share being $3.6 M. The Program started in August of 2003 and was scheduled to end in January of 2006. The actual program end date was October of 2007. A no cost extension was grated. The Department of Energy barriers addressed as part of this program are: Technical Barriers for Distributed Generation Systems: o Durability o Power Electronics o Start up time Technical Barriers for Fuel Cell Components: o Stack Material and Manufacturing Cost o Durability o Thermal and water management Background The next generation GenCore backup fuel cell system to be designed, developed and tested by Plug Power under the program is the first, mass-manufacturable design implementation of Plug Power’s GenCore architected platform targeted for battery and small generator replacement applications in the telecommunications, broadband and UPS markets. The next generation GenCore will be a standalone, H2 in-DC-out system. In designing the next generation GenCore specifically for the telecommunications market, Plug Power is teaming with BellSouth Telecommunications, Inc., a leading industry end user. The final next generation GenCore system is expected to represent a market-entry, mass-manufacturable and economically viable design. The technology will incorporate: • A cost-reduced, polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell stack tailored to hydrogen fuel use • An advanced electrical energy storage system • A modular, scalable power conditioning system tailored to market requirements • A scaled-down, cost-reduced balance of plant (BOP) • Network Equipment Building Standards (NEBS), UL and CE certifications.

  13. Site Monitoring Area Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the Site Monitoring Area (SMA) The Site Monitoring Area sampler Control measures (best management practices) installed at the Site Monitoring Area Structures such as...

  14. Wildlife Management Areas (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain areas of the State are designated as wildlife protection areas and refuges; new construction and development is restricted in these areas.

  15. Large-magnitude miocene extension in the central Mojave Desert: Implications for Paleozoic to Tertiary paleogeography and tectonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, J. Douglas; Bartley, John M.; Glazner, Allen F.

    1990-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    ., and D. J. DePaolo, Proterozoic crustal history of the western United States as determined by neodymium isotopic mapping, Geol. Soc. Am. Bull., 99, 674-685, 1987. Bowen, O. E., Geology and mineral deposits of the Barstow Quadrangle, San Bernardino... County, California, Bull. 165, 208 pp., Div. of Mines, Calif. Dep. of Nat. Resour., Sacramento, 1954. Burchfiel, B.C., and G. A. Davis, Mojave Desert and environs, in The Geotectonic Development of California, edited by W. G. Ernst, pp. 217...

  16. Desert dust and anthropogenic aerosol interactions in the Community Climate System Model coupled-carbon-climate model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahowald, Natalie [Cornell University; Rothenberg, D. [Cornell University; Lindsay, Keith [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Doney, Scott C. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; Moore, Jefferson Keith [University of California, Irvine; Randerson, James T. [University of California, Irvine; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Jones, C. D. [Hadley Center, Devon, England

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coupled-carbon-climate simulations are an essential tool for predicting the impact of human activity onto the climate and biogeochemistry. Here we incorporate prognostic desert dust and anthropogenic aerosols into the CCSM3.1 coupled carbon-climate model and explore the resulting interactions with climate and biogeochemical dynamics through a series of transient anthropogenic simulations (20th and 21st centuries) and sensitivity studies. The inclusion of prognostic aerosols into this model has a small net global cooling effect on climate but does not significantly impact the globally averaged carbon cycle; we argue that this is likely to be because the CCSM3.1 model has a small climate feedback onto the carbon cycle. We propose a mechanism for including desert dust and anthropogenic aerosols into a simple carbon-climate feedback analysis to explain the results of our and previous studies. Inclusion of aerosols has statistically significant impacts on regional climate and biogeochemistry, in particular through the effects on the ocean nitrogen cycle and primary productivity of altered iron inputs from desert dust deposition.

  17. Wildlife Management Areas (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain sites in Florida are designated as wildlife management areas, and construction and development is heavily restricted in these areas.

  18. Slip and Dilation Tendency Analysis of the Tuscarora Geothermal Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Critically stressed fault segments have a relatively high likelihood of acting as fluid flow conduits (Sibson, 1994). As such, the tendency of a fault segment to slip (slip tendency; Ts; Morris et al., 1996) or to dilate (dilation tendency; Td; Ferrill et al., 1999) provides an indication of which faults or fault segments within a geothermal system are critically stressed and therefore likely to transmit geothermal fluids. The slip tendency of a surface is defined by the ratio of shear stress to normal stress on that surface: Ts = ? / ?n (Morris et al., 1996). Dilation tendency is defined by the stress acting normal to a given surface: Td = (?1-?n) / (?1-?3) (Ferrill et al., 1999). Slip and dilation were calculated using 3DStress (Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by ambient stress conditions. Values range from a maximum of 1, a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions to zero, a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate. Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the focus study areas at, McGinness Hills, Neal Hot Springs, Patua, Salt Wells, San Emidio, and Tuscarora on fault traces. As dip is not well constrained or unknown for many faults mapped in within these we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip tendency or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum tendency of each fault to slip or dilate. The resulting along-fault and fault-to-fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault-to-fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Slip and dilation tendency for the Tuscarora geothermal field was calculated based on the faults mapped Tuscarora area (Dering, 2013). The Tuscarora area lies in the Basin and Range Province, as such we applied a normal faulting stress regime to the Tuscarora area faults, with a minimum horizontal stress direction oriented 115, based on inspection of local and regional stress determinations, as explained above. Under these stress conditions north-northeast striking, steeply dipping fault segments have the highest dilation tendency, while north-northeast striking 60° dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to slip. Tuscarora is defined by a left-step in a major north- to-north northeast striking, west-dipping range-bounding normal fault system. Faults within the broad step define an anticlinal accommodation zone...

  19. HYDROPHOBIC CHARACTERISTICS OF COMPOSITE INSULATORS IN SIMULATED INLAND ARID DESERT ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Yasin; Al-Arainy, Abdulrehman Ali; Malik, Nazar Hussain; Qureshi, Muhammad Iqbal [Department of Electrical Engineering, College of Engineering, King Saud University, Riyadh 11421 (Saudi Arabia)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Presently along with traditional insulators i.e. glass and porcelain, etc., the polymeric insulators are also used world widely. These polymeric insulators are very sensitive to various environmental parameters e.g. UV radiations, heat, etc. The UV radiation level in the central region of Saudi Arabia is high as compared to the recommended IEC-61109 standard for the accelerated aging of the composite insulators. In this study, thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) and Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer (EPDM) insulators were subjected to accelerated aging stress as per IEC standard as well as modified IEC standard simulating the inland arid desert's atmospheric conditions. The hydrophobic characteristics were studied by measuring the contact angle along the insulator surface before and after the accelerated aging of the samples. It was found that TPE loses its hydrophobic properties more as compared to EPDM insulator. This loss was proportional to the intensity of UV irradiation. The rate of recovery is also low for both the tested materials as compared to Silicone Rubber insulators.

  20. Evaluation of 27+ Years Old Photovoltaic Modules Operated in a Hot-Desert Climatic Condition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Y.; Raghutaman, B.; Kuitche, J.; TamizhMani, G.; Backus, C. E.; Osterwald, C.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Identification of failure mechanisms from the long-term field deployed modules is of great importance to the photovoltaic industry. This paper investigates the modules removed from a water pumping array operated over 27+ years in a hot-desert climatic condition, Arizona. Thirty-two modules were evaluated in this investigation. Each module is comprised of silicone rubber superstrate/encapsulant, mono-Si cells, fiberglass-like substrate, potted junction box and neoprene cable. Ten of these thirty-two modules were either non-functional or near non-functional with less than 30% of the original power. The other twenty-two functional modules showed an average power degradation of 1.08% per year over 27 years of operation. After the damp-heat (1000 hours of 85degC/85%RH), thermal cycling (two-hundred cycles of 90degC/-40degC) and hot-spot stress tests the modules lost about 11%, 9.8% and 3.5% of power, respectively.

  1. Slip and Dilation Tendency Anlysis of Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Slip and Dilation Tendency in focus areas Critically stressed fault segments have a relatively high likelihood of acting as fluid flow conduits (Sibson, 1994). As such, the tendency of a fault segment to slip (slip tendency; Ts; Morris et al., 1996) or to dilate (dilation tendency; Td; Ferrill et al., 1999) provides an indication of which faults or fault segments within a geothermal system are critically stressed and therefore likely to transmit geothermal fluids. The slip tendency of a surface is defined by the ratio of shear stress to normal stress on that surface: Ts = ? / ?n (Morris et al., 1996). Dilation tendency is defined by the stress acting normal to a given surface: Td = (?1-?n) / (?1-?3) (Ferrill et al., 1999). Slip and dilation were calculated using 3DStress (Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by ambient stress conditions. Values range from a maximum of 1, a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions to zero, a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate. Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the focus study areas at, McGinness Hills, Neal Hot Springs, Patua, Salt Wells, San Emidio, and Tuscarora on fault traces. As dip is not well constrained or unknown for many faults mapped in within these we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip tendency or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum tendency of each fault to slip or dilate. The resulting along-fault and fault-to-fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault-to-fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Based on inversion of fault kinematic data, Edwards (2013) interpreted that two discrete stress orientations are preserved at Neal Hot Springs. An older episode of east-west directed extension and a younger episode of southwest-northeast directed sinistral, oblique -normal extension. This interpretation is consistent with the evolution of Cenozoic tectonics in the region (Edwards, 2013). As such we applied a southwest-northeast (060) directed normal faulting stress regime, consistent with the younger extensional episode, to the Neal Hot Springs faults. Under these stress conditions northeast striking steeply dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to dilate and northeast striking 60° dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to slip. Under these stress condition...

  2. Integration of neutron time-of-flight single-crystal Bragg peaks in reciprocal space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, Arthur J [ORNL] [ORNL; Joergensen, Mads [ORNL] [ORNL; Wang, Xiaoping [ORNL] [ORNL; Mikkelson, Ruth L [ORNL] [ORNL; Mikkelson, Dennis J [ORNL] [ORNL; Lynch, Vickie E [ORNL] [ORNL; Peterson, Peter F [ORNL] [ORNL; Green, Mark L [ORNL] [ORNL; Hoffmann, Christina [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The intensity of single crystal Bragg peaks obtained by mapping neutron time-of-flight event data into reciprocal space and integrating in various ways are compared. These include spherical integration with a fixed radius, ellipsoid fitting and integrating of the peak intensity and one-dimensional peak profile fitting. In comparison to intensities obtained by integrating in real detector histogram space, the data integrated in reciprocal space results in better agreement factors and more accurate atomic parameters. Furthermore, structure refinement using integrated intensities from one-dimensional profile fitting is demonstrated to be more accurate than simple peak-minus-background integration.

  3. Observed Temperature Effects on Hourly Residential Electric Load Reduction in Response to an Experimental Critical Peak Pricing Tariff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herter, Karen B.; McAuliffe, Patrick K.; Rosenfeld, Arthur H.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Critical Peak Pricing Tariff Karen Herter ab* , Patrickunder critical peak pricing tariffs tested in the 2003-2004The 15-month experimental tariff gave customers a discounted

  4. Peak-to-average power ratio reduction in OFDM based on transformation of partial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peak-to-average power ratio reduction in OFDM based on transformation of partial transmit sequences number, but T-PTS is less complex. Introduction: To avoid the occurrence of large peak power of signals G. Lu, P. Wu and C. Carlemalm-Logothetis A novel scheme (transformation of partial transmit

  5. Energy Policy 34 (2006) 515531 Have we run out of oil yet? Oil peaking analysis from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    price shocks and economic downturns. Over the next 30 years oil demand is expected to grow by 60Energy Policy 34 (2006) 515­531 Have we run out of oil yet? Oil peaking analysis from an optimist of conventional oil production from an optimist's perspective. Is the oil peak imminent? What is the range

  6. An Approximate Method to Assess the Peaking Capability of the NW Hydroelectric System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DRAFT 1 An Approximate Method to Assess the Peaking Capability of the NW Hydroelectric System September 26, 2005 The best way to assess the hydroelectric system's peaking capability is to simulate its. This is an ominous task and requires the use of sophisticated simulation software. The Bonneville Power

  7. Peak discharge of a Pleistocene lava-dam outburst flood in Grand Canyon, Arizona, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Received 6 May 2005 Availble online 7 February 2006 Abstract The failure of a lava dam 165,000 yr ago dam-failure and unsteady flow modeling to estimate a peak discharge and flow hydrograph. FailurePeak discharge of a Pleistocene lava-dam outburst flood in Grand Canyon, Arizona, USA Cassandra R

  8. Peak production in an oil depletion model with triangular field profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stark, Dudley

    Peak production in an oil depletion model with triangular field profiles Dudley Stark School.S.A. would occur between 1965 and 1970. Oil production in the U.S.A. actually peaked in 1970 and has been declining since then. Hubbert used a logistic curve to approximate the rate of oil production. Deffeyes [2

  9. Imminence of peak in US coal production and overestimation of reserves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khare, Sanjay V.

    1 Imminence of peak in US coal production and overestimation of reserves Nathan G. F. Reaver, coal reserves, coal production forecast, peak coal, USA energy, non- linear fitting #12;3 1 fuels, coal, oil, and natural gas, it is coal that is the most carbon intensive (W. Moomaw, 2011). Due

  10. Journal of Chromatography A, 1086 (2005) 165170 Peak pattern variations related to comprehensive two-dimensional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reichenbach, Stephen E.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    non-linear pattern variations and changes in gas pressure generate nearly linear pattern variations Abstract Identifying compounds of interest for peaks in data generated by comprehensive two-dimensional gas and inlet gas pressure and evaluates two types of affine transformations for matching peak patterns

  11. Grain size, size-distribution and dislocation structure from diffraction peak profile analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gubicza, Jenõ

    Grain size, size-distribution and dislocation structure from diffraction peak profile analysis T, Budapest, Hungary Abstract Diffraction peak profile analysis (or Line Profile Analysis, LPA) has recently and the strain diffraction profiles. Strain anisotropy is rationalized in terms of the contrast factors

  12. Statistical Analysis and Dynamic Visualization of Travis Peak Production in the Eastern Texas Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayanbule, Babafemi O.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    , integrating data from various sources. This research will attempt to do just that for wells producing from the Travis Peak formation. Using data from HPDI L.L.C., (www.hpdi.com) a visual representation was created for the areal distribution of peak gas rates...

  13. A Queueing Study of PeakRate Enforcement for Jitter Reduction in ATM Networks \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stavrakakis, Ioannis

    A Queueing Study of Peak­Rate Enforcement for Jitter Reduction in ATM Networks \\Lambda Randall­ induced delay jitter. The adopted service policy regulates the traffic class of interest by enforcing a predetermined peak output rate. Probability distributions for delay and jitter of the regulated traffic class

  14. Jitter in ATM networks and its impact on peak rate enforcement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillemin, Fabrice

    Jitter in ATM networks and its impact on peak rate enforcement James ROBERTS FRANCE TELECOM CNET. This is the phenomenon of jitter and the aim of the present paper is to study its in uence on peak rate enforcement. We rst introduce some general characterizations of jitter and then, describe two models of jittered ows

  15. Evaluation of Travis Peak gas reservoirs, west margin of the East Texas Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yamin

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    for basinward extension of Travis Peak gas production along the west margin of the East Texas Basin. Along the west margin of the East Texas Basin, southeast-trending Travis Peak sandstones belts were deposited by the Ancestral Red River fluvial-deltaic system...

  16. Submitted to Renewable Energy, 5 December 2009 The technical potential for off-peak electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Larry

    October 2009 #12;The technical potential for off-peak electricity to serve as backup in wind. This paper examines the technical potential of off-peak electricity to ensure that wind-charged thermalSubmitted to Renewable Energy, 5 December 2009 ERG/200910 The technical potential for off

  17. Geochemistry of the Banded Iron Formations and their Host Rocks in the Eastern Desert of Egypt BACKUS, Ethan L.1, GAGNON, Kelli E.1, EL-SHAZLY, Aley K.1, and KHALIL, Khalil Isaac2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Shazly, Aley

    Geochemistry of the Banded Iron Formations and their Host Rocks in the Eastern Desert of Egypt University, Egypt Sponsored by NSF-OISE-1004021 Session 92:T3. Sigma Gamma Epsilon Undergraduate Research over 30,000 km2 in the central Eastern Desert of Egypt. The deposits most resemble Algoma-type iron

  18. Slip and Dilation Tendency Analysis of the Patua Geothermal Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Critically stressed fault segments have a relatively high likelihood of acting as fluid flow conduits (Sibson, 1994). As such, the tendency of a fault segment to slip (slip tendency; Ts; Morris et al., 1996) or to dilate (dilation tendency; Td; Ferrill et al., 1999) provides an indication of which faults or fault segments within a geothermal system are critically stressed and therefore likely to transmit geothermal fluids. The slip tendency of a surface is defined by the ratio of shear stress to normal stress on that surface: Ts = ? / ?n (Morris et al., 1996). Dilation tendency is defined by the stress acting normal to a given surface: Td = (?1-?n) / (?1-?3) (Ferrill et al., 1999). Slip and dilation were calculated using 3DStress (Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by ambient stress conditions. Values range from a maximum of 1, a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions to zero, a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate. Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the focus study areas at, McGinness Hills, Neal Hot Springs, Patua, Salt Wells, San Emidio, and Tuscarora on fault traces. As dip is not well constrained or unknown for many faults mapped in within these we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip tendency or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum tendency of each fault to slip or dilate. The resulting along-fault and fault-to-fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault-to-fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Slip and dilation tendency analysis for the Patua geothermal system was calculated based on faults mapped in the Hazen Quadrangle (Faulds et al., 2011). Patua lies near the margin between the Basin and Range province, which is characterized by west-northwest directed extension and the Walker Lane province, characterized by west-northwest directed dextral shear. As such, the Patua area likely has been affected by tectonic stress associated with either or both of stress regimes over geologic time. In order to characterize this stress variation we calculated slip tendency at Patua for both normal faulting and strike slip faulting stress regimes. Based on examination of regional and local stress data (as explained above) we applied at shmin direction of 105 to Patua. Whether the vertical stress (sv) magnitude is larger than ...

  19. Western Area Power Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    29-30, 2011 2 Agenda * Overview of Western Area Power Administration * Post-1989 Loveland Area Projects (LAP) Marketing Plan * Energy Planning and Management Program * Development...

  20. X-ray Fluorescence Measurements of Manganese in Petroglyphs and Graffiti in the Bluff, Utah Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ABSTRACT Desert varnish accumulates with time through a microbial process that binds clay minerals to be extracted from the desert varnish which, though usually small, damages the artifact. Despite

  1. Hydrologically Sensitive Areas: Variable Source Area Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Hydrologically Sensitive Areas: Variable Source Area Hydrology Implications for Water Quality Risk hydrology was developed and applied to the New York City (NYC) water supply watersheds. According and are therefore hydrologically sensitive with respect to their potential to transport contaminants to perennial

  2. AREA COORDINATOR RESIDENTIAL EDUCATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bordenstein, Seth

    AREA COORDINATOR RESIDENTIAL EDUCATION VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE The Office of Housing and Residential Education at Vanderbilt University is seeking applicants for an Area Coordinator. The Area Coordinator is responsible for assisting in the management and operation of a residential area

  3. Ashland Area Support Substation Project : Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides wholesale electric service to the City of Ashland (the City) by transferring power over Pacific Power & Light Company`s (PP&L) 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission lines and through PP&L`s Ashland and Oak Knoll Substations. The City distributes power over a 12.5-kV system which is heavily loaded during winter peak periods and which has reached the limit of its ability to serve peak loads in a reliable manner. Peak loads under normal winter conditions have exceeded the ratings of the transformers at both the Ashland and Oak Knoll Substations. In 1989, the City modified its distribution system at the request of PP&L to allow transfer of three megawatts (MW`s) of electric power from the overloaded Ashland Substation to the Oak Knoll Substation. In cooperation with PP&L, BPA installed a temporary 6-8 megavolt-amp (MVA) 115-12.5-kV transformer for this purpose. This additional transformer, however, is only a temporary remedy. BPA needs to provide additional, reliable long-term service to the Ashland area through additional transformation in order to keep similar power failures from occurring during upcoming winters in the Ashland area. The temporary installation of another 20-MVA mobile transformer at the Ashland Substation and additional load curtailment are currently being studied to provide for sustained electrical service by the peak winter period 1992. Two overall electrical plans-of-service are described and evaluated in this report. One of them is proposed for action. Within that proposed plan-of-service are location options for the substation. Note that descriptions of actions that may be taken by the City of Ashland are based on information provided by them.

  4. Decarbonization and the time-delay between peak CO2 emissions and concentrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seshadri, Ashwin K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon-dioxide (CO2) is the main contributor to anthropogenic global warming, and the timing of its peak concentration in the atmosphere is likely to govern the timing of maximum radiative forcing. While dynamics of atmospheric CO2 is governed by multiple time-constants, we idealize this by a single time-constant to consider some of the factors describing the time-delay between peaks in CO2 emissions and concentrations. This time-delay can be understood as the time required to bring CO2 emissions down from its peak to a small value, and is governed by the rate of decarbonizaton of economic activity. This decarbonization rate affects how rapidly emissions decline after having achieved their peak, and a rapid decline in emissions is essential for limiting peak radiative forcing. Long-term mitigation goals for CO2 should therefore consider not only the timing of peak emissions, but also the rate of decarbonization. We discuss implications for mitigation of the fact that the emissions peak corresponds to small bu...

  5. Method of multi-dimensional moment analysis for the characterization of signal peaks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Kent B; Yelton, William G; Kerr, Dayle R; Bouchier, Francis A

    2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of multi-dimensional moment analysis for the characterization of signal peaks can be used to optimize the operation of an analytical system. With a two-dimensional Peclet analysis, the quality and signal fidelity of peaks in a two-dimensional experimental space can be analyzed and scored. This method is particularly useful in determining optimum operational parameters for an analytical system which requires the automated analysis of large numbers of analyte data peaks. For example, the method can be used to optimize analytical systems including an ion mobility spectrometer that uses a temperature stepped desorption technique for the detection of explosive mixtures.

  6. The Effects of Site Characterization Activities on the Abundance of Ravens (Corvus corax) in the Yucca Mountain Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.E. Lederle

    1998-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 and the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) developed and is implementing the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Raven abundance was measured from August 1991 through August 1995 along treatment and control routes to evaluate whether site characterization activities resulted in increased raven abundance at Yucca Mountain. This study fulfills the requirement set forth in the incidental take provisions of the Biological Opinion that DOE monitor the abundance of ravens at Yucca Mountain. Ravens were more abundant at Yucca Mountain than in the control area, and raven abundance in both areas increased over time. However, the magnitude of differences between Yucca Mountain and control surveys did not change over time, indicating that the increase in raven abundance observed during this study was not related to site characterization activities. Increases over time on both Yucca Mountain and control routes are consistent with increases in raven abundance in the Mojave Desert reported by the annual Breeding Bird Survey of the US. Fish and Wildlife Service. Evidence from the Desert Tortoise Monitoring Program at Yucca Mountain suggests that ravens are not a significant predator of small tortoises in this locale. Carcasses of small tortoises (less than 110 mm in length) collected during the study showed little evidence of raven predation, and 59 radiomarked hatchlings that were monitored on a regular basis were not preyed upon by ravens. Overall, no direct evidence of raven predation on tortoises was observed during this study. Small tortoises are probably encountered so infrequently by ravens that they are rarely exploited as a food source. This is likely due to the relatively low abundance of both desert tortoises and ravens in the Yucca Mountain area.

  7. DESERT PAVEMENTS AND SOILS ON BASALTIC PYROCLASTIC DEPOSITS AT LATHROP WELLS AND RED CONE VOLCANOES, SOUTHERN NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.A. Valentine; C.D. Harrington

    2005-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Formation of desert pavement and accretionary soils are intimately linked in arid environments such as the Mojave Desert. Well-sorted fallout scoria lapilli at Lathrop Wells (75-80 ky) and Red Cone ({approx}1 Ma) volcanoes (southern Nevada) formed an excellent starting material for pavement, allowing infiltration of eolian silt and fine sand that first clogs the pore space of underlying tephra and then aggrades and develops vesicular A (Av) horizons. Variations in original pyroclast sizes provide insight into minimum and maximum clast sizes that promote pavement and soil formation: pavement becomes ineffective when clasts can saltate under the strongest winds, while clasts larger than coarse lapilli are unable to form an interlocking pavement that promotes silt accumulation (necessary for Av development). Contrary to predictions that all pavements above altitudes of {approx}400 m would have been ''reset'' in their development after late Pleistocene vegetation advances (about 15 ka), the soils and pavements show clear differences in maturity between the two volcanoes. This indicates that either the pavement soils develop slowly over many 10,000's of years and then are very stable, or that, if they are disrupted by vegetation advances, subsequent pavements are reestablished with successively more mature characteristics.

  8. Cosmogenic {sup 3}He surface-exposure dating of stone pavements. Implications for landscape evolution in deserts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, S.G. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States)] [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); McFadden, L.D. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Poths, J.; Olinger, C.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation of stone pavements, a ubiquitous gravel armor mantling landforms in arid regions of the world, has been previously attributed to erosion by wind and water or alternating shrinking and swelling of soil horizons, implying that gravel is concentrated at the land surface in a time-transgressive manner. A newly proposed model for pavement evolution differs from these models in that pavement clasts are continuously maintained at the land surface in response to deposition and pedogenic modification of windblown dust. In-situ cosmogenic {sup 3}He surface-exposure ages on volcanic and alluvial landforms in the Mojave Desert of California are used to understand pavement evolution over geologic time scales and to test this new model. These exposure ages are stratigraphically consistent, show internal consistency at each site, and, for stone pavements adjacent to pristine, continuously exposed volcanic bedrock, are indistinguishable at the 1{sigma} level. We conclude that stone pavements are born at the surface and that pavements may provide one of the longest-term records of geologic, hydrologic, and climatic processes operating on desert surfaces. 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 84-427-1613, Pikes Peak Dialysis Center, Colorado Springs, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pryor, P.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental and breathing zone samples were analyzed for formaldehyde at the Pikes Peak Dialysis Center, Colorado Springs, Colorado in August, 1984 and February, 1985. The evaluation was requested by a representative of the Center to determine if there was a health hazard due to formaldehyde. Eight employees were interviewed. The ventilation systems were investigated. Personal protective clothing was inspected. Breathing-zone samples contained 0 28 to 1.0 (mg/m/sup 3/) formaldehyde. The OSHA standard for formaldehyde is 3.7 mg/m/sup 3/. Area formaldehyde concentrations ranged from nondetectable to 0.75 mg/m/sup 3/. Health complaints reported included sore throat, congestion, cough, and eye, nose and throat irritation. Most of the complaints originated from employees in the formalin mixing, reuse sterilization, and dialysis unit packing sections. The exhaust system in the reuse sterilization area was not working efficiently. A variety of personal protective clothing was available including lab coats, protective goggles, aprons, respirators, and gloves. The author concludes that a health hazard from formaldehyde exposure exists at the facility. Recommendations include improving local exhaust ventilation in areas where formaldehyde is used extensively, avoiding skin and eye contact with formaldehyde, and training and educating employees in safe work practices.

  10. Insights from Smart Meters: The Potential for Peak-Hour Savings from Behavior-Based Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todd, Annika

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2014.  Insights from Smart  Meters: The Potential for Peak available data captured by smart meters and other sources,series Insights from Smart Meters. DRAFT – DO NOT CIRCULATE

  11. Dynamical diffraction peak splitting in time-of-flight neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uestuendag, E.; Karnesky, R. A.; Daymond, M. R.; Noyan, I. C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario K7L3N6 (Canada); Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Materials Science Program, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-of-flight neutron diffraction data from 20 and 0.7 mm thick perfect Si single crystal samples, which exhibit dynamical diffraction effects associated with finite crystal size, are presented. This effect is caused by constructive interference occurring solely from thin layers bounded by the front (entry) and back (exit) surfaces of the sample with no scattering originating from the layers in between, resulting in two distinct peaks observed for each reflection. If the sample is thin and/or the instrument resolution is insufficient, these two peaks can convolve and cause peak shape aberrations which can lead to significant errors in the strain and peak-broadening parameters obtained from a kinematical diffraction analysis.

  12. Large scale flows in the solar interior: Effect of asymmetry in peak profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarbani Basu; H. M. Antia

    1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ring diagram analysis can be used to study large scale velocity fields in the outer part of the solar convection zone. All previous works assume that the peak profiles in the solar oscillation power spectrum are symmetric. However, it has now been demonstrated that the peaks are not symmetric. In this work we study how the explicit use of asymmetric peak profiles in ring-diagram analysis influences the estimated velocity fields. We find that the use of asymmetric profiles leads to significant improvement in the fits, but the estimated velocity fields are not substantially different from those obtained using a symmetric profile to fit the peaks. The resulting velocity fields are compared with those obtained by other investigators.

  13. The effect of external magnetic field on the Raman peaks in manganites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahu, A. K., E-mail: ajitsahu@seemantaengg.ac.in [Seemanta Engineering College, Jharpokharia, Mayurbhanj-757086, Odisha (India); Rout, G. C. [School of Applied Sciences (Physics), KIIT University, Bhubaneswar-7561024 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We report here a microscopic theoretical model study exhibiting the effect of external magnetic field on the Raman excitation peaks in the CMR manganite system. The Hamiltonian consists of Jahn-Teller (J-T) distortion in e{sub g} band, the double exchange interaction and the Heisenberg spin-spin interaction. Further the phonons are coupled to e{sub g} band electrons, J-T distorted e{sub g} band and the double exchange interaction. The Raman spectral intensity is calculated from the imaginary part of the phonon Green function. The spectra exhibits three peaks besides a very weak high energy peak. The magnetic field effect on these peaks are reported.

  14. Sequence Stratigraphy and Detrital Zircon Geochronology of the Swan Peak Quartzite, Southeastern Idaho 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wulf, Tracy David

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The supermature Middle-Late Ordovician Swan Peak quartz arenite was deposited on the western Laurentia passive margin and is very fine to fine grained, well-rounded, well-sorted, and silica-cemented. Laurentia was positioned ...

  15. On The Portents of Peak Oil (And Other Indicators of Resource Scarcity)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, James L.

    Although economists have studied various indicators of resource scarcity (e.g., unit cost, resource rent, and market price), the phenomenon of “peaking” has largely been ignored due to its connection to non-economic theories ...

  16. Batse observations of gamma-ray burst spectra; 2, peak energy evolution in bright, long bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, L A; Matteson, J L; Briggs, M S; Pendleton, G N; Preece, R D; Paciesas, W S; Teegarden, B J; Palmer, D M; Schaefer, B E; Cline, T L; Fishman, G J; Kouveliotou, C; Meegan, C A; Wilson, R B; Lestrade, J P

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract We investigate spectral evolution in 37 bright, long gamma-ray bursts observed with the BATSE Spectroscopy Detectors. High resolution spectra are characterized by the energy of the peak of \

  17. Changes in measured lightning return stroke peak current after the 1994 National Lightning Detection Network upgrade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wacker, Robert Scott

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since a comprehensive upgrade of the US National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) in 1994, the mean peak current of detected cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning flashes has decreased, the number of detected flashes has increased, and the percentage...

  18. Using Compressed Air Efficiency Projects to Reduce Peak Industrial Electric Demands: Lessons Learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skelton, J.

    "To help customers respond to the wildly fluctuating energy markets in California, Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E) initiated an emergency electric demand reduction program in October 2000 to cut electric use during peak periods. One component...

  19. Diversity and productivity peak at intermediate dispersal rate in evolving metacommunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    LETTERS Diversity and productivity peak at intermediate dispersal rate in evolving metacommunities * Positive relationships between species diversity and productivity have been reported for a number of understanding how diversity and productivity are linked over evolutionary timescales. Here, we investigate

  20. How are flat demand charges based on the highest peak over the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    How are flat demand charges based on the highest peak over the past 12 months designated in the database (LADWP does this) Home > Groups > Utility Rate Submitted by Marcroper on 11...

  1. Appropriate Loads for Peak-Power During Resisted Sprinting on a Non-Motorized Treadmill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andre, Matthew J.; Fry, Andrew C.; Lane, Michael T.

    2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to determine the load which allows the highest peak power for resisted sprinting on a non-motorized treadmill and to determine if other variables are related to individual differences. Thirty ...

  2. An insoluble residue study of the Comanche Peak and Edwards limestones of Kimble County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jurik, Paul Peter

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Previous investigations Comanche Peak and Edwards limestones. . Insoluble res idues 1 1 3 5 6 S tratigraphy Wa)nut clay. Conanche Peak limestone Edwards limestone. Georgetown limestone. 8 9 9 12 Paleontology Macropaleontology... on the basis of tha silt?clay insoluble residua y. Tectonic map of Early Cretaceous. Plate I. Vertical variation in insoluble residua content. . . . pocket vertical variation in sand-siss insoluble residue content Vertical vari. stion in sand...

  3. Peak Doubling in SPDC Coincidence Spectra with a Short-Pulse Pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikhail V. Fedorov; Julia M. Mikhailova; Peter A. Volkov

    2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a double-peak structure of the coincidence spectrum of biphoton states in the process of spontaneous parametric down-conversion with a pump having the form of short pulses. The effect is shown to arise owing to the obligatory symmetry of bihoton wave functions, as wave functions describing states of two bozons obeying the Bose-Einstein statistics. Parameters of the peaks are found and conditions necessary for experimental observation of the effect are determined.

  4. Geology of the West Mason area, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polk, Ted Pritchard

    1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Creek limestone bedding following page 26 XI. Point Peak thin bedded shales. following page 29 XII. Point Peak shale beds and small bioherms. . following page 29 XIII. Fig. 1: Point Peak reef structure Fig. Z: Point Peak bioherm and "cabbage heads..." following page 29 XIV. Fig. 1: Point Peak bioherrn and bedding. . . following page 29 Fig. 2: Point Peak weathered out bioherrns XV. Point Peak shale bench. . following page 29 XVI. Fig. 1; San Saba limestone bedding on weathered slope. Fig. 2: San...

  5. Geology of the West Mason area, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polk, Ted Pritchard

    1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Creek limestone bedding following page 26 XI. Point Peak thin bedded shales. following page 29 XII. Point Peak shale beds and small bioherms. . following page 29 XIII. Fig. 1: Point Peak reef structure Fig. Z: Point Peak bioherm and "cabbage heads..." following page 29 XIV. Fig. 1: Point Peak bioherrn and bedding. . . following page 29 Fig. 2: Point Peak weathered out bioherrns XV. Point Peak shale bench. . following page 29 XVI. Fig. 1; San Saba limestone bedding on weathered slope. Fig. 2: San...

  6. A wavelet transform algorithm for peak detection and application to powder x-ray diffraction data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregoire, John M.; Dale, Darren; van Dover, R. Bruce

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Peak detection is ubiquitous in the analysis of spectral data. While many noise-filtering algorithms and peak identification algorithms have been developed, recent work [P. Du, W. Kibbe, and S. Lin, Bioinformatics 22, 2059 (2006); A. Wee, D. Grayden, Y. Zhu, K. Petkovic-Duran, and D. Smith, Electrophoresis 29, 4215 (2008)] has demonstrated that both of these tasks are efficiently performed through analysis of the wavelet transform of the data. In this paper, we present a wavelet-based peak detection algorithm with user-defined parameters that can be readily applied to the application of any spectral data. Particular attention is given to the algorithm's resolution of overlapping peaks. The algorithm is implemented for the analysis of powder diffraction data, and successful detection of Bragg peaks is demonstrated for both low signal-to-noise data from theta–theta diffraction of nanoparticles and combinatorial x-ray diffraction data from a composition spread thin film. These datasets have different types of background signals which are effectively removed in the wavelet-based method, and the results demonstrate that the algorithm provides a robust method for automated peak detection.

  7. Non-visual orientation of desert sand scorpions. R. McKee & D. Gaffin, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, U.S.A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaffin, Doug

    Non-visual orientation of desert sand scorpions. R. McKee & D. Gaffin, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, U.S.A OU Behavioral Neuroscience Works Cited. Brownell, P.H. & R.D. Farley. 1979 Arachnological Society. Burnham Beeches, Bucks. Stephens, A.V. 1999. Honors Thesis. University of Oklahoma

  8. Age constraints on the formation and emplacement of Neoproterozoic ophiolites along the AllaqiHeiani Suture, South Eastern Desert of Egypt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stern, Robert J.

    ­Heiani Suture, South Eastern Desert of Egypt K.A. Ali a,d, , M.K. Azer b , H.A. Gahlan c , S.A. Wilde d , M., Richardson, TX 75080, USA b Geology Department, National Research Centre, Dokki-Cairo, Egypt c Geology Department, Faculty of Science, Assiut University, Assiut 71516, Egypt d Department of Applied Geology

  9. Wetland Preservation Areas (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A wetland owner can apply to the host county for designation of a wetland preservation area. Once designated, the area remains designated until the owner initiates expiration, except where a state...

  10. Protected Areas Stacy Philpott

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gottgens, Hans

    · Convention of Biological Diversity, 1992 #12;IUCN Protected Area Management Categories Ia. Strict Nature. Protected Landscape/ Seascape VI. Managed Resource Protected Area #12;Ia. Strict Nature Preserves and Ib. Wilderness Areas · Natural preservation · Research · No · No #12;II. National Parks · Ecosystem protection

  11. Service Entry Delivery Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New South Wales, University of

    Catheter Lab Boiler House Main Entry Short Street ChapelStreet Vehicle Exit 23. Gray Street Car ParkingService Entry Waste Handling Area Delivery Area Admissions Entrance Inquiries Desk Cafeteria Coffee in July 2000 Vehicle Entry Emergency Main Entrance TOKOGARAHRAILWAYSTATION LEGEND Areas under construction

  12. Variability in desert bighorn and Rambouillet sheep using restriction fragment length polymorphisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyles, Ingrid Doodeheefver

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sheep for they provided the dry, cool habitat the wild sheep now prefer. Of importance in the evolution of Pachyceriformes was an ice-free area between northeastern Siberia and western Alaska. When immense quantities of water were frozen...

  13. ICRF Power-Deposition Profiles, Heating and Confinement of Monster-Sawtooth and Peaked-Density Profile Discharges in JET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ICRF Power-Deposition Profiles, Heating and Confinement of Monster-Sawtooth and Peaked-Density Profile Discharges in JET

  14. Fact #864: March 16, 2015 Imports of Primary Energy have Declined Sharply Since the Peak Reached in 2007

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file and dataset for Imports of Primary Energy have Declined Sharply Since the Peak Reached in 2007

  15. Estimating coal production peak and trends of coal imports in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bo-qiang Lin; Jiang-hua Liu [Xiamen University, Xiamen (China). China Center for Energy Economics Research (CCEER)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    More than 20 countries in the world have already reached a maximum capacity in their coal production (peak coal production) such as Japan, the United Kingdom and Germany. China, home to the third largest coal reserves in the world, is the world's largest coal producer and consumer, making it part of the Big Six. At present, however, China's coal production has not yet reached its peak. In this article, logistic curves and Gaussian curves are used to predict China's coal peak and the results show that it will be between the late 2020s and the early 2030s. Based on the predictions of coal production and consumption, China's net coal import could be estimated for coming years. This article also analyzes the impact of China's net coal import on the international coal market, especially the Asian market, and on China's economic development and energy security. 16 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. The synchrotron peak shift during high-energy flares of blazars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Boettcher

    1999-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A prediction for the energy shift of the synchrotron spectrum of flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) during high-energy flares is presented. If the $\\gamma$-ray emission of FSRQs is produced by Comptonization of external radiation, then the peak of the synchrotron spectrum is predicted to move to lower energies in the flare state. This is opposite to the well-known broadband spectral behavior of high-frequency peaked BL-Lac objects where the external radiation field is believed to be weak and synchrotron-self Compton scattering might be the dominant $\\gamma$-ray radiation mechanism. The synchrotron peak shift, if observed in FSRQs, can thus be used as a diagnostic to determine the dominant radiation mechanism in these objects. I suggest a few FSRQs as promising candidates to test the prediction of the external-Comptonization model.

  17. The Second Peak: The Dark-Energy Density and the Cosmic Microwave Background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc Kamionkowski; Ari Buchalter

    2000-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Supernova evidence for a negative-pressure dark energy (e.g., cosmological constant or quintessence) that contributes a fraction $\\Omega_\\Lambda\\simeq0.7$ of closure density has been bolstered by the discrepancy between the total density, $\\Omega_{\\rm tot}\\simeq1$, suggested by the location of the first peak in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) power spectrum and the nonrelativistic-matter density $\\Omega_m\\simeq0.3$ obtained from dynamical measurements. Here we show that the impending identification of the location of the {\\it second} peak in the CMB power spectrum will provide an immediate and independent probe of the dark-energy density. As an aside, we show how the measured height of the first peak probably already points toward a low matter density and places upper limits to the reionization optical depth and gravitational-wave amplitude.

  18. The Space Density of Galaxy Peaks and the Linear Matter Power Spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rupert A. C. Croft; Enrique Gaztanaga

    1997-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    One way of recovering information about the initial conditions of the Universe is by measuring features of the cosmological density field which are preserved during gravitational evolution and galaxy formation. In this paper we study the total number density of peaks in a (galaxy) point distribution smoothed with a filter, evaluating its usefulness as a means of inferring the shape of the initial (matter) power spectrum. We find that in numerical simulations which start from Gaussian initial conditions, the peak density follows well that predicted by the theory of Gaussian density fields, even on scales where the clustering is mildly non-linear. For smaller filter scales, $r \\simlt 4-6 \\hmpc$, we see evidence of merging as the peak density decreases with time. On larger scales, the peak density is independent of time. One might also expect it to be fairly robust with respect to variations in biasing, i.e. the way galaxies trace mass fluctuations. We find that this is the case when we apply various biasing prescriptions to the matter distribution in simulations. If the initial conditions are Gaussian, it is possible to use the peak density measured from the evolved field to reconstruct the shape of the initial power spectrum. We describe a stable method for doing this and apply it to several biased and unbiased non-linear simulations. We are able to recover the slope of the linear matter power spectrum on scales $k \\simlt 0.4 \\hmpc^{-1}$. The reconstruction has the advantage of being independent of the cosmological parameters ($\\Omega$, $\\Lambda$, $H_0$) and of the clustering normalisation ($\\sigma_8$). The peak density and reconstructed power spectrum slope therefore promise to be powerful discriminators between popular cosmological scenarios.

  19. Groundwater Management Areas (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation authorizes the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality and the Texas Water Development Board to establish Groundwater Management Areas to provide for the conservation,...

  20. Riparian Area. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Management Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    ..............................................................................................................19 Bruce Hoagland, Oklahoma Biological Survey and the University of Oklahoma Forest Management Riparian Area. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Management Handbook E-952 Oklahoma Cooperative . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oklahoma Conservation Commission Management Handbook #12

  1. A wedged-peak-pulse design with medium fuel adiabat for indirect-drive fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Zhengfeng; Ren, Guoli; Liu, Bin; Wu, Junfeng [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); He, X. T.; Liu, Jie; Wang, L. F.; Ye, Wenhua [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present letter, we propose the design of a wedged-peak pulse at the late stage of indirect drive. Our simulations of one- and two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics show that the wedged-peak-pulse design can raise the drive pressure and capsule implosion velocity without significantly raising the fuel adiabat. It can thus balance the energy requirement and hydrodynamic instability control at both ablator/fuel interface and hot-spot/fuel interface. This investigation has implication in the fusion ignition at current mega-joule laser facilities.

  2. Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Mesozoic granite granodiorite Aurora Geothermal Area Aurora Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region MW Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Beowawe Hot...

  3. Modeling and small-break loss-of-coolant accident analysis of Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station using RELAP5/MOD2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salim, Parvez

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pressurized Water Reactor System 2 RELAP5 Separator Model 3 Schematic of a PWR Nuclear Steam Supply System 4 PWR Reactor Vessel 5 PWR Pressurizer 6 U-tube Steam Generator Schematic Page 15 22 23 25 26 7 Steady-State RELAP5 Model for Comanche Peak... coefficients, the frictional reference area per unit volume, and the magnitude of interphase relative velocity. C is the coefficient of virtual mass, and it reduces to zero for a separated or stratified flow. The primary effect of the virtual mass term...

  4. CX-007164: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Prescott-Pinnacle Peak & Pinnacle Peak-Rogers Aerial Marker Ball AdditionCX(s) Applied: B1.9Date: 01/07/2011Location(s): Maricopa County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  5. The War in the Desert: The Vietnam Antiwar Movement in the American Southwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Brandon M.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    , mostly focusing on the East Coast and San Francisco Bay Area. Historians of the Chicano movement have not adequately shown how it allied with other movements in the 1960s to achieve its goals. The use of underground newspapers allows a window...

  6. partial mitigation for temporary disturbance of habitat of the threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii). The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pipeline construction corridor, is oriented east and west. The con- struction corridor had been cleared to construction. The plan was designed to allow separate analysis of shrubs and trees. Each revegetation area of vegetation, but af- ter construction the corridor was returned to its original contours. The top layer

  7. Demonstration of Smart Building Controls to Manage Building Peak Loads: Innovative Non-Wires Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katipamula, Srinivas; Hatley, Darrel D.

    2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    As a part of the non-wires solutions effort, BPA in partnership with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is exploring the use of two distributed energy resources (DER) technologies in the City of Richland. In addition to demonstrating the usefulness of the two DER technologies in providing peak demand relief, evaluation of remote direct load control (DLC) is also one of the primary objectives of this demonstration. The concept of DLC, which is used to change the energy use profile during peak hours of the day, is not new. Many utilities have had success in reducing demand at peak times to avoid building new generation. It is not the need for increased generation that is driving the use of direct load control in the Northwest, but the desire to avoid building additional transmission capacity. The peak times at issue total between 50 and 100 hours a year. A transmission solution to the problem would cost tens of millions of dollars . And since a ?non wires? solution is just as effective and yet costs much less, the capital dollars for construction can be used elsewhere on the grid where building new transmission is the only alternative. If by using DLC, the electricity use can be curtailed, shifted to lower use time periods or supplemented through local generation, the existing system can be made more reliable and cost effective.

  8. Smart Operations of Air-Conditioning and Lighting Systems in Government Buildings for Peak Power Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Hadban, Y.; Maheshwari, G. P.; Al-Nakib, D.; Al-Mulla, A.; Alasseri, R.

    During the summer 2007 smart operation strategies for air-conditioning (A/C) and lighting systems were developed and tested in a number of governmental buildings in Kuwait as one of the solutions to reduce the national peak demand for electrical...

  9. Ice Thermal Storage Systems for Nuclear Power Plant Supplemental Cooling and Peak Power Shifting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Phil Sharpe; Blaise Hamanaka; Wei Yan; WoonSeong Jeong

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Availability of cooling water has been one of the major issues for the nuclear power plant site selection. Cooling water issues have frequently disrupted the normal operation at some nuclear power plants during heat waves and long draught. One potential solution is to use ice thermal storage (ITS) systems that reduce cooling water requirements and boost the plant’s thermal efficiency in hot hours. ITS uses cheap off-peak electricity to make ice and uses the ice for supplemental cooling during peak demand time. ITS also provides a way to shift a large amount of electricity from off peak time to peak time. For once-through cooling plants near a limited water body, adding ITS can bring significant economic benefits and avoid forced derating and shutdown during extremely hot weather. For the new plants using dry cooling towers, adding the ITS systems can effectively reduce the efficiency loss during hot weather so that new plants could be considered in regions lack of cooling water. This paper will review light water reactor cooling issues and present the feasibility study results.

  10. Power Control for Block-Fading Channels with Peak-to-Average Power Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillén i Fàbregas, Albert

    .nguyen@postgrads.unisa.edu.au Albert Guill´en i F`abregas Engineering Department University of Cambridge Cambridge, CB2 1PZ, UK guillen@ieee.org Lars K. Rasmussen Institute for Telecommunications Research University of South Australia Mawson Lakes SA 5095 lars.rasmussen@unisa.edu.au Abstract-- Power allocation with peak-to-average power con

  11. (2013) 128 Data Center Demand Response: Avoiding the Coincident Peak via

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wierman, Adam

    (2013) 1­28 Data Center Demand Response: Avoiding the Coincident Peak via Workload Shifting.chen@hp.com Abstract Demand response is a crucial aspect of the future smart grid. It has the potential to provide centers' participation in demand response is becoming increasingly important given their high

  12. Sequence Stratigraphy and Detrital Zircon Geochronology of the Swan Peak Quartzite, Southeastern Idaho

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wulf, Tracy David

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    2.5 - 3.0 Ga (Archean), with a smaller, but persistent, population at 2.0 - 2.1 Ga, and a very minor 0.8 - 1.2 Ga (Mesoproterozoic) population occurring mainly in the tops of the measured sections. The base of each section has a larger Archean peak...

  13. A Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Renewable Energy, the U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center for Building Energy Efficiency, of the U Institute, Taiwan, ROC May 2013 This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of Buildings Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data

  14. ORIGINAL ARTICLE A theoretical analysis of the relative influences of peak BMD,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    loss and menopause on the development of osteoporosis C.J. Hernandez Æ G.S. Beaupre´ Æ D.R. Carter Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation 2003 Abstract Factors that determine a post-menopausal the relative influences of peak BMD, menopause and age- related bone loss on the development of osteoporosis

  15. Architecting Efficient Peak Power Shaving Using Batteries in Data Centers Baris Aksanli and Tajana Rosing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simunic, Tajana

    Architecting Efficient Peak Power Shaving Using Batteries in Data Centers Baris Aksanli and Tajana savings by as much as 3.35x because they use simple battery reliability models, boolean battery discharge and neglect the design and the cost of battery system communication in the state-of-the-art distributed UPS

  16. Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Future world oil production: growth, plateau, or peak?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Garrett

    Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Future world oil production: growth, plateau, or peak? Larry Hughes and Jacinda Rudolph With the exception of two oil shocks in the 1970s, world oil production that production will increase to about 96 million barrels a day. If this target is met, world oil production

  17. Driving Smart Growth: Electric Vehicle Adoption and OffPeak Electricity Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holsinger, Kent

    Driving Smart Growth: Electric Vehicle Adoption and OffPeak Electricity Rates Peter Driving Smart Growth: Electric Vehicle Adoption Page 2 Executive Summary Reducing our dependence to electric vehicles (EVs)1 is core to reducing reliance on fossil fuels and driving smart growth

  18. Incompatibility of modulated checkerboard patterns with the neutron scattering resonance peak in cuprate superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Erica

    in cuprate superconductors D. X. Yao and E. W. Carlson Department of Physics, Purdue University, West materials such as cuprate superconductors, nickelates, manganites, and related perovskites. Charge order as temperature is lowered into the superconducting state. The relation between the resonance peak

  19. The Influence of Air-Conditioning Efficiency in the Peak Load Demand for Kuwait

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, A. A.; Maheshwari, G. P.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in reduction in peak load demand and savings of KD 2,301 million in capital expenditures are possible for the years between 2001 and 2025 if the PR of AC systems are improved to 1.2 kW/RT from its present level of 2.0 kW/RT. Also, it is estimated that extent...

  20. Paleoecological evidence for abrupt cold reversals during peak Holocene warmth on Baffin Island, Arctic Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briner, Jason P.

    climate forcings, including volcanic eruptions and solar variability, and perturbations such as freshwaterPaleoecological evidence for abrupt cold reversals during peak Holocene warmth on Baffin Island Paleolimnology Abrupt climate change A continuous record of insect (Chironomidae) remains preserved in lake

  1. A Model for Predicting Daily Peak Visitation and Implications for Recreation Management and Water Quality: Evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    carrying capacity. Keywords Visitation model Á Recreation management Á Water quality Á River visitation ÁA Model for Predicting Daily Peak Visitation and Implications for Recreation Management and Water Quality: Evidence from Two Rivers in Puerto Rico Luis E. Santiago � Armando Gonzalez-Caban � John Loomis

  2. Discrete ordinates transport methods for problems with highly forward-peaked scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pautz, S.D.

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The author examines the solutions of the discrete ordinates (S{sub N}) method for problems with highly forward-peaked scattering kernels. He derives conditions necessary to obtain reasonable solutions in a certain forward-peaked limit, the Fokker-Planck (FP) limit. He also analyzes the acceleration of the iterative solution of such problems and offer improvements to it. He extends the analytic Fokker-Planck limit analysis to the S{sub N} equations. This analysis shows that in this asymptotic limit the S{sub N} solution satisfies a pseudospectral discretization of the FP equation, provided that the scattering term is handled in a certain way (which he describes) and that the analytic transport solution satisfies an analytic FP equation. Similar analyses of various spatially discretized S{sub N} equations reveal that they too produce solutions that satisfy discrete FP equations, given the same provisions. Numerical results agree with these theoretical predictions. He defines a multidimensional angular multigrid (ANMG) method to accelerate the iterative solution of highly forward-peaked problems. The analyses show that a straightforward application of this scheme is subject to high-frequency instabilities. However, by applying a diffusive filter to the ANMG corrections he is able to stabilize this method. Fourier analyses of model problems show that the resulting method is effective at accelerating the convergence rate when the scattering is forward-peaked. The numerical results demonstrate that these analyses are good predictors of the actual performance of the ANMG method.

  3. Peak Power Reduction Strategies for the Lighting Systems in Government Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Nakib, D.; Al-Mulla, A. A.; Maheshwari, G. P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fluorescent lamps with ECGs, CFLs, incandescent lamps and light emitting diodes (LEDs). The building has a peak load of around 2900 kW and it is mainly shared by A/C and lighting. Lighting system is controlled by DELMATIC software which controls...

  4. Jitter in ATM networks and its impact on peak rate enforcement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillemin, Fabrice

    Jitter in ATM networks and its impact on peak rate enforcement James ROBERTS FRANCE TELECOM CNET to queueing in upstream multiplexing stages, notably in customer premises. This is the phenomenon of jitter general characterizations of jitter and then, describe two models of jittered flows based on simple

  5. Using Double-peaked Supernova Light Curves to Study Extended Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piro, Anthony L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extended material at large radii surrounding a supernova can result in a double-peaked light curve when the material is sufficiently massive that the supernova shock continues to propagate into it and sufficiently extended that it produces a bright first peak. Such material can be the leftover, low-mass envelope of a star that has been highly stripped, the mass associated with a wind, or perhaps mass surrounding the progenitor due to some type of pre-explosion activity. I summarize the conditions necessary for such a light curve to occur, describe what can be learned about the extended material from the light curve shape, and provide a semi-analytic model for fitting the first peak in these double-peaked supernovae. This is applied to the specific case of a Type Ic super-luminous supernova, LSQ14bdq. The mass in the extended material around this explosion's progenitor is measured to be small, ~0.2-0.5 Msun. The radius of this material must be >500 Rsun, but it is difficult to constrain due to a degeneracy bet...

  6. Neutron scattering evidence of a boson peak in protein hydration water Alessandro Paciaroni,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tuscia, Università Degli Studi Della

    Neutron scattering evidence of a boson peak in protein hydration water Alessandro Paciaroni,1 Anna Viterbo, Italy Received 24 February 1999 Measurement of the low temperature neutron excess of scattering, has been detected by neutron scattering and Raman spectros- copy in a large variety of glassy systems

  7. Jitter and peak rate enforcement in ATM networks Fabrice GUILLEMIN, James ROBERTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillemin, Fabrice

    Jitter and peak rate enforcement in ATM networks Fabrice GUILLEMIN, James ROBERTS 1 Introduction the source and the policing device. This is the phenomenon of jitter and requires that, instead of simply of the jitter phenomenon taking account, notably, of the correlations between successive cell arrival epochs

  8. The Influence of Air-Conditioning Efficiency in the Peak Load Demand for Kuwait 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, A. A.; Maheshwari, G. P.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) The annual savings realized in peak load demand and cost of electric power generation and distribution network ( ) due to this revision are: nPRSAV PL ,, n,PR SAV nPRACACnPRAC PLPLPL ,,,, ?=? (4) 400*000,1* ,,, nPRACnPR PLSAV...

  9. TSNo s02-peak103534-O Effect of Sulfate on Lead Desorption from Goethite.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    TSNo s02-peak103534-O Title Effect of Sulfate on Lead Desorption from Goethite. abstract metals such as lead. It has been shown that lead adsorption is enhanced on goethite in the presence for this increased adsorption is the formation of a ternary complex on the goethite surface. While mechanistic

  10. Vortex-peak interaction and lattice shape in rotating two-component Bose-Einstein condensates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Jun-cheng

    Vortex-peak interaction and lattice shape in rotating two-component Bose-Einstein condensates: November 28, 2011) When a two component Bose-Einstein condensate is placed into rotation, a lattice component condensate is set into rotation, topological defects of both order parameters are created, which

  11. Slip and Dilation Tendency Analysis of the San Emidio Geothermal Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Critically stressed fault segments have a relatively high likelihood of acting as fluid flow conduits (Sibson, 1994). As such, the tendency of a fault segment to slip (slip tendency; Ts; Morris et al., 1996) or to dilate (dilation tendency; Td; Ferrill et al., 1999) provides an indication of which faults or fault segments within a geothermal system are critically stressed and therefore likely to transmit geothermal fluids. The slip tendency of a surface is defined by the ratio of shear stress to normal stress on that surface: Ts = ? / ?n (Morris et al., 1996). Dilation tendency is defined by the stress acting normal to a given surface: Td = (?1-?n) / (?1-?3) (Ferrill et al., 1999). Slip and dilation were calculated using 3DStress (Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by ambient stress conditions. Values range from a maximum of 1, a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions to zero, a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate. Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the focus study areas at, McGinness Hills, Neal Hot Springs, Patua, Salt Wells, San Emidio, and Tuscarora on fault traces. As dip is not well constrained or unknown for many faults mapped in within these we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip tendency or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum tendency of each fault to slip or dilate. The resulting along-fault and fault-to-fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault-to-fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Slip and dilation tendency for the San Emidio geothermal field was calculated based on the faults mapped Tuscarora area (Rhodes, 2011). The San Emidio area lies in the Basin and Range Province, as such we applied a normal faulting stress regime to the San Emidio area faults, with a minimum horizontal stress direction oriented 115, based on inspection of local and regional stress determinations, as explained above. This is consistent with the shmin determined through inversion of fault data by Rhodes (2011). Under these stress conditions north-northeast striking, steeply dipping fault segments have the highest dilation tendency, while north-northeast striking 60° dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to slip. Interesting, the San Emidio geothermal field lies in an area of primarily north striking faults, which...

  12. Slip and Dilation Tendency Anlysis of McGinness Hills Geothermal Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Slip and Dilation Tendency in focus areas Critically stressed fault segments have a relatively high likelihood of acting as fluid flow conduits (Sibson, 1994). As such, the tendency of a fault segment to slip (slip tendency; Ts; Morris et al., 1996) or to dilate (dilation tendency; Td; Ferrill et al., 1999) provides an indication of which faults or fault segments within a geothermal system are critically stressed and therefore likely to transmit geothermal fluids. The slip tendency of a surface is defined by the ratio of shear stress to normal stress on that surface: Ts = ? / ?n (Morris et al., 1996). Dilation tendency is defined by the stress acting normal to a given surface: Td = (?1-?n) / (?1-?3) (Ferrill et al., 1999). Slip and dilation were calculated using 3DStress (Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by ambient stress conditions. Values range from a maximum of 1, a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions to zero, a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate. Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the focus study areas at, McGinness Hills, Neal Hot Springs, Patua, Salt Wells, San Emidio, and Tuscarora on fault traces. As dip is not well constrained or unknown for many faults mapped in within these we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip tendency or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum tendency of each fault to slip or dilate. The resulting along-fault and fault-to-fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault-to-fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Slip and dilation tendency for the McGinness Hills geothermal field was calculated based on the faults mapped McGinness Hills area (Siler 2012, unpublished). The McGinness Hills area lies in the Basin and Range Province, as such we applied a normal faulting stress regime to the McGinness area faults, with a minimum horizontal stress direction oriented 115, based on inspection of local and regional stress determinations, as explained above. Under these stress conditions north-northeast striking, steeply dipping fault segments have the highest dilation tendency, while north-northeast striking 60° dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to slip. The McGinness Hills geothermal system is characterized by a left-step in a north-northeast striking west-dipping fault system wit...

  13. Foraging distances and forager population sizes of the desert termite Gnathamitermes tubiformans (Buckley) (Isoptera: Termitidae) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narayanan, Anne Michelle

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) with mesh (0.6 cm x 0.6 cm openings) bottom exposed..............10 3. After the five-day foraging period, G. tubiformans were separated from the manure bait using a sorter constructed from an inclined plastic shoebox lid with tubing leading... study that compared areas with termite activity and added straw mulch, plots where termites were present and straw mulch was added, nitrogen soil levels were significantly higher than levels in plots where termites were absent and straw mulch...

  14. 300 AREA URANIUM CONTAMINATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BORGHESE JV

    2009-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    {sm_bullet} Uranium fuel production {sm_bullet} Test reactor and separations experiments {sm_bullet} Animal and radiobiology experiments conducted at the. 331 Laboratory Complex {sm_bullet} .Deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning,. and demolition of 300 Area facilities

  15. Decontamination & decommissioning focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

  16. Physics Thrust Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPOPetroleum ReservesThrust Areas Physics Thrust Areas

  17. 300 Area Disturbance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LL Hale; MK Wright; NA Cadoret

    1999-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to define areas of previous disturbance in the 300 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to eliminate these areas from the cultural resource review process, reduce cultural resource monitoring costs, and allow cultural resource specialists to focus on areas where subsurface disturbance is minimal or nonexistent. Research into available sources suggests that impacts from excavations have been significant wherever the following construction activities have occurred: building basements and pits, waste ponds, burial grounds, trenches, installation of subsurface pipelines, power poles, water hydrants, and well construction. Beyond the areas just mentioned, substrates in the' 300 Area consist of a complex, multidimen- sional mosaic composed of undisturbed stratigraphy, backfill, and disturbed sediments; Four Geographic Information System (GIS) maps were created to display known areas of disturbance in the 300 Area. These maps contain information gleaned from a variety of sources, but the primary sources include the Hanford GIS database system, engineer drawings, and historic maps. In addition to these maps, several assumptions can be made about areas of disturbance in the 300 Area as a result of this study: o o Buried pipelines are not always located where they are mapped. As a result, cultural resource monitors or specialists should not depend on maps depicting subsurface pipelines for accurate locations of previous disturbance. Temporary roads built in the early 1940s were placed on layers of sand and gravel 8 to 12 in. thick. Given this information, it is likely that substrates beneath these early roads are only minimally disturbed. Building foundations ranged from concrete slabs no more than 6 to 8 in. thick to deeply excavated pits and basements. Buildings constructed with slab foundations are more numerous than may be expected, and minimally disturbed substrates may be expected in these locations. Historic black and white photographs provide a partial record of some excavations, including trenches, building basements, and material lay-down yards. Estimates of excavation depth and width can be made, but these estimates are not accurate enough to pinpoint the exact location where the disturbedhmdisturbed interface is located (e.g., camera angles were such that depths and/or widths of excavations could not be accurately determined or estimated). In spite of these limitations, these photographs provide essential information. Aerial and historic low-level photographs have captured what appears to be backfill throughout much of the eastern portion of the 300 Area-near the Columbia River shoreline. This layer of fill has likely afforded some protection for the natural landscape buried beneath the fill. This assumption fits nicely with the intermittent and inadvertent discoveries of hearths and stone tools documented through the years in this part of the 300 Area. Conversely, leveling of sand dunes appears to be substantial in the northwestern portion of the 300 Area during the early stages of development. o Project files and engineer drawings do not contain information on any impromptu but necessary adjustments made on the ground during project implementation-after the design phase. Further, many projects are planned and mapped but never implemented-this information is also not often placed in project files. Specific recommendations for a 300 Area cultural resource monitoring strategy are contained in the final section of this document. In general, it is recommended that monitoring continue for all projects located within 400 m of the Columbia River. The 400-m zone is culturally sensitive and likely retains some of the most intact buried substrates in the 300 Area.

  18. STORMVEX: The Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment Science and Operations Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mace, J; Matrosov, S; Shupe, M; Lawson, P; Hallar, G; McCubbin, I; Marchand, R; Orr, B; Coulter, R; Sedlacek, A; Avallone, L; Long, C

    2010-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    During the Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX), a substantial correlative data set of remote sensing observations and direct in situ measurements from fixed and airborne platforms will be created in a winter season, mountainous environment. This will be accomplished by combining mountaintop observations at Storm Peak Laboratory and the airborne National Science Foundation-supported Colorado Airborne Multi-Phase Cloud Study campaign with collocated measurements from the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2). We describe in this document the operational plans and motivating science for this experiment, which includes deployment of AMF2 to Steamboat Springs, Colorado. The intensive STORMVEX field phase will begin nominally on 1 November 2010 and extend to approximately early April 2011.

  19. Method and apparatus for reducing rotor blade deflections, loads, and/or peak rotational speed

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moroz, Emilian Mieczyslaw; Pierce, Kirk Gee

    2006-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for reducing at least one of loads, deflections of rotor blades, or peak rotational speed of a wind turbine includes storing recent historical pitch related data, wind related data, or both. The stored recent historical data is analyzed to determine at least one of whether rapid pitching is occurring or whether wind speed decreases are occurring. A minimum pitch, a pitch rate limit, or both are imposed on pitch angle controls of the rotor blades conditioned upon results of the analysis.

  20. Statistics of Merging Peaks of Random Gaussian Fluctuations: Skeleton Tree Formalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitoshi Hanami

    1999-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to study the statistics of the objects with hierarchical merging, we propose the skeleton tree formalism, which can analytically distinguish the episodic merging and the continuous accretion in the mass growth processes. The distinction was not clear in extended Press-Schechter (PS) formalism. The skeleton tree formalism is a natural extension of the peak theory which is an alternative formalism for the statistics of the bound objects. The fluctuation field smoothing with Gaussian filter produces the landscape with adding the extra-dimension of the filter resolution scale to the spatial coordinate of the original fluctuation. In the landscape, some smoothing peaks are nesting into the neighboring peaks at a type of critical points called sloping saddles appears, which can be interpreted as merging events of the objects in the context of the hierarchical structure formation. The topological properties of the landscape can be abstracted in skeleton trees, which consist of line process of the smoothing peaks and the point process of the sloping saddles. According to this abstract topological picture, in this paper, we present the concept and the basic results of the skeleton tree formalism to describe (1) the distinction between the accretion and the merger in the hierarchical structure formation from various initial random Gaussian fields; (2) the instantaneous number density of the sloping saddles which gives the instantaneous scale function of the objects with the destruction and reformation in the mergers; (3) the rates of the destruction, the reformation, and the relative accretion growth; (4) the self-consistency of the formalism for the statistics of the mass growth processes of the objects; (5) the mean growth history of the objects at the fixed mass.

  1. Blueshift Without Blueshift: Red Hole Gamma-Ray Burst Models Explain the Peak energy Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James S. Graber

    1999-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray bursts are still a puzzle. In particular, the central engine, the total energy and the very narrow distribution of peak energies challenge model builders. We consider here an extreme model of gamma-ray bursts based on highly red- and blue-shifted positron annihilation radiation. The burst emerges from inside the red hole created by the complete gravitational collapse of the GRB progenitor.

  2. Structure of the solar core: Effect of asymmetry of peak profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Basu; S. Turck-Chieze; G. Berthomieu; A. S. Brun; T. Corbard; J. Christensen-Dalsgaard; J. Provost; S. Thiery; A. H. Gabriel; P. Boumier

    2000-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies have established that peaks in solar oscillation power spectra are not Lorentzian in shape, but have a distinct asymmetry. Fitting a symmetric Lorentzian profile to the peaks therefore produces a shift in frequency of the modes. Accurate determination of low-frequency modes is essential to infer the structure of the solar core by inversion of the mode frequencies. In this paper we investigate how the changes in frequencies of low-degree modes obtained by fitting symmetric and asymmetric peak profiles change the inferred properties of the solar core. We use data obtained by the Global Oscillations at Low Frequencies (GOLF) project on board the SoHO spacecraft. Two different solar models and inversion procedures are used to invert the data to determine the sound speed in the solar core. We find that for a given set of modes no significant difference in the inferred sound-speed results from taking asymmetry into account when fitting the low-degree modes.

  3. Combining water budgets and IFIM results for analyzing operation alternatives at peaking projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conners, M.E.; Homa, J. Jr. [Ichthyological Associates, Inc., Lansing, NY (United States); Carrington, G. [Northrup, Devine, and Tarbell, Inc., Vancouver, WA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Licensing of hydropower projects often involves evaluating and comparing several different alternatives for project operation. Projects with peaking capabilities, in particular, are frequently required to compare peaking operation with substantially different alternatives, such as continuous run-of-the-river flows. Instream flow studies are used to assess the environmental impacts of hydropower operation by modeling the amount of aquatic habitat available at various flows. It can be difficult, however, to apply instream flow models downstream of peaking operations, or to present habitat model results in a way that clearly compares operation alternatives. This paper presents a two-stage analysis that was used in the successful negotiation of a licensing settlement for Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation`s Salmon River Project in upstate New York. A water budget model based on project configuration was used to compile flow-duration curves for the project under several alternative operating rules. A spreadsheet model was developed that combines the results of instream flow habitat models with flow-duration statistics. This approach provides a clear, quantitative comparison of the effect of alternative project operations on downstream aquatic habitat.

  4. A control system for improved battery utilization in a PV-powered peak-shaving system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palomino, E [Salt River Project, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Stevens, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wiles, J. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Southwest Technology Development Inst.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photovoltaic (PV) power systems offer the prospect of allowing a utility company to meet part of the daily peak system load using a renewable resource. Unfortunately, some utilities have peak system- load periods that do not match the peak production hours of a PV system. Adding a battery energy storage system to a grid-connected PV power system will allow dispatching the stored solar energy to the grid at the desired times. Batteries, however, pose system limitations in terms of energy efficiency, maintenance, and cycle life. A new control system has been developed, based on available PV equipment and a data acquisition system, that seeks to minimize the limitations imposed by the battery system while maximizing the use of PV energy. Maintenance requirements for the flooded batteries are reduced, cycle life is maximized, and the battery is operated over an efficient range of states of charge. This paper presents design details and initial performance results on one of the first installed control systems of this type.

  5. Twin peak HF QPOs as a spectral imprint of dual oscillation modes of accretion tori

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakala, Pavel; Török, Gabriel; Šrámková, Eva; Abramowicz, Marek A; Vincent, Frederic H; Mazur, Grzegorz P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High frequency (millisecond) quasi-periodic oscillations (HF QPOs) are observed in the X-ray power-density spectra of several microquasars and low mass X-ray binaries. Two distinct QPO peaks, so-called twin peak QPOs, are often detected simultaneously exhibiting their frequency ratio close or equal to 3/2. Following the analytic theory and previous studies of observable spectral signatures, we aim to model the twin peak QPOs as a spectral imprint of specific dual oscillation regime defined by a combination of the lowest radial and vertical oscillation mode of optically thick slender tori with constant specific angular momentum. We examined power spectra and fluorescent K$\\alpha$ iron line profiles for two different simulation setups with the mode frequency relations corresponding to the epicyclic resonance HF QPOs model and modified relativistic precession QPOs model. We use relativistic ray-tracing implemented in parallel simulation code LSDplus. In the background of the Kerr spacetime geometry, we analyze t...

  6. Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Rongxin; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Parrish, Kristen

    2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on the potential impact of demand response (DR) strategies in commercial buildings in California based on the Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT), which uses EnergyPlus simulation prototypes for office and retail buildings. The study describes the potential impact of building size, thermal mass, climate, and DR strategies on demand savings in commercial buildings. Sensitivity analyses are performed to evaluate how these factors influence the demand shift and shed during the peak period. The whole-building peak demand of a commercial building with high thermal mass in a hot climate zone can be reduced by 30percent using an optimized demand response strategy. Results are summarized for various simulation scenarios designed to help owners and managers understand the potential savings for demand response deployment. Simulated demand savings under various scenarios were compared to field-measured data in numerous climate zones, allowing calibration of the prototype models. The simulation results are compared to the peak demand data from the Commercial End-Use Survey for commercial buildings in California. On the economic side, a set of electricity rates are used to evaluate the impact of the DR strategies on economic savings for different thermal mass and climate conditions. Our comparison of recent simulation to field test results provides an understanding of the DR potential in commercial buildings.

  7. OLED area illumination source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foust, Donald Franklin (Scotia, NY); Duggal, Anil Raj (Niskayuna, NY); Shiang, Joseph John (Niskayuna, NY); Nealon, William Francis (Gloversville, NY); Bortscheller, Jacob Charles (Clifton Park, NY)

    2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to an area illumination light source comprising a plurality of individual OLED panels. The individual OLED panels are configured in a physically modular fashion. Each OLED panel comprising a plurality of OLED devices. Each OLED panel comprises a first electrode and a second electrode such that the power being supplied to each individual OLED panel may be varied independently. A power supply unit capable of delivering varying levels of voltage simultaneously to the first and second electrodes of each of the individual OLED panels is also provided. The area illumination light source also comprises a mount within which the OLED panels are arrayed.

  8. Inner Area Principles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn Other News linkThermalInner Area Principles The Inner Area

  9. Slip and Dilation Tendency Analysis of the Salt Wells Geothermal Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Critically stressed fault segments have a relatively high likelihood of acting as fluid flow conduits (Sibson, 1994). As such, the tendency of a fault segment to slip (slip tendency; Ts; Morris et al., 1996) or to dilate (dilation tendency; Td; Ferrill et al., 1999) provides an indication of which faults or fault segments within a geothermal system are critically stressed and therefore likely to transmit geothermal fluids. The slip tendency of a surface is defined by the ratio of shear stress to normal stress on that surface: Ts = ? / ?n (Morris et al., 1996). Dilation tendency is defined by the stress acting normal to a given surface: Td = (?1-?n) / (?1-?3) (Ferrill et al., 1999). Slip and dilation were calculated using 3DStress (Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by ambient stress conditions. Values range from a maximum of 1, a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions to zero, a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate. Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the focus study areas at, McGinness Hills, Neal Hot Springs, Patua, Salt Wells, San Emidio, and Tuscarora on fault traces. As dip is not well constrained or unknown for many faults mapped in within these we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip tendency or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum tendency of each fault to slip or dilate. The resulting along-fault and fault-to-fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault-to-fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005) as well as local stress information if applicable. For faults within these focus systems we applied either a normal faulting stress regime where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin) or strike-slip faulting stress regime where the maximum horizontal stress (shmax) is larger than the vertical stress (sv) which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (shmax >sv>shmin) depending on the general tectonic province of the system. Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46, which are consistent with complete and partial stress field determinations from Desert Peak, Coso, the Fallon area and Dixie valley (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2011; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012). Slip and dilation tendency for the Salt Wells geothermal field was calculated based on the faults mapped in the Bunejug Mountains quadrangle (Hinz et al., 2011). The Salt Wells area lies in the Basin and Range Province (N. Hinz personal comm.) As such we applied a normal faulting stress regime to the Salt Wells area faults, with a minimum horizontal stress direction oriented 105, based on inspection of local and regional stress determinations. Under these stress conditions north-northeast striking, steeply dipping fault segments have the highest dilation tendency, while north-northeast striking 60° dipping fault segments have the highest tendency to slip. Several such faults intersect in high density in the core of the accommodation zone in the Bunejug Mountains and local to the Salt Wells geothermal .

  10. SWIFT GRB GRB071010B: OUTLIER OF THE E {sup src} {sub peak} - E {sub gamma} AND E {sub iso} - E {sup src} {sub peak} - t {sup src} {sub jet} CORRELATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urata, Yuji; Lee, Induk; Ip, Wing Huen [Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, Chung-Li 32054, Taiwan (China); Huang, Kuiyun [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Im, Myungshin [Center for the Exploration of the Origin of the Universe, Department of Physics and Astronomy, FPRD, Seoul National University, Shillim-dong, San 56-1, Kwanak-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Deng Jinsong; Liping Xin; Qiu Yulei; Wei Jianyan; Zheng Weikang [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Krimm, Hans [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ohno, Masanori [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8510 (Japan); Sugita, Satoshi [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Tashiro, Makoto [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Shimo-Okubo, Saitama, 338-8570 (Japan); Yamaoka, Kazutaka, E-mail: urata@astro.ncu.edu.t [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama Gakuin University, 5-10-1, Fuchinobe, Sayamihara 229-8558 (Japan)

    2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present multi-band results for GRB071010B based on Swift, Suzaku, and ground-based optical observations. This burst is an ideal target to evaluate the robustness of the E{sup src}{sub peak} - E{sub iso} and E{sup src}{sub peak} - E {sub gamma} relations, whose studies have been in stagnation due to the lack of the combined estimation of E{sup src} {sub peak} and long-term optical monitoring. The joint prompt spectral fitting using Swift/Burst Alert Telescope and Suzaku/Wide-band All-sky Monitor data yielded the spectral peak energy as E {sup src} {sub peak} of 86.5{sup +6.4} {sub -6.3} keV and E {sub iso} of 2.25{sup +0.19} {sub -0.16} x 10{sup 52} erg with z = 0.947. The optical afterglow light curve is well fitted by a simple power law with temporal index alpha = -0.60 +- 0.02. The lower limit of temporal break in the optical light curve is 9.8 days. Our multi-wavelength analysis reveals that GRB071010B follows E{sup src}{sub peak} - E{sub iso} but violates the E{sup src}{sub peak} - E{sub gamma} and E{sub iso} - E {sup src}{sub peak} - t {sup src}{sub jet} at more than the 3sigma level.

  11. Paleoenvironments and hydrocarbon potential of Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation of southwestern Alabama and adjacent coastal water area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Upper Jurassic Norphlet sediments in southwestern Alabama and the adjacent coastal water area accumulated under arid climatic conditions. The Appalachian Mountains of the eastern United States extended into southwestern Alabama, providing a barrier for air and water circulation during Norphlet deposition. Norphlet paleogeography was dominated by a broad desert plain rimmed to the north and east by the Appalachians and to the south by a developing shallow sea. Initiation of Norphlet sedimentation was a result of erosion of the southern Appalachians. Norphlet conglomerates were deposited in coalescing alluvial fans in proximity to an Appalachian source. The conglomeratic sandstones grade downdip into red-bed lithofacies that accumulated in distal portions of alluvial fan and wadi systems. Quartzose sandstones (Denkman Member) were deposited as dune and interdune sediments on a broad desert plain. The source of the sand was the updip and adjacent alluvial fan, plain, and wadi deposits. A marine transgression was initiated late in Denkman deposition, resulting in the reworking of previously deposited Norphlet sediments. Norphlet hydrocarbon potential in southwestern and offshore Alabama is excellent with four oil and gas fields already established. Petroleum traps discovered to date are primarily structural traps involving salt anticlines, faulted salt anticlines, and extensional fault traps associated with salt movement. Reservoir rocks consist of quartzose sandstones, which are principally eolian in origin. Smackover algal carbonate mudstones were probably the source for the Norphlet hydrocarbons.

  12. PROTECTED AREAS AMENDMENTS AND.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as critical fish and wildlife habitat. The "protected areas" amendment is a major step in the Council's efforts to rebuild fish and wildlife populations that have been damaged by hydroelectric development. Low also imposed significant costs. The Northwest's fish and wildlife have suffered extensive losses

  13. MSL ENTERANCE REFERENCE AREA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    MSL ENTERANCE LOBBY ELEV STAIRS SSL-019 REFERENCE AREA SSL-021 GROUP STUDY SSL-018 STUDY ROOM SSL-029 SSL-020 COPY ROOM SSL-022 GROUP STUDY SSL-026 STACKS SSL-023 GROUP STUDY SSL-024 GROUP STUDY SSL TBL-014 TBL-014A STAIRS SSL-007 GIS/ WORKROOM SSL-011 SSL-008 SSL-009 SSL-010 SSL-014 SSL-017 STAIRS

  14. Subsurface contaminants focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites.

  15. Plutonium focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this new approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to the creation of specific Focus Areas. These organizations were designed to focus the scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on the major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The Focus Area approach provides the framework for intersite cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major Focus Areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50, now called the Office of Science and Technology), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (EM-66) followed the structure already in place in EM-50 and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). The following information outlines the scope and mission of the EM, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure.

  16. Imminence of peak in US coal production and overestimation of reserves Nathan G.F. Reaver a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khare, Sanjay V.

    Imminence of peak in US coal production and overestimation of reserves Nathan G.F. Reaver online 6 June 2014 Keywords: Logistic model Coal reserve Coal production forecast Peak coal USA energy Non-linear fitting Coal is the bulwark of US energy production making up about a third of all energy

  17. Dislocation structure and crystallite size-distribution in hexagonal nanomaterials from X-ray peak profile analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gubicza, Jenõ

    profile analysis Tamás Ungár1 and Jen Gubicza1,2 1 Department of General Physics, Eötvös University crystal structure are studied by X-ray diffraction peak profile analysis. The crystallite size, X-ray peak profile analysis, hexagonal crystals, nanostructure. Short title: T. Ungár & J. Gubicza

  18. Abstract--This paper formulates and develops a peak demand control tool for electric systems within the framework of direct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    techniques. Index Terms--Demand Side Management, direct load control, peak demand control, genetic algorithms in order to evaluate the suitability of the decision chosen. The Demand Side Management (DSM) plans attempt for central air conditioning systems in commercial buildings, hence allowing a measured control of peak demand

  19. Abstract--This paper formulates and develops a peak demand control tool for electric systems within the framework of direct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    techniques. Index Terms--Demand Side Management, direct load control, peak demand control, genetic algorithms in order to evaluate the suitability of the decision chosen. Demand Side Management (DSM) plans attempt for central air conditioning systems in commercial buildings, hence allowing a measured control of peak demand

  20. DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Interest Electric Transmission Corridors DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors October 2, 2007 - 11:12am Addthis...

  1. Have We Run Out of Oil Yet? Oil Peaking Analysis from an Optimist's Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, David L [ORNL; Hopson, Dr Janet L [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Li, Jia [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study addresses several questions concerning the peaking of conventional oil production from an optimist's perspective. Is the oil peak imminent? What is the range of uncertainty? What are the key determining factors? Will a transition to unconventional oil undermine or strengthen OPEC's influence over world oil markets? These issues are explored using a model combining alternative world energy scenarios with an accounting of resource depletion and a market-based simulation of transition to unconventional oil resources. No political or environmental constraints are allowed to hinder oil production, geological constraints on the rates at which oil can be produced are not represented, and when USGS resource estimates are used, more than the mean estimate of ultimately recoverable resources is assumed to exist. The issue is framed not as a question of "running out" of conventional oil, but in terms of the timing and rate of transition from conventional to unconventional oil resources. Unconventional oil is chosen because production from Venezuela's heavy-oil fields and Canada's Athabascan oil sands is already underway on a significant scale and unconventional oil is most consistent with the existing infrastructure for producing, refining, distributing and consuming petroleum. However, natural gas or even coal might also prove to be economical sources of liquid hydrocarbon fuels. These results indicate a high probability that production of conventional oil from outside of the Middle East region will peak, or that the rate of increase of production will become highly constrained before 2025. If world consumption of hydrocarbon fuels is to continue growing, massive development of unconventional resources will be required. While there are grounds for pessimism and optimism, it is certainly not too soon for extensive, detailed analysis of transitions to alternative energy sources.

  2. Electrical Energy Conservation and Peak Demand Reduction Potential for Buildings in Texas: Preliminary Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunn, B. D.; Baughman, M. L.; Silver, S. C.; Rosenfeld, A. H.; Akbari, H.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Zone 2 (Fort Worth) only SWPLY CURE LEGEND BASE COYSWIPIIOYI 15885 KYH IAll-rlecl I9414 KHI 16rc hat) BASE PEAK: 5.3 KY Srvlnqr are crlculrted lrol ClRA runs EN0 USE UITEBORY: Hert~nq md hol~nq COST 10 LIFE SRVIN6S CCE lR1TROFITl... -- for All Single and Multifamily Residences, All Climate Zones SUPPLY CURVE LEGEND EASE COYSUIPIIDH: See notes belor LhD USE CATEGORY: Relrlqerrtors COST Ill LIFE WlVlN6S --------- ----- ------------ LABEL DESCRIPIIOY HEY RE1 IVRSl KlH KY Relr...

  3. Synchrotron Self-Absorption Process in GRBs and the Isotropic Energy - Peak Energy Fundamental Relation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Yu. Piotrovich; Yu. N. Gnedin; T. M. Natsvlishvili

    2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The existence of strong correlation between the peak luminosity (and/or bolometric energetics) of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) is one of the most intrigue problem of GRB physics. This correlation is not yet understood. Here we demonstrate that this correlation can be explained in framework of synchrotron self-absorption (SSA) mechanism of GRB prompt emission. We estimate the magnetic field strength of the central engine at the level $B\\sim 10^{14} (10^3/\\Gamma)^3 (1+z)^2$, where $\\Gamma$ is the Lorentz factor of fireball.

  4. X-ray Emission of Low-Energy-Peaked BL Lacertae Objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randall, Jill M.; Perlman, Eric S. [Florida Institute of Technology, Department of Physics and Space Sciences, 150 W. University Blvd., Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States)

    2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented here is an analysis of X-ray observations of the following seven low-energy-peaked BL Lacertae objects: BL Lacertae, S5 0716+71, W Comae, 3C 66A, S4 0954+65, OJ 287, and AO 0235+16. The spectral data for these objects were taken from observations by the XMM-Newton and/or Chandra X-ray observatories. These objects are being analyzed in an effort to reanalyze all XMM-Newton and Chandra data of low-energy BL Lacs, similar to the efforts of Perlman et al.[4] for high energy BL Lacs. The objects were studied in an effort to understand the nature of the X-ray and multi-waveband emissions in these objects, study the shape of the spectra, and compare the observations of low-energy-peaked BL Lacs to previous observations of these objects and also to observations of high-energy-peaked BL Lacs. Light curves and spectra were analyzed to look for evidence of spectral variability in the objects and as a comparison to previous research on these objects. Most data shows both synchrotron and Inverse-Compton emission, though only little correlation was seen between the emission strength and the spectral slope. Our data is generally well-fitted to a broken power law model with distinct bimodality seen in the first spectral index (six observations with {Gamma}{sub 1{approx}}0.4 and four observations with {Gamma}{sub 1{approx}}3.0), a break in energy between 0.6 and 1.4 keV, and a second spectral index {Gamma}{sub 2{approx}}2.0. None of the observations showed spectral lines, which is consistent with past results. For S5 0716+71 the XMM-Newton X-ray and optical data, along with radio data obtained from the University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory (UMRAO), a spectral energy distribution was created and peak frequencies were estimated.

  5. An Energy and Peak Loads Analysis of the TYC/TRC Building – Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katipamula, S.; O'Neal, D. L.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the alternatives reduced energy consumption of the building. The ASHRAE and California standards had a reductions of more than 38% and 44%, respectively. iii iv TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER Page SUMMARY ii ABSTRACT iii TABLE OF CONTENTS iv I INTRODUCTION 1 II... using the DOE 2.IB building energy simulation program [4]. The program simulates hourly loads profiles and hourly system performance of HVAC equipment in the building. It also has a provision to output various data, such as, peak loads for each zone...

  6. Statistical distributions of level widths and conductance peaks in irregularly shaped quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alhassid, Y.; Lewenkopf, C.H. [Center for Theoretical Physics, Sloane Physics Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)] [Center for Theoretical Physics, Sloane Physics Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); [Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    1995-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Analytical expressions for width and conductance peak distributions for quantum dots with multichannel leads in the Coulomb blockade regime are presented for both limits of conserved and broken time-reversal symmetry. The results are valid for any number of nonequivalent and correlated channels, and the distributions are expressed in terms of the channel correlation matrix {ital M} in each lead. The matrix {ital M} is also given in closed form. A chaotic billiard is used as a model to test numerically the theoretical predictions. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital The} {ital American} {ital Physical} {ital Society}.

  7. ,"Table 3A.1. January Monthly Peak Hour Demand, by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assesment Area,"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePrice Sold to Electric Powere..3 andA.1. January

  8. ,"Table 3B.1. FRCC Monthly Peak Hour Demand, by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assesment Area,"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePrice Sold to Electric Powere..3 andA.1.

  9. Scientific and Natural Areas (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain scientific and natural areas are established throughout the state for the purpose of preservation and protection. Construction and new development is prohibited in these areas.

  10. Nitrogen control of 13C enrichment in heterotrophic organs relative to leaves in a landscape-building desert plant species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jinxin [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A longstanding puzzle in isotopic studies of C3 plant species is that heterotrophic plant organs (e.g., stems, roots, seeds, and fruits) tend to be enriched in 13C compared to the autotrophic organ (leaves) that provides them with photosynthate. Our inability to explain this puzzle suggests key deficiencies in understanding post-photosynthetic metabolic processes. It also limits the effectiveness of applications of stable carbon isotope analyses in a variety of scientific disciplines ranging from plant physiology to global carbon cycle studies. To gain insight into this puzzle, we excavated whole plant architectures of Nitraria tangutorum Bobrov, a C3 species that has an exceptional capability of fixing sands and building sand dunes, in two deserts in northwestern China. We systematically and simultaneously measured carbon isotopic ratios and nitrogen and phosphorous concentrations of different parts of the excavated plants. We also determined the seasonal variations in leaf carbon isotopic ratios on nearby intact plants of N. tangutorum. We found that higher nitrogen concentrations in heterotrophic organs were significantly correlated with increased heterotrophic 13C enrichment compared to leaves. However, phosphorous concentrations had no effect on the enrichment. In addition, new leaves had carbon isotopic ratios similar to roots but were progressively depleted in 13C as they matured. We concluded that a nitrogen-mediated process, probably the refixation of respiratory CO2 by phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase, was responsible for the differences in 13C enrichment among different heterotrophic organs while processes within leaves or during phloem loading may contribute to the overall autotrophic heterotrophic difference in carbon isotopic compositions.

  11. Use of Residential Smart Appliances for Peak Load Shifting & Spinning Reserves: Cost Benefit Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sastry, Chellury; Pratt, Robert G.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract In this paper, we present the results of an analytical cost-benefit study of residential smart appliances in support of a joint stakeholder petition to the EPA and DOE to provide a 5% credit to meet ENERGY STAR eligibility criteria for products that meet the definition of a smart appliance. The underlying hypothesis is that smart appliances can play a critical role in addressing some of the challenges associated with increased electricity demand, and increased penetration of renewable sources of power. Our analytical model utilizes current annual appliance electricity consumption data, and estimates what the wholesale grid operating cost savings would be if some percentage of appliance loads were shifted away from peak hours to run during off-peak hours, and appliance loads serve power system balancing needs such as spinning reserves that would otherwise have to be provided by generators. Historical wholesale market clearing prices (location marginal and spinning reserve) from major wholesale power markets in the United States are used to estimate savings. The savings are then compared with the five percent credit, to determine if the savings in grid operating costs (benefits) are at least as high as the credit (cost) if not higher.

  12. Radio-Optical Study of Double-Peaked AGNs. I. 3C 390.3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Leon-Tavares; A. P. Lobanov; V. H. Chavushyan; T. G. Arshakian

    2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We aim to test the model proposed to explain the correlation between the flux density at 15 GHz of a stationary component in the parsec-scale jet and the optical continuum emission in the radio galaxy 3C~390.3. In the model, the double-peaked emission from 3C~390.3 is likely to be generated both near the disk and in a rotating subrelativistic outflow surrounding the jet, due to ionization of the outflow by the beamed continuum emission from the jet. This scenario is chosen since broad-emission lines are observed to vary following changes in the inner radio jet. For recent epochs we have imaged and modelled the radio emission of the inner jet of 3C~390.3, which was observed with very long baseline interferometry at 15 GHz, 22 GHz and 43 GHz, to image the inner part of the parsec-scale jet, locate the exact region where the bulk of the continuum luminosity is generated and search for the mechanism that drives the double-peaked profile emission. We present the preliminary results of testing the model using data from 11 years of active monitoring of 3C~390.3.

  13. Effects of coordination and pressure on sound attenuation, boson peak and elasticity in amorphous solids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric DeGiuli; Adrien Laversanne-Finot; Gustavo Düring; Edan Lerner; Matthieu Wyart

    2014-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Connectedness and applied stress strongly affect elasticity in solids. In various amorphous solids, mechanical stability can be lost either by reducing connectedness or by increasing pressure. We present an effective medium theory of elasticity that extends previous approaches by incorporating the effect of compression, of amplitude $e$, allowing one to describe quantitative features of sound propagation, transport, the boson peak, and elastic moduli near the elastic instability occurring at a compression $e_c$. The theory disentangles several frequencies characterizing the vibrational spectrum: the onset frequency $\\omega_0\\sim \\sqrt{e_c-e}$ where strongly-scattered modes appear in the vibrational spectrum, the pressure-independent frequency $\\omega_*$ where the density of states displays a plateau, the boson peak frequency $\\omega_{BP}$, and the Ioffe-Regel frequency $\\omega_{IR}$ where scattering length and wavelength become equal. We predict that sound attenuation crosses over from $\\omega^4$ to $\\omega^2$ behaviour at $\\omega_0$. We predict that a frequency-dependent length scale $l_s(\\omega)$ and speed of sound $\

  14. Top Jets in the Peak Region: Factorization Analysis with NLL Resummation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean Fleming; Andre H. Hoang; Sonny Mantry; Iain W. Stewart

    2008-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider top-quarks produced at large energy in e+e- collisions, and address the question of what top-mass can be measured from reconstruction. The production process is characterized by well separated scales: the center-of-mass energy, Q, the top mass, m, the top decay width, Gamma_t, and also LambdaQCD; scales which can be disentangled with effective theory methods. In particular we show how the mass measurement depends on the way in which soft radiation is treated, and that this can shift the mass peak by an amount of order Q LambdaQCD/m. We sum large logs for Q >> m >> Gamma_t > LambdaQCD and demonstrate that the renormalization group ties together the jet and soft interactions below the scale m. Necessary conditions for the invariant mass spectrum to be protected from large logs are formulated. Results for the cross-section are presented at next-to-leading order with next-to-leading-log resummation, for invariant masses in the peak region and the tail region. Using our results we also predict the thrust distribution for massive quark jets at NLL order for large thrust. We demonstrate that soft radiation can be precisely controlled using data on massless jet production, and that in principle, a short distance mass parameter can be measured using jets with precision better than LambdaQCD.

  15. Analysis of the need for intermediate and peaking technologies in the year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrager, S.M.; Campbell, G.L.

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis was conducted to assess the impact of load management on the future need for intermediate- and peak-generating technologies (IPTs) such as combustion turbines, pumped storage, and cycling coal plants. There will be a reduced need for IPTs if load-management activities such as time-of-use pricing, together with customer-owned energy-storage devices, hot-water-heater controls, and interruptible service, can economically remove most of the variation from electric-power demands. Therefore, the analysis assesses the need for IPTs in an uncertain future, which will probably include load management and time-differentiated electricity prices. Section 2 provides a condensed description of the models used in the analysis. (Details and data sets are contained in the appendixes.) Results of sensitivities on growth rates, model parameters, and appliance saturations are discussed in Section 3, which also contains the analysis of the potential impacts of customer energy storage, appliance control, and time-of-use pricing. The future need for intermediate and peaking technologies is analyzed in Section 4.

  16. Photoisomerization for a model protonated Schiff base in solution: Sloped/peaked conical intersection perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malhado, Joao Pedro [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, CP 66318, 05314-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hynes, James T. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0215 (United States); Chemistry Department, Ecole Normale Superieure, UMR ENS-CNRS-UPMC 8640, 24 rue Lhomond, 75005 Paris (France)

    2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The topographical character of conical intersections (CIs)-either sloped or peaked-has played a fundamental and important role in the discussion of the efficiency of CIs as photochemical 'funnels.' Here this perspective is employed in connection with a recent study of a model protonated Schiff base (PSB) cis to trans photoisomerization in solution [Malhado et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 115, 3720 (2011)]. In that study, the calculated reduced photochemical quantum yield for the successful production of trans product versus cis reactant in acetonitrile solvent compared to water was interpreted in terms of a dynamical solvent effect related to the dominance, for the acetonitrile case, of S{sub 1} to S{sub 0} nonadiabatic transitions prior to the reaching the seam of CIs. The solvent influence on the quantum yield is here re-examined in the sloped/peaked CI topographical perspective via conversion of the model's two PSB internal coordinates and a nonequilibrium solvent coordinate into an effective branching space description, which is then used to re-analyze the generalized Langevin equation/surface hopping results. The present study supports the original interpretation and enriches it in terms of topographical detail.

  17. Energy-Dependent Gamma-Ray Burst Peak Durations and Blast-Wave Deceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Chiang

    1998-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Temporal analyses of the prompt gamma-ray and X-ray light curves of gamma-ray bursts reveal a tendency for the burst pulse time scales to increase with decreasing energy. For an ensemble of BATSE bursts, Fenimore et al. (1995) show that the energy dependence of burst peak durations can be represented by $\\Delta t \\propto E^{-\\gamma}$ with $\\gamma \\simeq 0.4$--0.45. This power-law dependence has led to the suggestion that this effect is due to radiative processes, most notably synchrotron cooling of the non-thermal particles which produce the radiation. Here we show that a similar power-law dependence occurs, under certain assumptions, in the context of the blast-wave model and is a consequence of the deceleration of the blast-wave. This effect will obtain whether or not synchrotron cooling is important, but different degrees of cooling will cause variations in the energy dependence of the peak durations.

  18. Supernovae with two peaks in the optical light curve and the signature of progenitors with low-mass extended envelopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakar, Ehud [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Piro, Anthony L. [Theoretical Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, M/C 350-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2014-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Early observations of supernova light curves are powerful tools for shedding light on the pre-explosion structures of their progenitors and their mass-loss histories just prior to explosion. Some core-collapse supernovae that are detected during the first days after the explosion prominently show two peaks in the optical bands, including the R and I bands, where the first peak appears to be powered by the cooling of shocked surface material and the second peak is clearly powered by radioactive decay. Such light curves have been explored in detail theoretically for SN 1993J and 2011dh, where it was found that they may be explained by progenitors with extended, low-mass envelopes. Here, we generalize these results. We first explore whether any double-peaked light curve of this type can be generated by a progenitor with a 'standard' density profile, such as a red supergiant or a Wolf-Rayet star. We show that a standard progenitor (1) cannot produce a double-peaked light curve in the R and I bands and (2) cannot exhibit a fast drop in the bolometric luminosity as is seen after the first peak. We then explore the signature of a progenitor with a compact core surrounded by extended, low-mass material. This may be a hydrostatic low-mass envelope or material ejected just prior to the explosion. We show that it naturally produces both of these features. We use this result to provide simple formulae to estimate (1) the mass of the extended material from the time of the first peak, (2) the extended material radius from the luminosity of the first peak, and (3) an upper limit on the core radius from the luminosity minimum between the two peaks.

  19. Detection of a vibration-rotation emission line of hydrogen deuteride toward Orion Peak 1 excitation coupling of HD to H_2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, S K R; Geballe, T R; Bertoldi, F; Mountain, C M

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2.46um v=1-0 R(5) line of deuterated molecular hydrogen, HD, has been detected in the Orion Peak~1 shock emission region, at a surface brightness of (8.5 +/- 2.1) x 10^(-9) W m^(-2)sr^(-1) over a 6 arcsec^2 area. Comparison of the column density of HD(v=1,J=6) with the column density of HD(v=0,J=6) previously observed from ISO and the H_2 level column densities toward the same region implies that the excitation of HD is similar to that of H_2 for these energy levels, despite much higher spontaneous transition rates for HD. We suggest that this rough equality is caused by the coupling of the HD levels to those of H_2, due to strong reactive collisions, HD + H -> H_2 + D, in warm, partially dissociated gas. The deuterium abundance implied by the combined ISO and UKIRT measurements toward Orion Peak 1 is [D]/[H] = (5.1 +/- 1.9)x10^(-6).

  20. Detection of a vibration-rotation emission line of hydrogen deuteride toward Orion Peak 1: excitation coupling of HD to H_2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. K Ramsay Howat; R. Timmermann; T. R. Geballe; F. Bertoldi; C. M. Mountain

    2001-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2.46um v=1-0 R(5) line of deuterated molecular hydrogen, HD, has been detected in the Orion Peak~1 shock emission region, at a surface brightness of (8.5 +/- 2.1) x 10^(-9) W m^(-2)sr^(-1) over a 6 arcsec^2 area. Comparison of the column density of HD(v=1,J=6) with the column density of HD(v=0,J=6) previously observed from ISO and the H_2 level column densities toward the same region implies that the excitation of HD is similar to that of H_2 for these energy levels, despite much higher spontaneous transition rates for HD. We suggest that this rough equality is caused by the coupling of the HD levels to those of H_2, due to strong reactive collisions, HD + H -> H_2 + D, in warm, partially dissociated gas. The deuterium abundance implied by the combined ISO and UKIRT measurements toward Orion Peak 1 is [D]/[H] = (5.1 +/- 1.9)x10^(-6).